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Sample records for 15n enriched ammonium

  1. 15N enrichment of ammonium, glutamine-amide and urea, measured via mass isotopomer analysis of hexamethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Yang, D; Puchowicz, M A; David, F; Powers, L; Halperin, M L; Brunengraber, H

    1999-11-01

    Ammonium is an important intermediate of protein metabolism and is a key component of acid-base balance. Investigations of the metabolism of NH(4)(+) in vivo using isotopic techniques are difficult because of the low concentration of NH(4)(+) in biological fluids and because of frequent artifactual isotopic dilution of the enrichment of NH(4)(+) during the assay. A new gas chromatographic mass spectrometric method was designed to monitor the (15)N enrichment and concentration of NH(4)(+) in vivo. These are both calculated from the mass isotopomer distribution of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) formed by reacting NH(4)(+) with formaldehyde. The enrichment of NH(4)(+) is amplified four times since the HMT molecule contains four atoms of nitrogen derived from NH(4)(+). This allows the measurement of low (15)N enrichment of NH(4)(+), down to 0.1%. (15)N enrichment of urea and of the amide N of L-glutamine are measured by enzymatic release of NH(4)(+) and conversion of the latter to HMT. These new techniques facilitate in vivo investigations of the metabolism of NH(4)(+) and related compounds.

  2. (15)N-ammonium and (15)N-nitrate uptake of a 15-year-old Picea abies plantation.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, N; Schulze, E-D; Gebauer, G

    1995-06-01

    Throughfall nitrogen of a 15-year-old Picea abies (L.) Karst. (Norway spruce) stand in the Fichtelgebirge, Germany, was labeled with either (15)N-ammonium or (15)N-nitrate and uptake of these two tracers was followed during two successive growing seasons (1991 and 1992). (15)N-labeling (62 mg (15)N m(-2) under conditions of 1.5 g N m(-2) atmospheric nitrogen deposition) did not increase N concentrations in plant tissues. The (15)N recovery within the entire stand (including soils) was 94%±6% of the applied (15)N-ammonium tracer and 100%±6% of the applied (15)N-nitrate tracer during the 1st year of investigation. This decreased to 80%±24% and 83%±20%, respectively, during the 2nd year. After 11 days, the (15)N tracer was detectable in 1-year-old spruce needles and leaves of understory species. After 1 month, tracer was detectable in needle litter fall. At the end of the first growing season, more than 50% of the (15)N taken up by spruce was assimilated in needles, and more than 20% in twigs. The relative distribution of recovered tracer of both (15)N-ammonium and (15)N-nitrate was similar within the different foliage age classes (recent to 11-year-old) and other compartments of the trees. (15)N enrichment generally decreased with increasing tissue age. Roots accounted for up to 20% of the recovered (15)N in spruce; no enrichment could be detected in stem wood. Although (15)N-ammonium and (15)N-nitrate were applied in the same molar quantities ((15)NH 4(+) : (15)NO 3(-) =1:1), the tracers were diluted differently in the inorganic soil N pools ((15)NH 4(+) /NH 4(+) : (15)NO 3(-) /NO 3(-) =1:9). Therefore the measured (15)N amounts retained by the vegetation do not represent the actual fluxes of ammonium and nitrate in the soil solution. Use of the molar ammonium-to-nitrate ratio of 9:1 in the soil water extract to estimate (15)N uptake from inorganic N pools resulted in a 2-4 times higher ammonium than nitrate uptake by P. abies.

  3. Ammonium and nitrate uptake lengths in a small forested stream determined by {sup 15}N tracer and short-term nutrient enrichment experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, P.J.; Tank, J.L.; Sanzone, D.M.; Webster, J.R.; Wollheim, W.; Peterson, B.J.; Meyer, J.L.

    1998-11-01

    Nutrient cycling is an important characteristic of all ecosystems, including streams. Nutrients often limit the growth rates of stream algae and heterotrophic microbes and the decomposition rate of allochthonous organic matter. Nutrient uptake (S{sub W}), defined as the mean distance traveled by a nutrient atom dissolved in stream water before uptake by biota is often used as an index of nutrient cycling in streams. It is often overlooked, however, that S{sub W} is not a measure of nutrient uptake rate per se, but rather a measure of the efficiency with which a stream utilizes the available nutrient supply. The ideal method for measuring S{sub W} involves short-term addition of a nutrient tracer. Regulatory constraints often preclude use of nutrient radiotracers in field studies and methodological difficulties and high analytical costs have previously hindered the use of stable isotope nutrient tracers (e.g., {sup 15}N). Short-term nutrient enrichments are an alternative to nutrient tracer additions for measuring S{sub W}.

  4. The Contamination of Commercial 15N2 Gas Stocks with 15N–Labeled Nitrate and Ammonium and Consequences for Nitrogen Fixation Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dabundo, Richard; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treibergs, Lija; Tobias, Craig R.; Altabet, Mark A.; Moisander, Pia H.; Granger, Julie

    2014-01-01

    We report on the contamination of commercial 15-nitrogen (15N) N2 gas stocks with 15N-enriched ammonium, nitrate and/or nitrite, and nitrous oxide. 15N2 gas is used to estimate N2 fixation rates from incubations of environmental samples by monitoring the incorporation of isotopically labeled 15N2 into organic matter. However, the microbial assimilation of bioavailable 15N-labeled N2 gas contaminants, nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, is liable to lead to the inflation or false detection of N2 fixation rates. 15N2 gas procured from three major suppliers was analyzed for the presence of these 15N-contaminants. Substantial concentrations of 15N-contaminants were detected in four Sigma-Aldrich 15N2 lecture bottles from two discrete batch syntheses. Per mole of 15N2 gas, 34 to 1900 µmoles of 15N-ammonium, 1.8 to 420 µmoles of 15N-nitrate/nitrite, and ≥21 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide were detected. One 15N2 lecture bottle from Campro Scientific contained ≥11 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide per mole of 15N2 gas, and no detected 15N-nitrate/nitrite at the given experimental 15N2 tracer dilutions. Two Cambridge Isotopes lecture bottles from discrete batch syntheses contained ≥0.81 µmoles 15N-nitrous oxide per mole 15N2, and trace concentrations of 15N-ammonium and 15N-nitrate/nitrite. 15N2 gas equilibrated cultures of the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta confirmed that the 15N-contaminants are assimilable. A finite-differencing model parameterized using oceanic field conditions typical of N2 fixation assays suggests that the degree of detected 15N-ammonium contamination could yield inferred N2 fixation rates ranging from undetectable, <0.01 nmoles N L−1 d−1, to 530 nmoles N L−1 d−1, contingent on experimental conditions. These rates are comparable to, or greater than, N2 fixation rates commonly detected in field assays. These results indicate that past reports of N2 fixation should be interpreted with caution, and demonstrate that the purity of commercial 15N2

  5. Enrichment of natural (15)N abundance during soil N losses under 20years of continuous cereal cropping.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew R; Dalal, Ram C

    2017-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the enrichment of natural (15)N abundance in soil over time is reflective of historic N cycling and loss, but this process in cropping soils is not yet clear. In this study, we identified an enrichment gradient of natural (15)N abundance during 20-year chronosequence of cereal cropping on Alfisols in southwest Queensland, Australia, that have no history of fertilisation. We demonstrate that the increase in soil (15)N abundance is explained by isotopic fractionation of (15)N during organic N mineralisation and nitrification, which lead to isotopically heavier ammonium retained in the soil and isotopically lighter soil nitrate taken up and removed by seasonal crops during harvest. Here we present a framework for natural (15)N isotopic fractionation co-occurring with N losses during long-term cultivation.

  6. Stepwise enrichment of 15N along food chains: Further evidence and the relation between δ 15N and animal age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masao; Wada, Eitaro

    1984-05-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrogen was measured in marine and fresh-water animals from the East China Sea, The Bering Sea, Lake Ashinoko and Usujiri intertidal zone. Primary producers, showed average δ15Nversus atmospheric nitrogen of +5.0%. (+3.4 to +7.5) in the Bering Sea and Lake Ashinoko, and +6.8%. (+6.0 to +7.6) in Usujiri intertidal zone. Blue green algae from the East China Sea show an average -0.55%. (-0.8 to +1.2). All consumers, Zooplankton, fish and bird exhibited Stepwise enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level. The 15N enrichment at a single feeding process ranged from +1.3 to +5.3 averaging +3.4 ± 1.1%.. This isotopic fractionation seems to be independent of habitat. The effect of age in animals was obtained by analyzing two marine mussels. The soft tissue nitrogen showed +2.0%. enrichment relative to that of primary producers, and the magnitude was almost constant with shell ages ranging from 0 to 8 years. A similar 15N enrichment occurs in all Molluscs, Crustaceans, Insecta, Amphibia, Fish, Ave and Mammal species regardless of the difference in the form of excreted nitrogen and in laboratory cultured fish, brine shrimp and mice (+2.9 to +4.9%.). The excreted ammonia from guppy was sufficiently light to balance the concentration of 15N to animal body.

  7. Creating 13C- and 15N-enriched tree leaf litter for decomposition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlavecz, K. A.; Pitz, S.; Chang, C.; Bernard, M.

    2013-12-01

    Labeling plant material with heavy isotopes of carbon and nitrogen can produce a traceable nutrient signal that can be followed into the different trophic levels and decomposer food web. We treated 60 tree saplings with 13C-enriched CO2 gas and 15N-enriched ammonium nitrate over a three-month period to create dually-labeled plant material for future decomposition experiments. The trees included both early (Red maple, Sweetgum, Tulip poplar) and late (American beech, White oak) successional deciduous tree species, and a conifer, White pine. We constructed a 2.4 m × 2.4 m × 2.4 m environmental chamber that was climate-controlled using an air conditioning system. An Arduino microcontroller interfaced with a Vaisala GMP343 CO2 probe maintained a CO2 concentration between 500-520 ppm by controlling a solenoid valve on the CO2 tank regulator. The trees were placed into the chamber in August 2012 and remained until senescence unless they were lost to death or disease. Ammonium nitrate was added twice, in September and October. Leaf samples were collected prior to the start of the experiment and after senescence, whereas root samples were collected only in December. Samples were dried, ground and analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. American beech and White oak had 40% mortality, and 34% of tulip poplar trees were removed because of powdery mildew overgrowth or death. Most tulip poplar trees exhibited a second leaf out following senescence in late September. Nearly 1 kg of litter was produced with tulip poplar representing over half of the total mass. Levels of enrichment varied greatly by species. Beech (-14.2‰) and White oak (-4.8‰) had low levels of enrichment in comparison to early successional species such as Sweetgum (41.7‰) and Tulip poplar (30.7‰ [first leaf fall] and 238.0‰ [second leaf fall]). Leaf enrichment with 15N followed a similar pattern, though it was achieved at a higher level with δ15N values varying from 271.6‰ to 1354.2

  8. Tracking wind-dispersed seeds using (15)N-isotope enrichment.

    PubMed

    Forster, C; Herrmann, J D

    2014-11-01

    Seed dispersal influences a wide range of ecological processes. However, measuring dispersal patterns, particularly long-distance dispersal, has been a difficult task. Marking bird-dispersed seeds with stable (15)N isotopes has been shown to be a user-friendly method to trace seed dispersal. In this study, we determined whether (15)N urea solution could be used to enrich seeds of two common wind-dispersed plants, Eupatorium glaucescens (Asteraceae) and Sericocarpus tortifolius (Asteraceae). We further tested if the water type (distilled versus tap) in (15)N urea solutions influences the level and variability of enrichment of plant seeds, and if increasing spraying frequency per se increases enrichment. Because droughts may lower seed set or kill plants, we wanted to investigate if the additional use of an externally applied anti-transpirant affects the intake of externally applied (15)N into seeds. The results demonstrate that (15)N enrichment of seeds can facilitate dispersal experiments with wind-dispersed plants. The use of distilled water in (15)N urea solutions did not increase (15)N enrichment compared to tap water. Further, enrichment was more efficient at lower spray frequencies. Both the use of tap water and low frequencies could lower time, effort and project costs. The results suggest that species can be protected from drought using an anti-transpirant without decreasing the incorporation of (15)N into seeds. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  9. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  10. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  11. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  12. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  13. A new method to track seed dispersal and recruitment using 15N isotope enrichment.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Tomás A; Tewksbury, Joshua J; Martínez Del Río, Carlos

    2009-12-01

    Seed dispersal has a powerful influence on population dynamics, genetic structuring, evolutionary rates, and community ecology. Yet, patterns of seed dispersal are difficult to measure due to methodological shortcomings in tracking dispersed seeds from sources of interest. Here we introduce a new method to track seed dispersal: stable isotope enrichment. It consists of leaf-feeding plants with sprays of 15N-urea during the flowering stage such that seeds developed after applications are isotopically enriched. We conducted a greenhouse experiment with Solanum americanum and two field experiments with wild Capsicum annuum in southern Arizona, USA, to field-validate the method. First, we show that plants sprayed with 15N-urea reliably produce isotopically enriched progeny, and that delta 15N (i.e., the isotopic ratio) of seeds and seedlings is a linear function of the 15N-urea concentration sprayed on mothers. We demonstrate that three urea dosages can be used to distinctly enrich plants and unambiguously differentiate their offspring after seeds are dispersed by birds. We found that, with high urea dosages, the resulting delta 15N values in seedlings are 10(3) - 10(4) times higher than the delta 15N values of normal plants. This feature allows tracking not only where seeds arrive, but in locations where seeds germinate and recruit, because delta 15N enrichment is detectable in seedlings that have increased in mass by at least two orders of magnitude before fading to normal delta 15N values. Last, we tested a mixing model to analyze seed samples in bulk. We used the delta 15N values of batches (i.e., combined seedlings or seeds captured in seed traps) to estimate the number of enriched seeds coming from isotopically enriched plants in the field. We confirm that isotope enrichment, combined with batch-sampling, is a cheap, reliable, and user-friendly method for bulk-processing seeds and is thus excellent for the detection of rare dispersal events. This method could

  14. Preparation and characterization of 15N-enriched, size-defined heparan sulfate precursor oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sigulinsky, Crystal; Babu, Ponnusamy; Victor, Xylophone V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    We report the preparation of size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides from Escherichia coli-derived 15N-enriched N-acetylheparosan. Optimized growth conditions of E. coli in minimal media containing 15NH4Cl yielded [15N]N-acetylheparosan on a preparative scale. Depolymerization of [15N]N-acetylheparosan by heparitinase I yielded resolvable, even-numbered oligosaccharides ranging from disaccharide to icosaccharide. Anion-exchange chromatography-assisted fractionation afforded size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides identifiable by ESI-TOFMS. These isotopically labeled oligosaccharides will prove to be valuable research tools for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of heparin and heparan sulfate oligosaccharides and for the study of their structural biology. PMID:19945695

  15. Highly 15N-Enriched Chondritic Clasts in the Isheyevo Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bonal, L; Huss, G R; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-01-14

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment ({delta}{sup 15}N up to +1500{per_thousand}), similar to {delta}{sup 15}N values reported in micron-sized regions (hotspots) of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) of possibly cometary origin and fine-grained matrices of unmetamorphosed chondrites. These {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are commonly attributed to low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in the protosolar molecular cloud or in the outer part of the protoplanetary disk. The nature of the whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment of the metal-rich chondrites is not understood. We report a discovery of a unique type of primitive chondritic clasts in the CH/CB-like meteorite Isheyevo, which provides important constraints on the origin of {sup 15}N anomaly in metal-rich chondrites and nitrogen-isotope fractionation in the Solar System. These clasts contain tiny chondrules and refractory inclusions (5-15 {micro}m in size), and abundant ferromagnesian chondrule fragments (1-50 {micro}m in size) embedded in the partly hydrated, fine-grained matrix material composed of olivines, pyroxenes, poorly-organized aromatic organics, phyllosilicates and other hydrous phases. The mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of chondrules and refractory inclusions in the clasts are similar to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting formation at similar heliocentric distances. In contrast to the previously known extraterrestrial samples, the fine-grained material in the clasts is highly and rather uniformly enriched in {sup 15}N, with bulk {delta}{sup 15}N values ranging between +1000 and +1300{per_thousand}; the {delta}{sup 15}N values in rare hotspots range from +1400 to +4000{per_thousand}. Since fine-grained matrices in the lithic clasts are the only component containing thermally unprocessed (during CAI and chondrule formation or during impact melting) materials that accreted into the metal rich chondrite parent body(ies), the {sup 15}N-enriched

  16. Application of 15N-enrichment methodologies to estimate nitrogen fixation in Casuarina equisetifolia

    Treesearch

    John A. Parrotta; Dwight D. Baker; Maurice Fried

    1994-01-01

    The 15N-enrichment technique for estimating biological nitrogen fixation in Casuarina equisetifolia J.R. & G. Forst. was evaluated under field conditions in single-species and mixed-species plantings (with a nonfixing reference species, Eucalyptus X robusta J.E. Smith) between...

  17. Estimation of nitrogen fixation in Leucaena leucocephala using 15N-enrichment methodologies

    Treesearch

    John A. Parrotta; Dwight D. Baker; Maurice Fried

    1994-01-01

    An estimation of biological nitrogen fixation by Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit in monoculture and mixed-species plantations (with Casuarina equisetifolia L. ex J.R. & G. Forst., and Eucalyptus robusta Sm.) was undertaken over a two-year period in Puerto Rico using the 15N-enrichment...

  18. In Vivo Fluxes in the Ammonium-Assimilatory Pathways in Corynebacterium glutamicum Studied by 15N Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, M.; de Graaf, A. A.; Sahm, H.

    1999-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS)–glutamine 2-oxoglutarate-aminotransferase (GOGAT) represent the two main pathways of ammonium assimilation in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In this study, the ammonium assimilating fluxes in vivo in the wild-type ATCC 13032 strain and its GDH mutant were quantitated in continuous cultures. To do this, the incorporation of 15N label from [15N]ammonium in glutamate and glutamine was monitored with a time resolution of about 10 min with in vivo 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) used in combination with a recently developed high-cell-density membrane-cyclone NMR bioreactor system. The data were used to tune a standard differential equation model of ammonium assimilation that comprised ammonia transmembrane diffusion, GDH, GS, GOGAT, and glutamine amidotransferases, as well as the anabolic incorporation of glutamate and glutamine into biomass. The results provided a detailed picture of the fluxes involved in ammonium assimilation in the two different C. glutamicum strains in vivo. In both strains, transmembrane equilibration of 100 mM [15N]ammonium took less than 2 min. In the wild type, an unexpectedly high fraction of 28% of the NH4+ was assimilated via the GS reaction in glutamine, while 72% were assimilated by the reversible GDH reaction via glutamate. GOGAT was inactive. The analysis identified glutamine as an important nitrogen donor in amidotransferase reactions. The experimentally determined amount of 28% of nitrogen assimilated via glutamine is close to a theoretical 21% calculated from the high peptidoglycan content of C. glutamicum. In the GDH mutant, glutamate was exclusively synthesized over the GS/GOGAT pathway. Its level was threefold reduced compared to the wild type. PMID:10049869

  19. Food webs of two intermittently open estuaries receiving 15N-enriched sewage effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadwen, Wade L.; Arthington, Angela H.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures were used to assess the response of food webs to sewage effluent discharged into two small intermittently open estuaries in northern New South Wales, Australia. One of these systems, Tallows Creek, has a history of direct sewage inputs, whilst the other, Belongil Creek, receives wastewater via an extensive wetland treatment system. The food webs of both systems were driven by algal sources of carbon, reflecting high autotrophic productivity in response to the nutrients entering the system from sewage effluent. All aquatic biota collected from Tallows Creek had significantly enriched δ15N signatures relative to their conspecifics from Belongil Creek, indicating that sewage nitrogen had been assimilated and transferred throughout the Tallows Creek food web. These δ15N values were higher than those reported from studies in permanently open estuaries receiving sewage effluent. We suggest that these enriched signatures and the transfer of nitrogen throughout the entire food web reflect differences in hydrology and associated nitrogen cycling processes between permanently open and intermittently open estuaries. Although all organisms in Tallows Creek were generally 15N-enriched, isotopically light (less 15N-enriched) individuals of estuary perchlet ( Ambassis marianus) and sea mullet ( Mugil cephalus) were also collected. These individuals were most likely recent immigrants into Tallows Creek, as this system had only recently been opened to the ocean. This isotopic discrimination between resident (enriched) and immigrant (significantly less enriched) individuals can provide information on fish movement patterns and the role of heavily polluted intermittently open estuaries in supporting commercially and recreationally valuable estuarine species.

  20. Why is Mineral-Associated Organic Matter Enriched in 15N? Evidence from Grazed Pasture Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, W. T.; Wells, N. S.; Mudge, P. L.; Clough, T. J.; Schipper, L. A.; Ghani, A.; Stevenson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Throughout the scientific literature, measurements across soil depth and density fractions suggest that, with few exceptions, mineral-associated organic matter (OM) has higher δ15N than non-mineral-associated OM. This implies that the δ15N difference between N inputs and mineral-stabilized OM may characterize the microbial processes involved in stabilization and mineral association. Yet current understanding of observed N isotope fractionation in terrestrial ecosystems suggests the large isotope effects are expressed during inorganic N transformations from NH4 to gaseous loss pathways of NH3 volatilization and denitrification. How can the relative importance of N isotope fractionation during OM stabilization versus loss pathways be resolved? We recently examined N isofluxes when a temporary nitrogen excess is created by urine deposition in a New Zealand dairy pasture. We found that the N isotopic composition of volatilized NH3, and NO3 available for leaching or denitrification could not be linked back to the added N using Rayleigh distillation models. Instead, the results imply that the added N was immobilized, and the N available for losses was increasingly derived from mineralization of organic matter during the course of the experiment. These results are consistent with recent evidence of enhanced OM mineralization in urine patches, understanding of N isotope mass balances and long-standing evidence that gross mineralization and immobilization fluxes greatly exceed net mineralization and nitrification, except at very high N saturation. These results suggest that where 15N enrichment occurs due to fractionating loss pathways, the isotope effects are primarily transmitted to immobilized N, forming 15N enriched stabilized OM. This further explains earlier findings that the δ15N of soil OM represents an integrated indicator of losses, reflecting the intensity and duration of pastoral agriculture. We suggest that development of an indicator based on δ15N in

  1. Foliar retention of 15N-nitrate and 15N-ammonium by red maple (Acer rubrum) and white oak (Quercus alba) leaves from simulated rain

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; Hanson, Paul J

    1990-07-01

    Studies of nitrogen cycling in forests indicate that trees assimilate atmospheric nitrate and ammonium and that differences between atmospheric deposition to the forest canopy and deposition measured in forest throughfall can be attributed to the removal of these ions from rain by tree leaves. Red maple and white oak leaves were exposed to artificial rain solutions (pH 4.1) containing {sup 15}N-labeled nitrate (3.5 {micro}g N/ml) or ammonium (2.2 {micro}g N/ml). At two time intervals after exposure (2 hr and 2 days) an exposed leaf and a control (non-exposed) leaf were removed from replicate seedlings. Based on results from {sup 15}N analysis, most of the nitrate applied to tree leaves was removed by washing with water; the mean per cent removal ({+-} standard error, N = 4) was 87 {+-} 1 and 73 {+-} 4% of the {sup 15}NO-N Applied to red maple and white oak leaves, respectively. Relative retention of {sup 15}NH{sub 4}-N by the leaves was greater than that observed for {sup 15}NO{sub 3}-N. In red maple and white oak leaves, 58 {+-} 9 and 84 {+-} 7% (mean {+-} standard error, N = 4), respectively, of the applied ammonium was not removed by washing treatments. Our results show that the foliar uptake of {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} from simulated rain by deciduous tree leaves is greater than that for {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Greater retention of NH{sub 4}{sup +} than NO{sub 3}{sup -} ions by red maple and white oak leaves from simulated rainfall is consistent with field observations showing a preferential retention of ammonium from rainfall by forest canopies. As nitrogen chemistry and the relative importance of nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere change in response to proposed emission reductions (and possibly climate change), an improved understanding of the fate of airborne nitrogen compounds in forest biogeochemical cycles will be necessary.

  2. The position dependent 15N enrichment of nitrous oxide in the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Röckmann, T; Kaiser, J; Brenninkmeijer, C A; Brand, W A; Borchers, R; Crowley, J N; Wollenhaupt, M; Crutzen, P J

    2001-01-01

    The position dependent 15N fractionation of nitrous oxide (N2O), which cannot be obtained from mass spectrometric analysis on molecular N2O itself, can be determined with high precision using isotope ratio mass spectrometry on the NO+ fragment that is formed on electron impact in the source of an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Laboratory UV photolysis experiments show that strong position dependent 15N fractionations occur in the photolysis of N2O in the stratosphere, its major atmospheric sink. Measurements on the isotopic composition of stratospheric N2O indeed confirm the presence of strong isotope enrichments, in particular the difference in the fractionation constants for 15N14NO and 14N15NO. The absolute magnitudes of the fractionation constants found in the stratosphere are much smaller, however, than those found in the lab experiments, demonstrating the importance of dynamical and also additional chemical processes like the reaction of N2O with O(1D).

  3. Simultaneous measurement of 13C- and 15N-isotopic enrichments of threonine by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Mermoud, Anne-France; Rémond, Didier; Faure, Magali; Breuille, Denis; Williamson, Gary; Peré-Trepat, Emma; Ramadan, Ziad; Fay, Laurent-Bernard; Kochhar, Sunil

    2009-04-01

    Under conditions of high isotopic dilution, e.g. in a tracer study, the ability to determine accurately and quantitatively small variations in isotopic enrichments of differently labelled chemical compounds (e.g. (13)C and (15)N in threonine) in a single run by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is desirable but remains a technological challenge. Here, we report a new, rapid and simple GC/MS method for simultaneously measuring the isotopic enrichments of doubly labelled threonine ([U(13)C] and (15)N) with isotopic enrichment lower than 1.5 Molar Percent Excess (MPE). The long-term reproducibility measured was around 0.09 MPE for both tracers (throughout a 6 week period). The intra-day repeatability was lower than 0.05 and 0.06 MPE for [U(13)C]-Thr and (15)N-Thr, respectively. To calculate both isotopic enrichments, two modes of calculations were used: one based on work by Rosenblatt et al. in 1992 and the other one using a matrix approach. Both methods gave similar results (ANOVA, P >0.05) with close precision for each mode of calculation. The GC/MS method was then used to investigate the differential utilization of threonine in different organs according to its route of administration in minipigs after administration of both tracers. In plasma samples, the lowest isotopic enrichment measured between two successive time points was at 0.01 and 0.02 MPE for [U(13)C]-Thr and (15)N-Thr, respectively. Moreover, the accuracy of GC/MS (13)C-isotopic enrichment measured was validated by analyzing the same plasma samples by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). Statistical analysis showed that both techniques gave the same results (ANOVA, P >0.05). This new GC/MS method offers the possibility to measure (13)C- and (15)N-isotopic enrichments with higher throughput, and using a lower amount of sample, than using GC/C/IRMS.

  4. The Continuing Search for the Location of 15N-Enriched Nitrogen in ACFER 182

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.; Arden, J. W.

    1992-07-01

    Acfer 182 is an unusual chondrite, with abundant small chondrules and CAIs (mean diameter ca. 100 micrometers), and rich in metal (ca. 15 vol%). It is closely related to ALH 85085, and, like that meteorite, is highly enriched in ^15N (bulk delta^15N ca. +600o/oo; delta^15N(sub)max = +1584o/oo at 900 degrees C; ref. 1). Stepped combustion of Acfer 182 (see figure) releases ^15N over a wide temperature range, indicating that its carriers must be dispersed throughout the meteorite, possibly occurring in carbonaceous material, fine-grained matrix, clasts, and metal. The highest relative abundance of ^15N is found in phase "N(sub)C", so far unidentified mineralogically, with a C/N ca. 10, which releases its nitrogen on combustion of the whole rock at 850-950 degrees C. N(sub)C is more apparent in Acfer 182 than ALH 85085, accounting for ca. 8 ppm of the total nitrogen inventory of 85.4 ppm. An attempt to isolate NC by physical means proved unsuccessful [1], therefore chemical treatments were tried: an HF/HCl-resistant residue was prepared from 9 g of fragments. Examination of the remaining material confirmed that it was dominantly composed of Mg-Al spinels, chromite, hibonite, and Cr-rich sulphides. Approximately two thirds of the original amount of nitrogen in the sample has been lost on dissolution (see figure), including any associated with Fe-Ni metal. There has been a reduction of over 50% of the nitrogen that was released up to 500 degrees C and presumed present in a carbonaceous component, without significant change in delta^15N value or C/N ratio. The most visible difference between results from the whole-rock and HF/HCl-resistant residue is that the combustion temperature of NC has decreased to 550-700 degrees C, with a concomitant drop in delta^15N from +1584o/oo to +1274o/oo It is unlikely that a minor (even heavier) sub-fraction of the ^15N-rich material has been removed; now that N(sub)C combusts at a temperature closer to the more abundant "organic

  5. NMR study of the metabolic 15N isotopic enrichment of cyanophycin synthesized by the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6308.

    PubMed

    Suarez, C; Kohler, S J; Allen, M M; Kolodny, N H

    1999-02-02

    1H, 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize cyanophycin, a multi-l-arginyl-poly-[l-aspartic acid] polypeptide from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6308. 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts and 1JHN and 1JCN coupling constants were measured in isolated 15N-labeled cyanophycin, and showed chemical shift values and J-couplings consistent with the reported polypeptide structure. 15N enrichment levels were determined from the extent of 1H-15N J-coupling in 1H NMR spectra of cyanophycin. Similar experiments using 13C-15N coupling in 13C NMR spectra were not useful in determining enrichment levels.

  6. Tracking the fate of nitrate through pulse-flow wetlands: A mesocosm scale 15N enrichment tracer study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messer, Tiffany L.; Burchell, Michael R.; Böhlke, John Karl; Tobias, Craig R.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative information about the fate of applied nitrate (NO3-N) in pulse-flow constructed wetlands is essential for designing wetland treatment systems and assessing their nitrogen removal services for agricultural and stormwater applications. Although many studies have documented NO3-N losses in wetlands, controlled experiments indicating the relative importance of different processes and N sinks are scarce. In the current study, 15NO3-N isotope enrichment tracer experiments were conducted in wetland mesocosms of two different wetland soil types at two realistic agricultural NO3-N source loads. The 15N label was traced from the source NO3-N into plant biomass, soil (including organic matter and ammonium), and N-gas constituents over 7–10 day study periods. All sinks responded positively to higher NO3-N loading. Plant uptake exceeded denitrification 2–3 fold in the low NO3-N loading experiments, while both fates were nearly equivalent in the high loading experiments. One to two years later, soils largely retained the assimilated tracer N, whereas plants had lost much of it. Results demonstrated that plant and microbial assimilation in the soil (temporary N sinks) can exceed denitrification (permanent N loss) in pulse-flow environments and must be considered by wetland designers and managers for optimizing nitrogen removal potential.

  7. Stellar Origins of Extremely 13C- and 15N-enriched Presolar SiC Grains: Novae or Supernovae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Nittler, Larry R.; O'D. Alexander, Conel M.; Wang, Jianhua; Pignatari, Marco; José, Jordi; Nguyen, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Extreme excesses of 13C (12C/13C < 10) and 15N (14N/15N < 20) in rare presolar SiC grains have been considered diagnostic of an origin in classical novae, though an origin in core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) has also been proposed. We report C, N, and Si isotope data for 14 submicron- to micron-sized 13C- and 15N-enriched presolar SiC grains (12C/13C < 16 and 14N/15N < ˜100) from Murchison, and their correlated Mg-Al, S, and Ca-Ti isotope data when available. These grains are enriched in 13C and 15N, but with quite diverse Si isotopic signatures. Four grains with 29,30Si excesses similar to those of type C SiC grains likely came from CCSNe, which experienced explosive H burning occurred during explosions. The independent coexistence of proton- and neutron-capture isotopic signatures in these grains strongly supports heterogeneous H ingestion into the He shell in pre-supernovae. Two of the seven putative nova grains with 30Si excesses and 29Si depletions show lower-than-solar 34S/32S ratios that cannot be explained by classical nova nucleosynthetic models. We discuss these signatures within the CCSN scenario. For the remaining five putative nova grains, both nova and supernova origins are viable because explosive H burning in the two stellar sites could result in quite similar proton-capture isotopic signatures. Three of the grains are sub-type AB grains that are also 13C enriched, but have a range of higher 14N/15N. We found that 15N-enriched AB grains (˜50 < 14N/15N < ˜100) have distinctive isotopic signatures compared to putative nova grains, such as higher 14N/15N, lower 26Al/27Al, and lack of 30Si excess, indicating weaker proton-capture nucleosynthetic environments.

  8. Plant community change mediates the response of foliar δ(15)N to CO 2 enrichment in mesic grasslands.

    PubMed

    Polley, H Wayne; Derner, Justin D; Jackson, Robert B; Gill, Richard A; Procter, Andrew C; Fay, Philip A

    2015-06-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may change the isotopic signature of plant N by altering plant and microbial processes involved in the N cycle. CO2 may increase leaf δ(15)N by increasing plant community productivity, C input to soil, and, ultimately, microbial mineralization of old, (15)N-enriched organic matter. We predicted that CO2 would increase aboveground productivity (ANPP; g biomass m(-2)) and foliar δ(15)N values of two grassland communities in Texas, USA: (1) a pasture dominated by a C4 exotic grass, and (2) assemblages of tallgrass prairie species, the latter grown on clay, sandy loam, and silty clay soils. Grasslands were exposed in separate experiments to a pre-industrial to elevated CO2 gradient for 4 years. CO2 stimulated ANPP of pasture and of prairie assemblages on each of the three soils, but increased leaf δ(15)N only for prairie plants on a silty clay. δ(15)N increased linearly as mineral-associated soil C declined on the silty clay. Mineral-associated C declined as ANPP increased. Structural equation modeling indicted that CO2 increased ANPP partly by favoring a tallgrass (Sorghastrum nutans) over a mid-grass species (Bouteloua curtipendula). CO2 may have increased foliar δ(15)N on the silty clay by reducing fractionation during N uptake and assimilation. However, we interpret the soil-specific, δ(15)N-CO2 response as resulting from increased ANPP that stimulated mineralization from recalcitrant organic matter. By contrast, CO2 favored a forb species (Solanum dimidiatum) with higher δ(15)N than the dominant grass (Bothriochloa ischaemum) in pasture. CO2 enrichment changed grassland δ(15)N by shifting species relative abundances.

  9. Determination of the delta(15N/14N)of Ammonium (NH4+) in Water: RSIL Lab Code 2898

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannon, Janet E.; Böhlke, John Karl

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the technique described by Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2898 is to determine the N isotopic composition, delta(15N/14N), abbreviated as d15N, of ammonium (NH4+) in water (freshwater and saline water). The procedure involves converting dissolved NH4+ into NH3 gas by raising the pH of the sample to above 9 with MgO and subsequently trapping the gas quantitatively as (NH4)2SO4 on a glass fiber (GF) filter. The GF filter is saturated with NaHSO4 and pressure sealed between two gas-permeable polypropylene filters. The GF filter 'sandwich' floats on the surface of the water sample in a closed bottle. NH3 diffuses from the water through the polypropylene filter and reacts with NaHSO4, forming (NH4)2SO4 on the GF filter. The GF filter containing (NH4)2SO4 is dried and then combusted with a Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA), which is used to convert total nitrogen in a solid sample into N2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines the relative difference in ratios of the amounts of the stable isotopes of nitrogen (15N and 14N) of the product N2 gas and a reference N2 gas. The filters containing the samples are compressed in tin capsules and loaded into a Costech Zero-Blank Autosampler on the EA. Under computer control, samples then are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where combustion takes place in a He atmosphere containing an excess of O2 gas. To remove S-O gases produced from the NaHSO4, a plug of Ag-coated Cu wool is inserted at the bottom of the reaction tube. Combustion products are transported by a He carrier through a reduction furnace to remove excess O2, toconvert all nitrogen oxides to N2, and to remove any remaining S-O gases. The gases then pass through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly N2 and a small amount of background CO2, are separated by a gas chromatograph (GC). The gas is then introduced

  10. STELLAR ORIGINS OF EXTREMELY {sup 13}C- AND {sup 15}N-ENRICHED PRESOLAR SIC GRAINS: NOVAE OR SUPERNOVAE?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nan; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O’D.; Wang, Jianhua; Pignatari, Marco; José, Jordi; Nguyen, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Extreme excesses of {sup 13}C ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C < 10) and {sup 15}N ({sup 14}N/{sup 15}N < 20) in rare presolar SiC grains have been considered diagnostic of an origin in classical novae, though an origin in core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) has also been proposed. We report C, N, and Si isotope data for 14 submicron- to micron-sized {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-enriched presolar SiC grains ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C < 16 and {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N < ∼100) from Murchison, and their correlated Mg–Al, S, and Ca–Ti isotope data when available. These grains are enriched in {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N, but with quite diverse Si isotopic signatures. Four grains with {sup 29,30}Si excesses similar to those of type C SiC grains likely came from CCSNe, which experienced explosive H burning occurred during explosions. The independent coexistence of proton- and neutron-capture isotopic signatures in these grains strongly supports heterogeneous H ingestion into the He shell in pre-supernovae. Two of the seven putative nova grains with {sup 30}Si excesses and {sup 29}Si depletions show lower-than-solar {sup 34}S/{sup 32}S ratios that cannot be explained by classical nova nucleosynthetic models. We discuss these signatures within the CCSN scenario. For the remaining five putative nova grains, both nova and supernova origins are viable because explosive H burning in the two stellar sites could result in quite similar proton-capture isotopic signatures. Three of the grains are sub-type AB grains that are also {sup 13}C enriched, but have a range of higher {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N. We found that {sup 15}N-enriched AB grains (∼50 < {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N < ∼100) have distinctive isotopic signatures compared to putative nova grains, such as higher {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N, lower {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al, and lack of {sup 30}Si excess, indicating weaker proton-capture nucleosynthetic environments.

  11. Probing site-specific 13C/15N-isotope enrichment of spider silk with liquid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangyan; Yarger, Jeffery L; Holland, Gregory P

    2013-05-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been extensively used to elucidate spider silk protein structure and dynamics. In many of these studies, site-specific isotope enrichment is critical for designing particular NMR methods for silk structure determination. The commonly used isotope analysis techniques, isotope-ratio mass spectroscopy and liquid/gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy, are typically not capable of providing the site-specific isotope information for many systems because an appropriate sample derivatization method is not available. In contrast, NMR does not require any sample derivatization or separation prior to analysis. In this article, conventional liquid-state (1)H NMR was implemented to evaluate incorporation of (13)C/(15)N-labeled amino acids in hydrolyzed spider dragline silk. To determine site-specific (13)C and (15)N isotope enrichments, an analysis method was developed to fit the (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N J-splitting (J CH and J NH) (1)H NMR peak patterns of hydrolyzed silk fiber. This is demonstrated for Nephila clavipes spiders, where [U-(13)C3,(15)N]-Ala and [1-(13)C,(15)N]-Gly were dissolved in their water supplies. Overall, contents for Ala and Gly isotopomers are extracted for these silk samples. The current methodology can be applied to many fields where site-specific tracking of isotopes is of interest.

  12. Adaptation of micro-diffusion method for the analysis of (15) N natural abundance of ammonium in samples with small volume.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shasha; Fang, Yunting; Xi, Dan

    2015-07-30

    There are several preparation methods for the measurement of the nitrogen (N) isotopic composition of ammonium (NH4 (+) ) in different types of samples (freshwater, saltwater and soil extracts). The diffusion method is the most popular and it involves NH4 (+) in solutions being released under alkaline conditions and then immediately trapped by an acidified filter. However, the traditional preparation is designed for samples with large volume and relatively high N concentrations. The performance of diffusion for small-volume samples (e.g., a few milliliters) remains unknown. We examined the overall performance of micro-diffusion on 5 mL samples on varying the incubation time, temperature and initial NH4 (+) concentration. The trapped ammonia was chemically converted into nitrous oxide (N2 O) with hypobromite and hydroxylamine in sequence. The produced N2 O was analyzed by a commercially available purge and cryogenic trap system coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. We found that diffusion can be complete with no more than 7 days of treatment at 37 °C. Increasing the temperature to 50 °C and the incubation time to 11 days did not improve the overall performance. There were no significant differences in the overall performance during diffusion with NH4 (+) concentrations from 15 to 60 μM. The blank size was relatively large, and the N contamination might come from the reagents especially KCl salts. The method presented here combines micro-diffusion and hypobromite oxidation and hydroxylamine reduction. It is suitable for samples with small volume and low NH4 (+) concentrations. Our study demonstrates that the NH4 (+) concentrations in samples can be as low as 15 μM, and a volume of 5 mL is sufficient for this method. We suggest that this method can be used for the routine determination of (15) N/(14) N for either natural abundance or (15) N-enriched NH4 (+) . Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Efficient production of (2)H, (13)C, (15)N-enriched industrial enzyme Rhizopus chinensis lipase with native disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Swapna, G V T; Xiao, Rong; Zheng, Haiyan; Sha, Chong; Xu, Yan; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2016-07-13

    In order to use most modern methods of NMR spectroscopy to study protein structure and dynamics, isotope-enriched protein samples are essential. Especially for larger proteins (>20 kDa), perdeuterated and Ile (δ1), Leu, and Val methyl-protonated protein samples are required for suppressing nuclear relaxation to provide improved spectral quality, allowing key backbone and side chain resonance assignments needed for protein structure and dynamics studies. Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris are two of the most popular expression systems for producing isotope-enriched, recombinant protein samples for NMR investigations. The P. pastoris system can be used to produce (13)C, (15)N-enriched and even (2)H,(13)C, (15)N-enriched protein samples, but efficient methods for producing perdeuterated proteins with Ile (δ1), Leu and Val methyl-protonated groups in P. pastoris are still unavailable. Glycosylation heterogeneity also provides challenges to NMR studies. E. coli expression systems are efficient for overexpressing perdeuterated and Ile (δ1), Leu, Val methyl-protonated protein samples, but are generally not successful for producing secreted eukaryotic proteins with native disulfide bonds. The 33 kDa protein-Rhizopus chinensis lipase (RCL), an important industrial enzyme, was produced using both P. pastoris and E. coli BL21 trxB (DE3) systems. Samples produced from both systems exhibit identical native disulfide bond formation and similar 2D NMR spectra, indicating similar native protein folding. The yield of (13)C, (15)N-enriched r27RCL produced using P. pastoris was 1.7 times higher that obtained using E. coli, while the isotope-labeling efficiency was ~15 % lower. Protein samples produced in P. pastoris exhibit O-glycosylation, while the protein samples produced in E. coli were not glycosylated. The specific activity of r27RCL from P. pastoris was ~1.4 times higher than that produced in E. coli. These data demonstrate efficient production of (2)H, (13)C, (15)N-enriched

  14. Influence of 15N enrichment on the net isotopic fractionation factor during the reduction of nitrate to nitrous oxide in soil.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Olivier; Lévêque, Jean; Hénault, Catherine; Ambus, Per; Milloux, Marie-Jeanne; Andreux, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas, is mainly emitted from soils during the denitrification process. Nitrogen stable-isotope investigations can help to characterise the N(2)O source and N(2)O production mechanisms. The stable-isotope approach is increasingly used with (15)N natural abundance or relatively low (15)N enrichment levels and requires a good knowledge of the isotopic fractionation effect inherent to this biological mechanism. This paper reports the measurement of the net and instantaneous isotopic fractionation factor (alpha(s/p) (i)) during the denitrification of NO(3) (-) to N(2)O over a range of (15)N substrate enrichments (0.37 to 1.00 atom% (15)N). At natural abundance level, the isotopic fractionation effect reported falls well within the range of data previously observed. For (15)N-enriched substrate, the value of alpha(s/p) (i) was not constant and decreased from 1.024 to 1.013, as a direct function of the isotopic enrichment of the labelled nitrate added. However, for enrichment greater than 0.6 atom% (15)N, the value of alpha(s/p) (i) seems to be independent of substrate isotopic enrichment. These results suggest that for isotopic experiments applied to N(2)O emissions, the use of low (15)N-enriched tracers around 1.00 atom% (15)N is valid. At this enrichment level, the isotopic effect appears negligible in comparison with the enrichment of the substrate. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Solving the woolly mammoth conundrum: amino acid 15N-enrichment suggests a distinct forage or habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz-Narbonne, Rachel; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Metcalfe, Jessica Z.; Zazula, Grant

    2015-06-01

    Understanding woolly mammoth ecology is key to understanding Pleistocene community dynamics and evaluating the roles of human hunting and climate change in late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions. Previous isotopic studies of mammoths’ diet and physiology have been hampered by the ‘mammoth conundrum’: woolly mammoths have anomalously high collagen δ15N values, which are more similar to coeval carnivores than herbivores, and which could imply a distinct diet and (or) habitat, or a physiological adaptation. We analyzed individual amino acids from collagen of adult woolly mammoths and coeval species, and discovered greater  15N enrichment in source amino acids of woolly mammoths than in most other herbivores or carnivores. Woolly mammoths consumed an isotopically distinct food source, reflective of extreme aridity, dung fertilization, and (or) plant selection. This dietary signal suggests that woolly mammoths occupied a distinct habitat or forage niche relative to other Pleistocene herbivores.

  16. Solving the woolly mammoth conundrum: amino acid 15N-enrichment suggests a distinct forage or habitat

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz-Narbonne, Rachel; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Metcalfe, Jessica Z.; Zazula, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Understanding woolly mammoth ecology is key to understanding Pleistocene community dynamics and evaluating the roles of human hunting and climate change in late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions. Previous isotopic studies of mammoths’ diet and physiology have been hampered by the ‘mammoth conundrum’: woolly mammoths have anomalously high collagen δ15N values, which are more similar to coeval carnivores than herbivores, and which could imply a distinct diet and (or) habitat, or a physiological adaptation. We analyzed individual amino acids from collagen of adult woolly mammoths and coeval species, and discovered greater  15N enrichment in source amino acids of woolly mammoths than in most other herbivores or carnivores. Woolly mammoths consumed an isotopically distinct food source, reflective of extreme aridity, dung fertilization, and (or) plant selection. This dietary signal suggests that woolly mammoths occupied a distinct habitat or forage niche relative to other Pleistocene herbivores. PMID:26056037

  17. Simple approach for the preparation of (15-15)N2-enriched water for nitrogen fixation assessments: evaluation, application and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Klawonn, Isabell; Lavik, Gaute; Böning, Philipp; Marchant, Hannah K; Dekaezemacker, Julien; Mohr, Wiebke; Ploug, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings revealed that the commonly used (15)N2 tracer assay for the determination of dinitrogen (N2) fixation can underestimate the activity of aquatic N2-fixing organisms. Therefore, a modification to the method using pre-prepared (15-15)N2-enriched water was proposed. Here, we present a rigorous assessment and outline a simple procedure for the preparation of (15-15)N2-enriched water. We recommend to fill sterile-filtered water into serum bottles and to add (15-15)N2 gas to the water in amounts exceeding the standard N2 solubility, followed by vigorous agitation (vortex mixing ≥ 5 min). Optionally, water can be degassed at low-pressure (≥950 mbar) for 10 min prior to the (15-15)N2 gas addition to indirectly enhance the (15-15)N2 concentration. This preparation of (15-15)N2-enriched water can be done within 1 h using standard laboratory equipment. The final (15)N-atom% excess was 5% after replacing 2-5% of the incubation volume with (15-15)N2-enriched water. Notably, the addition of (15-15)N2-enriched water can alter levels of trace elements in the incubation water due to the contact of (15-15)N2-enriched water with glass, plastic and rubber ware. In our tests, levels of trace elements (Fe, P, Mn, Mo, Cu, Zn) increased by up to 0.1 nmol L(-1) in the final incubation volume, which may bias rate measurements in regions where N2 fixation is limited by trace elements. For these regions, we tested an alternative way to enrich water with (15-15)N2. The (15-15)N2 was injected as a bubble directly to the incubation water, followed by gentle shaking. Immediately thereafter, the bubble was replaced with water to stop the (15-15)N2 equilibration. This approach achieved a (15)N-atom% excess of 6.6 ± 1.7% when adding 2 mL (15-15)N2 per liter of incubation water. The herein presented methodological tests offer guidelines for the (15)N2 tracer assay and thus, are crucial to circumvent methodological draw-backs for future N2 fixation assessments.

  18. Simple approach for the preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water for nitrogen fixation assessments: evaluation, application and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Klawonn, Isabell; Lavik, Gaute; Böning, Philipp; Marchant, Hannah K.; Dekaezemacker, Julien; Mohr, Wiebke; Ploug, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings revealed that the commonly used 15N2 tracer assay for the determination of dinitrogen (N2) fixation can underestimate the activity of aquatic N2-fixing organisms. Therefore, a modification to the method using pre-prepared 15−15N2-enriched water was proposed. Here, we present a rigorous assessment and outline a simple procedure for the preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water. We recommend to fill sterile-filtered water into serum bottles and to add 15−15N2 gas to the water in amounts exceeding the standard N2 solubility, followed by vigorous agitation (vortex mixing ≥ 5 min). Optionally, water can be degassed at low-pressure (≥950 mbar) for 10 min prior to the 15−15N2 gas addition to indirectly enhance the 15−15N2 concentration. This preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water can be done within 1 h using standard laboratory equipment. The final 15N-atom% excess was 5% after replacing 2–5% of the incubation volume with 15−15N2-enriched water. Notably, the addition of 15−15N2-enriched water can alter levels of trace elements in the incubation water due to the contact of 15−15N2-enriched water with glass, plastic and rubber ware. In our tests, levels of trace elements (Fe, P, Mn, Mo, Cu, Zn) increased by up to 0.1 nmol L−1 in the final incubation volume, which may bias rate measurements in regions where N2 fixation is limited by trace elements. For these regions, we tested an alternative way to enrich water with 15−15N2. The 15−15N2 was injected as a bubble directly to the incubation water, followed by gentle shaking. Immediately thereafter, the bubble was replaced with water to stop the 15−15N2 equilibration. This approach achieved a 15N-atom% excess of 6.6 ± 1.7% when adding 2 mL 15−15N2 per liter of incubation water. The herein presented methodological tests offer guidelines for the 15N2 tracer assay and thus, are crucial to circumvent methodological draw-backs for future N2 fixation assessments. PMID:26300853

  19. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in a tropical rainforest: 15N natural abundance measurements supported by experimental isotopic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pons, Thijs L; Perreijn, Kristel; van Kessel, Chris; Werger, Marinus J A

    2007-01-01

    * Leguminous trees are very common in the tropical rainforests of Guyana. Here, species-specific differences in N(2) fixation capability among nodulating legumes growing on different soils and a possible limitation of N(2) fixation by a relatively high nitrogen (N) and low phosphorus (P) availability in the forest were investigated. * Leaves of 17 nodulating species and 17 non-nodulating reference trees were sampled and their delta(15)N values measured. Estimates of N(2) fixation rates were calculated using the (15)N natural abundance method. Pot experiments were conducted on the effect of N and P availability on N(2) fixation using the (15)N-enriched isotope dilution method. * Nine species showed estimates of > 33% leaf N derived from N(2) fixation, while the others had low or undetectable N(2) fixation rates. High N and low P availability reduced N(2) fixation substantially. * The results suggest that a high N and low P availability in the forest limit N(2) fixation. At the forest ecosystem level, N(2) fixation was estimated at c. 6% of total N uptake by the tree community. We conclude that symbiotic N(2) fixation plays an important role in maintaining high amounts of soil available N in undisturbed forest.

  20. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in a tropical rainforest: (15) N natural abundance measurements supported by experimental isotopic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pons, Thijs L; Perreijn, Kristel; Van Kessel, Chris; Werger, Marinus J A

    2007-01-01

    •  Leguminous trees are very common in the tropical rainforests of Guyana. Here, species-specific differences in N2 fixation capability among nodulating legumes growing on different soils and a possible limitation of N2 fixation by a relatively high nitrogen (N) and low phosphorus (P) availability in the forest were investigated. •  Leaves of 17 nodulating species and 17 non-nodulating reference trees were sampled and their δ(15) N values measured. Estimates of N2 fixation rates were calculated using the (15) N natural abundance method. Pot experiments were conducted on the effect of N and P availability on N2 fixation using the (15) N-enriched isotope dilution method. •  Nine species showed estimates of > 33% leaf N derived from N2 fixation, while the others had low or undetectable N2 fixation rates. High N and low P availability reduced N2 fixation substantially. •  The results suggest that a high N and low P availability in the forest limit N2 fixation. At the forest ecosystem level, N2 fixation was estimated at c. 6% of total N uptake by the tree community. We conclude that symbiotic N2 fixation plays an important role in maintaining high amounts of soil available N in undisturbed forest.

  1. Nitrate degradation without 15N enrichment: a hydrochemical and isotopic study of a fractured rock aquifer including embedded lakes.

    PubMed

    Bozau, Elke; Knöller, Kay; Strauch, Gerhard

    2006-09-01

    Water samples from three quarry lakes and the surrounding fractured rock aquifer were investigated for delta18O and delta2H (H2O), delta15N and delta18O (NO3-), as well as anions and cations. Lake water and groundwater can be distinguished by their different chemical and isotopic composition. Because of evaporation processes, 18O and 2H are enriched in the lake water and can be used as natural tracers for the water dynamic of the lakes. The groundwater is characterised by high nitrate concentrations (up to 120 mg/l). Lake internal processes reduce the nitrate concentration in the quarry lakes. However, no enrichment of delta15N and delta18O in nitrate, typical for microbial nitrate degradation, is observed in the lake water. Because of the complex flow paths in the fractured rock aquifer and the intense chemical transformations at the interface between groundwater and lake water, isotopic and hydrochemical data of lake water and groundwater alone do not conclusively explain hydrological and hydrochemical processes of the investigated lake-groundwater system.

  2. Measurement of (15)N enrichment of glutamine and urea cycle amino acids derivatized with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate using liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Karakawa, Sachise; Watanabe, Akiko; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Sakai, Ryosei

    2015-05-01

    6-Aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) is an amino acid-specific derivatizing reagent that has been used for sensitive amino acid quantification by liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the ability of this method to measure the isotopic enrichment of amino acids and to determine the positional (15)N enrichment of urea cycle amino acids (i.e., arginine, ornithine, and citrulline) and glutamine. The distribution of the M and M+1 isotopomers of each natural AQC-amino acid was nearly identical to the theoretical distribution. The standard deviation of the (M+1)/M ratio for each amino acid in repeated measurements was approximately 0.1%, and the ratios were stable regardless of the injected amounts. Linearity in the measurements of (15)N enrichment was confirmed by measuring a series of (15)N-labeled arginine standards. The positional (15)N enrichment of urea cycle amino acids and glutamine was estimated from the isotopic distribution of unique fragment ions generated at different collision energies. This method was able to identify their positional (15)N enrichment in the plasma of rats fed (15)N-labeled glutamine. These results suggest the utility of LC-MS/MS detection of AQC-amino acids for the measurement of isotopic enrichment in (15)N-labeled amino acids and indicate that this method is useful for the study of nitrogen metabolism in living organisms.

  3. Salt marsh ecosystem biogeochemical responses to nutrient enrichment: a paired 15N tracer study.

    PubMed

    Drake, D C; Peterson, Bruce J; Galván, Kari A; Deegan, Linda A; Hopkinson, Charles; Johnson, J Michael; Koop-Jakobsen, K; Lemay, Lynsey E; Picard, Christian

    2009-09-01

    We compared processing and fate of dissolved NO3- in two New England salt marsh ecosystems, one receiving natural flood tide concentrations of approximately 1-4 micromol NO3-/ L and the other receiving experimentally fertilized flood tides containing approximately 70-100 micromol NO3-/ L. We conducted simultaneous 15NO3- (isotope) tracer additions from 23 to 28 July 2005 in the reference (8.4 ha) and fertilized (12.4 ha) systems to compare N dynamics and fate. Two full tidal cycles were intensively studied during the paired tracer additions. Resulting mass balances showed that essentially 100% (0.48-0.61 mol NO3-N.ha(-1).h(-1)) of incoming NO3- was assimilated, dissimilated, sorbed, or sedimented (processed) within a few hours in the reference system when NO3- concentrations were 1.3-1.8 micromol/L. In contrast, only 50-60% of incoming NO3- was processed in the fertilized system when NO3- concentrations were 84-96 micromol/L; the remainder was exported in ebb tidewater. Gross NO3- processing was approximately 40 times higher in the fertilized system at 19.34-24.67 mol NO3-N.ha(-1).h(-1). Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was evident in both systems during the first 48 h of the tracer additions but <1% of incoming 15NO3- was exported as 15NH4+. Nitrification rates calculated by 15NO3- dilution were 6.05 and 4.46 mol.ha(-1).h(-1) in the fertilized system but could not be accurately calculated in the reference system due to rapid (<4 h) NO3- turnover. Over the five-day paired tracer addition, sediments sequestered a small fraction of incoming NO3-, although the efficiency of sequestration was 3.8% in the reference system and 0.7% in the fertilized system. Gross sediment N sequestration rates were similar at 13.5 and 12.6 mol.ha(-1).d(-1), respectively. Macrophyte NO3- uptake efficiency, based on tracer incorporation in aboveground tissues, was considerably higher in the reference system (16.8%) than the fertilized system (2.6%), although bulk uptake of NO3

  4. Fossil Fuel Combustion-Related Emissions Dominate Atmospheric Ammonia Sources during Severe Haze Episodes: Evidence from (15)N-Stable Isotope in Size-Resolved Aerosol Ammonium.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuepeng; Tian, Shili; Liu, Dongwei; Fang, Yunting; Zhu, Xiaying; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Bo; Michalski, Greg; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-08-02

    The reduction of ammonia (NH3) emissions is urgently needed due to its role in aerosol nucleation and growth causing haze formation during its conversion into ammonium (NH4(+)). However, the relative contributions of individual NH3 sources are unclear, and debate remains over whether agricultural emissions dominate atmospheric NH3 in urban areas. Based on the chemical and isotopic measurements of size-resolved aerosols in urban Beijing, China, we find that the natural abundance of (15)N (expressed using δ(15)N values) of NH4(+) in fine particles varies with the development of haze episodes, ranging from -37.1‰ to -21.7‰ during clean/dusty days (relative humidity: ∼ 40%), to -13.1‰ to +5.8‰ during hazy days (relative humidity: 70-90%). After accounting for the isotope exchange between NH3 gas and aerosol NH4(+), the δ(15)N value of the initial NH3 during hazy days is found to be -14.5‰ to -1.6‰, which indicates fossil fuel-based emissions. These emissions contribute 90% of the total NH3 during hazy days in urban Beijing. This work demonstrates the analysis of δ(15)N values of aerosol NH4(+) to be a promising new tool for partitioning atmospheric NH3 sources, providing policy makers with insights into NH3 emissions and secondary aerosols for regulation in urban environments.

  5. Fossil Fuel Combustion-Related Emissions Dominate Atmospheric Ammonia Sources during Severe Haze Episodes: Evidence from 15N-Stable Isotope in Size-Resolved Aerosol Ammonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Tian, S.; Liu, D.; Fang, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhang, Q.; Zheng, B.; Michalski, G. M.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The reduction of ammonia (NH3) emissions is urgently needed due to its major contributions to nitrogen deposition and particle pollution. However, the relative contributions of individual NH3 sources are unclear, and debate remains over whether agricultural emissions dominate atmospheric NH3 in urban areas. Based on the chemical and isotopic measurements of size-resolved aerosols in urban Beijing, China, we find that the natural abundance of 15N (expressed using δ15N values) of ammonium (NH4+) in fine particles varies with the development of haze episodes, ranging from -37.1‰ to -21.7‰ during clean/dusty days (relative humidity: ˜ 40%), to -13.1‰ to +5.8‰ during hazy days (relative humidity: 70-90%). After factoring the isotope exchange between NH3 gas and aerosol NH4+, the δ15N value of the initial NH3 during hazy days is found to be -14.5‰ to -1.6‰, which indicates fossil fuel-based emissions. These emissions contribute 90% of the total NH3 during hazy days in urban Beijing. This work demonstrates the analysis of δ15N values of aerosol NH4+ to be a promising new tool for partitioning atmospheric NH3 sources, providing policy makers with insights into NH3 emissions and secondary aerosols for regulation in urban environments. This work also shed lights on the sources of nitrogen deposition in downwind ecosystems.

  6. High Resolution NMR ^15N and ^31P NMR Of Antiferroelectric Phase Transition in Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate and Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaydin-Sen, Ozge

    2005-03-01

    Natural abundance ^15N CPMAS NMR has been used to investigate the paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition of NH4H2AsO4 (ADA) (TN˜216K) and of NH4H2PO4 (ADP) (148K), with a focus on the role of the NH4^+ ion. Isotropic chemical shift of ^15N for ADA exhibits an almost linear temperature dependence to within TN±1K, and then changes discontinuously, followed by another almost linear dependence. The spectra of the paraelectric and antiferroelectric phases coexist around the TN. The sharp anomaly around TN implies that the NH4^+ ions undergo a displacive transition, whereas the protons in the O-HO bonds undergo an order-disorder transition. The ^15N data thus support a mixed order-disorder-displacive mechanism for this transition. The ^15N data on ADP exhibit somewhat different behavior. ^31P CPMAS measurements will also be presented and discussed in terms of the above model.

  7. CO2 enrichment modulates ammonium nutrition in tomato adjusting carbon and nitrogen metabolism to stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Vega-Mas, Izargi; Marino, Daniel; Sánchez-Zabala, Joseba; González-Murua, Carmen; Estavillo, Jose María; González-Moro, María Begoña

    2015-12-01

    Ammonium (NH4(+)) toxicity typically occurs in plants exposed to high environmental NH4(+) concentration. NH4(+) assimilating capacity may act as a biochemical mechanism avoiding its toxic accumulation but requires a fine tuning between nitrogen assimilating enzymes and carbon anaplerotic routes. In this work, we hypothesized that extra C supply, exposing tomato plants cv. Agora Hybrid F1 to elevated atmospheric CO2, could improve photosynthetic process and thus ameliorate NH4(+) assimilation and tolerance. Plants were grown under nitrate (NO3(-)) or NH4(+) as N source (5-15mM), under two atmospheric CO2 levels, 400 and 800ppm. Growth and gas exchange parameters, (15)N isotopic signature, C and N metabolites and enzymatic activities were determined. Plants under 7.5mM N equally grew independently of the N source, while higher ammonium supply resulted toxic for growth. However, specific stomatal closure occurred in 7.5mM NH4(+)-fed plants under elevated CO2 improving water use efficiency (WUE) but compromising plant N status. Elevated CO2 annulled the induction of TCA anaplerotic enzymes observed at non-toxic NH4(+) nutrition under ambient CO2. Finally, CO2 enrichment benefited tomato growth under both nutritions, and although it did not alleviate tomato NH4(+) tolerance it did differentially regulate plant metabolism in N-source and -dose dependent manner.

  8. Macroalgal bioindicators (growth, tissue N, delta(15)N) detect nutrient enrichment from shrimp farm effluent entering Opunohu Bay, Moorea, French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Lin, David T; Fong, Peggy

    2008-02-01

    Nutrient enrichment from shrimp aquaculture poses an increasing environmental threat due to the industry's projected rapid growth and unsustainable management practices. Traditional methods to monitor impacts emphasize water quality sampling; however, there are many advantages to bioindicators, especially in developing countries. We investigated the usefulness of three bioindicators -- growth, tissue nitrogen content and nitrogen stable isotope signature (delta(15)N) -- in the tropical red macroalga Acanthophora spicifera. Algae were collected, cultured, and deployed in a spatial array around the outflow from a shrimp farm in Moorea, French Polynesia, to detect nitrogenous wastes. All three parameters were highest adjacent to the shrimp farm indicating nutrient enrichment, and delta(15)N values confirmed the shrimp farm as the dominant nutrient source (5.63-5.96 per thousand). Isotope ratios proved the most sensitive indicator, as delta(15)N signatures were detected at the most distant sites tested, confirming their usefulness in tracing nutrients and mapping the spatial extent of enrichment.

  9. Precision and sensitivity of the measurement of 15N enrichment in D-alanine from bacterial cell walls using positive/negative ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunlid, A.; Odham, G.; Findlay, R. H.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitive detection of cellular components from specific groups of microbes can be utilized as 'signatures' in the examination of microbial consortia from soils, sediments or biofilms. Utilizing capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and stereospecific derivatizing agents, D-alanine, a component localized in the prokaryotic (bacterial) cell wall, can be detected reproducibly. Enrichments of D-[15N]alanine determined in E. coli grown with [15N]ammonia can be determined with precision at 1.0 atom%. Chemical ionization with methane gas and the detection of negative ions (M - HF)- and (M - F or M + H - HF)- formed from the heptafluorobutyryl D-2 butanol ester of D-alanine allowed as little as 8 pg (90 fmol) to be detected reproducibly. This method can be utilized to define the metabolic activity in terms of 15N incorporation at the level of 10(3)-10(4) cells, as a function of the 15N-14N ratio.

  10. Precision and sensitivity of the measurement of 15N enrichment in D-alanine from bacterial cell walls using positive/negative ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunlid, A.; Odham, G.; Findlay, R. H.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitive detection of cellular components from specific groups of microbes can be utilized as 'signatures' in the examination of microbial consortia from soils, sediments or biofilms. Utilizing capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and stereospecific derivatizing agents, D-alanine, a component localized in the prokaryotic (bacterial) cell wall, can be detected reproducibly. Enrichments of D-[15N]alanine determined in E. coli grown with [15N]ammonia can be determined with precision at 1.0 atom%. Chemical ionization with methane gas and the detection of negative ions (M - HF)- and (M - F or M + H - HF)- formed from the heptafluorobutyryl D-2 butanol ester of D-alanine allowed as little as 8 pg (90 fmol) to be detected reproducibly. This method can be utilized to define the metabolic activity in terms of 15N incorporation at the level of 10(3)-10(4) cells, as a function of the 15N-14N ratio.

  11. Chemical synthesis of glycoproteins with the specific installation of gradient enriched 15N-labeled amino acids for getting insight into glycoprotein behavior.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Yasuhiro; Nguyen, Minh Hien; Izumi, Masayuki; Sato, Hajime; Okamoto, Ryo

    2017-03-09

    We propose a novel partially 15N-labelling method for the amide backbone of a synthetic glycoprotein. By use of a chemical approach utilizing SPPS and NCL, we inserted thirteen 15N-labeled amino acids at specific positions of the protein backbone, while intentionally varying the enrichment of 15N atoms. This idea enables us to discriminate even the same type of amino acid based on the intensities of 1H-15N HSQC signals, thus allowing us to understand the dynamics of the local conformation of a synthetic homogeneous glycoprotein. Results suggested that the attachment of an oligosaccharide of either a bi-antennary complex-type or a high-mannose-type did not disturb protein conformation. However, T1 values suggested that the oligosaccharide influenced dynamics at the local conformation. Temperature-varied CD spectra and T1 values clearly indicated that oligosaccharides appeared to inhibit protein fluctuation or, in other words, stabilize protein structure.

  12. Hot and Cool Spots of Primary Production, Respiration and 15N Nitrate and Ammonium Uptake: Spatial Heterogeneity in Tropical Streams and Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, W. K.; Tromboni, F.; Neres-Lima, V.; Zandoná, E.; Moulton, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    While whole-stream measures of metabolism and uptake have become common methods to characterize biogeochemical transport and processing, less is known about how nitrogen (N) uptake, gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) covary among different stream substrata as smaller scales. We measured 15N ammonium and nitrate uptake seperately, and GPP and ER of ecosystem compartments (leaves, epilithon, sand-associated biota and macrophytes) in closed circulating chambers in three streams/ rivers of varied size. The streams drain pristine Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest watersheds and are all within a few km of eachother. The smallest stream had dense forest canopy cover; the largest river was almost completely open. GPP could not be detected in the closed canopy stream. Epilithon (biofilms on rocks) was a dominant compartment for GPP and N uptake in the two open streams, and macrophytes rivaled epilithon GPP and N uptake rates in the most open stream. Even though leaves covered only 1-3% of the stream bottom, they could account for around half of all the ER in the streams but almost no N uptake. Sand had minimal rates of N uptake, GPP and R associated with it in all streams due to relatively low organic material content. The data suggest that N uptake, GPP and ER of different substrata are not closely linked over relatively small spatial (dm) scales, and that different biogeochemical processes may map to different hot and cool spots for ecosystem rates.

  13. Plant community change mediates the response of foliar delta15N to CO2 enrichment in mesic grasslands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may change the isotopic signature of plant N by altering plant and microbial processes involved in the N cycle. Isotope fractionation theory and limited experimental evidence indicate that CO2 may increase leaf delta15N by increasing plant community productivity,...

  14. Plant community change mediates the response of foliar d15N to CO2 enrichment in mesic grasslands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may change the isotopic signature of plant N by altering plant and microbial processes involved in the N cycle. Isotope fractionation theory and limited experimental evidence indicate that CO2 may increase leaf delta15N by increasing plant community productivity...

  15. Nitrogen assimilation and short term retention in a nutrient-rich tidal freshwater marsh - a whole ecosystem 15N enrichment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribsholt, B.; Struyf, E.; Tramper, A.; de Brabandere, L.; Brion, N.

    2006-07-01

    We conducted two (May 2002 and September 2003) pulse additions of 15NH4+ to the flood water inundating a tidal freshwater marsh fringing the nutrient-rich Scheldt River (Belgium) and traced the fate of ammonium in the intact ecosystem. Here we report in detail the 15N uptake into the various marsh components (leaves, roots, sediment, leaf litter and invertebrate fauna), and the 15N retention on a scale of 15 days. We particularly focus on the contributions of the rooted macrophytes and the microbial community in the sediment and on plant litter. Assimilation and short term retention of 15NH4+ was low on both occasions. Only 4-9% of the added 15N trace was assimilated, corresponding to 13-22% and 8-18% of the processed 15N (i.e. not exported as 15NH4+ in May and September, respectively. In May nitrogen assimilation rate (per hour inundated) was >3 times faster than in September. Macrophytes (above- and below ground) were of limited importance for short term 15N retention accounting for <6% of the total 15NH4+ processed by the marsh. The less dominant herbaceous species were more important (on an area basis) than the dominant reed (Phragmites australis). The microbial community colonizing the sediment and litter surfaces were responsible for most nitrogen assimilation and short-term retention in the marsh. The large reactive surface area available for microbial colonization together with direct plant uptake, are the crucial components for nitrogen assimilation, retention and transformation in nutrient-rich tidal freshwater marshes.

  16. Alpine plant community controls on ecosystem N pools under the influence of N deposition using an enriched 15N tracer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, A. C.; Bowman, W. D.

    2016-12-01

    Plant communities are assemblages of species with unique traits, and by comparing different communities we can infer how those traits affect ecosystem processes. In particular, plant feedbacks affecting the N cycle can drive processing of N in numerous pools within an ecosystem, both as individuals and as a part of the larger community. Global nitrogen (N) deposition rates have increased dramatically since the industrial revolution and an understanding of how plant feedbacks may contribute to ecosystem responses is needed. We used an enriched 15N isotope tracer to compare ecosystem N pools associated with plant processing of N among three alpine plant communities (dry, moist, and wet meadows) with diverse characteristics. We applied NH4NO3 as a fertilizer at two treatment levels, ambient deposition (control) and 30 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (fertilized) and collected measurements of enrichment in ecosystem plant and soil N pools following two growing seasons after our application of the isotopic tracer (fall 2014 and fall 2015). We found that the 15N enrichment (‰) of aboveground plant litter declined in all communities between 2014 and 2015, with greater loss of enrichment in fertilized plots in both the dry and wet meadow communities. This decline between years is expected, as litter is decomposed or if plants translocate N into belowground structures, however these results suggest that increased N deposition promotes plant N leakiness for communities with higher species diversity. Despite this trend, aboveground litter from fertilized plots remained more enriched than controls in both the dry and wet meadow communities, perhaps associated with overall greater capacity of those plant individuals to retain N. For control plots, the 15N enrichment of aboveground plant litter was comparable among the dry and moist communities, but the wet meadow was more enriched relative to the moist meadow. Fertilized plots showed a different pattern of enrichment: moist meadow < dry

  17. Determination of 15N isotopic enrichment and concentrations of allantoin and uric acid in urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, X B; Calder, A G; Prasitkusol, P; Kyle, D J; Jayasuriya, M C

    1998-02-01

    A method for the determination of 15N enrichment and concentration of allantoin and uric acid simultaneously in urine using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is described. The urine samples contained [1,3-15N2] uric acid and its oxidation product allantoin. The uric acid and allantoin were isolated using an AG1-X8 (Cl-form) anion-exchange column and heated with a mixture containing 1:1 dimethylformamide and N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). The tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) derivatives of allantoin and uric acid formed were injected into a gas chromatograph interfaced with a mass spectrometer operated under electron impact ionization conditions. Isotope ratio measurements were made from the abundance of the M-57 ions at m/z 398, 399 and 400 for allantoin and at m/z 567 and 569 for uric acid. 15N2 allantoin (99 at.%) was produced from [1,3-15N2] uric acid by treatment with uricase and used as a standard. Quantitation of allantoin and uric acid was based on isotopic dilution by spiking the urine sample with known quantities of 99 at.% [15N] uric acid and allantoin internal standards. The observed isotope ratio measurements from the prepared standards matched the theoretical values. Coefficients of variation in measurements of isotope ratio and concentration were 0.2 and 0.5%, respectively. The method was applied in a study to measure the urinary recovery of [1,3-15N2] uric acid continuously infused for 8-10 h into the blood of four sheep each on two occasions. Within 24 h, 65.9 +/- 9.1% of the tracer was excreted in the urine unchanged. Little was converted into allantoin (approximately 7% of the dose). The total recovery (5 days) of the infused tracer averaged 69.5 +/- 7.6% as uric acid and 76.8 +/- 9.3% as the sum of uric acid and allantoin. Uricase activities in plasma, liver and kidney of sheep were also measured using [1,3-15N2] uric acid as a substrate. Uricase activity was estimated to be 0.6 mU g-1 wet tissue in

  18. Nitrogen assimilation and short term retention in a nutrient-rich tidal freshwater marsh - a whole ecosystem 15N enrichment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribsholt, B.; Struyf, E.; Tramper, A.; de Brabandere, L.; Brion, N.; van Damme, S.; Meire, P.; Dehairs, F.; Middelburg, J. J.; Boschker, H. T. S.

    2007-01-01

    An intact tidal freshwater marsh system (3477 m2) was labelled by adding 15N-ammonium as a tracer to the flood water inundating the ecosystem. The appearance and retention of 15N-label in different marsh components (leaves, roots, sediment, leaf litter and invertebrate fauna) was followed over 15 days. This allowed us to elucidate the direct assimilation and dependence on creek-water nitrogen on a relatively short term and provided an unbiased assessment of the relative importance of the various compartments within the ecosystem. Two separate experiments were conducted, one in spring/early summer (May 2002) when plants were young and building up biomass; the other in late summer (September 2003) when macrophytes were in a flowering or early senescent state. Nitrogen assimilation rate (per hour inundated) was >3 times faster in May compared to September. On both occasions, however, the results clearly revealed that the less conspicuous compartments such as leaf litter and ruderal vegetations are more important in nitrogen uptake and retention than the prominent reed (Phragmites australis) meadows. Moreover, short-term nitrogen retention in these nutrient rich marshes occurs mainly via microbial pathways associated with the litter and sediment. Rather than direct uptake by macrophytes, it is the large reactive surface area provided by the tidal freshwater marsh vegetation that is most crucial for nitrogen transformation, assimilation and short term retention in nutrient rich tidal freshwater marshes. Our results clearly revealed the dominant role of microbes in initial nitrogen retention in marsh ecosystems.

  19. Climate-Dependence of Plant-Soil 15N/14N Interactions Across Tropical Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Sigman, D. M.; Hedin, L. O.

    2005-12-01

    In most areas of the world, the 15N/14N of bulk soils is higher than that of plant leaves, and the isotopic signatures of these two ecosystem N pools progressively diverge with increasing rainfall. However, both the cause for this isotopic trend and its implications for understanding interactions between climate and N cycles are largely unknown. We report 15N/14N measurements of nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N in soil extracts from a highly constrained rainfall sequence in Hawaii, across which this trend in ecosystem 15N/14N is captured, to examine the competing explanations for plant-soil 15N/14N uncouplings. While the isotopic influences of microbial transfers of N between nitrate and ammonium pools and plant-mycorrhizae interactions have been posited in plant-soil 15N/14N relationships, our data did not support an important role for either of these mechanisms. Instead, preferential regeneration of 14N during the breakdown of DON to ammonium explains why the 15N/14N of plants is lower than that of bulk soils. Fractionation at this step leads to two isotopically distinct N subcycles in each forest, a lower-15N/14N subcycle composed of ammonium, nitrate, and bulk plant biomass N that `spins' rapidly and a higher-15N/14N subcycle composed of bulk soil N and DON that is much less dynamic. The increased difference between soil and plant 15N/14N is due to changes in the impacts of nitrification and denitrification on the 15N/14N of ammonium and nitrate, coupled with a switch from nitrate to ammonium uptake by plants under the wettest conditions. For instance, the particularly large (~6 per mil) 15N/14N difference between plants and soils in the wettest sites is due to the lack of 15N-enrichment of ammonium by nitrification coupled with plant dependence on ammonium uptake only. Our results highlight the importance of interactions between DON breakdown, ecosystem N recycling, and gaseous N losses in the explaining the interactions between the 15N signatures of

  20. Extreme 15N-enrichments in 2.72-Gyr-old sediments: evidence for a turning point in the nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Thomazo, C; Ader, M; Philippot, P

    2011-03-01

    Although nitrogen is a key element in organic molecules such as nucleic acids and proteins, the timing of the emergence of its modern biogeochemical cycle is poorly known. Recent studies on the antiquity of the nitrogen cycle and its interaction with free oxygen suggests the establishment of a complete aerobic N biogeochemical cycle with nitrification, denitrification, and nitrogen fixation at about 2.68 Gyr. Here, we report new bulk nitrogen isotope data for the 2.72 billion-year-old sedimentary succession of the Tumbiana Formation (Pilbara Craton, Western Australia). The nitrogen isotopic compositions vary widely from +8.6‰ up to +50.4‰ and are inversely correlated with the very low δ(13)C values of associated organic matter defining the Fortescue excursion (down to about -56‰). We propose that this (15)N-enrichment records the onset of nitrification coupled to the continuous removal of its derivatives (nitrite and nitrate) by denitrification. This finding implies an increase in the availability of electron acceptors and probably oxygen in the Tumbiana depositional environment, 300 million years before the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere.

  1. Denitrification, Dissimilatory Reduction of Nitrate to Ammonium, and Nitrification in a Bioturbated Estuarine Sediment as Measured with 15N and Microsensor Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Binnerup, Svend Jørgen; Jensen, Kim; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Jensen, Mikael Hjorth; Sørensen, Jan

    1992-01-01

    Nitrogen and oxygen transformations were studied in a bioturbated (reworked by animals) estuarine sediment (Norsminde Fjord, Denmark) by using a combination of 15N isotope (NO3-), specific inhibitor (C2H2), and microsensor (N2O and O2) techniques in a continuous-flow core system. The estuarine water was NO3- rich (125 to 600 μM), and NO3- was consistently taken up by the sediment on the four occasions studied. Total NO3- uptake (3.6 to 34.0 mmol of N m-2 day-1) corresponded closely to N2 production (denitrification) during the experimental steady state, which indicated that dissimilatory, as well as assimilatory, NO3- reduction to NH4+ was insignificant. When C2H2 was applied in the flow system, denitrification measured as N2O production was often less (58 to 100%) than the NO3- uptake because of incomplete inhibition of N2O reduction. The NO3- formed by nitrification and not immediately denitrified but released to the overlying water, uncoupled nitrification, was calculated both from 15NO3- dilution and from changes in NO3- uptake before and after C2H2 addition. These two approaches gave similar results, with rates ranging between 0 and 8.1 mmol of N m-2 day-1 on the four occasions. Attempts to measure total nitrification activity by the difference between NH4+ fluxes before and after C2H2 addition failed because of non-steady-state NH4+ fluxes. The vertical distribution of denitrification and oxygen consumption was studied by use of N2O and O2 microelectrodes. The N2O profiles measured during the experimental steady state were often irregularly shaped, and the buildup of N2O after C2H2 was added was much too fast to be described by a simple diffusion model. Only bioturbation by a dense population of infauna could explain these observations. This was corroborated by the relationship between diffusive and total fluxes, which showed that only 19 to 36 and 29 to 62% of the total O2 uptake and denitrification, respectively, were due to diffusion-reaction processes at

  2. Recombinant production of the p10CKS1At protein from Arabidopsis thaliana and 13C and 15N double-isotopic enrichment for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Landrieu, I; Casteels, P; Odaert, B; De Veylder, L; Portetelle, D; Lippens, G; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1999-06-01

    The CKS1At gene product, p10CKS1At from Arabidopsis thaliana, is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase subunit (CKS) family of small proteins. These proteins bind the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)/cyclin complexes and play an essential, but still not precisely known role in cell cycle progression. To solve the structure of p10CKS1At, a protocol was needed to produce the quantity of protein large enough for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The first attempt to express CKS1At in Escherichia coli under the control of the T7 promoter was not successful. E. coli BL21(DE3) cotransformed with the CKS1At gene and the E. coli argU gene that encoded the arginine acceptor tRNAUCU produced a sufficient amount of p10CKS1At to start the structural study by NMR. Replacement of four rare codons in the CKS1At gene sequence, including a tandem arginine, by highly used codons in E. coli, restored also a high expression of the recombinant protein. Double-isotopic enrichment by 13C and 15N is reported that will facilitate the NMR study. Isotopically labeled p10CKS1At was purified to yield as much as 55 mg from 1 liter of minimal media by a two-step chromatographic procedure. Preliminary results of NMR spectroscopy demonstrate that a full structural analysis using triple-resonance spectra is feasible for the labeled p10CKS1At protein. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Nutrient Status and δ15N Values in Leaves and Soils: A Cross-Biome Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, J. R.; Schuur, E. A.; Turner, B. L.; Wright, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Stable nitrogen (N) isotope ratios (δ15N) are often assumed to provide an integrated measure of multiple nitrogen cycling processes. For instance, shifts in the bioavailability of soil N forms are thought to alter plant δ15N values. Demonstrating this relationship is important as ecosystems undergo anthropogenic disturbances. We evaluated patterns and implied mechanisms of the N cycle using ecosystem δ15N values from 16 plots in boreal black spruce (Picea mariana) forest and lowland wet tropical forest. Fertilizer N and phosphorus (P) was applied annually for five and 11 years prior to measurement of ecosystem δ15N values. Full sun canopy foliage and soil extractable nitrate, ammonium, and dissolved organic N (DON) were sampled in fertilized and control plots and analyzed for δ15N. In boreal forest, N fertilization reduced DON concentrations and caused a depletion of δ15N in foliage and fungal sporocarps. Of four species occurring in all plots in the tropical forest, one (Alseis blackiana) had increased foliar δ15N values following N fertilization, one (Tetragastris panamensis) had increased foliar δ15N values following P fertilization, and one (Oenocarpus mapora) had increased foliar δ15N following N+P fertilization. Surprisingly, soil nitrate in the boreal forest became substantially 15N-enriched under P fertilization, whereas nitrate in the tropical forest soil was enriched only under N or N+P fertilization. Collectively, nitrate enrichment is likely due to enhanced rates of soil denitrification as evidenced by elevated resin extractable soil nitrate concentrations and close correlations between δ15N and δ18O values. On average, foliar δ15N in tropical trees corresponded well with δ15N in soil nitrate in control and P fertilized plots, but was 2-3% more enriched than DON under N and N+P fertilization. In boreal forests, N and N+P fertilization increased foliar N concentration and δ15N values indicating substantial use of applied fertilizer. Taken

  4. Nitrogen source effects on the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation culture and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria enrichment process.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-05-01

    The co-culture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) has a potential application in wastewater treatment plant. This study explored the effects of permutation and combination of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium on the culture enrichment from freshwater sediments. The co-existence of NO3(-), NO2(-), and NH4(+) shortened the enrichment time from 75 to 30 days and achieved a total nitrogen removal rate of 106.5 mg/L/day on day 132. Even though ammonium addition led to Anammox bacteria increase and a higher nitrogen removal rate, DAMO bacteria still dominated in different reactors with the highest proportion of 64.7% and the maximum abundance was 3.07 ± 0.25 × 10(8) copies/L (increased by five orders of magnitude) in the nitrite reactor. DAMO bacteria showed greater diversity in the nitrate reactor, and one was similar to M. oxyfera; DAMO bacteria in the nitrite reactor were relatively unified and similar to M. sinica. Interestingly, no DAMO archaea were found in the nitrate reactor. This study will improve the understanding of the impact of nitrogen source on DAMO and Anammox co-culture enrichment.

  5. Isotopically enriched ammonium shows high nitrogen transformation in the pile top zone of dairy manure compost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Koki; Toyoda, Sakae; Yano, Midori; Hattori, Shohei; Fukasawa, Makoto; Nakajima, Keiichi; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) of NH4+ in dairy manure compost piles with and without bulking agent (10 % w/w) were compared to understand the effects of the use of bulking agent on nitrogen conversion during manure composting. The δ15N-NH4+ values in each of three pile zones (top, side and core) were also compared. At the end of the process, piles with bulking agent showed significantly higher δ15N values (17.7 ± 1.3 ‰) than piles without bulking agent (11.8 ± 0.9 ‰), reflecting the significantly higher nitrogen conversion and NH3 loss in the former. The samples from the top zone, especially in the piles with bulking agent, showed very high NH4+ concentrations with significantly high 15N15N: 12.7-29.8 ‰) values, indicating that extremely high nitrogen conversion, nitrification-denitrification activity of the microbes and NH3 volatilization occurred in this zone.

  6. Enrichment of (15)N/(14)N in wastewater-derived effluent varies with operational performance of treatment systems: implications for isotope monitoring in receiving environments.

    PubMed

    Munksgaard, Niels C; Warnakulasooriya, Kanchana N; Kennedy, Karen; Powell, Lynne; Gibb, Karen S

    2017-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotope ratios are routinely used to trace the dispersion and assimilation of wastewater-derived N in receiving environments, but few isotope studies have investigated wastewater treatment plants and ponds themselves. An improved understanding of N isotope compositions in effluent will help assess treatment plant processes and performance and will help trace sources of excess nutrients in receiving environments. Here, we assess N budgets and treatment processes in seven wastewater treatment plants and wastewater stabilisation ponds in northern Australia based on concentrations and isotope ratios of N in effluent. We show that δ(15)N values in effluent are linked to treatment type, effectiveness of conversion of ammonia and levels of gaseous N emissions. These relationships suggest that N isotope monitoring of wastewater treatment plants and ponds can provide an integrated assessment of treatment performance and gaseous N emissions on a pond- or plant-wide scale that is not readily available through other methods. Our findings further imply that monitoring N isotope ratios in receiving environments cannot be assumed to be universally effective as their sensitivity to uptake of wastewater-derived N will vary with the characteristics of individual treatment systems. Paradoxically, N isotope monitoring is less effective where treatment systems are functioning poorly and where monitoring needs are the greatest.

  7. Enrichment and characterization of an anammox bacterium from a rotating biological contactor treating ammonium-rich leachate.

    PubMed

    Egli, K; Fanger, U; Alvarez, P J; Siegrist, H; van der Meer, J R; Zehnder, A J

    2001-03-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation with nitrite to N2 (anammox) is a recently discovered microbial reaction with interesting potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater. We enriched an anammox culture from a rotating disk contactor (near Kölliken, Switzerland) that was used to treat ammonium-rich leachate with low organic carbon content. This enrichment led to a relative population size of 88% anammox bacteria. The microorganism carrying out the anammox reaction was identified by analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S-rRNA-targeting probes. The percentage sequence identity between the 16S rDNA sequences of the Kölliken anammox organism and the archetype anammox strain Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans was 90.9%, but between 98.5 and 98.9% with Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, an organism identified in biofilms by molecular methods. The Kölliken culture catalyzed the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium with nitrite in a manner seemingly identical to that of Candidatus B. anammoxidans, but exhibited higher tolerance to phosphate (up to 20 mM) and to nitrite (up to 13 mM) and was active at lower cell densities. Anammox activity was observed only between pH 6.5 and 9, with an optimum at pH 8 and a temperature optimum at 37 degrees C. Hydroxylamine and hydrazine, which are intermediates of the anammox reaction of Candidatus B. anammoxidans, were utilized by the Kölliken organisms, and approximately 15% of the nitrite utilized during autotrophic growth was converted to nitrate. Electron microscopy showed a protein-rich region in the center of the cells surrounded by a doughnut-shaped region containing ribosomes and DNA. This doughnut-shape region was observed with FISH as having a higher fluorescence intensity. Similar to Candidatus B. anammoxidans, the Kölliken anammox organism typically formed homogenous clusters containing up to several hundred cells within an extracellular matrix.

  8. Biochar alleviates combined stress of ammonium and acids by firstly enriching Methanosaeta and then Methanosarcina.

    PubMed

    Lü, Fan; Luo, Chenghao; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2016-03-01

    This investigation evaluated the effectiveness of biochar of different particle sizes in alleviating ammonium (NH4(+)) inhibition (up to 7 g-N/L) during anaerobic digestion of 6 g/L glucose. Compared to the control treatment without biochar addition, treatments that included biochar particles 2-5 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 75-150 μm in size reduced the methanization lag phase by 23.9%, 23.8% and 5.9%, respectively, and increased the maximum methane production rate by 47.1%, 23.5% and 44.1%, respectively. These results confirmed that biochar accelerated the initiation of methanization during anaerobic digestion under double inhibition risk from both ammonium and acids. Furthermore, fine biochar significantly promoted the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Comparative analysis on the archaeal and bacterial diversity at the early and later stages of digestion, and in the suspended, biochar loosely bound, and biochar tightly bound fractions suggested that, in suspended fractions, hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium was actively resistant to ammonium. However, acetoclastic Methanosaeta can survive at VFAs concentrations up to 60-80 mmol-C/L by improved affinity to conductive biochar, resulting in the accelerated initiation of acetate degradation. Improved methanogenesis was followed by the colonization of the biochar tightly bound fractions by Methanosarcina. The selection of appropriate biochar particles sizes was important in facilitating the initial colonization of microbial cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitrification-driven forms of nitrogen metabolism in microbial mat communities thriving along an ammonium-enriched subsurface geothermal stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Manabu; Koba, Keisuke; Makabe, Akiko; Yoshida, Naohiro; Kaneko, Masanori; Hirao, Shingo; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Shibuya, Takazo; Kikuchi, Tohru; Hirai, Miho; Miyazaki, Junichi; Nunoura, Takuro; Takai, Ken

    2013-07-01

    ) was nearly constant (250 μM) throughout the stream. Based on the level of detectable dissolved molecular oxygen (O2) of the stream water (⩾38 μM) along with metabolic measurements, it was predicted that nitrification by thermophilic AOA and NOB components in the microbial mats that were exposed to the stream water would constrain the concentrations and isotopic ratios of ΣNH3, NO2- and NO3- of the stream water. The δ15N value of ΣNH3 increased from 0‰ to 7‰ with decreasing concentration, which was consistent with the previously reported isotopic fractionation for microbial ΣNH3 oxidation. In contrast, the δ15N value of NO2- was 22‰ lighter than that of NO3- in the steam water at the same site, indicating an inverse isotopic fractionation for microbial NO2- oxidation. The variation in concentrations and δ15N values of ΣNH3, NO2- and NO3- was largely explained using a two-step nitrification model, and the apparent nitrogen isotopic fractionations of ΣNH3 oxidation and NO2- oxidation were estimated to be 0.986 and 1.020, respectively. In the interstitial water within the microbial mats, the compositional and isotopic properties of TIN at the downstream site indicated potential denitrification by the anaerobic microbial components. The geochemically deduced transition of microbial nitrogen metabolism was substantiated through cultivation-independent microbiological analyses.

  10. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant.

    PubMed

    Fenilli, Tatiele A B; Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O S; Trivelin, Paulo C O; Dourado-Neto, Durval

    2007-12-01

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry.

  11. Ammonium and phosphate enrichment across the dry-wet transition and their ecological relevance in a subtropical reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qiongli; Chen, Nengwang; Zhou, Xingpeng; Chen, Jixin; Duan, Shuiwang

    2016-07-13

    Small river reservoirs are widespread and can be ecologically sensitive across the dry-wet transition under monsoon climate with respect to nutrient loading and phenology. Monthly sampling and high-frequency in situ measurements were conducted for a river reservoir (southeast China) in 2013-2014 to examine the seasonal pattern of nutrients and phytoplankton. We found that nutrient concentrations were runoff-mediated and determined by watershed inputs and, in some cases, by internal cycling depending on hydrology and temperature. Ammonium and phosphate were relatively enriched in February-March (a transitional period from dry/cold to wet/hot climate), which can be ascribed to initial flushing runoff from human/animal waste and spring fertilizer use. A phytoplankton bloom (mainly Chlorophyta) occurred during April after a surge of water temperature, probably due to the higher availability of inorganic nutrients and sunlight and suitable hydraulic residence time (medium flow) in the transitional period. The concentration of phytoplankton was low during May-June (wet-hot climate) when the concentrations of total suspended matter (TSM) were highest, likely owing to the "shading" effect of TSM and turbulence of high flow conditions. Nutrient-algae shifts across the dry-wet season and vertical profiles suggested that algal blooms seem to be fueled primarily by phosphate and ammonium rather than nitrate. Current findings of a strong temporal pattern and the relationship between physical parameters, nutrient and biota would improve our understanding of drivers of change in water quality and ecosystem functions with dam construction.

  12. Purple mixed-valence Cu{sub A} center in nitrous-oxide reductase: EPR of the copper-63-, copper-65-, and both copper-65- and [{sup 15}N] histidine-enriched enzyme and a molecular orbital interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Neese, F.; Kroneck, P.M.H.; Zumft, W.G.; Antholine, W.E.

    1996-09-11

    EPR spectra for the purple mixed-valence [Cu{sup 1.5+}...Cu{sup 1.5+}], S = 1/2, site (Cu{sub A}) in nitrous-oxide reductase (N{sub 2}OR) were obtained after insertion of either {sup 63}Cu or {sup 65}Cu or both {sup 65}Cu and [{sup 15}N]histidine. The spectrum of {sup 65}Cu- and [{sup 15}N]histidine-enriched N{sub 2}OR improved the resolution of the Cu hyperfine lines, but no lines from nitrogen and proton couplings were resolved. The Cu hyperfine parameters obtained by a theory analogous to that of Maki and McGarvey were indicative of a highly covalent Cu site. The total Cu character (Cu{sub A1} + Cu{sub A2}) in the ground state wave function required to describe the spin density distribution was 31-37% compared to 41% for type-1 Cu in plastocyanin. This value does not completely account for the reduction of g{sub max} from 2.23 of type-1 Cu in plastocyanin to 2.18 of Cu{sub A}. Remaining discrepancies were discussed in terms of different alignments of the principal axes for the hypothetical monomeric Cu{sup A1} and Cu{sub A2} in [Cu{sup 1.5+}...Cu{sup 1.5+}]. This effect appeared in the simulations of the EPR spectra as a noncoincidence between the Cu hyperfine and g principal axis systems. The g-value analysis of Cu{sub A} predicts an electric dipole forbidden absorption band in the near-infrared region. Based on X-ray structural data of Cu{sub A} in cytochrome c oxidase, iterative extended Hueckel and UHF-INDO/S calculations on a sulfur-bridged [(NH{sub 3})Cu{sup 1.5+}(SCH{sub 3}){sub 2}Cu{sup 1.5+}(NH{sub 3})]{sup +} core were used to interpret the EPR results. 76 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. The response of nitrifying microbial assemblages to ammonium (NH4+) enrichment from salmon farm activities in a northern Chilean Fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo-Patrone, Claudia; Hernández, Klaudia; Yannicelli, Beatriz; Olsen, Lasse Mork; Molina, Verónica

    2015-12-01

    The consequences of aquaculture include alterations in nitrogen cycling in aquatic environments that may lead to ecosystem degradation. Herein salmon aquaculture release of ammonium (NH4+) to the water column and its effects on natural archaea and bacteria ammonia-oxidizers (AOA and AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) community structure were studied in the Comau fjord using molecular approaches, such as: cloning (AOA and AOB richness), qPCR for C. Nitrosopumilus maritimus (AOA) and Nitrospina sp. (NOB) abundance (DNA) and RT-qPCR only for Nitrospina sp activity (RNA). Sampling was carried out in brackish (0.7-25 salinity, <5 m depth) and marine (>30 salinity, 25 m depth) waters during contrasting salmon production periods: rest (winter 2012), growth and harvest (summer and winter 2013). During the rest period, the highest NH4+ concentration was observed at Vodudahue River, whereas during productive periods NH4+ accumulated in the brackish layer inside salmon cages and in the vicinty (up to 700 m distance from the cages). The nitrifier community from the fjord reference station (Stn-C) was characterized by C. N. maritimus (AOA) and Nitrosomonas sp. (AOB) sequences affiliated with cosmopolitan ecotypes (e.g., marine, freshwater, hydrothermal), maxima abundances of C. N. maritimus (AOA) and Nitrospina sp. and extreme ranges of Nitrospina sp. activity occurred in the brackish layer. During productive periods, abundances of C. N. maritimus were co-varied with NH4+ concentrations inside salmon cages (summer) and the adjacent areas (winter). Productive periods were characterized by lower abundances but more homogeneity between brackish and marine areas than for the Stn-C nitrifiers. The physiological state of Nitrospina sp. estimated from cDNA:DNA ratios indicated higher growth during winter 2013 associated with NH4+ enrichment derived from production and river input. Our results suggest that in Comau Fjord, NH4+ enrichment events occur during salmon production and

  14. Nitrogen source tracking with delta(15)N content of coastal wetland plants in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Bruland, Gregory L; MacKenzie, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Inter- and intra-site comparisons of the nitrogen (N) stable isotope composition of wetland plant species have been used to identify sources of N in coastal areas. In this study, we compared delta(15)N values from different herbaceous wetland plants across 34 different coastal wetlands from the five main Hawaiian Islands and investigated relationships of delta(15)N with land use, human population density, and surface water quality parameters (i.e., nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N). The highest delta(15)N values were observed in plants from wetlands on the islands of Oahu (8.7-14.6 per thousand) and Maui (8.9-9.2 per thousand), whereas plants from wetlands on the islands of Kauai, Hawaii, and Molokai had delta(15)N values usually <4 per thousand. The enrichment in delta(15)N values in plant tissues from wetlands on Oahu and Maui was most likely a result of the more developed and densely populated watersheds on these two islands. Urban development within a 1000-m radius and population density were positively correlated to average delta(15)N vegetation values from each wetland site (r = 0.56 and 0.51, respectively; p < 0.001). This suggested that site mean delta(15)N values from mixed stands of wetland plants have potential as indices of N sources in coastal lowland wetlands in Hawaii and that certain sites on Oahu and Maui have experienced significant anthropogenic N loading. This information can be used to monitor future changes in N inputs to coastal wetlands throughout Hawaii and the Pacific.

  15. Nitrogen turnover of three different agricultural soils determined by 15N triple labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Sebastian R.; Kleineidam, Kristina; Strasilla, Nicol; Schlüter, Steffen; Reent Köster, Jan; Well, Reinhard; Müller, Christoph; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    To meet the demand for data to improve existing N turnover models and to evaluate the effect of different soil physical properties on gross nitrogen (N) transformation rates, we investigated two arable soils and a grassland soil after addition of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), where either ammonium (NH4+), or nitrate (NO3-), or both pools have been labelled with 15N at 60 atom% excess (triple 15N tracing method). Besides NH4+, NO3- and nitrite (NO2-) contents with their respective 15N enrichment, nitrous oxide (N2O) and dinitrogen (N2) fluxes have been determined. Each soil was adjusted to 60 % of maximum water holding capacity and pre-incubated at 20˚ C for two weeks. After application of the differently labelled N fertilizer, the soils were further incubated at 20˚ C under aerobic conditions in a He-N2-O2 atmosphere (21 % O2, 76 He, 2% N2) to increase the sensitivity of N2 rates via the 15N gas flux method. Over a 2 week period soil N pools were quantified by 2 M KCl extraction (adjusted to pH 7 to prevent nitrite losses) (Stevens and Laughlin, 1995) and N gas fluxes were measured by gas chromatography in combination with IRMS. Here, we present the pool sizes and fluxes as well as the 15N enrichments during the study. Results are discussed in light of the soil differences that were responsible for the difference in gross N dynamics quantified by the 15N tracing model Ntrace (Müller et al., 2007). References Müller, C., T. Rütting, J. Kattge, R.J. Laughlin, and R.J. Stevens, (2007) Estimation of parameters in complex 15N tracing models by Monte Carlo sampling. Soil Biology & Biochemistry. 39(3): p. 715-726. Stevens, R.J. and R.J. Laughlin, (1995) Nitrite transformations during soil extraction with potassium chloride. Soil Science Society of America Journal. 59(3): p. 933-938.

  16. Active autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in biofilm enrichments from simulated creek ecosystems at two ammonium concentrations respond to temperature manipulation.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, Sharon; Jia, Zhongjun; Neufeld, Josh D; Murrell, J Colin; Conrad, Ralf; Küsel, Kirsten

    2011-10-01

    The first step of nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, is important for reducing eutrophication in freshwater environments when coupled with anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) or denitrification. We analyzed active formerly biofilm-associated aerobic ammonia-oxidizing communities originating from Ammerbach (AS) and Leutra South (LS) stream water (683 ± 550 [mean ± standard deviation] and 16 ± 7 μM NH(4)(+), respectively) that were developed in a flow-channel experiment and incubated under three temperature regimens. By stable-isotope probing using (13)CO(2), we found that members of the Bacteria and not Archaea were the functionally dominant autotrophic ammonia oxidizers at all temperatures under relatively high ammonium loads. The copy numbers of bacterial amoA genes in (13)C-labeled DNA were lower at 30°C than at 13°C in both stream enrichment cultures. However, the community composition of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the (13)C-labeled DNA responded differently to temperature manipulation at two ammonium concentrations. In LS enrichments incubated at the in situ temperature (13°C), Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like sequences were retrieved with sequences from Nitrosospira AmoA cluster 4, while the proportion of Nitrosospira sequences increased at higher temperatures. In AS enrichments incubated at 13°C and 20°C, AmoA cluster 4 sequences were dominant; Nitrosomonas nitrosa-like sequences dominated at 30°C. Biofilm-associated AOB communities were affected differentially by temperature at two relatively high ammonium concentrations, implicating them in a potential role in governing contaminated freshwater AOB distributions.

  17. Active Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Biofilm Enrichments from Simulated Creek Ecosystems at Two Ammonium Concentrations Respond to Temperature Manipulation▿†

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Sharon; Jia, Zhongjun; Neufeld, Josh D.; Murrell, J. Colin; Conrad, Ralf; Küsel, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    The first step of nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, is important for reducing eutrophication in freshwater environments when coupled with anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) or denitrification. We analyzed active formerly biofilm-associated aerobic ammonia-oxidizing communities originating from Ammerbach (AS) and Leutra South (LS) stream water (683 ± 550 [mean ± standard deviation] and 16 ± 7 μM NH4+, respectively) that were developed in a flow-channel experiment and incubated under three temperature regimens. By stable-isotope probing using 13CO2, we found that members of the Bacteria and not Archaea were the functionally dominant autotrophic ammonia oxidizers at all temperatures under relatively high ammonium loads. The copy numbers of bacterial amoA genes in 13C-labeled DNA were lower at 30°C than at 13°C in both stream enrichment cultures. However, the community composition of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the 13C-labeled DNA responded differently to temperature manipulation at two ammonium concentrations. In LS enrichments incubated at the in situ temperature (13°C), Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like sequences were retrieved with sequences from Nitrosospira AmoA cluster 4, while the proportion of Nitrosospira sequences increased at higher temperatures. In AS enrichments incubated at 13°C and 20°C, AmoA cluster 4 sequences were dominant; Nitrosomonas nitrosa-like sequences dominated at 30°C. Biofilm-associated AOB communities were affected differentially by temperature at two relatively high ammonium concentrations, implicating them in a potential role in governing contaminated freshwater AOB distributions. PMID:21890674

  18. Characterization of incubation experiments and development of an enrichment culture capable of ammonium oxidation under iron-reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Jaffé, P. R.

    2015-02-01

    Incubation experiments were conducted using soil samples from a forested riparian wetland where we have previously observed anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron reduction. Production of both nitrite and ferrous iron was measured repeatedly during incubations when the soil slurry was supplied with either ferrihydrite or goethite and ammonium chloride. Significant changes in the microbial community were observed after 180 days of incubation as well as in a continuous flow membrane reactor, using 16S rRNA gene PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 454 pyrosequencing, and real-time quantitative PCR analysis. We be Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6), belonging to the Acidimicrobiaceae family, whose closest cultivated relative is Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum (with 92% identity) and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (with 90% identity), might play a key role in this anaerobic biological process that uses ferric iron as an electron acceptor while oxidizing ammonium to nitrite. After ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, nitrogen loss proceeded via denitrification and/or anammox.

  19. Effect of protein restriction on (15)N transfer from dietary [(15)N]alanine and [(15)N]Spirulina platensis into urea.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, M J; Hoffer, L J

    2001-08-01

    Six normal men consumed a mixed test meal while adapted to high (1.5 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) and low (0.3 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) protein intakes. They completed this protocol twice: when the test meals included 3 mg/kg of [(15)N]alanine ([(15)N]Ala) and when they included 30 mg/kg of intrinsically labeled [(15)N]Spirulina platensis ([(15)N]SPI). Six subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) receiving conventional insulin therapy consumed the test meal with added [(15)N]Ala while adapted to their customary high-protein diet. Protein restriction increased serum alanine, glycine, glutamine, and methionine concentrations and reduced those of leucine. Whether the previous diet was high or low in protein, there was a similar increase in serum alanine, methionine, and branched-chain amino acid concentrations after the test meal and a similar pattern of (15)N enrichment in serum amino acids for a given tracer. When [(15)N]Ala was included in the test meal, (15)N appeared rapidly in serum alanine and glutamine, to a minor degree in leucine and isoleucine, and not at all in other circulating amino acids. With [(15)N]SPI, there was a slow appearance of the label in all serum amino acids analyzed. Despite the different serum amino acid labeling, protein restriction reduced the postmeal transfer of dietary (15)N in [(15)N]Ala or [(15)N]SPI into [(15)N]urea by similar amounts (38 and 43%, respectively, not significant). The response of the subjects with IDDM was similar to that of the normal subjects. Information about adaptive reductions in dietary amino acid catabolism obtained by adding [(15)N]Ala to a test meal appears to be equivalent to that obtained using an intrinsically labeled protein tracer.

  20. Characterization of incubation experiments and development of an enrichment culture capable of ammonium oxidation under iron reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Jaffé, P. R.

    2014-08-01

    Incubation experiments were conducted using soil samples from a forested riparian wetland where we have previously observed anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron reduction. Production of both nitrite and ferrous iron were measured repeatedly during incubations when the soil slurry was supplied with either ferrihydrite or goethite and ammonium chloride. Significant changes in the microbial community were observed after 180 days of incubation as well as in a continuous flow membrane reactor, using 16S rRNA gene PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 454-pyrosequencing, and real-time quantitative PCR analysis. We believe that one of the dominant microbial species in our system (an uncultured Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6), belonging to the Acidimicrobiaceae family, whose closest cultivated relative is Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum (with 92% identity) and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (with 90% identity), might play a key role in this anaerobic biological process that uses ferric iron as an electron acceptor while oxidizing ammonium to nitrite. After ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, nitrogen loss proceeded via denitrification and/or anammox.

  1. Nitrogen input 15N signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances in subtropical forests in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Fang, Yunting; Mao, Qinggong; Hao, Chen; Mo, Jiangming

    2017-05-01

    Natural abundance of 15N15N) in plants and soils can provide time-integrated information related to nitrogen (N) cycling within ecosystems, but it has not been well tested in warm and humid subtropical forests. In this study, we used ecosystem δ15N to assess effects of increased N deposition on N cycling in an old-growth broad-leaved forest and a secondary pine forest in a high-N-deposition area in southern China. We measured δ15N of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and we measured N concentration (%N) and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient deposition and after decadal N addition at 50 kg N ha-1yr-1, which has a δ15N of -0.7 ‰. Our results showed that the total inorganic N in deposition was 15N-depleted (-10 ‰) mainly due to high input of strongly 15N-depleted NH4+-N. Plant leaves in both forests were also 15N-depleted (-4 to -6 ‰). The broad-leaved forest had higher plant and soil %N and was more 15N-enriched in most ecosystem compartments relative to the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect %N in the broad-leaved forest, indicating that the ecosystem pools are already N-rich. However, %N was marginally increased in pine leaves and significantly increased in understory vegetation in the pine forest. Soil δ15N was not changed significantly by the N addition in either forest. However, the N addition significantly increased the δ15N of plants toward the 15N signature of the added N, indicating incorporation of added N into plants. Thus, plant δ15N was more sensitive to ecosystem N input manipulation than %N in these subtropical forests. We interpret the depleted δ15N of plants as an imprint from the high and 15N-depleted N deposition that may dominate the effects of fractionation that are observed in most warm and humid forests. Fractionation during the steps of N cycling could explain the difference between negative δ15N in plants and positive δ15N in soils, and the increase

  2. 15N and 13C abundances in the Antartic Ocean with emphasis on the biogeochemical structure of the food web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Eitaro; Terazaki, Makoto; Kabaya, Yuko; Nemoto, Takahisa

    1987-06-01

    Distributions of δ 15N and δ 13C for biogenic substances in the Antarctic Ocean were investigated to construct a biogeochemical framework for assessing the Antarctic ecosystem. Phytoplankton exhibited particularly low δ 15N (0.5%) and 13C (-26.9%) values in pelagic plankton samples. High nitrate concentrations, and high PCO 2 in the surface waters on the southern side of the polar front and the resulting slow growth rate of phytoplankton under low light intensity are suggested as possible factors in causing the low isotopic compositions. Mean fractionation factors of 1.029 and 1.006 were estimated for photosynthetic carbon fixation and for the assimilation of inorganic nitrogeneous compounds (ammonium plus nitrate) during algal growth, respectively. Enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level was confirmed for Antarctic ecosystems: δ15N animal% = 3.3 (trophic level -1) + δ5N algae, whereas 13C content did not increase in the same manner. Differences in lipid content among animals may be the main factor in causing this δ 13C anomaly. 15N and 13C abundance of sedimentary organic nitrogen differed from phytoplankton and settling particles. An exact mechanism for explaining the high δ 15N (around 5%) is not known. The very high δ 13C value of -20.5% at Sta. 3B may originate in ice algae that had grown under CO 2-limited conditions. Particles collected by sediment traps gave characteristically low δ 15N values (-3.0 to 0.9%), strongly suggesting a phytoplankton origin. The δ 15N and δ 13C values of settling material showed similar vertical profiles with depth which might arise from temporal variation of algal growth.

  3. Comparison of nitrogen removal rates and nitrous oxide production from enriched anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria in suspended and attached growth reactors.

    PubMed

    Panwivia, Supaporn; Sirvithayapakorn, Sanya; Wantawin, Chalermraj; Noophan, Pongsak Lek; Munakata-Marr, Junko

    2014-01-01

    Attached growth-systems for the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process have been postulated for implementation in the field. However, information about the anammox process in attached growth-systems is limited. This study compared nitrogen removal rates and nitrous oxide (N2O) production of enriched anammox cultures in both suspended and attached growth sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Suspended growth reactors (SBR-S) and attached growth reactors using polystyrene sponge as a medium (SBR-A) were used in these experiments. After inoculation with an enriched anammox culture, significant nitrogen removals of ammonium (NH4 (+)) and nitrite (NO2 (-)) were observed under NH4 (+):NO2 (-) ratios ranging from 1:1 to 1:2 in both types of SBRs. The specific rates of total nitrogen removal in SBR-S and SBR-A were 0.52 mg N/mg VSS-d and 0.44 mg N/mg VSS-d, respectively, at an NH4 (+):NO2 (-) ratio of 1:2. N2O production by the enriched anammox culture in both SBR-S and SBR-A was significantly higher at NH4 (+):NO2 (-) ratio of 1:2 than at NH4 (+):NO2 (-) ratios of 1:1 and 1:1.32. In addition, N2O production was higher at a pH of 6.8 than at pH 7.3, 7.8, and 8.3 in both SBR-S and SBR-A. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the anammox process may avoid N2O emission by maintaining an NH4 (+):NO2 (-) ratio of less than 1:2 and pH higher than 6.8.

  4. Use of a 15N tracer to determine linkages between a mangrove and an upland freshwater swamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, R. A.; Cormier, N.

    2005-05-01

    Mangrove forests and adjacent upland freshwater swamps are important components of subsistence-based economies of Pacific islands. Mangroves provide valuable firewood (Rhizophora apiculata) and mangrove crabs (Scylla serrata); intact freshwater swamps are often used for agroforestry (e.g., taro cultivation). While these two systems are connected hydrologically via groundwater and surface flows, little information is available on how they may be biogeochemically or ecologically linked. For example, mangrove leaf litter was once thought to be an important food source for resident and transient nekton and invertebrates, but this value may have been overestimated. Instead, nutrients or allochthonous material (e.g., phytoplankton, detritus) delivered via groundwater or surface water from upland freshwater swamps may play a larger role in mangrove food webs. Understanding the linkages between these two ecologically and culturally important ecosystems will help us to understand the potential impacts of hydrological alterations that occur when roads or bridges are constructed through them. We conducted a 15N tracer study in the Yela watershed on the island of Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia. K15NO3 was continually added at trace levels for 4 weeks to the Yela River in an upland freshwater swamp adjacent to a mangrove forest. Nitrate and ammonium pools, major primary producers, macroinvertebrates, and fish were sampled from stations 5 m upstream (freshwater swamp) and 138, 188, 213, and 313 m downstream (mangrove) from the tracer addition. Samples were collected once a week prior to, during, and after the 15N addition for a total of 6 weeks. Preliminary results revealed no significant enrichment (< 1 ‰) in the 15N isotope composition of either resident shrimp (Macrobrachium sp.) or mudskipper fish (Periophthalmus sp.). However, the 15N signature of ammonium pools was enriched 10-60 ‰ by the end of the third week. These results suggest that the tracer was present

  5. Nitrogen isotope fractionation during archaeal ammonia oxidation: Coupled estimates from isotopic measurements of ammonium and nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooshammer, Maria; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Bayer, Barbara; Jochum, Lara; Melcher, Michael; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial environments and knowledge about the nitrogen (N) isotope effect associated with their ammonia oxidation activity will allow a better understanding of natural abundance isotope ratios, and therefore N transformation processes, in the environment. Here we examine the kinetic isotope effect for ammonia oxidation in a pure soil AOA culture (Ca. Nitrososphaera viennensis) and a marine AOA enrichment culture. We estimated the isotope effect from both isotopic signatures of ammonium and nitrite over the course of ammonia oxidation. Estimates of the isotope effect based on the change in the isotopic signature of ammonium give valuable insight, because these estimates are not subject to the same concerns (e.g., accumulation of an intermediate) as estimates based on isotopic measurements of nitrite. Our results show that both the pure soil AOA culture and a marine AOA enrichment culture have similar but substantial isotope effect during ammonia consumption (31-34 per mill; based on ammonium) and nitrite production (43-45 per mill; based on nitrite). The 15N fractionation factors of both cultures tested fell in the upper range of the reported isotope effects for archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation (10-41 per mill) or were even higher than those. The isotope fractionation for nitrite production was significantly larger than for ammonium consumption, indicating that (1) some intermediate (e.g., hydroxylamine) of ammonia oxidation accumulates, allowing for a second 15N fractionation step to be expressed, (2) a fraction of ammonia oxidized is lost via gaseous N forms (e.g., NO or N2O), which is 15N-enriched or (3) a fraction of ammonium is assimilated into AOA biomass, biomass becoming 15N-enriched. The significance of these mechanisms will be explored in more detail for the soil AOA culture, based on isotope modeling and isotopic measurements of biomass and N2O.

  6. Isolation and stable nitrogen isotope analysis of ammonium ions in ammonium nitrate prills using sodium tetraphenylborate.

    PubMed

    Howa, John D; Lott, Michael J; Ehleringer, James R

    2014-07-15

    Because of the threat of bombings using improvised explosives containing ammonium nitrate (AN), law enforcement and intelligence communities have been interested in stable isotope techniques for tracking and discriminating AN sources. Separate analysis of the AN component ions ammonium and nitrate would add discriminatory power to these techniques. Ammonium ions in dissolved AN solution were isolated from samples by precipitation using sodium tetraphenylborate solution. We tested the isolation of ammonium from nitrates using solutions of ammonium and nitrate salts with different (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios. Ammonium tetraphenylborate and AN were separately analyzed for their (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios using EA-ConFlo-IRMS, and the (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios of the nitrate ions were calculated using mass balance. Ammonium and nitrate nitrogen isotope ratios were plotted as two separate variables. Isolation of ammonium precipitate from solutions containing dissolved nitrates did not influence the nitrogen isotope ratios of test ammonium salts. A survey set of 42 AN samples showed that the ammonium and nitrate (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios were not significantly correlated, and the paired mean differences were not statistically significant. Both ammonium and nitrate were depleted in (15)N relative to their theoretical atmospheric sources. Isolation of the ammonium ion from AN adds another dimension for the discrimination of forensic AN samples. This technique using sodium tetraphenylborate is robust and does not require specialized equipment. Our observations indicated that ammonium nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen have independent sources of isotopic variation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Nitrogen cycling in a forest stream determined by a 15N tracer addition

    Treesearch

    Patrick J. Mullholland; Jennifer L. Tank; Diane M. Sanzone; Wilfred M. Wollheim; Bruce J. Peterson; Jackson R. Webster; Judy L. Meyer

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen uptake and cycling was examined using a six-week tracer addition of 15N-labeled ammonium in early spring in Waer Branch, a first-order deciduous forest stream in eastern Tennessee. Prior to the 15N addition, standing stocks of N were determined for the major biomass compartments. During and after the addition,

  8. Phytoplankton-specific response to enrichment of phosphorus-rich surface waters with ammonium, nitrate, and urea.

    PubMed

    Donald, Derek B; Bogard, Matthew J; Finlay, Kerri; Bunting, Lynda; Leavitt, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Supply of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) to the biosphere has tripled since 1960; however, little is known of how in situ response to N fertilisation differs among phytoplankton, whether species response varies with the chemical form of N, or how interpretation of N effects is influenced by the method of analysis (microscopy, pigment biomarkers). To address these issues, we conducted two 21-day in situ mesocosm (3140 L) experiments to quantify the species- and genus-specific responses of phytoplankton to fertilisation of P-rich lake waters with ammonium (NH(4)(+)), nitrate (NO(3)(-)), and urea ([NH(2)](2)CO). Phytoplankton abundance was estimated using both microscopic enumeration of cell densities and high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of algal pigments. We found that total algal biomass increased 200% and 350% following fertilisation with NO(3)(-) and chemically-reduced N (NH(4)(+), urea), respectively, although 144 individual taxa exhibited distinctive responses to N, including compound-specific stimulation (Planktothrix agardhii and NH(4)(+)), increased biomass with chemically-reduced N alone (Scenedesmus spp., Coelastrum astroideum) and no response (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Ceratium hirundinella). Principle components analyses (PCA) captured 53.2-69.9% of variation in experimental assemblages irrespective of the degree of taxonomic resolution of analysis. PCA of species-level data revealed that congeneric taxa exhibited common responses to fertilisation regimes (e.g., Microcystis aeruginosa, M. flos-aquae, M. botrys), whereas genera within the same division had widely divergent responses to added N (e.g., Anabaena, Planktothrix, Microcystis). Least-squares regression analysis demonstrated that changes in phytoplankton biomass determined by microscopy were correlated significantly (p<0.005) with variations in HPLC-derived concentrations of biomarker pigments (r(2) = 0.13-0.64) from all major algal groups, although HPLC tended to

  9. Phytoplankton-Specific Response to Enrichment of Phosphorus-Rich Surface Waters with Ammonium, Nitrate, and Urea

    PubMed Central

    Donald, Derek B.; Bogard, Matthew J.; Finlay, Kerri; Bunting, Lynda; Leavitt, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Supply of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) to the biosphere has tripled since 1960; however, little is known of how in situ response to N fertilisation differs among phytoplankton, whether species response varies with the chemical form of N, or how interpretation of N effects is influenced by the method of analysis (microscopy, pigment biomarkers). To address these issues, we conducted two 21-day in situ mesocosm (3140 L) experiments to quantify the species- and genus-specific responses of phytoplankton to fertilisation of P-rich lake waters with ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3−), and urea ([NH2]2CO). Phytoplankton abundance was estimated using both microscopic enumeration of cell densities and high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of algal pigments. We found that total algal biomass increased 200% and 350% following fertilisation with NO3− and chemically-reduced N (NH4+, urea), respectively, although 144 individual taxa exhibited distinctive responses to N, including compound-specific stimulation (Planktothrix agardhii and NH4+), increased biomass with chemically-reduced N alone (Scenedesmus spp., Coelastrum astroideum) and no response (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Ceratium hirundinella). Principle components analyses (PCA) captured 53.2–69.9% of variation in experimental assemblages irrespective of the degree of taxonomic resolution of analysis. PCA of species-level data revealed that congeneric taxa exhibited common responses to fertilisation regimes (e.g., Microcystis aeruginosa, M. flos-aquae, M. botrys), whereas genera within the same division had widely divergent responses to added N (e.g., Anabaena, Planktothrix, Microcystis). Least-squares regression analysis demonstrated that changes in phytoplankton biomass determined by microscopy were correlated significantly (p<0.005) with variations in HPLC-derived concentrations of biomarker pigments (r2 = 0.13–0.64) from all major algal groups, although HPLC tended to underestimate the relative

  10. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  11. Robust method for investigating nitrogen metabolism of 15N labeled amino acids using AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry: application to a parasitic plant-plant interaction.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Zachary; Cerveau, Delphine; Marnet, Nathalie; Bouchereau, Alain; Delavault, Philippe; Simier, Philippe; Pouvreau, Jean-Bernard

    2014-01-21

    An AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (AccQ•Tag-UPLC-PDA-ESI-MS) method is presented here for the fast, robust, and sensitive quantification of (15)N isotopologue enrichment of amino acids in biological samples, as for example in the special biotic interaction between the cultivated specie Brassica napus (rapeseed) and the parasitic weed Phelipanche ramosa (broomrape). This method was developed and validated using amino acid standard solutions containing (15)N amino acid isotopologues and/or biological unlabeled extracts. Apparatus optimization, limits of detection and quantification, quantification reproducibility, and calculation method of (15)N isotopologue enrichment are presented. Using this method, we could demonstrate that young parasite tubercles assimilate inorganic nitrogen as (15)N-ammonium when supplied directly through batch incubation but not when supplied by translocation from host root phloem, contrary to (15)N2-glutamine. (15)N2-glutamine mobility from host roots to parasite tubercles followed by its low metabolism in tubercles suggests that the host-derived glutamine acts as an important nitrogen containing storage compound in the young tubercle of Phelipanche ramosa.

  12. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  13. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    PubMed Central

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies. PMID:28281640

  14. δ15N Value Does Not Reflect Fasting in Mysticetes

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Alex; Giménez, Joan; Gómez–Campos, Encarna; Cardona, Luís; Borrell, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    The finding that tissue δ15N values increase with protein catabolism has led researchers to apply this value to gauge nutritive condition in vertebrates. However, its application to marine mammals has in most occasions failed. We investigated the relationship between δ15N values and the fattening/fasting cycle in a model species, the fin whale, a migratory capital breeder that experiences severe seasonal variation in body condition. We analyzed two tissues providing complementary insights: one with isotopic turnover (muscle) and one that keeps a permanent record of variations in isotopic values (baleen plates). In both tissues δ15N values increased with intensive feeding but decreased with fasting, thus contradicting the pattern previously anticipated. The apparent inconsistency during fasting is explained by the fact that a) individuals migrate between different isotopic isoscapes, b) starvation may not trigger significant negative nitrogen balance, and c) excretion drops and elimination of 15N-depleted urine is minimized. Conversely, when intensive feeding is resumed in the northern grounds, protein anabolism and excretion start again, triggering 15N enrichment. It can be concluded that in whales and other mammals that accrue massive depots of lipids as energetic reserves and which have limited access to drinking water, the δ15N value is not affected by fasting and therefore cannot be used as an indicatior of nutritive condition. PMID:24651388

  15. Production of 15N-Labelled Liquid Organic Fertilisers Based on Manure and Crop Residue for Use in Fertigation Studies.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Fernández, Carlos; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of crop residue and animal manure from agricultural and livestock activities are annually produced worldwide. With proper management, these residues are potentially valuable sources of plant nutrients, mainly N. Recycling such subproducts in sustainably-based agricultural systems can minimise the use of mineral fertilisers, and hence reduce the potential risk of surface and groundwater pollution. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to obtain (small scale) two liquid labelled-organic fertilisers, an animal- and a vegetal-based organic (AO and VO, respectively) fertiliser, to be used as organic N sources in subsequent fertigation studies. Forage maize (Zea mays L.) grown under 15N-labelled fertiliser supply was used as raw material for VO fertiliser production, and also as 15N-labelled sheep feed to obtain 15N-labelled manure. The labelled faeces fraction was used as raw material for the AO fertiliser. The VO fertiliser was obtained after an acidic and an enzyme-driven hydrolysis. The AO fertiliser was obtained after acidic hydrolysis. The VO liquid fertiliser presented an N concentration of 330 mg·L-1, 85% of total N was organic, while ammonium and nitrate N accounted for 55% and 45% of the mineral nitrogen fraction, respectively. This fertiliser also exhibited high K, Ca and S concentrations and notable values for the remaining macro- and micronutrients. The AO liquid fertiliser had a similar total N concentration (496 mg·L-1, 82% of total N in an organic form) to that of VO, but its mineral N fraction significantly differed, which came in a predominantly (95%) ammonia form. It also had a high content of N, P, K and other macronutrients, and sufficient Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu and B levels, which suggests its suitability as a potential fertiliser. The percentage of 15N enrichment in both VO and AO liquid fertilisers exceeded 2% 15N atom excess, which enabled their use in subsequent assays run to assess nitrogen uptake efficiency.

  16. Elucidating mineralisation-immobilisation dynamics in a grassland soil using triple 15N labelling in the field combined with a 15N tracing laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleineidam, Kristina; Müller, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Mineralisation is a key N transformation process supplying reactive nitrogen (N) to terrestrial ecosystems. The various soil organic matter fractions contribute to the total mineralisation according to their turnover characteristic. However, the exact mechanism and the gross dynamics of the various processes are not well understood. In this study we investigated the mineralisation-immobilisation dynamics in a grassland soil by a combined field-laboratory study. Eighteen microplots were established at a field site receiving 50 kg N ha-1 as ammonium nitrate. In nine (3 x 3) respective plots the ammonium, or the nitrate, or both moieties were 15N labelled at 60 atom%. Previous studies with this soil showed that rapid turnover occurred and available N would partly be immobilised by the microbial biomass increasing the 15N label of the soil organic nitrogen pool in the field. After one year, soil samples were taken from the 15N treated and the so far non-labelled plots and examined in a laboratory study (for details of the setup see: Müller et al., 2004). While the previously differentially 15N labelled field soils were now supplied with unlabelled ammonium nitrate, the previously unlabelled soils were now treated with either 15N labelled ammonium nitrate similar to the 15N treatments established in the field, resulting in six different 15N treatments in total. The incubation study was carried out over a two week period and data were analysed with the Ntrace model to quantify the simultaneously occurring gross N transformations while optimizing a single parameter set for all six treatments. Thus, the appearance of 15N from the previously labelled soils and the dilution of the 15N in the recently labelled treatments were assumed to be driven by the same processes and activities and were used to constrain the 15N tracing model. This approach allowed us to estimate the individual gross N transformation rates with a much higher accuracy than if only a common triple

  17. Nitrate reductase 15N discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Aspergillus niger, Pichea angusta, and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Eli; Yarnes, Chris; Toney, Michael D.; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Stable 15N isotopes have been used to examine movement of nitrogen (N) through various pools of the global N cycle. A central reaction in the cycle involves the reduction of nitrate (NO−3) to nitrite (NO−2) catalyzed by nitrate reductase (NR). Discrimination against 15N by NR is a major determinant of isotopic differences among N pools. Here, we measured in vitro 15N discrimination by several NRs purified from plants, fungi, and a bacterium to determine the intrinsic 15N discrimination by the enzyme and to evaluate the validity of measurements made using 15N-enriched NO−3. Observed NR isotope discrimination ranged from 22 to 32‰ (kinetic isotope effects of 1.022–1.032) among the different isozymes at natural abundance 15N (0.37%). As the fractional 15N content of substrate NO−3 increased from natural abundance, the product 15N fraction deviated significantly from that expected based on substrate enrichment and 15N discrimination measured at natural abundance. Additionally, isotopic discrimination by denitrifying bacteria used to reduce NO−3 and NO−2 in some protocols became a greater source of error as 15N enrichment increased. We briefly discuss potential causes of the experimental artifacts with enriched 15N and recommend against the use of highly enriched 15N tracers to study N discrimination in plants or soils. PMID:25071800

  18. Distribution of 15N Among Plant Parts of Nodulating and Nonnodulating Isolines of Soybeans 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Kohl, Daniel H.; Harper, James E.

    1980-01-01

    Differences among plant parts in the natural abundance of 15N are of interest from the point of view of developing a sampling strategy for using 15N measurements to estimate the contribution of symbiotically fixed N to N2 fixing plants, and because they reflect isotopic fractionation associated with degradation, transport, and resynthesis of N-bearing molecules. This paper reports such differences in nodulating and nonnodulating isolines of soybeans (Glycine max [L] (Merrill, variety Harosoy)) grown under several different conditions. Nodules were strikingly enriched in 15N compared to other plant parts (by an average of 8.3‰ excess 15N), and the enrichment increased with time during the growing season. 15N was much more uniformly distributed among other plant parts. Although there were significant differences among other plant parts, the maximum deviation of the 15N abundance of any plant part from that of the entire plant was about 2‰ 15N excess. The 15N abundance of the seed N was most representative of the whole plant. There were significant differences between isolines in the distribution of 15N. The distribution of 15N within plants also varied with experimental conditions. The implications of these results for estimation of N2 fixation from measurements of the natural abundance of 15N are discussed. PMID:16661393

  19. Marking Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) With Rubidium or 15N.

    PubMed

    Klick, J; Yang, W Q; Bruck, D J

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) has caused significant economic damage to berry and stone fruit production regions. Markers that are systemic in plants and easily transferred to target organisms are needed to track D. suzukii exploitation of host resources and trophic interactions. High and low concentrations of the trace element, rubidium (Rb), and the stable isotope, 15N, were tested to mark D. suzukii larvae feeding on fruits of enriched strawberry plants grown in containers under greenhouse conditions. Fly marker content and proportion of flies marked 1, 7, and 14 d after emergence from enriched fruits and fly dry mass were analyzed. Nearly 100% of the flies analyzed 14 d after emerging from 15N-enriched plants were marked, whereas only 30-75% and 0-3% were marked 14 d after emerging from high and low Rb concentration plants, respectively. Rapid Rb decay, strong 15N persistence, and the economics of using these markers in the field to elucidate D. suzukii pest ecology are discussed. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Ntrace a 15N tracing model to analyse gross N transformations and sources of gaseous N emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenically generated reactive nitrogen (N) cascades throughout the global environment ...(Galloway and Cowling, 2002). This reactive N may be lost from ecosystems via leaching, as nitrate (NO3-), or in gaseous forms such as ammonia and nitrous oxide (N2O) and the loss is governed by the N dynamics of the system. Thus, to be rendered environmentally benign NO3- must be reduced to a non-reactive form, dinitrogen (N2) which requires the evaluation of three major biological pathways of NO3- reduction: i) assimilatory NO3- reduction into biomass, ii) dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ (DNRA) and iii) dissimilatory NO3- reduction to N2 (denitrification) ...(Burger and Jackson, 2004). Advanced techniques based on 15N tracing in combination with suitable model analyses are the method of choice to analyse complex N interactions and simultaneous N transformation process. Techniques are based on dilution - enrichment principles and usually rely on the simultaneous labelling of various N pools. The data sets are then analysed by suitable 15N tracing models which allow the individual N transformation rates to be calculated based on realistic kinetic settings. The 15N tracing model Ntrace has been developed to analyse the simultaneously occurring N transformation rates in soil-plant systems and includes submodels for the evaluation of the processes associated with gaseous N emissions. The 15N tracing model and some typical model results will be presented. Literature cited .Burger, M., and Jackson, L. E. (2004). Plant and microbial use and turnover: rapid conversion of nitrate to ammonium in soil with roots. Plant and Soil 266, 289-301. Galloway, J. N., and Cowling, E. B. (2002). Reactive nitrogen and the world: 200 years of change. Ambio 31, 64-71. .

  1. An analytical method for hydrogeochemical surveys: Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry after using enrichment coprecipitation with cobalt and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkins, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Trace metals that are commonly associated with mineralization were concentrated and separated from natural water by coprecipitation with ammonium pyrollidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) and cobalt and determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The method is useful in hydrogeochemical surveys because it permits preconcentration near the sample sites, and selected metals are preserved shortly after the samples are collected. The procedure is relatively simple: (1) a liter of water is filtered; (2) the pH is adjusted; (3) Co chloride and APDC are added to coprecipitate the trace metals; and (4) later, the precipitate is filtered, dissolved, and diluted to 10 ml for a 100-fold concentration enrichment of the separated metals. Sb(III), As(III), Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Ag, V, and Zn can then be determined simultaneously by ICP-AES. In an experiment designed to measure the coprecipitation efficiency, Sb(III), Cd and Ag were recovered at 70 to 75% of their original concentration. The remaining metals were recovered at 85 to 100% of their original concentrations, however. The range for the lower limits of determination for the metals after preconcentration is 0.1 to 3.0 ??g/l. The precision of the method was evaluated by replicate analyses of a Colorado creek water and two simulated water samples. The accuracy of the method was estimated using a water reference standard (SRM 1643a) certified by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards. In addition, the method was evaluated by analyzing groundwater samples collected near a porphyry copper deposit in Arizona and by analyzing meltwater from glacier-covered areas favorable for mineralization in south-central Alaska. The results for the ICP-AES analyses compared favorably with those obtained using the sequential technique of GFAAS on the acidified but unconcentrated water samples. ICP-AES analysis of trace-metal preconcentrates for hydrogeochemical surveys is more efficient than GFAAS because a

  2. Nitrogen removal in maturation ponds: tracer experiments with 15N-labelled ammonia.

    PubMed

    Camargo Valero, M A; Mara, D D

    2007-01-01

    A primary maturation pond (M1) was spiked with labelled ammonium chloride (15NH4Cl) to track ammonium transformations associated with algal uptake and subsequent sedimentation. Conventional sampling based on grab samples collected from M1 influent, water column and effluent, and processed for unfiltered and filtered TKN, ammonium, nitrite and nitrate, found low total nitrogen removal (8%) and high ammonium nitrogen removal (90%). Stable isotope analysis of 15N from suspended organic and ammonium nitrogen fractions in M1 effluent revealed that labelled ammonium was mainly found in the organic fraction (69% of the 15N recovered), rather than the inorganic fraction (5%). Algal uptake was the predominant pathway for ammonia removal, even though conditions were favourable for ammonia volatilization (8.9 < pH <10.1 units, 15.2 < temperature <18.8 degrees C). Total nitrogen was removed by ammonia volatilization at 15 g N/ha d (3%), organic nitrogen sedimentation at 105 g N/ha d (20%), and in-pond accumulation due to algal uptake at 377 g N/ha d (71%). Algal uptake of ammonium and subsequent sedimentation and retention in the benthic sludge, after partial ammonification of the algal organic nitrogen, is thus likely to be the dominant mechanism for permanent nitrogen removal in maturation ponds during warm summer months in England.

  3. Refining cotton-wick method for 15N plant labelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fustec, Joëlle; Mahieu, Stéphanie

    2010-05-01

    The symbiosis Fabaceae/Rhizobiaceae plays a critical role in the nitrogen cycle. It gives the plant the ability to fix high amounts of atmospheric N. A part of this N can be transferred to the soil via rhizodeposition. The contribution of Fabaceae to the soil N pool is difficult to measure, since it is necessary for assessing N benefits for other crops, for soil biological activity, and for reducing water pollution in sustainable agriculture (Fustec, 2009). The aim of this study was to test and improve the reliability of the 15N cotton-wick method for measuring the soil N derived from plant rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2007). The effects of the concentration of the 15N-urea labelling solution and of the feeding frequency (continuous or pulses) on the assessment of nitrogen rhizodeposition were studied in two greenhouse experiments using the field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and the non-nodulating isoline P2. The plant parts and the soil were prepared for 15N:14N measurements for assessing N rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2009). The fraction of plants' belowground nitrogen allocated to rhizodeposition in both Frisson pea and P2 was 20 to more than 50% higher when plants were labelled continuously than when they were labelled using fortnightly pulses. Our results suggested that when 15N root enrichment was high, nitrogen rhizodeposition was underestimated only for plants that were 15N-fed by fortnightly pulses, and not in plants 15N-fed continuously. This phenomenon was especially observed for plants relying on symbiotic N fixation for N acquisition; it may be linked to the concentration of the labelling solution. In conclusion, N rhizodeposition assessment was strongly influenced by the 15N-feeding frequency and the concentration of the labelling solution. The estimation of N rhizodeposition was more reliable when plants were labelled continuously with a dilute solution of 15N urea. Fustec et al. 2009. Agron. Sustain. Dev., DOI 10.1051/agro/2009003, in press. Mahieu

  4. Food web structure in two counter-rotating eddies based on δ15N and δ13C isotopic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, A. M.; Muhling, B. A.; Holl, C. M.; Beckley, L. E.; Montoya, J. P.; Strzelecki, J.; Thompson, P. A.; Pesant, S.

    2007-04-01

    We measured the natural inventories of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes within various ecosystem fractions of two counter-rotating eddies associated with the poleward Leeuwin Current (LC), off Western Australia. Isotopic signatures ( δ15N and δ13C) were used as proxies for trophic transformation of inorganic and organic matter and are the basis for our discussion on food web functions in the two eddies. We present the first measurements of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) isotopic composition for the eastern Indian Ocean. We show that the large autotrophs (sampled within the >5-μm and >20-μm fractions of particulate organic matter (POM)), including a distinctive diatom population in the warm-core (WC) eddy, are likely to have taken up sources of DIN which were primarily nitrate, while the picoplankton are likely to have assimilated a large fraction of recycled ammonium. We show that phytoplankton in the cold-core (CC) eddy had distinctly more enriched δ15N signatures than in the WC eddy, probably due to the higher vertical fluxes of nitrate into the CC eddy. A clear negative correlation between mixed-layer depth and δ15N in POM across both eddies also supports the role of vertical nitrate fluxes in determining the primary δ15N signature of the autotrophs. Within the WC eddy, there was a significant δ13C-enrichment in comparison to the CC eddy across all size fractions of the mesozooplankton community, which, in combination with a low C:N molar ratio the >200- and >500-μm mesozooplankton size fractions, suggests a healthier mesozooplankton community, with greater lipid storage, in the WC eddy. This is consistent with the greater productivity and biomass of large diatoms in the WC eddy. Larval fish from the WC eddy also had an enriched δ13C signature compared to those from the CC eddy. The WC eddy had higher production rates than the CC eddy, and harboured a physiologically healthier population of zooplankton. Paradoxically, this seemed to occur

  5. The effect of manuring on cereal and pulse amino acid δ(15)N values.

    PubMed

    Styring, Amy K; Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-06-01

    Amino acid δ(15)N values of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) grains and rachis and broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, grown in manured and unmanured soil at the experimental farm stations of Rothamsted, UK and Bad Lauchstädt, Germany, were determined by GC-C-IRMS. Manuring was found to result in a consistent (15)N-enrichment of cereal grain amino acid δ(15)N values, indicating that manuring did not affect the metabolic routing of nitrogen (N) into cereal grain amino acids. The increase in cereal grain δ(15)N values with manuring is therefore due to a (15)N-enrichment in the δ(15)N value of assimilated inorganic-N. Greater variation was observed in the (15)N-enrichment of rachis amino acids with manuring, possibly due to enhanced sensitivity to changes in growing conditions and higher turnover of N in rachis cells compared to cereal grains. Total amino acid δ(15)N values of manured and unmanured broad beans and peas were very similar, indicating that the legumes assimilated N2 from the atmosphere rather than N from the soil, since there was no evidence for routing of (15)N-enriched manure N into any of the pulse amino acids. Crop amino acid δ(15)N values thus provide insights into the sources of N assimilated by non N2-fixing and N2-fixing crops grown on manured and unmanured soils, and reveal an effect of manure on N metabolism in different crop species and plant parts.

  6. Interpreting δ15N in Soil Profiles: Insights From the N-Isotopes of Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philben, M. J.; Edwards, K. A.; Billings, S. A.; Van Biesen, G.; Podrebarac, F. A.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    The δ15N of soil organic matter is consistently enriched with depth in soil profiles, although the magnitude of enrichment appears to vary with latitude. This could provide important insights on differences in N cycling among ecosystems, but the mechanism responsible for the depth trend remains controversial. Hypothesized explanations are (1) selective loss of depleted N during decomposition; (2) accumulation of 15N-enriched biomass of decomposers at depth; and (3) transfer of depleted N from depth to the soil surface by mycorrhizal fungi. To constrain these possible mechanisms, we analyzed the δ15N of hydrolyzable amino acids in the L, F, and H soil horizons of 2 boreal forests in southeast Labrador and southwest Newfoundland, Canada, before and after 480-day laboratory incubations of the soils. Most amino acids are both produced and degraded by microbes, but some are not resynthesized. The difference between these groups can be used to isolate the effects of decomposition from other fractionating processes. The amino acid δ15N did not change during the soil incubations, indicating peptide depolymerization does not fractionate N isotopes. This is consistent with a previously conducted fallow experiment in which amino acid δ15N remained unchanged after 68 years of decomposition in the absence of plant inputs. In contrast, the δ15N of most amino acids were enriched by 3-7‰ from the L to the H horizon, similar to the enrichment of bulk δ15N with depth. This pattern suggests these amino acids were resynthesized deeper in the soil profile where the bulk δ15N was more enriched. The δ15N amino acids phenylalanine and hydroxyproline, which are not resynthesized by the microbial community with decomposition, did not change with depth, indicating the depth trend was not due to temporal change in the δ15N of plant inputs to the soil. The enrichment of amino acid δ15N with depth in the soil profiles but not in the incubations or the fallow experiment indicates

  7. Measuring denitrification after grassland renewal and grassland conversion to cropland by using the 15N gas-flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchen, Caroline; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Flessa, Heinz; Giesemann, Anette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    Denitrification, the reduction of oxidized forms of inorganic N to N2O and N2 is an important pathway of gaseous nitrogen losses. Measuring denitrification, especially the reduction of N2O to N2, expressed in the product ratio (N2O/(N2O + N2)), is rather difficult and hence rarely performed under field conditions. But using the 15N gas-flux method allows determining N transformation processes in their natural environment. In order to develop effective climate mitigation strategies understanding the N2O source is essential. We used the 15N gas-flux method to determine N2O and N2 emissions following grassland renewal and conversion techniques. Therefore we selected three different treatments: control (C), mechanical grassland renovation (GR) (autumn 2013) and grassland conversion to maize (GM) (spring 2014) from field plot trials on two different sites (Histic Gleysoil and Plaggic Anthrosol) near Oldenburg, Lower Saxony, Germany. We applied 15N labeled KNO3- (60 atom. % 15N) at a rate equivalent to common farming practices (150 kg N*ha-1) using needle injection of fertilizer solution in three different depths (10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm) for homogeneous soil labeling up to 30 cm in microplots. During the first 10 days after application (May 2014) gas flux measurements from closed chambers were performed every second day and then weekly following a period of 8 weeks. Gas samples were analyzed for δ15N of N2 and N2O by IRMS according to Lewicka-Szczebak et al. (2013). Concentration and 15N enrichment of NO3- in soil water was determined on weekly samples using the SPIN-MAS technique (Stange et al. 2007). Fluxes of N2 and N2O evolved from the 15N labeled soil nitrogen pool were calculated using the equations of Spott et al. (2006). Peak events of N2 and N2O emissions occurred during the first 10 days of measurement, showing differences in soil types, as well as treatment variations. N2 fluxes up to 178 g*ha-1*day-1 and N2O fluxes up to 280 g*ha-1*day-1 were measured on the

  8. Mechanisms of ammonium assimilation by Chlorella vulgaris F1068: Isotope fractionation and proteomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Li, Feng; Ge, Fei; Tao, Nengguo; Zhou, Qiongzhi; Wong, Minghung

    2015-08-01

    Removal of ammonium (NH4(+)-N) by microalgae has evoked interest in wastewater treatment, however, the detailed mechanisms of ammonium assimilation remain mysterious. This study investigated the effects of NH4(+)-N concentration on the removal and biotransformation efficiency by Chlorella vulgaris F1068, and explored the mechanisms by (15)N isotope fractionation and proteome approaches. The results showed NH4(+)-N was efficiently removed (84.8%) by F1068 at 10mgL(-1) of NH4(+)-N. The isotope enrichment factor (ε=-2.37±0.08‰) of (15)N isotope fractionation revealed 47.6% biotransformation at above condition, while 7.0% biotransformation at 4mgL(-1) of NH4(+)-N (ε=-1.63±0.06‰). This was due to the different expression of glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation, which was up-regulated 6.4-fold at proteome level and 18.0-fold at transcription level. The results will provide a better mechanistic understanding of ammonium assimilation by microalgae and this green technology is expected to reduce the burden of NH4(+)-N removal for municipal sewage treatment plants.

  9. Nitrogen and 15N in the Mer Bleue peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Tim

    2017-04-01

    this. In 30-cm thick beaver pond sediments, the del15N values remained between 0 and +2 ‰. A number of processes may account for the increase in the del15N with depth in the peat profile: more rapid decomposition of tissues with larger del15N values than the slowly decomposing mosses; fractionation of N during decomposition, leaving the heavier 15N enriched in the peat; fractionation during denitrification (though denitrification potentials and emissions are small). An intriguing possibility is that methane oxidation at and just above the water table would lead to an increase in del15N, assuming the fixed N2 has a del15N close to 0.

  10. Aerosol isotopic ammonium signatures over the remote Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. T.; Jickells, T. D.; Baker, A. R.; Marca, A.; Johnson, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    We report aerosol ammonium 15N signatures for samples collected from research cruises on the South Atlantic and Caribbean using a new high sensitivity method. We confirm a pattern of isotopic signals from generally light (δ15N -5 to -10‰), for aerosols with very low (<2 nmol m-3) ammonium concentrations from the remote high latitude ocean, to generally heavier values (δ15N +5 to +10‰), for aerosols collected in temperate and tropical latitudes and with higher ammonium concentrations (>2 nmol m-3). We discuss whether this reflects a mixing of aerosols from two end-members (polluted continental and remote marine emissions), or isotopic fractionation during aerosol transport.

  11. Production of 15N-Labelled Liquid Organic Fertilisers Based on Manure and Crop Residue for Use in Fertigation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Fernández, Carlos; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of crop residue and animal manure from agricultural and livestock activities are annually produced worldwide. With proper management, these residues are potentially valuable sources of plant nutrients, mainly N. Recycling such subproducts in sustainably-based agricultural systems can minimise the use of mineral fertilisers, and hence reduce the potential risk of surface and groundwater pollution. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to obtain (small scale) two liquid labelled-organic fertilisers, an animal- and a vegetal-based organic (AO and VO, respectively) fertiliser, to be used as organic N sources in subsequent fertigation studies. Forage maize (Zea mays L.) grown under 15N-labelled fertiliser supply was used as raw material for VO fertiliser production, and also as 15N-labelled sheep feed to obtain 15N-labelled manure. The labelled faeces fraction was used as raw material for the AO fertiliser. The VO fertiliser was obtained after an acidic and an enzyme-driven hydrolysis. The AO fertiliser was obtained after acidic hydrolysis. The VO liquid fertiliser presented an N concentration of 330 mg·L-1, 85% of total N was organic, while ammonium and nitrate N accounted for 55% and 45% of the mineral nitrogen fraction, respectively. This fertiliser also exhibited high K, Ca and S concentrations and notable values for the remaining macro- and micronutrients. The AO liquid fertiliser had a similar total N concentration (496 mg·L-1, 82% of total N in an organic form) to that of VO, but its mineral N fraction significantly differed, which came in a predominantly (95%) ammonia form. It also had a high content of N, P, K and other macronutrients, and sufficient Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu and B levels, which suggests its suitability as a potential fertiliser. The percentage of 15N enrichment in both VO and AO liquid fertilisers exceeded 2% 15N atom excess, which enabled their use in subsequent assays run to assess nitrogen uptake efficiency. PMID:26982183

  12. Fate of nitrate and origin of ammonium during infiltration of treated wastewater investigated through stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Matthew; Schlögl, Johanna; Knöller, Kay; Schüth, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    concentration is not clearly logarithmic, so processes other than denitrification are not ruled out for explaining the fate of nitrate. The δ15N of ammonium in the water samples and of nitrogen in the soil were also measured. With increasing depth and time, the δ15N-NH4+ (mean 4.3‰) decreases and approaches the δ15N of the pre-experimental soil of 2.4‰. This suggests that ammonium is formed at least in part from the soil organic matter, likely through a combination of leaching and microbial processes. Although most nitrate attenuates by 15 cm depth and very little ammonium is observed here, some nitrate (usually <0.5 mg-N/L) was observed at depths of 30 cm and below, especially early in the experiments. Starting at 30 cm depth, organic carbon concentrations and thereby also C:NO3-ratios become high (>10), which are conditions sometimes found to be favorable to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium. Rayleigh enrichment factors also suggest that nitrate may be the source of some of the ammonium. Measurements of additional samples and organic nitrogen isotopes are planned, in order to further evaluate the fate of nitrate and the source(s) of the ammonium.

  13. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in an arid ecosystem measured by sup 15 N natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Plants dependent on nitrogen fixation have an {sup 15}N abundance similar to the atmosphere, while non-nitrogen fixing plants usually are enriched in {sup 15}N and are similar to soil nitrogen values. The natural abundance of {sup 15}N in leaf tissues and soils was determined to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation by several legumes and actinorhizal species in the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research area in central New Mexico. Comparison of {delta}{sup 15}N values for the legume Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) to adjacent Atriplex canascens (fourwing saltbush) indicated that P. glandulosa obtained 66% of its nitrogen by fixation. The legume Hoffmanseggia jamesii was found to be utilizing soil nitrogen. The {delta}{sup 15}N values for the actinorhizal plants, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Cercocarpus montanus, while below values for soil nitrogen, did not differ from associated non-fixing plants.

  14. Enhanced plant growth at reduced N2O emissions: 15N dynamics confirm nitrate capture and release of co-composted biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Claudia; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Williams, Anne; Hagemann, Nikolas; Marhan, Sven; Clough, Tim; Mueller, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (biochar) produced from biomass may be used as a soil amendment to sequester biomass-C and to mitigate climate change. Moreover, biochar may increase soil fertility and optimize nutrient cycling in agro-ecosystems. However, according to meta-studies large additions (>10 t ha-1) of pure biochar, may only lead to moderate yield increases. Thus, there are no economic benefits for farmers to use biochar. Recently, it has been suggested that biochar may be used as an on-farm nutrient management tool (feed additive, liquid manure treatment, composting) to deliver small doses of nutrients and biochar to the soil each year. It may also be used as a carrier for (organic) nutrients in small doses (0.5 - 2 t ha-1) in the root zone; recent studies reported considerably increased yields. The mechanisms, however, are not well understood. Co-composted biochar was recently shown to promote plant growth due to its nutrient delivery and release capabilities, particularly nitrate (NO3-). To gain further insights into biochar-nitrogen (N) interactions, we conducted a 15N labelling-tracing study under controlled conditions with treatments consisting of a non-biochar amended control, 2% (wt/wt) of untreated biochar particles (BCpure ,no intrinsic content of nitrate) and a 2% co-composted biochar (BCcomp, 5.3 g NO3-N kg-1 as a result of composting), replicated thrice. Biochars were added to a sandy loam soil in jars (200 g) planted with barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings. Fertilizer (NH4NO3) was homogenously added with either the ammonium (NH4+) or the nitrate (NO3-) pools 15N labelled (60 atom% 15N) hours before planting the seedlings. Sets of 18 jars were harvested on days 1, 3, 8, 15 and 29 and nitrogen pools were analysed to trace 15N fertilizer fate (soil mineral N, plant biomass, biochar particles, nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions). Interestingly, both BCpure and BCcomp captured fertilizer 15N from the soil matrix within hours of addition, with higher capture of 15

  15. Isotopic fractionation of dissolved ammonium at the oxygen-hydrogen sulfide interface in anoxic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Velinsky, D.J. ); Fogel, M.L.; Todd, J.F.; Tebo, B.M.

    1991-04-01

    The {delta}{sup 15}N of dissolved ammonium was determined in three anoxic marine basins: Black Sea, Saanich Inlet, B.C., Canada, and Framvaren Fjord, Norway. In each basin, the {delta}{sup 15}N-NH{sub 4{sup +}} was greatest near the O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S interface, with {delta}{sup 15}N as high as +21{per thousand}. The depth distributions of NH{sub 4{sup +}} and {delta}{sup 15}N-NH{sub 4{sup +}} for Black Sea and Framvaren Fjord were examined with a one-dimensional, steady-state, vertical advection-diffusion model to calculate the isotope fractionation during the consumption of NH{sub 4{sup +}} by bacteria. Isotope enrichments, {var epsilon}, for Black Sea were between 5 and 15{per thousand}, whereas in Framvaren Fjord {var epsilon} ranged from 20 to 30{per thousand}. These differences are related mainly to the ambient concentration of NH{sub 4{sup +}}. Biosynthetic uptake of NH{sub 4{sup +}} rather than nitrification was responsible for the fractionation. The {delta}{sup 15}N-NH{sub 4{sup +}} in Saanich Inlet appears related to in-situ regeneration of NH{sub 4{sup +}} with little isotopic fractionation between dissolved and particulate nitrogen (PN).

  16. A new organic reference material, L-glutamic acid, USGS41a, for δ13C and δ15N measurements − a replacement for USGS41

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.; Brand, Willi A.; Brandes, Lauren; Geilmann, Heike; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    RationaleThe widely used l-glutamic acid isotopic reference material USGS41, enriched in both 13C and 15N, is nearly exhausted. A new material, USGS41a, has been prepared as a replacement for USGS41.MethodsUSGS41a was prepared by dissolving analytical grade l-glutamic acid enriched in 13C and 15N together with l-glutamic acid of normal isotopic composition. The δ13C and δ15N values of USGS41a were directly or indirectly normalized with the international reference materials NBS 19 calcium carbonate (δ13CVPDB = +1.95 mUr, where milliurey = 0.001 = 1 ‰), LSVEC lithium carbonate (δ13CVPDB = −46.6 mUr), and IAEA-N-1 ammonium sulfate (δ15NAir = +0.43 mUr) and USGS32 potassium nitrate (δ15N = +180 mUr exactly) by on-line combustion, continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, and off-line dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.ResultsUSGS41a is isotopically homogeneous; the reproducibility of δ13C and δ15N is better than 0.07 mUr and 0.09 mUr, respectively, in 200-μg amounts. It has a δ13C value of +36.55 mUr relative to VPDB and a δ15N value of +47.55 mUr relative to N2 in air. USGS41 was found to be hydroscopic, probably due to the presence of pyroglutamic acid. Experimental results indicate that the chemical purity of USGS41a is substantially better than that of USGS41.ConclusionsThe new isotopic reference material USGS41a can be used with USGS40 (having a δ13CVPDB value of −26.39 mUr and a δ15NAir value of −4.52 mUr) for (i) analyzing local laboratory isotopic reference materials, and (ii) quantifying drift with time, mass-dependent isotopic fractionation, and isotope-ratio-scale contraction for isotopic analysis of biological and organic materials. Published in 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Plant and Soil Natural Abundance delta-15N: Indicators of Nitrogen Cycling in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.; Lovett, G. M.; Weathers, K.; Arthur, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    We examined the potential use of natural abundance 15N of plants and soils as an indicator of forest nitrogen (N) cycling rates within the Catskill Mountains, NY. These watersheds receive among the highest rates of N deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Many studies have shown a link between increased N cycling rates and 15N enrichment of soil and plant pools. Faster rates of N cycling processes, especially nitrification, lead to fractionation of 14/15N, creating N products that are relatively depleted in 15N. This can lead to enrichment of soil pools, as lighter 14N is lost from the system via leaching or denitrification. Plant N pools can become increasingly enriched as they take up 15N-enriched soil N. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across the Catskill Mountains, forests dominated by different tree species appear to vary in the amount of N retained or lost to nearby streams. To determine if plant and soil 15N could be used as indicators of N cycling rates, we collected foliage, wood, litterfall, organic and mineral soil, and fine roots from single species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine roots and soil 15N were highest within sugar maple stands (p<0.05). Sugar maple soils also had the highest rates of net nitrification and N leaching. Therefore, soil 15N appears to correlate with forest N retention and loss. However, 15N enrichment was highest within foliage, litterfall and wood of beech trees (p<0.05). The decoupling between foliage 15N and N cycling, as well as between 15N of foliage and fine roots, illustrates that it may not be possible to use a single plant pool as an indicator of N cycling rates.

  18. Compound-specific δ15N amino acid measurements in littoral mussels in the California upwelling ecosystem: a new approach to generating baseline δ15N Isoscapes for coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ(15)N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ(15)N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ(15)N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ(15)N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼ 7‰ to ∼ 12‰, R(2) = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ(15)N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ(15)N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ(15)N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with (15)N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ(15)N values of phenylalanine (δ(15)NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ(15)N values. We hypothesize δ(15)N(Phe) values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ(15)N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ(15)N(Phe) values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ(15)N values. We propose that δ(15)N(Phe) isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ(15)N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives.

  19. Light-mediated 15N fractionation in Caribbean gorgonian octocorals: implications for pollution monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. M.; Kim, K.; Andras, J. P.; Sparks, J. P.

    2011-09-01

    The stable nitrogen isotope ratio ( δ 15N) of coral tissue is a useful recorder of anthropogenic pollution in tropical marine ecosystems. However, little is known of the natural environmentally induced fractionations that affect our interpretation of coral δ 15N values. In symbiotic scleractinians, light affects metabolic fractionation of N during photosynthesis, which may confound the identification of N pollution between sites of varied depth or turbidity. Given the superiority of octocorals for δ 15N studies, our goal was to quantify the effect of light on gorgonian δ 15N in the context of monitoring N pollution sources. Using field collections, we show that δ 15N declined by 1.4‰ over 20 m depth in two species of gorgonians, the common sea fan, Gorgonia ventalina, and the slimy sea plume, Pseudopterogorgia americana. An 8-week laboratory experiment with P. americana showed that light, not temperature causes this variation, whereby the lowest fractionation of the N source was observed in the highest light treatment. Finally, we used a yearlong reciprocal depth transplant experiment to quantify the time frame over which δ 15N changes in G. ventalina as a function of light regime . Over the year, δ 15N was unchanged and increased slightly in the deep control colonies and shallow colonies transplanted to the deep site, respectively. Within 6 months, colonies transplanted from deep to shallow became enriched by 0.8‰, mirroring the enrichment observed in the shallow controls, which was likely due to the combined effect of an increase in the source δ 15N and reduced fractionation. We conclude that light affects gorgonian δ 15N fractionation and should be considered in sampling designs for N pollution monitoring. However, these fractionations are small relative to differences observed between natural and anthropogenic N sources.

  20. Long-term 15N tracking from biological N fixation across different plant and humus components of the boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroniz-Crespo, Maria; Jones, David L.; Zackrisson, Olle; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2014-05-01

    Biological N2 fixation by cyanobacteria associated with feather mosses is an important cog in the nitrogen (N) cycle of boreal forests; still, our understanding of the turnover and fate of N fixed by this association remains greatly incomplete. The 15N signature of plants and soil serves as a powerful tool to explore N dynamics in forest ecosystems. In particular, in the present study we aimed to investigate the contribution of N2 fixation to δ15N signatures of plants and humus component of the boreal forest. Here we present results from a long-term (7 years) tacking of labelled 15N2 across the humus layer, seedlings of the tree species Pinus sylvestris, two common dwarf shrub species (Empetrum hermaphroditum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and the feather moss Pleurozium schreibery. The enriched experiment was conducted in 2005 in a natural boreal forest in northern Sweden. Two different treatments (10% 15N2 headspace enrichment and control) were setup in nine different plots (0.5 x 0.5 m) within the forest. We observed a significant reduction of δ15N signature of the 15N-enriched moss that could be explained by a growth dilution effect. Nevertheless, after 5 years since 15N2 enrichment some of the label 15N was still detected on the moss and in particular in the dead tissue. We could not detect a clear transfer of the labelled 15N2 from the moss-cyanobacteria system to other components of the ecosystem. However, we found consistence relationship through time between increments of δ15N signature of some of the forest components in plots which exhibited higher N fixation rates in the moss. In particular, changes in natural abundance δ15N that could be associated with N fixation were more apparent in the humus layer, the dwarf shrub Vaccinium vitis-idaea and the pine seedlings when comparing across plots and years.

  1. Ammonium sulfamate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium sulfamate ; CASRN 7773 - 06 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  2. Ammonium methacrylate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium methacrylate ; CASRN 16325 - 47 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  3. Ammonium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium acetate ; CASRN 631 - 61 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  4. The Nature of the Dietary Protein Impacts the Tissue-to-Diet 15N Discrimination Factors in Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Poupin, Nathalie; Bos, Cécile; Mariotti, François; Huneau, Jean-François; Tomé, Daniel; Fouillet, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Due to the existence of isotope effects on some metabolic pathways of amino acid and protein metabolism, animal tissues are 15N-enriched relative to their dietary nitrogen sources and this 15N enrichment varies among different tissues and metabolic pools. The magnitude of the tissue-to-diet discrimination (Δ15N) has also been shown to depend on dietary factors. Since dietary protein sources affect amino acid and protein metabolism, we hypothesized that they would impact this discrimination factor, with selective effects at the tissue level. To test this hypothesis, we investigated in rats the influence of a milk or soy protein-based diet on Δ15N in various nitrogen fractions (urea, protein and non-protein fractions) of blood and tissues, focusing on visceral tissues. Regardless of the diet, the different protein fractions of blood and tissues were generally 15N-enriched relative to their non-protein fraction and to the diet (Δ15N>0), with large variations in the Δ15N between tissue proteins. Δ15N values were markedly lower in tissue proteins of rats fed milk proteins compared to those fed soy proteins, in all sampled tissues except in the intestine, and the amplitude of Δ15N differences between diets differed between tissues. Both between-tissue and between-diet Δ15N differences are probably related to modulations of the relative orientation of dietary and endogenous amino acids in the different metabolic pathways. More specifically, the smaller Δ15N values observed in tissue proteins with milk than soy dietary protein may be due to a slightly more direct channeling of dietary amino acids for tissue protein renewal and to a lower recycling of amino acids through fractionating pathways. In conclusion, the present data indicate that natural Δ15N of tissue are sensitive markers of the specific subtle regional modifications of the protein and amino acid metabolism induced by the protein dietary source. PMID:22132207

  5. The nature of the dietary protein impacts the tissue-to-diet 15N discrimination factors in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Poupin, Nathalie; Bos, Cécile; Mariotti, François; Huneau, Jean-François; Tomé, Daniel; Fouillet, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Due to the existence of isotope effects on some metabolic pathways of amino acid and protein metabolism, animal tissues are (15)N-enriched relative to their dietary nitrogen sources and this (15)N enrichment varies among different tissues and metabolic pools. The magnitude of the tissue-to-diet discrimination (Δ(15)N) has also been shown to depend on dietary factors. Since dietary protein sources affect amino acid and protein metabolism, we hypothesized that they would impact this discrimination factor, with selective effects at the tissue level. To test this hypothesis, we investigated in rats the influence of a milk or soy protein-based diet on Δ(15)N in various nitrogen fractions (urea, protein and non-protein fractions) of blood and tissues, focusing on visceral tissues. Regardless of the diet, the different protein fractions of blood and tissues were generally (15)N-enriched relative to their non-protein fraction and to the diet (Δ(15)N>0), with large variations in the Δ(15)N between tissue proteins. Δ(15)N values were markedly lower in tissue proteins of rats fed milk proteins compared to those fed soy proteins, in all sampled tissues except in the intestine, and the amplitude of Δ(15)N differences between diets differed between tissues. Both between-tissue and between-diet Δ(15)N differences are probably related to modulations of the relative orientation of dietary and endogenous amino acids in the different metabolic pathways. More specifically, the smaller Δ(15)N values observed in tissue proteins with milk than soy dietary protein may be due to a slightly more direct channeling of dietary amino acids for tissue protein renewal and to a lower recycling of amino acids through fractionating pathways. In conclusion, the present data indicate that natural Δ(15)N of tissue are sensitive markers of the specific subtle regional modifications of the protein and amino acid metabolism induced by the protein dietary source.

  6. The Organization of High-Affinity Ammonium Uptake in Arabidopsis Roots Depends on the Spatial Arrangement and Biochemical Properties of AMT1-Type Transporters[W

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lixing; Loqué, Dominique; Kojima, Soichi; Rauch, Sabine; Ishiyama, Keiki; Inoue, Eri; Takahashi, Hideki; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2007-01-01

    The AMMONIUM TRANSPORTER (AMT) family comprises six isoforms in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we describe the complete functional organization of root-expressed AMTs for high-affinity ammonium uptake. High-affinity influx of 15N-labeled ammonium in two transposon-tagged amt1;2 lines was reduced by 18 to 26% compared with wild-type plants. Enrichment of the AMT1;2 protein in the plasma membrane and localization of AMT1;2 promoter activity in the endodermis and root cortex indicated that AMT1;2 mediates the uptake of ammonium entering the root via the apoplasmic transport route. An amt1;1 amt1;2 amt1;3 amt2;1 quadruple mutant (qko) showed severe growth depression under ammonium supply and maintained only 5 to 10% of wild-type high-affinity ammonium uptake capacity. Transcriptional upregulation of AMT1;5 in nitrogen-deficient rhizodermal and root hair cells and the ability of AMT1;5 to transport ammonium in yeast suggested that AMT1;5 accounts for the remaining uptake capacity in qko. Triple and quadruple amt insertion lines revealed in vivo ammonium substrate affinities of 50, 234, 61, and 4.5 μM for AMT1;1, AMT1;2, AMT1;3, and AMT1;5, respectively, but no ammonium influx activity for AMT2;1. These data suggest that two principle means of achieving effective ammonium uptake in Arabidopsis roots are the spatial arrangement of AMT1-type ammonium transporters and the distribution of their transport capacities at different substrate affinities. PMID:17693533

  7. Fungal functioning in a pine forest: evidence from a 15N-labeled global change experiment

    Treesearch

    Erik A. Hobbie; Linda T.A. van Diepen; Erik A. Lilleskov; Andrew P. Oiumette; Adrien C. Finzi; Kirsten S. Hofmockel

    2014-01-01

    We used natural and tracer nitrogen (N) isotopes in a Pinus taeda free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment to investigate functioning of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi in N cycling. Fungal sporocarps were sampled in 2004 (natural abundance and 15N tracer) and 2010 (tracer) and δ15...

  8. Heterotrophic 15N2 Fixation and Distribution of Newly Fixed Nitrogen in a Rice-Flooded Soil System 1

    PubMed Central

    Eskew, David L.; Eaglesham, Allan R. J.; App, A. A.

    1981-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants growing in pots of flooded soil were exposed to a 15N2-enriched atmosphere for 3 to 13 days in a gas-tight chamber. The floodwater and soil surface were shaded with a black cloth to reduce the activity of phototrophic N2-fixing micro-organisms. The highest 15N enrichments were consistently observed in the roots, although the total quantity of 15N incorporated into the soil was much greater. The rate of 15N incorporation into roots was much higher at the heading than at the tillering stage of growth. Definite enrichments were also found in the basal node and in the lower outer leaf sheath fractions after 3 days of exposure at the heading stage. Thirteen days was the shortest time period in which definite 15N enrichment was observed in the leaves and panicle. When plants were exposed to 15N2 for 13 days just before heading and then allowed to mature in a normal atmosphere, 11.3% of the total 15N in the system was found in the panicles, 2.3% in the roots, and 80.7% in the subsurface soil. These results provide direct evidence of heterotrophic N2 fixation associated with rice roots and the flooded soil and demonstrate that part of the newly fixed N is available to the plant. PMID:16661887

  9. Continuous Silicate Utilization Over Multiple 14L:10D Day:Night Cycles Confirms Night Metabolism in Lake Michigan Diatom Enrichments Using Either Nitrate or Ammonium as a Nitrogen Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderling, M.; Aguilar, C.; Cuhel, R. L.

    2016-02-01

    Diatoms are single-celled organelle containing eukaryotes living in "glass houses". As diatoms only take up silica when they replicate, measuring the amounts of dissolved and particulate silicate were an important aspect of this study. Silica was used as a proxy of the diatom reproduction. Depending on growth conditions, some algal species divide throughout the day and night; this suggests that protein synthesis can be an important component of algal night metabolism and hence nitrogen utilization. The goal of this experiment was to measure the amount of night protein synthesis occurring in a culture of diatoms from Lake Michigan. Diatoms were enriched with light for energy and excess nutrients—including phosphate, silicate, nitrate and limited ammonium for some—along with use of physical separation methods. Growing conditions were prepared in a way which anticipated the diatoms would synchronize to a 14:10 day/night cycle and store energy, during their day phase, to use for night protein synthesis and replication. Their growth was monitored by taking samples before and after the transitions of light to dark along with midday and midnight samples. Assays of dissolved and particulate silicate were used to measure utilization, which confirmed their nighttime growth. As hypothesized, the diatoms had significant growth during their night phase. There were decreases in the nighttime dissolved silicate and increases in the nighttime particulate silicate. When available, the diatoms preferred to use ammonium instead of nitrate. Cell division during the night phase indicated sufficient daytime energy storage to fuel night protein synthesis and cell replication. Uptake of nutrients occurred at night almost as if the "sun" did not set. There was continuous growth of this photosynthetic community.

  10. Two new organic reference materials for δ13C and δ15N measurements and a new value for the δ13C of NBS 22 oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Geilmann, Heike; Brand, Willi A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    Analytical grade L-glutamic acid is chemically stable and has a C/N mole ratio of 5, which is close to that of many of natural biological materials, such as blood and animal tissue. Two L-glutamic acid reference materials with substantially different 13C and 15N abundances have been prepared for use as organic reference materials for C and N isotopic measurements. USGS40 is analytical grade L-glutamic acid and has a δ13C value of −26.24‰ relative to VPDB and a δ15N value of −4.52‰ relative to N2 in air. USGS41 was prepared by dissolving analytical grade L-glutamic acid with L-glutamic acid enriched in 13C and 15N. USGS41 has a δ13C value of +37.76‰ and a δ15N value of +47.57‰. The δ13C and δ15N values of both materials were measured against the international reference materials NBS 19 calcium carbonate (δ13C = +1.95‰), L-SVEC lithium carbonate (δ13C = −46.48‰), IAEA-N-1 ammonium sulfate (δ15N = 0.43‰), and USGS32 potassium nitrate (δ15N = 180‰) by on-line combustion continuous-flow and off-line dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Both USGS40 and USGS41 are isotopically homogeneous; reproducibility of δ13C is better than 0.13‰, and that of δ15N is better than 0.13‰ in 100-μg amounts. These two isotopic reference materials can be used for (i) calibrating local laboratory reference materials, and (ii) quantifying drift with time, mass-dependent fractionations, and isotope-ratio-scale contraction in the isotopic analysis of various biological materials. Isotopic results presented in this paper yield a δ13C value for NBS 22 oil of −29.91‰, in contrast to the commonly accepted value of −29.78‰ for which off-line blank corrections probably have not been quantified satisfactorily.

  11. Two new organic reference materials for δ13C and δ15N measurements and a new value for the δ13C of NBS 22 oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Geilmann, Heike; Brand, Willi A.; Böhlke, John Karl

    2003-01-01

    Analytical grade L-glutamic acid is chemically stable and has a C/N mole ratio of 5, which is close to that of many of natural biological materials, such as blood and animal tissue. Two L-glutamic acid reference materials with substantially different 13C and 15N abundances have been prepared for use as organic reference materials for C and N isotopic measurements. USGS40 is analytical grade L-glutamic acid and has a δ13C value of −26.24‰ relative to VPDB and a δ15N value of −4.52‰ relative to N2 in air. USGS41 was prepared by dissolving analytical grade L-glutamic acid with L-glutamic acid enriched in 13C and 15N. USGS41 has a δ13C value of +37.76‰ and a δ15N value of +47.57‰. The δ13C and δ15N values of both materials were measured against the international reference materials NBS 19 calcium carbonate (δ13C = +1.95‰), L-SVEC lithium carbonate (δ13C = −46.48‰), IAEA-N-1 ammonium sulfate (δ15N = 0.43‰), and USGS32 potassium nitrate (δ15N = 180‰) by on-line combustion continuous-flow and off-line dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Both USGS40 and USGS41 are isotopically homogeneous; reproducibility of δ13C is better than 0.13‰, and that of δ15N is better than 0.13‰ in 100-μg amounts. These two isotopic reference materials can be used for (i) calibrating local laboratory reference materials, and (ii) quantifying drift with time, mass-dependent fractionations, and isotope-ratio-scale contraction in the isotopic analysis of various biological materials. Isotopic results presented in this paper yield a δ13C value for NBS 22 oil of −29.91‰, in contrast to the commonly accepted value of −29.78‰ for which off-line blank corrections probably have not been quantified satisfactorily.

  12. Stem injection of 15N-NH4NO3 into mature Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis).

    PubMed

    Nair, Richard; Weatherall, Andrew; Perks, Mike; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Stem injection techniques can be used to introduce (15)N into trees to overcome a low variation in natural abundance and label biomass with a distinct (15)N signature, but have tended to target small and young trees, of a variety of species, with little replication. We injected 98 atom% (15)N ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) solution into 13 mature, 9- to 13-m tall edge-profile Sitka spruce trees in order to produce a large quantity of labelled litter, examining the distribution of the isotope throughout the canopy after felling in terms of both total abundance of (15)N and relative distribution of the isotope throughout individual trees. Using a simple mass balance of the canopy alone, based on observed total needle biomass and modelled branch biomass, all of the isotope injected was accounted for, evenly split between needles and branches, but with a high degree of variability both within individual trees, and among trees. Both (15)N abundance and relative within-canopy distribution were biased towards the upper and middle crown in foliage. Recovery of the label in branches was much more variable than in needles, possibly due to differences in nitrogen allocation for both growth and storage, which differ seasonally between foliage and woody biomass.

  13. 15N Content Reflects Development of Mycorrhizae and Nitrogen Dynamics During Primary Succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Jumpponen, A.

    2004-05-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous symbionts on terrestrial plants that are particularly important for plant nitrogen nutrition. 15N content appears to be a useful marker of the mycorrhizal role in plant nitrogen supply because of an apparent fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from mycorrhizal fungi to host plants. Because plants developing during primary succession are gradually colonized by mycorrhizal fungi, such situations provide good opportunities to study interactions between mycorrhizal colonization and plant 15N content. Here, we present results of a study of nitrogen isotope patterns in ecosystem components during the first 100 years of ecosystem development after glacial retreat, and compare those patterns with those on adjacent mature terrain. Soils in primary succession were depleted in 15N relative to nitrogen-fixing plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants generally colonized by ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, or arbuscular fungi showed similar 15N content very early in succession (-4 to -6‰ ), corresponding to low colonization levels of all plant species. Subsequent colonization of evergreen plants by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid fungi led to a 5-6‰ decline in 15N content, indicating transfer of 15N-depleted N from fungi to plants. The values recorded (-10 to -14‰ ) are among the lowest yet observed in vascular plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi did not decline in 15N content. Most ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi were similar in 15N content in early succession (-1 to -3‰ ), with the notable exception of ectomycorrhizal fungi suspected of proteolytic capabilities, which were 15N enriched relative to all other fungi. 15N contents in both plants and soil from the mature site were 5‰ greater than in recently exposed sites. We conclude that 1) the primary nitrogen source to this ecosystem must be atmospheric deposition, 2) low plant 15N content generally corresponds with greater

  14. Determination of nitrogen-15 enrichment of nitrate and nitrite using thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hogge, L.R.; Hynes, R.K.; Nelson, L.M.; Vestal, M.L.

    1986-11-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of percent /sup 15/N enrichment in NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ that is both rapid and sensitive. NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ separation was done by use of reverse-phase liquid chromatography with a mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate with tetrabutylammonium acetate as the ion pair reagent. The % /sup 15/N in isotopically enriched anions was determined by using thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Enrichment values were obtained on as little as 20 ng of NO/sub 2//sup -/-N/20 ..mu..L and 4 ng of NO/sub 3//sup -/-N/20 ..mu..L. The linear regression curve was plotted for the observed enrichment vs. the actual enrichment over the range from the natural abundance to 25% enrichment for each anion and the equation for the linear regression calculated (y = 1.16x + 0.7577 for NO/sub 2//sup -/ and y = 0.951x + 0.447 for NO/sub 3//sup -/). The coefficient of determination for the NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ curves was 0.988 and 0.987, respectively. The dynamic range of the method was found to be suitable for the range of NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ expected in plant xylem sap. Xylem sap samples obtained from NO/sub 3//sup -/ fed pea, Pisum sativum cv. Homesteader (3.9 ..mu..g of NO/sub 3//sup -/-N/mL, 24.7% /sup 15/N), contained a /sup 15/N enrichment of 25.4% +/- 0.7%.

  15. Compound-Specific δ15N Amino Acid Measurements in Littoral Mussels in the California Upwelling Ecosystem: A New Approach to Generating Baseline δ15N Isoscapes for Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ15N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ15N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ15N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ15N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼7‰ to ∼12‰, R2 = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ15N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ15N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ15N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with15N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ15N values of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ15N values. We hypothesize δ15NPhe values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ15N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ15NPhe values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ15N values. We propose that δ15NPhe isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ15N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives. PMID:24887109

  16. Efficient Synthesis of Nicotinamide-1-15N for Ultrafast NMR Hyperpolarization Using Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide (a vitamin B3 amide) is one of the key vitamins as well as a drug for treatment of M. tuberculosis, HIV, cancer, and other diseases. Here, an improved Zincke reaction methodology is presented allowing for straightforward and scalable synthesis of nicotinamide-1-15N with an excellent isotopic purity (98%) and good yield (55%). 15N nuclear spin label in nicotinamide-1-15N can be NMR hyperpolarized in seconds using parahydrogen gas. NMR hyperpolarization using the process of temporary conjugation between parahydrogen and to-be-hyperpolarized biomolecule on hexacoordinate iridium complex via the Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) method significantly increases detection sensitivity (e.g., >20 000-fold for nicotinamide-1-15N at 9.4 T) as has been shown by Theis T. et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404), and hyperpolarized in this fashion, nicotinamide-1-15N can be potentially used to probe metabolic processes in vivo in future studies. Moreover, the presented synthetic methodology utilizes mild reaction conditions, and therefore can also be potentially applied to synthesis of a wide range of 15N-enriched N-heterocycles that can be used as hyperpolarized contrast agents for future in vivo molecular imaging studies. PMID:26999571

  17. Compound-specific 15N analysis of amino acids in 15N tracer experiments provide an estimate of newly synthesised soil protein from inorganic and organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, Alice; Michaelides, Katerina; Evershed, Richard

    2015-04-01

    unlike previous works analyses for amino acids (representing organic products) rather than ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). Amino acids are commonly referred to as 'the building blocks of life' as they form the proteins which regulate life's essential biochemical reactions. Proteinaceous matter generally comprises 20-40% of total soil N and is ubiquitous in living organisms, so is a likely 'organic product' of microbial activity/assimilation. Hence, we consider it likely that amino acids represent the major organic nitrogenous products and a reasonable 'proxy' for/measure of the assimilation of an applied 15N substrate by the soil microbial biomass and an estimate of the newly synthesized soil protein. Brookes, P. C. et al. Soil Biol Biochem. 1985, 17, 837-842. Jenkinson, D. S. et al. Soil Biol Biochem. 2004, 36, 5-7. Nannipieri, P. et al. Plant Soil. 1999, 208, 43-56. Pilbeam, C. J. et al. J Agr Sci. 1997, 128, 415-424. Sebilo, M. et al. PNAS. 2013, 110, 18185-18189.

  18. Monthly variations in nitrogen isotopes of ammonium and nitrate in wet deposition at Guangzhou, south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guodong; Chen, Fajin

    2010-06-01

    Monthly nitrogen isotopes of ammonium and nitrate in wet deposition in the city of Guangzhou, and the causes of their variability, are reported in this paper. Nitrate δ 15N showed nearly constant values around zero in the dry season (October to April), but oscillating values from negative to positive in the rainy season (May to September). By contrast, ammonium δ 15N displayed lower values during the rainy season than in the dry season. The rural area north of the city was considered as the prominent source of ammonium and nitrate in spring and early summer (May and June), as suggested by their concurrent negative isotopic trends and higher NH 4+/NO 3- ratios. From July to September, different dominating sources from the city, i.e., fossil fuel combustion for nitrate, and sewage and waste emission for ammonium, caused disparate δ 15N trends of the two species, showing positive nitrate δ 15N, but still negative ammonium δ 15N. During the cool dry season, the high values of ammonium δ 15N and concurrently low NH 4+/NO 3- ratios suggested the decrease in NH 3 volatilization and relatively important thermogenic origin of ammonium, but the intermediate nitrate δ 15N values around zero may be a result of a balanced emission of NO x from the city and the rural areas. The isotopic effects of chemical conversion of NO x to nitrate and washout of nitrate were ruled out as significant causes of nitrate δ 15N variability, but ammonium washout, during which 15N is assumed to be preferentially removed, may partly contribute to the ammonium δ 15N variability.

  19. Nitrogen Isotopic Ratios in Cometary NH2: Implication for 15N-fractionation in Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuël; Decock, Alice; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arai, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Isotopic ratios in cometary molecules are diagnostic for the physico-chemical conditions where molecules formed and are processed, from the interstellar medium to the solar nebula. Usually temperatures at the molecular formation control the fractionation of the heavier element in molecular species, e.g., D-fractionation in water.In cometary volatiles, the 14N/15N ratios in CN have been well observed (Manfroid et al. 2009, A&A, 503, 613, and reference therein) and is consistent with the ratio in HCN (a most probable parent of CN) measured in few comets (Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2008, ApJ, 679, L49). Those ratios are enriched compared to the proto-solar value by a factor of ~3. In contrast to those Nitriles, there are only few reports on 14N/15N ratios in Ammonia (as Amine) (Rousselot et al. 2014, ApJ, 780, L17; Shinnaka et al. 2014, ApJ, 782, L16). Ammonia (NH3) is usually the most abundant and HCN is the second most abundant N-bearing volatiles in cometary ice. Especially, recent observations of 15NH2 revealed the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 are comparable to those of CN. However, from the viewpoint of theoretical work, the enrichment of 15N in cometary NH3 cannot be reproduced by current chemical network models. Information about the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 of individual comets is needed to understand the formation mechanisms/environments of NH3 in the early solar system.To clarify the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in cometary NH3, we determine the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets individually which include not only Oort cloud comets but also short period comets by using the high-resolution optical spectra of NH2. These spectra were obtained with both the UVES mounted on the VLT in Chile and the HDS on the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii.The derived 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets show high 15N-enrichment compared with the elemental abundances of nitrogen in the Sun by about factor of ~3 and has no large diversity depending on

  20. A study of 15N- 15N and 15N- 13C spin couplings in some 15N labeled mesoionic 1-oxa and 1-thia-2,3,4-triazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaźwiński, J.; Staszewska, O.; Stefaniak, L.; Webb, G. A.

    1996-03-01

    15N- 15N and 15N- 13C spin-spin couplings are reported for seven 15N labeled 1-oxa and 1-thia-2,3,4-triazoles and three sydnonimines. For the former class of compounds the spin-spin coupling data show a close similarity between the N2N3 and N3N4 bonds which had not previously been suspected from chemical shift measurements.

  1. 15N Abundance of Nodules as an Indicator of N Metabolism in N2-Fixing Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Feldman, Lori; Bryan, Barbara A.; Skeeters, Jerri L.; Kohl, Daniel H.; Amarger, Nöelle; Mariotti, Françoise; Mariotti, André

    1982-01-01

    This paper expands upon previous reports of 15N elevation in nodules (compared to other tissues) of N2-fixing plants. N2-Fixing nodules of Glycine max (soybeans), Vigna unguiculata (cowpea), Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), Phaseolus coccineus (scarlet runner bean), Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite), and Olneya tesota (desert ironwood) were enriched in 15N. Nodules of Vicia faba (fava beans), Arachis hypogaea (peanut), Trifolium pratense (red clover), Pisum sativum (pea), Lathyrus sativus (grass pea), Medicago sativa (alfalfa), and Lupinus mutabilis (South American lupine) were not; nor were the nodules of nine species of N2-fixing nonlegumes. The nitrogen of ineffective nodules of soybeans and cowpeas was not enriched in 15N. Thus, 15N elevation in nodules of these plants depends on active N2-fixation. Results obtained so far on the generality of 15N enrichment in N2-fixing nodules suggest that only the nodules of plants which actively fix N2 and which transport allantoin or allantoic acid exhibit 15N enrichment. PMID:16662517

  2. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  3. (15)N- and (2)H proteomic stable isotope probing links nitrogen flow to archaeal heterotrophic activity.

    PubMed

    Justice, Nicholas B; Li, Zhou; Wang, Yingfeng; Spaudling, Susan E; Mosier, Annika C; Hettich, Robert L; Pan, Chongle; Banfield, Jillian F

    2014-10-01

    Understanding how individual species contribute to nutrient transformations in a microbial community is critical to prediction of overall ecosystem function. We conducted microcosm experiments in which floating acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial biofilms were submerged - recapitulating the final stage in a natural biofilm life cycle. Biofilms were amended with either (15)NH4(+) or deuterium oxide ((2)H2O) and proteomic stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to track the extent to which different members of the community used these molecules in protein synthesis across anaerobic iron-reducing, aerobic iron-reducing and aerobic iron-oxidizing environments. Sulfobacillus spp. synthesized (15)N-enriched protein almost exclusively under iron-reducing conditions whereas the Leptospirillum spp. synthesized (15)N-enriched protein in all conditions. There were relatively few (15)N-enriched archaeal proteins, and all showed low atom% enrichment, consistent with Archaea synthesizing protein using the predominantly (14)N biomass derived from recycled biomolecules. In parallel experiments using (2)H2O, extensive archaeal protein synthesis was detected in all conditions. In contrast, the bacterial species showed little protein synthesis using (2)H2O. The nearly exclusive ability of Archaea to synthesize proteins using (2)H2O may be due to archaeal heterotrophy, whereby Archaea offset deleterious effects of (2)H by accessing (1)H generated by respiration of organic compounds. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Analysis of the coexisting pathways for NO and N2O formation in Chernozem using the (15)N-tracer SimKIM-Advanced model.

    PubMed

    Stange, Claus Florian; Spott, Oliver; Russow, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle consists of a variety of microbial processes. These processes often occur simultaneously in soils, but respond differently to local environmental conditions due to process-specific biochemical restrictions (e.g. oxygen levels). Hence, soil nitrogen cycling (e.g. soil N gas production through nitrification and denitrification) is individually affected through these processes, resulting in the complex and highly dynamic behaviour of total soil N turnover. The development and application of methods that facilitate the quantification of individual contributions of coexisting processes is a fundamental prerequisite for (i) understanding the dynamics of soil N turnover and (ii) implementing these processes in ecosystem models. To explain the unexpected results of the triplet tracer experiment (TTE) of Russow et al. (Role of nitrite and nitric oxide in the processes of nitrification and denitrification in soil: results from (15)N tracer experiments. Soil Biol Biochem. 2009;41:785-795) the existing SimKIM model was extended to the SimKIM-Advanced model through the addition of three separate nitrite subpools associated with ammonia oxidation, oxidation of organic nitrogen (Norg), and denitrification, respectively. For the TTE, individual treatments with (15)N ammonium, (15)N nitrate, and (15)N nitrite were conducted under oxic, hypoxic, and anoxic conditions, respectively, to clarify the role of nitric oxide as a denitrification intermediate during N2O formation. Using a split nitrite pool, this analysis model explains the observed differences in the (15)N enrichments in nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) which occurred in dependence on different oxygen concentrations. The change from oxic over hypoxic to anoxic conditions only marginally increased the NO and N2O release rates (1.3-fold). The analysis using the model revealed that, under oxic and hypoxic conditions, Norg-based N2O production was the dominant pathway, contributing to 90 and 50

  5. Tracking the flow of bacterially derived 13C and 15N through soil faunal feeding channels.

    PubMed

    Crotty, F V; Blackshaw, R P; Murray, P J

    2011-06-15

    The soil food web has been referred to as a 'black box', a 'poor man's tropical rainforest' and an 'enigma', due to its opacity, diversity and the limited insight into feeding specificity. Here we investigate the flow of C and N through the soil food web as a way to gain understanding of the feeding interactions occurring. A bacterium, Pseudomonas lurida, was introduced to soil cores from two different habitats, a grassland and a woodland with the same soil type, enriched to 99 atom% in (13)C and (15)N, to trace the flow of bacterial C and N through the soil food web. Throughout the experiment the soil remained enriched in (13)C and (15)N. Almost all the invertebrates tested gained C and N enrichment indicative of the labelled bacteria, implying that bacterial feeding is a common mechanism within the soil. Only three groups were significantly enriched in both (13)C and (15)N in both habitats. These were Collembola (Entomobryomorpha), Acari (Oribatida), and Nematoda, indicating that these organisms are consuming the most bacteria within both systems. When the invertebrates were grouped into hypothesised trophic levels, those considered secondary decomposers were gaining the most enrichment across all invertebrates tested. This enrichment was also high in the micro-predators within the soil, implying that their main food source was the secondary decomposers, particularly the Collembola. Using an enriched bacterium to track the trophic transfer between organisms within the soil food web is a novel way of empirically showing that interactions are occurring, which normally cannot be seen.

  6. Spatial variations in larch needle and soil δ(15)N at a forest-grassland boundary in northern Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Fujiyoshi, Lei; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Tsukuura, Akemi; Kitayama, Asami; Lopez Caceres, M Larry; Mijidsuren, Byambasuren; Saraadanbazar, Ariunaa; Tsujimura, Maki

    2017-03-01

    The spatial patterns of plant and soil δ(15)N and associated processes in the N cycle were investigated at a forest-grassland boundary in northern Mongolia. Needles of Larix sibirica Ledeb. and soils collected from two study areas were analysed to calculate the differences in δ(15)N between needle and soil (Δδ(15)N). Δδ(15)N showed a clear variation, ranging from -8 ‰ in the forest to -2 ‰ in the grassland boundary, and corresponded to the accumulation of organic layer. In the forest, the separation of available N produced in the soil with (15)N-depleted N uptake by larch and (15)N-enriched N immobilization by microorganisms was proposed to cause large Δδ(15)N, whereas in the grassland boundary, small Δδ(15)N was explained by the transport of the most available N into larch. The divergence of available N between larch and microorganisms in the soil, and the accumulation of diverged N in the organic layer control the variation in Δδ(15)N.

  7. Effects of Four Different Restoration Treatments on the Natural Abundance of 15N Stable Isotopes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Temperton, Vicky M.; Märtin, Lea L. A.; Röder, Daniela; Lücke, Andreas; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    δ15N signals in plant and soil material integrate over a number of biogeochemical processes related to nitrogen (N) and therefore provide information on net effects of multiple processes on N dynamics. In general little is known in many grassland restoration projects on soil–plant N dynamics in relation to the restoration treatments. In particular, δ15N signals may be a useful tool to assess whether abiotic restoration treatments have produced the desired result. In this study we used the range of abiotic and biotic conditions provided by a restoration experiment to assess to whether the restoration treatments and/or plant functional identity and legume neighborhood affected plant δ15N signals. The restoration treatments consisted of hay transfer and topsoil removal, thus representing increasing restoration effort, from no restoration measures, through biotic manipulation to major abiotic manipulation. We measured δ15N and %N in six different plant species (two non-legumes and four legumes) across the restoration treatments. We found that restoration treatments were clearly reflected in δ15N of the non-legume species, with very depleted δ15N associated with low soil N, and our results suggest this may be linked to uptake of ammonium (rather than nitrate). The two non-legume species differed considerably in their δ15N signals, which may be related to the two species forming different kinds of mycorrhizal symbioses. Plant δ15N signals could clearly separate legumes from non-legumes, but our results did not allow for an assessment of legume neighborhood effects on non-legume δ15N signals. We discuss our results in the light of what the δ15N signals may be telling us about plant–soil N dynamics and their potential value as an indicator for N dynamics in restoration. PMID:22645597

  8. Effects of four different restoration treatments on the natural abundance of (15)n stable isotopes in plants.

    PubMed

    Temperton, Vicky M; Märtin, Lea L A; Röder, Daniela; Lücke, Andreas; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    δ(15)N signals in plant and soil material integrate over a number of biogeochemical processes related to nitrogen (N) and therefore provide information on net effects of multiple processes on N dynamics. In general little is known in many grassland restoration projects on soil-plant N dynamics in relation to the restoration treatments. In particular, δ(15)N signals may be a useful tool to assess whether abiotic restoration treatments have produced the desired result. In this study we used the range of abiotic and biotic conditions provided by a restoration experiment to assess to whether the restoration treatments and/or plant functional identity and legume neighborhood affected plant δ(15)N signals. The restoration treatments consisted of hay transfer and topsoil removal, thus representing increasing restoration effort, from no restoration measures, through biotic manipulation to major abiotic manipulation. We measured δ(15)N and %N in six different plant species (two non-legumes and four legumes) across the restoration treatments. We found that restoration treatments were clearly reflected in δ(15)N of the non-legume species, with very depleted δ(15)N associated with low soil N, and our results suggest this may be linked to uptake of ammonium (rather than nitrate). The two non-legume species differed considerably in their δ(15)N signals, which may be related to the two species forming different kinds of mycorrhizal symbioses. Plant δ(15)N signals could clearly separate legumes from non-legumes, but our results did not allow for an assessment of legume neighborhood effects on non-legume δ(15)N signals. We discuss our results in the light of what the δ(15)N signals may be telling us about plant-soil N dynamics and their potential value as an indicator for N dynamics in restoration.

  9. Vertical δ13C and δ15N changes during pedogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunn, Melanie; Spielvogel, Sandra; Wells, Andrew; Condron, Leo; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2015-04-01

    The natural abundance of soil organic matter (SOM) stable C and N isotope ratios are subjected to vertical changes throughout the soil profile. This vertical distribution is a widely reported phenomenon across varieties of ecosystems and constitutes important insights of soil carbon cycling. In most ecosystems, SOM becomes enriched in heavy isotopes by several per mill in the first few centimeters of the topsoil. The enrichment of 13C in SOM with soil depth is attributed to biological and physical-chemical processes in soil e.g., plant physiological impacts, microbial decomposition, sorption and transport processes. Such vertical trends in 13C and 15N abundance have rarely been related to SOM composition during pedogenesis. The aims of our study were to investigate short and long-term δ13C and δ15N depth changes and their interrelations under progressing pedogenesis and ecosystem development. We sampled soils across the well studied fordune progradation Haast-chronosequence, a dune ridge system under super-humid climate at the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island (43° 53' S, 169° 3' E). Soils from 11 sites with five replicates each covered a time span of around 2870 yr of soil development (from Arenosol to Podzol). Vertical changes of δ13C and δ15N values of SOM were investigated in the organic layers and in 1-cm depth intervals of the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. With increasing soil depth SOM became enriched in δ13C by 1.9 ± SE 0.1 o and in δ15N by 6.0 ± 0.4 ‰˙Litter δ13C values slightly decreased with increasing soil age (r = -0.61; p = 0.00) likely due to less efficient assimilation linked to nutrient limitations. Fractionation processes during mycorrhizal transfer appeared to affect δ15N values in the litter. We found a strong decrease of δ15N in the early succession stages ≤ 300 yr B.P. (r = -0.95; p = 0.00). Positive relations of vertical 13C and 15N enrichment with soil age might be related to decomposition and appeared to be

  10. Nitrogen assimilation and dissimilation by bacteria and benthic microalgae in tidal mudflat sediment in a 15N labeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dähnke, K.; Moneta, A.; Veuger, B.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    In a short-term 15N-labeling experiment, we investigated the changes in relative utilization of reactive nitrogen in tidal flat sediment, focusing on the relative importance of assimilatory versus dissimilatory processes and the role of benthic microalgae therein. 15N-labeled ammonium and nitrate were added separately to homogenized tidal flat sediment, and 15N was subsequently traced into bulk sediment and inorganic nutrients in pore water. Integration of results in an N cycle model allowed us to quantify rates for the major assimilatory and dissimilatory processes in the sediment. Overall, the results indicate that the equilibrium between assimilation and dissimilation in this tidal mudflat is mainly dependent on the nitrogen source: Nitrate is utilized almost exclusively dissimilatory via denitrification, whereas ammonium is rapidly assimilated, with about a quarter of this assimilation due to BMA activity. The major influence of benthic microalgae is on assimilation of ammonium, ceasing BMA activity turns the sediments from a net ammonium sink to a net source. There is little evidence of dissimilative processes like nitrification in undisturbed sediments, but high initial nitrification rates suggest that in a dynamic environment like tidal flats, intense and fast nitrification/denitrification of ammonium is abundant. The driving mechanisms for assimilation or dissimilation accordingly appear to be ruled to a large extent by external physical forcing, with the entire system being capable of rapid shifts following environmental changes. Our combined experimental and model approach reveals that selective removal of labeled compounds takes place for both ammonium and nitrate. Mechanisms remain unclear, but this finding clearly challenges the traditional labeling approach and underscores the need to consider selective uptake in future labeling studies. Ignoring such selective uptake mechanisms will lead to misinterpretation of process rates when these are estimated

  11. Production of 15N-labeled α-amanitin in Galerina marginata

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Brandon; Sgambelluri, R. Michael; Angelos, Evan R.; Li, Xuan; Holmes, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    α-Amanitin is the major causal constituent of deadly Amanita mushrooms that account for the majority of fatal mushroom poisonings worldwide. It is also an important biochemical tool for the study of its target, RNA polymerase II. The commercial supply of this bicyclic peptide comes directly from A. phalloides, the death cap mushroom, which is collected from its natural habitat. Isotopically labeled amanitin could be useful for clinical and forensic applications, but α-amanitin has not been chemically synthesized and A. phalloides cannot be cultured on artificial medium. Using Galerina marginata, an unrelated saprobic mushroom that grows and produces α-amanitin in culture, we describe a method for producing 15N-labeled α-amanitin using growth media containing 15N as sole nitrogen source. A key to success was preparing 15N-enriched yeast extract via a novel method designated “glass bead-assisted maturation.” In the presence of the labeled yeast extract and 15N-NH4Cl, α-amanitin was produced with >97% isotope enrichment. The labeled product was confirmed by HPLC, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and NMR. PMID:26100667

  12. Production of (15)N-labeled α-amanitin in Galerina marginata.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; DuBois, Brandon; Sgambelluri, R Michael; Angelos, Evan R; Li, Xuan; Holmes, Daniel; Walton, Jonathan D

    2015-09-01

    α-Amanitin is the major causal constituent of deadly Amanita mushrooms that account for the majority of fatal mushroom poisonings worldwide. It is also an important biochemical tool for the study of its target, RNA polymerase II. The commercial supply of this bicyclic peptide comes from Amanita phalloides, the death cap mushroom, which is collected from the wild. Isotopically labeled amanitin could be useful for clinical and forensic applications, but α-amanitin has not been chemically synthesized and A. phalloides cannot be cultured on artificial medium. Using Galerina marginata, an unrelated saprotrophic mushroom that grows and produces α-amanitin in culture, we describe a method for producing (15)N-labeled α-amanitin using growth media containing (15)N as sole nitrogen source. A key to success was preparing (15)N-enriched yeast extract via a novel method designated "glass bead-assisted maturation." In the presence of the labeled yeast extract and (15)N-NH4Cl, α-amanitin was produced with >97% isotope enrichment. The labeled product was confirmed by HPLC, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and NMR.

  13. Quantifying remobilization of pre-existing nitrogen from cuttings to new growth of woody plants using 15N at natural abundance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For measurements of nitrogen isotope composition at natural abundance, carry-over of pre-existing nitrogen remobilized to new plant growth can cause deviation of measured isotope composition (δ15N) from the δ15Nof newly acquired nitrogen. To account for this problem, a two-step approach was proposed to quantify and correct for remobilized nitrogen from vegetative cuttings of Populus balsamifera L. grown with either nitrate (δ15N = 58.5‰) or ammonium (δ15N = −0.96‰). First, the fraction of carry-over nitrogen remaining in the cutting was estimated by isotope mass balance. Then measured δ15N values were adjusted for the fraction of pre-existing nitrogen remobilized to the plant. Results Mean plant δ15N prior to correction was 49‰ and −5.8‰ under nitrate and ammonium, respectively. Plant δ15N was non-linearly correlated to biomass (r2 = 0.331 and 0.249 for nitrate and ammonium, respectively; P < 0.05) where the δ15N of plants with low biomass approached the δ15N of the pre-existing nitrogen. Approximately 50% of cutting nitrogen was not remobilized, irrespective of size. The proportion of carry-over nitrogen in new growth was not different between sources but ranged from less than 1% to 21% and was dependent on plant biomass and, to a lesser degree, the size of the cutting. The δ15N of newly acquired nitrogen averaged 52.7‰ and −6.4‰ for nitrate and ammonium-grown plants, respectively; both lower than their source values, as expected. Since there was a greater difference in δ15N between the carried-over pre-existing and newly assimilated nitrogen where nitrate was the source, the difference between measured δ15N and adjusted δ15N was also greater. There was no significant relationship between biomass and plant δ15N with either ammonium or nitrate after adjusting for carry-over nitrogen. Conclusion Here, we provide evidence of remobilized pre-existing nitrogen influencing δ15N of new growth of P. balsamifera L

  14. Quantifying remobilization of pre-existing nitrogen from cuttings to new growth of woody plants using 15N at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Kalcsits, Lee A; Guy, Robert D

    2013-07-12

    For measurements of nitrogen isotope composition at natural abundance, carry-over of pre-existing nitrogen remobilized to new plant growth can cause deviation of measured isotope composition (δ15N) from the δ15Nof newly acquired nitrogen. To account for this problem, a two-step approach was proposed to quantify and correct for remobilized nitrogen from vegetative cuttings of Populus balsamifera L. grown with either nitrate (δ15N = 58.5‰) or ammonium (δ15N = -0.96‰). First, the fraction of carry-over nitrogen remaining in the cutting was estimated by isotope mass balance. Then measured δ15N values were adjusted for the fraction of pre-existing nitrogen remobilized to the plant. Mean plant δ15N prior to correction was 49‰ and -5.8‰ under nitrate and ammonium, respectively. Plant δ15N was non-linearly correlated to biomass (r2 = 0.331 and 0.249 for nitrate and ammonium, respectively; P < 0.05) where the δ15N of plants with low biomass approached the δ15N of the pre-existing nitrogen. Approximately 50% of cutting nitrogen was not remobilized, irrespective of size. The proportion of carry-over nitrogen in new growth was not different between sources but ranged from less than 1% to 21% and was dependent on plant biomass and, to a lesser degree, the size of the cutting. The δ15N of newly acquired nitrogen averaged 52.7‰ and -6.4‰ for nitrate and ammonium-grown plants, respectively; both lower than their source values, as expected. Since there was a greater difference in δ15N between the carried-over pre-existing and newly assimilated nitrogen where nitrate was the source, the difference between measured δ15N and adjusted δ15N was also greater. There was no significant relationship between biomass and plant δ15N with either ammonium or nitrate after adjusting for carry-over nitrogen. Here, we provide evidence of remobilized pre-existing nitrogen influencing δ15N of new growth of P. balsamifera L. A simple, though approximate

  15. /sup 18/O isotope shift in /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopy. 2. Synthesis of /sup 15/N, /sup 18/O-labeled hydroxylamine hydrochloride

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, G.; Van Etten, R.L.

    1986-03-12

    Since hydroxylamine can serve as a key intermediate in the synthesis of a variety of compounds, the synthesis of (/sup 15/N, /sup 18/O)-labelled hydroxylamine hydrochloride was undertaken. Published procedures for the synthesis of hydroxylamine resulted in poor yields in some cases and in lower percentage of /sup 18/O in the product than expected in other cases. The compound was synthesized in dry tetrahydrofuran (THF) by treating NaNO/sub 2/ with borane-methyl sulfide. The course of the reaction was examined using /sup 11/B NMR spectroscopy, and the product yield was 74%. The /sup 18/O enrichment was demonstrated by both mass spectrometry and /sup 15/N NMR of the isolated acetoxime. 23 references, 1 figure.

  16. Sewage derive [sup 15]N in the Baltic traced in fucus

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbie, J.E.; Fry, B. ); Larsson, U.; Elmgren, R. )

    1990-01-09

    Himmerfjarden, a fjord-like bay on the eastern shore of the Baltic, receives treated sewage from 250,000 inhabitants. Because the inorganic N in the effluent is enriched in [sup 15]N through denitrification, nitrification, and ammonia volatilization, an analysis of the distribution of [sup 15]N in the Bay tells how far from the source the sewage nitrogen moves. The attached macroalga Fucus vesiculosus was collected in early May from rocky shore at 0-0.5 m depth and the [sup 15]N content of the tips of the fronds analyzed. This N represents uptake and storage during the previous six months and growth during March and April. The [delta][sup 15]N was uniformly high (11-13[per thousand]) in the main body of the Bay within 15 km from the sewage source. Beyond 15 km values decreased with distance to a low of 4.6[per thousand] at 35 km, where the Bay ends and the coastal waters begin. Using the 11-13 and 4.6[per thousand] as endmembers, the percentage of sewage N making up the Fucus at any point may be calculated. The [delta][sub 15]N of particulate organic matter in the offshore Baltic waters was around 0[per thousand] and Fucus had an [delta][sup 15]N about 1.5[per thousand] higher than the POM. From this and other evidence we conclude that there is a belt of coastal water with an elevated [delta][sup 15]N lying along the east coast of the Baltic. This presumably derives from sewage and perhaps from agriculture and is potentially of use as a tracer of coastal zone/pelagic zone interactions.

  17. Using a macroalgal δ15N bioassay to detect cruise ship waste water effluent inputs.

    PubMed

    Kaldy, James

    2011-08-01

    Green macroalgae bioassays were used to determine if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in a small harbor. Opportunistic green macroalgae (Ulva spp.) were collected, cultured under nutrient depleted conditions and characterized with regard to N content and δ15N. Samples of algae were used in controlled incubations to evaluate the direction of isotope shift from exposure to CSWWE. Algae samples exposed to CSWWE exhibited an increase of 1-2.5‰ in δ15N values indicating that the CSWWE had an enriched isotope signature. In contrast, algae samples exposed to field conditions exhibited a significant decrease in the observed δ15N indicating that a light N source was used. Isotopically light, riverine nitrogen derived from N2-fixing trees in the watershed may be a N source utilized by algae. These experiments indicate that the δ15N CSWWE signature was not detectable under the CSWWE loading conditions of this experiment.

  18. Macroalgae δ15N values in well-mixed estuaries: Indicator of anthropogenic nitrogen input or macroalgae metabolism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Guillou, Gaël; Mornet, Françoise; Richard, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Although nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in macroalgae is widely used as a bioindicator of anthropogenic nitrogen inputs to the coastal zone, recent studies suggest the possible role of macroalgae metabolism in δ15N variability. Simultaneous determinations of δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) along the land-sea continuum, inter-species variability of δ15N and its sensitivity to environmental factors are necessary to confirm the efficiency of macroalgae δ15N in monitoring nitrogen origin in mixed-use watersheds. In this study, δ15N of annual and perennial macroalgae (Ulva sp., Enteromorpha sp., Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus) are compared to δ15N-DIN along the Charente Estuary, after characterizing δ15N of the three main DIN sources (i.e. cultivated area, pasture, sewage treatment plant outlet). During late winter and spring, when human activities produce high DIN inputs, DIN sources exhibit distinct δ15N signals in nitrate (NO) and ammonium (NH): cultivated area (+6.5 ± 0.6‰ and +9.0 ± 11.0‰), pasture (+9.2 ± 1.8‰ and +12.4‰) and sewage treatment plant discharge (+16.9 ± 8.7‰ and +25.4 ± 5.9‰). While sources show distinct δN- in this multiple source catchment, the overall mixture of NO sources - generally >95% DIN - leads to low variations of δN-NO at the mouth of the estuary (+7.7 to +8.4‰). Even if estuarine δN-NO values are not significantly different from pristine continental and oceanic site (+7.3‰ and +7.4‰), macroalgae δ15N values are generally higher at the mouth of the estuary. This highlights high anthropogenic DIN inputs in the estuary, and enhanced contribution of 15N-depleted NH in oceanic waters. Although seasonal variations in δN-NO are low, the same temporal trends in macroalgae δ15N values at estuarine and oceanic sites, and inter-species differences in δ15N values, suggest that macroalgae δ15N values might be modified by the metabolic response of macroalgae to environmental parameters (e

  19. Isotopic analysis of bulk, LMW, and HMW DON d15N indicates recycled nitrogen release from marine DON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, A. N.; Sigman, D. M.; Lipschultz, F.; Kustka, A.; Capone, D. G.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) concentration and stable isotope ratio (d15N) measurements were made on bulk and size fractionated surface ocean dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) samples collected in the oligotrophic North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The bulk DON concentration in the upper 100 m is similar between the North Atlantic and North Pacific, between 4.5 and 5.0 uM, but the average d15N of bulk DON is significantly different, 3.9 per mil vs. air in the North Atlantic and 4.7 per mil in the North Pacific. The d15N of both bulk and HMW DON from the western tropical North Atlantic are similar to previous measurements, ~4.0 to 4.5 per mil. We report the first measurements of LMW DON d15N, which is consistently lower than HMW DON d15N. Neither the concentration nor d15N of bulk or size-fractionated DON varied with in situ N2 fixation rate, although significant variation in bulk and LMW DON d15N was observed between January and July of the same year in the western tropical North Atlantic. We propose a conceptual model to explain 1) the elevated d15N of bulk DON relative to other surface ocean N pools and fluxes, 2) the elevation of HMW DON d15N relative to LMW DON d15N, and 3) the inter-basin difference in the d15N of bulk DON. In this model, DON is produced from suspended particulate organic nitrogen (PON) without isotope fractionation because the conversion from PON to DON largely does not involve N-bearing bonds. In contrast, deamination and amide hydrolysis, with N isotope effects of 3 to 10 per mil, are major mechanisms by which DON is converted to ammonia and/or to other simple N compounds (e.g., amino acids). Thus these N-specific DON loss reactions result in an elevated d15N of residual DON relative to the parent DON and therefore also to the PON source. Moreover, the ammonium and simple organic N compounds released by microbial DON degradation are efficiently reassimilated back into the PON pool, as an integral part of the regenerated N cycle that further lowers the d15N

  20. Delta15N values of tropical savanna and monsoon forest species reflect root specialisations and soil nitrogen status.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S; Stewart, G R

    2003-03-01

    species. Plants from annually burnt savanna had significantly higher delta(15)N values compared to plants from less frequently burnt savanna, suggesting that foliar (15)N natural abundance could be used as marker for assessing historic fire regimes. Australian woodland and savanna species had low leaf delta(15)N and N content compared to species from equivalent African communities indicating that Australian biota are the more N depauperate. The largest differences in leaf delta(15)N occurred between the dominant ECM Australian and African savanna (miombo) species, which were depleted and enriched in (15)N, respectively. While the depleted delta(15)N of Australian ECM species are similar to those of previous reports on ECM species in natural plant communities, the (15)N-enriched delta(15)N of African ECM species represent an anomaly.

  1. Longitudinal differences in 15N between mothers and offspring during and after weaning in a small cooperative mammal, the meerkat (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Dalerum, Fredrik; Bennett, Nigel C; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2007-01-01

    Gestation and subsequent lactation are energetically costly life history events for mammalian females. We used longitudinal delta15N data from hair samples from offspring and their mothers to explore lactation patterns in a small cooperative mammal, the meerkat (Suricata suricatta). Lactation enriched hair from meerkat offspring in 15N compared with that of their mothers, and this enrichment gradually declined after weaning. Although the observed peak enrichment of approximately 1 per thousand was substantially below the predicted levels of trophic enrichment in capital versus income breeders, we suggest that our results reflect an income breeding tactic in this species. Our study supports the notion that delta15N analyses can be a useful tool to investigate lactation schedules in mammals. However, reliable conclusions from 15N data regarding the nutritional tactics of mammalian females during reproduction may be limited by our scant understanding of the effects of various physiological variables on isotope assimilation.

  2. High-Precision Measurements of 15N15N, 14N15N, and 14N2 in N2 and Potential Applications to Oceanic Nitrogen Cycle Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Yeung, L.; Young, E. D.; Ostrom, N. E.; Haslun, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    The balance of nitrogen fixation and nitrogen loss in the oceans is uncertain. For example, anaerobic ammonia oxidation could account for 50% or more of marine N2 production, although its global importance is still poorly known. Isotopic ratios in fixed nitrogen species (e.g., δ15N and δ18O values of NO2- and NO3-) are widely used to trace preservation and removal of N-bearing compounds and/or isotopic variations of their different sources. However, these approaches in general probe only one side of the nitrogen mass balance—the "fixed" nitrogen reservoir—so they offer few constraints on the ultimate loss of nitrogen from that pool as N2. The rare isotopologue ratio 15N15N/14N2 in N2may provide information about those nitrogen-loss processes directly. We will report the first measurements of Δ30 (the abundance of 15N15N relative to that predicted by chance alone), made on a unique high-resolution mass spectrometer (the Nu Instruments Panorama), and we will discuss the potential utility of Δ30 as an independent tracer of the nitrogen cycle. The parameter Δ30 is insensitive to the bulk 15N/14N isotopic ratio of the reservoir; instead, it reflects isotopic ordering in N2, which is altered when N-N bonds are made or broken. Our preliminary measurements of N2 from denitrifying soils and pure cultures of denitrifiers indicate large kinetic isotopic effects during N-N bond formation that favor 15N15N production during denitrification. We also observed a nonstochastic excess of 15N15N in tropospheric N2 [Δ30 = +19.05 ± 0.12‰ (1σ)]. This excess likely comes from fixed-nitrogen loss processes in the biosphere. Variations in Δ30 of N2 from pure culture experiments (+16.96 to +18.95‰) probably reflect the different isotopic signatures of the enzymes that catalyze denitrification. So, enzyme-specific Δ30 values of dissolved N2 should provide information about the importance of different biochemical pathways of fixed-nitrogen loss (e.g., denitrification vs

  3. Heavy δ 15N in Intertidal Benthic Algae and Invertebrates in the Scheldt Estuary (The Netherlands): Effect of River Nitrogen Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, P.; Stal, L. J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.

    2000-09-01

    The study investigated δ 15N in the intertidal benthic food webs from the middle Westerschelde Estuary and the middle Oosterschelde. Much heavier δ 15N values were observed for the main benthic primary producers and invertebrates in the Westerschelde Estuary. In the Oosterschelde, mean δ 15N values ranged from 1·4 to 7·3‰ for SOM and suspended POM, respectively, to 6·3 to 9·1‰ for Fucus vesiculosus and benthic diatoms, respectively. Mean δ 15N values in benthic invertebrates ranged from 9·7‰ for Gammarus locusta to 15·4‰ for Tubificoides sp. In the Westerschelde Estuary, mean δ 15N increased from 8·1 to 8·6‰ for suspended POM and SOM, respectively, to heavier δ 15N from 15·9 to 28·5‰ for F. vesiculosus and benthic diatoms, respectively. Mean δ 15N for intertidal invertebrates ranged from 18·1‰ for Lumbricillus sp. to 20·7‰ for Eulimnogammarus obtusatus. Higher enrichment in 15N in benthic primary producers and invertebrates from the Westerschelde Estuary are most likely due to the incorporation of 15N-enriched DIN carried by the Scheldt River by benthic algae and, then by benthic consumers. These results point to the fact that δ 15N in benthic estuarine food webs may respond directly to anthropogenic nitrogen inputs delivered into estuaries by rivers which drain highly urbanized areas.

  4. Cryptic or day-to-day parts of the riverbed N cycle - new challenges for 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimmer, Mark; Ouyang, Liao; Lansdown, Katrina

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) not only changed our understanding of the nitrogen cycle in aquatic ecosystems but it also undermined some of the key 15N techniques used to study it. Reformulations of principle equations and the development of new 15N2 and 15N2O techniques enabled the simultaneous quantification of N2 production by anammox and denitrification in mainly soft, cohesive sediments where redox gradients are clearly defined and solute exchanged governed by diffusion. At the heart of the application of 15N, for the quantification of natural 14N cycling, is the key assumption that the respective pools of 15N and 14N are evenly mixed and that both are cycled without bias towards each other. Recent evidence, however, from a variety of aquatic ecosystems, suggests that this may not be the case. For example, organic N may be oxidised directly to N2 gas without ever mixing with the inorganic pool or inorganic intermediates (e.g. nitrite) are 'shunted' internally and also fail to mix evenly with the applied tracer pool. Our most recent work in permeable, oxic gravel riverbeds presents some particular challenges to the application of 15N. In these systems, a tight coupling between aerobic nitrification and anaerobic N2 production - in the presence of 100

  5. Entanglement of Spin States in 15N@C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, W.; Weidinger, A.; Mehring, M.

    2004-09-01

    The endohedral fullerene 15N@C60 comprises an electron spin S = 3/2 coupled to a nuclear spin I = 1/2 and is therefore ideally suited for experimental testing of basic properties of quantum mechanics. We will show that the 15N@C60 molecule represents a multi qubit system where different kinds of entangled states can be generated.

  6. Probing platinum azido complexes by 14N and 15N NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Farrer, Nicola J; Gierth, Peter; Sadler, Peter J

    2011-10-17

    Metal azido complexes are of general interest due to their high energetic properties, and platinum azido complexes in particular because of their potential as photoactivatable anticancer prodrugs. However, azido ligands are difficult to probe by NMR spectroscopy due to the quadrupolar nature of (14)N and the lack of scalar (1)H coupling to enhance the sensitivity of the less abundant (15)N by using polarisation transfer. In this work, we report (14)N and (15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of cis,trans,cis-[Pt(N(3))(2)(OH)(2)(NH(3))] (1) and trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N(3))(2)(OH)(2)(X)(Y)], where X=Y=NH(3) (2); X=NH(3), Y=py (3) (py=pyridine); X=Y=py (4); and selected Pt(II) precursors. These studies provide the first (15)N NMR data for azido groups in coordination complexes. We discuss one- and three-bond J((15)N,(195)Pt) couplings for azido and am(m)ine ligands. The (14)N(α) (coordinated azido nitrogen) signal in the Pt(IV) azido complexes is extremely broad (W(1/2)≈2124 Hz for 4) in comparison to other metal azido complexes, attributable to a highly asymmetrical electric field gradient at the (14)N(α) atom. Through the use of anti-ringing pulse sequences, the (14)N NMR spectra, which show resolution of the broad (14)N(α) peak, were obtained rapidly (e.g., 1.5 h for 10 mM 4). The linewidths of the (14)N(α) signals correlate with the viscosity of the solvent. For (15) N-enriched samples, it is possible to detect azido (15)N resonances directly, which will allow photoreactions to be followed by 1D (15)N NMR spectroscopy. The T(1) relaxation times for 3 and 4 were in the range 5.7-120 s for (15)N, and 0.9-11.3 ms for (14)N. Analysis of the (1)J((15)N,(195)Pt) coupling constants suggests that an azido ligand has a moderately strong trans influence in octahedral Pt(IV) complexes, within the series 2-pic

  7. Community 15N isoscapes to resolve plant-plant-interactions at the spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Christine; Rascher, Katherine G.; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Isoscapes have greatly improved our ability to understand biogeochemical processes on continental to global scales. However, the isoscapes framework may also have significant potential to resolve the spatial component of within-community interactions. For example, exotic plant invaders often exert strong impacts on ecosystem functioning, particularly regarding water-, carbon- and nutrient-cycles, but the spatial extent of such alterations is largely unknown. Here we show that massive N input by the N2-fixing exotic invasive Acacia longifolia to a Portuguese dune system can be traced using spatially resolved information on native plants' leaf δ15N. We found isotopic signatures of N to differ strongly between the native system (δ15N c. -10 o) and the atmospherically derived N in A. longifolia phyllodes (δ15N c. 0 o). Thus, sources of N for native plants could be readily distinguished. Leaf δ15N of a native, non-fixing species was increasingly enriched the closer the plant grew to the invader, indicating uptake of fixed N provided by A. longifolia. The enrichment was evident far beyond the stands of the invader, demonstrating that A. longifolia affected N budgets of native species up to a distance of 8 m exceeding the margin of the canopy. Furthermore, using the isoscapes approach, we were able to quantify the total area of N enrichment and could thus show that the area affected by invasion was at least 3.5 times larger than the area actually occupied by the invader. However, a native N2-fixing species had no such effects. Thus, downscaling isoscapes to the community level opens new frontiers in quantifying the spatial dimension of functional changes associated with plant invasions. Moreover, considering the feasibility and applicability of this approach, it may provide a promising tool to identify, quantify and monitor different types of functional plant-plant interactions within communities at a spatially explicit scale.

  8. Potential probe for examining opiate-receptor interactions: model compound study of dynamic effects on /sup 15/N INEPT enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, K.H.; Mikita, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    Model systems were chosen in an attempt to mimic the proton exchange environment of an agonist nitrogen in an opiate-receptor interaction. The two model systems studied were an ammonium: 18-crown-6 ether complex and a quinuclidine-trifluoroacetic acid ion pair. Each system was examined for their effects on /sup 15/N NMR INEPT enhancements. Both models were found to retard proton exchange dynamics, as observed by increased enhancements relative to free ions in neutral aqueous solutions. These results suggest that the confinement of a protonated nitrogen, such as that expected in receptor binding, may alter exchange dynamics to favor INEPT enhancements, while unbound agonists would remain unenhanced. As a result, /sup 15/N NMR INEPT enhancements from a solution of receptor subtypes with an appropriate /sup 15/N-labeled agonist may present a means of exploring the dynamics of direct opiate-receptor interactions.

  9. Importance of Nitrate Attenuation In A Small Wetland Following Forest Harvest: 18O/16O, 15N/14N in nitrate and 15N/14N) in vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoelstra, J.; Schiff, S. L.; Semkin, R. G.; Jeffries, D. S.; Elgood, R. J.

    2004-05-01

    Forest harvest can result in elevated nitrate concentrations in streams and groundwater affecting forest regeneration and downstream aquatic ecosystems. Turkey Lakes Watershed, located near Sault Ste Marie, Ontario (TLW), exhibits relatively high nitrate export due to naturally high rates of nitrification. During a forest harvest experiment at the TLW, stable isotope techniques were used to investigate nitrate attenuation in an intermediate position natural wetland receiving high concentrations of nitrate following forest clear-cutting. Isotopic analysis of nitrate (18O/16O, 15N/14N) and vegetation (15N/14N) demonstrated that denitrification and plant uptake of nitrate resulted in significantly lower nitrate concentrations in wetland outflow compared to incoming stream water and groundwater. The 0.2-hectare forested swamp, too small to show up on standard topographic maps, retained 65 to 100 percent of upgradient nitrate inputs, elevated due to increased nitrification in soils. The 15N/14N enrichment factor associated with nitrate attenuation in wetland surface water was lower than observed during denitrification in groundwaters, suggesting that denitrification proceeded to completion in some areas of the wetland. Even small, shallow, carbon rich pockets of organic matter in topographic depressions can significantly affect biogeochemical fluxes of C, N, S and Ca. Future forest management practices designed to recognize and preserve small wetlands could significantly reduce the potentially detrimental effects of forest harvest on aquatic systems.

  10. Exploring the nitrogen ingestion of aphids--a new method using electrical penetration graph and (15)N labelling.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Franziska; Opitz, Sebastian E W; Inselsbacher, Erich; Ganeteg, Ulrika; Näsholm, Torgny; Ninkovic, Velemir

    2013-01-01

    Studying plant-aphid interactions is challenging as aphid feeding is a complex process hidden in the plant tissue. Here we propose a combination of two well established methods to study nutrient acquisition by aphids focusing on the uptake of isotopically labelled nitrogen ((15)N). We combined the Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) technique that allows detailed recording of aphid feeding behaviour and stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to precisely measure the uptake of nitrogen. Bird cherry-oat aphids Rhopalosiphum padi L. (Hemiptera, Aphididae) fed for 24 h on barley plants (Hordeum vulgare L., cultivar Lina, Poaceae) that were cultivated with a (15)N enriched nutrient solution. The time aphids fed in the phloem was strongly positive correlated with their (15)N uptake. All other single behavioural phases were not correlated with (15)N enrichment in the aphids, which corroborates their classification as non-feeding EPG phases. In addition, phloem-feeding and (15)N enrichment of aphids was divided into two groups. One group spent only short time in the phloem phase and was unsuccessful in nitrogen acquisition, while the other group displayed longer phloem-feeding phases and was successful in nitrogen acquisition. This suggests that several factors such as the right feeding site, time span of feeding and individual conditions play a role for the aphids to acquire nutrients successfully. The power of this combination of methods for studying plant-aphid interactions is discussed.

  11. Exploring the Nitrogen Ingestion of Aphids — A New Method Using Electrical Penetration Graph and 15N Labelling

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, Franziska; Opitz, Sebastian E. W.; Inselsbacher, Erich; Ganeteg, Ulrika; Näsholm, Torgny; Ninkovic, Velemir

    2013-01-01

    Studying plant-aphid interactions is challenging as aphid feeding is a complex process hidden in the plant tissue. Here we propose a combination of two well established methods to study nutrient acquisition by aphids focusing on the uptake of isotopically labelled nitrogen (15N). We combined the Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) technique that allows detailed recording of aphid feeding behaviour and stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to precisely measure the uptake of nitrogen. Bird cherry-oat aphids Rhopalosiphum padi L. (Hemiptera, Aphididae) fed for 24 h on barley plants (Hordeum vulgare L., cultivar Lina, Poaceae) that were cultivated with a 15N enriched nutrient solution. The time aphids fed in the phloem was strongly positive correlated with their 15N uptake. All other single behavioural phases were not correlated with 15N enrichment in the aphids, which corroborates their classification as non-feeding EPG phases. In addition, phloem-feeding and 15N enrichment of aphids was divided into two groups. One group spent only short time in the phloem phase and was unsuccessful in nitrogen acquisition, while the other group displayed longer phloem-feeding phases and was successful in nitrogen acquisition. This suggests that several factors such as the right feeding site, time span of feeding and individual conditions play a role for the aphids to acquire nutrients successfully. The power of this combination of methods for studying plant-aphid interactions is discussed. PMID:24376642

  12. (15)N natural abundance of non-fixing woody species in the Brazilian dry forest (caatinga).

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Ana Dolores Santiago; de Sa Barretto Sampaio, Everardo Valadares; Menezes, Romulo Simoes Cezar; Tiessen, Holm

    2010-06-01

    Foliar delta(15)N values are useful to calculate N(2) fixation and N losses from ecosystems. However, a definite pattern among vegetation types is not recognised and few data are available for semi-arid areas. We sampled four sites in the Brazilian caatinga, along a water availability gradient. Sites with lower annual rainfall (700 mm) but more uniform distribution (six months) had delta(15)N values of 9.4 and 10.1 per thousand, among the highest already reported, and significantly greater than those (6.5 and 6.3 per thousand) of sites with higher rainfall (800 mm) but less uniform distribution (three months). There were no significant differences at each site among species or between non-fixing legume and non-legume species, in spite of the higher N content of the first group. Therefore, they constitute ideal reference plants in estimations of legume N(2) fixation. The higher values could result from higher losses of (15)N depleted gases or lower losses of enriched (15)N material.

  13. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templer, P.H.; Mack, M.C.; Chapin, F. S.; Christenson, L.M.; Compton, J.E.; Crook, H.D.; Currie, W.S.; Curtis, C.J.; Dail, D.B.; D'Antonio, C. M.; Emmett, B.A.; Epstein, H.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Gundersen, P.; Hobbie, S.E.; Holland, K.; Hooper, D.U.; Hungate, B.A.; Lamontagne, S.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Osenberg, C.W.; Perakis, S.S.; Schleppi, P.; Schimel, J.; Schmidt, I.K.; Sommerkorn, M.; Spoelstra, J.; Tietema, A.; Wessel, W.W.; Zak, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3–18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C: N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N·ha-1·yr-1 above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer addition.

  14. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies.

    PubMed

    Templer, P H; Mack, M C; Chapin, F S; Christenson, L M; Compton, J E; Crook, H D; Currie, W S; Curtis, C J; Dail, D B; D'Antonio, C M; Emmett, B A; Epstein, H E; Goodale, C L; Gundersen, P; Hobbie, S E; Holland, K; Hooper, D U; Hungate, B A; Lamontagne, S; Nadelhoffer, K J; Osenberg, C W; Perakis, S S; Schleppi, P; Schimel, J; Schmidt, I K; Sommerkorn, M; Spoelstra, J; Tietema, A; Wessel, W W; Zak, D R

    2012-08-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (< 1 week after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3-18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C:N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1) above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer

  15. Cereal grain, rachis and pulse seed amino acid δ15N values as indicators of plant nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Styring, Amy K; Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Natural abundance δ(15)N values of plant tissue amino acids (AAs) reflect the cycling of N into and within plants, providing an opportunity to better understand environmental and anthropogenic effects on plant metabolism. In this study, the AA δ(15)N values of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) grains and rachis and broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, grown at the experimental farm stations of Rothamsted, UK and Bad Lauchstädt, Germany, were determined by GC-C-IRMS. It was found that the δ(15)N values of cereal grain and rachis AAs could be largely attributed to metabolic pathways involved in their biosynthesis and catabolism. The relative (15)N-enrichment of phenylalanine can be attributed to its involvement in the phenylpropanoid pathway and glutamate has a δ(15)N value which is an average of the other AAs due to its central role in AA-N cycling. The relative AA δ(15)N values of broad bean and pea seeds were very different from one another, providing evidence for differences in the metabolic routing of AAs to the developing seeds in these leguminous plants. This study has shown that AA δ(15)N values relate to known AA biosynthetic pathways in plants and thus have the potential to aid understanding of how various external factors, such as source of assimilated N, influence metabolic cycling of N within plants.

  16. Compound-specific δ15N and chlorin preservation in surface sediments of the Peru Margin with implications for ancient bulk δ15N records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junium, Christopher K.; Arthur, Michael A.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the processes that control the preservation of paleoceanographic proxies is of clear importance. Surface sediments from the Peru Margin oxygen-minimum zone are subject to lateral and downslope transport by bottom currents that decrease organic matter (OM) quality. Indicators of bulk OM quality (pyrolysis hydrogen index, pyrolysis S1 + S2 and C/N) demonstrate significant degradation between 150 and 400 m water depth, within the oxygen-minimum zone. Concentrations of the three most abundant chlorins (chlorophyllone, pheophytin and pyropheophytin) decrease from 750 to 150 nmol g TOC-1 from 150 to 400 m water depth though the relative abundances of the chlorins in an individual sample do not change. This suggests that the three chlorins have similar reactivity over the ambient conditions. Values for δ15N of bulk sediments (δ15Nbulk) decrease by 3‰ from the inner shelf to the upper slope (1000 m) but co-occurring compound-specific δ15N values (δ15Nchlorin) do not decrease downslope. The low variability of δ15Nchlorin values supports a single source for the chlorins, and demonstrates the recalcitrance of δ15Nchlorin values despite degradation. This set of observation raises questions about which type of OM fraction best records 'primary' signatures. We assess two possible models to guide our interpretation of these disparate datasets (1) that decreasing δ15Nbulk values are the result of degradation of a 15N-enriched fraction during downslope transport, and that δ15Nchlorin values reflect primary values; (2) that δ15Nbulk values are primary and that chlorins are derived from material transported from upslope. These data reaffirm that in active sedimentary environments such as the Eastern Tropical Pacific, transport of OM can significantly alter bulk geochemical parameters of OM integrity, but the impacts on the δ15N record of bulk sediments and chlorins are less clear, and require more study to be thoroughly understood.

  17. Hexavalent chromium stress enhances the uptake of nitrate but reduces the uptake of ammonium and glycine in pak choi (Brassica chinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingxu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Jinzhao; Tan, Xiaoli; Xie, Yinan; Xiao, Han; Wu, Lianghuan

    2017-05-01

    Chromium (Cr) pollution affects plant growth and biochemical processes, so, the relative uptake of glycine, nitrate, and ammonium by pak choi (Brassica chinensis) seedlings in treatments with 0mgL(-1) and 10mgL(-1) Cr (VI) were detected by substrate-specific (15)N-labelling in a sterile environment. The short-term uptake of (15)N-labelled sources and (15)N-enriched amino acids were detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to explore the mechanism by which Cr stress affects glycine uptake and metabolism, which showing that Cr stress hindered the uptake of ammonium and glycine but increased significantly the uptake of nitrate. Cr stress did not decrease the active or passive uptake of glycine, but it inhibited the conversion of glycine to serine in pak choi roots, indicating that the metabolism of glycine to serine in roots, rather than the root uptake, was the limiting step in glycine contribution to total N uptake in pak choi. Since Cr affects the relative uptake of different N sources, a feasible way to reduce Cr-induced stress is application of selective fertilization, in particular nitrate, in pak choi cultivation on Cr-polluted soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. COMPARISON OF STABLE-NITROGEN (15N/14N) ISOTOPE RATIOS IN LARGE MOUTH BASS SCALES AND MUSCLE TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable-nitrogen (15N/14N) isotope ratios of fish tissue are currently used to determine trophic structure, contaminant bioaccumulation, and the level of anthropogenic nitrogen enrichment in aquatic systems. The most common tissue used for these measurements is fileted dorsal musc...

  19. Nitrogen isotopic ratios of NH2 in comets: implication for 15N-fractionation in cometary ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuël; Decock, Alice; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arai, Akira

    2016-11-01

    The isotopic ratios are diagnostics for the physico-chemical conditions governing molecular formation. In comets, 14N/15N ratios have been measured from HCN in three comets and from CN in more than 20 comets. Those ratios are enriched in 15N compared to the Sun by a factor of ˜3, have a small diversity and do not depend on the dynamical type of the comets. The origin of this high 15N-fractionation is still in debate because CN probably comes not only from HCN, but also from other materials (such as polymers or organic dusts) in the coma. Consequently, an interpretation of the isotopic ratios in cometary CN is quite complicated due to the multiple possible parents of CN. In contrast with CN, the isotopic ratios of nitrogen in NH3 give us a much clearer interpretation than in CN because NH3 is directly incorporated in the nuclear ices. To estimate the 14N/15N ratios in NH3, 14N/15N ratios have been determined from high-resolution spectra of NH2 in the optical wavelength region. NH2 is indeed a dominant photodissociation product of NH3. Those ratios were also found to be enriched in 15N compared to the Sun by a factor of ˜3. In this paper, we present 14N/15N ratios in NH2 for an additional sample of 16 comets. Our sample includes short-period comets as well as long-period comets. We found that the 14N/15N ratios in cometary NH2 also show a small dispersion and do not depend on the dynamical origin of the comets.

  20. Mycorrhizal Fungi Provide Most of the Nitrogen for Symbiotic Arctic Plants: 15N Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, J. E.; Hobbie, E. A.

    2004-12-01

    When soil nitrogen is in short supply, most terrestrial plants form symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizae) in which fine hyphal threads take up soil nitrogen, transport it into plant roots, and in return receive plant sugars. Because the transfer rates are very difficult to measure in nature, ecologists need new tools by which to assess the role of mycorrhizal fungi in carbon and nitrogen cycling. Recent studies indicate that the natural abundance of 15N taken up from the soil by hyphae is changed during transfer of nitrogen to roots; the result is large differences among the natural abundance of 15N in soil, symbiotic plants, and symbiotic fungi that depend on the mass balance of nitrogen in the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Measurements were carried out in acidic tussock tundra at the Toolik Lake LTER site in Arctic Alaska (68\\deg N 149\\deg W). The \\delta15N of soil N was 1.5%, of soil ammonium was 1.5%, of ericoid and ectomycorrhizal plants was -5.0%, and of ectomycorrhizal fungi was 7.0 parts per mille%. The mass balance of the 15N shows that the plants received 61-86% of their nitrogen from the fungal hyphae. These values, when combined with known plant growth rates, reveal that the plants provided 7-16% of their photosynthetic carbon to the fungi for growth and respiration, or about 25% of all carbon allocated to belowground processes. This analytical technique could be readily applied to other nitrogen-limited ecosystems such as many temperate and boreal forests to quantify the importance for terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling of mycorrhizally mediated transfers at the plant-soil interface.

  1. Iron availability influences 15N-isotope fractionation during nitrogen fixation by aerobic chemoheterotroph Azotobacter vinelandii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Kopf, S.; Lee, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    The N stable isotope composition (δ15N) of biomass provides a powerful tool for reconstructing present and past N cycling, but its interpretation hinges on a complete understanding of the isotopic signature of biological nitrogen fixation, which sets the δ15N of newly fixed N. All biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by the metalloenzyme nitrogenase in a complex reaction that reduces inert atmospheric N2 gas into bioavailable ammonium. Recent investigations into the metal cofactor variants of nitrogenase revealed that the canonical Mo-, and alternative V-, and Fe-only isoforms of nitrogenase impart different isotope fractionations during N2 fixation in vivo, challenging the traditional view that N2 fixation only imparts small, invariable isotope effects of 0-2‰. However, the mechanistic basis for the fractionation of N2 fixation remains largely unknown. To better understand mechanisms underlying fractionation, we varied Fe availability and measured in vivo fractionations for the aerobic chemoheterotroph Azotobacter vinelandii utilizing Mo- or V-nitrogenase under batch culture conditions. Under all iron conditions, N2 fixation based on Mo-nitrogenase yielded lower fractionations (heavier biomasss δ15N) compared to V-nitrogenase. For fractionations associated with a single metalloenzyme, higher Fe concentrations, which correlated with faster growth rates, yielded small but systematically larger fractionations ( 1 ‰ increase for Mo- and V- nitrogenases). To directly determine the effect of growth rate on fractionation, we grew Mo-nitrogenase expressing A. vinelandii in Fe-replete medium at different growth rates using chemostats and found that growth rate alone does not alter fractionation. The results indicate that Fe availability, in addition to the type of nitrogenase metalloenzyme, controls 15N fractionation during N2 fixation by A. vinelandii.

  2. Insensitive Ammonium Nitrate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    is reduced by replacing the ammonium nitrate with a solid solution of potassium nitrate in form III ammonium nitrate wherein the potassium nitrate...constitutes from more than zero to less than 50 weight percent of the solid solution . (Author)

  3. 15N NMR of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Goba, Inguna; Liepinsh, Edvards

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we describe the characteristic (15)N and (1)HN NMR chemical shifts and (1)J((15)N-(1)H) coupling constants of various symmetrically and unsymmetrically substituted 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives. The NMR chemical shifts and coupling constants are discussed in terms of their relationship to structural features such as character and position of the substituent in heterocycle, N-alkyl substitution, nitrogen lone pair delocalization within the conjugated system, and steric effects.

  4. δ15N in the turtle grass from the Mexican Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talavera-Saenz, A.; Sanchez, A.; Ortiz-Hernandez, M.

    2013-05-01

    Nutrient inputs associated with population growth threaten the integrity of coastal ecosystems. To assess the rapid increase in tourism, we compared the δ15N from Thalassia testudinum collected at sites with different levels of tourism development and population to detect the N inputs of wastewater discharge (WD) along the coast of Quintana Roo. The contributions of nitrogen enriched in 15N are directly related to the increase of WD inputs in areas of high tourism development (Nichupte Lagoon in Cancun, >3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.7 million of resident population) and decreased towards Bahia Akumal and Tulum (>3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.15 million of resident population). The δ15N from T. testudinum was significantly lower at Mahahual and Puerto Morelos (about 0.4 million tourists per year in 2007 to 2011 and 0.25 million of resident population) than other the sites. In areas of the lowest development and with tourist activity restricted and small population, such as the Yum Balam Reserve and Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve, the δ15N values were in much higher enrichment that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. Therefore is suggested that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos may be used for baseline isotopic monitoring, over environmental pressure on the reef lagoon ecosystem, where tourist activities and population are growing very slow rate. The anthropogenic N input has the potential to impact, both environmentally and economically, the seagrass meadows and the coral reefs along the coast of Quintana Roo and the Caribbean.

  5. Species differences in nitrogen cycling in a humid sub-tropical forest inferred from 15N natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Mao, Qinggong; Zhou, Kaijun; Mo, Jiangming

    2017-04-01

    Studies of natural abundance of stable nitrogen isotope (δ15N) of ecosystems can provide integrated information about N status and N cycling rates within the ecosystems. Plant species with different N cycling traits can affect ecosystem δ15N, but such differences are poorly explored in tropical forests. This study evaluates the extent of variation in plant δ15N among co-occurring sub-tropical tropical tree species in old-growth mixed broadleaved forest in southern China. We compared leaf δ15N values among five co-occurring tree species under ambient deposition (control plots), and variation in plant δ15N response to a decade of N addition (N-plots) and to a one-year enriched 15N addition to both treatments in the study forest. We found significant differences in leaf δ15N values among tree species (up to 3‰) both in control and N-plots. Responses of leaf δ15N to N and 15N addition also differ among the tree species. These differences are explained by differences in N acquisition strategies (dependence on soil N and/or deposition N among the plant species) that is partly related to differences in mycorrhizal association among the studied plants. Our results indicate that plant species in N-rich tropical forests could have distinct N cycling traits as observed in many predominantly N-limited temperate and boreal forests. The finding, therefore, highlights the importance of considering tree species variation in studying N cycling in N-rich tropical forests.

  6. In vivo uniform (15)N-isotope labelling of plants: using the greenhouse for structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ippel, Johannes H; Pouvreau, Laurice; Kroef, Toos; Gruppen, Harry; Versteeg, Geurt; van den Putten, Peter; Struik, Paul C; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2004-01-01

    Isotope labelling of proteins is important for progress in the field of structural proteomics. It enables the utilisation of the power of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) for the characterisation of the three-dimensional structures and corresponding dynamical features of proteins. The usual approach to obtain isotopically labelled protein molecules is by expressing the corresponding gene in bacterial or yeast host organisms, which grow on isotope-enriched media. This method has several drawbacks. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to fully label a plant with (15)N-isotopes. The advantage of in vivo labelling of higher organisms is that all constituting proteins are labelled and become available as functional, post-translationally modified, correctly folded proteins. A hydroponics set-up was used to create the first example of a uniformly (15)N-labelled (> 98%) plant species, the potato plant (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Elkana). Two plants were grown at low costs using potassium-[(15)N]-nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. At harvest time, a total of 3.6 kg of potato tubers and 1.6 kg of foliage, stolons and roots were collected, all of which were fully (15)N-labelled. Gram quantities of soluble (15)N-labelled proteins (composed mainly of the glycoprotein patatin and Kunitz-type protease inhibitors) were isolated from the tubers. NMR results on the complete proteome of potato sap and on an isolated protease inhibitor illustrate the success of the labelling procedure. The presented method of isotope labelling is easily modified to label other plants. Its envisioned impact in the field of structural proteomics of plants is discussed.

  7. Availability of 15N from pioneer herbaceous plants to pine seedlings in reclaimed burnt soils.

    PubMed

    González-Prieto, S J; Villar, M C; Carballas, T

    2008-09-01

    A pot experiment was used to assess N uptake by pine seedlings during 2 years on a burnt soil to which was added (15)N-labelled ryegrass, obtained from a (15)N-enriched sample of this soil after a fire. The nitrogen concentration in needles, stems and roots of seedlings decreased significantly from the first to the second growing period (from 2.55, 1.30 and 2.19% to 1.19, 0.47 and 1.00%, respectively), with needles accounting for 53-58% of the pine-N. At the end of the experiment, 98.87 +/- 1.12% of the added ryegrass-(15)N was recovered: two-thirds in the soil organic N pool and one-third in the pine seedlings. Therefore, the post-fire pulse of inorganic-N, which was successfully kept in the burnt soil-plant system through its uptake by the pioneer species, is available for trees in the medium term. Pine seedlings assimilated 16.4% and 16.9% of the added ryegrass-(15)N in the first and second year, respectively. This result contrasts with the usual yearly decrease of added N uptake by plants; a possible explanation is the transient increase of available N in burnt soils that would have modified the mineralization pattern of the (15)N-labelled phytomass. The pine-N derived from the ryegrass-N decreased from 4.05% in the first year to 2.53% in the second one, with 3.10% being the 2-year weighed average. In addition to the direct contribution of ryegrass to pine-N nutrition reflected by these figures, the rapid post-fire establishment of a herbaceous cover on the burnt soil also provides important indirect benefits for tree nutrition by reducing organic- and inorganic-N losses. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. 15 N- and 2 H proteomic stable isotope probing links nitrogen flow to archaeal heterotrophic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, Nicholas B.; Li, Zhou; Wang, Yingfeng; Spaulding, Susan E.; Mosier, Annika C.; Robert L. Hettich; Pan, Chongle; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2014-05-20

    Understanding how individual species contribute to nutrient transformations in a microbial community is critical to prediction of overall ecosystem function. We conducted microcosm experiments in which floating acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial biofilms were submerged recapitulating the final stage in a natural biofilm life cycle. Biofilms were amended with either 15NH4 + or deuterium oxide (2H2O) and proteomic stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to track the extent to which different members of the community used these molecules in protein synthesis across anaerobic iron-reducing, aerobic iron-reducing and aerobic iron-oxidizing environments. Sulfobacillus spp. synthesized 15N-enriched protein almost exclusively under iron-reducing conditions whereas the Leptospirillum spp. synthesized 15N-enriched protein in all conditions. There were relatively few 15Nenriched archaeal proteins, and all showed low atom% enrichment, consistent with Archaea synthesizing protein using the predominantly 14N biomass derived from recycled biomolecules. In parallel experiments using 2H2O, extensive archaeal protein synthesis was detected in all conditions. In contrast, the bacterial species showed little protein synthesis using 2H2O. The nearly exclusive ability of Archaea to synthesize proteins using 2H2O may be due to archaeal heterotrophy, whereby Archaea off set deleterious effects of 2H by accessing 1H generated byrespiration of organic compounds.

  9. The origin of nitrogen on Jupiter and Saturn from the 15N/14N ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Greathouse, T. K.; Orton, G. S.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Mousis, O.; Sinclair, J. A.; Giles, R. S.

    2014-08-01

    The Texas Echelon cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES), mounted on NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), was used to map mid-infrared ammonia absorption features on both Jupiter and Saturn in February 2013. Ammonia is the principle reservoir of nitrogen on the giant planets, and the ratio of isotopologues (15N/14N) can reveal insights into the molecular carrier (e.g., as N2 or NH3) of nitrogen to the forming protoplanets, and hence the source reservoirs from which these worlds accreted. We targeted two spectral intervals (900 and 960 cm-1) that were relatively clear of terrestrial atmospheric contamination and contained close features of 14NH3 and 15NH3, allowing us to derive the ratio from a single spectrum without ambiguity due to radiometric calibration (the primary source of uncertainty in this study). We present the first ground-based determination of Jupiter’s 15N/14N ratio (in the range from 1.4×10-3 to 2.5×10-3), which is consistent with both previous space-based studies and with the primordial value of the protosolar nebula. On Saturn, we present the first upper limit on the 15N/14N ratio of no larger than 2.0×10-3 for the 900-cm-1 channel and a less stringent requirement that the ratio be no larger than 2.8×10-3 for the 960-cm-1 channel (1σ confidence). Specifically, the data rule out strong 15N-enrichments such as those observed in Titan’s atmosphere and in cometary nitrogen compounds. To the extent possible with ground-based radiometric uncertainties, the saturnian and jovian 15N/14N ratios appear indistinguishable, implying that 15N-enriched ammonia ices could not have been a substantial contributor to the bulk nitrogen inventory of either planet. This result favours accretion of primordial N2 on both planets, either in the gas phase from the solar nebula, or as ices formed at very low temperatures. Finally, spatially-resolved TEXES observations are used to derive zonal contrasts in tropospheric temperatures, phosphine and 14NH3 on both

  10. Phenylalanine δ15N in Paleo Archives as a New Proxy for δ15N of Exported Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M.; Batista, F. C.; Vokhshoori, N. L.; Brown, J. T.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ravelo, A. C.; Sherwood, O.

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of individual amino acids (CSI-AA) is emerging as a powerful new tool for studying the paleo nitrogen cycle. Because most detrital organic nitrogen is composed of amino acids, CSI-AA can reveal the mechanistic basis for organic nitrogen diagenesis, preserve a record of past food web structure, and potentially reconstruct the δ15N values of past nitrate and primary production. Within the commonly measured amino acids, the δ15N value of phenylalanine (Phe) appears uniquely promising as a new proxy that reflects the nitrogen isotopic value of the original source. Phe δ15N values remain almost unchanged with trophic transfer through food webs, and also during at least the initial stages of organic matter degradation. Here we synthesize results from both bio-archives and recent sediments, which together suggest that at least in Holocene archives the Phe δ15N value does in fact record the average inorganic nitrogen δ15N value at the base of planktonic food webs. However, several important unknowns also remain. These include the extent of variation in amino acid isotopic fractionation patterns in phylogenetically distinct algal groups. The stability of Phe δ15N values in older sediments where organic matter has undergone extensive diagenesis is also an important research area, which may ultimately establish the temporal limit for application of this approach to study past geological epochs. Together, however, results to date suggest that of Phe δ15N values in paleo archives represent a novel molecular-level proxy which is not tied to any specific organism or group, but rather can provide an integrated estimate of δ15N value of exported primary production.

  11. Assimilation of ammonium and nitrate nitrogen by bean plants

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, R.J. ); Chaillou, S.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F. ); Mariotti, A. )

    1989-04-01

    Enhanced growth is often observed in plants growing on combined ammonium and nitrate nutrition. The physiological basis for such enhancement was examined by exposing non-nodulated bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants to {sup 15}N-labeled, 1.0 mM N solutions containing 0, 33, 67 or 100% of the N as ammonium, the balance being nitrate. Maximal total N uptake and biomass production were attained by plants receiving 33% ammonium. A higher proportion of incoming ammonium than nitrate was incorporated into root protein. This was accompanied by increased partitioning of plant biomass to roots. It was concluded that as a consequence of greater N metabolism in the root under mixed ammonium and nitrate nutrition, the root became a more active sink for photosynthate. Concurrently, the augmented supply of N to the shoot enhanced net photosynthesis as reflected in increased plant biomass.

  12. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  13. Solvent effects on 15N NMR coordination shifts.

    PubMed

    Kleinmaier, Roland; Arenz, Sven; Karim, Alavi; Carlsson, Anna-Carin C; Erdélyi, Máté

    2013-01-01

    (15)N NMR chemical shift became a broadly utilized tool for characterization of complex structures and comparison of their properties. Despite the lack of systematic studies, the influence of solvent on the nitrogen coordination shift, Δ(15)N(coord), was hitherto claimed to be negligible. Herein, we report the dramatic impact of the local environment and in particular that of the interplay between solvent and substituents on Δ(15)N(coord). The comparative study of CDCl(3) and CD(3)CN solutions of silver(I)-bis(pyridine) and silver(I)-bis(pyridylethynyl)benzene complexes revealed the strong solvent dependence of their (15)N NMR chemical shift, with a solvent dependent variation of up to 40 ppm for one and the same complex. The primary influence of the effect of substituent and counter ion on the (15)N NMR chemical shifts is rationalized by corroborating Density-Functional Theory (nor discrete Fourier transform) calculations on the B3LYP/6-311 + G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. Cooperative effects have to be taken into account for a comprehensive description of the coordination shift and thus the structure of silver complexes in solution. Our results demonstrate that interpretation of Δ(15)N(coord) in terms of coordination strength must always consider the solvent and counter ion. The comparable magnitude of Δ(15)N(coord) for reported transition metal complexes makes the principal findings most likely general for a broad scale of complexes of nitrogen donor ligands, which are in frequent use in modern organometallic chemistry.

  14. Afforestation impacts microbial biomass and its natural (13)C and (15)N abundance in soil aggregates in central China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-10-15

    We investigated soil microbial biomass and its natural abundance of δ(13)C and δ(15)N in aggregates (>2000μm, 250-2000μm, 53-250μm and <53μm) of afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) soils, adjacent croplands and open area (i.e., control) in the Danjiangkou Reservoir area of central China. The afforested soils averaged higher microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) levels in all aggregates than in open area and cropland, with higher microbial biomass in micro-aggregates (<250μm) than in macro-aggregates (>2000μm). The δ(13)C of soil microbial biomass was more enriched in woodland soils than in other land use types, while δ(15)N of soil microbial biomass was more enriched compared with that of organic soil in all land use types. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N of microbial biomass were positively correlated with the δ(13)C and δ(15)N of organic soil across aggregates and land use types, whereas the (13)C and (15)N enrichment of microbial biomass exhibited linear decreases with the corresponding C:N ratio of organic soil. Our results suggest that shifts in the natural (13)C and (15)N abundance of microbial biomass reflect changes in the stabilization and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby imply that afforestation can greatly impact SOM accumulation over the long-term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stellar Origin of 15N-rich Presolar SiC Grains of Type AB: Supernovae with Explosive Hydrogen Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Nittler, Larry R.; Pignatari, Marco; O'D. Alexander, Conel M.; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-06-01

    We report C, N, and Si isotopic data for 59 highly 13C-enriched presolar submicron- to micron-sized SiC grains from the Murchison meteorite, including eight putative nova grains (PNGs) and 29 15N-rich (14N/15N ≤ solar) AB grains, and their Mg-Al, S, and Ca-Ti isotope data when available. These 37 grains are enriched in 13C, 15N, and 26Al with the PNGs showing more extreme enhancements. The 15N-rich AB grains show systematically higher 26Al and 30Si excesses than the 14N-rich AB grains. Thus, we propose to divide the AB grains into groups 1 (14N/15N < solar) and 2 (14N/15N ≥ solar). For the first time, we have obtained both S and Ti isotopic data for five AB1 grains and one PNG and found 32S and/or 50Ti enhancements. Interestingly, one AB1 grain had the largest 32S and 50Ti excesses, strongly suggesting a neutron-capture nucleosynthetic origin of the 32S excess and thus the initial presence of radiogenic 32Si (t 1/2 = 153 years). More importantly, we found that the 15N and 26Al excesses of AB1 grains form a trend that extends to the region in the N-Al isotope plot occupied by C2 grains, strongly indicating a common stellar origin for both AB1 and C2 grains. Comparison of supernova models with the AB1 and C2 grain data indicates that these grains came from supernovae that experienced H ingestion into the He/C zones of their progenitors.

  16. Insight on RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus strains using 13C and 15N kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Anat; Ronen, Zeev; Gelman, Faina

    2013-01-02

    The explosive Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is known to be degraded aerobically by various isolates of the Rhodococcus species, with denitration being the key step, mediated by Cytochrome P450. Our study aimed at gaining insight into the RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus species and comparing isotope effects associated with RDX degradation by distinct Rhodococcus strains. For these purposes, enrichment in (13)C and (15)N isotopes throughout RDX denitration was studied for three distinct Rhodococcus strains, isolated from soil and groundwater in an RDX-contaminated site. The observable (15)N enrichment throughout the reaction, together with minor (13)C enrichment, suggests that N-N bond cleavage is likely to be the key rate-limiting step in the reaction. The similarity in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect between the three tested strains suggests that either isotope-masking effects are negligible, or are of a similar extent for all tested strains. The lack of variability in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect allows the interpretation of environmental studies with greater confidence.

  17. δ15N Values in Crassostrea virginica Shells Provides Early Direct Evidence for Nitrogen Loading to Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, H. D.; Andrus, C. F. T.; Lambert, W. J.; Rick, T. C.; Gillikin, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    Crassostrea virginica is one of the most common estuarine bivalves in the United States’ east coast and is frequently found in archaeological sites and sub-fossil deposits. Although there have been several sclerochronological studies on stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in the shells of this species, less is known about δ15N values within their shells, which could be a useful paleoenvironmental proxy to assess estuarine nitrogen dynamics. Modern C. virginica samples were collected in Chesapeake Bay for comparison with archaeological shells from nearby sites ranging in age from ~100 to 3,200 years old. Left valves were sampled by milling the hinge area and the resulting powder was analyzed for %N and δ15N values. Comparison of δ15N values between C. virginica shells shows relatively constant values from ~1250 BC to ~1800 AD. After ~1800 AD, there are rapid increases in 15N enrichment in the shells, which continue to increase in value up to the modern shell values. The increase in δ15N values is evidence of early anthropogenic impact in Chesapeake Bay. These results corroborate the observation that coastal nitrogen pollution occurred earlier than the 19th century and support the use of oyster shell δ15N values as a useful environmental proxy.

  18. δ(15)N Values in Crassostrea virginica Shells Provides Early Direct Evidence for Nitrogen Loading to Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Black, H D; Andrus, C F T; Lambert, W J; Rick, T C; Gillikin, D P

    2017-03-10

    Crassostrea virginica is one of the most common estuarine bivalves in the United States' east coast and is frequently found in archaeological sites and sub-fossil deposits. Although there have been several sclerochronological studies on stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in the shells of this species, less is known about δ(15)N values within their shells, which could be a useful paleoenvironmental proxy to assess estuarine nitrogen dynamics. Modern C. virginica samples were collected in Chesapeake Bay for comparison with archaeological shells from nearby sites ranging in age from ~100 to 3,200 years old. Left valves were sampled by milling the hinge area and the resulting powder was analyzed for %N and δ(15)N values. Comparison of δ(15)N values between C. virginica shells shows relatively constant values from ~1250 BC to ~1800 AD. After ~1800 AD, there are rapid increases in (15)N enrichment in the shells, which continue to increase in value up to the modern shell values. The increase in δ(15)N values is evidence of early anthropogenic impact in Chesapeake Bay. These results corroborate the observation that coastal nitrogen pollution occurred earlier than the 19th century and support the use of oyster shell δ(15)N values as a useful environmental proxy.

  19. Mycorrhizal fungi supply nitrogen to host plants in Arctic tundra and boreal forests: 15N is the key signal.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, John E; Hobbie, Erik A; Drossman, Howard; Conte, Maureen; Weber, J C; Shamhart, Julee; Weinrobe, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Symbiotic fungi's role in providing nitrogen to host plants is well-studied in tundra at Toolik Lake, Alaska, but little-studied in the adjoining boreal forest ecosystem. Along a 570 km north-south transect from the Yukon River to the North Slope of Alaska, the 15N content was strongly reduced in ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal plants including Betula, Salix, Picea mariana (P. Mill.) B.S.P., Picea glauca Moench (Voss), and ericaceous plants. Compared with the 15N content of soil, the foliage of nonmycorrhizal plants (Carex and Eriophorum) was unchanged, whereas content of the ectomycorrhizal fungi was very much higher (e.g., Boletaceae, Leccinum and Cortinarius). It is hypothesized that similar processes operate in tundra and boreal forest, both nitrogen-limited ecosystems: (i) mycorrhizal fungi break down soil polymers and take up amino acids or other nitrogen compounds; (ii) mycorrhizal fungi fractionate against 15N during production of transfer compounds; (iii) host plants are accordingly depleted in 15N; and (iv) mycorrhizal fungi are enriched in 15N. Increased N availability for plant roots or decreased light availability to understory plants may have decreased N allocation to mycorrhizal partners and increased delta15N by 3-4 parts per million for southern populations of Vaccinium vitis-idaea L. and Salix. Fungal biomass, measured as ergosterol, correlated strongly with soil organic matter and attained amounts similar to those in temperate forest soils.

  20. δ15N Values in Crassostrea virginica Shells Provides Early Direct Evidence for Nitrogen Loading to Chesapeake Bay

    PubMed Central

    Black, H. D.; Andrus, C. F. T.; Lambert, W. J.; Rick, T. C.; Gillikin, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    Crassostrea virginica is one of the most common estuarine bivalves in the United States’ east coast and is frequently found in archaeological sites and sub-fossil deposits. Although there have been several sclerochronological studies on stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in the shells of this species, less is known about δ15N values within their shells, which could be a useful paleoenvironmental proxy to assess estuarine nitrogen dynamics. Modern C. virginica samples were collected in Chesapeake Bay for comparison with archaeological shells from nearby sites ranging in age from ~100 to 3,200 years old. Left valves were sampled by milling the hinge area and the resulting powder was analyzed for %N and δ15N values. Comparison of δ15N values between C. virginica shells shows relatively constant values from ~1250 BC to ~1800 AD. After ~1800 AD, there are rapid increases in 15N enrichment in the shells, which continue to increase in value up to the modern shell values. The increase in δ15N values is evidence of early anthropogenic impact in Chesapeake Bay. These results corroborate the observation that coastal nitrogen pollution occurred earlier than the 19th century and support the use of oyster shell δ15N values as a useful environmental proxy. PMID:28281649

  1. New insight in tholin chemical structure through 13C and 15N solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derenne, S.; Coelho, C.; Anquetil, C.; Szopa, C.; Quirico, E.; Bonhomme, C.

    2011-10-01

    Tholins are complex materials synthesized in laboratory as models of the molecules occurring in the atmosphere of Titan. Using labeled gases, pure 13C and 15N-enriched tholins were synthesized and analyzed using 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance. This study allowed confirming the presence of some functional groups (cyano, amino, imino) previously inferred from other techniques and to assess their relative contribution. It also indicated that some other functions (such as carbodiimide, protonated aromatic carbons) if present, only show a very low contribution and ruled out the occurrence of hydrazones.

  2. Variability and directionality of temporal changes in δ(13)C and δ (15)N of aquatic invertebrate primary consumers.

    PubMed

    Woodland, Ryan J; Magnan, Pierre; Glémet, Hélène; Rodríguez, Marco A; Cabana, Gilbert

    2012-05-01

    Seasonal oscillations in the carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotope signatures of aquatic algae can cause seasonal enrichment-depletion cycles in the isotopic composition of planktonic invertebrates (e.g., copepods). Yet, there is growing evidence that seasonal enrichment-depletion cycles also occur in the isotope signatures of larger invertebrate consumers, taxa used to define reference points in isotope-based trophic models (e.g., trophic baselines). To evaluate the general assumption of temporal stability in non-zooplankton aquatic invertebrates, δ(13)C and δ(15)N time series data from the literature were analyzed for seasonality and the influence of biotic (feeding group) and abiotic (trophic state, climate regime) factors on isotope temporal patterns. The amplitude of δ(13)C and δ(15)N enrichment-depletion cycles was negatively related to body size, although all size-classes of invertebrates displayed a winter-to-summer enrichment in δ(13)C and depletion in δ(15)N. Among feeding groups, periphytic grazers were more variable and displayed larger temporal changes in δ(13)C than detritivores. For nitrogen, temporal variability and magnitude of directional change of δ(15)N was most strongly related to ecosystem trophic state (eutrophic > mesotrophic, oligotrophic). This study provides evidence of seasonality in the isotopic composition of aquatic invertebrates across very broad geographical and ecological gradients as well as identifying factors that are likely to modulate the strength and variability of seasonality. These results emphasize the need for researchers to recognize the likelihood of temporal changes in non-zooplankton aquatic invertebrate consumers at time scales relevant to seasonal studies and, if present, to account for temporal dynamics in isotope trophic models.

  3. 15N fractionation in infrared-dark cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, S.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Cosentino, G.; Viti, S.; Barnes, A. T.; Henshaw, J. D.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.; Hily-Blant, P.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Nitrogen is one of the most abundant elements in the Universe and its 14N/15N isotopic ratio has the potential to provide information about the initial environment in which our Sun formed. Recent findings suggest that the solar system may have formed in a massive cluster since the presence of short-lived radioisotopes in meteorites can only be explained by the influence of a supernova. Aims: We seek to determine the 14N/15N ratio towards a sample of cold and dense cores at the initial stages in their evolution. Methods: We observed the J = 1 → 0 transitions of HCN, H13CN, HC15N, HN13C, and H15NC towards a sample of 22 cores in four infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) which are believed to be the precursors of high-mass stars and star clusters. Assuming LTE and a temperature of 15 K, the column densities of HCN, H13CN, HC15N, HN13C, and H15NC are calculated and their 14N/15N ratio is determined for each core. Results: The 14N/15N ratios measured in our sample of IRDC cores range between 70 and ≥763 in HCN and between 161 and 541 in HNC. These ratios are consistent with the terrestrial atmosphere (TA) and protosolar nebula (PSN) values, and with the ratios measured in low-mass prestellar cores. However, the 14N/15N ratios measured in cores C1, C3, F1, F2, and G2 do not agree with the results from similar studies towards the same cores using nitrogen bearing molecules with nitrile functional group (-CN) and nitrogen hydrides (-NH) although the ratio spread covers a similar range. Conclusions: Relatively low 14N/15N ratios amongst the four-IRDCs were measured in IRDC G which are comparable to those measured in small cosmomaterials and protoplanetary disks. The low average gas density of this cloud suggests that the gas density, rather than the gas temperature, may be the dominant parameter influencing the initial nitrogen isotopic composition in young PSN. The reduced spectra (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  4. Paleoenvironmental implications of taxonomic variation among δ 15 N values of chloropigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Meytal B.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Robinson, Rebecca S.; Qin, Yelun; Saito, Mak A.; Pearson, Ann

    2011-11-01

    Natural variations in the ratios of nitrogen isotopes in biomass reflect variations in nutrient sources utilized for growth. In order to use δ 15N values of chloropigments of photosynthetic organisms to determine the corresponding δ 15N values of biomass - and by extension, surface waters - the isotopic offset between chlorophyll and biomass must be constrained. Here we examine this offset in various geologically-relevant taxa, grown using nutrient sources that may approximate ocean conditions at different times in Earth's history. Phytoplankton in this study include cyanobacteria (diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic), eukaryotic algae (red and green), and anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (Proteobacteria), as well as environmental samples from sulfidic lake water. Cultures were grown using N 2, NO 3-, and NH 4+ as nitrogen sources, and were examined under different light regimes and growth conditions. We find surprisingly high variability in the isotopic difference (δ 15N biomass - δ 15N chloropigment) for prokaryotes, with average values for species ranging from -12.2‰ to +11.7‰. We define this difference as ɛpor, a term that encompasses diagenetic porphyrins and chlorins, as well as chlorophyll. Negative values of ɛpor reflect chloropigments that are 15N-enriched relative to biomass. Notably, this enrichment appears to occur only in cyanobacteria. The average value of ɛpor for freshwater cyanobacterial species is -9.8 ± 1.8‰, while for marine cyanobacteria it is -0.9 ± 1.3‰. These isotopic effects group environmentally but not phylogenetically, e.g., ɛpor values for freshwater Chroococcales resemble those of freshwater Nostocales but differ from those of marine Chroococcales. Our measured values of ɛpor for eukaryotic algae (range = 4.7-8.7‰) are similar to previous reports for pure cultures. For all taxa studied, values of ɛpor do not depend on the type of nitrogen substrate used for growth. The observed environmental control of

  5. Novel labeling technique illustrates transfer of 15N2 from Sphagnum moss to vascular plants via diazotrophic nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Vile, M. A.; Wieder, R.

    2013-12-01

    transferred to P. mariana roots (mean δ15N at 1 and 2 months of 15.26 × 3.30 and 16.19 × 1.21) more than shoots (mean δ15N at 1 and 2 months of 6.57 × 0.52 and 4.67×0.17) (initial δ15N values of roots and shoots of 2.16 × 0.37 and 5.54 × 0.35, respectively). Nitrogen also was transferred to V. oxycoccos roots (δ15N at 2 months of 21.46 × 3.61) more than shoots (δ15N 2 months of -2.17 × 0.23) (initial δ15N values of roots and shoots of -6.41 × 0.21 and -6.85 × 0.15, respectively). A two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD verified that both vascular plants' roots were significantly enriched with 15N (P. mariana roots; p < 0.0001, V. oxycoccus roots; p < 0.0001) after 1 month. These results indicate that bog vascular plants may derive considerable nitrogen from biological N2-fixation taking place in Sphagnum moss capitula. The experiment was subsequently repeated in-situ.

  6. The CN/C15N isotopic ratio towards dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hily-Blant, P.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Faure, A.; Le Gal, R.; Padovani, M.

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the origin of the composition of solar system cosmomaterials is a central question, not only in the cosmochemistry and astrochemistry fields, and requires various approaches to be combined. Measurements of isotopic ratios in cometary materials provide strong constraints on the content of the protosolar nebula. Their relation with the composition of the parental dark clouds is, however, still very elusive. In this paper, we bring new constraints based on the isotopic composition of nitrogen in dark clouds, with the aim of understanding the chemical processes that are responsible for the observed isotopic ratios. We have observed and detected the fundamental rotational transition of C15N towards two starless dark clouds, L1544 and L1498. We were able to derive the column density ratio of C15N over 13CN towards the same clouds and obtain the CN/C15N isotopic ratios, which were found to be 500 ± 75 for both L1544 and L1498. These values are therefore marginally consistent with the protosolar value of 441. Moreover, this ratio is larger than the isotopic ratio of nitrogen measured in HCN. In addition, we present model calculations of the chemical fractionation of nitrogen in dark clouds, which make it possible to understand how CN can be deprived of 15N and HCN can simultaneously be enriched in heavy nitrogen. The non-fractionation of N2H+, however, remains an open issue, and we propose some chemical way of alleviating the discrepancy between model predictions and the observed ratios. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe reduced spectra (in FITS format) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/557/A65

  7. Compound-specific 15N stable isotope probing of N assimilation by the soil microbial biomass: a new methodological paradigm in soil N cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, A. F.; Knowles, T. D. J.; Michaelides, K.; Evershed, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    A compound-specific nitrogen-15 stable isotope probing (15N-SIP) technique is described which allows investigation of the fate of inorganic- or organic-N amendments to soils. The technique uses gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to determine the δ15N values of individual amino acids (AAs; determined as N-acetyl, O-isopropyl derivatives) as proxies of biomass protein production. The δ15N values are used together with AA concentrations to quantify N assimilation of 15N-labelled substrates by the soil microbial biomass. The utility of the approach is demonstrated through incubation experiments using inorganic 15N-labelled substrates ammonium (15NH4+) and nitrate (15NO3-) and an organic 15N-labelled substrate, glutamic acid (15N-Glu). Assimilation of all the applied substrates was undetectable based on bulk soil properties, i.e. % total N (% TN), bulk soil N isotope composition and AA concentrations, all of which remained relatively constant throughout the incubation experiments. In contrast, compound-specific AA δ15N values were highly sensitive to N assimilation, providing qualitative and quantitative insights into the cycling and fate of the applied 15N-labelled substrates. The utility of this 15N-AA-SIP technique is considered in relation to other currently available methods for investigating the microbially-mediated assimilation of nitrogenous substrates into the soil organic N pool. This approach will be generally applicable to the study of N cycling in any soil, or indeed, in any complex ecosystem.

  8. 14N15N detectability in Pluto’s atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, Kandis Lea; Gladstone, G. R.; Heays, A. N.; Gibson, S. T.; Lewis, B. R.; Stark, G.

    2013-11-01

    Based on the vapor pressure behavior of Pluto’s surface ices, Pluto’s atmosphere is expected to be predominantly composed of N2 gas. Measurement of the N2 isotopologue 15N/14N ratio within Pluto’s atmosphere would provide important clues to the evolution of Pluto’s atmosphere from the time of formation to its present state. The most straightforward way of determining the N2 isotopologue 15N/14N ratio in Pluto’s atmosphere is via spectroscopic observation of the 14N15N gas species. Recent calculations of the 80-100 nm absorption behavior of the 14N2 and 14N15N isotopologues by Heays et al. (Heays, A.N. et al. [2011]. J. Chem. Phys. 135, 244301), Lewis et al. (Lewis, B.R., Heays, A.N., Gibson, S.T., Lefebvre-Brion, H., Lefebvre, R. [2008]. J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164306); Lewis et al. (Lewis, B.R., Gibson, S.T., Zhang, W., Lefebvre-Brion, H., Robbe, J.-M. [2005]. J. Chem. Phys. 122, 144302), and Haverd et al. (Haverd, V.E., Lewis, B.R., Gibson, S.T., Stark, G. [2005]. J. Chem. Phys. 123, 214304) show that the peak magnitudes of the 14N2 and 14N15N absorption bandhead cross-sections are similar, but the locations of the bandhead peaks are offset in wavelength by ∼0.05-0.1 nm. These offsets make the segregation of the 14N2 and 14N15N absorption signatures possible. We use the most recent N2 isotopologue absorption cross-section calculations and the atmospheric density profiles resulting from photochemical models developed by Krasnopolsky and Cruickshank (Krasnopolsky, V.A., Cruickshank, D.P. [1999]. J. Geophys. Res. 104, 21979-21996) to predict the level of solar light that will be transmitted through Pluto’s atmosphere as a function of altitude during a Pluto solar occultation. We characterize the detectability of the isotopic absorption signature per altitude assuming 14N15N concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 2% of the 14N2 density and instrumental spectral resolutions ranging from 0.01 to 0.3 nm. Our simulations indicate that optical depth of unity is

  9. Using δ15N of Chironomidae as an index of nitrogen sources and processing within watersheds as part of EPA's National Aquatic Resource Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, J. R.; Compton, J.; Herlihy, A.; Sobota, D. J.; Stoddard, J.; Weber, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) removal in watersheds is an important regulating ecosystem service that can help reduce N pollution in the nation's waterways. However, processes that remove N such as denitrification are generally determined at point locations. Measures that integrate N processing within watersheds and over time would be particularly useful for assessing the degree of this vital service. Because most N removal processes isotopically enrich the N remaining, δ15N from basal food-chain organisms in aquatic ecosystems can provide information on watershed N processing. As part of EPA's National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS), we measured δ15N of Chironomidae in lakes, rivers and streams because these larval aquatic insects were found in abundance in almost every lake and stream in the U.S. Using information on nitrogen loading to the watershed, and total N concentrations within the water, we assessed when elevated chironomid δ15N would indicate N removal rather than possible enriched sources of N. Chironomid δ15N values ranged from -4 to +20 ‰, and were higher in rivers and streams than in lakes (median = 7.6 ‰ vs. 4.8 ‰, respectively), indicating that N was processed to a greater degree in lotic chironomids than in lentic ones. For both, δ15N increased with watershed-level agricultural land cover and N loading, and decreased as precipitation increased. In rivers and streams with high synthetic N loading, we found lower N concentrations in streams with higher chironomid δ15N values, suggesting greater N removal. At low levels of synthetic N loading, the pattern reversed, and streams with enriched chironomid δ15N had higher N concentrations, suggesting enriched sources such as manure or sewage. Our results indicate that chironomid δ15N values can provide valuable information about watershed-level N inputs and processing for national water quality monitoring efforts.

  10. Technical Note: Simultaneous measurement of sedimentary N2 and N2O production and new 15N isotope pairing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, T.-C.; Kao, S.-J.

    2013-04-01

    Dinitrogen (N2) and/or nitrous oxide (N2O) are produced through denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or nitrification in sediments, of which entangled processes obfuscate the absolute rate estimation of gaseous nitrogen production from individual pathway. Recently, the classical isotope pairing technique (IPT), the most common 15N-nitrate enrichment method to quantify denitrification, has been modified by different researchers to (1) discriminate relative contribution of N2 production by denitrification from anammox or to (2) provide more accurate denitrification rate by considering both N2O and N2 productions. Both modified methods, however, have deficiencies such as overlooking N2O production in case 1 and neglecting anammox in case 2. In this paper, a new method was developed to refine previous methods. We installed cryogenic traps to pre-concentrate N2 and N2O separately, thus, allowing simultaneous measurement for two gases generated by one sample. The precision is better than 2% for N2 (m/z 28, m/z 29 and m/z 30), and 1.5% for N2O (m/z 44, m/z 45 and m/z 46). Based on the six m/z peaks of the two gases, we further revised IPT formulae to truthfully resolve the production rates of N2 and N2O contributed from 3 specific nitrogen removal processes, i.e. N2 and N2O from denitrification, N2 from anammox and N2O from nitrification. To validate the applicability of our new method, incubation experiments were conducted using sediment cores taken from the Danshuei estuary in Taiwan. We successfully determined the rates of aforementioned nitrogen removal processes. Moreover, N2O yield was as high as 66%, which no doubt would significantly bias previous IPT approaches when N2O was not considered. Our new method not only complements the previous IPT but also provides more comprehensive information to advance our understanding of nitrogen dynamics through the water-sediment interface.

  11. Foliar and fungal 15N:14N ratios reflect development of mycorrhizae and nitrogen supply during primary succession: testing analytical models.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, Erik A; Jumpponen, Ari; Trappe, Jim

    2005-12-01

    per thousand. Plants, fungi and soil were at least 4 per thousand higher in delta15N from the mature site than in recently exposed sites. On both the forefront and the mature site, host-specific ectomycorrhizal fungi had higher delta15N values than ectomycorrhizal fungi with a broad host range. From these isotopic patterns, we conclude: (1) large enrichments in 15N of many ectomycorrhizal fungi relative to co-occurring ectomycorrhizal plants are best explained by treating the plant-fungal-soil system as a closed system with a discrimination against 15N of 8-10 per thousand during transfer from fungi to plants, (2) based on models of 15N mass balance, ericoid and ectomycorrhizal fungi retain up to two-thirds of the N in the plant-mycorrhizal system under the N-limited conditions at forefront sites, (3) sporocarps are probably enriched in 15N by an additional 3 per thousand relative to available nitrogen, and (4) host-specific ectomycorrhizal fungi may transfer more N to plant hosts than non-host-specific ectomycorrhizal fungi. Our study confirms that nitrogen isotopes are a powerful tool for probing nitrogen dynamics between mycorrhizal fungi and associated plants.

  12. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported.

  13. A novel method for trapping and analyzing 15N in NO for tracing NO sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ronghua; Mulder, Jan; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    15N isotope tracing is an effective and direct approach to investigate the biological and chemical sources of nitric oxide (NO) in soil. However, NO is highly reactive and rapidly converted to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the presence of ozone. Various chemical conversions of NO to the more stable solutes nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) have been proposed, which allow analysing the 15N abundance without major fractionation. However, NO emissions from soils are usually small, posing major challenges to conversion efficiency and background contamination. Here we present a novel method in which NO is oxidized to NO2- by chromium trioxide (CrO3) prior to conversion to NO2- and NO3- in an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. Immediately following trapping, manganese dioxide (MnO2) and 5M HCl are added to remove excess H2O2, and to adjust the pH to around 6.0-7.0, respectively. The resulting solution can be stored until analysis and is none-toxic, allowing to use a modified denitrifier method (Zhu et al., submitted), where NO2- and NO3- are reduced quantitatively to nitrous oxide (N2O). Optimum NO conversion rates of > 90% even at extremely low initial NO concentration were obtained with 4% H2O2, 0.5 M NaOH, and 0.5 L min-1 gas flow rate. In a laboratory test, using NO gas with different 15N signals produced from unlabelled and labelled NO2-, we found an overall precision of 0.4‰ for unlabelled and 49.7‰ for NO enriched with 1.0 atom% 15N, respectively. This indicates that this method can be used for both natural abundance studies of NO, as well as in labelling studies tracing NO sources. Zhu J, Yu L, Bakken LR, Mørkved PT, Mulder J, Dörsch P. Controlled induction of denitrification in Pseudomonas aureofaciens: a modified denitrifier method for 15N and 18O analysis in NO3- from natural water samples by IRMS. Submitted.

  14. Experimental evidence for diel δ15N-patterns in different tissues, xylem and phloem saps of castor bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    PubMed

    Peuke, A D; Gessler, A; Tcherkez, G

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen isotope signatures in plants might give insights in the metabolism and allocation of nitrogen. To obtain a deeper understanding of the modifications of the nitrogen isotope signatures, we determined δ(15)N in transport saps and in different fractions of leaves, axes and roots during a diel course along the plant axis. The most significant diel variations were observed in xylem and phloem saps where δ(15)N was significantly higher during the day compared with during the night. However in xylem saps, this was observed only in the canopy, but not at the hypocotyl positions. In the canopy, δ(15)N was correlated fairly well between phloem and xylem saps. These variations in δ(15)N in transport saps can be attributed to nitrate reduction in leaves during the photoperiod as well as to (15)N-enriched glutamine acting as transport form of N. δ(15)N of the water soluble fraction of roots and leaves partially affected δ(15)N of phloem and xylems saps. δ(15)N patterns are likely the result of a complex set of interactions and N-fluxes between plant organs. Furthermore, the natural nitrogen isotope abundance in plant tissue is not constant during the diel course - a fact that needs to be taken into account when sampling for isotopic studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Isotopic characterization of nitrate, ammonium and sulfate in stack PM2.5 emissions in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proemse, Bernadette C.; Mayer, Bernhard; Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.

    2012-12-01

    Stable isotope techniques may be a suitable tool for tracing industrial emissions in the atmosphere and the environment provided that the isotopic compositions of industrial emissions are distinct. We determined the isotopic compositions of nitrate, ammonium and sulfate in PM2.5 emitted from two industrial stacks at a large upgrader site in the Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR), northeastern Alberta, Canada, and compared them to the nitrogen and sulfur isotopic compositions of source materials and upgrading by-products. We found distinct isotopic compositions of nitrate and ammonium in PM2.5 compared to those reported for atmospheric nitrate and ammonium in the literature. Nitrate in PM2.5 had δ15N values of 9.4‰ (Stack A) and 16.1 ± 1.2‰ (Stack B) that were significantly enriched in 15N compared to the feedstock materials (˜2.5‰), by-products of upgrading (-0.3-1.3‰), and atmospheric N2 (0‰). δ15N of ammonium in PM2.5 showed a large range with values between - 4.5 to +20.1‰ (Stack B). We report the first measurements of the triple oxygen isotopic composition of industrial emitted nitrate. Nitrate emitted as PM2.5 is not mass-independently enriched in 17O resulting in Δ17O = 0.5 ± 0.9‰ (Stack B) and is therefore distinct from atmospheric nitrate, constituting an excellent indicator of industrial derived nitrate. δ18O values of nitrate in PM2.5 (36.0 and 17.6 ± 1.8‰ for Stack A and B, respectively) were also significantly lower than δ18O values of atmospheric nitrates and hence isotopically distinct. δ34S values of sulfate in PM2.5 were with 7.3 ± 0.3‰ (Stack A) and 9.4 ± 2.0‰ (Stack B) slightly enriched in 34S compared to δ34S in bitumen (4.3 ± 0.3‰) and coke (3.9 ± 0.2‰). δ18O values of sulfate in PM2.5 were 18.9 ± 2.9‰ and 14.2 ± 2.8‰ for Stack A and Stack B, respectively. The isotopic composition of sulfate in PM2.5 was not sufficiently different from δ34S and δ18O values of sulfate in long-range atmospheric

  16. /sup 15/N kinetic analysis of N/sub 2/O production by Nitrosomonas europaea: an examination of nitrifier denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Poth, M.; Focht, D.D.

    1985-05-01

    A series of /sup 15/N isotope tracer experiments showed that Nitrosomonas europaea produces nitrous oxide only under oxygen-limiting conditions and that the labeled N from nitrite, but not nitrate, is incorporated into nitrous oxide, indicating the presence of the denitrifying enzyme nitrite reductase. A kinetic analysis of the m/z 44, 45, and 46 nitrous oxide produced by washed cell suspensions of N. europaea when incubated with 4 mM ammonium (99% /sup 14/N) and 0.4 mM nitrite (99% /sup 15/N) was performed. No labeled nitirte was reduced to ammonium. All labeled material added was accounted for as either nitrite or nitrous oxide. The hypothesis that nitrous oxide is produced directly from nitrification was rejected since (i) it does not allow for the large amounts of double-labeled (m/z 46) nitrous oxide observed; (ii) the observed patterns of m/z 44, 45, 46 nitrous oxide were completely consistent with a kinetic analysis based on denitrification as the sole mechanism of nitrous oxide production but not with a kinetic analysis based on both mechanisms; (iii) the asymptotic ratio of m/z 45 to m/z 46 nitrous oxide was consistent with denitrification kinetics but inconsistent with nitrification kinetics, which predicted no limit to m/z 45 production. It is concluded that N. europaea is a denitrifier which, under conditions of oxygen stress, uses nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor and produces nitrous oxide.

  17. 15N investigation into the effect of a pollutant on the nitrogen metabolism of Tetrahymena pyriformis as a model for environmental medical research.

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, K; Hofmann, D; Gehre, M; Krumbiegel, P

    1998-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to examine the potential of stable isotope techniques for monitoring the impact of a harmful substance on the cellular nitrogen metabolism in the ciliate species Tetrahymena pyriformis. After identical cultivation periods of control cells and toluene-exposed cells in a defined culture medium enriched with [guanidino-15N2]l-arginine, a number of nitrogen-containing pools were analyzed: 1) quantity and 15N abundance of ammonia as the end product of nitrogen metabolism in the system; 2) pattern and 15N abundances of the protein-bound amino acids in the cells; 3) pattern and 15N abundances of free amino acids in the cells; and 4) pattern and 15N abundances of the amino acids in the culture medium. In addition to 15N emission spectrometry, a new gas chromatography/combustion interface-isotope ratio mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analytical system was used. The production and 15N content of ammonia were higher in the toluene-exposed system by 30% and 43%, respectively, indicating higher deamination rates and greater arginine consumption. The toluene-exposed cells exhibited increased 15N abundances of protein-bound amino acids in alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and tyrosine. Furthermore, structural analyses revealed the presence of N[Omega]-acetylarginine and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid--compounds that had not previously been detected in Tetrahymena pyriformis. Differences in the 15N-enrichment of free amino acids were also evident. This new effect-monitoring system designed to investigate the impact of a pollutant on protein metabolism by using a stable isotope-labeled cell culture is a powerful tool for environmental medical research. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9681977

  18. delta15N and delta13C diet-tissue discrimination factors for large sharks under semi-controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Nigel E; Brush, Jaclyn; McCarthy, Ian D; Fisk, Aaron T

    2010-04-01

    Stable isotopes (delta(15)N and delta(13)C) are being widely applied in ecological research but there has been a call for ecologists to determine species- and tissue-specific diet discrimination factors ((13)C and (15)N) for their study animals. For large sharks stable isotopes may provide an important tool to elucidate aspects of their ecological roles in marine systems, but laboratory based controlled feeding experiments are impractical. By utilizing commercial aquaria, we estimated (15)N and (13)C of muscle, liver, vertebral cartilage and a number of organs of three large sand tiger (Carcharias taurus) and one large lemon shark (Negaprion brevirostris) under a controlled feeding regime. For all sharks mean+/-SD for (15)N and (13)C in lipid extracted muscle using lipid extracted prey data were 2.29 per thousand+/-0.22 and 0.90 per thousand+/-0.33, respectively. The use of non-lipid extracted muscle and prey resulted in very similar (15)N and (13)C values but mixing of lipid and non-lipid extracted data produced variable estimates. Values of (15)N and (13)C in lipid extracted liver and prey were 1.50 per thousand+/-0.54 and 0.22 per thousand+/-1.18, respectively. Non-lipid extracted diet discrimination factors in liver were highly influenced by lipid content and studies that examine stable isotopes in shark liver, and likely any high lipid tissue, should strive to remove lipid effects through standardising C:N ratios, prior to isotope analysis. Mean vertebral cartilage (15)N and (13)C values were 1.45 per thousand+/-0.61 and 3.75 per thousand+/-0.44, respectively. Organ (15)N and (13)C values were more variable among individual sharks but heart tissue was consistently enriched by approximately 1-2.5 per thousand. Minimal variability in muscle and liver delta(15)N and delta(13)C sampled at different intervals along the length of individual sharks and between liver lobes suggests that stable isotope values are consistent within tissues of individual animals. To our

  19. Spatial Patterns of Plant δ13C and δ15N Along a Topoedaphic Gradient in a Subtropical Savanna Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, E.; Boutton, T. W.; Liu, F.; Wu, B.; Archer, S. R.

    2005-12-01

    relationship between δ15N and leaf [N] and soil water may reflect the fact that plants with high δ15N values occurred on lower-lying portions of the landscape with relatively high N-transformation rates where soil mineral N was both relatively available and 15N-enriched. The lack of variation in δ15N values of Prosopis suggests that it may be somewhat uncoupled from these processes because it is an N-fixer. Results of this study indicate that N-availability plays an important role in landscale scale variation in plant δ13C and δ15N.

  20. Multi-Isotope Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Combining Heavy Water 2H with 15N Labeling As Complementary Tracers for Metabolic Heterogeneity at the Single-Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, S.; McGlynn, S.; Cowley, E.; Green, A.; Newman, D. K.; Orphan, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic rates of microbial communities constitute a key physiological parameter for understanding the in situ growth constraints for life in any environment. Isotope labeling techniques provide a powerful approach for measuring such biological activity, due to the use of isotopically enriched substrate tracers whose incorporation into biological materials can be detected with high sensitivity by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Nano-meter scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) combined with stable isotope labeling provides a unique tool for studying the spatiometabolic activity of microbial populations at the single cell level in order to assess both community structure and population diversity. However, assessing the distribution and range of microbial activity in complex environmental systems with slow-growing organisms, diverse carbon and nitrogen sources, or heterotrophic subpopulations poses a tremendous technical challenge because the introduction of isotopically labeled substrates frequently changes the nutrient availability and can inflate or bias measures of activity. Here, we present the use of hydrogen isotope labeling with deuterated water as an important new addition to the isotopic toolkit and apply it for the determination of single cell microbial activities by NanoSIMS imaging. This tool provides a labeling technique that minimally alters any aquatic chemical environment, can be administered with strong labels even in minimal addition (natural background is very low), is an equally universal substrate for all forms of life even in complex, carbon and nitrogen saturated systems, and can be combined with other isotopic tracers. The combination of heavy water labeling with the most commonly used NanoSIMS tracer, 15N, is technically challenging but opens up a powerful new set of multi-tracer experiments for the study of microbial activity in complex communities. We present the first truly simultaneous single cell triple isotope system

  1. Technical Note: Simultaneous measurement of sedimentary N2 and N2O production and a modified 15N isotope pairing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, T.-C.; Kao, S.-J.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen (N2) and/or nitrous oxide (N2O) are produced through denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or nitrification in sediments, of which entangled processes complicate the absolute rate estimations of gaseous nitrogen production from individual pathways. The classical isotope pairing technique (IPT), the most common 15N nitrate enrichment method to quantify denitrification, has recently been modified by different researchers to (1) discriminate between the N2 produced by denitrification and anammox or to (2) provide a more accurate denitrification rate under considering production of both N2O and N2. In case 1, the revised IPT focused on N2 production being suitable for the environments of a low N2O-to-N2 production ratio, while in case 2, anammox was neglected. This paper develops a modified method to refine previous versions of IPT. Cryogenic traps were installed to separately preconcentrate N2 and N2O, thus allowing for subsequent measurement of the two gases generated in one sample vial. The precision is better than 2% for N2 (m/z 28, m/z 29 and m/z 30), and 1.5% for N2O (m/z 44, m/z 45 and m/z 46). Based on the six m/z peaks of the two gases, the 15N nitrate traceable processes including N2 and N2O from denitrification and N2 from anammox were estimated. Meanwhile, N2O produced by nitrification was estimated via the production rate of unlabeled 44N2O. To validate the applicability of our modified method, incubation experiments were conducted using sediment cores taken from the Danshuei Estuary in Taiwan. Rates of the aforementioned nitrogen removal processes were successfully determined. Moreover, N2O yield was as high as 66%, which would significantly bias previous IPT approaches if N2O was not considered. Our modified method not only complements previous versions of IPT but also provides more comprehensive information to advance our understanding of nitrogen dynamics of the water-sediment interface.

  2. The Kinetics of Intramolecular Distribution of 15N in Uric Acid after Administration of [15N]Glycine A REAPPRAISAL OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF PREFERENTIAL LABELING OF N-(3 + 9) OF URIC ACID IN PRIMARY GOUT

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Oded; Wyngaarden, James B.; Starmer, C. Frank

    1973-01-01

    The concept of an abnormality of glutamine metabolism in primary gout was first proposed on the basis of isotope data: when [15N]glycine was administered to gouty subjects, there was disproportionately great enrichment of N-(3 + 9) of uric acid, which derive from the amide-N of glutamine. An unduly high concentration of 15N in glutamine was postulated, and attributed to a hypothetical defect in catabolism of glutamine. Excess glutamine was proposed as the driving force of uric acid overproduction. We have reexamined this proposition in four gouty subjects: one mild overproducer of uric acid with “idiopathic gout,” one marked overproducer with high-grade but “partial” hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase deficiency, and two extraordinary overproducers with superactive phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetases. In the last three, the driving force of excessive purine biosynthesis is a known surplus of α-5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Disproportionately high labeling of N-(3 + 9) was present in all four gouty subjects, most marked in the most flamboyant overproducers. The precursor glucine pool was sampled by periodic administration of benzoic acid and isolation of urinary hippuric acid. Similarly, the precursor glutamine pool was sampled by periodic administration of phenylacetic acid and isolation of the amide-N of urinary phenylacetylglutamine. The time course of 15N enrichment of hippurate differed from that of the amide-N of glutamine. Whereas initial enrichment values of hippurate were very high, those of glutamine-amide-N were low, increasing to a maximum at about 3 h, and then declining less rapidly than those of hippurate. However, enrichment values of hippurate and of phenacetyl glutamine were normal in all of the gouty subjects studied. Thus, preferential enrichment of N-(3 + 9) in gouty overproducers given [15N]glycine does not necessarily reflect a specific abnormality of glutamine metabolism, but rather appears to be a kinetic

  3. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  4. 15N-labeling experiments to dissect the contributions of heterotrophic denitrification and anammox to nitrogen removal in the OMZ waters of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Holtappels, Moritz; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, (15)N-labeling experiments have become a powerful tool investigating rates and regulations of microbially mediated nitrogen loss processes in the ocean. This chapter introduces the theoretical and practical aspects of (15)N-labeling experiments to dissect the contribution of denitrification and anammox to nitrogen removal in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). We provide a detailed description of the preparation and realization of the experiments on board. Subsequent measurements of N(2) isotopes using gas chromatography mass spectrometry as well as processing of data and calculation of anammox and denitrification rates are explained. Important supplementary measurements are specified, such as the measurement of nanomolar concentrations of ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate. Nutrient profiles and (15)N-experiments from the Peruvian OMZ are presented and discussed as an example. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance of the N2V- defect in 15N -doped synthetic diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, B. L.; Dale, M. W.; Newton, M. E.; Fisher, D.

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen is the dominant impurity in the majority of natural and synthetic diamonds, and the family of nitrogen vacancy-type (NnV ) defects are crucial in our understanding of defect dynamics in these diamonds. A significant gap is the lack of positive identification of N2V- , the dominant charge state of N2V in diamond that contains a significant concentration of electron donors. In this paper, we employ isotopically-enriched diamond to identify the EPR spectrum associated with 15N2V- and use the derived spin Hamiltonian parameters to identify 14N2V- in a natural isotopic abundance sample. The electronic wave function of the N2V- ground state and previous lack of identification is discussed. The N2V- EPR spectrum intensity is shown to correlate with the H2 optical absorption over an order of magnitude in concentration.

  6. Variation in the natural abundance of (15)N in the halophyte, Salicornia virginica, associated with groundwater subsidies of nitrogen in a southern California salt-marsh.

    PubMed

    Page, Henry M

    1995-10-01

    To provide insight into the importance of the salt-marsh ecotone as a sink for inorganic nitrogen in perched groundwater, measurements were made of the natural abundance of (15)N in dissolved NO3-N and NH4-N and in the salt-marsh halophyte, Salicornia virginica, along an environmental gradient from agricultural land into a salt-marsh. The increase in the natural abundance of (15)N (expressed by convention as δ(15)N) of NO3-N, accompanied by the decrease in NO3-N (and total dissolved inorganic N, DIN) concentration along the gradient, suggested that the salt-marsh ecotone is a site of transformation, most likely through denitrification, of inorganic nitrogen in groundwater. (15)N enrichment in S. virginica (and the parasitic herb, Cuscuta salina), along the tidal marsh boundary, relative to high and middle marsh locations, indicated the retention of groundwater nitrogen as vegetative biomass. The correlation between δ(15)N Salicornia and δ(15)NNH4 suggested a preference for NH4-N over NO3-N during uptake by this plant. Groundwater inputs enhanced the standing crop, above-ground productivity, and nitrogen content of S. virginica but the ralative effects of pore water salinity and DIN concentration on these parameters were not determined. (15)N enrichment of marsh plants by groundwater DIN inputs could prove useful in tracing the fate of these inputs in the marsh food web.

  7. Competition for /sup 15/N labelled ammonium between Trifolium subterraneum L. and Lolium multiflorium L. when grown in a mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz Espinoza, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Grasses and legumes are often grown in association in pastures because total herbage yield and forage quality is often higher than a monoculture grass sward. The competitive ability of the forage species for mineral N influences the stability of the mixed pasture. Mt. Barker subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum L.) Gulf ryegrass (Lolium multiflorium L.) were grown in pure stands and in mixtures in 3.8 I pots filled with exploded vermiculite to quantity the competition for applied mineral nitrogen (N). The isotope dilution technique using /sup 15/NH/sub 4/ was used. Also, the effect of increasing rates of fertilizer N on nodulation and fixation by subterranean clover and the rate of N uptake of subterranean clover and ryegrass was measured. The acetylene-ethylene technique and nodulation rating were used to examine the effect of N fertilization on fixation and nodulation. The uptake of N fertilizer by subterranean clover and ryegrass in both pure stands and the mixtures increased as the rate of fertilizer N applied increased. When grown in a pure stand, subterranean clover recovered a comparable amount of fertilizer N, but when grown in mixture with ryegrass, subterranean clover recovered from 44 to 364 mg of N. Ryegrass recovered 2 times the amount of labelled N in 6 hours than subterranean clover. The rate of N uptake was not due to differences in root fresh weight or dry weight. Ryegrass appeared to be a better competitor for NH/sub 4/ than subterranean clover because of the greater rate of uptake.

  8. Non-homogeneity of isotopic labelling in 15N gas flux studies: theory, some observations and possible lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Deppe, Marianna; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Gattinger, Andreas; Giesemann, Anette; Krause, Hans-Martin; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying dinitrogen (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from different soil N pools and processes can be accomplished using the 15N tracer technique but this is subject to four different sources of bias (i. - iv.). This approach includes 15N labelling of selected N pools in soil and subsequent isotope analysis of all relevant N pools as well as of gas samples from enclosures, i.e. mixtures of soil-derived and atmospheric N2 and N2O. Depending on the processes of interest, there may be 15N labelling of one or several N pools, were several labelling treatment are needed in the latter case (e.g. Müller et al., 2004). Measuring pool-derived N2 or N2O has been shown to include two calculation problems, (i.) arising from multiple pools (e.g. Arah, 1992) and (ii.) dealing with the non-random distribution of N2 and N2O mole masses (Hauck et al., 1958). Non-randomness can be solved if m/z 28, 29 and 30 are correctly analysed and the 15N enrichment of one (to distinguish two pools, i.e. soil and atmosphere) or two pools (in case of three pools) is known (Spott & Stange, 2008). Moreover (iii.), NO3- pools generating N2 and N2O via denitrification can be identical or different, e.g. if N2O evolved from higher enriched NO3- in deeper soil was more reduced to N2 compared to N2O evolved from N2O from shallow soil with lower enrichment, or vice versa. Apportioning N2O fluxes to NH4+ (nitrification and/or nitrifier denitrification) and NO3- (denitrification) is often conducted by NO3-labeling, measuring δ15N of emitted N2O and applying mixing equations were the measured 15N enrichment of NH4+and NO3-pool is used. However, this assumes that the average 15N enrichment of NH4+and NO3-in the soil is identical to the enrichment in the active soil domain producing N2 and/or N2O. Violation of this precondition must lead to bias in source apportionment (iv.), but to our knowledge this has not been investigated until now. Here we present conceptual models and model calculations

  9. Population of Nitrifying Bacteria and Nitrification in Ammonium Saturated Clinoptilolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J.

    1999-01-01

    As humans begin to spend longer periods of time in space, plants will be incorporated into life support systems. Ammonium saturated clinoptilolite is one plant growth substrate but a balance between ammonium and nitrate is needed. A laboratory study was conducted to determine effects of nitrifying bacteria on ammonium concentrations and kinetics of nitrification. Columns containing clinoptilolite substrate amended with nitrifying bacteria obtained from soil enrichment were analyzed weekly for a 90 day period. The enrichment culture initially contained 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria and 1 x 10(exp 2) nitrite oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate. Populations of ammonium oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 6) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 3) per gram of substrate. The nitrification rate was approximately 0.25mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Experiments were also conducted to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in a clinoptilolite substrate used to grow wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Seventy days following the initial inoculation with an unknown number of commercial nitrifying bacteria, 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate were present. The number of nitrite oxidizing bacteria was between 1 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) per gram of substrate as measured by the most probable number method. Nitrification rates were approximately 0.20mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Clinoptilolite readily exchanged sufficient concentrations of ammonium to support nitrifying bacteria and they survived well in this medium.

  10. Population of Nitrifying Bacteria and Nitrification in Ammonium Saturated Clinoptilolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J.

    1999-01-01

    As humans begin to spend longer periods of time in space, plants will be incorporated into life support systems. Ammonium saturated clinoptilolite is one plant growth substrate but a balance between ammonium and nitrate is needed. A laboratory study was conducted to determine effects of nitrifying bacteria on ammonium concentrations and kinetics of nitrification. Columns containing clinoptilolite substrate amended with nitrifying bacteria obtained from soil enrichment were analyzed weekly for a 90 day period. The enrichment culture initially contained 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria and 1 x 10(exp 2) nitrite oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate. Populations of ammonium oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 6) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 3) per gram of substrate. The nitrification rate was approximately 0.25mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Experiments were also conducted to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in a clinoptilolite substrate used to grow wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Seventy days following the initial inoculation with an unknown number of commercial nitrifying bacteria, 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate were present. The number of nitrite oxidizing bacteria was between 1 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) per gram of substrate as measured by the most probable number method. Nitrification rates were approximately 0.20mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Clinoptilolite readily exchanged sufficient concentrations of ammonium to support nitrifying bacteria and they survived well in this medium.

  11. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  12. Uptake of stormwater nitrogen in bioretention systems demonstrated from 15N tracer techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdeshel, D.; Hultine, K. R.; Pomeroy, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Bioretention stormwater management systems are engineered ecosystems that capture urban stormwater in order to reduce the harmful effects of stormwater pollution on receiving waters. Bioretention systems have been shown to be effective at reducing the volume of runoff, and thereby reduce the nutrient loading to receiving waters from urban areas. However, little work has been done to evaluate the treatment processes that are responsible for reductions in effluent nitrogen (N). We hypothesize that the pulses of inorganic nitrogen associated with urban runoff events are captured in the plat tissues within these systems and not adsorbed to the soil media, thus creating a long-term, sustainable treatment approach to reducing the total nutrient loading to receiving waters. Nitrogen treatment performance was tested on two bioretention systems in Salt Lake City, UT: 1) an upland native community that does not require irrigation in semi-arid climates, and 2) a wetland community that requires 250 l of daily irrigation to offset the relatively high evaporative demand in the region. Each cell is sized to treat a 2.5 cm storm from a 140 m2 impervious surface: the area of the bioretention system is 10 m2. To test the N removal performance of each system, runoff events were simulated to represent an average precipitation regime using a synthetic stormwater blend starting in January, 2012. Effluent was collected from an underdrain and analyzed for total nitrogen (TN); mass removal was calculated for each month by subtracting the TN mass added to the garden minus the TN mass that flowed out of the garden. To test the hypothesis that plants assimilate stormwater N, 4 g of 100 atom% 15N NH4NO3 tracer was used as the N source in the synthetic stormwater during the first 2,000 l synthetic storm event in May. This isotopic label was calculated to enrich the total N pool of each garden to 100‰ 15N/14Nair. New growth was harvested from each plant in both cells and analyzed for 15N

  13. Paleoenvironmental implications of taxonomic variation among δ15N values of chloropigments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, Meytal B.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Robinson, Rebecca S.; Qin, Yelun; Saito, Mark A.; Pearson, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Natural variations in the ratios of nitrogen isotopes in biomass reflect variations in nutrient sources utilized for growth. In order to use δ15N values of chloropigments of photosynthetic organisms to determine the corresponding δ15N values of biomass – and by extension, surface waters – the isotopic offset between chlorophyll and biomass must be constrained. Here we examine this offset in various geologically-relevant taxa, grown using nutrient sources that may approximate ocean conditions at different times in Earth’s history. Phytoplankton in this study include cyanobacteria (diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic), eukaryotic algae (red and green), and anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (Proteobacteria), as well as environmental samples from sulfidic lake water. Cultures were grown using N2, NO3−, and NH4+ as nitrogen sources, and were examined under different light regimes and growth conditions. We find surprisingly high variability in the isotopic difference (δ15Nbiomass − δ15Nchloropigment) for prokaryotes, with average values for species ranging from −12.2‰ to +11.7‰. We define this difference as εpor, a term that encompasses diagenetic porphyrins and chlorins, as well as chlorophyll. Negative values of εpor reflect chloropigments that are 15N-enriched relative to biomass. Notably, this enrichment appears to occur only in cyanobacteria. The average value of εpor for freshwater cyanobacterial species is −9.8 ± 1.8‰, while for marine cyanobacteria it is −0.9 ± 1.3‰. These isotopic effects group environmentally but not phylogenetically, e.g., εpor values for freshwater Chroococcales resemble those of freshwater Nostocales but differ from those of marine Chroococcales. Our measured values of εpor for eukaryotic algae (range = 4.7–8.7‰) are similar to previous reports for pure cultures. For all taxa studied, values of εpor do not depend on the type of nitrogen substrate used for growth. The observed

  14. Development and application of 15N-tracer substances for measuring the whole-body protein turnover rates in the human, especially in neonates: a review.

    PubMed

    Wutzke, Klaus D

    2012-06-01

    Our research group of the Children's Hospital of the University of Rostock (Rostock group) has long-time experience in (15)N-labelling and in using yeast protein and its hydrolysates for tracer kinetic studies to evaluate parameters of the whole-body protein metabolism in premature infants. The particular advantage of applying an economically convenient, highly (15)N-enriched, and completely labelled yeast protein for evaluating protein turnover rates is the fact that the (15)N dose is spread among all proteinogenic amino acids. The absorption has been improved by hydrolysing [(15)N]yeast protein with thermitase into a mixture of amino acids, dipeptides and tripeptides so that faecal analysis becomes unnecessary when determining turnover rates. The review shows that, in contrast to the application of single (15)N-labelled amino acids with resulting overestimation of protein turnover rates, the (15)N-labelled yeast protein thermitase hydrolysate represents the amino acid metabolism more closely without causing amino acid imbalances. The (15)N-labelled yeast protein thermitase hydrolysate leads to the estimation of reliable protein turnover rates, particularly in premature infants.

  15. [Responses of Soil and Plant 15N Natural Abundance to Long-term N Addition in an N-Saturated Pinus massoniana Forest in Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-jing; Kang, Rong-hua; Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Jing; Duan, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Increasing N deposition in China will possibly cause N saturation of forest ecosystem, further resulting in a series of serious environmental problems. In order to explore the response of forest ecosystem to N deposition in China, and further evaluate and predict the N status of ecosystem, the 15N natural abundance (delta 15N) of soil and plants was measured in a typical Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest in southwest China to examine the potential use of delta 15N enrichment factor (epsilon(p/s)) as an effective indicator of N status. Long-term high N addition could significantly increase delta 15N of soil and plants, which was suggested by an on-going N fertilizing experiment with NH4NO3 or NaNO3 for 7 years. Meanwhile, delta 15N of soil and plants under NH, deposition was significantly higher than that under NO- deposition, suggesting different responses of ecosystem to different N-forms of deposition. The "N enrichment factor (epsilon(p/s)) had positive correlations with N deposition, N nitrification, and N leaching in the soil water. Linear correlation between "N enrichment factor and N deposition was found for all Masson pine forests investigated in this and previous studies in China, demonstrating that 15N enrichment factor could be used as an indicator of N status. The NH3 emission control should also be carried out accompanying with NOx emission control in the future, because NH4- deposition had significantly greater impact on the forest ecosystem than NO3- deposition with the same equivalence.

  16. Nitrogen removal in Myriophyllum aquaticum wetland microcosms for swine wastewater treatment: (15) N-labelled nitrogen mass balance analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunan; Liu, Feng; Xiao, Runlin; He, Yang; Wu, Jinshui

    2017-01-01

    Ecological treatments are effective for treating agricultural wastewater. In this study, wetland microcosms vegetated with Myriophyllum aquaticum were designed for nitrogen (N) removal from two strengths of swine wastewater, and (15) N-labelled ammonium (NH4(+) -N) was added to evaluate the dominant NH4(+) -N removal pathway. The results showed that 98.8% of NH4(+) -N and 88.3% of TN (TN: 248.6 mg L(-1) ) were removed from low-strength swine wastewater (SW1) after an incubation of 21 days, with corresponding values for high-strength swine wastewater (SW2) being 99.2% of NH4(+) -N and 87.8% of TN (TN: 494.9 mg L(-1) ). Plant uptake and soil adsorption respectively accounted for 24.0% and 15.6% of the added (15) N. Meanwhile, above-ground tissues of M. aquaticum had significantly higher biomass and TN content than below-ground (P < 0.05). (15) N mass balance analysis indicated that gas losses contributed 52.0% to the added (15) N, but the N2 O flux constituted only 7.5% of total gas losses. The dynamics of NO3(-) -N and N2 O flux revealed that strong nitrification and denitrification occurred in M. aquaticum microcosms, which was a dominant N removal pathway. These findings demonstrated that M. aquaticum could feasibly be used to construct wetlands for high N-loaded animal wastewater treatment. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. δ15N measurement of organic and inorganic substances by EA-IRMS: a speciation-dependent procedure.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Natacha; Rossi, Michel J; Delémont, Olivier; Siegwolf, Rolf T W

    2013-01-01

    Little attention has been paid so far to the influence of the chemical nature of the substance when measuring δ(15)N by elemental analysis (EA)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Although the bulk nitrogen isotope analysis of organic material is not to be questioned, literature from different disciplines using IRMS provides hints that the quantitative conversion of nitrate into nitrogen presents difficulties. We observed abnormal series of δ(15)N values of laboratory standards and nitrates. These unexpected results were shown to be related to the tailing of the nitrogen peak of nitrate-containing compounds. A series of experiments were set up to investigate the cause of this phenomenon, using ammonium nitrate (NH(4)NO(3)) and potassium nitrate (KNO(3)) samples, two organic laboratory standards as well as the international secondary reference materials IAEA-N1, IAEA-N2-two ammonium sulphates [(NH(4))(2)SO(4)]-and IAEA-NO-3, a potassium nitrate. In experiment 1, we used graphite and vanadium pentoxide (V(2)O(5)) as additives to observe if they could enhance the decomposition (combustion) of nitrates. In experiment 2, we tested another elemental analyser configuration including an additional section of reduced copper in order to see whether or not the tailing could originate from an incomplete reduction process. Finally, we modified several parameters of the method and observed their influence on the peak shape, δ(15)N value and nitrogen content in weight percent of nitrogen of the target substances. We found the best results using mere thermal decomposition in helium, under exclusion of any oxygen. We show that the analytical procedure used for organic samples should not be used for nitrates because of their different chemical nature. We present the best performance given one set of sample introduction parameters for the analysis of nitrates, as well as for the ammonium sulphate IAEA-N1 and IAEA-N2 reference materials. We discuss these results considering the

  18. The δ15N of nitrate in the Southern Ocean: Nitrogen cycling and circulation in the ocean interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigman, D. M.; Altabet, M. A.; McCorkle, D. C.; Francois, R.; Fischer, G.

    2000-08-01

    We report analyses of the nitrogen isotopic composition of nitrate in the eastern Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean. In this paper, we focus on the subsurface data as well as data from the deep waters of other ocean basins. Nitrate δ15N is relatively invariant in much of the abyssal ocean (i.e., below 2.5 km), with a value of 4.8±0.2‰ observed in Lower Circumpolar Deep Water, North Atlantic Deep Water, and central Pacific deep water. The isotopic invariance of deep ocean nitrate stems fundamentally from the completeness of nitrate utilization in most of the global surface ocean, the Southern Ocean surface being an important exception. In the Subantarctic Zone (north of the Polar Frontal Zone) the nitrate δ15N of Upper Circumpolar Deep Water is ˜0.7‰ greater than that of Lower Circumpolar Deep Water. This isotopic enrichment appears to result from denitrification in the low-latitude water masses with which Upper Circumpolar Deep Water communicates. The isotopic enrichment of Upper Circumpolar Deep Water is diminished in the Antarctic, probably because of the remineralization of sinking organic N, which has a low δ15N in the Antarctic. Relative to the other water masses of the Southern Ocean, the Subantarctic thermocline has a very low nitrate δ15N for its nitrate concentration because of exchange with the low-latitude thermocline, where this isotopic signature appears to originate. This signature of the low-latitude thermocline has two probable causes: (1) mixing with low-nitrate surface water and (2) the oxidation of newly fixed N.

  19. Protein expression and isotopic enrichment based on induction of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Refaeli, Bosmat; Goldbourt, Amir

    2012-10-12

    The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is known to exist in many organisms including bacteria, archea and eukarya. Although the common route for carbon catabolism in Escherichia coli is the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, it was shown that gluconate catabolism in E. coli occurs via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. We demonstrate here that by supplying BL21(DE3) competent E.coli cells with gluconate in a minimal growth medium, protein expression can be induced. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of over-expressed ubiquitin show that by using [1-(13)C]-gluconate as the only carbon source, and (15)N-enriched ammonium chloride, sparse isotopic enrichment in the form of a spin-pair carbonyl-amide backbone enrichment is obtained. The specific amino acid labeling pattern is analyzed and is shown to be compatible with Entner-Doudoroff metabolism. Isotopic enrichment serves as a key factor in the biophysical characterization of proteins by various methods including nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and more. Therefore, the method presented here can be applied to study proteins by obtaining sparse enrichment schemes that are not based on the regular glycolytic pathway, or to study the Entner-Doudoroff metabolism during protein expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nirtogen-15-labeled oligodeoxynucleotides. 4. Tetraplex formation of d[G({sup 15}N{sup 7})GTTTTTGG] and d[T({sup 15}N{sup 7})GGGT] monitored by {sup 1}H detected {sup 15}N NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, B.L.; Chuan Wang; Jones, R.A.

    1992-05-20

    The authors have synthesized two molecules containing [7-{sup 15}N]-labeled 2{prime}-deoxyguanosine, d[G({sup 15}N{sup 7})GTTTTTGG], and d[T({sup 15}N{sup 7})GGGT] which, under appropriate conditions, will form tetramolecular complexes. The {sup 15}N chemical shifts of these molecules and of their Watson-Crick duplexes, d[G({sup 15}N{sup 7})GTTTTTGG]-d[CCAAAAACC] and d[T({sup 15}N{sup 7})GGGT]-d[ACCCA], were monitored as a function of temperature. The {sup 15}N chemical shift of the labeled N7 atom in each tetramolecular complex shows a similar temperature dependence, and the chemical shifts are not signal-averaged. The similarity of the chemical shifts for the tetraplex and single strand structures, and the difference seen for the two duplexes, are consistent with the different degrees of hydrogen bonding to the N7 which could be expected in each case. Thus, although more examples will be required to establish the generality of these observations, a purine [7-{sup 15}N] label appears to be able to monitor groove interactions, including hydration. 28 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. 70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM NITRATE IN STORAGE. APRIL 18, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  2. Acute ammonium dichromate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Meert, K L; Ellis, J; Aronow, R; Perrin, E

    1994-10-01

    We report the ingestion of ammonium dichromate by a child that resulted in multiple-organ-system failure and death. Exchange transfusion and hemodialysis were ineffective in removing significant amounts of chromium or causing sustained clinical improvement. We suggest that immediate, large doses of the reducing agent ascorbic acid would allow effective reduction of hexavalent chromium with less cellular toxicity.

  3. δ(15)N variation in Ulva lactuca as a proxy for anthropogenic nitrogen inputs in coastal areas of Gulf of Gaeta (Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Lucia; Bentivoglio, Flavia; Carlino, Pasquale; Calizza, Edoardo; Rossi, David; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Loreto

    2014-07-15

    We tested the capacity of Ulva lactuca to mark N sources across large marine areas by measuring variation in its δ(15)N at several sites in the Gulf of Gaeta. Comparisons were made with the macroalga Cystoseira amentacea. Variation of δ(15)N values was assessed also in the coastal waters off the Circeo Natural Park, where U. lactuca and C. amentacea were harvested, as these waters are barely influenced by human activities and were used as reference site. A small fragment from each frond was preserved before deployment in order to characterize the initial isotopic values. After 48 h of submersion, U. lactuca was more responsive than C. amentacea to environmental variation and δ(15)N enrichment in the Gulf of Gaeta was observed. The spatial distribution of δ(15)N enrichment indicated that different macro-areas in the Gulf were affected by N inputs from different origins. Comparison of the δ(15)N values of fragments taken from the same transplanted frond avoided bias arising from natural isotopic variability. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. A cost-effective approach to produce (15)N-labelled amino acids employing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC503.

    PubMed

    Nicolás Carcelén, Jesús; Marchante-Gayón, Juan Manuel; González, Pablo Rodríguez; Valledor, Luis; Cañal, María Jesús; Alonso, José Ignacio García

    2017-08-18

    The use of enriched stable isotopes is of outstanding importance in chemical metrology as it allows the application of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). Primary methods based on IDMS ensure the quality of the analytical measurements and traceability of the results to the international system of units. However, the synthesis of isotopically labelled molecules from enriched stable isotopes is an expensive and a difficult task. Either chemical and biochemical methods to produce labelled molecules have been proposed, but so far, few cost-effective methods have been described. The aim of this study was to use the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce, at laboratory scale, (15)N-labelled amino acids with a high isotopic enrichment. To do that, a culture media containing (15)NH4Cl was used. No kinetic isotope effect (KIE) was observed. The labelled proteins biosynthesized by the microorganism were extracted from the biomass and the (15)N-labelled amino acids were obtained after a protein hydrolysis with HCl. The use of the wall deficient strain CC503 cw92 mt+ is fit for purpose, as it only assimilates ammonia as nitrogen source, avoiding isotope contamination with nitrogen from the atmosphere or the reagents used in the culture medium, and enhancing the protein extraction efficiency compared to cell-walled wild type Chlamydomonas. The isotopic enrichment of the labelled amino acids was calculated from their isotopic composition measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The average isotopic enrichment for the 16 amino acids characterized was 99.56 ± 0.05% and the concentration of the amino acids in the hydrolysate ranged from 18 to 90 µg/mL. Previously reported biochemical methods to produce isotopically labelled proteins have been applied in the fields of proteomics and fluxomics. For these approaches, low amounts of products are required and the isotopic enrichment of the molecules has never been properly determined. So far, only

  5. Fate of orally administered 15N-labeled polyamines in rats bearing solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Xu, Yong Ji; Samejima, Keijiro; Goda, Hitomi; Niitsu, Masaru; Takahashi, Masakazu; Hashimoto, Yoshiyuki

    2003-03-01

    We studied absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) in the gastrointestinal tract using (15)N-labeled polyamines as tracers and ionspray ionization mass spectrometry (IS-MS). The relatively simple protocol using rats bearing solid tumors provided useful information. Three (15)N-labeled polyamines that were simultaneously administered were absorbed equally from gastrointestinal tract, and distributed within tissues at various concentrations. The uptake of (15)N-spermidine seemed preferential to that of (15)N-spermine since the concentrations of (15)N-spermidine in the liver and tumors were higher, whereas those of (15)N-spermine were higher in the kidney, probably due to the excretion of excess extracellular spermine. Most of the absorbed (15)N-putrescine seemed to be lost, suggesting blood and tissue diamine oxidase degradation. Concentrations of (15)N-spermidine and (15)N-spermine in the tumor were low. We also describe the findings from two rats that were administered with (15)N-spermine. The tissue concentrations of (15)N-spermine were unusually high, and significant levels of (15)N-spermidine were derived from (15)N-spermine in these animals.

  6. The Titan 14N/ 15N and 12C/ 13C isotopic ratios in HCN from Cassini/CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Nixon, Conor A.

    2007-11-01

    We report the detection of H 13CN and HC 15N in mid-infrared spectra recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini, along with the determination of the 12C/ 13C and 14N/ 15N isotopic ratios. We analyzed two sets of limb spectra recorded near 13-15° S (Tb flyby) and 83° N (T4 flyby) at 0.5 cm -1 resolution. The spectral range 1210-1310 cm -1 was used to retrieve the temperature profile in the range 145-490 km at 13° S and 165-300 km at 83° N. These two temperature profiles were then incorporated in the atmospheric model to retrieve the abundance profile of H 12C 14N, H 13CN and HC 15N from their bands at 713, 706 and 711 cm -1, respectively. The HCN abundance profile was retrieved in the range 90-460 km at 15° S and 165-305 km at 83° N. There is no evidence for vertical variations of the isotopic ratios. Constraining the isotopic abundance profiles to be proportional to the HCN one, we find C12/C13=89-18+22 at 15° S, and 68-12+16 at 83° N, two values that are statistically consistent. A combination of these results yields a 12C/ 13C value equal to 75±12. This global result, as well as the 15° S one, envelop the value in Titan's methane ( 82.3±1) [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779-784] measured at 10° S and is slightly lower than the terrestrial inorganic standard value (89). The 14N/ 15N isotopic ratio is found equal to 56-13+16 at 15° S and 56-9+10 at 83° N. Combining the two values yields 14N/ 15N = 56 ± 8, which corresponds to an enrichment in 15N of about 4.9 compared with the terrestrial ratio. These results agree with the values obtained from previous ground-based millimeter observations [Hidayat, T., Marten, A., Bézard, B., Gautier, D., Owen, T., Matthews, H.E., Paubert, G., 1997. Icarus 126, 170-182; Marten, A., Hidayat, T., Biraud, Y., Moreno, R., 2002. Icarus 158, 532-544]. The 15N/ 14N ratio found in HCN is ˜3 times higher than in N 2 [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779

  7. FIRST MEASUREMENTS OF {sup 15}N FRACTIONATION IN N{sub 2}H{sup +} TOWARD HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Fontani, F.; Caselli, P.; Bizzocchi, L.; Palau, A.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the first measurements of the isotopic ratio {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N in N{sub 2}H{sup +} toward a statistically significant sample of high-mass star-forming cores. The sources belong to the three main evolutionary categories of the high-mass star formation process: high-mass starless cores, high-mass protostellar objects, and ultracompact H ii regions. Simultaneous measurements of the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in CN have been made. The {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios derived from N{sub 2}H{sup +} show a large spread (from ∼180 up to ∼1300), while those derived from CN are in between the value measured in the terrestrial atmosphere (∼270) and that of the proto-solar nebula (∼440) for the large majority of the sources within the errors. However, this different spread might be due to the fact that the sources detected in the N{sub 2}H{sup +} isotopologues are more than those detected in the CN ones. The {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio does not change significantly with the source evolutionary stage, which indicates that time seems to be irrelevant for the fractionation of nitrogen. We also find a possible anticorrelation between the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N (as derived from N{sub 2}H{sup +}) and the H/D isotopic ratios. This suggests that {sup 15}N enrichment could not be linked to the parameters that cause D enrichment, in agreement with the prediction by recent chemical models. These models, however, are not able to reproduce the observed large spread in {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N, pointing out that some important routes of nitrogen fractionation could be still missing in the models.

  8. Physiological integration modifies δ15N in the clonal plant Fragaria vesca, suggesting preferential transport of nitrogen to water-stressed offspring

    PubMed Central

    Roiloa, S. R.; Antelo, B.; Retuerto, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims One of the most striking attributes of clonal plants is their capacity for physiological integration, which enables movement of essential resources between connected ramets. This study investigated the capacity of physiological integration to buffer differences in resource availability experienced by ramets of the clonal wild strawberry plant, Fragaria vesca. Specifically, a study was made of the responses of connected and severed offspring ramets growing in environments with different water availability conditions (well watered or water stressed) and nitrogen forms (nitrate or ammonium). Methods The experimental design consisted of three factors, ‘integration’ (connected, severed) ‘water status’ (well watered, water stressed) and ‘nitrogen form’ (nitrate, ammonium), applied in a pot experiment. The effects of physiological integration were studied by analysing photochemical efficiency, leaf spectral reflectance, photosynthesis and carbon and nitrogen isotope discrimination, the last of which has been neglected in previous studies. Key Results Physiological integration buffered the stress caused by water deprivation. As a consequence, survival was improved in water-stressed offspring ramets that remained connected to their parent plants. The nitrogen isotope composition (δ15N) values in the connected water-stressed ramets were similar to those in ramets in the ammonium treatment; however, δ15N values in connected well-watered ramets were similar to those in the nitrate treatment. The results also demonstrated the benefit of integration for offspring ramets in terms of photochemical activity and photosynthesis. Conclusions This is the first study in which carbon and nitrogen isotopic discrimination has been used to detect physiological integration in clonal plants. The results for nitrogen isotope composition represent the first evidence of preferential transport of a specific form of nitrogen to compensate for stressful conditions

  9. Preferential flow, nitrogen transformations and 15N balance under urine-affected areas of irrigated and non-irrigated clover-based pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakro, Naser; Dillon, Peter

    1995-12-01

    Urine-affected areas can lead to considerable losses of N by leaching, ammonia volatilisation and denitrification from dairy pastures in the southeast of South Australia. Potable groundwater supplies are considered to have become contaminated by nitrate as a result of leaching from these leguminous pastures. Dairy cow urine, labelled with 15N urea, was applied to micro-plots and mini-lysimeters installed in two adjacent irrigated (white clover-rye grass) and non-irrigated (subterranean clover-annual grasses) paddocks of a dairy farm on four occasions representing different seasonal conditions. These experiments allowed measurement of nitrogen transformations, recovery of 15N in the pasture and soil, and leaching below various depths. Gaseous losses were calculated from the nitrogen balance. The results of the four experiments showed that within a day of urine application up to 40% of the applied urinary-N was leached below a depth of 150 mm as a result of macropore flow in the irrigated paddock, and up to 24% in the non-irrigated one. After application to the irrigated paddock 17% of the urinary-N moved immediately below 300 mm but only 2% below the 450-mm depth. The urinary-N remaining in the soil was converted from urea to ammonium within a day regardless of season. Within the first 7 days of application six times more nitrate was produced in summer than in winter. This has obvious implications for leaching potential. Leaching of 15N from the top 150 mm of soil, following urine applications in all seasons, was between 41% and 62% of the applied 15N in the irrigated paddock and 25-51% in the non-irrigated paddock. However, leaching losses measured at depths of 300 or 450 mm were smaller by a factor of 2-4. The leaching loss of 15N applied in spring in both paddocks was 41% below 150 mm and 12% below 450 mm. Recovery of 15N from the soil-plant system in the 450-nm deep lysimeters was ˜60% of that applied. Estimated ammonia was ˜9% of applied 15N with no paddock

  10. Macroalgae blooms and delta 15N in subtropical coastal lagoons from the Southeastern Gulf of California: discrimination among agricultural, shrimp farm and sewage effluents.

    PubMed

    Piñón-Gimate, Alejandra; Soto-Jiménez, Martín F; Ochoa-Izaguirre, María Julia; García-Pagés, Eynar; Páez-Osuna, Federico

    2009-08-01

    Macroalgae blooms of Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Hypnea spinella and Spyridia filamentosa have been found in coastal lagoons in the SE Gulf of California. Agriculture, livestock, shrimp and poultry farms and sewage contribute anthropogenic nitrogen to the systems. The delta(15)N of these sources, water column and macroalgae were studied in order to identify the N supply for macroalgae blooms. delta(15)N of three species of macroalgae (4.3-13.6 per thousand) were enriched compared to the water column (delta(15)N-NO(3)(-) 3.7-6.8 per thousand), probably because of fractioning from the macroalgae. delta(15)N of POM (1.4-10.3 per thousand) was similar to the water column but the relationship was unclear. Depending on the site, macroalgae showed different delta(15)N values since some sites receive more or less influence from one given source of the associated watershed, which is reflected in the different delta(15)N values of the macroalgae of the same system and in the relative contributions of the sources.

  11. Kinetic commitment in the catalysis of glutamine synthesis by GS1 from Arabidopsis using (14)N/(15)N and solvent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Mauve, Caroline; Giraud, Nicolas; Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard R A; Antheaume, Ingrid; Tea, Illa; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) catalyzes the production of glutamine from glutamate, ammonium and ATP. Although being essential in plants for N assimilation and recycling, kinetic commitments and transition states of the reaction have not been clearly established yet. Here, we examined (12)C/(13)C, (14)N/(15)N and H2O/D2O isotope effects in Arabidopsis GS1 catalysis and compared to the prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) enzyme. A(14)N/(15)N isotope effect ((15)V/K ≈ 1.015, with respect to substrate NH4(+)) was observed in the prokaryotic enzyme, indicating that ammonium utilization (deprotonation and/or amidation) was partially rate-limiting. In the plant enzyme, the isotope effect was inverse ((15)V/K = 0.965), suggesting that the reaction intermediate is involved in an amidation-deamidation equilibrium favoring (15)N. There was no (12)C/(13)C kinetic isotope effect ((13)V/K = 1.000), suggesting that the amidation step of the catalytic cycle involves a transition state with minimal alteration of overall force constants at the C-5 carbon. Surprisingly, the solvent isotope effect was found to be inverse, that is, with a higher turn-over rate in heavy water ((D)V ≈ 0.5), showing that restructuration of the active site due to displacement of H2O by D2O facilitates the processing of intermediates.

  12. Nitrogen dynamics observed in high resolution: Understanding bulk sedimentary d15N using amino acid compound-specific nitrogen isotopes in the eastern tropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauthoff, W.; McCarthy, M. D.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    Compound-specific nitrogen (N) isotopic analysis of amino acids (δ15N-AA) is a novel tool to study nitrogen cycling, with rapidly expanding applications in geochemistry and paleoceanography. However, its applicability to marine sediments has only just been explored in a highly productive, hypoxic margin setting. δ15N-AA can untangle major underlying drivers for changes in sedimentary bulk δ15N, representing a powerful new approach to study regions of complex N cycling with competing isotopic fractionation processes. For example, the δ15N-AA proxy indicates the δ15N value of source inorganic nitrogen (i.e. baseline δ15N), while simultaneously indicating trophic structure complexity in the overlying water column. Further, δ15N-AA patterns indicate effects of microbial resynthesis and degradation of organic nitrogen. Understanding depositional processes and their biases in the bulk δ15N record informs our understanding of N cycling globally. Here we use δ15N-AA to provide new insight into source and transformation of sedimentary organic nitrogen in diverse depositional conditions using a core top sample set in the eastern tropical Pacific (11.3°N-8.5°S, 81.2-110.6°W). These sites vary in surface productivity, sediment oxicity, accumulation rate, and water depth (378-4,360m below sea level), parameters understood to determine the formation and preservation of bulk sedimentary N pool. Our core top bulk nitrogen isotope values (δ15Nbulk) exhibited characteristic enrichment with decreasing surface nitrate away from upwelled water masses, allowing us to examine how a nitrate utilization gradient is manifest in δ15N-AA values. Additionally, we examined a suite of multicores from a zone of diverse N cycling, the eastern tropical Pacific, where competing factors such as upwelling and denitrification influence δ15N-AA. Downcore δ15N-AA records from this region inform interpretations of past changes in N utilization, water column N cycling, and post

  13. The fate of 15N-nitrate in mesocosms from five European peatlands differing in long-term nitrogen deposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, K.; Blodau, C.

    2016-02-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition changes the retention, transformation, and fluxes of N in ombrotrophic peatlands. To evaluate such effects we applied a 15N tracer (NH4 15NO3) at a rate of 2.3 g N m-2 yr-1 to mesocosms of five European peatlands with differing long-term N deposition rates for a period of 76 days of dry and 90 days of wet conditions. We determined background N content and moss length growth, and recovered the 15N tracer from the mosses, graminoids, shrubs, the peat, and dissolved N. Background N contents in Sphagnum mosses increased from 5.5 (Degerö Stormyr, deposition < 0.2 g N m-2 yr-1) up to 12.2 mg g-1 (Frölichshaier Sattelmoor, 4.7-6.0 g N m-2 yr-1). In peat from Degerö, nitrate and ammonium concentrations were below 3 mg L-1, whereas up to 30 (nitrate) and 11 mg L-1 (ammonium) was found in peat from Frölichshaier Sattelmoor. Sphagnum mosses (down to 5 cm below surface) generally intercepted large amounts of 15N (0.2-0.35 mg g-1) and retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Similar quantities of the 15N were recovered from the peat, followed by shrubs, graminoids, and the dissolved pool. At the most polluted sites we recovered more 15N from shrubs (up to 12.4 %) and from nitrate and ammonium (up to 0.7 %). However, no impact of N deposition on 15N retention by Sphagnum could be identified and their length growth was highest under high N background deposition. Our experiment suggests that the decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, is likely more modest than previously thought. This conclusion is related to the finding that Sphagnum species can apparently thrive at elevated long-term N deposition rates in European peatlands.

  14. Nitrogen Transformations in Wetland Soil Cores Measured by (sup15)N Isotope Pairing and Dilution at Four Infiltration Rates

    PubMed Central

    Stepanauskas, R.; Davidsson, E. T.; Leonardson, L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of water infiltration rate (IR) on nitrogen cycling in a saturated wetland soil was investigated by applying a (sup15)N isotope dilution and pairing method. Water containing [(sup15)N]nitrate was infiltrated through 10-cm-long cores of sieved and homogenized soil at rates of 72, 168, 267, and 638 mm day(sup-1). Then the frequencies of (sup30)N(inf2), (sup29)N(inf2), (sup15)NO(inf3)(sup-), and (sup15)NH(inf4)(sup+) in the outflow water were measured. This method allowed simultaneous determination of nitrification, coupled and uncoupled denitrification, and nitrate assimilation rates. From 3% (at the highest IR) to 95% (at the lowest IR) of nitrate was removed from the water, mainly by denitrification. The nitrate removal was compensated for by the net release of ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen. Lower oxygen concentrations in the soil at lower IRs led to a sharper decrease in the nitrification rate than in the ammonification rate, and, consequently, more ammonium leaked from the soil. The decreasing organic-carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (from 12.8 to 5.1) and the increasing light A(inf250)/A(inf365) ratio (from 4.5 to 5.2) indicated an increasing bioavailability of the outflowing dissolved organic matter with increasing IR. The efflux of nitrous oxide was also very sensitive to IR and increased severalfold when a zone of low oxygen concentration was close to the outlet of the soil cores. N(inf2)O then constituted 8% of the total gaseous N lost from the soil. PMID:16535352

  15. Regional patterns in foliar 15N across a gradient of nitrogen deposition in the northeastern US

    Treesearch

    Linda H. Pardo; Steven G. McNulty; Johnny L. Boggs; Sara Duke

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that natural abundance 15N can be a useful tool for assessing nitrogen saturation, because as nitrification and nitrate loss increase, a15N of foliage and soil also increases. We measured foliar a15N at 11 high-elevation spruce-fir stands along an N deposition gradient...

  16. Regional patterns in foliar 15N across a gradient of nitrogen deposition in the northeastern US

    Treesearch

    Linda H. Pardo; Steven G. McNulty; Johnny L. Boggs; Sara Duke

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that natural abundance 15N can be a useful tool for assessing nitrogen saturation, because as nitrification and nitrate loss increase, d15N of foliage and soil also increases. We measured foliar d15N at 11 high-elevation spruce-fir stands along an N deposition gradient...

  17. 1H, 15N and 13C NMR Assignments of Mouse Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B2

    PubMed Central

    Breivik, Åshild S.; Aachmann, Finn L.; Sal, Lena S.; Kim, Hwa-Young; Del Conte, Rebecca; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Dikiy, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant mouse methionine-r-sulfoxide reductase 2 (MsrB2ΔS) isotopically labeled with 15N and 15N/13C was generated. We report here the 1H, 15N and 13C NMR assignments of the reduced form of this protein. PMID:19636904

  18. Nitrogen Recycling in the Atmosphere - Crust - Mantle Systems: Evidence From Secular Variation of Crustal N Abundances and δ 15N Values, Archean to Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Kerrich, R.

    2001-12-01

    The origin and evolution of nitrogen in the Earth's major reservoirs of atmosphere, crust, and mantle is controversial. The initial mantle acquired a δ 15N of -m 25‰ corresponding to enstatite chondrite as found in rare diamonds, and the secondary atmosphere from late accretion of volatile-rich C1 carbonaceous chondrites was +30 to +43‰ . Most diamonds and mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) are -m 5‰ , and the present atmosphere 0‰ , requiring shifts of +20‰ and -m 30 to -m 43‰ in these two reservoirs. The present mass of N in the mantle and atmosphere are estimated at 3.5 x 1019 kg and 3.8 x 1018 kg, respectively. Initial atmospheric δ 15N could have been shifted to lower values by degassing of 15N depleted N from the mantle. However, the mantle would remain more depleted than is observed. The crustal record shows that shifts of both atmosphere and mantle could have occurred by recycling. Sedimentary rocks, and crustal hydrothermal systems that proxy for bulk crust, both show systematic trends over 2.7 Ga from the Archean (δ 15N = 15.0 +/- 1.8‰ ; 16.5 +/- 3.3‰ ); through Paleoproterozoic (δ 15N = 9.7 +/- 1.0‰ ; 9.5 +/- 2.4‰ ); to the Phanerozoic (δ 15N = 3.5 +/- 1.0‰ ; 3.0 +/- 1.2‰ ). Crustal N content has increased in parallel from 84 +/- 67 ppm, through 266 +/- 195 ppm, to 1550 +/- 1135 ppm in the Phanerozoic. These trends are consistent with progressive sequestering of atmospheric N2 into sediments, recycling of 15N enriched continental crust into the mantle, and degassing of 15N depleted from the mantle N into the atmosphere.

  19. Exploring the ammonium and nitrate transport of marine phytoplankton with nutrient analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    Radiolabelled methylamine, an ammonium analogue and chlorate, a nitrate analogue, were transported constitutely by laboratory and field populations of phytoplakton. There was no effect of light on the transport of methylamine or chlorate which is contrary to similar measurements made with /sup 15/N-NH/sub 4//sup +/ and /sup 15/N-NO/sub 3//sup -/. The discrepancy appears to result from the fact that the analogues are only transported, while /sup 15/N-NH/sub 4/ and /sup 15/N-NO/sub 3//sup -/ are both transported and assimilated. Transport of ammonium and nitrate appeared to be active; it was against typical values of algal electrochemical gradients. Influx and efflux rates of methylamine and chlorate were measured in pulse-chase experiments; efflux rates increased as intracellular pools filled and net uptake slowed after approximately one to six hours. The pulse-chase experiments indicated that methylamine and chlorate (hence ammonium and nitrate) were stored in two intracellular compartments of diatoms, probably the vacuole and cytoplasm. Laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that chlorate transport by phytoplankton was inhibited when ambient ammonium or nitrite concentrations were high.

  20. Quantitative and qualitative 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopic investigation of the urea-formaldehyde resin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Steinhof, Oliver; Kibrik, Éléonore J; Scherr, Günter; Hasse, Hans

    2014-04-01

    Urea-formaldehyde resins are bulk products of the chemical industry. Their synthesis involves a complex reaction network. The present work contributes to its elucidation by presenting results from detailed NMR spectroscopic studies with different methods. Besides (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR, (15)N NMR spectroscopy is also applied. (15)N-enriched urea was used for the investigations. A detailed NMR signal assignment and a model of the reaction network of the hydroxymethylation step of the synthesis are presented. Because of its higher spectral dispersion and the fact that all key reactions directly involve the nitrogen centers, (15)N NMR provides a much larger amount of detail than do (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Symmetric and asymmetric dimethylol urea can be clearly distinguished and separated from monomethylol urea, trimethylol urea, and methylene-bridged urea. The existence of hemiformals of methylol urea is confirmed. 1,3,5-Oxadiazinan-4-on (uron) and its derivatives were not found in the reaction mixtures investigated here but were prepared via alternative routes. The molar ratios of formaldehyde to urea were 1, 2, and 4, the pH values 7.5 and 8.5, and the reaction temperature 60 °C.

  1. Nitrous oxide emissions from soil amended with 15N-labelled urea with nitrification inhibitor (Nitrapyrin) and mulch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Aamir; Heiling, Maria; Zaman, Mohammad; Resch, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), one of the key greenhouse and ozone (O3) depleting gases, constitutes 7% of the anthropogenic greenhouse effect. Its global warming potential is 310 times higher than that of carbon dioxide (CO2) and 16 times than methane (CH4) over a 100-year period. To develop mitigation tools for N2O emissions, and to investigate the relationship between gross N transformation and N2O emission from soil, it is imperative to understand N2O emission from soils as influenced by N inputs, environmental conditions and farm management practices. The use of nitrification inhibitor such as Nitrapyrin and crop residues (mulch) may have a role in mitigating N2O losses from soil because of their effects on nitrification and denitrification. It prevents hydrolytic action on urea and keeps nitrogen in ammonium form. To determine the effects of urea applied with nitrification inhibitor and mulch on N2O emissions from soil, an incubation experiment was conducted under controlled moisture of 60% water filled pore space (WFPS) and temperature (20±2oC) conditions. Soil samples (0-20 cm soil depth) collected from an arable site were treated with 15N-labelled urea (5 atom %) at 150 kg N/ha rate. The 5 treatments including control, (urea, urea with Nitrapyrin (800 g/100 kg urea), urea with mulch (5 tons/ha) and urea with Nitrapyrin and mulch) were replicated 4 times using 500 ml glass jars. The N2O isotopic signature and the intramolecular distribution of 15N were measured by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research). The preliminary results showed that nitrification inhibitor (Nitrapyrin) can be used to distinguish between different pathways of N2O production from soil. In addition to the site preference of the 15N promises to be a helpful tool to determine the source of the generated N2O.

  2. Heavy water and 15N labeling with NanoSIMS analysis reveals growth-rate dependent metabolic heterogeneity in chemostats

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Green-Saxena, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    To measure single cell microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns in environmental systems, we employ a new technique using stable isotope labeling of microbial populations with heavy water (a passive tracer) and 15N ammonium in combination with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry. We demonstrate simultaneous NanoSIMS analysis of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen at high spatial and mass resolution, and report calibration data linking single cell isotopic compositions to the corresponding bulk isotopic equivalents for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that heavy water is capable of quantifying in situ single cell microbial activities ranging from generational time scales of minutes to years, with only light isotopic incorporation (∼0.1 atom % 2H). Applying this approach to study the rates of fatty acid biosynthesis by single cells of S. aureus growing at different rates in chemostat culture (∼6 hours, 1 day and 2 week generation times), we observe the greatest anabolic activity diversity in the slowest growing populations. By using heavy water to constrain cellular growth activity, we can further infer the relative contributions of ammonium vs. amino acid assimilation to the cellular nitrogen pool. The approach described here can be applied to disentangle individual cell activities even in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:25655651

  3. What can Δ 15N and Δ 18O isotopes tell us about sources, transport, and fate of nitrate in the Mississippi River Basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglin, W. A.

    2003-12-01

    Water and nutrients, primarily nitrate (NO3) in Mississippi River discharge, affect the size and severity of the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic (depleted dissolved oxygen) zone. Approximately 120 water samples were collected from 16 sites on small streams and 6 sites on large rivers within the Mississippi River Basin in 1997-98 to see if NO3 sources and transformations can be identified using the stable isotopic ratios Δ 15N and Δ 18O. Results from Lagrangian sampling at the large river sites indicate that nitrate mass decreases slightly, while Δ 15N and Δ 18O isotope ratios are unchanged in the 1500 river kilometers between the Upper Mississippi-Ohio River confluence and the Gulf of Mexico. Results also show that Δ 15N and Δ 18O values from small streams draining lands dominated by row crops or livestock tended to be distinct from those dominated by urban or undeveloped land. Mean Δ 15N values at the 16 sites on small streams were most strongly correlated (Pearson's r) with manure production rate (0.64), percent residential land use (-0.45), and urea use rate (0.43). The best multiple linear regression (MLR) model for mean Δ 15N values (r2=0.69) used manure production rate and ammonium nitrate use rate as explanatory variables. Mean Δ 18O values were most strongly correlated with percent wetlands (0.72), mean NO3 concentration (-0.71), and percent residential land use (0.58). The best MLR model for mean Δ 18O values (r2=0.85) used percent residential land use, percent wetlands, and ammonium nitrate use rate as explanatory variables. Mean NO3 concentrations were most strongly correlated with percent row-crops land use (0.84), nitrogen-fertilizer use rate (0.74), and hog-manure production rate (0.66). The best MLR model for mean NO3 concentration (r2=0.85) used percent row-crops land use and percent grain-crops land use as explanatory variables. MLR equations developed from the 16 smaller streams were used to predict mean Δ 15N and Δ 18O values and NO3

  4. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  5. Salt Marsh sediment 15N/13C "Push-Pull" assays reveal coupled sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.; Tucker, J.; Thomas, F.; Sievert, S. M.; Cardon, Z. G.; Giblin, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marshes are extraordinarily productive ecosystems found in estuaries worldwide, hosting intensive sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon cycling. Although it has been hypothesized that in this environment sulfur oxidation may be important for energy flow, there is little direct data. At the heart of these hypothesized interactions are sulfur oxidizing microbes. Sulfur oxidizers can catalyze sulfide (re-)oxidation with nitrate as the electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions, producing ammonium (via DNRA) or dinitrogen gas (via denitrification). The form of sulfur present in marsh systems influences whether autotrophic or heterotrophic processes transform nitrate either to dinitrogen gas or ammonium through DNRA. To examine the fate of nitrate and interactions with sulfur, we conducted a series of "push-pull" experiments in marsh sediment at the Plum Island Ecosystems Long-Term Ecological Research site in Massachusetts. Porewater was extracted anoxically and amended with isotopically labeled nitrate (15N) and bicarbonate (13C). Porewater was pumped back into the sediment and then withdrawn at intervals of several hours. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon were measured as well as isotopes of nitrogen gas and ammonium. These push-pull experiments were conducted at several times during the growing season, to coincide with salt marsh grass initial growth (May), maximum growth (July), flowering (August), and senescence (October). Porewater sulfides were very low to non-detectable in May (time of initial plant growth) and increased to a maximum of 3 mM in October (time of plant senescence). Combined rates of denitrification and DNRA also varied seasonally: rates were higher in May (0.16 - 17.5 nmoles N/cm3/hr) and much lower in October (0 - 0.03 nmoles N/cm3/hr). Interestingly, DNRA rates were always higher than denitrification rates, often by an order of magnitude or more.

  6. The “Speedy” Synthesis of Atom-Specific 15N Imino/Amido-Labeled RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Christoph; Micura, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous reports on the synthesis of atom-specific 15N-labeled nucleosides exist, fast and facile access to the corresponding phosphoramidites for RNA solid-phase synthesis is still lacking. This situation represents a severe bottleneck for NMR spectroscopic investigations on functional RNAs. Here, we present optimized procedures to speed up the synthesis of 15N(1) adenosine and 15N(1) guanosine amidites, which are the much needed counterparts of the more straightforward-to-achieve 15N(3) uridine and 15N(3) cytidine amidites in order to tap full potential of 1H/15N/15N-COSY experiments for directly monitoring individual Watson–Crick base pairs in RNA. Demonstrated for two preQ1 riboswitch systems, we exemplify a versatile concept for individual base-pair labeling in the analysis of conformationally flexible RNAs when competing structures and conformational dynamics are encountered. PMID:26237536

  7. Comparing isotope signatures of prey fish: does gut removal affect δ13C or δ15N?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, Steven R.; Fincel, Mark J.; VanDeHey, Justin A.; Wuestewald, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a quick and inexpensive method to monitor the effects of food web changes on aquatic communities. Traditionally, whole specimens have been used when determining isotope composition of prey fish or age-0 recreational fishes. However, gut contents of prey fish could potentially alter isotope composition of the specimen, especially when recent foraging has taken place or when the gut contains non-assimilated material that would normally pass through fishes undigested. To assess the impacts of gut content on prey fish isotope signatures, we examined the differences in isotopic variation of five prey fish species using whole fish, whole fish with the gut contents removed, and dorsal muscle only. We found significant differences in both δ15N and δ13C between the three tissue treatments. In most cases, muscle tissue was enriched compared to whole specimens or gut-removed specimens. Moreover, differences in mean δ15N within a species were up to 2‰ among treatments. This would result in a change of over half a trophic position (TP) based on a 3.4‰ increase per trophic level. However, there were no apparent relationships between tissue isotope values in fish with increased gut fullness (more prey tissue present). We suggest that muscle tissue should be used as the standard tissue for determining isotope composition of prey fish or age-0 recreational fishes, especially when determining enrichment for mixing models, calculating TP, or constructing aquatic food webs.

  8. Fate of nitrogen deposition and decomposed nitrogen from litter in a 15N-tracer mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, R.; Perks, M.; Mencuccini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic-derived nitrogen may be a major driver of the 0.6-0.7 Pg y-1 increase in the carbon sink in historically N-limited northern and boreal forests, but the magnitude of its effect is still uncertain. A strong effect depends on the allocation of N to trees, because of their high C:N ratio in woody tissues, and isotope tracer experiments have shown that the majority of 15N tracers applied directly to the soil are lost via leeching or retained in soil pools rather than being acquired by tree root systems. However, ambient anthropogenic inputs of N to these systems are transported in the atmosphere and intercepted by foliage before they reach the soil system, while labelled fertilization experiments also can only explicitly trace the fate of the 15N-tracer from deposition, as opposed to changes in the fate of N from litter, where decomposition rates may be enhanced at low ambient levels of deposition, affecting the availability of N from this pool for tree nutrition. We present initial results from a potted Sitka Spruce mesocosm 15N-tracer experiment where ambient nitrogen deposition was supplemented with a minor (0.4 kg ha-1 y-1) input of additional N, applied to either the soil or the foliage. Either this deposition, or litter in the pots, was enriched in 15N, allowing the fate of the isotope from two different methods of deposition to be compared with that of nitrogen released from the litter under the deposition treatment.

  9. A 115-year δ15N record of cumulative nitrogen pollution in California serpentine grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallano, D.; Zavaleta, E. S.

    2010-12-01

    Until the 1980s, California’s biodiverse serpentine grasslands were threatened primarily by development and protected by reserve creation. However, nitrogen (N) fertilization due to increasing fossil fuel emissions in the expanding Bay Area is thought to be contributing to rapid, recent invasion of these ecosystems by exotic annual grasses that are displacing rare and endemic serpentine species. Documenting the cumulative effects of N deposition in this ecosystem can direct policy and management actions to mitigate the role of N deposition in its transformation. Natural abundance stable isotopes of N in vegetation have been increasingly used as bio-indicators of N deposition patterns and subsequent changes to plant N cycling and assimilation. However, the long-term record of atmospheric reactive N enrichment and the resulting changes in ecosystem N dynamics have yet to be adequately reconstructed in many ecosystems. Museum archives of vascular plant tissue are valuable sources of materials to reconstruct temporal and spatial isotopic patterns of N inputs to ecosystems. Here, we present N stable isotope data from archived and current specimens of an endemic California serpentine grassland species, leather oak (Quercus durata), since 1895 across the greater San Francisco Bay region. We measured spatial and temporal trends in stable isotope composition (δ15N and δ13C) and concentration (%N and %C) of historical and current samples of leather oak leaves from sites within the Bay Area, impacted by increasing development, and sites northeast of the Bay Area, with significantly lower rates of urbanization and industrialization. Specifically, we sampled dry museum and fresh leaf specimens from serpentine sites within Lake (n=27) and Santa Clara (n=30) counties dating from 1895 to 2010. Leaf δ15N values were stable from 1895 to the 1950s and then decreased strongly throughout the last 50 years as fossil fuel emissions rapidly increased in the Bay Area, indicating that

  10. Endogenous and environmental factors influence the dietary fractionation of 13C and 15N in hissing cockroaches Gromphadorhina portentosa.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D

    2008-01-01

    Since DeNiro and Epstein's discovery that the (13)C and (15)N isotopic signatures of animals approximate those of their respective diets, the measurement of stable isotope signatures has become an important tool for ecologists studying the diets of wild animals. This study used Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa) to examine several preexisting hypotheses about the relationship between the isotopic composition of an animal and its diet. Contrary to my predictions, the results revealed that the tissues of adult cockroaches raised for two generations on a diet of known isotopic composition did not demonstrate enrichment of heavy stable isotopes. Moreover, the (15)N signatures of cockroaches were neither influenced by periods of rapid growth (i.e., 300-fold increase in dry body mass over 120 d) nor by imposed periods of starvation lasting up to 80 d. The offspring born to mothers raised on known diets were enriched in (15)N. Diet-switching experiments showed that turnover times of (13)C were highly correlated with age and ranged from 9 to 10 d to 60 to 75 d in subadults and adults, respectively. Adults subjected to diet switches differed from the subadults in that the adults achieved equilibrated isotopic signatures that were shifted approximately 1.0 per thousand toward their respective original diets. Lipid fractions of adult cockroaches averaged 2.9 per thousand more depleted in (13)C than in lipid-free fractions, but no changes in (13)C were observed in aging adults. Exposure to reduced ambient temperature from 33 degrees C to 23 degrees C over 120 d did not influence isotopic signatures of tissues. Overall, the results of this study reveal that different endogenous and exogenous factors can influence the isotopic signatures of cockroaches. These findings reinforce the need to conduct controlled studies to further examine environmental factors that influence the relationships between the isotopic signatures of animals and their diets.

  11. Ammonia 15N/14N Isotope Ratio in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.R.; Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, M. H.; Owen, T. C; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Data from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer has been used to derive the N-15/N-14 isotope ratio in ammonia at Jupiter. Although the mass spectral interference from the water contribution to 18 amu makes an accurate derivation of the (N-15)H3/(N-14)H3 ratio difficult from measurements of the singly ionized signals at 18 and 17 amu, this interference is not present in the doubly charged 8.5 and 9.0 amu signals from (N-14)H3++ and (N-15)H3++ respectively. Although the count rate from the 9 amu signal is low during the direct sampling of the atmosphere, the ammonia signal was considerably enhanced during the first enrichment cell (EC1) experiment that measured gas sampled between 0.8 and 2.8 bar. Count rates at 9 amu in the EC1 experiment reach 60/second and measure ammonia sampled from 0.88 to 2.8 bar. In the EC1 measurements the 8.5 amu signal is not measured directly, but can be calculated from the ammonia contribution to 17 amu and the ratio of NH3 ions of a double to single charged observed during a high resolution mass scan taken near the end of the descent. The high resolution scan gives this ratio from ammonia sampled much deeper in the atmosphere. These results are described and compared with Infrared Space Observatory-Short Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-SWS) observations that give this ratio at 400 mbar.

  12. Ammonia 15N/14N Isotope Ratio in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.R.; Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, M. H.; Owen, T. C; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Data from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer has been used to derive the N-15/N-14 isotope ratio in ammonia at Jupiter. Although the mass spectral interference from the water contribution to 18 amu makes an accurate derivation of the (N-15)H3/(N-14)H3 ratio difficult from measurements of the singly ionized signals at 18 and 17 amu, this interference is not present in the doubly charged 8.5 and 9.0 amu signals from (N-14)H3++ and (N-15)H3++ respectively. Although the count rate from the 9 amu signal is low during the direct sampling of the atmosphere, the ammonia signal was considerably enhanced during the first enrichment cell (EC1) experiment that measured gas sampled between 0.8 and 2.8 bar. Count rates at 9 amu in the EC1 experiment reach 60/second and measure ammonia sampled from 0.88 to 2.8 bar. In the EC1 measurements the 8.5 amu signal is not measured directly, but can be calculated from the ammonia contribution to 17 amu and the ratio of NH3 ions of a double to single charged observed during a high resolution mass scan taken near the end of the descent. The high resolution scan gives this ratio from ammonia sampled much deeper in the atmosphere. These results are described and compared with Infrared Space Observatory-Short Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-SWS) observations that give this ratio at 400 mbar.

  13. Relationships between soil nitrogen dynamics and natural 15N-abundance in plant foliage from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; Van Miegroet, H. M.

    1994-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that naturally occurring nitrogen (N) isotope ratios in foliage (from plants that do not symbiotically fix atmospheric N{sub 2}) are an indicator of soil N dynamics in forests. Replicate plots were established at eight locations ranging in elevation from 615 to 1670 m in Great Smoky Mountains National Park in eastern Tennessee, U.S.A. The locations selected ranged from N-poor (low-elevation) to N-rich (high-elevation) forest stands. Soils were sampled in June 1992; plants, forest floors, and upper mineral soils were sampled in August 1992. Net N mineralization and net nitrification potentials for surface mineral soils and organic matter layers at each site were determined by aerobic laboratory incubations. Soils and organic layers from high-elevation sites had greater net N mineralization and nitrification potentials than soils from low-elevation sites. There were significant (P {le} 0.05) differences between study sites in soil {sup 15}N abundance. Therefore, we examined correlations between measures of soil N availability and both mean foliar {delta}{sup 15}N values and mean enrichment factors ({var_epsilon}{sub p-s} = {delta}{sup 15}N{sub leaf} - {delta}{sup 15}N{sub soil}). In evergreens, maples, and ferns, mean foliar {delta}{sup 15}N values and mean enrichment factors were positively correlated with net N mineralization and net nitrification potentials in soil. The observed relationships between natural {sup 15}N abundance in plant leaves and soil N availability were explained by a simple model of soil N dynamics. The model predicts how the isotopic composition of plant N is affected by the following factors: (i) varying uptake of soil NH{sub 4}-N and NO{sub 3}-N, (ii) the isotopic composition of different soil N pools, and (iii) relative rates of soil N transformations.

  14. Comparing the Influence of Wildfire and Prescribed Burns on Watershed Nitrogen Biogeochemistry Using 15N Natural Abundance in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystem Components

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Kirsten; Kavanagh, Kathleen L.; Koyama, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated differences in the effects of three low-severity spring prescribed burns and four wildfires on nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry in Rocky Mountain headwater watersheds. We compared paired (burned/unburned) watersheds of four wildfires and three spring prescribed burns for three growing seasons post-fire. To better understand fire effects on the entire watershed ecosystem, we measured N concentrations and δ15N in both the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems components, i.e., soil, understory plants in upland and riparian areas, streamwater, and in-stream moss. In addition, we measured nitrate reductase activity in foliage of Spiraea betulifolia, a dominant understory species. We found increases of δ15N and N concentrations in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem N pools after wildfire, but responses were limited to terrestrial N pools after prescribed burns indicating that N transfer from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystem components did not occur in low-severity prescribed burns. Foliar δ15N differed between wildfire and prescribed burn sites; the δ15N of foliage of upland plants was enriched by 2.9 ‰ (difference between burned and unburned watersheds) in the first two years after wildfire, but only 1.3 ‰ after prescribed burns. In-stream moss δ15N in wildfire-burned watersheds was enriched by 1.3 ‰, but there was no response by moss in prescription-burned watersheds, mirroring patterns of streamwater nitrate concentrations. S. betulifolia showed significantly higher nitrate reductase activity two years after wildfires relative to corresponding unburned watersheds, but no such difference was found after prescribed burns. These responses are consistent with less altered N biogeochemistry after prescribed burns relative to wildfire. We concluded that δ15N values in terrestrial and aquatic plants and streamwater nitrate concentrations after fire can be useful indicators of the magnitude and duration of fire effects and the fate of post

  15. Effects of hydration on the acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Chan-Huot, Monique; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-09-21

    Using high resolution solid state (15)N and (13)C NMR spectroscopy we have studied the effects of successive hydration on the (15)N labeled side chain amino groups of solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) in the presence of acids. Generally, hydration leads to the formation of local "ionic fluid" phases composed by flexible side chain ammonium groups, acid anions and small amounts of water. The associated local dynamics reduces the widths of the inhomogeneously broadened (15)N amino signals found for the dry states. The hydration of free base PLL--which consists of mixtures of alpha-helices and beta-pleated sheets--is monitored by a small low-field shift of the amino group signal arising from hydrogen bonding with water, reaching eventually the value of PLL in water at pH 13. No difference for the two conformations is observed. PLL x HF adopts a similar secondary structure with isolated NHF hydrogen bonds; hydration leads only to small low-field shifts which are nevertheless compatible with the formation of ammonium groups in aqueous solution. PLL doped with small amounts of HCl contains ammonium groups which are internally solvated by neighboring free amino groups. Both nitrogen environments are characterized by different chemical shifts. Hydration with less than one water molecule per amino group leads already to a chemical shift averaging arising from fast proton motions along NHN-hydrogen bonds and fast side chain and anion motions.By contrast, the hydration of fully doped PLL x HBr and PLL x HCl is more complex. These systems exist only in beta-pleated sheet conformations forming alkyl ammonium salt structures. Separate (15)N signal components are observed for (i) the dry states, for (ii) wet beta-pleated sheets and for (iii) wet alpha-helices which are successively formed upon hydration. Exchange between these environments is slow, but water motions lead to averaged amino group signals within each of the two wet environments. These results indicate that the different

  16. Ammonium imidazolium dichromate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Run-Qiang

    2012-04-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound, (C(3)H(5)N(2))(NH(4))[Cr(2)O(7)], the anions and cations are linked through N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a three-dimensional structure which contains three kinds of layers parallel to (001). One layer contains imidazole cations, the other two layers the ammonium cations and dichromate anions. The dichromate anion has an eclipsed conformation with a dihedral angle of 14.65 (18)° between the mean planes of the O-P-O-P-O backbone.

  17. Millimeter-Wave Observations of Circumstellar 14N/15N and 12C/13C Ratios: New Insights into J-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adande, Gilles; Ziurys, Lucy M.; Woolf, Neville

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of 14N/15N and 12C/13C isotopic ratios have been conducted towards circumstellar envelopes of a sample of evolved stars using the J = 3→2 rotational transitions of the isotopologues of HCN, observed with the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Towards the J-type stars Y CVn and RY Dra, where 12C/13C ~ 3, the 14N/15N ratios were found to be 120-180 and 225, respectively. The 14N/15N ratio is thus anomalously low relative to interstellar values and a factor ~100 lower than equilibrium values predicted from the CNO cycle. Combining these results with previous chemical and isotopic prior observations of these stars, we conclude that two anomalous behaviors are likely to have occurred in Y CVn and RY Dra. First, the stellar envelope failed to participate in the normal mixing seen in low mass red giants, in which C and then O are substantially converted to N. Secondly, both the carbon enrichment and anomalous isotopic composition of both 13C and15N could have been caused by a plume of hot gas, hydrogen poor but enriched in 12C, from a helium flash mixing into the envelope.

  18. Uptake and Reduction of [15N]Nitrate by Intact Soybean Plants in the Dark

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Joseph C.; Harper, James E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine if nitrate (15N-labeled) was taken up and assimilated by intact soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Williams) plants during extended periods of dark. Nitrate was taken up by soybean roots throughout a 12-hour dark period. The 15N-labeled nitrogen was also translocated to the plant shoots, but at a slower rate than the rate of accumulation in the roots. Much of the nitrogen (15N-labeled) was present in a nonreduced form, although considerable soluble-reduced nitrogen (15N-labeled) accumulated throughout the dark period. The 15N-labeled, soluble-reduced nitrogen fraction accounted for nearly 30% of the total 15N found in plant roots and more than 63% of the total 15N found in plant tops after 12 hours of dark. This provided evidence that intact soybean plants take up and metabolize significant quantities of nitrate to reduced N forms in the dark. In addition to nitrate influx during the dark, it was shown that there was a concomitant loss of 15N-labeled nitrogen compounds from previously 15N-labeled plants to a natural abundance 15N nutrient solution. Thus, evidence was obtained which indicated that light was not directly essential for flux and reduction of nitrate by intact soybean plants. PMID:16664059

  19. Estimation of nitric oxide synthase activity via LC-MS/MS determination of 15N3-citrulline in biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Beom Soo; Fung, Ho-Leung; Upadhyay, Mahesh; Shin, Soyoung

    2015-01-01

    Rationale We showed that the metabolite peaks of 15N3-citrulline (15N3-CIT) and 15N3-arginine (15N3-ARG) could be detected when 15N4-ARG was metabolized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in endothelial cells. The usefulness of these metabolites as potential surrogate indices of nitric oxide (NO) generation is evaluated. Methods A hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometric assay (LC-MS/MS) was utilized for the simultaneous analysis of 15N4-ARG, ARG, CIT, 15N3-CIT and 15N3-ARG. 15N3-CIT and 15N3-ARG from impurities of 15N4-ARG were determined and corrected for the calculation of their concentration. 15N4-ARG-derived NO, i.e., 15NO formation was determined by analyzing 15N-nitrite accumulation by another LC-MS/MS assay. Results After EA.hy926 human endothelial cells were challenged with 15N4-ARG for 2 hours, the peak intensities of 15N3-CIT and 15N3-ARG significantly increased with 15N4-ARG concentration and positively correlated with 15N-nitrite production. The estimated Km values were independent of the metabolite (i.e., 15N3-CIT, 15N3-CIT+15N3-ARG or 15N-nitrite) used for calculation. However, after correction for its presence as a chemical contaminant of 15N4-ARG, 15N3-ARG was only a marginal contributor for the estimation of NOS activity. Conclusions These data suggest that the formation of 15N3-CIT can be used as an indicator of NOS activity when 15N4-ARG is used as a substrate. This approach may be superior to the radioactive 14C-CIT method which can be contaminated by 14C-urea, and to the 14N-nitrite method which lacks sensitivity. PMID:26349467

  20. Adjusting ammonium uptake via phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lanquar, Viviane; Frommer, Wolf B

    2010-06-01

    In plants, AMT/MEP/Rh superfamily mediates high affinity ammonium uptake. AMT/MEP transporters form a trimeric complex, which requires a productive interaction between subunits in order to be functional. The AMT/MEP C-terminal domain is highly conserved in more than 700 AMT homologs from cyanobacteria to higher plants with no cases found to be lacking this domain. AMT1;1 exists in active and inactive states, probably controlled by the spatial positioning of the C-terminus. Ammonium triggers the phosphorylation of a conserved threonine residue (T460) in the C-terminus of AMT1;1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The T460 phosphorylation level correlates with a decrease of root ammonium uptake. We propose that ammonium-induced phosphorylation modulates ammonium uptake as a general mechanism to protect against ammonium toxicity.

  1. Adjusting ammonium uptake via phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lanquar, Viviane

    2010-01-01

    In plants, AMT/MEP/Rh superfamily mediates high affinity ammonium uptake. AMT/MEP transporters form a trimeric complex, which requires a productive interaction between subunits in order to be functional. The AMT/MEP C-terminal domain is highly conserved in more than 700 AMT homologs from cyanobacteria to higher plants with no cases found to be lacking this domain. AMT1;1 exists in active and inactive states, probably controlled by the spatial positioning of the C-terminus. Ammonium triggers the phosphorylation of a conserved threonine residue (T460) in the C-terminus of AMT1;1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The T460 phosphorylation level correlates with a decrease of root ammonium uptake. We propose that ammonium-induced phosphorylation modulates ammonium uptake as a general mechanism to protect against ammonium toxicity. PMID:20418663

  2. Hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sucha, V.; Elsass, F.; Eberl, D.D.; Kuchta, L'.; Madejova, J.; Gates, W.P.; Komadel, P.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic gel and glass of illitic composition, natural kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite were used as starting materials for hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite. Ammonium illite was prepared from synthetic gel by hydrothermal treatment at 300??C. The onset of crystallization began within 3 h, and well-crystallized ammonium illite appeared at 24 h. Increasing reaction time (up to four weeks) led to many illite layers per crystal. In the presence of equivalent proportions of potassium and ammonium, the gel was transformed to illite with equimolar contents of K and NH4. In contrast, synthesis using glass under the same conditions resulted in a mixture of mixed-layer ammonium illite-smectite with large expandability and discrete illite. Hydrothermal treatments of the fine fractions of natural kaolinite and illite-smectite produced ammonium illite from kaolinite but the illite-smectite remained unchanged.

  3. Nitrogen retention across a gradient of 15N additions to an unpolluted temperate forest soil in Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Compton, J.E.; Hedin, L.O.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated nitrogen (N) inputs can drive nonlinear changes in N cycling, retention, and loss in forest ecosystems. Nitrogen processing in soils is critical to understanding these changes, since soils typically are the largest N sink in forests. To elucidate soil mechanisms that underlie shifts in N cycling across a wide gradient of N supply, we added 15NH415NO3 at nine treatment levels ranging in geometric sequence from 0.2 kg to 640 kg NA? ha-1A? yr-1 to an unpolluted old-growth temperate forest in southern Chile. We recovered roughly half of tracers in 0-25 cm of soil, primarily in the surface 10 cm. Low to moderate rates of N supply failed to stimulate N leaching, which suggests that most unrecovered 15N was transferred from soils to unmeasured sinks above ground. However, soil solution losses of nitrate increased sharply at inputs > 160 kg NA? ha-1A? yr-1, corresponding to a threshold of elevated soil N availability and declining 15N retention in soil. Soil organic matter (15N in soils at the highest N inputs and may explain a substantial fraction of the 'missing N' often reported in studies of fates of N inputs to forests. Contrary to expectations, N additions did not stimulate gross N cycling, potential nitrification, or ammonium oxidizer populations. Our results indicate that the nonlinearity in N retention and loss resulted directly from excessive N supply relative to sinks, independent of plant-soil-microbial feedbacks. However, N additions did induce a sharp decrease in microbial biomass C:N that is predicted by N saturation theory, and which could increase long-term N storage in soil organic matter by lowering the critical C:N ratio for net N mineralization. All measured sinks accumulated 15N tracers across the full gradient of N supply, suggesting that short-term nonlinearity in N retention resulted from saturation of uptake kinetics, not uptake capacity, in plant, soil, and microbial pools.

  4. A cross-shelf gradient in δ15N stable isotope values of krill and pollock indicates seabird foraging patterns in the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Nathan M.; Hoover, Brian A.; Heppell, Scott A.; Kuletz, Kathy J.

    2014-11-01

    Concurrent measurements of predator and prey δ15N isotope values demonstrated that a cross-shelf isotopic gradient can propagate through a marine food web from forage species to top-tier predators and indicate foraging areas at a scale of tens of kilometers. We measured δ13C and δ15N in muscle tissues of thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) and black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), and in whole body tissues of walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) and krill (Thysanoessa spp), sampled across the continental shelf break in the Bering Sea in 2008 and in 2009. We found significant basin-shelf differences at fine scales (<100 km) in δ15N among murres but not kittiwakes, and no such differences in δ13C in either seabird species at that scale. We then quantified the multi-trophic signal and spatial structure of a basin-shelf δ15Nitrogen gradient in the central and southern Bering Sea, and used it to contrast foraging patterns of thick-billed murres and kittiwakes on the open ocean. Seabird muscle δ15N values were compared to baselines created from measurements in krill and pollock tissues sampled concurrently throughout the study area. Krill, pollock, and murre tissues from northern, shallow, shelf habitat (<200 m) were enriched 1-2‰ in δ15N relative to samples taken from deeper habitats (>200 m) to the south and west. Krill δ15N baseline values predicted 35-42% of the variability in murre tissue values. Patterns between kittiwakes and prey were less coherent. The persistence of strong spatial autocorrelation among sample values, and a congruence of geospatial patterns in δ15N among murre and prey tissues, suggest that murres forage repeatedly in specific areas. Murre isotope values showed distinct geospatial stratification, coincident with the spatial distribution of three colonies: St. Paul, St. George, and Bogoslof. This suggests some degree of foraging habitat partitioning among colonies.

  5. Influence of ammonium on the accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in aerobic open mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katja; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-05-17

    Mixed microbial cultures enriched in feast-famine sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) can accumulate large amounts of the bioplastic PHB under conditions of ammonium starvation. If waste streams are to be used as a substrate, nutrient starvation may not always be achievable. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ammonium on PHB production in the PHB production stage of the process. The biomass was enriched in an acetate-fed (carbon limited) feast-famine SBR operated at 30 degrees C, 1-d sludge residence time and with a cycle length of 12h. The biomass was used in three fed-batch experiments with medium C/N ratios of infinity (ammonium starvation), 40 Cmol Nmol(-1) (ammonium limitation) and 8 Cmol Nmol(-1) (ammonium excess) and acetate as the carbon source. Under conditions of ammonium starvation the biomass reached a maximum PHB content of 89 wt% after 7.6h, under ammonium limitation 77 wt% after 9.3h and under ammonium excess 69 wt% after 4.4h. PHB contents decreased after these maxima were reached. PHB production slowed down more with time with larger ammonium availability. Growth led to a dilution of the PHB pool after the maximum PHB content was reached. Nutrient starvation seems thus to be the best strategy for maximal PHB production.

  6. [15N-flow after in sacco incubation and feeding of sheep and goats with untreated wheat straw or straw treated with 15N horse urine].

    PubMed

    Schubert, R; Flachowsky, G; Bochröder, B

    1994-01-01

    Chopped wheat straw was homogeneously mixed with urine of horses (5.75 gN per 1, 16.88 atom-% 15N-excess) and airtightly stored in plastic containers for 6 months. Three rumen fistulated sheep and goats each were fed with untreated or urine treated straw. Concentrate was added to straw. Untreated and urine treated straw were given in nylon bags and incubated in the rumen of sheep and goats for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. A three compartment exponential function was used to fit the measurements of 15N-excess and 15N-amount of bag content. The curves and the calculated partial Y-values of the three compartments show the inflow and outflow of 15N into or from the bags and allow conclusions about the binding of urine N. Most N of urine was not compactly bound by straw during storage. Primarily microbial N was attached to the straw in the rumen. About 6% of urine N were bound more compact to the straw. Similar curves were calculated for 15N-excess and 15N-amount of nylon bags. The curves allow conclusions about tracer flows without quantitative knowledge. There were no significant differences between animal species.

  7. Ammonium assimilation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Muro-Pastor, M Isabel; Reyes, Jose C; Florencio, Francisco J

    2005-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, after transport by specific permeases, ammonium is incorporated into carbon skeletons by the sequential action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT). Two types of GS (GSI and GSIII) and two types of GOGAT (ferredoxin-GOGAT and NADH-GOGAT) have been characterized in cyanobacteria. The carbon skeleton substrate of the GS-GOGAT pathway is 2-oxoglutarate that is synthesized by the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). In order to maintain the C-N balance and the amino acid pools homeostasis, ammonium assimilation is tightly regulated. The key regulatory point is the GS, which is controlled at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The transcription factor NtcA plays a critical role regulating the expression of the GS and the IDH encoding genes. In the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, NtcA controls also the expression of two small proteins (IF7 and IF17) that inhibit the activity of GS by direct protein-protein interaction. Cyanobacteria perceive nitrogen status by sensing the intracellular concentration of 2-oxoglutarate, a signaling metabolite that is able to modulate allosterically the function of NtcA, in vitro. In vivo, a functional dependence between NtcA and the signal transduction protein PII in controlling NtcA-dependent genes has been also shown.

  8. Soil processes drive seasonal variation in retention of 15N tracers in a deciduous forest catchment.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Christine L; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Weiss, Marissa S; McCalley, K; Sparks, Jed P; Thomas, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal patterns of stream nitrate concentration have long been interpreted as demonstrating the central role of plant uptake in regulating stream nitrogen loss from forested catchments. Soil processes are rarely considered as important drivers of these patterns. We examined seasonal variation in N retention in a deciduous forest using three whole-ecosystem 15N tracer additions: in late April (post-snowmelt, pre-leaf-out), late July (mid-growing- season), and late October (end of leaf-fall). We expected that plant 15N uptake would peak in late spring and midsummer, that immobilization in surface litter and soil would peak the following autumn leaf-fall, and that leaching losses would vary inversely with 15N retention. Similar to most other 15N tracer studies, we found that litter and soils dominated ecosystem retention of added 15N. However, 15N recovery in detrital pools varied tremendously by season, with > 90% retention in spring and autumn and sharply reduced 15N retention in late summer. During spring, over half of the 15N retained in soil occurred within one day in the heavy (mineral-associated) soil fraction. During summer, a large decrease in 15N retention one week after addition coincided with increased losses of 15NO3- to soil leachate and seasonal increases in soil and stream NO3- concentrations, although leaching accounted for only a small fraction of the lost 15N (< 0.2%). Uptake of 15N into roots did not vary by season and accounted for < 4% of each tracer addition. Denitrification or other processes that lead to N gas loss may have consumed the rest. These measurements of 15N movement provide strong evidence for the dominant role of soil processes in regulating seasonal N retention and losses in this catchment and perhaps others with similar soils.

  9. Doubly 15N-substituted diazenylium: THz laboratory spectra and fractionation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, L.; Bizzocchi, L.; Wirström, E. S.; Degli Esposti, C.; Tamassia, F.; Charnley, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Isotopic fractionation in dense molecular cores has been suggested as a possible origin of large 14N/15N ratio variations in solar system materials. While chemical models can explain some observed variations with different fractionation patterns for molecules with -NH or -CN functional groups, they fail to reproduce the observed ratios in diazenylium (N2H+). Aims: Observations of doubly 15N-substituted species could provide important constraints and insights for theoretical chemical models of isotopic fractionation. However, spectroscopic data are very scarce. Methods: The rotational spectra of the fully 15N-substituted isopologues of the diazenylium ion, 15N2H+ and 15N2D+, have been investigated in the laboratory well into the THz region by using a source-modulation microwave spectrometer equipped with a negative glow discharge cell. An extended chemical reaction network has been used to estimate what ranges of 15N fractionation in doubly 15N-substituted species could be expected in the interstellar medium (ISM). Results: For each isotopologue of the H- and D-containing pair, nine rotational transitions were accurately measured in the frequency region 88 GHz-1.2 THz. The analysis of the spectrum provided very precise rest frequencies at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths, useful for the radioastronomical identification of the rotational lines of 15N2H+ and 15N2D+ in the ISM.

  10. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly 13C/15N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive 13C/15N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of 13C/15N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% 13C-glycerol and 0.5% 15N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of 13C/15N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  12. (15)N CSA tensors and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static (15)N NMR techniques for the determination of the (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and (15)N-(1)H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone (15)N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the (15)N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the (15)N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the "magic sandwich" SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the (15)N-(1)H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples.

  13. 15N CSA tensors and 15N-1H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static 15N NMR techniques for the determination of the 15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and 15N-1H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone 15N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the 15N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the 15N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the ;magic sandwich; SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the 15N-1H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples.

  14. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms.

  15. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  16. Nitrate turnover in a peat soil under drained and rewetted conditions: results from a [(15)N]nitrate-bromide double-tracer study.

    PubMed

    Russow, Rolf; Tauchnitz, Nadine; Spott, Oliver; Mothes, Sibylle; Bernsdorf, Sabine; Meissner, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Under natural conditions, peatlands are generally nitrate-limited. However, recent concerns about an additional N input into peatlands by atmospheric N deposition have highlighted the risk of an increased denitrification activity and hence the likelihood of a rise of emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the turnover of added nitrate in a drained and a rewetted peatland using a [(15)N]nitrate-bromide double-tracer method. The double-tracer method allows a separation between physical effects (dilution, dispersion and dislocation) and microbial and chemical nitrate transformation by comparing with the conservative Br(-) tracer. In the drained peat site, low NO3(-) consumption rates have been observed. In contrast, NO3(-) consumption at the rewetted peat site rises rapidly to about 100% within 4 days after tracer application. Concomitantly, the (15)N abundances of nitrite and ammonium in soil water increased and lead to the conclusion that, besides commonly known NO3(-) reduction to nitrite (i.e. denitrification), a dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium has simultaneously taken place. The present study reveals that increasing NO3(-) inputs into rewetted peatlands via atmospheric deposition results in a rapid NO3(-) consumption, which could lead to an increase in N2O emissions into the atmosphere.

  17. Three functional transporters for constitutive, diurnally regulated, and starvation-induced uptake of ammonium into Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed Central

    Gazzarrini, S; Lejay, L; Gojon, A; Ninnemann, O; Frommer, W B; von Wirén, N

    1999-01-01

    Ammonium and nitrate are the prevalent nitrogen sources for growth and development of higher plants. 15N-uptake studies demonstrated that ammonium is preferred up to 20-fold over nitrate by Arabidopsis plants. To study the regulation and complex kinetics of ammonium uptake, we isolated two new ammonium transporter (AMT) genes and showed that they functionally complemented an ammonium uptake-deficient yeast mutant. Uptake studies with 14C-methylammonium and inhibition by ammonium yielded distinct substrate affinities between ammonium uptake in roots when nitrogen nutrition became limiting, whereas those of AtAMT1;3 increased slightly, with AtAMT1;2 being more constitutively expressed. All three ammonium transporters showed diurnal variation in expression, but AtAMT1;3 transcript levels peaked with ammonium uptake at the end of the light period, suggesting that AtAMT1;3 provides a link between nitrogen assimilation and carbon provision in roots. Our results show that high-affinity ammonium uptake in roots is regulated in relation to the physiological status of the plant at the transcriptional level and by substrate affinities of individual members of the AMT1 gene family. PMID:10330477

  18. Shifts in relative tissue delta15N values in snowy egret nestlings with dietary mercury exposure: a marker for increased protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Allen, Patricia L; Romanek, Christopher S; Bryan, A L; Brant, Heather; Jagoe, Charles H

    2005-06-01

    Shifts in tissue nitrogen isotope composition may be a more sensitive general indicator of stress than measurement of high-turnover defensive biomolecules such as metallothionein and glutathione. As a physical resource transmitted along the trophic web, perturbations in protein nitrogen metabolism may also help resolve issues concerning the effects of contaminants on organisms and their consequential hierarchical linkages in ecotoxicology. Snowy egret nestlings (Egretta thula) fed mercury-contaminated diets of constant nitrogen isotope composition exhibited increased relative delta15N values in whole liver (p = 0.0011) and the acid-soluble fraction (ASF) of the liver (p = 0.0005) when compared to nestlings fed a reference diet. When nitrogen isotope data were adjusted for the source term of the diet, liver mercury concentrations corresponded with both whole liver relative 15N enrichment (r2 = 0.79, slope 0.009, p < 0.0001) and relative 15N enrichment in the acid-soluble fraction of the liver (r2 = 0.85, slope 0.026, p < 0.0001). Meanwhile, significant differences were not observed in hepatic levels of the metal-binding peptides metallothionein and glutathione despite a nearly 3-fold difference in liver mercury content. Because increases in tissue delta15N values result from increased rates of protein breakdown relative to synthesis, we propose that the increased relative liver delta15N values reflect a shift in protein metabolism. The relationship between ASF and mercury was significantly stronger (p < 0.0001) than that for whole liver, suggesting that the relationship is driven by an increase in bodily derived amino acids in the acid-soluble, free amino acid pool.

  19. Ammonium Regulation in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Pateman, J. A.; Kinghorn, J. R.; Dunn, Etta; Forbes, E.

    1973-01-01

    l-Glutamate uptake, thiourea uptake, and methylammonium uptake and the intracellular ammonium concentration were measured in wild-type and mutant cells of Aspergillus nidulans held in various concentrations of ammonium and urea. The levels of l-glutamate uptake, thiourea uptake, nitrate reductase, and hypoxanthine dehydrogenase activity are determined by the extracellular ammonium concentration. The level of methylammonium uptake is determined by the intracellular ammonium concentration. The uptake and enzyme characteristics of the ammonium-derepressed mutants, meaA8, meaB6, DER3, amrA1, xprD1, and gdhA1, are described. The gdhA mutants lack normal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) activity and are derepressed with respect to both external and internal ammonium. The other mutant classes are derepressed only with respect to external ammonium. The mutants meaA8, DER3, amrA1, and xprD1 have low levels of one or more of the l-glutamate, thiourea, and methylammonium uptake systems. A model for ammonium regulation in A. nidulans is put forward which suggests: (i) NADP-GDH located in the cell membrane complexes with extracellular ammonium. This first regulatory complex determines the level of l-glutamate uptake, thiourea uptake, nitrate reductase, and xanthine dehydrogenase by repression or inhibition, or both. (ii) NADP-GDH also complexes with intracellular ammonium. This second and different form of regulatory complex determines the level of methylammonium uptake by repression or inhibition, or both. PMID:4145865

  20. δ 15 N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural abundance δ15N of ecosystems integrates nitrogen (N) inputs and losses, and thus reflects factors that control the long-term development of ecosystem N balances. We here report N and carbon (C) content of forest vegetation and soils, and associated δ15N, across nine Doug...

  1. Increased Plant Uptake of Nitrogen from 15N Depleted Fertilizer Using Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The techniques of 15N isotope have been very useful for determining the behavior and fate of N in soil, including the use efficiency of applied N fertilizers by plants. Our objective in this study was to use 15N isotope techniques to demonstrate that a model plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGP...

  2. δ(15) N from soil to wine in bulk samples and proline.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Mauro; Ziller, Luca; Bertoldi, Daniela; Bontempo, Luana; Larcher, Roberto; Nicolini, Giorgio; Camin, Federica

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of using δ(15) N as an additional isotopic marker able to link wine to its area of origin was investigated. The whole production chain (soil-leaves-grape-wine) was considered. Moreover, the research included evaluation of the effect of the fermentation process, the use of different types of yeast and white and red vinification, the addition of nitrogen adjuvants and ultrasound lysis simulating wine ageing. The δ(15) N of grapes and wine was measured in bulk samples and compounds, specifically in proline, for the first time. Despite isotopic fractionation from soil to wine, the δ(15) N values of leaves, grapes, wine and particularly must and wine proline conserved the variability of δ(15) N in the growing soil. Fermentation and ultrasound treatment did not affect the δ(15) N values of grape must, which was therefore conserved in wine. The addition of inorganic or organic adjuvants was able to influence the δ(15) N of bulk wine, depending on the amount and the difference between the δ(15) N of must and that of the adjuvant. The δ(15) N of wine proline was not influenced by adjuvant addition and is therefore the best marker for tracing the geographical origin of wine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and ä15N over long-term forest succession

    Treesearch

    Steven S. Perakis; Alan J. Tepley; Jana E. Compton

    2015-01-01

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession towards old-growth are thought to increase nitrogen (N) availability and N loss, which should increase soil ä15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and ä15N, and soil N mineralization, across 800 years of forest succession in a topographically complex montane...

  4. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  5. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  6. δ 15 N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural abundance δ15N of ecosystems integrates nitrogen (N) inputs and losses, and thus reflects factors that control the long-term development of ecosystem N balances. We here report N and carbon (C) content of forest vegetation and soils, and associated δ15N, across nine Doug...

  7. 1H and 15N Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Studies of Carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Solum, Mark S.; Wind, Robert A.; Nilsson, Brad L.; Peterson, Matt A.; Pugmire, Ronald J.; Grant, David M.

    2000-01-01

    15N NMR experiments, combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), are reported on carbazole doped with the stable free radical 1,3 bisdiphenylene-2 phenylally1 (BDPA). Doping shortens the nuclear relaxation times and provides paramagnetic centers that can be used to enhance the nuclear signal by means of DNP so that 15 N NMR experiments can be done in minutes. The factors were measured in a 1.4 T external field, using both unlabeled and 98% 15N labeled carbazole with doping levels varying between 0.65 and 5.0 wt % BDPA. A doping level of approximately 1 wt % produced optimal results. DNP enhancement factors of 35 and 930 were obtained for 1H and 15N, respectively making it possible to perform 15N DNP NMR experiments at the natural abundance level.

  8. {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N dynamic nuclear polarization studies of carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.Z.; Solum, M.S.; Wind, R.A.; Nilsson, B.L.; Peterson, M.A.; Pugmire, R.J.; Grant, D.M.

    2000-05-18

    {sup 15}N NMR experiments, combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), are reported on carbazole doped with the stable free radical 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA). Doping shortens the nuclear relaxation times and provides paramagnetic centers that can be used to enhance the nuclear signal by means of DNP so that {sup 15}N NMR experiments can be done in minutes. The factors were measured in a 1.4 T external field, using both unlabeled and 98% {sup 15}N labeled carbazole with doping levels varying between 0.65 and 5.0 wt {degree} BDPA. A doping level of approximately 1 wt {degree} produced optimal results. DNP enhancement factors of 35 and 930 were obtained for {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N, respectively, making it possible to perform {sup 15}N DNP NMR experiments at the natural abundance level.

  9. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  10. Application of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) to quantify food chain length and trophic structure.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Matthew J; McDonald, Robbie A; van Veen, F J Frank; Kelly, Simon D; Rees, Gareth; Bearhop, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15)N) and carbon (δ(13)C) are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR) using δ(15)N, and carbon range (CR) using δ(13)C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of known food chain lengths we examined how NR and CR changed within and between food chains. Our isotopic estimates of structure are robust because they were calculated using resampling procedures that propagate variance in sample means through to quantified uncertainty in final estimates. To identify origins of uncertainty in estimates of NR and CR, we additionally examined variation in discrimination (which is change in δ(15)N or δ(13)C from source to consumer) between trophic levels and among food chains. δ(15)N discrimination showed significant enrichment, while variation in enrichment was species and system specific, ranged broadly (1.4‰ to 3.3‰), and importantly, propagated variation to subsequent estimates of NR. However, NR proved robust to such variation and distinguished food chain length well, though some overlap between longer food chains infers a need for awareness of such limitations. δ(13)C discrimination was inconsistent; generally no change or small significant enrichment was observed. Consequently, estimates of CR changed little with increasing food chain length, showing the potential utility of δ(13)C as a tracer of energy pathways. This study serves as a robust test of isotopic quantification of food chain structure, and given global estimates of aquatic food chains approximate four trophic levels while many food chains include invertebrates, our use of four trophic level plant-invertebrate food chains makes our findings relevant for a majority of

  11. Application of Nitrogen and Carbon Stable Isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) to Quantify Food Chain Length and Trophic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Matthew J.; McDonald, Robbie A.; van Veen, F. J. Frank; Kelly, Simon D.; Rees, Gareth; Bearhop, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR) using δ15N, and carbon range (CR) using δ13C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of known food chain lengths we examined how NR and CR changed within and between food chains. Our isotopic estimates of structure are robust because they were calculated using resampling procedures that propagate variance in sample means through to quantified uncertainty in final estimates. To identify origins of uncertainty in estimates of NR and CR, we additionally examined variation in discrimination (which is change in δ15N or δ13C from source to consumer) between trophic levels and among food chains. δ15N discrimination showed significant enrichment, while variation in enrichment was species and system specific, ranged broadly (1.4‰ to 3.3‰), and importantly, propagated variation to subsequent estimates of NR. However, NR proved robust to such variation and distinguished food chain length well, though some overlap between longer food chains infers a need for awareness of such limitations. δ13C discrimination was inconsistent; generally no change or small significant enrichment was observed. Consequently, estimates of CR changed little with increasing food chain length, showing the potential utility of δ13C as a tracer of energy pathways. This study serves as a robust test of isotopic quantification of food chain structure, and given global estimates of aquatic food chains approximate four trophic levels while many food chains include invertebrates, our use of four trophic level plant-invertebrate food chains makes our findings relevant for a majority of ecological systems

  12. Protein expression and isotopic enrichment based on induction of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Refaeli, Bosmat; Goldbourt, Amir

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is induced during protein expression in E. coli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-{sup 13}C-gluconate and {sup 15}NH{sub 4}Cl provide a carbonyl-amide protein backbone labeling scheme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enrichment pattern is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. -- Abstract: The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is known to exist in many organisms including bacteria, archea and eukarya. Although the common route for carbon catabolism in Escherichia coli is the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, it was shown that gluconate catabolism in E. coli occurs via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. We demonstrate here that by supplying BL21(DE3) competent E.coli cells with gluconate in a minimal growth medium, protein expression can be induced. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of over-expressed ubiquitin show that by using [1-{sup 13}C]-gluconate as the only carbon source, and {sup 15}N-enriched ammonium chloride, sparse isotopic enrichment in the form of a spin-pair carbonyl-amide backbone enrichment is obtained. The specific amino acid labeling pattern is analyzed and is shown to be compatible with Entner-Doudoroff metabolism. Isotopic enrichment serves as a key factor in the biophysical characterization of proteins by various methods including nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and more. Therefore, the method presented here can be applied to study proteins by obtaining sparse enrichment schemes that are not based on the regular glycolytic pathway, or to study the Entner-Doudoroff metabolism during protein expression.

  13. Pathways for nitrate release from an alpine watershed: determination using d15N and d18O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Donald H.; Kendall, Carol; Chang, Cecily C.Y.; Silva, Steven R.; Tonnessen, Kathy A.

    2002-01-01

    [1] Snowpack, snowmelt, precipitation, surface water, and groundwater samples from the Loch Vale watershed in Colorado were analyzed for ??15N and ??18O of nitrate to determine the processes controlling the release of atmospherically deposited nitrogen from alpine and subalpine ecosystems. Although overlap was found between the ??15N(NO3) values for all water types (-4 to +6???), the ??18O(NO3) values for surface water and groundwater (+10 to +30???) were usually distinct from snowpack, snowmelt, and rainfall values (+40 to +70???). During snowmelt, ??18O(NO3) indicated that about half of the nitrate in stream water was the product of microbial nitrification; at other times that amount was greater than half. Springs emerging from talus deposits had high nitrate concentrations and a seasonal pattern in ??18O(NO3) that was similar to the pattern in the streams, indicating that shallow groundwater in talus deposits is a likely source of stream water nitrate. Only a few samples of surface water and groundwater collected during early snowmelt and large summer rain events had isotopic compositions that indicated most of the nitrate came directly from atmospheric deposition with no biological assimilation and release. This study demonstrates the value of the nitrate double-isotope technique for determining nitrogen-cycling processes and sources of nitrate in small, undisturbed watersheds that are enriched with inorganic nitrogen.

  14. Heteronuclear relaxation in time-dependent spin systems: (15)N-T1 (rho) dispersion during adiabatic fast passage.

    PubMed

    Konrat, R; Tollinger, M

    1999-03-01

    A novel NMR experiment comprising adiabatic fast passage techniques for the measurement of heteronuclear self-relaxation rates in fully 15N-enriched proteins is described. Heteronuclear self-relaxation is monitored by performing adiabatic fast passage (AFP) experiments at variable adiabaticity (e.g., variation of RF spin-lock field intensity). The experiment encompasses gradient- selection and sensitivity-enhancement. It is shown that transverse relaxation rates derived with this method are in good agreement with the ones measured by the classical Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences. An application of this method to the study of the carboxyl-terminal LIM domain of quail cysteine and glycine-rich protein qCRP2(LIM2) is presented.

  15. Sequence-specific sup 1 H and sup 15 N resonance assignments for human dihydrofolate reductase in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Nirmala, N.R.; Wagner, G. ); Delcamp, T.J.; DeYarman, M.T.; Freisheim, J.H. )

    1992-01-14

    Dihydrofolate reductase is an intracellular target enzyme for folate antagonists, including the anticancer drug methotrexate. In order to design novel drugs with altered binding properties, a detailed description of protein-drug interactions in solution is desirable to understand the specificity of drug binding. As a first step in this process, heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been used to make sequential resonance assignments for more than 90% of the residues in human dihydrofolate reductase complexed with methotrexate. Uniform enrichment of the 21.5-kDa protein with {sup 15}N was required to obtain the resonance assignments via heteronuclear 3D NMR spectroscopy since homonuclear 2D spectra did not provide sufficient {sup 1}H resonance dispersion. Medium- and long-range NOE's have been used to characterize the secondary structure of the binary ligand-enzyme complex in solution.

  16. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15 N over long-term forest succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven; Tepley, Alan J.; Compton, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession towards old-growth are thought to increase nitrogen (N) availability and N loss, which should increase soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across 800 years of forest succession in a topographically complex montane landscape influenced by human logging and wildfire. In contrast to expectations, we found that disturbance caused declines in surface mineral soil δ15N values, both in logged forests measured 40–50 years after disturbance, and in unlogged forests disturbed by severe wildfire within the last 200 years. Both symbiotic N fixation and N transfers from disturbed vegetation and detritus could lower soil δ15N values after disturbance. A more important role for symbiotic N fixation is suggested by lower soil δ15N values in slow-successional sites with slow canopy closure, which favors early-successional N fixers. Soil δ15N values increased only marginally throughout 800 years of succession, reflecting soil N uptake by vegetation and strong overall N retention. Although post-disturbance N inputs lowered surface soil δ15N values, steady-state mass balance calculations suggest that wildfire combustion of vegetation and detritus can dominate long-term N loss and increase whole-ecosystem δ15N. On steeper topography, declining soil δ15N values highlight erosion and accelerated soil turnover as an additional abiotic control on N balances. We conclude for N-limited montane forests that soil δ15N and N availability are less influenced by nitrate leaching and denitrification loss than by interactions between disturbance, N fixation, and erosion.

  17. Coastal lagoons as a natural sewage treatment plant and their impact on the natural stable isotope signature in nitrate (d 15N, d 18O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, M.; Pastuszak, M.; Sitek, S.; Schulte, U.

    2003-04-01

    Eutrophication is one of the major threats to the Baltic Sea ecosystems and, therefore, various possibilities for nutrient removal scenarios are currently discussed. One approach considers a 50% decrease in nutrient inputs by all riparian countries, however, this would cost 380 Mio Euro/yr. Some countries already discharge highly treated sewage waters and any further reduction would be very costly, while other countries use only basic (mechanical) treatment procedures and further treatment could be done cost efficiently. One natural way that reduces nutrient loads and minimize inputs of nitrate, ammonium and phosphate is their transfer through coastal lagoons that act as a natural treatment plant. The residence time of river water is prolonged and that enables settlement of particles and bacterial removal of nitrate and ammonium. This study made it possible to investigate the effect the Szczecin Lagoon has on nutrient concentrations by comparing two stations - one located ca. 100 km upstream, and the other in the Swina Canal, the major outlet of the lagoon. Biweekly samples were taken at both stations. A drop in nitrate concentrations occasionally reached 90%, while the annual removal of nitrate amounted to 55%. The delta 15N and delta 18O data of nitrate were used to investigate the processes responsible for the drop in concentration. Surprisingly, the theoretical delta 15N values (calculated after Rayleigh equation) were negatively correlated with the measured ones, and delta 18O values were unusually high for the river nitrate. We therefore conclude that part of the nitrate was denitrified without fractionation as suggested by Brandes and Devol (1997). However, an additional nitrate source with low delta 15N and high delta 18O values might be also considered. For phosphate the removal was lower, reaching only 15% annually. It seems that the lagoon was more efficiently retaining nitrogen thus changing the N/P ratio of the outflowing water towards N-limitation.

  18. Measurement of 15N longitudinal relaxation rates in 15NH4+ spin systems to characterise rotational correlation times and chemical exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. Flemming

    2017-06-01

    Many chemical and biological processes rely on the movement of monovalent cations and an understanding of such processes can therefore only be achieved by characterising the dynamics of the involved ions. It has recently been shown that 15N-ammonium can be used as a proxy for potassium to probe potassium binding in bio-molecules such as DNA quadruplexes and enzymes. Moreover, equations have been derived to describe the time-evolution of 15N-based spin density operator elements of 15NH4+ spin systems. Herein NMR pulse sequences are derived to select specific spin density matrix elements of the 15NH4+ spin system and to measure their longitudinal relaxation in order to characterise the rotational correlation time of the 15NH4+ ion as well as report on chemical exchange events of the 15NH4+ ion. Applications to 15NH4+ in acidic aqueous solutions are used to cross-validate the developed pulse sequence while measurements of spin-relaxation rates of 15NH4+ bound to a 41 kDa domain of the bacterial Hsp70 homologue DnaK are presented to show the general applicability of the derived pulse sequence. The rotational correlation time obtained for 15N-ammonium bound to DnaK is similar to the correlation time that describes the rotation about the threefold axis of a methyl group. The methodology presented here provides, together with the previous theoretical framework, an important step towards characterising the motional properties of cations in macromolecular systems.

  19. Measurement of (15)N longitudinal relaxation rates in (15)NH4(+) spin systems to characterise rotational correlation times and chemical exchange.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D Flemming

    2017-06-01

    Many chemical and biological processes rely on the movement of monovalent cations and an understanding of such processes can therefore only be achieved by characterising the dynamics of the involved ions. It has recently been shown that (15)N-ammonium can be used as a proxy for potassium to probe potassium binding in bio-molecules such as DNA quadruplexes and enzymes. Moreover, equations have been derived to describe the time-evolution of (15)N-based spin density operator elements of (15)NH4(+) spin systems. Herein NMR pulse sequences are derived to select specific spin density matrix elements of the (15)NH4(+) spin system and to measure their longitudinal relaxation in order to characterise the rotational correlation time of the (15)NH4(+) ion as well as report on chemical exchange events of the (15)NH4(+) ion. Applications to (15)NH4(+) in acidic aqueous solutions are used to cross-validate the developed pulse sequence while measurements of spin-relaxation rates of (15)NH4(+) bound to a 41kDa domain of the bacterial Hsp70 homologue DnaK are presented to show the general applicability of the derived pulse sequence. The rotational correlation time obtained for (15)N-ammonium bound to DnaK is similar to the correlation time that describes the rotation about the threefold axis of a methyl group. The methodology presented here provides, together with the previous theoretical framework, an important step towards characterising the motional properties of cations in macromolecular systems. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous Nitrite-Dependent Anaerobic Methane and Ammonium Oxidation Processes▿

    PubMed Central

    Luesken, Francisca A.; Sánchez, Jaime; van Alen, Theo A.; Sanabria, Janeth; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Kartal, Boran

    2011-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (n-damo) and ammonium (anammox) are two recently discovered processes in the nitrogen cycle that are catalyzed by n-damo bacteria, including “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera,” and anammox bacteria, respectively. The feasibility of coculturing anammox and n-damo bacteria is important for implementation in wastewater treatment systems that contain substantial amounts of both methane and ammonium. Here we tested this possible coexistence experimentally. To obtain such a coculture, ammonium was fed to a stable enrichment culture of n-damo bacteria that still contained some residual anammox bacteria. The ammonium supplied to the reactor was consumed rapidly and could be gradually increased from 1 to 20 mM/day. The enriched coculture was monitored by fluorescence in situ hybridization and 16S rRNA and pmoA gene clone libraries and activity measurements. After 161 days, a coculture with about equal amounts of n-damo and anammox bacteria was established that converted nitrite at a rate of 0.1 kg-N/m3/day (17.2 mmol day−1). This indicated that the application of such a coculture for nitrogen removal may be feasible in the near future. PMID:21841030

  1. Toxicokinetics of ammonium perfluorohexanoate.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    Excretion patterns and rates of ammonium perfluorohexanoate (APFHx) after administration of a single and multiple (14 days) oral dose(s) at 50 mg/kg to male and female mice and rats were examined. The test substance was [(14)C]-labeled APFHx. After a single oral administration, total excretion was rapid, with mean recoveries of over 90% of the dose at 24 hours after administration, irrespective of gender or species. The major route of elimination was via the urine (means of percentage recovery between 73.0 and 90.2% of the dose), followed by the feces (means of percentage recovery between 7.0 and 15.5% of the dose). Elimination via expired air was negligible. For the multiple dose tests, multiple (13 daily doses) oral administration of APFHx was followed by a single oral administration of [(14)C]-APFHx. Excretion was rapid, with mean recoveries of over 90% of the administered dose (mean values >95% of the ultimately recovered material) at 24 hours after dosing, irrespective of gender or species. The major route of elimination was via the urine (means of percentage recovery between 77.8 and 83.4% of the dose), followed by the feces (means of percentage recovery between 9.6 and 12.9% of the dose).

  2. Spatial and temporal variations in stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopic composition of symbiotic scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Nahon, Sarah; Richoux, Nicole B; Kolasinski, Joanna; Desmalades, Martin; Ferrier Pages, Christine; Lecellier, Gael; Planes, Serge; Berteaux Lecellier, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Tropical scleractinian corals are considered autotrophic as they rely mainly on photosynthesis-derived nutrients transferred from their photosymbionts. Corals are also able to capture and ingest suspended particulate organic matter, so heterotrophy can be an important supplementary trophic pathway to optimize coral fitness. The aim of this in situ study was to elucidate the trophic status of 10 coral species under contrasted environmental conditions in a French Polynesian lagoon. Carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopic compositions of coral host tissues and photosymbionts were determined at 3 different fringing reefs during wet and dry seasons. Our results highlighted spatial variability in stable isotopic compositions of both coral host tissues and photosymbionts. Samples from the site with higher level of suspended particulate matter were (13)C-depleted and (15)N-enriched relative to corals and photosymbionts from less turbid sites. However, differences in both δ(13)C and δ(15)N between coral host tissues and their photosymbionts (Δ(host-photosymbionts 13)C and Δ(host-photosymbionts 15)N) were small (0.27 ± 0.76‰ and 1.40 ± 0.90‰, respectively) and similar at all sites, thus indicating no general increases in the heterotrophic pathway. Depleted δ(13)C and enriched δ(15)N values of coral host tissues measured at the most turbid site were explained by changes in isotopic composition of the inorganic nutrients taken up by photosymbionts and also by changes in rate of isotopic fractionation with environmental conditions. Our results also highlighted a lack of significant temporal variations in δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of coral host and photosymbiont tissues and in Δ(host-photosymbionts 13)C and Δ(host-photosymbionts 15)N values. This temporal stability indicated that corals remained principally autotrophic even during the wet season when photosymbiont densities were lower and the concentrations of phytoplankton were higher. Increased coral

  3. Physiological integration modifies δ15N in the clonal plant Fragaria vesca, suggesting preferential transport of nitrogen to water-stressed offspring.

    PubMed

    Roiloa, S R; Antelo, B; Retuerto, R

    2014-08-01

    One of the most striking attributes of clonal plants is their capacity for physiological integration, which enables movement of essential resources between connected ramets. This study investigated the capacity of physiological integration to buffer differences in resource availability experienced by ramets of the clonal wild strawberry plant, Fragaria vesca. Specifically, a study was made of the responses of connected and severed offspring ramets growing in environments with different water availability conditions (well watered or water stressed) and nitrogen forms (nitrate or ammonium). The experimental design consisted of three factors, 'integration' (connected, severed) 'water status' (well watered, water stressed) and 'nitrogen form' (nitrate, ammonium), applied in a pot experiment. The effects of physiological integration were studied by analysing photochemical efficiency, leaf spectral reflectance, photosynthesis and carbon and nitrogen isotope discrimination, the last of which has been neglected in previous studies. Physiological integration buffered the stress caused by water deprivation. As a consequence, survival was improved in water-stressed offspring ramets that remained connected to their parent plants. The nitrogen isotope composition (δ(15)N) values in the connected water-stressed ramets were similar to those in ramets in the ammonium treatment; however, δ(15)N values in connected well-watered ramets were similar to those in the nitrate treatment. The results also demonstrated the benefit of integration for offspring ramets in terms of photochemical activity and photosynthesis. This is the first study in which carbon and nitrogen isotopic discrimination has been used to detect physiological integration in clonal plants. The results for nitrogen isotope composition represent the first evidence of preferential transport of a specific form of nitrogen to compensate for stressful conditions experienced by a member clone. Water consumption was lower

  4. Influence of roots and mycorrhiza on the internal nitrogen cycle in an organic forest soil ­revealed by a 15N tracing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, M.; Rutting, T.; Klemedtsson, L.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The cycle of nitrogen in soil is complex, consisting of many simultaneous occurring transformation processes. So far, microorganisms have been thought to govern N cycling in soil. Nevertheless, plant roots and their associated mycorrhizal symbionts may exert control on N turnover for example by input of labile C to soil. However, studies investigating the effect of roots on gross N turnover rates are scarce. We conducted a 15N tracer study under field conditions to reveal the effect of plants on soil N cycle. The experiment includes three treatments: (a) control, (b) excluding roots and (c) excluding roots + mycorrhiza. On the study site, exclusion of roots + mycorrhiza has previously been shown to increase N2O emissions which indicate that plants affect internal N cycling. 15NH4NO3 and NH415NO3 were given to the soil and traced for a period of 10 days. Gross N turnover rates were determined applying a numerical 15N tracing model. Results on N turnover rates showed that roots and their fungal symbionts increased N cycling probably by input of labile C to soil which may results in an activation of the microbial biomass. While gross N mineralization increased by 270 and 313 % compared to the treatment excluding roots + mycorrhiza, NH4+ immobilization increased by 402 and 489 %. Differences in ammonium and nitrate immobilization further indicated that ammonium was the preferred N source for roots and microorganisms. While ammonium availability decreased with trenching (0.59 compared to -0.47 and -0.96 μg N g-1 d-1), the opposite was true for nitrate (0.50 compared to 2.08 and 2.18 μg N g-1 d-1), explaining the increased N2O emissions which were likely caused by denitrification. Further, plants increased dissimilarity nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and affected autotrophic nitrification probably by the release of nitrification inhibitors and by influencing ammonium availability. We conclude that plants and their mycorrhizal symbionts actively control N cycling

  5. Thaumarchaeal ammonium oxidation and evidence for a nitrogen cycle in a subsurface radioactive thermal spring in the Austrian Central Alps

    PubMed Central

    Gerbl, Friedrich W.; Weidler, Gerhard W.; Wanek, Wolfgang; Erhardt, Angelika; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies had suggested the presence of ammonium oxidizing Thaumarchaeota as well as nitrite oxidizing Bacteria in the subsurface spring called Franz Josef Quelle (FJQ), a slightly radioactive thermal mineral spring with a temperature of 43.6–47°C near the alpine village of Bad Gastein, Austria. The microbiological consortium of the FJQ was investigated for its utilization of nitrogen compounds and the putative presence of a subsurface nitrogen cycle. Microcosm experiments made with samples from the spring water, containing planktonic microorganisms, or from biofilms, were used in this study. Three slightly different media, enriched with vitamins and trace elements, and two incubation temperatures (30 and 40°C, respectively) were employed. Under aerobic conditions, high rates of conversion of ammonium to nitrite, as well as nitrite to nitrate were measured. Under oxygen-limited conditions nitrate was converted to gaseous compounds. Stable isotope probing with 15NH4Cl or (15NH4)2SO4as sole energy sources revealed incorporation of 15N into community DNA. Genomic DNA as well as RNA were extracted from all microcosms. The following genes or fragments of genes were successfully amplified, cloned and sequenced by standard PCR from DNA extracts: Ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA), nitrite oxidoreductase subunits A and B (nxrA and nxrB), nitrate reductase (narG), nitrite reductase (nirS), nitric oxide reductases (cnorB and qnorB), nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ). Reverse transcription of extracted total RNA and real-time PCR suggested the expression of each of those genes. Nitrogen fixation (as probed with nifH and nifD) was not detected. However, a geological origin of NH+4 in the water of the FJQ cannot be excluded, considering the silicate, granite and gneiss containing environment. The data suggested the operation of a nitrogen cycle in the subsurface environment of the FJQ. PMID:24904540

  6. Nitrogen Fractionation in Protoplanetary Disks from the H13CN/HC15N Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, V. V.; Öberg, K. I.; Huang, J.; Loomis, R.; Qi, C.

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen fractionation is commonly used to assess the thermal history of solar system volatiles. With ALMA it is for the first time possible to directly measure {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratios in common molecules during the assembly of planetary systems. We present ALMA observations of the {{{H}}}13{CN} and {{HC}}15{{N}} J=3-2 lines at 0.″5 angular resolution, toward a sample of six protoplanetary disks, selected to span a range of stellar and disk structure properties. Adopting a typical {}12{{C}}/{}13{{C}} ratio of 70, we find comet-like {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratios of 80-160 in five of the disks (3 T Tauri and 2 Herbig Ae disks) and lack constraints for one of the T Tauri disks (IM Lup). There are no systematic differences between T Tauri and Herbig Ae disks, or between full and transition disks within the sample. In addition, no correlation is observed between disk-averaged D/H and {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratios in the sample. One of the disks, V4046 Sgr, presents unusually bright HCN isotopologue emission, enabling us to model the radial profiles of {{{H}}}13{CN} and {{HC}}15{{N}}. We find tentative evidence of an increasing {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratio with radius, indicating that selective photodissociation in the inner disk is important in setting the {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratio during planet formation.

  7. Steroselective synthesis and application of L-( sup 15 N) amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J. ); Lodwig, S.N. . Div. of Science)

    1991-01-01

    We have developed two general approaches to the stereoselective synthesis of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-labeled amino acids. First, labeled serine, biosynthesized using the methylotrophic bacterium M. extorquens AM1, serves as a chiral precursor for the synthesis of other amino acids. For example, pyridoxal phosphate enzymes can be used for the conversion of L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)serine to L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tyrosine, L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tryptophan, and L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)cysteine. In the second approach, developed by Oppolzer and Tamura, an electrophilic amination'' reagent, 1-chloro-1-nitrosocyclohexane, was used to convert chiral enolates into L-{alpha}-amino acids. We prepared 1-chloro-1-({sup 15}N) nitrosocyclohexane and used it to aminate chiral enolates to produce L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)amino acids. The stereoselectivity of this scheme using the Oppolzer sultam chiral auxiliary is remarkable, producing enantiomer ratios of 200 to 1. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  8. An evaluation of sources of nitrogen in shallow groundwater using (15)N abundance technique.

    PubMed

    Alva, A K; Dou, H; Paramasivam, S; Wang, F L; Graetz, D A; Sajwan, K S

    2006-01-01

    A (15)N abundance technique was employed to identify the source of NO(3)-N in groundwater under three commercial citrus production sites in central Florida. Water samples were collected from 0 to 300 and 300 to 600 cm depths in the surficial aquifer and analyzed for NO(3)-N and delta N-15 (delta (15)N). Groundwater samples were also collected in a residential area adjacent to one of the citrus groves and analyzed for NO(3)-N and delta (15)N. The delta (15)N values were in the range of (+)1 to (+)10% in both depths underneath the citrus groves. The range of delta (15)N measured in this study represents the range expected for groundwater that was impacted by NO(3)-N originated from mineralization of organic N from the soil as well as from the crop residue. There are occasional high delta (15)N values which are indicative of the effects of NH(3) volatilization losses of applied fertilizer N. The range of delta (15)N values for groundwater samples collected from the residential area adjacent to the citrus groves was very similar to that from the groundwater underneath the citrus groves. Thus, the source of NO(3)-N that impacted the groundwater under the citrus groves also impacted the groundwater in the adjacent residential area.

  9. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles.

  10. A novel method for determination of the (15) N isotopic composition of Rubisco in wheat plants exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Molero, Gemma; Avice, Jean Christophe; Bourguignon, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Although ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is mostly known as a key enzyme involved in CO2 assimilation during the Calvin cycle, comparatively little is known about its role as a pool of nitrogen storage in leaves. For this purpose, we developed a protocol to purify Rubisco that enables later analysis of its (15) N isotope composition (δ(15) N) at the natural abundance and (15) N-labeled plants. In order to test the utility of this protocol, durum wheat (Triticum durum var. Sula) exposed to an elevated CO2 concentration (700 vs 400 µmol mol(-1) ) was labeled with K(15) NO3 (enriched at 2 atom %) during the ear development period. The developed protocol proves to be selective, simple, cost effective and reproducible. The study reveals that (15) N labeling was different in total organic matter, total soluble protein and the Rubisco fraction. The obtained data suggest that photosynthetic acclimation in wheat is caused by Rubisco depletion. This depletion may be linked to preferential nitrogen remobilization from Rubisco toward grain filling.

  11. Standing Out From the Crowd: New Fish Recruits Have Unique δ15N Signatures in a Heavily Polluted Intermittently Open Estuary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadwen, W. L.; Arthington, A. H.

    2005-05-01

    Intermittently open estuaries (IOEs) are the dominant coastal ecosystems of the Australian coastline. Conditions in IOEs range from freshwater when closed, to marine when open to the ocean, during which time marine fish often migrate into these systems. Many IOEs are facing increasing pressure from coastal development and ongoing nutrient inputs from industrial and urban sources have been shown to increase the δ15N isotope signatures of biota in receiving waters. In this study, we examined the food web structure of Tallows Creek, a relatively small IOE in northern NSW, Australia, which receives ongoing sewage treatment plant inputs. We first sampled Tallows Creek when it was closed to the ocean and found that all components of the food web had enriched δ15N signatures relative to biota sampled from a relatively undisturbed neighbouring system. However, samples collected immediately following an entrance opening event revealed some individuals of highly mobile taxa with δ15N signatures more typical of unpolluted estuaries. We suggest that these isotopically light individuals were recent migrants into Tallows Creek and that δ15N signatures can act as a guide to the importance of heavily polluted systems as nursery grounds for mobile taxa, owing to the distinction between resident and migrant signatures.

  12. Spatial distribution of δ15N of chlorophyll-a in surface sediment of the northern Benguela Upwelling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We analyzed the δ15N of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in surface sediments of the northern Benguela Upwelling System (BUS), a coastal upwelling system with high primary productivity in surface waters and intensive denitrification in the subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Upwelled nitrate is the major N-input to the northern BUS, and is consumed by denitrification and phytoplankton assimilation. Both processes gradually enrich the residual nitrate pool in 15N that is assimilated to synthesize chlorophyll-a (Chl-a). The δ15NChl-a distribution in surficial sediment should thus characterize the combined effects of denitrification and biological assimilation on the δ15N of nitrate in the overlying shelf waters, and should image the spatial patterns of denitrification and nitrate assimilation, respectively, in the northern BUS. Paired δ15NChl-a and bulk sediment δ15N (δ15Nsed) data of 27 surface sediment samples lack a significant correlation (R2 0.19, P=0.012). This insignificant correlation and the spatial discrepancies between δ15Nsed and δ15NChl-a suggest a varying post-depositional bias of diagenetic processes on the δ15Nsed. The onshore-offshore difference (∆) of δ15NChl-a in the northern sector of the studied area (17°-19°S,11°-14°E) is created mainly by fractionation effects of progressive plankton assimilation, because here the OMZ is weak and water-column denitrification is insignificant. In the southern sector (19°-23°S, 11°-14°E) where the OMZ is prominent, additional nitrate loss through denitrification causes most of the ∆ of δ15NChl-a. Along the inner shelf (17°-23°S), the southward increase of δ15NChl-a along the inner shelf mirrors an increase of δ15NNO3 from 17°S to 23°S, from which an annual denitrification rate of 0.6 Tg yr-1 is calculated based on the south-north difference in δ15NChl-a of 11.3‰. In coastal upwelling zones where OMZ intensity is coupled to the upwelling dynamics over the shelf, the δ15NChl-a in surface

  13. sup 13 C and sup 15 N nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of the ionization state of substrates bound to bovine dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Selinsky, B.S.; Perlman, M.E.; London, R.E. ); Unkefer, C.J. ); Mitchell, J. ); Blakley, R.L. Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis )

    1990-02-06

    The state of protonation of substrates bound to mammalian dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) has significance for the mechanism of catalysis. To investigate this, dihydrofolate and dihydropteroylpentaglutamate have been synthesized with {sup 15}N enrichment at N-5. {sup 15}N NMR studies have been performed on the binary complexes formed by bovine DHFR with these compounds and with (5-{sup 15}N)dihydrobiopterin. The results indicate that there is no protonation at N-5 in the binary complexes, and this was confirmed by {sup 13}C NMR studies with folate and dihydrofolate synthesized with {sup 13}C enrichment at C-6. The chemical shift displacements produced by complex formation are in the same direction as those which result from deprotonation of the N-3/C-4-O amide group and are consistent with at least partial loss of the proton from N-3. This would be possible if, as crystallographic data indicate, there is interaction of N-3 and the 2-amino group of the bound ligands with the carboxylate of the active site glutamate residue (Glu{sup 30}).

  14. Carbon-rich Presolar Grains from Massive Stars: Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N Ratios and the Mystery of 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.

  15. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  16. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12 C/ 13 C and 14 N/ 15 N ratios and the mystery of 15 N

    DOE PAGES

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; ...

    2015-07-30

    We compared carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. Furthermore, we present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. All of the explosion energies and H concentrations aremore » considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.« less

  17. Ammonium nitrate cold pack ingestion.

    PubMed

    Challoner, K R; McCarron, M M

    1988-01-01

    Disposable ammonium nitrate cold packs are widely used in emergency departments instead of ice bags. Five confused or suicidal patients who tore open a pack and ingested from 64 to 234 grams of ammonium nitrate in a single dose, and another patient who attempted to do so, are reported. It is known that chronic ingestion of 6 to 12 grams/day of ammonium nitrate may cause gastritis, acidosis, isosmotic diuresis, and nitrite toxicity manifesting as methemoglobinemia or vasodilatation. None of these patients developed severe toxicity, although three had symptoms of gastritis, three had slight methemoglobinemia, and two had mild hypotension. The product was removed from the stomach promptly in three of the five patients. None had pre-existing renal or intestinal dysfunction, which are known to enhance ammonium nitrate toxicity.

  18. High performance ammonium nitrate propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A high performance propellant having greatly reduced hydrogen chloride emission is presented. It is comprised of: (1) a minor amount of hydrocarbon binder (10-15%), (2) at least 85% solids including ammonium nitrate as the primary oxidizer (about 40% to 70%), (3) a significant amount (5-25%) powdered metal fuel, such as aluminum, (4) a small amount (5-25%) of ammonium perchlorate as a supplementary oxidizer, and (5) optionally a small amount (0-20%) of a nitramine.

  19. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  20. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  1. Proton-coupled 15N NMR spectra of neutral and protonated ethenoadenosine and ethenocytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Sierzputowska-Gracz, H; Wiewiórowski, M; Kozerski, L; von Philipsborn, W

    1984-01-01

    The 15N chemical shifts and 15N, 1H spin coupling constants were determined in the title compounds using the INEPT pulse sequence and assigned with the aid of selective proton decoupling. The delta/15N/ and J/N, H/ values are discussed in terms of involvement of the imidazole ring created by ethenobridging in the electronic structure of the whole molecule. Both spectral parameters indicate that the diligant nitrogen in this ring is the primary site of protonation in these modified nucleosides. It is concluded that 15N NMR of nucleoside bases can be largely a complementary method to 1H and 13C NMR studies and, in addition, can serve as a direct probe for studies of nitrogen environment in oligomeric fragments of nucleic acids even at moderately strong magnetic fields due to the higher spectral dispersion compared with 1H and 13C NMR spectra. PMID:6473107

  2. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin-lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C).

  3. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin–lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C). PMID:28067292

  4. Project ENRICH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwaley, Elizabeth; And Others

    Project ENRICH was conceived in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, to: (1) identify preschool children with learning disabilities, and (2) to develop a program geared to the remediation of the learning disabilities within a school year, while allowing the child to be enrolled in a regular class situation for the following school year. Through…

  5. Job Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Rick

    1970-01-01

    Job enrichment means giving people more decision-making power, more responsibility, more grasp of the totality of the job, and a sense of their own importance in the company. This article presents evidence of the successful working of this approach (Donnelly Mirrors), and the lack of success with an opposing approach (General Motors). (NL)

  6. Alanine flux in obese and healthy humans as evaluated by /sup 15/N- and /sup 2/H/sub 3/-labeled alanines

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, L.J.; Yang, R.D.; Matthews, D.E.; Bistrian, B.R.; Bier, D.M.; Young, V.R.

    1988-10-01

    Estimates of plasma alanine flux as measured in humans using L-(/sup 15/N)-alanine or L-(3,3,3-/sup 2/H/sub 3/)alanine were compared by simultaneous intravenous infusion of both tracers. Plasma isotope enrichments were measured by chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In 16 obese women before and during a hypocaloric diet and in 4 normal men in the postabsorptive and fed states, the fluxes were highly correlated (r2 = 0.93) although plasma alanine flux with the /sup 2/H tracer was two to three times greater than that obtained with (/sup 15/N)alanine. The fluxes decreased with the hypocaloric diet in obese subjects and increased during the fed state in healthy adults. Thus, although the estimates of alanine flux differed according to the tracer used, both appear to give equivalent information about changes in alanine kinetics induced by the nutritional conditions examined.

  7. δ(13)C and δ(15)N in deep-living fishes and shrimps after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Rizzo, Ester; Torres, Joseph J; Ross, Steve W; Romero, Isabel; Watson, Kathleen; Goddard, Ethan; Hollander, David

    2015-05-15

    The blowout of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) drill-rig produced a surface oil layer, dispersed micro-droplets throughout the water column, and sub-surface plumes. We measured stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in mesopelagic fishes and shrimps in the vicinity of DWH collected prior to, six weeks after, and one year after the oil spill (2007, 2010 and 2011). In 2010, the year of the oil spill, a small but significant depletion of δ(13)C was found in two mesopelagic fishes (Gonostoma elongatum and Chauliodus sloani) and one shrimp (Systellaspis debilis); a significant δ(15)N enrichment was identified in the same shrimp and in three fish species (G. elongatum, Ceratoscopelus warmingii, and Lepidophanes guentheri). The δ(15)N change did not suggest a change of trophic level, but did indicate a change in diet. The data suggest that carbon from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was incorporated into the mesopelagic food web of the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...). It is prepared by the sublimation of a mixture of ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate and occurs... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1137 Ammonium carbonate. (a) Ammonium carbonate ((NH4)2CO3, CAS...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...). It is prepared by the sublimation of a mixture of ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate and occurs... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1137 Ammonium carbonate. (a) Ammonium carbonate ((NH4)2CO3, CAS...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...). It is prepared by the sublimation of a mixture of ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate and occurs... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1137 Ammonium carbonate. (a) Ammonium carbonate ((NH4)2CO3, CAS...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...). It is prepared by the sublimation of a mixture of ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate and occurs... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1137 Ammonium carbonate. (a) Ammonium carbonate ((NH4)2CO3, CAS...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium bicarbonate. 184.1135 Section 184.1135... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1135 Ammonium bicarbonate. (a) Ammonium bicarbonate.... Crystals of ammonium bicarbonate are precipitated from solution and subsequently washed and dried. (b) The...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium bicarbonate. 184.1135 Section 184.1135... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1135 Ammonium bicarbonate. (a) Ammonium bicarbonate.... Crystals of ammonium bicarbonate are precipitated from solution and subsequently washed and dried. (b) The...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium bicarbonate. 184.1135 Section 184.1135... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1135 Ammonium bicarbonate. (a) Ammonium bicarbonate.... Crystals of ammonium bicarbonate are precipitated from solution and subsequently washed and dried. (b) The...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium bicarbonate. 184.1135 Section 184.1135... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1135 Ammonium bicarbonate. (a) Ammonium bicarbonate.... Crystals of ammonium bicarbonate are precipitated from solution and subsequently washed and dried. (b) The...

  17. Ecosystem N distribution and δ15N during a century of forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compton, J.E.; Hooker, T.D.; Perakis, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of terrestrial ecosystem nitrogen (N) pools reflect internal processes and input–output balances. Disturbance generally increases N cycling and loss, yet few studies have examined ecosystem δ15N over a disturbance-recovery sequence. We used a chronosequence approach to examine N distribution and δ15N during forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment. Site ages ranged from 10 to 115 years, with similar soils, climate, land-use history, and overstory vegetation (white pine Pinus strobus). Foliar N and δ15N decreased as stands aged, consistent with a progressive tightening of the N cycle during forest regrowth on agricultural lands. Over time, foliar δ15N became more negative, indicating increased fractionation along the mineralization–mycorrhizal–plant uptake pathway. Total ecosystem N was constant across the chronosequence, but substantial internal N redistribution occurred from the mineral soil to plants and litter over 115 years (>25% of ecosystem N or 1,610 kg ha−1). Temporal trends in soil δ15N generally reflected a redistribution of depleted N from the mineral soil to the developing O horizon. Although plants and soil δ15N are coupled over millennial time scales of ecosystem development, our observed divergence between plants and soil suggests that they can be uncoupled during the disturbance-regrowth sequence. The approximate 2‰ decrease in ecosystem δ15N over the century scale suggests significant incorporation of atmospheric N, which was not detected by traditional ecosystem N accounting. Consideration of temporal trends and disturbance legacies can improve our understanding of the influence of broader factors such as climate or N deposition on ecosystem N balances and δ15N.

  18. Syntheses of all singly labeled [15N]adenines: Mass spectral fragmentation of adenine

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, Maria Del Carmen G.; Scopes, David I. C.; Holtwick, Joseph B.; Leonard, Nelson J.

    1981-01-01

    Syntheses of all five of the singly labeled [15N]adenines are now provided. The presence or absence of two-bond 15N-1H spin couplings in their 1H NMR spectra confirm the location of the isotope in each case. The fragmentation patterns in their mass spectra are indicative of the sequential losses of HCN units and of CH2N2 from adenine upon electron impact. PMID:16593042

  19. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  20. Nitrogen source tracking with δ15N content of coastal wetland plants in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Gregory L. Bruland; Richard A.. Mackenzie

    2010-01-01

    Inter- and intra-site comparisons of the nitrogen (N) stable isotope composition of wetland plant species have been used to identify sources of N in coastal areas. In this study, we compared δ15N values from different herbaceous wetland plants across 34 different coastal wetlands from the five main Hawaiian Islands and investigated relationships of δ15N with...

  1. Angular distributions for /sup 16/O(/gamma/,p)/sup 15/N at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.S.; Kinney, E.R.; Matthews, J.L.; Sapp, W.W.; Soos, T.; Owens, R.O.; Turley, R.S.; Pignault, G.

    1988-12-01

    The photoproton knockout reaction on /sup 16/O leaving /sup 15/N in low-lying bound states has been observed over the photon energy range from 196 to 361 MeV. The angular distribution for the reaction populating the ground state of /sup 15/N develops sharp structure as the photon energy is increased but that for population of the excited states is smooth. The results are not explained by existing theoretical models.

  2. Application of C30B15N15 heterofullerene in the isoniazid drug delivery: DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazrati, Mehrnoosh Khodam; Bagheri, Zargham; Bodaghi, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Using density functional theory, we have investigated the potential application of a C30B15N15 heterofullerene in anti-cancer isoniazid drug delivery. It was found that isoniazid prefers to attach via its -NH2 group to a boron atom of the C30B15N15 with releasing a large energy of about 21.91 kcal/mol. Our partial density of states analysis demonstrates that the boron atoms significantly contribute in generation of virtual orbitals of C30B15N15 fullerene, indicating that these atoms will be suitable for nucleophilic attack rather than carbon atoms. In addition to the large released energy, the electronic properties C30B15N15 are significantly sensitive to the isoniazid attachment which can recognize the drug trajectory by affecting the fluorescence emission properties. Unlike, different nanostructures whose structures need to be manipulated to be suitable for drug delivery, the C30B15N15 fullerene can be used in the pristine form. We proposed a drug release mechanism in cancer tissues, representing that in the low pH of the cancer cells the drug and C30B15N15 fullerene are considerably protonated, thereby separating the drug from the surface of the fullerene. The reaction mechanism of the drug with the fullerene is changed from covalence in natural environment to hydrogen bonding in acidic cancer cells.

  3. Partition of the relative contribution of nitrification and denitrification from Amazon forest soils using a model based on bulk 15N of N2O natural abundance determinations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, T. J.; Trumbore, S. E.; Tyler, S. C.; Park, S.; Boering, K.; Decamargo, P.

    2004-12-01

    Most of the available methods for the determination of the relative contribution of nitrification and denitrification to the soil emitted N2O are invasive. Therefore, they could produce biased results due to the change in soil structure, alteration to the microbial community and substrates. However, the soil community bacterial activity has intrinsic properties such as isotopic fractionation factors that are relative constant through different sets of soil conditions. We took advantage of these bacterial properties and devised a mass balance method for partitioning the relative contribution of each process by using: (1) The 15N enrichment factors for N2O production via nitrification and denitrification for soils (determined previously by acetylene addition soil incubation methods) and (2) the δ 15N-N2O soil emission values from the selected studied soils. We selected soils from a forest soil texture gradient from the Tapajos National Forest (TNF), in the Amazon Basin, Pará State, Brazil and Nova Vida Farm (NV), Rondonia State, Brazil where we had determined the 15N enrichment factors for each microbial process and collected N2O soil emissions for bulk stable isotope analysis during the rainy season of 2002. The soils selected were Oxisol (clay) and Ultison (sandy) at TNF and Latosol (sandy loam) at NV. We found that for all studied soils, the relative contribution of nitrification was smaller than 40 %. This corroborates the assumption that the N2O emitted from Amazon forest is mostly denitrification-derived. The advantage of this method is that is non invasive. However, the uncertainties associated with the method increase when δ 15N-N2O values of emitted N2O are smaller than -25 per mil.

  4. Solubility of the Sodium and Ammonium Salts of Oxalic Acid in Water with Ammonium Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Buttke, Lukas G; Schueller, Justin R; Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2016-08-18

    The solubility of the sodium and ammonium salts of oxalic acid in water with ammonium sulfate present has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray crystallography, and infrared spectroscopy. The crystals that form from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium hydrogen oxalate were determined to be sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate under low ammonium sulfate conditions and ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate under high ammonium sulfate conditions. Crystals from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium oxalate were determined to be ammonium oxalate monohydrate under moderate to high ammonium sulfate concentrations and sodium oxalate under low ammonium sulfate concentrations. It was also found that ammonium sulfate enhances the solubility of the sodium oxalate salts (salting in effect) and decreases the solubility of the ammonium oxalate salts (salting out effect). In addition, a partial phase diagram for the ammonium hydrogen oxalate/water system was determined.

  5. The ammonium content in the Malayer igneous and metamorphic rocks (Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Western Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadnejad, Vahid; Hirt, Ann Marie; Valizadeh, Mohammad-Vali; Bokani, Saeed Jabbari

    2011-04-01

    The ammonium (NH4+) contents of the Malayer area (Western Iran) have been determined by using the colorimetric method on 26 samples from igneous and metamorphic rocks. This is the first analysis of the ammonium contents of Iranian metamorphic and igneous rocks. The average ammonium content of metamorphic rocks decreases from low-grade to high-grade metamorphic rocks (in ppm): slate 580, phyllite 515, andalusite schist 242. In the case of igneous rocks, it decreases from felsic to mafic igneous types (in ppm): granites 39, monzonite 20, diorite 17, gabbro 10. Altered granitic rocks show enrichment in NH4+ (mean 61 ppm). The high concentration of ammonium in Malayer granites may indicate metasedimentary rocks as protoliths rather than meta-igneous rocks. These granitic rocks (S-types) have high K-bearing rock-forming minerals such as biotite, muscovite and K-feldspar which their potassium could substitute with ammonium. In addition, the high ammonium content of metasediments is probably due to inheritance of nitrogen from organic matter in the original sediments. The hydrothermally altered samples of granitic rocks show highly enrichment of ammonium suggesting external sources which intruded additional content by either interaction with metasedimentary country rocks or meteoritic solutions.

  6. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  7. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  8. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  9. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  10. Stable isotope composition (δ(13)C and δ(15)N values) of slime molds: placing bacterivorous soil protozoans in the food web context.

    PubMed

    Tiunov, Alexei V; Semenina, Eugenia E; Aleksandrova, Alina V; Tsurikov, Sergey M; Anichkin, Alexander E; Novozhilov, Yuri K

    2015-08-30

    Data on the bulk stable isotope composition of soil bacteria and bacterivorous soil animals are required to estimate the nutrient and energy fluxes via bacterial channels within detrital food webs. We measured the isotopic composition of slime molds (Myxogastria, Amoebozoa), a group of soil protozoans forming macroscopic spore-bearing fruiting bodies. An analysis of largely bacterivorous slime molds can provide information on the bulk stable isotope composition of soil bacteria. Fruiting bodies of slime molds were collected in a monsoon tropical forest of Cat Tien National Park, Vietnam, and analyzed by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Prior to stable isotope analysis, carbonates were removed from a subset of samples by acidification. To estimate the trophic position of slime molds, their δ(13) C and δ(15) N values were compared with those of plant debris, soil, microbial destructors (litter-decomposing, humus-decomposing, and ectomycorrhizal fungi) and members of higher trophic levels (oribatid mites, termites, predatory macroinvertebrates). Eight species of slime molds represented by at least three independent samples were 3-6‰ enriched in (13) C and (15) N relative to plant litter. A small but significant difference in the δ(13) C and δ(15) N values suggests that different species of myxomycetes can differ in feeding behavior. The slime molds were enriched in (15) N compared with litter-decomposing fungi, and depleted in (15) N compared with mycorrhizal or humus-decomposing fungi. Slime mold sporocarps and plasmodia largely overlapped with oribatid mites in the isotopic bi-plot, but were depleted in (15) N compared with predatory invertebrates and humiphagous termites. A comparison with reference groups of soil organisms suggests strong trophic links of slime molds to saprotrophic microorganisms which decompose plant litter, but not to humus-decomposing microorganisms or to mycorrhizal fungi. Under the assumption that slime molds are

  11. Effects of clear-cutting and soil preparation on natural 15N abundance in the soil and needles of two boreal conifer tree species.

    PubMed

    Sah, Shambu P; Ilvesniemi, Hannu

    2006-12-01

    This study presents the impacts of clear-cutting and site preparation on soil and needle 15N-fractionation of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris, L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.), Karst). Three microsites on different methods of site preparation were used: (i) mound (broken O/E/B horizons piled upside down over undisturbed humus), (ii) deep (exposed C-horizon) and (iii) shallow (exposed E/B horizon). We found significant differences between species, between closed forest and clear-cuts as well as between different site preparations. For instance, in the context of interspecific variations, the mean needle nitrogen concentrations of both seedlings (1.15,+/-0.10 %) and mature (1.09,+/-0.07 %) pine trees were significantly higher compared to corresponding needle concentrations of seedlings (0.88,+/-0.06 %) and mature trees (0.79,+/-0.02 %) of spruce. Similarly, we observed significantly more 15N-enriched needles of mature spruces (-4.0,+/-0.20 per thousand) as well as of seedlings (-5.0,+/-0.11 per thousand) relative to that of mature pine needles (-5.6,+/-0.10 per thousand) and seedlings (-6.0,+/-0.31 per thousand). These variations were assumed to be caused by the variation in mycorrhizal associations between the species. We assume that the proportion of mycorrhizal N-uptake of pines might have been larger than that of spruce. Regarding the clear-cut effects on N and 15N of both tree species, we observed that, in the mature natural stand, needle N concentrations of both pine (1.09,+/-0.07 %) and spruce (0.79,+/-0.02 %) tree species did not change significantly after clear-cutting (pine: 1.01,+/-0.06 %; spruce: 0.74,+/-0.04 % ). However, clear-cutting resulted in the significant increase in needle 15N natural abundance of both pine (-2.70,+/-0.06 per thousand) and spruce (-2.09,+/-0.05 per thousand) in comparison to that of natural stand (pine:-5.60,+/-0.10 per thousand; spruce:-4.00,+/-0.20 per thousand), which is assumed to be due to the increased level of

  12. Reducing fertilizer-derived N2O emission: Point injection vs. surface application of ammonium-N fertilizer at a loamy sand site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppe, Marianna; Well, Reinhard; Giesemann, Anette; Kücke, Martin; Flessa, Heinz

    2013-04-01

    N2O emitted from soil originates either from denitrification of nitrate and/or nitrification of ammonium. N fertilization can have an important impact on N2O emission rates. Injection of nitrate-free ammonium-N fertilizer, in Germany also known as CULTAN (Controlled Uptake Long-Term Ammonium Nutrition), results in fertilizer depots with ammonium concentrations of up to 10 mg N g-1 soil-1. High concentrations of ammonium are known to inhibit nitrification. However, it has not yet been clarified how N2O fluxes are affected by CULTAN. In a field experiment, two application methods of nitrogen fertilizer were used at a loamy sand site: Ammonium sulphate was applied either by point injection or by surface application. 15N-ammonium sulphate was used to distinguish between N2O originating from either fertilizer-N or soil-N. Unfertilized plots and plots fertilized with unlabeled ammonium sulphate served as control. N2O emissions were measured using static chambers, nitrate and ammonium concentrations were determined in soil extracts. Stable isotope analysis of 15N in N2O, nitrate and ammonium was used to calculate the contribution of fertilizer N to N2O emissions and the fertilizer turnover in soil. 15N analysis clearly indicated that fertilizer derived N2O fluxes were higher from surface application plots. For the period of the growing season, about 24% of the flux measured in surface application treatment and less than 10% from injection treatment plots originated from the fertilizer. In addition, a lab experiment was conducted to gain insight into processes leading to N2O emission from fertilizer depots. One aim was to examine whether the ratio of N2O to nitrate formation differs depending on the ammonium concentration. Loamy sand soil was incubated in microcosms continuously flushed with air under conditions favouring nitrification. 15N-labeled nitrate was used to differentiate between nitrification and denitrification. Stable isotope analyses of 15N were performed on

  13. Composition of free and adherent ruminal bacteria: inaccuracy of the microbial nutrient supply estimates obtained using free bacteria as reference samples and (15)N as the marker.

    PubMed

    González, J; Arroyo, J M; Ouarti, M; Guevara-González, J; Rodríguez, C A; Alvir, M R; Moya, V J; Piquer, O

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that (15)N enrichment of solid-associated bacteria (SAB) may be predicted from the same value in liquid-associated bacteria (LAB). The aims of this study were to confirm this and to measure the error in the nutrient supply from SAB, when LAB are used as the reference sample. For this purpose, the chemical and amino acid (AA) compositions of both the bacterial populations were studied in four experiments carried out on different groups of three rumen cannulated wethers. Diets (one in Experiments 1 and 4 and three in Experiments 2 and 3) had forage-to-concentrate ratios (dry matter (DM) basis) between 2 : 1 and 40 : 60, and were consumed at intake levels between 40 and 75 g DM/kg (BW)(0.75). The bacteria samples were isolated after continuous infusion of ((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) (40, 18, 30 and 25 mg (15)N/day, in Experiments 1 to 4, respectively) for at least 14 days. In all experiments, SAB had consistently higher concentrations of organic matter (826 v. 716 g/kg DM, as average) and total lipids (192 v. 95 g/kg DM, as average) than LAB. Similar CP concentrations of both populations were observed, except a higher concentration in SAB than in LAB in Experiment 3. A consistent (in Experiment 4 only as tendency) higher AA-N/total N ratio (on average 17.5%) was observed in SAB than in LAB. The (15)N enrichment in SAB was systematically lower than in LAB. On the basis of the results of all studies a close relationship was found between the (15)N enrichment in SAB and LAB, which was shown irrespective of experiments. This relationship was established from Experiments 1 and 2 and the above cited previous results (n = 20; P < 0.001; R(2) = 0.996), and then confirmed from the results of Experiments 3 and 4. These relationships between SAB and LAB demonstrate that CP supply from SAB is underevaluated by, on average, 21.2% when LAB are used as the reference. This underevaluation was higher for true protein and even higher for the lipid supply (32

  14. Estimate of production of gaseous nitrogen in the human body based on (15)N analysis of breath N2 after administration of [(15)N2]urea.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Peter

    2013-01-01

    After oral administration of [(15)N2]urea (1.5 mmol, 95 atom% (15)N), we found that breath N2 was significantly (15)N-labelled. The result suggests that molecular nitrogen in breath must be partly produced endogenously. Based on a metabolic model, the endogenous N2 production was estimated to be 0.40±0.25 mmol kg(-1) d(-1) or 2.9±1.8 % of the total (urinary and faecal) N excretion in fasted healthy subjects (n=4). In patients infected with Helicobacter pylori (n=5), the endogenous N2 production was increased to 1.24±0.59 mmol kg(-1) d(-1) or 9.0±4.3 % of the total N excretion compared to the healthy controls (p<0.05). We conclude that N balance and gas exchange measurements may be affected by endogenously produced nitrogen, especially in metabolic situations with elevated nitrosation, for instance in oxidative and nitrosative stress-related diseases such as H. pylori infections.

  15. Soil N and 15N variation with time in a California annual grassland ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, D.L.; Amundson, Ronald; Baisden, W. Troy; Kendall, C.; Harden, J.

    2001-01-01

    The %N and ??15N values of soils and plants were measured along a chronosequence spanning 3 to 3000 Ky in a California annual grassland. Total soil N decreased with increasing soil age (1.1 to 0.4 kg N m-2) while the mean ?? 15N values of the soil N increased by several ??? from the youngest to oldest sites (+3.5 to +6.2 ???). The ?? 15N values of plants varied along the gradient, reflecting changing soil N pools and differences in the form of N uptake. The decline in total N storage with time is hypothesized to be due to a shift from N to P limitation with increasing soil age. The general increase in ?? 15N values with time is interpreted using a N mass balance model, and appears to reflect a shift toward an increasing proportional losses of inorganic mineral forms of N (vs. organic forms) with increasing soil age. We develop a quantitative index of this trend (mineral vs. organic forms of N loss) using mass balance considerations and parameters. The %N and ?? 15N values along the California age gradient were compared to the published data for a comparably aged chronosequence in Hawaii. Most striking in this comparison is the observation that the California soil and plant ?? 15N values are several ??? greater than those on comparably aged Hawaiian sites. Multiple explanations are plausible, but assuming the sites have a similar range in ?? 15N values of atmospheric inputs, the isotopic differences suggest that N may be, at least seasonally, in greater excess in the strongly seasonal, semi-arid, California grassland. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. Effects of ruminally degradable nitrogen intake and in vitro addition of ammonia and propionate on the metabolic fate of L-[1-14C]alanine and L-[15N]alanine in isolated sheep hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mutsvangwa, T; Buchanan-Smith, J G; McBride, B W

    1997-04-01

    Isolated hepatocytes prepared from sheep fed a basal diet (bromegrass hay-corn, 50:50 wt/ wt, as-fed basis) with or without urea were used to determine the effects of added ammonia (as NH4Cl) and propionate on the partitioning of C from 1.25 mM L-[1-14C]alanine between oxidation and gluconeogenesis, and the flux of 15N from 1.25 mM L-[15N]alanine to [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea. Hepatocyte suspensions were incubated with NH4Cl (0, .31, .63, and 1.25 mM) and (or) propionate (0, .31, .63, and 1.25 mM) in the presence of either 1.25 mM L-[15N]alanine or 1.25 mM L-alanine plus 18.5 kBq of L-[1-14C]alanine. Feeding dietary urea did not affect [1-14C]alanine oxidation to 14CO2 (P = .601), or its conversion to [14C]glucose (P = .576) by isolated hepatocytes. Increasing in vitro concentrations of NH4Cl and propionate between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced [1-14C]alanine oxidation to 14CO2 (P < .001). Increasing NH4Cl concentration between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced [1-14C]alanine conversion to [14C]glucose in isolated hepatocytes (P < .001), whereas addition of propionate between 0 and 1.25 mM stimulated production of [14C]glucose from [1-14C]alanine (P < .001). Feeding urea did not affect in vitro rates of total urea production (P = .655) but increased the production of [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea (P < .05). Addition of NH4Cl increased total urea, [14N15N]urea, and [15N15N]urea production (P < .001), but reduced 15N isotopic enrichments of [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea (P < .001). Increasing propionate concentration between 0 and 1.25 mM reduced total urea production (P < .001), but [14N15N]urea and [15N15N]urea production was reduced only at 1.25 mM propionate (P < .001). We conclude that NH3 detoxification by isolated sheep hepatocytes increases amino acid deamination and this might have implications for nitrogen retention in ruminants consuming diets that promote considerable NH3 absorption from the digestive tract.

  17. Variation in δ(15) N and δ(13) C values of forages for Arctic caribou: effects of location, phenology and simulated digestion.

    PubMed

    Vansomeren, Lindsay L; Barboza, Perry S; Gustine, David D; Syndonia Bret-Harte, M

    2017-05-15

    The use of stable isotopes for dietary estimates of wildlife assumes that there are consistent differences in isotopic ratios among diet items, and that the differences in these ratios between the diet item and the animal tissues (i.e., fractionation) are predictable. However, variation in isotopic ratios and fractionation of δ(13) C and δ(15) N values among locations, seasons, and forages are poorly described for arctic herbivores especially migratory species such as caribou (Rangifer tarandus). We measured the δ(13) C and δ(15) N values of seven species of forage growing along a 200-km transect through the range of the Central Arctic caribou herd on the North Slope of Alaska over 2 years. We compared forages available at the beginning (May; n = 175) and the end (n = 157) of the growing season (September). Purified enzymes were used to measure N digestibility and to assess isotopic fractionation in response to nutrient digestibility during simulated digestion. Values for δ(13) C declined by 1.38 ‰ with increasing latitude across the transect, and increased by 0.44 ‰ from the beginning to the end of the season. The range of values for δ(15) N was greater than that for δ(13) C (13.29 vs 5.60 ‰). Differences in values for δ(13) C between graminoids (Eriophorum and Carex spp.) and shrubs (Betula and Salix spp.) were small but δ(15) N values distinguished graminoids (1.87 ± 1.02 ‰) from shrubs (-2.87 ± 2.93 ‰) consistently across season and latitude. However, undigested residues of forages were enriched in (15) N when the digestibility of N was less than 0.67. Although δ(15) N values can distinguish plant groups in the diet of arctic herbivores, variation in the digestibility of dietary items may need to be considered in applying fractionation values for (15) N to caribou and other herbivores that select highly digestible items (e.g. forbs) as well as heavily defended plants (e.g. woody browse). Published in 2017. This article is a U

  18. Food web implications of delta13C and delta15N variability over 370 km of the regulated Colorado River USA.

    PubMed

    Shannon, J P; Blinn, D W; Haden, G A; Benenati, E P; Wilson, K P

    2001-01-01

    Dual stable isotope analysis in the regulated Colorado River through Grand Canyon National Park, USA, revealed a food web that varied spatially through this arid biome. Down-river enrichment of delta13C data was detected across three trophic levels resulting in shifted food webs. Humpack chub delta13C and delta15N values from muscle plugs and fin clips did not differ significantly. Humpback chub and rainbow trout trophic position is positively correlated with standard length indicating an increase in piscivory by larger fishes. Recovery of the aquatic community from impoundment by Glen Canyon Dam and collecting refinements for stable isotope analysis within large rivers are discussed.

  19. Oak loss increases foliar nitrogen, δ(15)N and growth rates of Betula lenta in a northern temperate deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Falxa-Raymond, Nancy; Patterson, Angelica E; Schuster, William S F; Griffin, Kevin L

    2012-09-01

    Oak forests dominate much of the eastern USA, but their future is uncertain due to a number of threats and widespread failure of oak regeneration. A sudden loss of oaks (Quercus spp.) could be accompanied by major changes in forest nitrogen (N) cycles with important implications for plant nutrient uptake and tree species composition. In this study, we measured the changes in N use and growth rates of black birch trees (Betula lenta L.) following oak girdling at the Black Rock Forest in southeastern New York, USA. Data were collected from nine experimental plots composed of three treatments: 100% oaks girdled (OG), 50% oaks girdled (O50) and control (C). Foliar N concentration and foliar (15)N abundance increased significantly in the oak-girdled plots relative to the control, indicating that the loss of oaks significantly altered N cycling dynamics. As mineralization and nitrification rates increase following oak loss, black birch trees increase N absorption as indicated by higher foliar N content and increased growth rates. Foliar N concentration increased by 15.5% in the O50 and 30.6% in the OG plots relative to the control, while O50 and OG plots were enriched in (15)N by 1.08‰ and 3.33‰, respectively (P < 0.0001). A 641% increase in black birch growth rates in OG plots suggests that this species is able to respond to additional N availability and/or increased light availability. The loss of oaks and subsequent increase in black birch productivity may have a lasting impact on ecosystem form and function.

  20. Screening enoxaparin tetrasaccharide SEC fractions for 3-O-sulfo-N-sulfoglucosamine residues using [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC NMR.

    PubMed

    Beecher, Consuelo N; Manighalam, Matthew S; Nwachuku, Adanma F; Larive, Cynthia K

    2016-02-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) are important in mediating a variety of biological processes through binding to myriad different proteins. Specific structural elements along the polysaccharide chains are essential for high affinity protein binding, such as the 3-O-sulfated N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS3S) residue, a relatively rare modification essential for heparin's anticoagulant activity. The isolation of 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides from complex mixtures is challenging because of their low abundance. Although methods such as affinity chromatography are useful in isolating oligosaccharides that bind specific proteins with high affinity, other important 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides may easily be overlooked. Screening preparative-scale size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) fractions of heparin or HS digests using [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC NMR allows the identification of fractions containing 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides through the unique (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts of the GlcNS3S residue. Those SEC fractions containing 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides can then be isolated using strong anion-exchange (SAX)-HPLC. Compared with the results obtained by pooling the fractions comprising a given SEC peak, SAX-HPLC analysis of individual SEC fractions produces a less complicated chromatogram in which the 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides are enriched relative to more abundant components. The utility of this approach is demonstrated for tetrasaccharide SEC fractions of the low molecular weight heparin drug enoxaparin facilitating the isolation and characterization of an unsaturated 3-O-sulfated tetrasaccharide containing a portion of the antithrombin-III binding sequence.

  1. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  2. The effects of preservation methods, dyes and acidification on the isotopic values (δ15N and δ13C) of two zooplankton species from the KwaZulu-Natal Bight, South Africa.

    PubMed

    de Lecea, Ander M; Cooper, Rachel; Omarjee, Aadila; Smit, Albertus J

    2011-07-15

    Stable isotope measurements are an important tool for ecosystem trophic linkage studies. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but in many cases organisms must be preserved and analysed later. In some cases dyes must be used to help distinguish organisms from detritus. Since preservatives and dyes are carbon-based, their addition could influence isotopic readings. This study aims to improve understanding of the effects of sample storage method, dye addition and acidification on the δ(15)N and δ(13)C values of zooplankton (Euphasia frigida and Undinula vulgaris). Zooplankton was collected and preserved by freezing, or by the addition of 5% formalin, 70% ethanol, or 5% formalin with added Phloxine B or Rose Bengal, and stored for 1 month before processing. Samples in 5% formalin and 70% ethanol were also kept and processed after 3 and 9 months to study changes over time. Formalin caused the largest enrichment for δ(13)C and a slight enrichment for δ(15)N, while ethanol produced a slight depletion for δ(13)C, and different effects on δ(15)N depending on the species. In formalin, dyes depleted the δ(13)C values, but had variable effects on δ(15)N, relative to formalin alone. Acidification had no significant effect on δ(15)N or δ(13)C for either species. Long-term storage showed that the effects of the preservatives were species-dependent. Although the effects on δ(15)N varied, a relative enrichment in (13)C of samples occurred with time. This can have important consequences for the understanding of the organic flow within a food web and for trophic studies. .

  3. The Five-Year Fate of a 15N Tracer in a Mixed Deciduous Forest: Retention, Redistribution, and Differences by Mycorrhizal Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodale, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of nitrogen deposition on forest ecosystems depends in large part on its fate: uptake by trees can stimulate growth, while gaseous or leaching losses contribute to air and water pollution and represent the loss of a limiting nutrient. Past tracer studies have shown that soils dominate the short-term fate of added 15N, but its longer-term term fate remains uncertain. This study examined how much 15N tracer moved plant or soil pools or was lost over 5-6 years. In 2007, a 15N tracer (0.21 kg/ha as 99% enriched 15N-KNO3) was added to 0.25 ha mixed hardwood forest in central NY. All of the tracer was recovered in the days after its addition, but recovery fell to 78% by the end of this year (25% surface litter, 48% 0-10 cm soil, 5% roots). One year later, recovery in these pools fell (to 51%), with losses from surface litter (-11%) and the 0-10 cm soils (-15%), including losses from the "heavy" soil fraction. Additional tracer moved to other plant pools (+5%) and to deeper soil (+13%; up to 30 cm), for a total recovery of 69% of the added tracer. Between years 1 and 5-6, only total tracer recovery decreased by only 1.4%. Recovery decreased in foliage (-0.2%), all roots (-3.5%), and surface litter (-9.8%), while increasing in woody biomass (+0.9%), 0-10 cm soil (+8.9%), and deep soil (+2.3%; up to 50 cm). Tracer recovery in live and dead plant N pools (11%) did not change, as 3% moved from roots into aboveground plant tissues and 3% moved from live plant pools into leaf litter; these results imply no net transfer of 15N from soil to plants during this period. Over all 5-6 years, only 1.6% of the tracer moved into bark or wood, a small but important sink because of its high C:N ratio; however, roughly one-third of this total was in wood formed prior to the start of the tracer addition. Tree species differed in their recovery of 15N: the six species with ectomycorrhizal associations showed more enrichment than the four species with arbuscular mycorrhizae. It is

  4. Rivermouth Alteration of Agricultural Impacts on Consumer Tissue δ15N

    PubMed Central

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jon M.; Nelson, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the ‘rivermouth effect’). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models. PMID:23935980

  5. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ(15)N.

    PubMed

    Larson, James H; Richardson, William B; Vallazza, Jon M; Nelson, John C

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ(15)N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ(15)N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ(15)N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ(15)N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the 'rivermouth effect'). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ(15)N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  6. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ15N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Nelson, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the ‘rivermouth effect’). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  7. Organically treated biochar increases plant production and reduces N2O emissions: mechanistic insights by 15N tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Claudia; Messerschmidt, Nicole; Clough, Tim; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Marhan, Sven; Koyro, Hans-Werner; Steffens, Diedrich; Müller, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (biochar) offers considerable potential for carbon capture and soil storage (CCSS) compared to other, less recalcitrant soil-C additives. Recent meta-analysis demonstrated that it can significantly reduce agricultural N2O emissions. Freshly produced biochars, however, do not always have yield-improving effects, i.e. there is no immediate economic incentive for using it. Hence, combining biochar with organic nutrient-rich amendments may be a promising agricultural strategy to accelerate CCSS, but it is unclear if biochar still reduces N2O emissions, in particular when it may act as nutrient carrier. We explored the potential of biochar to improve the GHG-cost/yield ratio and thereby its socio-economic value as soil amendment in two subsequent studies under controlled conditions: (1) A proof-of-concept study where the effects of untreated biochar were compared to those of co-composted biochar combined with stepwise improved nutritional regimes (+/- compost; +/- mineral-N application), and (2) a 15N-labeling-tracing study to unravel N exchange on biochar particles and N2O production and reduction mechanisms. Both studies were carried out in nutrient-poor sandy soils, the most likely initial target soils for biochar-CCSS strategies. While the untreated biochar reduced plant growth under N-limiting conditions, or at best did not reduce it, the co-composted biochar always significantly stimulated plant growth. The relative stimulation was largest with the lowest nutrient additions (305% versus 61% of control with untreated biochar). Electro-ultra-filtration analyses revealed that the co-composted but not the untreated biochar carried considerable amounts of easily extractable as well as more strongly sorbed plant nutrients, in particular nitrate and phosphorus. The subsequent 15N labelling-tracing study revealed that the co-composted biochar still (i) acted as a mineral-N exchange site for nitrate and ammonium despite its N-preloading, (ii) reduced N2O

  8. Ecological functions provided by dung beetles are interlinked across space and time: evidence from (15) N isotope tracing.

    PubMed

    Nervo, Beatrice; Caprio, Enrico; Celi, Luisella; Lonati, Michele; Lombardi, Giampiero; Falsone, Gloria; Iussig, Gabriele; Palestrini, Claudia; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Rolando, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Maintaining multiple ecological functions ("multifunctionality") is crucial to sustain viable ecosystems. To date most studies on biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) have focused on single or few ecological functions and services. However, there is a critical need to evaluate how species and species assemblages affect multiple processes at the same time, and how these functions are interconnected. Dung beetles represent excellent model organisms because they are key contributors to several ecosystem functions. Using a novel method based on the application of (15) N-enriched dung in a mesocosm field experiment, we assessed the role of dung beetles in regulating multiple aspects of nutrient cycling in alpine pastures over appropriate spatial (up to a soil depth of 20 cm) and temporal (up to 1 yr after dung application) scales. (15) N isotope tracing allowed the evaluation of multiple interrelated ecosystem functions responsible for the cycling of dung-derived nitrogen (DDN) in the soil and vegetation. We also resolved the role of functional group identity and the importance of interactions among co-occurring species for sustaining multiple functions by focusing on two different dung beetle nesting strategies (tunnelers and dwellers). Species interactions were studied by contrasting mixed-species to single-species assemblages, and asking whether the former performed multiple functions better than the latter. Dung beetles influenced at least seven ecological functions by facilitating dung removal, transport of DDN into the soil, microbial ammonification and nitrification processes, uptake of DDN by plants, herbage growth, and changes in botanical composition. Tunnelers and dwellers were found to be similarly efficient for most functions, with differences based on the spatial and temporal scales over which the functions operated. Although mixed-species assemblages seemed to perform better than single-species, this outcome may be dependent on the context. Most

  9. Stable Isotope Evidence for Abiotic Ammonium Production in the Hydrothermal Vent Fluids from the Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charoenpong, C.; Wankel, S. D.; Seewald, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Rise hosts the world's deepest (up to 4,987 meters) hydrothermal vent field, Piccard. Under the tremendous pressure, the vent fluid from Piccard can be as hot as 398°C. Here, the concentration of ammonium (35 μmol/kg) is much higher than that of the bottom water nitrate (22 μmol/kg). The undetectable nitrate in the vent fluid suggests that nitrate is completely reduced to ammonium in the reaction zone and there has to be an additional source for ammonium production. Because Piccard is unsedimented (i.e., lacking significant sedimentary organic matter), the other possible source of ammonium is the reduction of nitrogen gas (N2). We demonstrated that the isotopic composition of ammonium15N-NH4+) for the Piccard vent fluid end-member (3.4 ± 0.1 ‰) supports the mixing between two ammonium sources: the reduction of nitrate and the reduction of N2. However, at Von Damm, shallower depth (up to 2,300 meters) causes the vent fluid to be relatively cooler (138°C) compared to Piccard and it is very likely that the reduction of nitrate is the only source of ammonium in the vent fluid. Studying the vent fluids from these sites where the temperatures are well above the upper limit for life can be useful in assessing the conditions and abiotic processes that might have given rise to the ammonium production in the early prebiotic ocean.

  10. Pathways of glutamine metabolism in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells: evidence for the presence of the nitrogen assimilation system, and a metabolic switch by 1H/15N NMR.

    PubMed

    Drews, M; Doverskog, M; Ohman, L; Chapman, B E; Jacobsson, U; Kuchel, P W; Häggström, L

    2000-02-28

    1H/15N and 13C NMR were used to investigate metabolism in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. Labelled substrates ([2-15N]glutamine, [5-15N]glutamine, [2-15N]glutamate, 15NH4Cl, [2-15N]alanine, and [1-13C]glucose) were added to batch cultures and the concentration of labelled excreted metabolites (alanine, NH4+, glutamine, glycerol, and lactate) were quantified. Cultures with excess glucose and glutamine produce alanine as the main metabolic by-product while no ammonium ions are released. 1H/15N NMR data showed that both the amide and amine-nitrogen of glutamine was incorporated into alanine in these cultures. The amide-nitrogen of glutamine was not transferred to the amine-position in glutamate (for further transamination to alanine) via free NH4+ but directly via an azaserine inhibitable amido-transfer reaction. In glutamine-free media 15NH4+ was consumed and incorporated into alanine. 15NH4+ was also incorporated into the amide-position of glutamine synthesised by the cells. These data suggest that the nitrogen assimilation system, glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT), is active in glutamine-deprived cells. In cultures devoid of glucose, ammonium is the main metabolic by-product while no alanine is formed. The ammonium ions stem both from the amide and amine-nitrogen of glutamine, most likely via glutaminase and glutamate dehydrogenase. 13C NMR revealed that the [1-13C] label from glucose appeared in glycerol, alanine, lactate, and in extracellular glutamine. Labelling data also showed that intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were recycled to glycolysis and that carbon sources, other than glucose-derived acetylCoA, entered the cycle. Furthermore, Sf9 cell cultures excreted significant amounts glycerol (1.9-3.2 mM) and ethanol (6 mM), thus highlighting the importance of sinks for reducing equivalents in maintaining the cytosolic redox balance.

  11. 3D 15N/15N/1H chemical shift correlation experiment utilizing an RFDR-based 1H/1H mixing period at 100 kHz MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yusuke; Malon, Michal; Ishii, Yuji; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Homonuclear correlation NMR experiments are commonly used in the high-resolution structural studies of proteins. While 13C/13C chemical shift correlation experiments utilizing dipolar recoupling techniques are fully utilized under MAS, correlation of the chemical shifts of 15N nuclei in proteins has been a challenge. Previous studies have shown that the negligible 15N-15N dipolar coupling in peptides or proteins necessitates the use of a very long mixing time (typically several seconds) for effective spin diffusion to occur and considerably slows down a 15N/15N correlation experiment. In this study, we show that the use of mixing proton magnetization, instead of 15N, via the recoupled 1H-1H dipolar couplings enable faster 15N/15N correlation. In addition, the use of proton-detection under ultrafast MAS overcomes the sensitivity loss due to multiple magnetization transfer (between 1H and 15N nuclei) steps. In fact, less than 300 nL (∼1.1 micromole quantity) sample is sufficient to acquire the 3D spectrum within 5 h. Our results also demonstrate that a 3D 15N/15N/1H experiment can render higher resolution spectra that will be useful in the structural studies of proteins at ultrafast MAS frequencies. 3D 15N/15N/1H and 2D radio frequency-driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR)-based 1H/1H experimental results obtained from a powder sample of N-acetyla-L-15N-valyl-L-15N-leucine at 70 and 100 kHz MAS frequencies are presented.

  12. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  13. (15)N-nitrate and (34)S-sulfate isotopic fractionation reflects electron acceptor 'recycling' during hydrocarbon biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kern, Martin; Watzinger, Andrea; Scherr, Kerstin E

    2017-09-25

    The analysis of stable carbon isotopes for the assessment of contaminant fate in the aquifer is impeded in the case of petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) by their chain length. Alternatively, the coupled nitrogen-sulfur-carbon cycles involved into TPH biodegradation under sulfate- and nitrate reducing conditions can be investigated using nitrogen (δ(15)N) and sulfur (δ(34)S) isotopic shifts in terminal electron acceptors (TEA) involved in anaerobic TPH oxidation. Biodegradation of a paraffin-rich crude oil was studied in anaerobic aquifer microcosms with nitrate (NIT), sulfate (SUL), nitrate plus sulfate (MIX) and nitrate under sulfate reduction suppression by molybdate (MOL) as TEA. After 8 months, TPH biodegradation was not different (around 33%) in experiments receiving only nitrate (NIT, MOL) versus under mixed TEA-conditions (MIX), despite higher biodiversity under mixed conditions (H'NIT and H'MOL≈5.9, H'MIX=8.0). Molybdate addition effected higher nitrate depletion, possibly by increasing the production of nitrate reductase. Additional sulfate depletion under mixed conditions suggested bioconversion of polar intermediates. Microcosms only receiving sulfate (SUL) showed no significant TEA and TPH decrease. A Rayleigh kinetic isotope enrichment model for isotopic (15)N/(14)N and (34)S/(32)S shifts in residual TEA gave apparent enrichment factors ɛN,NIT and ɛN,MOL values of -16.7 to -18.0‰ for nitrate as sole TEA and ɛN,MIX of -6.0‰ and ɛS,MIX of -4.1‰ under mixed electron accepting conditions. The low isotopic fractionation under mixed terminal electron accepting conditions was attributed to lithotrophic, sulfide-dependent denitrification by Thiobacillus species, while it was hypothesized that Desulfovibrio replenished the reduced sulfur pool via oxidation of polar hydrocarbon metabolites. Concurrently, organotrophic denitrification was performed by Pseudomonas species, with isotopic fractionation expressed by ɛN,MIX representing the superposition of

  14. Molecular and Stable Isotope Investigation of Nitrite Respiring Bacterial Communities Capable of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) and Denitrifying Anaerobic Methane Oxidation (DAMO) in Nitrogen Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Hirsch, M.; Taylor, J.; Smith, R. L.; Repert, D.; Tobias, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) and denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) are two recently discovered N2 production pathways in the microbial nitrogen cycle. ANAMMOX has been relatively well investigated in various aquatic ecosystems, while DAMO has been examined only in freshwater wetlands. However, neither ANAMMOX nor DAMO have been studied in groundwater ecosystems as microbial N removal processes where they could compliment or compete with denitrification to remediate N contaminated aquifers. Thus, we conducted molecular and stable isotope analyses to detect and measure ANAMMOX and DAMO in a nitrogen contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The study site has a plume of nitrogen contaminated groundwater as a result of continuous discharge of treated wastewater over 60 years. Groundwater was collected from multiport sampling devices installed at two sites, near the waste-water disposal location (A) and more than 3 km down gradient (B) along the contamination plume. Biomass was collected from water samples for DNA extraction and 15N tracer incubation experiments. PCR with specific 16S rRNA gene primers detected the presence of ANAMMOX and DAMO bacteria at both sites. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the ANAMMOX community at site A was most associated with Kuenenia spp. while site B had a community more closely related to Brocadia spp. The DAMO communities at the two sites were quite different based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The communities at site B are closely associated with Candidatus “Methylomirabilis oxyfera”, which is the first enriched DAMO culture. Most of the 16S rRNA sequences detected in site A were related to those found in other DAMO enrichment cultures established from a eutrophic ditch sediment. In order to determine active members of ANAMMOX communities, the transcriptional expression of hydrazine oxidase (hzo) and hydrazine hydrolase (hh) genes was examined at both sites. In addition, 15N tracer

  15. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  16. Derivatives of pyrazinecarboxylic acid: 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Wolfgang; Eller, Gernot A; Datterl, Barbara; Habicht, Daniela

    2009-07-01

    NMR spectroscopic studies are undertaken with derivatives of 2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid. Complete and unambiguous assignment of chemical shifts ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N) and coupling constants ((1)H,(1)H; (13)C,(1)H; (15)N,(1)H) is achieved by combined application of various 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques. Unequivocal mapping of (13)C,(1)H spin coupling constants is accomplished by 2D (delta,J) long-range INEPT spectra with selective excitation. Phenomena such as the tautomerism of 3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid are discussed.

  17. Reactions, characterization and uptake of ammoxidized kraft lignin labeled with 15N.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, F; Varela, G; Delgado, E; López-Dellamary, F; Zúñiga, V; González, V; Faix, O; Meier, D

    2007-05-01

    Ammoxidation of kraft lignin was carried out in a Parr reactor using (15)NH(3) as the main nitrogen source. Reaction parameters were set up until a total nitrogen content of approximately 13 wt.% in lignin was achieved, in accordance with conditions of previous studies. Analytical tools such as FTIR, Py-GC/MS, and solid state NMR were used in this research. The nature of nitrogen bondings is discussed. The incorporation of the (15)N from ammoxidized lignin was followed in pumpkins (Zucchini cucurbita pepo L.) by means of (15)N emission spectroscopy.

  18. The role of electrostatic interactions and solvent polarity on the 15N NMR shielding of azines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Gester, Rodrigo M.; Manzoni, Vinícius

    2017-10-01

    The nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance (15N NMR) shielding of azines is very sensitive to the chemical environment. Theoretically, specific interactions are important on the calculation of their spectroscopic properties. However, the choice of the solvent model for the description of NMR shielding constants is still a subject of discussion. In this context, we analyse the role of electrostatic interactions on 15N NMR shielding as function of solvent polarity using the sequential-Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics approach methodology. Excellent agreement with experimental data of the NMR shielding was obtained without the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules either for polar or non polar solvents.

  19. Benzylic Ammonium Ylide Mediated Epoxidations

    PubMed Central

    Roiser, Lukas; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-01-01

    A high yielding synthesis of stilbene oxides using ammonium ylides has been developed. It turned out that the amine leaving group plays a crucial role as trimethylamine gives higher yields than DABCO or quinuclidine. The amine group also influences the diastereoselectivity, and detailed DFT calculations to understand the key parameters of these reactions have been carried out. PMID:27766017

  20. Inoculation of Bacillus sphaericus UPMB-10 to Young Oil Palm and Measurement of Its Uptake of Fixed Nitrogen Using the 15N Isotope Dilution Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zakry, Fitri Abdul Aziz; Shamsuddin, Zulkifli H.; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Zakaria, Zin Zawawi; Rahim, Anuar Abdul

    2012-01-01

    There are increasing applications of diazotrophic rhizobacteria in the sustainable agriculture system. A field experiment on young immature oil palm was conducted to quantify the uptake of N derived from N2 fixation by the diazotroph Bacillus sphaericus strain UPMB-10, using the 15N isotope dilution method. Eight months after 15N application, young immature oil palms that received 67% of standard N fertilizer application together with B. sphaericus inoculation had significantly lower 15N enrichment than uninoculated palms that received similar N fertilizers. The dilution of labeled N served as a marker for the occurrence of biological N2 fixation. The proportion of N uptake that was derived from the atmosphere was estimated as 63% on the whole plant basis. The inoculation process increased the N and dry matter yields of the palm leaflets and rachis significantly. Field planting of young, immature oil palm in soil inoculated with B. sphaericus UPMB-10 might mitigate inorganic fertilizer-N application through supplementation by biological nitrogen fixation. This could be a new and important source of nitrogen biofertilizer in the early phase of oil palm cultivation in the field. PMID:22446306

  1. Coupling Sap Flow Velocity and Amino Acid Concentrations as an Alternative Method to 15N Labeling for Quantifying Nitrogen Remobilization by Walnut Trees1

    PubMed Central

    Frak, Ela; Millard, Peter; Le Roux, Xavier; Guillaumie, Sabine; Wendler, Renate

    2002-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of N remobilization was studied in walnut (Juglans nigra × regia) trees growing in sand culture. Trees were fed with labeled N (15N) during 1999 and unlabeled N in 2000. Total N and 15N contents in different tree compartments were measured during 80 d after bud burst and were used to estimate N remobilization for spring growth. The seasonal (and occasionally diurnal) dynamics of the concentration and 15N enrichment of the major amino acids in xylem sap were determined concurrently. Sap flow velocity was also measured for sample trees. A new approach coupling amino acid concentrations to sap flow velocity for quantifying N remobilization was tested. A decrease of the labeled N contents of medium roots, tap roots, and trunk was observed concurrently to the increase in the labeled N content of new shoots. Remobilized N represented from previous year storage 54% of N recovered in new shoots. Arginine, citruline, γ-amino butyric acid, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid always represented around 80% of total amino acid and amide N in xylem sap and exhibited specific seasonal trends and significant diurnal trends. N translocation was mainly insured by arginine during the first 15 d after bud burst, and then by glutamic acid and citruline. The pattern of N remobilization estimated by the new approach was consistent with that measured by the classical labeling technique. Implications for quantifying N remobilization for large, field-growing trees are discussed. PMID:12376667

  2. Robust and low cost uniform (15)N-labeling of proteins expressed in Drosophila S2 cells and Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells for NMR applications.

    PubMed

    Meola, Annalisa; Deville, Célia; Jeffers, Scott A; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Vasiliauskaite, Ieva; Sizun, Christina; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Malosse, Christian; van Heijenoort, Carine; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Krey, Thomas; Guittet, Eric; Pêtres, Stéphane; Rey, Félix A; Bontems, François

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool to study structural and functional properties of proteins, provided that they can be enriched in stable isotopes such as (15)N, (13)C and (2)H. This is usually easy and inexpensive when the proteins are expressed in Escherichiacoli, but many eukaryotic (human in particular) proteins cannot be produced this way. An alternative is to express them in insect cells. Labeled insect cell growth media are commercially available but at prohibitive prices, limiting the NMR studies to only a subset of biologically important proteins. Non-commercial solutions from academic institutions have been proposed, but none of them is really satisfying. We have developed a (15)N-labeling procedure based on the use of a commercial medium depleted of all amino acids and supplemented with a (15)N-labeled yeast autolysate for a total cost about five times lower than that of the currently available solutions. We have applied our procedure to the production of a non-polymerizable mutant of actin in Sf9 cells and of fragments of eukaryotic and viral membrane fusion proteins in S2 cells, which typically cannot be produced in E. coli, with production yields comparable to those obtained with standard commercial media. Our results support, in particular, the putative limits of a self-folding domain within a viral glycoprotein of unknown structure.

  3. Intraspecific variation in hair delta(13)C and delta(15)N values of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) with known individual histories, behavior, and feeding ecology.

    PubMed

    Loudon, James E; Sponheimer, Matt; Sauther, Michelle L; Cuozzo, Frank P

    2007-07-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions were analyzed from hair samples of 30 sympatric ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) inhabiting the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar. All lemurs were known individuals involved in a longitudinal study, which allowed us to explore the degree to which group membership, sex, health status, and migration influenced their stable isotope compositions. The differences in delta(13)C and delta(15)N values between groups were small (<1.5 per thousand) but highly significant. In fact, each group was tightly clustered, and discriminant function analysis of the stable isotope data assigned individuals to the group in which they were originally collared with over 90% accuracy. In general, the differences between groups reflected the degree to which they utilized forested versus open habitats. As open habitats at Beza Mahafaly often correspond to areas of anthropogenic disturbance, these data suggest that isotopic data can be useful for addressing questions of lemur conservation. There were few sex differences, but significant differences did occur between individuals of normal and suboptimal health, with those in poor health (especially those in the worst condition) being enriched in (15)N and to a lesser degree (13)C compared with healthy individuals. Moreover, lemurs that had emigrated between 2003 and 2004 had different delta(13)C and delta(15)N compositions than their original groups. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Coupling sap flow velocity and amino acid concentrations as an alternative method to (15)N labeling for quantifying nitrogen remobilization by walnut trees.

    PubMed

    Frak, Ela; Millard, Peter; Le Roux, Xavier; Guillaumie, Sabine; Wendler, Renate

    2002-10-01

    The temporal dynamics of N remobilization was studied in walnut (Juglans nigra x regia) trees growing in sand culture. Trees were fed with labeled N ((15)N) during 1999 and unlabeled N in 2000. Total N and (15)N contents in different tree compartments were measured during 80 d after bud burst and were used to estimate N remobilization for spring growth. The seasonal (and occasionally diurnal) dynamics of the concentration and (15)N enrichment of the major amino acids in xylem sap were determined concurrently. Sap flow velocity was also measured for sample trees. A new approach coupling amino acid concentrations to sap flow velocity for quantifying N remobilization was tested. A decrease of the labeled N contents of medium roots, tap roots, and trunk was observed concurrently to the increase in the labeled N content of new shoots. Remobilized N represented from previous year storage 54% of N recovered in new shoots. Arginine, citruline, gamma-amino butyric acid, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid always represented around 80% of total amino acid and amide N in xylem sap and exhibited specific seasonal trends and significant diurnal trends. N translocation was mainly insured by arginine during the first 15 d after bud burst, and then by glutamic acid and citruline. The pattern of N remobilization estimated by the new approach was consistent with that measured by the classical labeling technique. Implications for quantifying N remobilization for large, field-growing trees are discussed.

  5. Is δ15N of sedimentary organic matter a good proxy for paleodenitrification in coastal waters of the eastern Arabian Sea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnihotri, Rajesh; Naqvi, S. Wajih A.; Kurian, Siby; Altabet, Mark A.; Bratton, J. F.

    We compared recently published sedimentary records of δ15N from several coastal areas affected by both natural and anthropogenically produced shallow hypoxia with the objective of testing this as a proxy for denitrification in coastal settings. We examined the eastern boundary systems of continental shelves off western India and Peru, which appear to be experiencing intensification of bottom-water oxygen depletion, most likely as a consequence of intensification of eastern boundary coastal upwelling over the last few decades. In systems that are significantly affected by an enhanced inventory of nutrients from organic matter in soils due to continental erosion following colonial land clearing (e.g., Chesapeake Bay), fertilizer and wastewater runoff (e.g., western Indian shelf and Long Island Sound), the productivity increase is largely local and induced by anthropogenic activity. The western Indian shelf thus experiences a double effect, being both an upwelling zone and prone to nutrient enrichment from land. While in other regions of both natural and anthropogenic bottom-water hypoxia, sedimentary δ15N has undergone significant increases over the Anthropocene; in the eastern Arabian Sea, an opposite trend is noticed despite historical water-column measurements revealing a contemporaneous intensification of denitrification. Plausible causes are discussed here in detail, which led us to conclude that the sedimentary δ15N may not always work as a reliable proxy of denitrification in coastal regions.

  6. δ 13C and δ 15N biogeographic trends in rocky intertidal communities along the coast of South Africa: Evidence of strong environmental signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Jaclyn M.; McQuaid, Christopher D.

    2008-11-01

    Ecosystem dynamics driven by top-down controls have been well documented in rocky intertidal communities, while the effects of bottom-up influences are comparatively poorly understood. We hypothesized that large-scale signatures of the physical environment may be identifiable along the South African coastline as it is subject to two very different current systems (Benguela and Agulhas Currents) that profoundly influence primary production and thus both food type and availability. Through stable isotope analysis, we examined biogeographic patterns in multiple trophic levels at four sites along a 1400-km stretch of South African coastline and investigated the dietary role of macroalgal-derived organic carbon in rocky intertidal communities. The general positioning of trophic groups was comparable across all sites, with animals from the same trophic levels grouping together and with a δ 15N fractionation of 1-2‰ between levels. The species found at all sites demonstrated east-west δ 15N enrichment, presumably reflecting a biogeographic shift in nitrogen sources linked to upwelling on the west coast. Filter-feeders gave particularly clear results. Using discriminant analysis, mussels could be categorized into four geographic groups based on carbon and nitrogen signatures: east coast, southeast coast, south-west coast and west coast. Barnacles and polychaetes showed similar geographic groupings to mussels, but with shifts in actual values (1‰ depletion in δ 13C and 3‰ enrichment in δ 15N relative to mussels). This suggests that fractionation varies between species within a trophic level. IsoSource models showed that Ulva sp. made large contributions to the diets of two microalgal grazers ( Siphonaria capensis and Scutellastra granularis) and this dietary dependence increased when moving from west to east coast, along the shoreline. Additionally, IsoSource models determined that relative to phytoplankton, macroalgae accounted for upwards of 60% of suspended

  7. Determination of the mutual orientation of the 15N and 13C NMR chemical shift tensors of 13- 15N double labeled model peptides for silk fibroin from the dipolar-coupled powder patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Yamazaki, Yasunobu; Seng, Koo Wey; Demura, Makoto

    1998-05-01

    The 15N and 13C chemical shift tensors, and the orientation of the principal axis system relative to the molecular symmetry axes were determined for 15N and 13C carbonyl carbon sites of 13C 15N double labeled model peptides for Bombyx mori silk fibroin, that is, Boc-[1- 13C]Ala[ 15N]Gly-OMe, Boc-[1- 13C]Ala[ 15N]GlyAlaGly-OPac, Boc-AlaGly[1- 13C]Ala[ 15N]GlyAlaGly-OPac, Boc-[1- 13C]Gly[ 15N]AlaGlyAla-OPac, Boc-GlyAla[1- 13C]Gly[ 15N]AlaGlyAla-OPac and Boc-[1- 13C]Gly[ 15N]ValGlyAla-OPac, where Boc is t-butoxycarbonyl, OMe is methyl ester, OPac is phenacyl ester, Ala is alanine, Gly is glycine and Val is valine. From the comparisons of the 15N chemical shift tensors and the orientations of the principal axis system relative to the molecular symmetry axes among three compounds having [1- 13C]Ala[ 15N]Gly units, it is concluded that the intermolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding are different between Boc-[1- 13C]Ala[ 15N]Gly-OMe and two compounds, Boc-[1- 13C]Ala[ 15N]GlyAlaGly-OPac and Boc-AlaGly[1- 13C]Ala[ 15N]GlyAlaGly-OPac although the latter two compounds have similar structures. A similar conclusion has also been obtained from the 13C chemical shift tensors of these compounds.

  8. 21 CFR 582.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1139 Ammonium hydroxide. (a) Product. Ammonium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1137 Ammonium carbonate. (a) Product. Ammonium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1135 Ammonium bicarbonate. (a) Product. Ammonium bicarbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing or feeding practice. ...

  12. 76 FR 62311 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... to best notify agents (AN Agents) when ammonium nitrate purchasers (AN Purchasers) submit those AN... directly to ammonium nitrate sellers (AN Sellers) when it is not possible for an AN Seller to verify the...

  13. (Ferrocenylmeth­yl)trimethyl­ammonium perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Chun

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title complex, [Fe(C5H5)(C9H15N)]ClO4, contains one discrete (ferrocenylmeth­yl)trimethyl­ammonium cation and one perchlorate anion. The anion is disordered over two sets of sites, with refined occupancies of 0.776 (8) and 0.224 (8). The distances from the Fe atom to the centroids of the unsubstituted and substituted cyclo­penta­dienyl (Cp) rings are 1.650 (1) and 1.640 (1) Å, respectively. The Cp rings form a dihedral angle of 2.66 (3)°. PMID:22346865

  14. Source apportionment of ammonium and nitrate ion using nitrogen stable isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, H.

    2013-12-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM), defined to particle size as 100 % cut-off aerodynamic diameter at 10 μm, has adverse effects on human health. In these years, stable isotope ratio of small sample volume can be analyzed high precision by isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupling with elemental analyzer. Recently some fields are using stable isotope ratio. For environmental field, it is expected such as powerful tool for source identification and understanding mechanism. But the existed researches intended for stable nitrogen isotope (δ15N) of particulate matter have been limited. We try to analysis δ15N-ammonium15N-NH4+) and nitrate (δ15N-NO3-) of SPM, to estimate source of NH4+ and NO3- of SPM. Average δ15N-NH4+ and δ15N-NO3- of SPM in Akita prefecture, Japan were 15.9 ‰ (1.3‰ to 38.5 ‰) and - 0.7 ‰ (-4.6 ‰ to 4.8 ‰), respectively. Although δ15N-NH4+ do not show seasonal trend, δ15N-NO3- increased in winter markedly and decreasing in summer. In generally, the dominant origin of NO3- of SPM is produced from NOx emitted by combustion of some fuel and NO by agriculture source. Heaton (1990) summarized that δ15N-NOx is very different by temperature of combustion. They insisted that δ15N-NOx values are between -13 ‰ to -2 ‰ over 2000 °C (e.g. vehicle engine) and 6 ‰ to 13 ‰ under 1300 °C (e.g. coal combustion). Therefore, the reason of the winter high trend in this study might be combustion process such as coal combustion source. Moreover, the baseline might be made by vehicle sources. In addition, the reason of decreasing in summer seemed to be affected very low δ15N-NO of fertilizer and urea indicated by Li and Wang (2008). Bacteria were activated in summer, and NO from fertilizer and urea was emitted. This summary seemed to be very reasonable.

  15. Stellar Origins of C-13 and N-15-Enriched Presolar SiC Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O’D.; Wang, Jianhua; Pignatari, Marco; Jose, Jordi; Nguyen, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Extreme excesses of 13 C ( C (12 C/ 13 C<10) and 15 N ( N (14 N/ 15 N< 20) in rare presolar SiC 20) in rare presolar SiClar SiC grains have been considered diagnostic of an origin in classical novae [1], though an origin in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) has also been proposed [2]. We report multi-element isotopic data for 19 13 C- and 15 N-enriched presolar SiC grains(12 C/13 C<16 and 14 N/ 15 N<150) from an acid resistant residue of the Murchison meteorite. These grains are enriched in 13 C and15 N, but with quite diverse Si isotopic signatures. Four grains with isotopic signatures. Four grains with isotopic signatures. Four grains with isotopic signatures. Four grains with isotopic signatures.

  16. Delta15N of soil N and plants in a N-saturated, subtropical forest of southern China.

    PubMed

    Koba, K; Isobe, K; Takebayashi, Y; Fang, Y T; Sasaki, Y; Saito, W; Yoh, M; Mo, J; Liu, L; Lu, X; Zhang, T; Zhang, W; Senoo, K

    2010-09-15

    We investigated the delta(15)N profile of N (extractable NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), and organic N (EON)) in the soil of a N-saturated subtropical forest. The order of delta(15)N in the soil was EON > NH(4)(+) > NO(3)(-). Although the delta(15)N of EON had been expected to be similar to that of bulk soil N, it was higher than that of bulk soil N by 5 per thousand. The difference in delta(15)N between bulk soil N and EON (Delta(15)N(bulk-EON)) was correlated significantly with the soil C/N ratio. This correlation implies that carbon availability, which determines the balance between N assimilation and dissimilation of soil microbes, is responsible for the high delta(15)N of EON, as in the case of soil microbial biomass delta(15)N. A thorough delta(15)N survey of available N (NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), and EON) in the soil profiles from the organic layer to 100 cm depth revealed that the delta(15)N of the available N forms did not fully overlap with the delta(15)N of plants. This mismatch in delta(15)N between that of available N and that of plants reflects apparent isotopic fractionation during N uptake by plants, emphasizing the high N availability in this N-saturated forest. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Tracing Nitrogen through Landscapes to Coastal Wetlands using d15N of Larval Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to evaluate the use of the nitrogen stable isotope value (d15N) of larval fish as an indicator of incipient anthropogenic nitrogen loading to coastal wetlands in the Great Lakes. We sampled coastal wetlands in five Lake Superior south shore tributaries that had ...

  18. 15N fractionation in star-forming regions and Solar System objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirström, E. S.; Adande, G.; Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.; Cordiner, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    We briefly review what is currently known of 14N/15N ratios in interstellar molecules. We summarize the fractionation ratios measured in HCN, HNC, CN, N2 and NH3, and compare these to theoretical predictions and to the isotopic inventory of cometary volatiles.

  19. Nitrate Removal in Two Relict Oxbow Urban Wetlands: A 15N Mass-balance Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 15N-tracer method was used to quantify nitrogen (N) removal processes in two relict oxbow wetlands located adjacent to the Minebank Run restored stream reach in Baltimore County (Maryland, USA) during summer 2009 and early spring 2010. A mass-balance approach was used to determ...

  20. Plant delta 15N correlates with the transpiration efficiency of nitrogen acquisition in tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Winter, Klaus; Turner, Benjamin L

    2009-11-01

    Based upon considerations of a theoretical model of (15)N/(14)N fractionation during steady-state nitrate uptake from soil, we hypothesized that, for plants grown in a common soil environment, whole-plant delta(15)N (deltaP) should vary as a function of the transpiration efficiency of nitrogen acquisition (F(N)/v) and the difference between deltaP and root delta(15)N (deltaP - deltaR). We tested these hypotheses with measurements of several tropical tree and liana species. Consistent with theoretical expectations, both F(N)/v and deltaP - deltaR were significant sources of variation in deltaP, and the relationship between deltaP and F(N)/v differed between non-N(2)-fixing and N(2)-fixing species. We interpret the correlation between deltaP and F(N)/v as resulting from variation in mineral nitrogen efflux-to-influx ratios across plasma membranes of root cells. These results provide a simple explanation of variation in delta(15)N of terrestrial plants and have implications for understanding nitrogen cycling in ecosystems.

  1. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  2. Using a Macroalgal δ15N Bioassay to Detect Cruise Ship Waste Water Effluent Inputs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  3. Quantifying the production of dissolved organic nitrogen in headwater streams using 15N tracer additions

    Treesearch

    Laura T. Johnson; Jennifer L. Tank; Robert O. Hall; Patrick J. Mullholland; Stephen K. Hamilton; H. Maurice Valett; Jackson R. Webster; Melody J. Bernot; William H. McDowell; Bruce J. Peterson; Suzanne M. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Most nitrogen (N) assimilation in lake and marine ecosystems is often subsequently released via autochthonous dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) production, but autochthonous DON production has yet to be quantified in flowing waters. We measured in-stream DON production following 24 h 15N-nitrate (NO3-...

  4. Regional assessment of N saturation using foliar and root δ15N

    Treesearch

    L.H. Pardo; P.H. Templer; C.L. Goodale; S. Duke; P.M. Groffman; M.B. Adams; P. Boeckx; J. Boggs; J. Campbell; B. Colman; J. Compton; B. Emmett; P. Gundersen; J. Kjonaas; G. Lovett; M. Mack; A. Magill; M. Mbila; M.J. Mitchell; G. McGee; S. McNulty; K. Nadelhoffer; S. Ollinger; D. Ross; H. Rueth; L. Rustad; P. Schaberg; S. Schiff; P. Schleppi; J. Spoelstra; W. Wessel

    2006-01-01

    N saturation induced by atmospheric N deposition can have serious consequences for forest health in many regions. In order to evaluate whether foliar δ15N may be a robust, regional-scale measure of the onset of N saturation in forest ecosystems, we assembled a large dataset on atmospheric N deposition, foliar and root δ