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Sample records for 15n metabolic labeling

  1. Automated Protein Turnover Calculations from 15N Partial Metabolic Labeling LC/MS Shotgun Proteomics Data

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, David; Castillejo, Maria Angeles; Staudinger, Christiana; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Egelhofer, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Protein turnover is a well-controlled process in which polypeptides are constantly being degraded and subsequently replaced with newly synthesized copies. Extraction of composite spectral envelopes from complex LC/MS shotgun proteomics data can be a challenging task, due to the inherent complexity of biological samples. With partial metabolic labeling experiments this complexity increases as a result of the emergence of additional isotopic peaks. Automated spectral extraction and subsequent protein turnover calculations enable the analysis of gigabytes of data within minutes, a prerequisite for systems biology high throughput studies. Here we present a fully automated method for protein turnover calculations from shotgun proteomics data. The approach enables the analysis of complex shotgun LC/MS 15N partial metabolic labeling experiments. Spectral envelopes of 1419 peptides can be extracted within an hour. The method quantifies turnover by calculating the Relative Isotope Abundance (RIA), which is defined as the ratio between the intensity sum of all heavy (15N) to the intensity sum of all light (14N) and heavy peaks. To facilitate this process, we have developed a computer program based on our method, which is freely available to download at http://promex.pph.univie.ac.at/protover. PMID:24736476

  2. Design and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber for uniform or differential, metabolic and structural, plant isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2014-01-16

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as (13)C with (15)N, (18)O or (2)H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation(1-4). From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage(5-7). The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing (13)C and (15)N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous (13)C and (15)N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%(13)C and 6.7 atom%(15)N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%(13)C and 0.56 atom%(15)N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water

  3. Design and Operation of a Continuous 13C and 15N Labeling Chamber for Uniform or Differential, Metabolic and Structural, Plant Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M. Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O or 2H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation1-4. From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage5-7. The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing 13C and 15N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%13C and 6.7 atom%15N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%13C and 0.56 atom%15N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water residual components

  4. A new approach for the comparative analysis of multiprotein complexes based on 15N metabolic labeling and quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trompelt, Kerstin; Steinbeck, Janina; Terashima, Mia; Hippler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The introduced protocol provides a tool for the analysis of multiprotein complexes in the thylakoid membrane, by revealing insights into complex composition under different conditions. In this protocol the approach is demonstrated by comparing the composition of the protein complex responsible for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, isolated from genetically different strains. The procedure comprises the isolation of thylakoid membranes, followed by their separation into multiprotein complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, SDS-PAGE, immunodetection and comparative, quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) based on differential metabolic labeling ((14)N/(15)N) of the analyzed strains. Detergent solubilized thylakoid membranes are loaded on sucrose density gradients at equal chlorophyll concentration. After ultracentrifugation, the gradients are separated into fractions, which are analyzed by mass-spectrometry based on equal volume. This approach allows the investigation of the composition within the gradient fractions and moreover to analyze the migration behavior of different proteins, especially focusing on ANR1, CAS, and PGRL1. Furthermore, this method is demonstrated by confirming the results with immunoblotting and additionally by supporting the findings from previous studies (the identification and PSI-dependent migration of proteins that were previously described to be part of the CEF-supercomplex such as PGRL1, FNR, and cyt f). Notably, this approach is applicable to address a broad range of questions for which this protocol can be adopted and e.g. used for comparative analyses of multiprotein complex composition isolated from distinct environmental conditions. PMID:24686495

  5. Metabolic labeling with stable isotope nitrogen (15N) to follow amino acid and protein turnover of three plastid proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The length of time that a protein remains available to perform its function is significantly influenced by its turnover rate. Knowing the turnover rate of proteins involved in different processes is important to determining how long a function might progress even when the stimulus has been removed and no further synthesis of the particular proteins occurs. In this article, we describe the use of 15N-metabolic labeling coupled to GC-MS to follow the turnover of free amino acids and LC-MS/MS to identify and LC-MS to follow the turnover of specific proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Results To achieve the metabolic labeling, the growth medium was formulated with standard Tris acetate phosphate medium (TAP) in which14NH4Cl was replaced with 15NH415NO3 and (14NH4)6Mo7O24.4H2O was replaced with Na2MoO4.2H2O. This medium designated 15N-TAP allowed CC-125 algal cells to grow normally. Mass isotopic distribution revealed successful 15N incorporation into 13 amino acids with approximately 98% labeling efficiency. Tryptic digestion of the 55 kDa SDS-PAGE bands from 14N- and 15N-labeled crude algal protein extracts followed by LC-MS/MS resulted in the identification of 27 proteins. Of these, five displayed peptide sequence confidence levels greater than 95% and protein sequence coverage greater than 25%. These proteins were the RuBisCo large subunit, ATP synthase CF1 alpha and beta subunits, the mitochondrial protein (F1F0 ATP synthase) and the cytosolic protein (S-adenosyl homocysteine hydroxylase). These proteins were present in both labeled and unlabeled samples. Once the newly synthesized 15N-labeled free amino acids and proteins obtained maximum incorporation of the 15N-label, turnover rates were determined after transfer of cells into 14N-TAP medium. The t½ values were determined for the three plastid proteins (RuBisCo, ATP synthase CF1 alpha and beta) by following the reduction of the 15N-fractional abundance over time. Conclusion We describe a more

  6. Heavy water and 15N labeling with NanoSIMS analysis reveals growth-rate dependent metabolic heterogeneity in chemostats

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Green-Saxena, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    To measure single cell microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns in environmental systems, we employ a new technique using stable isotope labeling of microbial populations with heavy water (a passive tracer) and 15N ammonium in combination with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry. We demonstrate simultaneous NanoSIMS analysis of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen at high spatial and mass resolution, and report calibration data linking single cell isotopic compositions to the corresponding bulk isotopic equivalents for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that heavy water is capable of quantifying in situ single cell microbial activities ranging from generational time scales of minutes to years, with only light isotopic incorporation (∼0.1 atom % 2H). Applying this approach to study the rates of fatty acid biosynthesis by single cells of S. aureus growing at different rates in chemostat culture (∼6 hours, 1 day and 2 week generation times), we observe the greatest anabolic activity diversity in the slowest growing populations. By using heavy water to constrain cellular growth activity, we can further infer the relative contributions of ammonium vs. amino acid assimilation to the cellular nitrogen pool. The approach described here can be applied to disentangle individual cell activities even in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:25655651

  7. Multi-Isotope Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Combining Heavy Water 2H with 15N Labeling As Complementary Tracers for Metabolic Heterogeneity at the Single-Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, S.; McGlynn, S.; Cowley, E.; Green, A.; Newman, D. K.; Orphan, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic rates of microbial communities constitute a key physiological parameter for understanding the in situ growth constraints for life in any environment. Isotope labeling techniques provide a powerful approach for measuring such biological activity, due to the use of isotopically enriched substrate tracers whose incorporation into biological materials can be detected with high sensitivity by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Nano-meter scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) combined with stable isotope labeling provides a unique tool for studying the spatiometabolic activity of microbial populations at the single cell level in order to assess both community structure and population diversity. However, assessing the distribution and range of microbial activity in complex environmental systems with slow-growing organisms, diverse carbon and nitrogen sources, or heterotrophic subpopulations poses a tremendous technical challenge because the introduction of isotopically labeled substrates frequently changes the nutrient availability and can inflate or bias measures of activity. Here, we present the use of hydrogen isotope labeling with deuterated water as an important new addition to the isotopic toolkit and apply it for the determination of single cell microbial activities by NanoSIMS imaging. This tool provides a labeling technique that minimally alters any aquatic chemical environment, can be administered with strong labels even in minimal addition (natural background is very low), is an equally universal substrate for all forms of life even in complex, carbon and nitrogen saturated systems, and can be combined with other isotopic tracers. The combination of heavy water labeling with the most commonly used NanoSIMS tracer, 15N, is technically challenging but opens up a powerful new set of multi-tracer experiments for the study of microbial activity in complex communities. We present the first truly simultaneous single cell triple isotope system

  8. Design and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber for uniform or differential, metabolic and structural, plant tissue isotope labeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tracing heavy stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O o...

  9. Refining cotton-wick method for 15N plant labelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fustec, Joëlle; Mahieu, Stéphanie

    2010-05-01

    The symbiosis Fabaceae/Rhizobiaceae plays a critical role in the nitrogen cycle. It gives the plant the ability to fix high amounts of atmospheric N. A part of this N can be transferred to the soil via rhizodeposition. The contribution of Fabaceae to the soil N pool is difficult to measure, since it is necessary for assessing N benefits for other crops, for soil biological activity, and for reducing water pollution in sustainable agriculture (Fustec, 2009). The aim of this study was to test and improve the reliability of the 15N cotton-wick method for measuring the soil N derived from plant rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2007). The effects of the concentration of the 15N-urea labelling solution and of the feeding frequency (continuous or pulses) on the assessment of nitrogen rhizodeposition were studied in two greenhouse experiments using the field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and the non-nodulating isoline P2. The plant parts and the soil were prepared for 15N:14N measurements for assessing N rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2009). The fraction of plants' belowground nitrogen allocated to rhizodeposition in both Frisson pea and P2 was 20 to more than 50% higher when plants were labelled continuously than when they were labelled using fortnightly pulses. Our results suggested that when 15N root enrichment was high, nitrogen rhizodeposition was underestimated only for plants that were 15N-fed by fortnightly pulses, and not in plants 15N-fed continuously. This phenomenon was especially observed for plants relying on symbiotic N fixation for N acquisition; it may be linked to the concentration of the labelling solution. In conclusion, N rhizodeposition assessment was strongly influenced by the 15N-feeding frequency and the concentration of the labelling solution. The estimation of N rhizodeposition was more reliable when plants were labelled continuously with a dilute solution of 15N urea. Fustec et al. 2009. Agron. Sustain. Dev., DOI 10.1051/agro/2009003, in press. Mahieu

  10. 15N chemical shift tensors and conformation of solid polypeptides containing 15N-labeled glycine residue by 15N NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Akira; Ozaki, Takuo; Fujito, Teruaki; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ando, Isao; Magoshi, Jun

    1998-01-01

    The correlation between the isotropic 15N chemical shift ( δiso) and 15N chemical shift tensor components ( δ11, δ22 and δ33) and the main-chain conformation such as the polyglycine I (PGI: β-sheet), II (PGII: 3 1-helix), α-helix and β-sheet forms of solid polypeptides [Gly∗,X] n consisting of 15N-labeled glycine (Gly∗) and other amino acids (X: natural abundance of 15N) has been studied by solid-state 15N NMR method. A series of polypeptides [Gly∗,X] n (X = glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-valine, L-isoleucine, β-benzyl L-aspartate, γ-benzyl L-glutamate, ɛ-carbobenzoxy L-lysine, and sarcosine) were synthesized by the α-amino acid N-carboxy anhydride (NCA) method. Conformations of these polypeptides in the solid state were characterized on the basis of conformation-dependent 13C chemical shifts in the 13C cross-polarization-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) NMR spectra and by the characteristic bands in the IR and far-IR spectra. The δiso, δ11, δ22 and δ33 of the polypetides were determined from the 15N CP-MAS and 15N CP-static (powder pattern) spectra. It was found that the δiso, δ11, δ22 and δ33 in the PGI form (δ 83.5, 185, 40.7 and 25 ppm, resp.) are upfield from those in the PGII form (88.5, 194, 42.1 and 29 ppm, resp.), which were reproduced by the calculated 15N shielding constants using the finite perturbation theory (FPT)-INDO method. It was also found that the δ22 of the Gly∗ of [Gly∗,X] n is closely related to the main-chain conformation and the neighboring amino acid sequence, although the δiso is almost independent of the glycine content and conformation. Consequently, the δ22 value of Gly∗ containing copolypeptides is useful for the structural (main-chain conformation and neighboring amino acid sequence) analysis in the solid state by 15N NMR, if the 15N-labeled copolypeptide or natural protein can be provided. In addition, it is shown that the δiso of the glycine residue is useful for the conformational study of some

  11. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  12. Robust method for investigating nitrogen metabolism of 15N labeled amino acids using AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry: application to a parasitic plant-plant interaction.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Zachary; Cerveau, Delphine; Marnet, Nathalie; Bouchereau, Alain; Delavault, Philippe; Simier, Philippe; Pouvreau, Jean-Bernard

    2014-01-21

    An AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (AccQ•Tag-UPLC-PDA-ESI-MS) method is presented here for the fast, robust, and sensitive quantification of (15)N isotopologue enrichment of amino acids in biological samples, as for example in the special biotic interaction between the cultivated specie Brassica napus (rapeseed) and the parasitic weed Phelipanche ramosa (broomrape). This method was developed and validated using amino acid standard solutions containing (15)N amino acid isotopologues and/or biological unlabeled extracts. Apparatus optimization, limits of detection and quantification, quantification reproducibility, and calculation method of (15)N isotopologue enrichment are presented. Using this method, we could demonstrate that young parasite tubercles assimilate inorganic nitrogen as (15)N-ammonium when supplied directly through batch incubation but not when supplied by translocation from host root phloem, contrary to (15)N2-glutamine. (15)N2-glutamine mobility from host roots to parasite tubercles followed by its low metabolism in tubercles suggests that the host-derived glutamine acts as an important nitrogen containing storage compound in the young tubercle of Phelipanche ramosa. PMID:24359440

  13. Quantitative analysis of 15N labeled positional isomers of glutamine and citrulline via electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of their dansyl derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enteral metabolism of glutamine and citrulline are intertwined because, while glutamine is one of the main fuel sources for the enterocyte, citrulline is one of its products. It has been shown that the administration of 15N labeled glutamine results in the incorporation of the 15N label into cit...

  14. The “Speedy” Synthesis of Atom-Specific 15N Imino/Amido-Labeled RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Christoph; Micura, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous reports on the synthesis of atom-specific 15N-labeled nucleosides exist, fast and facile access to the corresponding phosphoramidites for RNA solid-phase synthesis is still lacking. This situation represents a severe bottleneck for NMR spectroscopic investigations on functional RNAs. Here, we present optimized procedures to speed up the synthesis of 15N(1) adenosine and 15N(1) guanosine amidites, which are the much needed counterparts of the more straightforward-to-achieve 15N(3) uridine and 15N(3) cytidine amidites in order to tap full potential of 1H/15N/15N-COSY experiments for directly monitoring individual Watson–Crick base pairs in RNA. Demonstrated for two preQ1 riboswitch systems, we exemplify a versatile concept for individual base-pair labeling in the analysis of conformationally flexible RNAs when competing structures and conformational dynamics are encountered. PMID:26237536

  15. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  16. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  17. Fungal Functioning In A Pine Forest: Evidence From A 15N-Labeled Global Change Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Hofmockel, K.; van Diepen, L.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we used tracer 15N labeling and a concurrent six-year nitrogen fertilization experiment in a Pinus taeda Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment to investigate the functioning of saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal fungi in nitrogen cycling. Ectomycorrhizal fungi with hydrophobic ectomycorrhizae acquired nitrogen from deeper in the soil profile than taxa with hydrophilic ectomycorrhizae, whereas saprotrophic fungi acquired nitrogen primarily from relatively recent surface litter. By combining natural abundance and tracer measurements, we estimated the 15N enrichment of fungi relative to source nitrogen at between 4‰ and 9‰, depending on genus, with some genera sampling pools more 15N-enriched in the labeling experiment than could be measured by bulk analyses. Thus, biologically relevant nitrogen fractions may correspond poorly to what can be extracted chemically. The multiple 15N labels in this FACE experiment proved useful for tracking nitrogen into different fungal taxa from potential nitrogen sources.

  18. Numerical evaluation of subsoil diffusion of (15) N labelled denitrification products during employment of the (15) N gas flux method in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Ruoss, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Common methods for measuring soil denitrification in situ include monitoring the accumulation of 15N labelled N2 and N2O evolved from 15N labelled soil nitrate pool in soil surface chambers. Gas diffusion is considered to be the main accumulation process. Because accumulation of the gases decreases concentration gradients between soil and chamber over time, gas production rates are underestimated if calculated from chamber concentrations. Moreover, concentration gradients to the non-labelled subsoil exist, inevitably causing downward diffusion of 15N labelled denitrification products. A numerical model for simulating gas diffusion in soil was used in order to determine the significance of this source of error. Results show that subsoil diffusion of 15N labelled N2 and N2O - and thus potential underestimation of denitrification derived from chamber fluxes - increases with cover closure time as well as with increasing diffusivity. Simulations based on the range of typical gas diffusivities of unsaturated soils show that the fraction of subsoil diffusion after chamber closure for 1 hour is always significant with values up to >30 % of total production of 15N labelled N2 and N2O. Field experiments for measuring denitrification with the 15N gas flux method were conducted. The ability of the model to predict the time pattern of gas accumulation was evaluated by comparing measured 15N2 concentrations and simulated values.

  19. In vivo uniform (15)N-isotope labelling of plants: using the greenhouse for structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ippel, Johannes H; Pouvreau, Laurice; Kroef, Toos; Gruppen, Harry; Versteeg, Geurt; van den Putten, Peter; Struik, Paul C; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2004-01-01

    Isotope labelling of proteins is important for progress in the field of structural proteomics. It enables the utilisation of the power of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) for the characterisation of the three-dimensional structures and corresponding dynamical features of proteins. The usual approach to obtain isotopically labelled protein molecules is by expressing the corresponding gene in bacterial or yeast host organisms, which grow on isotope-enriched media. This method has several drawbacks. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to fully label a plant with (15)N-isotopes. The advantage of in vivo labelling of higher organisms is that all constituting proteins are labelled and become available as functional, post-translationally modified, correctly folded proteins. A hydroponics set-up was used to create the first example of a uniformly (15)N-labelled (> 98%) plant species, the potato plant (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Elkana). Two plants were grown at low costs using potassium-[(15)N]-nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. At harvest time, a total of 3.6 kg of potato tubers and 1.6 kg of foliage, stolons and roots were collected, all of which were fully (15)N-labelled. Gram quantities of soluble (15)N-labelled proteins (composed mainly of the glycoprotein patatin and Kunitz-type protease inhibitors) were isolated from the tubers. NMR results on the complete proteome of potato sap and on an isolated protease inhibitor illustrate the success of the labelling procedure. The presented method of isotope labelling is easily modified to label other plants. Its envisioned impact in the field of structural proteomics of plants is discussed.

  20. An economical method for (15)N/(13)C isotopic labeling of proteins expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, E; Krishna, N R

    2001-07-01

    We report a new and cost-effective approach to prepare (15)N/(13)C labeled proteins for NMR using the Pichia pastoris expression system. Four protocols (P1 to P4) were defined and compared using recombinant Ovine interferon-tau (rOvIFN-tau). Our results demonstrate that in order to get full incorporation of (15)N and (13)C, the isotopes are not totally required during the initial growth phase of P. pastoris culture. The addition of small amounts of (15)N and (13)C compounds 6 h prior to the methanol induction phase is sufficient to obtain 99% incorporation of heavy isotopes into the protein. Our optimized protocol P4 is two-thirds less costly than the classical method using (15)N and (13)C isotopes during the entire growth phase.

  1. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with (2)H, (13)C and (15)N in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-06-01

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80% can be achieved for (15)N and (13)C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For (2)H,(15)N and (2)H,(13)C,(15)N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73%, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins. PMID:25929326

  2. Fate and metabolism of [15N]2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in soil.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Martin; Geyer, Roland; Russow, Rolf; Richnow, Hans H; Kästner, Matthias

    2004-08-01

    The fates of the labels from [14C] and [15N] trinitrotoluene were analyzed in bioreactors under aerobic conditions in soil treated by a fungal bioremediation process with Stropharia rugosoannulata and in control soil. Up to 17.5% of the 15N label had a different fate than the 14C label. Three N-mineralization processes were identified in detailed experiments with [15N]TNT. About 2% of the 15N label was found as NO3- and NH4+, showing simultaneous processes of direct TNT denitration (I) and reduction with cleavage of the amino groups (II). The enrichment of NO2-/NO3- (up to 7.5 atom% 15N abundance) indicates the formation of Meisenheimer complexes with a denitration of [15N]TNT. A 1.4% of the label was found distributed between N2O and N2. However, the 15N enrichment of the N2O (up to 38 atom%) demonstrated that both N atoms were generated from the labeled TNT and clearly indicates a novel formation process (III). We propose, as an explanation, the generation of N2O by cleavage from condensed azoxy metabolites. In addition, 1.7% of the 15N label was detected as biogenic amino acids in the wheat straw containing the fungus. Overall, 60 to 85% of the applied [15N]TNT was degraded and 52 to 64% was found as nonextractable residues in the soil matrix. Three percent was detected as 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene.

  3. Differential growth of the fungus Absidia cylindrospora on 13C/15N-labelled media.

    PubMed

    Crotty, F V; Blackshaw, R P; Murray, P J

    2011-06-15

    Many studies utilise enrichment of stable isotopes as tracers to follow the interactions occurring within soil food webs and methods have been developed to enrich bacteria, soil fauna and plant litter, Here for the first time we attempt to enrich a soil fungus to 99 atom% with (13)C and (15)N stable isotopes. In this study our objectives were to (a) assess whether the saprotrophic zygomycete fungus Absidia cylindrospora could grow on a medium enriched to 99 atom% with (13)C-glucose and (15)N-ammonium chloride, (b) to determine the level of enrichment obtained, and (c) to examine the change in growth rate of this fungus while it was growing on the dually enriched medium. To achieve this, the fungus was grown on agar enriched with (13)C and (15)N to 99 atom% and its growth rate monitored. The results showed that A. cylindrospora would grow on the highly labelled growth medium, but that its rate of growth was affected compared with the rate on either natural abundance media or media highly enriched with a single isotope ((13)C or (15)N). The implications of these results is that although the fungus is able to utilise these heavier isotopes, the biochemical processes involved in growth are affected, and consideration should be given to these differences when using stable isotope tracers in, for example, soil food web studies.

  4. Measurement of multiple psi torsion angles in uniformly 13C,15N-labeled alpha-spectrin SH3 domain using 3D 15N-13C-13C-15N MAS dipolar-chemical shift correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Jaroniec, Christopher P; Diehl, Annette; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Griffin, Robert G

    2003-06-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous measurement of several backbone torsion angles psi in the uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled alpha-Spectrin SH3 domain using two different 3D 15N-13C-13C-15N dipolar-chemical shift magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments. The first NCCN experiment utilizes double quantum (DQ) spectroscopy combined with the INADEQUATE type 13C-13C chemical shift correlation. The decay of the DQ coherences formed between 13C'(i) and 13C(alphai) spin pairs is determined by the "correlated" dipolar field due to 15N(i)-13C(alphai) and 13C'(i)-15N(i+1) dipolar couplings and is particularly sensitive to variations of the torsion angle in the regime |psi| > 140 degrees. However, the ability of this experiment to constrain multiple psi-torsion angles is limited by the resolution of the 13C(alpha)-(13)CO correlation spectrum. This problem is partially addressed in the second approach described here, which is an NCOCA NCCN experiment. In this case the resolution is enhanced by the superior spectral dispersion of the 15N resonances present in the 15N(i+1)-13C(alphai) part of the NCOCA chemical shift correlation spectrum. For the case of the 62-residue alpha-spectrin SH3 domain, we determined 13 psi angle constraints with the INADEQUATE NCCN experiment and 22 psi constraints were measured in the NCOCA NCCN experiment.

  5. Cerebral glutamine metabolism under hyperammonemia determined in vivo by localized 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cudalbu, Cristina; Lanz, Bernard; Duarte, João MN; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Pilloud, Yves; Mlynárik, Vladimir; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Brain glutamine synthetase (GS) is an integral part of the glutamate–glutamine cycle and occurs in the glial compartment. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allows noninvasive measurements of the concentrations and synthesis rates of metabolites. 15N MRS is an alternative approach to 13C MRS. Incorporation of labeled 15N from ammonia in cerebral glutamine allows to measure several metabolic reactions related to nitrogen metabolism, including the glutamate–glutamine cycle. To measure 15N incorporation into the position 5N of glutamine and position 2N of glutamate and glutamine, we developed a novel 15N pulse sequence to simultaneously detect, for the first time, [5-15N]Gln and [2-15N]Gln+Glu in vivo in the rat brain. In addition, we also measured for the first time in the same experiment localized 1H spectra for a direct measurement of the net glutamine accumulation. Mathematical modeling of 1H and 15N MRS data allowed to reduce the number of assumptions and provided reliable determination of GS (0.30±0.050 μmol/g per minute), apparent neurotransmission (0.26±0.030 μmol/g per minute), glutamate dehydrogenase (0.029±0.002 μmol/g per minute), and net glutamine accumulation (0.033±0.001 μmol/g per minute). These results showed an increase of GS and net glutamine accumulation under hyperammonemia, supporting the concept of their implication in cerebral ammonia detoxification. PMID:22167234

  6. Stereospecific assignments of glycine in proteins by stereospecific deuteration and {sup 15}N labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Curley, R.W. Jr.; Panigot, M.J.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Stereospecific assignments are important for accurately determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins through the use of multidimensional NMR techniques. It is especially important to stereospecifically assign the glycine {alpha}-protons in proteins because of the potential for different backbone conformations of this residue. These stereospecific assignments are critical for interpreting the {sup 3}J{sub NH,{alpha}H} coupling constants and NOEs involving the glycine {alpha}-protons that determine the conformation of this part of the protein. However, it is often difficult to unambiguously obtain the stereospecific assignments for glycine residues by using only NOE data. In this poster, we present a method for unambiguous, stereospecific assignment of the {alpha}-protons of glycine residues. This method involves synthesis of stereo-specifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gly using a slightly modified procedure originally described by Woodard and coworkers for the stereoselective deuteration of glycine. The stereospecifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gy has been incorporated into recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial systems (FKBP) and mammalian cells (u-PA). Two- and three-dimensional isotope-filtered and isotope-edited NMR experiments were used to obtain the stereospecific assignments of the glycine {alpha}-protons for these proteins.

  7. A spectral correlation function for efficient sequential NMR assignments of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Bartels, C; Wüthrich, K

    1994-11-01

    A new computer-based approach is described for efficient sequence-specific assignment of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins. For this purpose three-dimensional (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra are divided up into two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H strips which extend over the entire spectral width along one dimension and have a width of ca. 100 Hz, centered about the amide proton chemical shifts along the other dimension. A spectral correlation function enables sorting of these strips according to proximity of the corresponding residues in the amino acid sequence. Thereby, starting from a given strip in the spectrum, the probability of its corresponding to the C-terminal neighboring residue is calculated for all other strips from the similarity of their peak patterns with a pattern predicted for the sequentially adjoining residue, as manifested in the scalar product of the vectors representing the predicted and measured peak patterns. Tests with five different proteins containing both α-helices and β-sheets, and ranging in size from 58 to 165 amino acid residues show that the discrimination achieved between the sequentially neighboring residue and all other residues compares well with that obtained with an unguided interactive search of pairs of sequentially neighboring strips, with important savings in the time needed for complete analysis of 3D (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra. The integration of this routine into the program package XEASY ensures that remaining ambiguities can be resolved by visual inspection of the strips, combined with reference to the amino acid sequence and information on spin-system types obtained from additional NMR spectra.

  8. Effects of trichloroacetic acid on the nitrogen metabolism of Pinus sylvestris--a 13C/15N tracer study.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Christoph; Jung, Klaus; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2002-01-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) can be found in various environmental compartments like air, rain and plants all over the world. It is assumed that TCA is an atmospheric degradation product of volatile chloroorganic hydrocarbons. The herbicide effect of TCA in higher concentrations is well known, but not much is known about the phytotoxic effects in environmentally relevant concentrations. It can be shown in this study by using the 13C/15N stable isotope tracer technique that [13C]TCA is taken up by roots of two-year-old seedlings of Pinus sylvestris L. and transported into the needles. At the same time the effect of the substance on nitrogen metabolism can be analyzed by measuring the incorporation of 15NO3- into different nitrogen fractions of the plant. The more [13C]TCA incorporation, the higher the synthesis of 15N labelled amino acids and proteins is. These effects on the nitrogen metabolism are probably based on the activation of stress- and detoxification metabolism. It has to be assumed that there is an influence on N metabolism of Pinus sylvestris caused by the deposition of environmentally relevant TCA concentrations.

  9. Tracking the incorporation of 15N from labeled beech litter into mineral-organic associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, M.; Hatton, P.; Derrien, D.; Lajtha, K.; Zeller, B.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen containing organic compounds are thought to have a role in the complex web of processes that control the turnover time of soil organic matter. The sequential density fractionation technique is increasingly used for the purpose of investigating the association of organic materials with the mineral matrix. Organic materials in the denser fractions (>2.0 kg L-1) typically show 13C NMR signals indicative of carbohydrate and aliphatic structures, an absence of lignin and tannin structures and a narrow C:N ratio, suggesting a microbial origin of organic matter in these fractions. Here we take advantage of a labeling experiment conducted at two different sites in Germany and in France to investigate the incorporation of organic nitrogen into physical fractions of increasing density, representing a proximity gradient to mineral surfaces. 15N labeled beech litter was applied to two acidic forest topsoils 8 and 12 years ago. Although there are differences in the distribution patterns between the two soils, and the majority of the organic nitrogen was recovered in fractions representing organic matter of plant origin and not bound to the mineral matrix, our data clearly show that after a decade, significant amounts of the nitrogen had been incorporated in mineral-organic fractions of supposedly slow turnover. It remains to be shown to which extent the N in the densest fractions was incorporated by soil microbiota and associated with mineral surfaces in organic form or adsorbed to mineral surfaces in inorganic form (NH4+).

  10. Cosine Modulated HSQC: A Rapid Determination of 3JHNHα Scalar Couplings in 15N-labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Audrey; Vincent, Sébastien J. F.; Zwahlen, Catherine

    2002-06-01

    A two-dimensional HSQC-based NMR method, 15N-COSMO-HSQC, is presented for the rapid determination of homonuclear 3JHNHα couplings in 15N-labeled proteins in solution. Scalar couplings are extracted by comparing the intensity of two separate datasets recorded with and without decoupling of the 3JHNHα during a preparation period. The scalar couplings are introduced through a cosine modulation of the peak intensities. The experiment relies on a BIRD sandwich to selectively invert all amide protons H N and is very simple to implement. 3JHNHα couplings were determined using both the 15N-COSMO-HSQC and quantitative- J on 15N-labeled chemokine RANTES. The two experiments show well-correlated values.

  11. Synthesis of 13C and 15N labeled 2,4-dinitroanisole.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Field, Jim A; Chorover, Jon; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Abrell, Leif; Mash, Eugene A

    2014-05-30

    Syntheses of [(13)C6]-2,4-dinitroanisole (ring-(13)C6) from [(13)C6]-anisole (ring-(13)C6) and [(15)N2]-2,4-dinitroanisole from anisole using in situ generated acetyl nitrate and [(15)N]-acetyl nitrate, respectively, are described. Treatment of [(13)C6]-anisole (ring-(13)C6) with acetyl nitrate generated in 100% HNO3 gave [(13)C6]-2,4-dinitroanisole (ring-(13)C6) in 83% yield. Treatment of anisole with [(15)N]-acetyl nitrate generated in 10 N [(15)N]-HNO3 gave [(15)N2 ]-2,4-dinitroanisole in 44% yield after two cycles of nitration. Byproducts in the latter reaction included [(15)N]-2-nitroanisole and [(15)N]-4-nitroanisole.

  12. Sub-cellular localisation of a 15N-labelled peptide vector using NanoSIMS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, Winfried; Wu, Ting-Di; Duchambon, Patricia; Amessou, Mohamed; Carrez, Danièle; Johannes, Ludger; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc

    2006-07-01

    Dynamic SIMS imaging is proposed to map sub-cellular distributions of isotopically labelled, exogenous compounds. NanoSIMS imaging allows the characterisation of the intracellular transport pathways of exogenous molecules, including peptide vectors employed in innovative therapies, using stable isotopes as molecular markers to detect the compound of interest. Shiga toxin B-subunit (STxB) was chosen as a representative peptide vector. The recombinant protein ( 15N-STxB) was synthesised in Escherichia coli using 15NH 4Cl as sole nitrogen source resulting in 15N enrichment in the molecule. Using the NanoSIMS 50 ion microprobe (Cameca), different ion species ( 12C 14N -, 12C 15N -, 31P -) originating from the same sputtered micro volume were simultaneously detected. High mass resolving power enabled the discrimination of 12C 15N - from its polyatomic isobars of mass 27. We imaged the membrane binding and internalisation of 15N-STxB in HeLa cells at spatial resolutions of less than 100 nm. Thus, the use of rare stable isotopes like 15N with dynamic SIMS imaging permits sub-cellular detection of isotopically labelled, exogenous molecules and imaging of their transport pathways at high mass and spatial resolution. Application of stable isotopes as markers can replace the large and chemically complex tags used for fluorescence microscopy, without altering the chemical and physical properties of the molecule.

  13. Triple resonance experiments for aligned sample solid-state NMR of 13C and 15N labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Neeraj; Grant, Christopher V.; Park, Sang Ho; Brown, Jonathan Miles; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Initial steps in the development of a suite of triple-resonance 1H/13C/15N solid-state NMR experiments applicable to aligned samples of 13C and 15N labeled proteins are described. The experiments take advantage of the opportunities for 13C detection without the need for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling presented by samples with two different patterns of isotopic labeling. In one type of sample, the proteins are ~20% randomly labeled with 13C in all backbone and side chain carbon sites and ~100% uniformly 15N labeled in all nitrogen sites; in the second type of sample, the peptides and proteins are 13C labeled at only the α-carbon and 15N labeled at the amide nitrogen of a few residues. The requirement for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling while detecting 13C signals is avoided in the first case because of the low probability of any two 13C nuclei being bonded to each other; in the second case, the labeled 13Cα sites are separated by at least three bonds in the polypeptide chain. The experiments enable the measurement of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C and 15N–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies associated with the 13Cα and 13C′ backbone sites, which provide orientation constraints complementary to those derived from the 15N labeled amide backbone sites. 13C/13C spin-exchange experiments identify proximate carbon sites. The ability to measure 13C–15N dipolar coupling frequencies and correlate 13C and 15N resonances provides a mechanism for making backbone resonance assignments. Three-dimensional combinations of these experiments ensure that the resolution, assignment, and measurement of orientationally dependent frequencies can be extended to larger proteins. Moreover, measurements of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies for nearly all side chain sites enable the complete three-dimensional structures of proteins to be determined with this approach. PMID:17293139

  14. Novel labeling technique illustrates transfer of 15N2 from Sphagnum moss to vascular plants via diazotrophic nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Vile, M. A.; Wieder, R.

    2013-12-01

    We used 15N2 gas to trace nitrogen (N) from biological N2-fixation to vascular plant uptake in an Alberta bog in order to determine if neighboring bog plants acquire recently fixed N from diazotrophs associating with Sphagnum mosses. Recent evidence indicates high rates of N2-fixation in Sphagnum mosses of Alberta bogs (Vile et al. 2013). Our previous work has shown that mosses can assimilate fixed N from associated diazotrophs as evidenced by the high N content of mosses despite minimal inputs from atmospheric deposition, retranslocation, and N mineralization. Therefore, the potential exists for vascular plants to obtain N from ';leaky' tissues of live mosses, however, this phenomenon has not been tested previously. Here we document the potential for relatively rapid transfer to vascular plants of N fixed by Sphagnum moss-associated diazotrophs. We utilized the novel approach of incubating mosses in 15N2 to allow the process of diazotrophic N2-fixation to mechanistically provide the 15N label, which is subsequently transferred to Sphagnum mosses. The potential for vascular bog natives to tap this N was assessed by planting the vascular plants in the labeled moss. Sphagnum mosses (upper 3 cm of live plants) were incubated in the presence of 98 atom % 15N2 gas for 48 hours. Two vascular plants common to Alberta bogs; Picea mariana and Vaccinium oxycoccus were then placed in the labeled mosses, where the mosses served as the substrate. Tissue samples from these plants were collected at three time points during the incubation; prior to 15N2 exposure (to determine natural abundance 15N), and at one and two months after 15N2 exposure. Roots and leaves were separated and run separately on a mass spectrometer to determine 15N concentrations. Sphagnum moss capitula obtained N from N2-fixation (δ15N of -2.43 × 0.40, 122.76 × 23.78, 224.92 × 68.37, 143.74 × 54.38 prior to, immediately after, and at 1 and 2 months after exposure to 15N2, respectively). Nitrogen was

  15. Production of 15N-Labelled Liquid Organic Fertilisers Based on Manure and Crop Residue for Use in Fertigation Studies.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Fernández, Carlos; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of crop residue and animal manure from agricultural and livestock activities are annually produced worldwide. With proper management, these residues are potentially valuable sources of plant nutrients, mainly N. Recycling such subproducts in sustainably-based agricultural systems can minimise the use of mineral fertilisers, and hence reduce the potential risk of surface and groundwater pollution. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to obtain (small scale) two liquid labelled-organic fertilisers, an animal- and a vegetal-based organic (AO and VO, respectively) fertiliser, to be used as organic N sources in subsequent fertigation studies. Forage maize (Zea mays L.) grown under 15N-labelled fertiliser supply was used as raw material for VO fertiliser production, and also as 15N-labelled sheep feed to obtain 15N-labelled manure. The labelled faeces fraction was used as raw material for the AO fertiliser. The VO fertiliser was obtained after an acidic and an enzyme-driven hydrolysis. The AO fertiliser was obtained after acidic hydrolysis. The VO liquid fertiliser presented an N concentration of 330 mg·L-1, 85% of total N was organic, while ammonium and nitrate N accounted for 55% and 45% of the mineral nitrogen fraction, respectively. This fertiliser also exhibited high K, Ca and S concentrations and notable values for the remaining macro- and micronutrients. The AO liquid fertiliser had a similar total N concentration (496 mg·L-1, 82% of total N in an organic form) to that of VO, but its mineral N fraction significantly differed, which came in a predominantly (95%) ammonia form. It also had a high content of N, P, K and other macronutrients, and sufficient Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu and B levels, which suggests its suitability as a potential fertiliser. The percentage of 15N enrichment in both VO and AO liquid fertilisers exceeded 2% 15N atom excess, which enabled their use in subsequent assays run to assess nitrogen uptake efficiency.

  16. Nitrogen mineralization from selected /sup 15/N-labelled crop residues and humus as affected by inorganic nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of cover crops or crop residues as a source of N to succeeding crops has become a matter of increasing importance for economic and environmental reason. Greenhouse and field studies were conducted to determine the N contribution of four /sup 15/N labelled crop residues, rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), crimson clover (Trifolium encarnatum L.), and hairy vetch (Vicia sativa L.), to successive crops and to evaluate the effect of different organic (ON) and inorganic N (IN) combinations on mineralization of the above residues. Total /sup 15/N recovery from the residues ranged from 51% to 85% and 4% to 74% for the greenhouse and field studies, respectively.

  17. Comparison of five soil organic matter decomposition models using data from a 14C and 15N labeling field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansu, Marc; Bottner, Pierre; Sarmiento, Lina; Metselaar, Klaas

    2004-12-01

    Five alternatives of the previously published MOMOS model (MOMOS-2 to -6) are tested to predict the dynamics of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil during the decomposition of plant necromass. 14C and 15N labeled wheat straw was incubated over 2 years in fallow soils of the high Andean Paramo of Venezuela. The following data were collected: soil moisture, total 14C and 15N and microbial biomass (MB)-14C and -15N, daily rainfall, air temperature and total radiation. Daily soil moisture was predicted using the SAHEL model. MOMOS-2 to -4 (type 1 models) use kinetic constants and flow partitioning parameters. MOMOS-2 can be simplified to MOMOS-3 and further to MOMOS-4, with no significant changes in the prediction accuracy and robustness for total-14C and -15N as well as for MB-14C and -15N. MOMOS-5 (type 2 models) uses only kinetic constants: three MB-inputs (from labile and stable plant material and from humified compounds) and two MB-outputs (mortality and respiration constants). MOMOS-5 did not significantly change the total-14C and -15N predictions but markedly improved the predictive quality and robustness of MB-14C and -15N predictions (with a dynamic different from the predictions by other models). Thus MOMOS-5 is proposed as an accurate and ecologically consistent description of decomposition processes. MOMOS-6 extends MOMOS-5 by including a stable humus compartment for long-term simulations of soil native C and N. The improvement of the predictions is not significant for this 2-year experiment, but MOMOS-6 enables prediction of a sequestration in the stable humus compartment of 2% of the initially added 14C and 5.4% of the added 15N.

  18. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes. PMID:27678172

  19. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes.

  20. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  1. Exploring the nitrogen ingestion of aphids--a new method using electrical penetration graph and (15)N labelling.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Franziska; Opitz, Sebastian E W; Inselsbacher, Erich; Ganeteg, Ulrika; Näsholm, Torgny; Ninkovic, Velemir

    2013-01-01

    Studying plant-aphid interactions is challenging as aphid feeding is a complex process hidden in the plant tissue. Here we propose a combination of two well established methods to study nutrient acquisition by aphids focusing on the uptake of isotopically labelled nitrogen ((15)N). We combined the Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) technique that allows detailed recording of aphid feeding behaviour and stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to precisely measure the uptake of nitrogen. Bird cherry-oat aphids Rhopalosiphum padi L. (Hemiptera, Aphididae) fed for 24 h on barley plants (Hordeum vulgare L., cultivar Lina, Poaceae) that were cultivated with a (15)N enriched nutrient solution. The time aphids fed in the phloem was strongly positive correlated with their (15)N uptake. All other single behavioural phases were not correlated with (15)N enrichment in the aphids, which corroborates their classification as non-feeding EPG phases. In addition, phloem-feeding and (15)N enrichment of aphids was divided into two groups. One group spent only short time in the phloem phase and was unsuccessful in nitrogen acquisition, while the other group displayed longer phloem-feeding phases and was successful in nitrogen acquisition. This suggests that several factors such as the right feeding site, time span of feeding and individual conditions play a role for the aphids to acquire nutrients successfully. The power of this combination of methods for studying plant-aphid interactions is discussed.

  2. High Resolution 13C MRI With Hyperpolarized Urea: In Vivo T2 Mapping and 15N Labeling Effects

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Galen D.; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L.; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J.; Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    13C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [13C] urea and [13C, 15N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. 15N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [13C, 15N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [13C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [13C, 15N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [13C, 15N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio [13C] over urea. PMID:24235273

  3. Exogenous proline relieves growth inhibition caused by NaCl in petunia cells: Metabolism of L-( sup 15 M)-proline followed by sup 15 N NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Heyser, J.W.; Chacon, M.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Exogenous proline stimulated the growth of Petunia hybrida cells on 195 mM NaCl 10-fold as compared with cells grown on 195 mM CaCl medium minus proline. L-({sup 15}N)-proline was fed to cells growing on 0 and 195 mM CaCl, and its metabolism was followed by {sup 15}N NMR analysis of cell extracts. Total proline and amino acids were determined by ninhydrin assay. Proline and primary amino acids were easily resolved in NMR spectra and the amount of {sup 15}N-label which remained in proline was determined. Reduced catabolism of proline in cells grown on NaCl was evident. The role of exogenous proline in conferring increased NaCl tolerance in this nonhalophyte will be discussed.

  4. Cereal grain, rachis and pulse seed amino acid δ15N values as indicators of plant nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Styring, Amy K; Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Natural abundance δ(15)N values of plant tissue amino acids (AAs) reflect the cycling of N into and within plants, providing an opportunity to better understand environmental and anthropogenic effects on plant metabolism. In this study, the AA δ(15)N values of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) grains and rachis and broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, grown at the experimental farm stations of Rothamsted, UK and Bad Lauchstädt, Germany, were determined by GC-C-IRMS. It was found that the δ(15)N values of cereal grain and rachis AAs could be largely attributed to metabolic pathways involved in their biosynthesis and catabolism. The relative (15)N-enrichment of phenylalanine can be attributed to its involvement in the phenylpropanoid pathway and glutamate has a δ(15)N value which is an average of the other AAs due to its central role in AA-N cycling. The relative AA δ(15)N values of broad bean and pea seeds were very different from one another, providing evidence for differences in the metabolic routing of AAs to the developing seeds in these leguminous plants. This study has shown that AA δ(15)N values relate to known AA biosynthetic pathways in plants and thus have the potential to aid understanding of how various external factors, such as source of assimilated N, influence metabolic cycling of N within plants.

  5. Site-specific φ- and ψ-torsion angle determination in a uniformly/extensively 13C- and 15N-labeled peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sungsool; Spano, Justin

    2011-10-01

    A solid-state rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR) NMR method was introduced to identify the ϕ- and ψ-torsion angle from a 1H- 15N or 1H- 13C' spin system of alanine-like residues in a selectively, uniformly, or extensively 15N-/ 13C-labeled peptide. When a C α( i) or a 15N peak is site-specifically obtainable in the NMR spectrum of a uniformly 15N/ 13C-labeled sample system, the ψ- or ϕ-torsion angle specified by the conformational structure of peptide geometry involving 15N( i)- 1H αi - 15N( i + 1) or 13C'( i - 1)- 1H Ni- 13C'( i) spin system can be identified based on 13C α- or 15N-detected 1H α- 15N or 1H N- 13C REDOR experiment. This method will conveniently be utilized to identify major secondary motifs, such as α-helix, β-sheet, and β-turn, from a uniformly 15N-/ 13C-labled peptide sample system. When tested on a 13C-/ 15N-labeled model system of a three amino acid peptide Gly-[U- 13C, 15N]Ala-[U- 13C, 15N]Leu, the ψ-angle of alanine obtained experimentally, ψ = -40 ± 30°, agreed reasonably well with the X-ray determined angle, ψ = -39°.

  6. Production of 15N-Labelled Liquid Organic Fertilisers Based on Manure and Crop Residue for Use in Fertigation Studies.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Fernández, Carlos; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of crop residue and animal manure from agricultural and livestock activities are annually produced worldwide. With proper management, these residues are potentially valuable sources of plant nutrients, mainly N. Recycling such subproducts in sustainably-based agricultural systems can minimise the use of mineral fertilisers, and hence reduce the potential risk of surface and groundwater pollution. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to obtain (small scale) two liquid labelled-organic fertilisers, an animal- and a vegetal-based organic (AO and VO, respectively) fertiliser, to be used as organic N sources in subsequent fertigation studies. Forage maize (Zea mays L.) grown under 15N-labelled fertiliser supply was used as raw material for VO fertiliser production, and also as 15N-labelled sheep feed to obtain 15N-labelled manure. The labelled faeces fraction was used as raw material for the AO fertiliser. The VO fertiliser was obtained after an acidic and an enzyme-driven hydrolysis. The AO fertiliser was obtained after acidic hydrolysis. The VO liquid fertiliser presented an N concentration of 330 mg·L-1, 85% of total N was organic, while ammonium and nitrate N accounted for 55% and 45% of the mineral nitrogen fraction, respectively. This fertiliser also exhibited high K, Ca and S concentrations and notable values for the remaining macro- and micronutrients. The AO liquid fertiliser had a similar total N concentration (496 mg·L-1, 82% of total N in an organic form) to that of VO, but its mineral N fraction significantly differed, which came in a predominantly (95%) ammonia form. It also had a high content of N, P, K and other macronutrients, and sufficient Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu and B levels, which suggests its suitability as a potential fertiliser. The percentage of 15N enrichment in both VO and AO liquid fertilisers exceeded 2% 15N atom excess, which enabled their use in subsequent assays run to assess nitrogen uptake efficiency. PMID:26982183

  7. Production of 15N-Labelled Liquid Organic Fertilisers Based on Manure and Crop Residue for Use in Fertigation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Fernández, Carlos; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of crop residue and animal manure from agricultural and livestock activities are annually produced worldwide. With proper management, these residues are potentially valuable sources of plant nutrients, mainly N. Recycling such subproducts in sustainably-based agricultural systems can minimise the use of mineral fertilisers, and hence reduce the potential risk of surface and groundwater pollution. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to obtain (small scale) two liquid labelled-organic fertilisers, an animal- and a vegetal-based organic (AO and VO, respectively) fertiliser, to be used as organic N sources in subsequent fertigation studies. Forage maize (Zea mays L.) grown under 15N-labelled fertiliser supply was used as raw material for VO fertiliser production, and also as 15N-labelled sheep feed to obtain 15N-labelled manure. The labelled faeces fraction was used as raw material for the AO fertiliser. The VO fertiliser was obtained after an acidic and an enzyme-driven hydrolysis. The AO fertiliser was obtained after acidic hydrolysis. The VO liquid fertiliser presented an N concentration of 330 mg·L-1, 85% of total N was organic, while ammonium and nitrate N accounted for 55% and 45% of the mineral nitrogen fraction, respectively. This fertiliser also exhibited high K, Ca and S concentrations and notable values for the remaining macro- and micronutrients. The AO liquid fertiliser had a similar total N concentration (496 mg·L-1, 82% of total N in an organic form) to that of VO, but its mineral N fraction significantly differed, which came in a predominantly (95%) ammonia form. It also had a high content of N, P, K and other macronutrients, and sufficient Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu and B levels, which suggests its suitability as a potential fertiliser. The percentage of 15N enrichment in both VO and AO liquid fertilisers exceeded 2% 15N atom excess, which enabled their use in subsequent assays run to assess nitrogen uptake efficiency. PMID:26982183

  8. Non-homogeneity of isotopic labelling in 15N gas flux studies: theory, some observations and possible lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Deppe, Marianna; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Gattinger, Andreas; Giesemann, Anette; Krause, Hans-Martin; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying dinitrogen (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from different soil N pools and processes can be accomplished using the 15N tracer technique but this is subject to four different sources of bias (i. - iv.). This approach includes 15N labelling of selected N pools in soil and subsequent isotope analysis of all relevant N pools as well as of gas samples from enclosures, i.e. mixtures of soil-derived and atmospheric N2 and N2O. Depending on the processes of interest, there may be 15N labelling of one or several N pools, were several labelling treatment are needed in the latter case (e.g. Müller et al., 2004). Measuring pool-derived N2 or N2O has been shown to include two calculation problems, (i.) arising from multiple pools (e.g. Arah, 1992) and (ii.) dealing with the non-random distribution of N2 and N2O mole masses (Hauck et al., 1958). Non-randomness can be solved if m/z 28, 29 and 30 are correctly analysed and the 15N enrichment of one (to distinguish two pools, i.e. soil and atmosphere) or two pools (in case of three pools) is known (Spott & Stange, 2008). Moreover (iii.), NO3- pools generating N2 and N2O via denitrification can be identical or different, e.g. if N2O evolved from higher enriched NO3- in deeper soil was more reduced to N2 compared to N2O evolved from N2O from shallow soil with lower enrichment, or vice versa. Apportioning N2O fluxes to NH4+ (nitrification and/or nitrifier denitrification) and NO3- (denitrification) is often conducted by NO3-labeling, measuring δ15N of emitted N2O and applying mixing equations were the measured 15N enrichment of NH4+and NO3-pool is used. However, this assumes that the average 15N enrichment of NH4+and NO3-in the soil is identical to the enrichment in the active soil domain producing N2 and/or N2O. Violation of this precondition must lead to bias in source apportionment (iv.), but to our knowledge this has not been investigated until now. Here we present conceptual models and model calculations

  9. Macroalgae δ15N values in well-mixed estuaries: Indicator of anthropogenic nitrogen input or macroalgae metabolism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Guillou, Gaël; Mornet, Françoise; Richard, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Although nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in macroalgae is widely used as a bioindicator of anthropogenic nitrogen inputs to the coastal zone, recent studies suggest the possible role of macroalgae metabolism in δ15N variability. Simultaneous determinations of δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) along the land-sea continuum, inter-species variability of δ15N and its sensitivity to environmental factors are necessary to confirm the efficiency of macroalgae δ15N in monitoring nitrogen origin in mixed-use watersheds. In this study, δ15N of annual and perennial macroalgae (Ulva sp., Enteromorpha sp., Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus) are compared to δ15N-DIN along the Charente Estuary, after characterizing δ15N of the three main DIN sources (i.e. cultivated area, pasture, sewage treatment plant outlet). During late winter and spring, when human activities produce high DIN inputs, DIN sources exhibit distinct δ15N signals in nitrate (NO) and ammonium (NH): cultivated area (+6.5 ± 0.6‰ and +9.0 ± 11.0‰), pasture (+9.2 ± 1.8‰ and +12.4‰) and sewage treatment plant discharge (+16.9 ± 8.7‰ and +25.4 ± 5.9‰). While sources show distinct δN- in this multiple source catchment, the overall mixture of NO sources - generally >95% DIN - leads to low variations of δN-NO at the mouth of the estuary (+7.7 to +8.4‰). Even if estuarine δN-NO values are not significantly different from pristine continental and oceanic site (+7.3‰ and +7.4‰), macroalgae δ15N values are generally higher at the mouth of the estuary. This highlights high anthropogenic DIN inputs in the estuary, and enhanced contribution of 15N-depleted NH in oceanic waters. Although seasonal variations in δN-NO are low, the same temporal trends in macroalgae δ15N values at estuarine and oceanic sites, and inter-species differences in δ15N values, suggest that macroalgae δ15N values might be modified by the metabolic response of macroalgae to environmental parameters (e

  10. Nitrogen and Carbon Flows Estimated by 15N and 13C Pulse-Chase Labeling during Regrowth of Alfalfa.

    PubMed Central

    Avice, J. C.; Ourry, A.; Lemaire, G.; Boucaud, J.

    1996-01-01

    The flow of 15N and 13C from storage compounds in organs remaining after defoliation (sources) to regrowing tissue (sinks), and 13C losses through root or shoot respiration were assessed by pulse-chase labeling during regrowth of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) following shoot removal. A total of 73% of labeled C and 34% of labeled N were mobilized in source organs within 30 d. Although all of the 15N from source organs was recovered in the regrowing tissue, much of the 13C was lost, mainly as CO2 respired from the root (61%) or shoot (8%), and was found to a lesser extent in sink tissue (5%). After 3, 10, or 30 d of regrowth, 87, 66, and 52% of shoot N, respectively, was derived from source tissue storage compounds; the rest resulted from translocation of fixed N2. Overall results suggest that most shoot C was linked to photosynthetic activity rather than being derived from mobilization of stored C in source organs. Furthermore, isotopic analysis of different chemical fractions of plant tissue suggests that between 14 and 58% of the shoot C derived from source tissues was linked to the mobilization of N compounds, not carbohydrates. PMID:12226391

  11. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins.

  12. Millipedes and earthworms increase the decomposition rate of 15N-labelled winter rape litter in an arable field.

    PubMed

    Martens, H; Alphei, J; Schaefer, M; Scheu, S

    2001-01-01

    Effects of millipedes and earthworms on the decomposition of 15N-labelled litter of winter oilseed rape were investigated in a microcosm field experiment over a period of 264 days on an oat field near Göttingen managed by integrated farming. A total of 32 microcosms were filled with defaunated soil. 15N-labelled rape litter was placed either on top of the soil or buried into the soil simulating mulching and ploughing, respectively. To the microcosms nine adult individuals of Blaniulus guttulatus (Diplopoda) and two of Aporrectodea caliginosa (Lumbricidae) were added separately or in combination. In general, the presence of the animals accelerated the decomposition rate of the litter material. The effects were most pronounced in the presence of Aporrectodea caliginosa. The total amount of nitrate, ammonium and the amount of 35N leached from the microcosms was increased in the presence of earthworms or of both earthworms and millipedes. Both species proved to be important members of the detritus food web of the agricultural system studied.

  13. Production, Purification, and Characterization of 15N-Labeled DNA Repair Proteins as Internal Standards for Mass Spectrometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jaruga, Pawel; Nelson, Bryant C.; Lowenthal, Mark S.; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Loseva, Olga; Coskun, Erdem; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by a variety of damaging agents, resulting in the formation of a multiplicity of lesions, which are mutagenic and cytotoxic. Unless repaired by DNA repair mechanisms before DNA replication, DNA lesions can lead to genomic instability, which is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Oxidatively induced DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair pathway with the involvement of a plethora of proteins. Cancer tissues develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues by overexpressing DNA repair proteins. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions generated by therapeutic agents before they became toxic is a major mechanism in the development of therapy resistance. Evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker of patient response. Thus, knowledge of DNA–protein expressions in disease-free and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. Our laboratory has developed methodologies that use mass spectrometry with isotope dilution for the measurement of expression of DNA repair proteins in human tissues and cultured cells. For this purpose, full-length 15N-labeled analogs of a number of human DNA repair proteins have been produced and purified to be used as internal standards for positive identification and accurate quantification. This chapter describes in detail the protocols of this work. The use of 15N-labeled proteins as internal standards for the measurement of several DNA repair proteins in vivo is also presented. PMID:26791985

  14. Ner protein of phage Mu: Assignments using {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strzelecka, T.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    The Ner protein is a small (74-amino acid) DNA-binding protein that regulates a switch between the lysogenic and lytic stages of phage Mu. It inhibits expression of the C repressor gene and down-regulates its own expression. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled protein provided most of the backbone and some of the sidechain proton assignments. The secondary structure determination using two-dimensional NOESY experiments showed that Ner consists of five {alpha}-helices. However, because most of the sidechain protons could not be assigned, the full structure was not determined. Using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled Ner and a set of three-dimensional experiments, we were able to assign all of the backbone and 98% of the sidechain protons. In particular, the CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH experiments were used to sequentially assign the C{alpha} and C{beta} resonances; the HCCH-CTOCSY and HCCH-COSY were used to assign sidechain carbon and proton resonances.

  15. Identification of the magnesium-histidine stretching vibration of the bacteriochlorophyll cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers via {sup 15}N-labeling of the histidines

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, K.; Bocian, D.F.; Chynwat, V.; Erickson, J.P.; Frank, H.A.

    1997-03-12

    In this communication, we report low-frequency, near-infrared-exciation RR spectra of bacterial RCs in which the histidine residues of the protein are selectively labeled with {sup 15}N. For practical reasons, the studies were conducted by comparing the vibrational signatures of RCs in which {sup 15}N was universally incorporated (all cofactors and all protein residues) (designated all-{sup 15}N RCs) with those in which [{sup 14}N]histidine was introduced as a reverse label (disignated {sup 14}N-His RCs) into the all {sup 15}N-labeled RCs. The studies of the histidine-labeled RCs reveal that the vibrational characteristics of the BChl core are far more complicated than originally anticipated. These results have clear implications for the photoexcitation dynamics of the BChls in RCs and may also have significant consequences for the dynamics of exogenous ligand binding to heme-based oxygen carriers. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Estimation of internal and external nitrogen for corals with a long-term 15N-labelling experiment and subsequent model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuaki; Grottoli, Andréa; Matsui, Yohei; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Coral reef ecosystems maintain high primary productivity though the seawater is extremely oligotrophic. One of the hypotheses to explain this paradox is the recycling of nutrients in animal-algal symbiotic organisms such as corals. It is relatively easy to measure nutrient uptake rates by corals from seawater, but the proportion of internally circulating nutrients between the coral host and the endosymbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) is more challenging. Here, we performed a long-term and continuous 15N-labelling experiment to quantify the proportionate contribution of seawater (external N source) and the animal host (internal N source) to the total N influx in the endosymbiotic algae. Branches from the scleractinian corals Porites cylindrica and Montipora digitata from Okinawa, Japan, were cultured for 2 months in indoor, flow-through, filtered seawater tanks with the continuous supply of 15N-labelled nitrate. At the initial and after 2, 4, and 9 weeks of the study, coral branches were collected and the algal and animal fractions were separated for isotopic analyses. In both corals, the N isotope ratio of symbiotic algae exponentially increased and the values were much higher than those of the host tissue, suggesting that the algae had a faster turnover N time than the animal host. Algal and host N biomass normalized to the coral surface area slowly decreased in both coral species over the study period. To calculate the contribution of internal and external N, a simple mixing model of algal N metabolism was designed. Using differential equations of 15N balance and N biomass balance, F1 and F2 (external and internal N fluxes to symbiotic algae, respectively) were expressed as the functions of time. The model calculations showed that F2 was much higher than F1 in P. cylindrica and the percentage of internal N to the total influx N (PIN) was >70%. On the other hand, the contribution of F1 and F2 was comparable in M. digitata and the PIN was 40-70%. These results

  17. Determination of Multimodal Isotopic Distributions: The Case of a (15)N Labeled Protein Produced into Hairy Roots.

    PubMed

    Trouillard, Romain; Hubert-Roux, Marie; Tognetti, Vincent; Guilhaudis, Laure; Plasson, Carole; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Coquet, Laurent; Guerineau, François; Hardouin, Julie; Ele Ekouna, Jean-Pierre; Cosette, Pascal; Lerouge, Patrice; Boitel-Conti, Michèle; Afonso, Carlos; Ségalas-Milazzo, Isabelle

    2015-06-16

    Isotopic labeling is widely used in various fields like proteomics, metabolomics, fluxomics, as well as in NMR structural studies, but it requires an efficient determination of the isotopic enrichment. Mass spectrometry is the method of choice for such analysis. However, when complex expression systems like hairy roots are used for production, multiple populations of labeled proteins may be obtained. If the isotopic incorporation determination is actually well-known for unimodal distributions, the multimodal distributions have scarcely been investigated. Actually, only a few approaches allow the determination of the different labeled population proportions from multimodal distributions. Furthermore, they cannot be used when the number of the populations and their respective isotope ratios are unknown. The present study implements a new strategy to measure the (15)N labeled populations inside a multimodal distribution knowing only the peptide sequence and peak intensities from mass spectrometry analyses. Noteworthy, it could be applied to other elements, like carbon and hydrogen, and extended to a larger range of biomolecules.

  18. Partitioning Residue-derived and Residue-induced Emissions of N2O Using 15N-labelled Crop Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, R. E.; Carverhill, J.; Lemke, R.; Knight, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of N2O emissions in Canada indicate that 17% of all agriculture-based emissions are associated with the decomposition of crop residues. However, research specific to the western Canadian prairies (including Saskatchewan) has shown that the N2O emission factor for N sources in this region typically ranges between 0.2 and 0.6%, which is well below the current IPCC default emission factor of 1.0%. Thus, it stands to reason that emissions from crop residues should also be lower than those calculated using the current IPCC emission factor. Current data indicates that residue decomposition, N mineralization and N2O production are affected by a number of factors such as C:N ratio and chemical composition of the residue, soil type, and soil water content; thus, a bench-scale incubation study was conducted to examine the effects of soil type and water content on N2O emissions associated with the decomposition of different crop residues. The study was carried out using soils from the Black, Dark Brown, Brown, and Gray soil zones and was conducted at both 50% and 70% water-filled pore space (WFPS); the soils were amended with 15N-labeled residues of wheat, pea, canola, and flax, or with an equivalent amount of 15N-labeled urea; 15N2O production was monitored using a Picarro G5101-i isotopic N2O analyzer. Crop residue additions to the soils resulted in both direct and indirect emissions of N2O, with residue derived emissions (RDE; measured as 15N2O) generally exceeding residue-induced emissions (RIE) at 50% WFPS—with RDEs ranging from 42% to 88% (mean = 58%) of the total N2O. Conversely, at 70% WFPS, RDEs were generally lower than RIEs—ranging from 21% to 83% (mean = 48%). Whereas both water content and soil type had an impact on N2O production, there was a clear and consistent trend in the emission factors for the residues; i.e., emissions were always greatest for the canola residue and lowest for the wheat residue and urea fertilizer; and intermediate for pea

  19. A facile method for expression and purification of (15)N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Armand, Tara; Ball, K Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with (15)N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the (15)N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼ 6 mg/L culture for (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with (15)N and (13)C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants.

  20. Expression, purification, and mass spectrometric analysis of 15N, 13C-labeled RGD-hirudin, expressed in Pichia pastoris, for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yinong; Zhang, Yanling; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jue; Liu, Xingang; Dai, Linsen; Wang, Longsheng; Yu, Min; Mo, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A novel recombinant hirudin, RGD-hirudin, inhibits the activity of thrombin and the aggregation of platelets. Here, we successfully expressed (15)N, (13)C-labeled RGD-hirudin in Pichia pastoris in a fermenter. The protein was subsequently purified to yield sufficient quantities for structural and functional studies. The purified protein was characterized by HPLC and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. Analysis revealed that the protein was pure and uniformly labeled with (15)N and (13)C. A bioassay showed that the anti-thrombin activity and the anti-platelet aggregation ability of the labeled protein were the same as those of unlabeled RGD-hirudin. Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine almost complete backbone (15)N, (13)C and (1)H resonance assignments of the r-RGD-Hirudin. The (15)N-(1)H HSQC spectrum of uniformly (15)N, (13)C-labeled RGD-hirudin allowed successful assignment of the signals. Examples of the quality of the data are provided for the (15)N-(l)H correlation spectrum, and by selected planes of the CBCA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and HNCO experiments. These results provide a basis for further studies on the structure-function relationship of RGD-hirudin with thrombin and platelets. PMID:22879918

  1. hNCOcanH pulse sequence and a robust protocol for rapid and unambiguous assignment of backbone ((1)H(N), (15)N and (13)C') resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence named as hNCOcanH has been described to aid rapid sequential assignment of backbone resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. The experiment has been derived by a simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147]; t2 evolution is used to frequency label (13)C' rather than (15)N (similar trick has also been used in the design of hNCAnH pulse sequence from hNcaNH [Frueh et al., JACS, 131 (2009) 12880-12881]). The modification results in a spectrum equivalent to HNCO, but in addition to inter-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi , Ci-1), the spectrum also contains additional intra-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi-1 , Ci-1) in the direct proton dimension which has maximum resolution. This is the main strength of the experiment and thus, even a small difference in amide (1) H chemical shifts (5-6 Hz) can be used for establishing a sequential connectivity. This experiment in combination with the HNN experiment described previously [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] leads to a more robust assignment protocol for backbone resonances ((1) H(N) , (15)N) than could be derived from the combination of HNN and HN(C)N experiments [Bhavesh et al., Biochemistry, 40 (2001) 14727-14735]. Further, this new protocol enables assignment of (13)C' resonances as well. We believe that the experiment and the protocol presented here will be of immense value for structural-and functional-proteomics research by NMR. Performance of this experiment has been demonstrated using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin.

  2. Simultaneous CT-13C and VT-15N chemical shift labelling: application to 3D NOESY-CH3NH and 3D 13C,15N HSQC-NOESY-CH3NH.

    PubMed

    Uhrín, D; Bramham, J; Winder, S J; Barlow, P N

    2000-11-01

    Based on the HSQC scheme, we have designed a 2D heterocorrelated experiment which combines constant time (CT) 13C and variable time (VT) 15N chemical shift labelling. Although applicable to all carbons, this mode is particularly suitable for simultaneous recording of methyl-carbon and nitrogen chemical shifts at high digital resolution. The methyl carbon magnetisation is in the transverse plane during the whole CT period (1/J(CC) = 28.6 ms). The magnetisation originating from NH protons is initially stored in the 2HzNz state, then prior to the VT chemical shift labelling period is converted into 2HzNy coherence. The VT -15N mode eliminates the effect of 1J(N,CO) and 1,2J(N,CA) coupling constants without the need for band-selective carbon pulses. An optional editing procedure is incorporated which eliminates signals from CH2 groups, thus removing any potential overlap with the CH3 signals. The CT-13CH3,VT-15N HSQC building block is used to construct two 3D experiments: 3D NOESY-CH3NH and 3D 13C,15N HSQC-NOESY-CH3NH. Combined use of these experiments yields proton and heteronuclear chemical shifts for moieties experiencing NOEs with CH3 and NH protons. These NOE interactions are resolved as a consequence of the high digital resolution in the carbon and nitrogen chemical shifts of CH3 and NH groups, respectively. The techniques are illustrated using a double labelled sample of the CH domain from calponin.

  3. hNCOcanH pulse sequence and a robust protocol for rapid and unambiguous assignment of backbone ((1)H(N), (15)N and (13)C') resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence named as hNCOcanH has been described to aid rapid sequential assignment of backbone resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. The experiment has been derived by a simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147]; t2 evolution is used to frequency label (13)C' rather than (15)N (similar trick has also been used in the design of hNCAnH pulse sequence from hNcaNH [Frueh et al., JACS, 131 (2009) 12880-12881]). The modification results in a spectrum equivalent to HNCO, but in addition to inter-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi , Ci-1), the spectrum also contains additional intra-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi-1 , Ci-1) in the direct proton dimension which has maximum resolution. This is the main strength of the experiment and thus, even a small difference in amide (1) H chemical shifts (5-6 Hz) can be used for establishing a sequential connectivity. This experiment in combination with the HNN experiment described previously [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] leads to a more robust assignment protocol for backbone resonances ((1) H(N) , (15)N) than could be derived from the combination of HNN and HN(C)N experiments [Bhavesh et al., Biochemistry, 40 (2001) 14727-14735]. Further, this new protocol enables assignment of (13)C' resonances as well. We believe that the experiment and the protocol presented here will be of immense value for structural-and functional-proteomics research by NMR. Performance of this experiment has been demonstrated using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin. PMID:21818779

  4. Intestinal renal metabolism of L-citrulline and L-arginine following enteral or parenteral infusion of L-alanyl-L-[2,15N]glutamine or L-[2,15N]glutamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Boelens, Petra G; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2005-10-01

    Previously, we observed increased plasma arginine (ARG) concentrations after glutamine (GLN)-enriched diets, in combination with clinical benefits. GLN delivers nitrogen for ARG synthesis, and the present study was designed to quantify the interorgan relationship of exogenous L-GLN or GLN dipeptide, by enteral or parenteral route, contributing to intestinal citrulline (CIT) and renal de novo ARG synthesis in mice. To study this, we used a multicatheterized mouse model with Swiss mice (n = 43) in the postabsorptive state. Stable isotopes were infused into the jugular vein or into the duodenum {per group either free L-[2,(15)N]GLN or dipeptide L-ALA-L-[2,(15)N]GLN, all with L-[ureido-(13)C-(2)H(2)]CIT and L-[guanidino-(15)N(2)-(2)H(2)]ARG} to establish renal and intestinal ARG and CIT metabolism. Blood flow was measured using (14)C-para-aminohippuric acid. Net intestinal CIT release, renal uptake of CIT, and net renal ARG efflux was found, as assessed by arteriovenous flux measurements. Quantitatively, more de novo L-[2,(15)N]CIT was produced when free L-[2,(15)N]GLN was given than when L-ALA-L-[2,(15)N]GLN was given, whereas renal de novo L-[2,(15)N]ARG was similar in all groups. In conclusion, the intestinal-renal axis is hereby proven in mice in that L-[2,(15)N]GLN or dipeptide were both converted into de novo renal L-[2,(15)N]ARG; however, not all was derived from intestinal L-[2,(15)N]CIT production. In this model, the feeding route and form of GLN did not influence de novo renal ARG production derived from GLN.

  5. An economic approach to efficient isotope labeling in insect cells using homemade 15N-, 13C- and 2H-labeled yeast extracts.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Christian; Isogai, Shin; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Heterologous expression of proteins in insect cells is frequently used for crystallographic structural studies due to the high yields even for challenging proteins requiring the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities of the host. However for NMR studies, the need for isotope labeling poses extreme challenges in eukaryotic hosts. Here, we describe a robust method to achieve uniform protein (15)N and (13)C labeling of up to 90 % in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The approach is based on the production of labeled yeast extract, which is subsequently supplemented to insect cell growth media. The method also allows deuteration at levels of >60 % without decrease in expression yield. The economic implementation of the labeling procedures into a standard structural biology laboratory environment is described in a step-by-step protocol. Applications are demonstrated for a variety of NMR experiments using the Abelson kinase domain, GFP, and the beta-1 adrenergic receptor as examples. Deuterated expression of the latter provides spectra of very high quality of a eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptor.

  6. Worms from venus and mars: proteomics profiling of sexual differences in Caenorhabditis elegans using in vivo 15N isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Tops, Bastiaan B J; Gauci, Sharon; Heck, Albert J R; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Hermaphrodites of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produce both sperm and oocytes in the same germline. To investigate the process underlying spermatogenesis and oogenesis separately, we used a quantitative proteomics approach applied to two mutant worm lines (fem-3(q20) and fem-1(hc17)) developing only male and female germlines, respectively. We used stable isotopic labeling of whole animals by feeding them either (14)N or (15)N labeled Escherichia coli. This way, we could confidently identify and quantify 1040 proteins in two independent experiments. Of these, approximately 400 proteins showed significant differential expression between female-like and male-like animals. As expected, proteins linked to oogenesis were found to be highly upregulated in the feminized worms, whereas proteins involved in spermatogenesis were found to be highly upregulated in the masculinized worms. This was complemented by many proteins strongly enriched in either mutant. Although the function of the majority of these proteins is unknown, their expression profile indicates that they have an as yet unrecognized role in the development and/or function of the female- and male germline in C. elegans. We show that members of several protein complexes as well as functionally similar proteins show comparable abundance ratios, indicating coregulation of protein expression. Additional analysis comparing our protein data to a previously published microarray data set shows that mRNA and protein expression are poorly correlating. We provide one of the first examples of a large-scale quantitative proteomics experiment in C. elegans and show the potential and feasibility of an approach enabling system-wide accurate quantitative proteomics experiments in this model organism. PMID:19916504

  7. Interresidue carbonyl-carbonyl polarization transfer experiments in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Rafal; Ritz, Emily; Gravelle, Andrew; Shi, Lichi; Peng, Xiaohu; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that Homonuclear Rotary Resonance Recoupling (HORROR) can be used to reintroduce carbonyl-carbonyl interresidue dipolar interactions and to achieve efficient polarization transfer between carbonyl atoms in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled peptides and proteins. We show that the HORROR condition is anisotropically broadened and overall shifted to higher radio frequency intensities because of the CSA effects. These effects are analyzed theoretically using Average Hamiltonian Theory. At spinning frequencies used in this study, 22 kHz, this broadening is experimentally found to be on the order of a kilohertz at a proton field of 600 MHz. To match HORROR condition over all powder orientations, variable amplitude radio frequency (RF) fields are required, and efficient direct transfers on the order of 20-30% can be straightforwardly established. Two- and three-dimensional chemical shift correlation experiments establishing long-range interresidue connectivities (e.g., (N[i]-CO[i - 2])) are demonstrated on the model peptide N-acetyl-valine-leucine, and on the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. Possible future developments are discussed.

  8. Decomposition and nitrogen dynamics of 15N-labeled leaf, root, and twig litter in temperate coniferous forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Huysen, Tiff L.; Harmon, Mark E.; Perakis, Steven S.; Chen, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Litter nutrient dynamics contribute significantly to biogeochemical cycling in forest ecosystems. We examined how site environment and initial substrate quality influence decomposition and nitrogen (N) dynamics of multiple litter types. A 2.5-year decomposition study was installed in the Oregon Coast Range and West Cascades using 15N-labeled litter from Acer macrophyllum, Picea sitchensis, and Pseudotsuga menziesii. Mass loss for leaf litter was similar between the two sites, while root and twig litter exhibited greater mass loss in the Coast Range. Mass loss was greatest from leaves and roots, and species differences in mass loss were more prominent in the Coast Range. All litter types and species mineralized N early in the decomposition process; only A. macrophyllum leaves exhibited a net N immobilization phase. There were no site differences with respect to litter N dynamics despite differences in site N availability, and litter N mineralization patterns were species-specific. For multiple litter × species combinations, the difference between gross and net N mineralization was significant, and gross mineralization was 7–20 % greater than net mineralization. The mineralization results suggest that initial litter chemistry may be an important driver of litter N dynamics. Our study demonstrates that greater amounts of N are cycling through these systems than may be quantified by only measuring net mineralization and challenges current leaf-based biogeochemical theory regarding patterns of N immobilization and mineralization.

  9. Insights into nitrogen allocation and recycling from nitrogen elemental analysis and 15N isotope labelling in 14 genotypes of willow.

    PubMed

    Brereton, Nicholas J B; Pitre, Frederic E; Shield, Ian; Hanley, Steven J; Ray, Michael J; Murphy, Richard J; Karp, Angela

    2014-11-01

    Minimizing nitrogen (N) fertilization inputs during cultivation is essential for sustainable production of bioenergy and biofuels. The biomass crop willow (Salix spp.) is considered to have low N fertilizer requirements due to efficient recycling of nutrients during the perennial cycle. To investigate how successfully different willow genotypes assimilate and allocate N during growth, and remobilize and consequently recycle N before the onset of winter dormancy, N allocation and N remobilization (to and between different organs) were examined in 14 genotypes of a genetic family using elemental analysis and (15)N as a label. Cuttings were established in pots in April and sampled in June, August and at onset of senescence in October. Biomass yield of the trees correlated well with yields recorded in the field. Genotype-specific variation was observed for all traits measured and general trends spanning these sampling points were identified when trees were grouped by biomass yield. Nitrogen reserves in the cutting fuelled the entirety of the canopy establishment, yet earlier cessation of this dependency was linked to higher biomass yields. The stem was found to be the major N reserve by autumn, which constitutes a major source of N loss at harvest, typically every 2-3 years. These data contribute to understanding N remobilization in short rotation coppice willow and to the identification of traits that could potentially be selected for in breeding programmes to further improve the sustainability of biomass production.

  10. A solution NMR study of the selectively 13C, 15N-labeled peptaibol chrysospermin C in methanol.

    PubMed

    Anders, R; Wenschuh, H; Soskic, V; Fischer-Frühholz, S; Ohlenschläger, O; Dornberger, K; Brown, L R

    1998-07-01

    The conformation of the 19-residue peptaibol chrysospermin C in methanol has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy using selective 15N and 13C labeling of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues. Complete 1H and 13C sequential assignments, including stereospecific assignments for the heavily overlapped resonances from the two Cbeta methyl groups of the eight Aib residues, are reported for a peptaibol for the first time. An Aib residue followed by a Pro is an exception to previous suggestions regarding stereospecific assignment of the two Cbeta methyl groups of Aib residues. Local nuclear Overhauser effects and 3J(HNC') and 3J(HNCbeta) scalar couplings indicate that the phi angles of the Aib residues are restricted sterically to local conformations consistent with right-handed helices. Despite these constraints on the eight Aib residues, the NMR data for chrysospermin C in methanol are generally most consistent with an ensemble of transient conformations, including backbone conformations inconsistent with helical structures. Initial NMR measurements for chrysospermin C bound to micelles suggest structural and dynamic differences relative to alamethicin bound to micelles which may be related to differences in gating voltages for formation of ion channels.

  11. Interresidue carbonyl-carbonyl polarization transfer experiments in uniformly 13C,15N-labeled peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Janik, Rafal; Ritz, Emily; Gravelle, Andrew; Shi, Lichi; Peng, Xiaohu; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that Homonuclear Rotary Resonance Recoupling (HORROR) can be used to reintroduce carbonyl-carbonyl interresidue dipolar interactions and to achieve efficient polarization transfer between carbonyl atoms in uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled peptides and proteins. We show that the HORROR condition is anisotropically broadened and overall shifted to higher radio frequency intensities because of the CSA effects. These effects are analyzed theoretically using Average Hamiltonian Theory. At spinning frequencies used in this study, 22kHz, this broadening is experimentally found to be on the order of a kilohertz at a proton field of 600MHz. To match HORROR condition over all powder orientations, variable amplitude radio frequency (RF) fields are required, and efficient direct transfers on the order of 20-30% can be straightforwardly established. Two- and three-dimensional chemical shift correlation experiments establishing long-range interresidue connectivities (e.g., (N[i]-CO[i-2])) are demonstrated on the model peptide N-acetyl-valine-leucine, and on the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. Possible future developments are discussed. PMID:20060344

  12. 13C- and 15N-Labeling Strategies Combined with Mass Spectrometry Comprehensively Quantify Phospholipid Dynamics in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Robin; Gafken, Philip R.; Olsen, Carissa Perez

    2015-01-01

    Membranes define cellular and organelle boundaries, a function that is critical to all living systems. Like other biomolecules, membrane lipids are dynamically maintained, but current methods are extremely limited for monitoring lipid dynamics in living animals. We developed novel strategies in C. elegans combining 13C and 15N stable isotopes with mass spectrometry to directly quantify the replenishment rates of the individual fatty acids and intact phospholipids of the membrane. Using multiple measurements of phospholipid dynamics, we found that the phospholipid pools are replaced rapidly and at rates nearly double the turnover measured for neutral lipid populations. In fact, our analysis shows that the majority of membrane lipids are replaced each day. Furthermore, we found that stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs), critical enzymes in polyunsaturated fatty acid production, play an unexpected role in influencing the overall rates of membrane maintenance as SCD depletion affected the turnover of nearly all membrane lipids. Additionally, the compromised membrane maintenance as defined by LC-MS/MS with SCD RNAi resulted in active phospholipid remodeling that we predict is critical to alleviate the impact of reduced membrane maintenance in these animals. Not only have these combined methodologies identified new facets of the impact of SCDs on the membrane, but they also have great potential to reveal many undiscovered regulators of phospholipid metabolism. PMID:26528916

  13. Selective observation of biologically important 15N-labeled metabolites in isolated rat brain and liver by 1H-detected multiple-quantum-coherence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.; Parivar, Farhad

    Four cerebral metabolites of importance in neurotransmission, serotonin, L-tryptophan, L-glutamine, and N-acetyl- L-aspartate, and two hepatic urea-cycle intermediates, citrulline and urea, were found to be observable by 1H- 15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum-coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy in aqueous solution at physiological pH and temperature, through the protons spin-coupled to their indole, amide, or ureido nitrogen. Their 1H chemical shifts were well dispersed over a 5-10 ppm region while the 1J 15N- 1H values were 87-99 Hz. For [γ- 15N]glutamine, a 50- to 100-fold increase in sensitivity over direct 15N detection was achieved, in contrast to a 2-fold increase by the polarization-transfer method. In the isolated brain of portacaval-shunted rats, the amide protons of biologically 15N-enriched [γ- 15N]glutamine were observed in 2 min of acquisition, with suppression of proton signals from all other cerebral metabolites. In isolated liver of 15N-enriched control rats, [ 15NIurea protons were observed in 16 min. The HMQC method is likely to be effective for the in vivo study of cerebral and hepatic nitrogen metabolism.

  14. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly 13C/15N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive 13C/15N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of 13C/15N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% 13C-glycerol and 0.5% 15N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of 13C/15N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  15. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-06-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive (13)C/(15)N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of (13)C/(15)N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% (13)C-glycerol and 0.5% (15)N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of (13)C/(15)N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state.

  16. Differential 14N/15N-Labeling of Peptides Using N-Terminal Charge Derivatization with a High-Proton Affinity for Straightforward de novo Peptide Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nihashi, Yoichiro; Miyashita, Masahiro; Awane, Hiroyuki; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    While de novo peptide sequencing is essential in many situations, it remains a difficult task. This is because peptide fragmentation results in complicated and often incomplete product ion spectra. In a previous study, we demonstrated that N-terminal charge derivatization with 4-amidinobenzoic acid (Aba) resulted in improved peptide fragmentation under low-energy CID conditions. However, even with this derivatization, some ambiguity exists, due to difficulties in discriminating between N- and C-terminal fragments. In this study, to specifically identify b-ions from complex product ion spectra, the differential 14N/15N-labeling of peptides was performed using Aba derivatization. 15N-Labeled Aba was synthesized in the form of a succinimide ester. Peptides were derivatized individually with 14N-Aba or 15N-Aba and analyzed by ESI-MS/MS using a linear ion trap-Orbitrap hybrid FTMS system. The N-terminal fragments (i.e., b-ions) were then identified based on m/z differences arising from isotope labeling. By comparing the spectra between 14N- and 15N-Aba derivatized peptides, b-ions could be successfully identified based on the m/z shifts, which provided reliable sequencing results for all of the peptides examined in this study. The method developed in this study allows the easy and reliable de novo sequencing of peptides, which is useful in peptidomics and proteomics studies. PMID:24860714

  17. Importance of bacterivory and preferential selection toward diatoms in larvae of Crepidula fornicata (L.) assessed by a dual stable isotope (13C, 15N) labeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Fanny; Riera, Pascal; Jeanthon, Christian; Edmond, Frédérique; Leroux, Cédric; Comtet, Thierry

    2012-05-01

    In Europe, the gastropod Crepidula fornicata is an invasive species characterized by a long reproductive period (from February to November). Thus, its larvae are exposed to variations in available food sources (in terms of quantity and quality). We aimed to investigate if bacteria could contribute to larval food both in presence or absence of phytoplankton, and to compare these results to seasonal variations of bacteria and phytoplankton abundances at a coastal site in the English Channel. First, ingestion of fluorescent beads of 0.5 to 2 μm diameter, showed that larvae were able to ingest particles of typical bacterial size. Then we used a dual stable isotope labeling approach which consisted in labeling a bacterial pelagic community with 15N and a diatom (Chaetoceros gracilis) culture with 13C, and supplying larvae with 15N-labeled bacteria, 13C-labeled diatoms, and both labeled sources. This technique has, to our knowledge, never been applied to invertebrate larvae. After 24 h of experiment, larvae were significantly enriched in all treatments: + 21.5‰ (∆δ13C) when supplied with diatoms, + 1364‰ (∆δ15N) when supplied with bacteria, and + 24‰ (∆δ13C) and + 135‰ (∆δ15N) when supplied with the two mixed sources. These results indicated that bacteria can contribute to the larval nutrition in C. fornicata, even in the presence of phytoplankton. Our results however suggested that larvae of C. fornicata preferentially used diatoms and showed that the supply of free bacteria did not alter the uptake of diatoms. Considering the seasonal variations of bacteria and phytoplankton abundances at the study site, these results suggested that bacteria may constitute a complementary resource for the larvae of C. fornicata when phytoplankton is abundant and may become a substitute resource when phytoplankton is less available. This approach offers promising perspectives to trace food sources and assess nitrogen and carbon fluxes between planktotrophic larvae

  18. Uniform {sup 15}N- and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeling of proteins in mammalian cells and solution structure of the amino terminal fragment of u-PA

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Petros, A.M.; Meadows, R.P.; Mazar, A.P.; Nettesheim, D.G.; Pederson, T.M.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) is a 54-kDa glycoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, a broad-specificity protease responsible for the degradation of fibrin clots and extracellular matrix components. The u-PA protein consists of three individual modules: a growth factor domain (GFD), a kringle, and a serine protease domain. The amino terminal fragment (ATF) includes the GFD-responsible for u-PA binding to its receptor-and the kringle domains. This protein was expressed and uniformly {sup 15}N-and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled in mammalian cells by methods that will be described. In addition, we present the three-dimensional structure of ATF that was derived from 1299 NOE-derived distance restraints along with the {phi} angle and hydrogen bonding restraints. Although the individual domains in the structures were highly converged, the two domains are structurally independent. The overall structures of the individual domains are very similar to the structures of homologous proteins. However, important structural differences between the growth factor domain of u-PA and other homologous proteins were observed in the region that has been implicated in binding the urokinase receptor. These results may explain, in part, why other growth factors show no appreciable affinity for the urokinase receptor.

  19. Artifact suppression in electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of 14N- and 15N-labeled nitroxyl radicals with asymmetric absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Wataru; Miyake, Yusuke; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    This article describes an improved method for suppressing image artifacts in the visualization of 14N- and 15N-labeled nitroxyl radicals in a single image scan using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The purpose of this work was to solve the problem of asymmetric EPR absorption spectra in spectral processing. A hybrid function of Gaussian and Lorentzian lineshapes was used to perform spectral line-fitting to successfully separate the two kinds of nitroxyl radicals. This approach can process the asymmetric EPR absorption spectra of the nitroxyl radicals being measured, and can suppress image artifacts due to spectral asymmetry. With this improved visualization method and a 750-MHz continuous-wave EPR imager, a temporal change in the distributions of a two-phase paraffin oil and water/glycerin solution system was visualized using lipophilic and hydrophilic nitroxyl radicals, i.e., 2-(14-carboxytetradecyl)-2-ethyl-4,4-dimethyl-3-oxazolidinyloxy (16-DOXYL stearic acid) and 4-hydroxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-d17-1-15N-1-oxyl (TEMPOL-d17-15N). The results of the two-phase separation experiment verified that reasonable artifact suppression could be achieved by the present method that deals with asymmetric absorption spectra in the EPR imaging of 14N- and 15N-labeled nitroxyl radicals.

  20. Sensitivity-Enhanced MQ-HCN-CCH-TOCSY and MQ-HCN-CCH-COSY Pulse Schemes for 13C/ 15N Labeled RNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weidong; Jiang, Licong; Gosser, Yuying Q.

    2000-07-01

    Sensitivity enhanced multiple-quantum 3D HCN-CCH-TOCSY and HCN-CCH-COSY experiments are presented for the ribose resonance assignment of 13C/15N-labeled RNA sample. The experiments make use of the chemical shift dispersion of N1/N9 of pyrimidine/purine to distinguish the ribose spin systems. They provide a complementary approach for the assignment of ribose resonance to the currently used HCCH-COSY and HCCH-TOCSY type experiments in which either 13C or 1H is utilized to separate the different ribose spin systems. The pulse schemes have been demonstrated on a 23-mer 13C/15N-labeled RNA aptamer complexed with neomycin and tested on a 32-mer RNA complexed with a 23-residue peptide.

  1. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  2. Measurement of 13C and 15N isotope labeling by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry to study amino acid fluxes in a plant-microbe symbiotic association.

    PubMed

    Molero, Gemma; Aranjuelo, Iker; Teixidor, Pilar; Araus, José Luis; Nogués, Salvador

    2011-03-15

    We have developed a method based on a double labeling with stable isotopes and gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) analyses to study amino acid exchange in a symbiotic plant-microbe association. Isotopic precision was studied for 21 standards including 15 amino acid derivatives, three N-protected amino acid methyl esters, three amines and one international standard. High correlations were observed between the δ(13)C and δ(15)N values obtained by GC/C/IRMS and those obtained by an elemental analyzer (EA) coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (R(2) = 0.9868 and 0.9992, respectively). The mean precision measured was 0.04‰ for δ(13)C and 0.28‰ for δ(15)N (n = 15). This method was applied in vivo to the symbiotic relationship between alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and N(2)-fixing bacteria. Plants were simultaneously labeled over 10 days with (13)C-depleted CO(2) ((12)CO(2)), which was assimilated through photosynthesis by leaves, and (15)N(2) fixed via nodules. Subsequently, the C and N isotope compositions (i.e. δ(13)C and δ(15)N) of free amino acids were analyzed in leaves and nodules by GC/C/IRMS. The method revealed the pattern of C and N exchange between leaves and nodules, highlighting that γ-aminobutanoic acid and glycine may represent an important form of C transport from leaves to the nodules. The results confirmed the validity, reliability and accuracy of the method for assessing C and N fluxes between plants and symbiotic bacteria and support the use of this technique in a broad range of metabolic and fluxomic studies.

  3. An intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH experiment for the assignment of main-chain resonances in 15N, 13C labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Mäntylahti, Sampo; Tossavainen, Helena; Hellman, Maarit; Permi, Perttu

    2009-11-01

    An improved pulse sequence, intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH, is described for establishing solely (13)C'(i), (15)N(i), (1)HN(i) connectivities in uniformly 15N/13C-labeled proteins. In comparison to the "out-and-back" style intra-HN(CA)CO experiment, the new pulse sequence offers at least two-fold higher experimental resolution in the (13)C' dimension and on average 1.6 times higher sensitivity especially for residues in alpha-helices. Performance of the new experiment was tested on a small globular protein ubiquitin and an intrinsically unfolded 110-residue cancer/testis antigen CT16/PAGE5. Use of intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH experiment in combination with the established HNCO experiment was crucial for the assignment of highly disordered CT16. PMID:19768387

  4. A new strategy for sequential assignment of intrinsically unstructured proteins based on 15N single isotope labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Gerard, Melanie; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy

    2013-11-01

    We describe a new efficient strategy for the sequential assignment of amide resonances of a conventional 15N-1H HSQC spectrum of intrinsically unfolded proteins, based on composite NOESY-TOCSY and TOCSY-NOESY mixing times. These composite mixing times lead to a Hα-proton mediated unidirectional transfer of amide to amide proton. We have implemented the composite mixing times in an HSQC-NOESY-HSQC manner to obtain directional connectivity between amides of neighbouring residues. We experimentally determine the optimal mixing times for both transfer schemes, and demonstrate its use in the assignment for both a fragment of the neuronal tau protein and for α-synuclein.

  5. Interactions of /sup 14/N:/sup 15/N stearic acid spin-label pairs: effects of host lipid alkyl chain length and unsaturation

    SciTech Connect

    Feix, J.B.; Yin, J.J.; Hyde, J.S.

    1987-06-30

    Electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) and saturation recovery electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy have been employed to examine the interactions of /sup 14/N:/sup 15/N stearic acid spin-label pairs in fluid-phase model membrane bilayers composed of a variety of phospholipids. The (/sup 14/N)-16-doxylstearate:(/sup 15/N)-16-doxylstearate (16:16) pair was utilized to measure lateral diffusion of the spin-labels, while the (/sup 14/N)-16-doxylstearate:(/sup 15/N)-5-doxylstearate (16:5) pair provided information on vertical fluctuations of the 16-doxylstearate nitroxide moiety toward the membrane surface. Three saturated host lipids of varying alkyl chain length (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC)), an ..cap alpha..-saturated, ..beta..-unsaturated lipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)), and phosphatidylcholine from a natural source (egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (egg PC)) were utilized as host lipids. Lateral diffusion of the stearic acid spin-labels was only slightly affected by alkyl chain length at a given reduced temperature (T/sub r/) in the saturated host lipids but was significantly decreased in POPC at the same T/sub r/. Lateral diffusion in DMPC, POPC, and egg PC was quite similar at 37/sup 0/C. A strong correlation was noted between lateral diffusion constants and rotational mobility of (/sup 14/N)-16-doxylstearate. Vertical fluctuations were likewise only slightly influenced by alklyl chain length but were strongly diminished in POPC and egg PC relative to the saturated systems. This diminution of the 16:5 interaction was observed even under conditions where no differences were discernible by conventional EPR.

  6. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using (13)C and (15)N labeling.

    PubMed

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA - the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method - has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to (13)C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the (13)C (14)N (-) recombinant ion and the use of the (13)C: (12)C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  7. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using 13C and 15N labeling

    PubMed Central

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA – the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method – has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to 13C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the 13C 14N - recombinant ion and the use of the 13C: 12C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  8. Paramagnetic Inversion of the Sign of the Interference Contribution to the Transverse Relaxation of the Imido Protons of the Coordinated Imidazoles in the Uniformly 15N-Labeled Cytochrome c3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Tomoaki; Harada, Erisa; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kawai, Gota; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Akutsu, Hideo

    1998-04-01

    In the spectrum of uniformly15N-labeled cytochromec3, the relative linewidths of the doublet peaks of the15N-coupled imido proton of the coordinated imidazole group were reversed on oxidation. This inversion was explained by the interference relaxation process between the electron-proton dipolar and15N-1H dipolar interactions. The inversion can be used to assign the imido protons of the coordinated imidazole groups in heme proteins.

  9. Selecting matched root architecture in tree pairs to be used for assessing N 2 fixation based on soil- 15N-labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr, Hafedh; Ghorbel, Mohamed Habib; Wallander, Håkan; Dommergues, Yvon René

    2005-03-01

    It is commonly assumed that soil- 15N-labelling provides reliable estimates of N 2 fixation in trees by matching N 2-fixing and non-N 2-fixing tree pairs. As root system is a key parameter in determining suitability of the tree pairs, we compared root architecture of Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. and Casuarina glauca Sieber ex. Spreng. (two N 2-fixing trees) with Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. and Ceratonia siliqua L. (two non-N 2-fixing trees) at 4-year-old in Mediterranean-semiarid zone. The rhizobium strain used appeared more motile than Frankia strain. A. cyanophylla and E. camaldulensis had extensive rooting area and volume of fine roots, and both species tended to develop marked horizontal rooting, compared to C. glauca and C. siliqua. Characteristics of fine- and horizontal-root components can be used in selecting matched root systems of N 2-fixing and reference-paired trees. Root architecture of C. glauca was more similar to C. siliqua, than to E. camaldulensis, and that of A. cyanophylla was more similar to E. camaldulensis than to C. siliqua. Accordingly, E. camaldulensis is an appropriate reference to estimate actual N 2 fixation by A. cyanophylla, and C. siliqua is an appropriate reference for C. glauca, when using soil- 15N-labelling method in the prevailing site environment.

  10. Determining Degradation and Synthesis Rates of Arabidopsis Proteins Using the Kinetics of Progressive 15N Labeling of Two-dimensional Gel-separated Protein Spots*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J.; Solheim, Cory; Whelan, James; Millar, A. Harvey

    2012-01-01

    The growth and development of plant tissues is associated with an ordered succession of cellular processes that are reflected in the appearance and disappearance of proteins. The control of the kinetics of protein turnover is central to how plants can rapidly and specifically alter protein abundance and thus molecular function in response to environmental or developmental cues. However, the processes of turnover are largely hidden during periods of apparent steady-state protein abundance, and even when proteins accumulate it is unclear whether enhanced synthesis or decreased degradation is responsible. We have used a 15N labeling strategy with inorganic nitrogen sources coupled to a two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional IEF/SDS-PAGE gel spots to define the rate of protein synthesis (KS) and degradation (KD) of Arabidopsis cell culture proteins. Through analysis of MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectra from 120 protein spots, we were able to quantify KS and KD for 84 proteins across six functional groups and observe over 65-fold variation in protein degradation rates. KS and KD correlate with functional roles of the proteins in the cell and the time in the cell culture cycle. This approach is based on progressive 15N labeling that is innocuous for the plant cells and, because it can be used to target analysis of proteins through the use of specific gel spots, it has broad applicability. PMID:22215636

  11. In vivo, large-scale preparation of uniformly (15)N- and site-specifically (13)C-labeled homogeneous, recombinant RNA for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Le, My T; Brown, Rachel E; Simon, Anne E; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of how ribonucleic acid (RNA) structures fold to form intricate, three-dimensional structures has provided fundamental insights into understanding the biological functions of RNA. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a particularly useful high-resolution technique to investigate the dynamic structure of RNA. Effective study of RNA by NMR requires enrichment with isotopes of (13)C or (15)N or both. Here, we present a method to produce milligram quantities of uniformly (15)N- and site-specifically (13)C-labeled RNAs using wild-type K12 and mutant tktA Escherichia coli in combination with a tRNA-scaffold approach. The method includes a double selection protocol to obtain an E. coli clone with consistently high expression of the recombinant tRNA-scaffold. We also present protocols for the purification of the tRNA-scaffold from a total cellular RNA extract and the excision of the RNA of interest from the tRNA-scaffold using DNAzymes. Finally, we showcase NMR applications to demonstrate the benefit of using in vivo site-specifically (13)C-labeled RNA. PMID:26577743

  12. NMR studies on /sup 15/N-labeled creatine (CR), creatinine (CRN), phosphocreatine (PCR), and phosphocreatinine (PCRN), and on barriers to rotation in creatine kinase-bound creatine in the enzymatic reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, G.L.; Reddick, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    Recently, the authors have synthesized /sup 15/N-2-Cr, /sup 15/N-3-Crn, /sup 15/N-2-Crn, /sup 15/N-3-PCrn, /sup 15/N-3-PCr, and /sup 15/N-2-PCr. /sup 1/H, /sup 15/N, /sup 31/P NMR data show that Crn protonates exclusively at the non-methylated ring nitrogen, confirm that PCrn is phosphorylated at the exocyclic nitrogen, and demonstrate that the /sup 31/P-/sup 15/N one-bond coupling constant in /sup 15/N-3-PCr is 18 Hz, not 3 Hz as previously reported by Brindle, K.M., Porteous, R. and Radda, G.K.. The authors have found that creatine kinase is capable of catalyzing the /sup 14/N//sup 15/N positional isotope exchange of 3-/sup 15/N-PCr in the presence of MgADP, but not in its absence. Further, the exchange does not take place when labeled PCr is resynthesized exclusively from the ternary complex E X Cr X MgATP as opposed to either E X Cr or free Cr. This suggests that the enzyme both imparts an additional rotational barrier to creatine in the complex and catalyzes the transfer of phosphoryl group with essentially complete regiospecificity.

  13. 15N Abundance of Nodules as an Indicator of N Metabolism in N2-Fixing Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Feldman, Lori; Bryan, Barbara A.; Skeeters, Jerri L.; Kohl, Daniel H.; Amarger, Nöelle; Mariotti, Françoise; Mariotti, André

    1982-01-01

    This paper expands upon previous reports of 15N elevation in nodules (compared to other tissues) of N2-fixing plants. N2-Fixing nodules of Glycine max (soybeans), Vigna unguiculata (cowpea), Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), Phaseolus coccineus (scarlet runner bean), Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite), and Olneya tesota (desert ironwood) were enriched in 15N. Nodules of Vicia faba (fava beans), Arachis hypogaea (peanut), Trifolium pratense (red clover), Pisum sativum (pea), Lathyrus sativus (grass pea), Medicago sativa (alfalfa), and Lupinus mutabilis (South American lupine) were not; nor were the nodules of nine species of N2-fixing nonlegumes. The nitrogen of ineffective nodules of soybeans and cowpeas was not enriched in 15N. Thus, 15N elevation in nodules of these plants depends on active N2-fixation. Results obtained so far on the generality of 15N enrichment in N2-fixing nodules suggest that only the nodules of plants which actively fix N2 and which transport allantoin or allantoic acid exhibit 15N enrichment. PMID:16662517

  14. Balancing the (carbon) budget: Using linear inverse models to estimate carbon flows and mass-balance 13C:15N labelling experiments in low oxygen sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, William Ross; Van Oevelen, Dick; Witte, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    Over 1 million km2 of seafloor experience permanent low-oxygen conditions within oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). OMZs are predicted to grow as a consequence of climate change, potentially affecting oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The Arabian Sea OMZ impinges upon the western Indian continental margin at bathyal depths (150 - 1500m) producing a strong depth dependent oxygen gradient at the sea floor. The influence of the OMZ upon the short term processing of organic matter by sediment ecosystems was investigated using in situ stable isotope pulse chase experiments. These deployed doses of 13C:15N labeled organic matter onto the sediment surface at four stations from across the OMZ (water depth 540 - 1100 m; [O2] = 0.35 - 15 μM). In order to prevent experimentally anoxia, the mesocosms were not sealed. 13C and 15N labels were traced into sediment, bacteria, fauna and 13C into sediment porewater DIC and DOC. However, the DIC and DOC flux to the water column could not be measured, limiting our capacity to obtain mass-balance for C in each experimental mesocosm. Linear Inverse Modeling (LIM) provides a method to obtain a mass-balanced model of carbon flow that integrates stable-isotope tracer data with community biomass and biogeochemical flux data from a range of sources. Here we present an adaptation of the LIM methodology used to investigate how ecosystem structure influenced carbon flow across the Indian margin OMZ. We demonstrate how oxygen conditions affect food-web complexity, affecting the linkages between the bacteria, foraminifera and metazoan fauna, and their contributions to benthic respiration. The food-web models demonstrate how changes in ecosystem complexity are associated with oxygen availability across the OMZ and allow us to obtain a complete carbon budget for the stationa where stable-isotope labelling experiments were conducted.

  15. H/D exchange of a 15N labelled Tau fragment as measured by a simple Relax-EXSY experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Huvent, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2014-12-01

    We present an equilibrium H/D exchange experiment to measure the exchange rates of labile amide protons in intrinsically unfolded proteins. By measuring the contribution of the H/D exchange to the apparent T1 relaxation rates in solvents of different D2O content, we can easily derive the rates of exchange for rapidly exchanging amide protons. The method does not require double isotope labelling, is sensitive, and requires limited fitting of the data. We demonstrate it on a functional fragment of Tau, and provide evidence for the hydrogen bond formation of the phosphate moiety of Ser214 with its own amide proton in the same fragment phosphorylated by the PKA kinase.

  16. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  17. hnCOcaNH and hncoCANH pulse sequences for rapid and unambiguous backbone assignment in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Reddy, Jithender G; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2010-09-01

    Time-saving in data acquisition is a major thrust of NMR pulse sequence development in the context of structural proteomics research. The conventional HNCA and HN(CA)CO pulse sequences, routinely used for sequential backbone assignment, have the limitation that they cannot distinguish inter- and intra-residue correlations. In order to remove this ambiguity, one has to record HNCO and HN(CO)CA or sequential HNCA experiments which provide unambiguous information of sequential correlations. However, this almost doubles the experimental time. Besides, they require repeated scanning through the (15)N planes to search for the matching peaks along the carbon dimension. In this background, we present here two pulse sequences, termed as hncoCANH and hnCOcaNH that lead to spectra equivalent to HNCA and HN(CA)CO spectra, respectively, but with direct distinction of inter- and intra-residue peaks; these occur with opposite signs in the new experiments. The two pulse sequences have been derived by simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] to frequency-label (13)C(alpha) or (13)C' instead of (15)N during the t(1) period. Like HN(C)N, these spectra also exhibit special patterns of self and sequential peaks around glycines and prolines, which enable direct identification of certain triplets of residues and thus provide internal checks during the sequential assignment walk. The spectra enable rapid and unambiguous assignment of H(N), (15)N and (13)C(alpha) (or (13)C') in a single experiment, and thus would be of great value in high-throughput structural proteomics. PMID:20643567

  18. Synthesis of 14N and 15N-labeled trityl-nitroxide biradicals with strong spin-spin interaction and improved sensitivity to redox status and oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangping; Villamena, Frederick A.; Song, Yuguang; Sun, Jian; Rockenbauer, Antal

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous evaluation redox status and oxygenation in biological systems is of great importance for the understanding of biological functions. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy coupled with the use of the nitroxide radicals have been an indispensable technique for this application but are still limited by its low oxygen sensitivity, and low EPR resolution in part due to the moderately broad EPR triplet and spin quenching through bioreduction. In this study, we showed that these drawbacks can be overcome through the use of trityl-nitroxide biradicals allowing for the simultaneous measurement of redox status and oxygenation. A new trityl-nitroxide biradical TNN14 composed of a pyrrolidinyl-nitroxide and a trityl, and its isotopically labeled 15N analogue TNN15 were synthesized and characterized. Both biradicals exhibited much stronger spin-spin interaction with J > 400 G than the previous synthesized trityl-nitroxide biradicals TN1 (~160 G) and TN2 (~52 G) with longer linker chain length. The enhanced stability of TNN14 was evaluated using ascorbate as reductant and the effect of different types of cyclodextrins on its stability in the presence of ascorbate was also investigated. Both biradicals are sensitive to redox status, and their corresponding trityl-hydroxylamines resulting from the reduction of the biradicals by ascorbate share the same oxygen sensitivity. Of note is that the 15N-labeled TNN15-H with an EPR doublet exhibits improved EPR signal amplitude as compared to TNN14-H with an EPR triplet. In addition, cyclic voltammetric studies verify the characteristic electrochemical behaviors of the trityl-nitroxide biradicals. PMID:21028905

  19. Analysis of metabolic flux using dynamic labelling and metabolic modelling.

    PubMed

    Fernie, A R; Morgan, J A

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic fluxes and the capacity to modulate them are a crucial component of the ability of the plant cell to react to environmental perturbations. Our ability to quantify them and to attain information concerning the regulatory mechanisms that control them is therefore essential to understand and influence metabolic networks. For all but the simplest of flux measurements labelling methods have proven to be the most informative. Both steady-state and dynamic labelling approaches have been adopted in the study of plant metabolism. Here the conceptual basis of these complementary approaches, as well as their historical application in microbial, mammalian and plant sciences, is reviewed, and an update on technical developments in label distribution analyses is provided. This is supported by illustrative cases studies involving the kinetic modelling of secondary metabolism. One issue that is particularly complex in the analysis of plant fluxes is the extensive compartmentation of the plant cell. This problem is discussed from both theoretical and experimental perspectives, and the current approaches used to address it are assessed. Finally, current limitations and future perspectives of kinetic modelling of plant metabolism are discussed. PMID:23421750

  20. Three-Dimensional Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Is Essential for Resolution of Resonances from In-Plane Residues in Uniformly 15N-Labeled Helical Membrane Proteins in Oriented Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marassi, Francesca M.; Ma, Che; Gesell, Jennifer J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2000-05-01

    Uniformly 15N-labeled samples of membrane proteins with helices aligned parallel to the membrane surface give two-dimensional PISEMA spectra that are highly overlapped due to limited dispersions of 1H-15N dipolar coupling and 15N chemical shift frequencies. However, resolution is greatly improved in three-dimensional 1H chemical shift/1H-15N dipolar coupling/15N chemical shift correlation spectra. The 23-residue antibiotic peptide magainin and a 54-residue polypeptide corresponding to the cytoplasmic domain of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu are used as examples. Both polypeptides consist almost entirely of α-helices, with their axes aligned parallel to the membrane surface. The measurement of three orientationally dependent frequencies for Val17 of magainin enabled the three-dimensional orientation of this helical peptide to be determined in the lipid bilayer.

  1. Use of a novel nitrification inhibitor to reduce nitrous oxide emission from (15)N-labelled dairy slurry injected into soil.

    PubMed

    Dittert, K; Bol, R; King, R; Chadwick, D; Hatch, D

    2001-01-01

    Recent recommendations for environmentally sound use of liquid animal manure often include injection of slurry into soil. Two of the most important undesired side effects, ammonia (NH(3)) volatilisation and odour emissions, are usually significantly reduced by slurry injection. On the other hand, because of the higher amount of nitrogen (N) remaining in soil, the risk of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) leaching and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions is increased. Thus, the reduction of local effects caused by NH(3) deposition, e.g. N enrichment and soil acidification, may be at the cost of large-scale effects such as ozone depletion and global warming as a result of emitted N(2)O. In this context, nitrification inhibitors can contribute significantly to a reduction in NO(3)(-) leaching and N(2)O production. A field experiment was carried out at IGER, North Wyke, which aimed to evaluate the effect of the new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP/ENTEC). For this experiment, (15)N enriched dairy slurry was used and the isotopic label in soil N as well as in N(2)O were studied. After slurry injection into the grassland soil in August 2000, the major emissions of N(2)O occurred during the first ten days. As expected, high N(2)O emission rates and (15)N content of the emissions were concentrated on the slurry injection slots, showing a steep decrease towards the untreated centre-point between slurry injection slots. The nitrification inhibitor DMPP proved to be very efficient in reducing N(2)O emissions. At a rate of 2 kg DMPP ha(-1), the total amount of N(2)O emitted was reduced by 32%, when compared with slurry injection without DMPP. The isotopic label of the emitted N(2)O showed that during the 22-day experimental period, emissions from the slurry N pool were strongly reduced by DMPP from 0.93 kg N(2)O-N ha(-1) (-DMPP) to 0.50 kg N(2)O-N ha(-1) (+DMPP), while only a minor effect on emissions from the soil N pool was observed (0.69 to 0.60 kg N(2)O-N ha(-1

  2. Plasma free amino acid kinetics in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using a bolus injection of 15N-labeled amino acids.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jacob William; Yanke, Dan; Mirza, Jeff; Ballantyne, James Stuart

    2011-02-01

    To gain insight into the metabolic design of the amino acid carrier systems in fish, we injected a bolus of (15)N amino acids into the dorsal aorta in mature rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The plasma kinetic parameters including concentration, pool size, rate of disappearance (R(d)), half-life and turnover rate were determined for 15 amino acids. When corrected for metabolic rate, the R(d) values obtained for trout for most amino acids were largely comparable to human values, with the exception of glutamine (which was lower) and threonine (which was higher). R(d) values ranged from 0.9 μmol 100 g(-1) h(-1) (lysine) to 22.1 μmol 100 g(-1) h(-1) (threonine) with most values falling between 2 and 6 μmol 100 g(-1) h(-1). There was a significant correlation between R(d) and the molar proportion of amino acids in rainbow trout whole body protein hydrolysate. Other kinetic parameters did not correlate significantly with whole body amino acid composition. This indicates that an important design feature of the plasma-free amino acids system involves proportional delivery of amino acids to tissues for protein synthesis.

  3. Dynamics of exogenous nitrogen partitioning and nitrogen remobilization from vegetative organs in pea revealed by 15N in vivo labeling throughout seed filling.

    PubMed

    Schiltz, Séverine; Munier-Jolain, Nathalie; Jeudy, Christian; Burstin, Judith; Salon, Christophe

    2005-04-01

    The fluxes of (1) exogenous nitrogen (N) assimilation and (2) remobilization of endogenous N from vegetative plant compartments were measured by 15N labeling during the seed-filling period in pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Cameor), to better understand the mechanism of N remobilization. While the majority (86%) of exogenous N was allocated to the vegetative organs before the beginning of seed filling, this fraction decreased to 45% at the onset of seed filling, the remainder being directed to seeds. Nitrogen remobilization from vegetative parts contributed to 71% of the total N in mature seeds borne on the first two nodes (first stratum). The contribution of remobilized N to total seed N varied, with the highest proportion at the beginning of filling; it was independent of the developmental stage of each stratum of seeds, suggesting that remobilized N forms a unique pool, managed at the whole-plant level and supplied to all filling seeds whatever their position on the plant. Once seed filling starts, N is remobilized from all vegetative organs: 30% of the total N accumulated in seeds was remobilized from leaves, 20% from pod walls, 11% from roots, and 10% from stems. The rate of N remobilization was maximal when seeds of all the different strata were filling, consistent with regulation according to the N demand of seeds. At later stages of seed filling, the rate of remobilization decreases and may become controlled by the amount of residual N in vegetative tissues.

  4. A data processing pipeline for mammalian proteome dynamics studies using stable isotope metabolic labeling.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shenheng; Price, John C; Prusiner, Stanley B; Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Burlingame, Alma L

    2011-12-01

    In a recent study, in vivo metabolic labeling using (15)N traced the rate of label incorporation among more than 1700 proteins simultaneously and enabled the determination of individual protein turnover rate constants over a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude (Price, J. C., Guan, S., Burlingame, A., Prusiner, S. B., and Ghaemmaghami, S. (2010) Analysis of proteome dynamics in the mouse brain. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 107, 14508-14513). These studies of protein dynamics provide a deeper understanding of healthy development and well-being of complex organisms, as well as the possible causes and progression of disease. In addition to a fully labeled food source and appropriate mass spectrometry platform, an essential and enabling component of such large scale investigations is a robust data processing and analysis pipeline, which is capable of the reduction of large sets of liquid chromatography tandem MS raw data files into the desired protein turnover rate constants. The data processing pipeline described in this contribution is comprised of a suite of software modules required for the workflow that fulfills such requirements. This software platform includes established software tools such as a mass spectrometry database search engine together with several additional, novel data processing modules specifically developed for (15)N metabolic labeling. These fulfill the following functions: (1) cross-extraction of (15)N-containing ion intensities from raw data files at varying biosynthetic incorporation times, (2) computation of peptide (15)N isotopic incorporation distributions, and (3) aggregation of relative isotope abundance curves for multiple peptides into single protein curves. In addition, processing parameter optimization and noise reduction procedures were found to be necessary in the processing modules in order to reduce propagation of errors in the long chain of the processing steps of the entire workflow. PMID:21937731

  5. Site-specific protein backbone and side-chain NMR chemical shift and relaxation analysis of human vinexin SH3 domain using a genetically encoded {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-labeled unnatural amino acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Xi, Zhaoyong; Wang, Hu; Shi, Chaowei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine. {yields} Site-specific incorporation of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine to SH3. {yields} Site-specific backbone and side chain chemical shift and relaxation analysis. {yields} Different internal motions at different sites of SH3 domain upon ligand binding. -- Abstract: SH3 is a ubiquitous domain mediating protein-protein interactions. Recent solution NMR structural studies have shown that a proline-rich peptide is capable of binding to the human vinexin SH3 domain. Here, an orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair for {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine ({sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-tfmF) has been applied to achieve site-specific labeling of SH3 at three different sites. One-dimensional solution NMR spectra of backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F were obtained for SH3 with three different site-specific labels. Site-specific backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F chemical shift and relaxation analysis of SH3 in the absence or presence of a peptide ligand demonstrated different internal motions upon ligand binding at the three different sites. This site-specific NMR analysis might be very useful for studying large-sized proteins or protein complexes.

  6. Quantitative Shotgun Proteomics Using a Uniform 15N-Labeled Standard to Monitor Proteome Dynamics in Time Course Experiments Reveals New Insights into the Heat Stress Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Mühlhaus, Timo; Weiss, Julia; Hemme, Dorothea; Sommer, Frederik; Schroda, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Crop-plant-yield safety is jeopardized by temperature stress caused by the global climate change. To take countermeasures by breeding and/or transgenic approaches it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying plant acclimation to heat stress. To this end proteomics approaches are most promising, as acclimation is largely mediated by proteins. Accordingly, several proteomics studies, mainly based on two-dimensional gel-tandem MS approaches, were conducted in the past. However, results often were inconsistent, presumably attributable to artifacts inherent to the display of complex proteomes via two-dimensional-gels. We describe here a new approach to monitor proteome dynamics in time course experiments. This approach involves full 15N metabolic labeling and mass spectrometry based quantitative shotgun proteomics using a uniform 15N standard over all time points. It comprises a software framework, IOMIQS, that features batch job mediated automated peptide identification by four parallelized search engines, peptide quantification and data assembly for the processing of large numbers of samples. We have applied this approach to monitor proteome dynamics in a heat stress time course using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as model system. We were able to identify 3433 Chlamydomonas proteins, of which 1116 were quantified in at least three of five time points of the time course. Statistical analyses revealed that levels of 38 proteins significantly increased, whereas levels of 206 proteins significantly decreased during heat stress. The increasing proteins comprise 25 (co-)chaperones and 13 proteins involved in chromatin remodeling, signal transduction, apoptosis, photosynthetic light reactions, and yet unknown functions. Proteins decreasing during heat stress were significantly enriched in functional categories that mediate carbon flux from CO2 and external acetate into protein biosynthesis, which also correlated with a rapid, but fully

  7. SIMS ion microscopy imaging of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine in human glioblastoma cells: Relevance of subcellular scale observations to BPA-mediated boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Lorey, Daniel R., II

    2007-02-01

    p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a clinically approved boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent currently being used in clinical trials of glioblastoma multiforme, melanoma and liver metastases. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) observations from the Cornell SIMS Laboratory provided support for using a 6 h infusion of BPA, instead of a 2 h infusion, for achieving higher levels of boron in brain tumor cells. These observations were clinically implemented in Phase II experimental trials of glioblastoma multiforme in Sweden. However, the mechanisms for higher BPA accumulation with longer infusions have remained unknown. In this work, by using 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine and T98G human glioblastoma cells, comparisons between the 10B-delivery of BPA and the accumulation of labeled phenylalanine after 2 and 6 h treatments were made with a Cameca IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution in fast frozen, freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cells. Due to the presence of the Na-K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of most mammalian cells, the cells maintain an approximately 10/1 ratio of K/Na in the intracellular milieu. Therefore, the quantitative imaging of these highly diffusible species in the identical cell in which the boron or labeled amino acid was imaged provides a rule-of-thumb criterion for validation of SIMS observations and the reliability of the cryogenic sampling. The labeled phenylalanine was detected at mass 28, as the 28(13C15N)- molecular ion. Correlative analysis with optical and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that fractured freeze-dried glioblastoma cells contained well-preserved ultrastructural details with three discernible subcellular regions: a nucleus or multiple nuclei, a mitochondria-rich perinuclear cytoplasmic region and the remaining cytoplasm. SIMS analysis revealed that the overall cellular signals of both 10B from BPA and 28CN- from labeled phenylalanine increased approximately 1.6-fold between the 2 and 6 h exposures

  8. Effect of 15 N Labeled Riparian Fertilization And Salmon Carcass Analog Addition On Food Web Dynamics And Productivity In Four Idaho Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugenski, A. T.; Kohler, A.; Minshall, G. W.; Danehy, R. J.; Taki, D.

    2005-05-01

    Nutrient budgets of stream/riparian ecosystems in the Intermountain West have been depleted through declining salmon populations and certain anthropogenic disturbances (e.g. forestry practices). We measured stream food web responses to a riparian fertilization and an in-stream carcass analog addition in 4 Idaho streams with a 15 N tracer. Aerial application of fertilizer pellets to light (224 kg/ha) and heavy (448 kg/ha) treatment sections of 2 streams and carcass analog additions to 2 others were completed in autumn. Periphyton response was measured through chlorophyll a, nutrient diffusing substrata, and stable isotope analyses. Macroinvertebrates were analyzed for abundance, biomass, community structure, and stable isotope composition. Also, willow (Salix) breakdown rates were determined. Pre-treatment chlorophyll a values showed no significant difference between treatment and reference reaches. Post-treatment results showed significantly higher chlorophyll a and δ 15 N values in treatment reaches compared to reference reaches. Macroinvertebrate abundance, richness, biomass, and δ 15 N values also increased in treated reaches. No significant differences were detected in leaf breakdown rates between reaches. Riparian fertilization effects were longer lasting than the in-stream treatment. These results suggest that nutrient addition to streams and riparian areas can be used as a management tool to increase stream productivity where nutrients are limiting.

  9. First results on the incorporation and excretion of 15N from orally administered urea in lactating pony mares.

    PubMed

    Schubert, R; Zander, R; Gruhn, K; Hennig, A

    1991-05-01

    Two lactating pony mares were given oral offers of 20 g 15N urea [95 atom-% 15N-excess (15N')] on 6 subsequent days. About 80% of the consumed 15N' were excreted via urine and faeces, but only about 2% via milk. The 15N' secreted via milk-lysine only amounted to 0.04% of the 15N' intake. The recovery was about 90% in each case. Tissues with active metabolism had an unexpectedly high labelling (greater than 0.3 atom-% 15N'). The low extent of the conversion of oral urea N into milk-lysine speaks against an essential participation of the enteral synthesis in meeting the amino acid requirement of lactating mares. It was already concluded from this results that the determination of the amino acid requirement will be necessary for this group of performance. PMID:1888274

  10. In Vitro Metabolic Labeling of Intestinal Microbiota for Quantitative Metaproteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Ning, Zhibin; Mayne, Janice; Deeke, Shelley A; Li, Jennifer; Starr, Amanda E; Chen, Rui; Singleton, Ruth; Butcher, James; Mack, David R; Stintzi, Alain; Figeys, Daniel

    2016-06-21

    Intestinal microbiota is emerging as one of the key environmental factors influencing or causing the development of numerous human diseases. Metaproteomics can provide invaluable information on the functional activities of intestinal microbiota and on host-microbe interactions as well. However, the application of metaproteomics in human microbiota studies is still largely limited, in part due to the lack of accurate quantitative intestinal metaproteomic methods. Most current metaproteomic microbiota studies are based on label-free quantification, which may suffer from variability during the separate sample processing and mass spectrometry runs. In this study, we describe a quantitative metaproteomic strategy, using in vitro stable isotopically ((15)N) labeled microbiota as a spike-in reference, to study the intestinal metaproteomes. We showed that the human microbiota were efficiently labeled (>95% (15)N enrichment) within 3 days under in vitro conditions, and accurate light-to-heavy protein/peptide ratio measurements were obtained using a high-resolution mass spectrometer and the quantitative proteomic software tool Census. We subsequently employed our approach to study the in vitro modulating effects of fructo-oligosaccharide and five different monosaccharides on the microbiota. Our methodology improves the accuracy of quantitative intestinal metaproteomics, which would promote the application of proteomics for functional studies of intestinal microbiota. PMID:27248155

  11. The fates of 15N-labeled fertilizer in a wheat–soil system as influenced by fertilization practice in a loamy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoming; Wang, Huoyan; Liu, Xiaowei; Lu, Dianjun; Zhou, Jianmin

    2016-10-01

    Appropriate fertilization practice is crucial to achieve maximum wheat grain yield with minimum nitrogen (N) loss. A field 15N micro-plot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of application methods [split application (SA) and band application (BA)] and N rates (60, 150 and 240 kg ha‑1) on the wheat grain yield, urea-15N fate and N efficiency in Jiangyan County, China. At high N rates, wheat grain yield was significantly higher for SA than BA treatment, but there was no difference at the lower N rates. Plant N derived from fertilizer was higher in SA than in BA treatment. The high N fertilizer application increased total N uptake by wheat derived from fertilizer, but wheat plant N derived from soil was not affected by the N rate. Fertilizer-N recovery in SA treatment was higher than in BA treatment. Residual N recovery in the 0–80 cm soil layer was 31–51%, which decreased with increasing N rate. The highest N loss was found for BA treatment at the N application of 240 kg ha‑1. The one-time BA of N fertilizer, especially for higher N rates, led to reduced wheat grain yield and N efficiency, and increased the N loss.

  12. The fates of 15N-labeled fertilizer in a wheat–soil system as influenced by fertilization practice in a loamy soil

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaoming; Wang, Huoyan; Liu, Xiaowei; Lu, Dianjun; Zhou, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate fertilization practice is crucial to achieve maximum wheat grain yield with minimum nitrogen (N) loss. A field 15N micro-plot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of application methods [split application (SA) and band application (BA)] and N rates (60, 150 and 240 kg ha−1) on the wheat grain yield, urea-15N fate and N efficiency in Jiangyan County, China. At high N rates, wheat grain yield was significantly higher for SA than BA treatment, but there was no difference at the lower N rates. Plant N derived from fertilizer was higher in SA than in BA treatment. The high N fertilizer application increased total N uptake by wheat derived from fertilizer, but wheat plant N derived from soil was not affected by the N rate. Fertilizer-N recovery in SA treatment was higher than in BA treatment. Residual N recovery in the 0–80 cm soil layer was 31–51%, which decreased with increasing N rate. The highest N loss was found for BA treatment at the N application of 240 kg ha−1. The one-time BA of N fertilizer, especially for higher N rates, led to reduced wheat grain yield and N efficiency, and increased the N loss. PMID:27713476

  13. Metabolic Labeling in the Study of Mammalian Ribosomal RNA Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovsky, Victor Y; Moss, Tom

    2016-01-01

    RNA metabolic labeling is a method of choice in the study of dynamic changes in the rate of gene transcription and RNA processing. It is particularly applicable to transcription of the ribosomal RNA genes and their processing products due to the very high levels of ribosomal RNA synthesis. Metabolic labeling can detect changes in ribosomal RNA transcription that occur within a few minutes as opposed to the still widely used RT-PCR or Northern blot procedures that measure RNA pool sizes and at best are able to detect changes occurring over several hours or several days. Here, we describe a metabolic labeling technique applicable to the measurement of ribosomal RNA synthesis and processing rates, as well as to the determination of RNA Polymerase I transcription elongation rates. PMID:27576716

  14. Grass species influence on plant N uptake - Determination of atmospheric N deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site using a 15N labelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Spott, Oliver; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2014-05-01

    Large areas of natural peat bogs in Northwestern Germany have been converted to arable land and were subjected to draining and peat cutting in the past. The few protected peatland areas remaining are affected by high nitrogen (N) deposition. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog - is surrounded by highly fertilized agricultural land and livestock production. In this study, we used a 15N pool dilution technique called 'Integrated Total Nitrogen Input' (ITNI) to quantify annual deposition of atmospheric N into biomonitoring pots over a two-year period. Since it considers direct N uptake by plants, it was expected to result in higher N input than conventional methods for determination of N deposition (e.g. micrometeorological approaches, bulk N samplers). Using Lolium multiflorum and Eriophorum vaginatum as monitor plants and low, medium and high levels of fertilization, we aimed to simulate increasing N deposition to planted pots and to allocate airborne N after its uptake by the soil-plant system in aboveground biomass, roots and soil. Increasing N fertilization was positively correlated with biomass production of Eriophorum vaginatum, whereas atmospheric plant N uptake decreased and highest airborne N input of 899.8 ± 67.4 µg N d-1 pot-1 was found for low N fertilization. In contrast, Lolium multiflorum showed a clear dependency of N supply on plant N uptake and was highest (688.7 ± 41.4 µg N d-1 pot-1) for highly fertilized vegetation pots. Our results suggest that grass species respond differently to increasing N input. While crop grasses such as Lolium multiflorum take up N according to N availability, species adopted to nutrient-limited conditions like Eriophorum vaginatum show N saturation effects with increasing N supply. Total airborne N input ranged from about 24 to 66 kg N ha-1 yr-1 dependent on the used indicator plant and the amount of added fertilizer. Parallel determination of atmospheric N deposition using a micrometeorological approach

  15. Post-translational heterocyclic backbone modifications in the 43-peptide antibiotic microcin B17. Structure elucidation and NMR study of a 13C,15N-labelled gyrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bayer, A; Freund, S; Jung, G

    1995-12-01

    Microcin B17 (McB17), the first known gyrase inhibitor of peptidic nature, is produced by ribosomal synthesis and post-translational modification of the 69-residue precursor protein by an Escherichia coli strain. To elucidate the chemical structure of the mature 43-residue peptide antibiotic, fermentation and purification protocols were established and optimized which allowed the isolation and purification of substantial amounts of highly pure McB17 (non-labelled, 15N-labelled and 13C/15N-labelled peptide. By ultraviolet-absorption spectroscopy. HPLC-electrospray mass spectrometry and GC-mass spectrometry, amino acid analysis, protein sequencing, and, in particular, multidimensional NMR, we could demonstrate and unequivocally prove that the enzymic modification of the precursor backbone at Gly-Cys and Gly-Ser segments leads to the formation of 2-aminomethylthiazole-4-carboxylic acid and 2-aminomethyloxazole-4-carboxylic acid, respectively. In addition, two bicyclic modifications 2-(2-aminomethyloxazolyl)thiazole-4-carboxylic acid and 2-(2-aminomethylthiazolyl)oxazole-4-carboxylic acid were found that consist of directly linked thiazole and oxazole rings derived from one Gly-Ser-Cys and one Gly-Cys-Ser segment. Analogous to the thiazole and oxazole rings found in antitumor peptides of microbial and marine origin, these heteroaromatic ring systems of McB17 presumably play an important role in its gyrase-inhibiting activity, e.g. interacting with the DNA to trap the covalent protein-DNA intermediate of the breakage-reunion reaction of the gyrase.

  16. Quantifying plant phenotypes with isotopic labeling & metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Doug K

    2016-02-01

    Analyses of metabolic flux using stable isotopes in plants have traditionally been restricted to tissues with presumed homogeneous cell populations and long metabolic steady states such as developing seeds, cell suspensions, or cultured roots and root tips. It is now possible to describe these and other metabolically more dynamic tissues such as leaves in greater detail using novel methods in mass spectrometry, isotope labeling strategies, and transient labeling-based flux analyses. Such studies are necessary for a systems level description of plant function that more closely represents biological reality, and provides insights into the genes that will need to be modified as natural resources become ever more limited and environments change. PMID:26613198

  17. Development and application of 15N-tracer substances for measuring the whole-body protein turnover rates in the human, especially in neonates: a review.

    PubMed

    Wutzke, Klaus D

    2012-06-01

    Our research group of the Children's Hospital of the University of Rostock (Rostock group) has long-time experience in (15)N-labelling and in using yeast protein and its hydrolysates for tracer kinetic studies to evaluate parameters of the whole-body protein metabolism in premature infants. The particular advantage of applying an economically convenient, highly (15)N-enriched, and completely labelled yeast protein for evaluating protein turnover rates is the fact that the (15)N dose is spread among all proteinogenic amino acids. The absorption has been improved by hydrolysing [(15)N]yeast protein with thermitase into a mixture of amino acids, dipeptides and tripeptides so that faecal analysis becomes unnecessary when determining turnover rates. The review shows that, in contrast to the application of single (15)N-labelled amino acids with resulting overestimation of protein turnover rates, the (15)N-labelled yeast protein thermitase hydrolysate represents the amino acid metabolism more closely without causing amino acid imbalances. The (15)N-labelled yeast protein thermitase hydrolysate leads to the estimation of reliable protein turnover rates, particularly in premature infants.

  18. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady, J; Schwender, J; Shachar-Hill, Y; Morgan, JA

    2012-03-26

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (CO2)-C-13 dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  19. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady J.; Schwender J.; Shachar-Hill, Y.; Morgan, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on {sup 13}CO{sub 2} dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  20. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, John; Schwender, Jörg; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Morgan, John A

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (13)CO(2) dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  1. Isotopic labeling affects 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Halloran, B.P.; Bikle, D.D.; Castro, M.E.; Gee, E.

    1989-02-07

    Isotope substitution can change the biochemical properties of vitamin D. To determine the effect of substituting 3H for 1H on the metabolism of 1,25(OH)2D3, we measured the metabolic clearance rate and renal metabolism of unlabeled and 3H-labeled 1,25(OH)2D3. Substitution of 3H for 1H on carbons 26 and 27 (1,25(OH)2(26,27(n)-3H)D3) or on carbons 23 and 24 (1,25(OH)2(23,24(n)-3H)D3) reduced the in vivo metabolic clearance rate of 1,25(OH)2D3 by 36% and 37%, respectively, and reduced the in vitro renal catabolism of 1,25(OH)2D3 by 11% and 54%, respectively. Substitutions of 3H for 1H on carbons 23 and 24 as opposed to carbons 26 and 27 reduced conversion of (3H)1,25(OH)2D3 to (3H)1,24,25(OH)2D3 by 25% and to putative 24-oxo-1,23,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by 1600%. These results indicate that substitution of 3H for 1H on carbons 26 and 27 or on carbons 23 and 24 can reduce the metabolic clearance rate and in vitro metabolism of 1,25(OH)2D3 and quantitatively alter the pattern of metabolic products produced.

  2. Measurement of 1J(Ni,Calpha(i)), 1J(Ni,C'i-1), 2J(Ni,Calpha(i-1)), 2J(H(N)i,C'i-1) and 2J(H(N)i,Calpha(i)) values in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sulakshana; Mustafi, Sourajit M; Atreya, H S; Chary, K V R

    2005-04-01

    Use of partial or selective (13)C/(15)N labeling of specific amino acid residues in a given protein to measure the values of (1)J((15)N(i),(13)C(alpha) (i)), (2)J((1)H(N),(13)C(alpha) (i)), (2)J((15)N(i),(13)C(alpha) (i-1)), (1)J((15)N(i),(13)C'(i-1)) and (2)J((1)H(N),(13)C'(i-1)) is described. This was achieved by recording a sensitivity-enhanced 2D [(15)N-(1)H] HSQC experiment, without mixing the spin states of C(alpha) and C' during the course of entire experiment.

  3. Label-free oxygen-metabolic photoacoustic microscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-07-01

    Almost all diseases, especially cancer and diabetes, manifest abnormal oxygen metabolism. Accurately measuring the metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2) can be helpful for fundamental pathophysiological studies, and even early diagnosis and treatment of disease. Current techniques either lack high resolution or rely on exogenous contrast. Here, we propose label-free metabolic photoacoustic microscopy (mPAM) with small vessel resolution to noninvasively quantify MRO2 in vivo in absolute units. mPAM is the unique modality for simultaneously imaging all five anatomical, chemical, and fluid-dynamic parameters required for such quantification: tissue volume, vessel cross-section, concentration of hemoglobin, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and blood flow speed. Hyperthermia, cryotherapy, melanoma, and glioblastoma were longitudinally imaged in vivo. Counterintuitively, increased MRO2 does not necessarily cause hypoxia or increase oxygen extraction. In fact, early-stage cancer was found to be hyperoxic despite hypermetabolism.

  4. NMR studies of active-site properties of human carbonic anhydrase II by using (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole as a local probe and histidine hydrogen-bond correlations.

    PubMed

    Shenderovich, Ilya G; Lesnichin, Stepan B; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    By using a combination of liquid and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole (4-MI) as a local probe of the environment has been studied: 1) in the polar, wet Freon CDF3 /CDF2 Cl down to 130 K, 2) in water at pH 12, and 3) in solid samples of the mutant H64A of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). In the latter, the active-site His64 residue is replaced by alanine; the catalytic activity is, however, rescued by the presence of 4-MI. For the Freon solution, it is demonstrated that addition of water molecules not only catalyzes proton tautomerism but also lifts its quasidegeneracy. The possible hydrogen-bond clusters formed and the mechanism of the tautomerism are discussed. Information about the imidazole hydrogen-bond geometries is obtained by establishing a correlation between published (1) H and (15) N chemical shifts of the imidazole rings of histidines in proteins. This correlation is useful to distinguish histidines embedded in the interior of proteins and those at the surface, embedded in water. Moreover, evidence is obtained that the hydrogen-bond geometries of His64 in the active site of HCA II and of 4-MI in H64A HCA II are similar. Finally, the degeneracy of the rapid tautomerism of the neutral imidazole ring His64 reported by Shimahara et al. (J. Biol. Chem.- 2007, 282, 9646) can be explained with a wet, polar, nonaqueous active-site conformation in the inward conformation, similar to the properties of 4-MI in the Freon solution. The biological implications for the enzyme mechanism are discussed. PMID:25521423

  5. NMR studies of active-site properties of human carbonic anhydrase II by using (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole as a local probe and histidine hydrogen-bond correlations.

    PubMed

    Shenderovich, Ilya G; Lesnichin, Stepan B; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    By using a combination of liquid and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole (4-MI) as a local probe of the environment has been studied: 1) in the polar, wet Freon CDF3 /CDF2 Cl down to 130 K, 2) in water at pH 12, and 3) in solid samples of the mutant H64A of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). In the latter, the active-site His64 residue is replaced by alanine; the catalytic activity is, however, rescued by the presence of 4-MI. For the Freon solution, it is demonstrated that addition of water molecules not only catalyzes proton tautomerism but also lifts its quasidegeneracy. The possible hydrogen-bond clusters formed and the mechanism of the tautomerism are discussed. Information about the imidazole hydrogen-bond geometries is obtained by establishing a correlation between published (1) H and (15) N chemical shifts of the imidazole rings of histidines in proteins. This correlation is useful to distinguish histidines embedded in the interior of proteins and those at the surface, embedded in water. Moreover, evidence is obtained that the hydrogen-bond geometries of His64 in the active site of HCA II and of 4-MI in H64A HCA II are similar. Finally, the degeneracy of the rapid tautomerism of the neutral imidazole ring His64 reported by Shimahara et al. (J. Biol. Chem.- 2007, 282, 9646) can be explained with a wet, polar, nonaqueous active-site conformation in the inward conformation, similar to the properties of 4-MI in the Freon solution. The biological implications for the enzyme mechanism are discussed.

  6. Application of stable isotope-labeled compounds in metabolism and in metabolism-mediated toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Mutlib, Abdul E

    2008-09-01

    Stable isotope-labeled compounds have been synthesized and utilized by scientists from various areas of biomedical research during the last several decades. Compounds labeled with stable isotopes, such as deuterium and carbon-13, have been used effectively by drug metabolism scientists and toxicologists to gain better understanding of drugs' disposition and their potential role in target organ toxicities. The combination of stable isotope-labeling techniques with mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which allows rapid acquisition and interpretation of data, has promoted greater use of these stable isotope-labeled compounds in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies. Examples of the use of stable isotope-labeled compounds in elucidating structures of metabolites and delineating complex metabolic pathways are presented in this review. The application of labeled compounds in mechanistic toxicity studies will be discussed by providing an example of how strategic placement of a deuterium atom in a drug molecule mitigated specific-specific renal toxicity. Other examples from the literature demonstrating the application of stable isotope-labeled compounds in understanding metabolism-mediated toxicities are presented. Furthermore, an example of how a stable isotope-labeled compound was utilized to better understand some of the gene changes in toxicogenomic studies is discussed. The interpretation of large sets of data produced from toxicogenomics studies can be a challenge. One approach that could be used to simplify interpretation of the data, especially from studies designed to link gene changes with the formation of reactive metabolites thought to be responsible for toxicities, is through the use of stable isotope-labeled compounds. This is a relatively unexplored territory and needs to be further investigated. The employment of analytical techniques, especially mass spectrometry and NMR, used in conjunction

  7. Leaf Urea Metabolism in Potato. Urease Activity Profile and Patterns of Recovery and Distribution of 15N after Foliar Urea Application in Wild-Type and Urease-Antisense Transgenics1

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Claus-Peter; Tiller, Sarah A.; Taylor, Mark A.; Davies, Howard V.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of urease activity on N distribution and losses after foliar urea application was investigated using wild-type and transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum cv Désirée) plants in which urease activity was down-regulated. A good correlation between urease activity and 15N urea metabolism (NH3 accumulation) was found. The general accumulation of ammonium in leaves treated with urea indicated that urease activity is not rate limiting, at least initially, for the assimilation of urea N by the plant. It is surprising that there was no effect of urease activity on either N losses or 15N distribution in the plants after foliar urea application. Experiments with wild-type plants in the field using foliar-applied 15N urea demonstrated an initial rapid export of N from urea-treated leaves to the tubers within 48 h, followed by a more gradual redistribution during the subsequent days. Only 10% to 18% of urea N applied was lost (presumably because of NH3 volatilization) in contrast to far greater losses reported in several other studies. The pattern of urease activity in the canopy was investigated during plant development. The activity per unit protein increased up to 10-fold with leaf and plant age, suggesting a correlation with increased N recycling in senescing tissues. Whereas several reports have claimed that plant urease is inducible by urea, no evidence for urease induction could be found in potato. PMID:11891267

  8. Quantum dots as strain- and metabolism-specific microbiological labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloepfer, J. A.; Mielke, R. E.; Wong, M. S.; Nealson, K. H.; Stucky, G.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Biologically conjugated quantum dots (QDs) have shown great promise as multiwavelength fluorescent labels for on-chip bioassays and eukaryotic cells. However, use of these photoluminescent nanocrystals in bacteria has not previously been reported, and their large size (3 to 10 nm) makes it unclear whether they inhibit bacterial recognition of attached molecules and whether they are able to pass through bacterial cell walls. Here we describe the use of conjugated CdSe QDs for strain- and metabolism-specific microbial labeling in a wide variety of bacteria and fungi, and our analysis was geared toward using receptors for a conjugated biomolecule that are present and active on the organism's surface. While cell surface molecules, such as glycoproteins, make excellent targets for conjugated QDs, internal labeling is inconsistent and leads to large spectral shifts compared with the original fluorescence, suggesting that there is breakup or dissolution of the QDs. Transmission electron microscopy of whole mounts and thin sections confirmed that bacteria are able to extract Cd and Se from QDs in a fashion dependent upon the QD surface conjugate.

  9. Quantum Dots as Strain- and Metabolism-Specific Microbiological Labels

    PubMed Central

    Kloepfer, J. A.; Mielke, R. E.; Wong, M. S.; Nealson, K. H.; Stucky, G.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Biologically conjugated quantum dots (QDs) have shown great promise as multiwavelength fluorescent labels for on-chip bioassays and eukaryotic cells. However, use of these photoluminescent nanocrystals in bacteria has not previously been reported, and their large size (3 to 10 nm) makes it unclear whether they inhibit bacterial recognition of attached molecules and whether they are able to pass through bacterial cell walls. Here we describe the use of conjugated CdSe QDs for strain- and metabolism-specific microbial labeling in a wide variety of bacteria and fungi, and our analysis was geared toward using receptors for a conjugated biomolecule that are present and active on the organism's surface. While cell surface molecules, such as glycoproteins, make excellent targets for conjugated QDs, internal labeling is inconsistent and leads to large spectral shifts compared with the original fluorescence, suggesting that there is breakup or dissolution of the QDs. Transmission electron microscopy of whole mounts and thin sections confirmed that bacteria are able to extract Cd and Se from QDs in a fashion dependent upon the QD surface conjugate. PMID:12839801

  10. Quantification of (15)N-nitrate in urine with gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to estimate endogenous NO production.

    PubMed

    Houben, Els; Hamer, Henrike M; Luypaerts, Anja; De Preter, Vicky; Evenepoel, Pieter; Rutgeerts, Paul; Verbeke, Kristin

    2010-01-15

    The use of stable isotope labeled substrates and subsequent analysis of urinary nitrate, forms a noninvasive test for evaluation of the in vivo NO metabolism. The present paper describes a new method for simultaneous quantification of (15)N-nitrate and total nitrate with gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Nitrate, isolated from urine with a nitrate selective resin, was reduced to nitrite using copperized cadmium. Subsequently, Sudan I was formed by diazotation. Sudan II was added as internal standard, and both molecules were analyzed with GC-C-IRMS as tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives. The accuracy was determined during a recovery study of two different known nitrate concentrations and two (15)N-enrichments. A recovery of 101.6% and 103.9% for total nitrate and 107.6% and 91.2% for (15)N-nitrate was obtained, respectively. The validated method was applied on complete 72 h urine collections after intravenous administration of (15)N-nitrate and (15)N-arginine in humans. On average, 51.8% (47.0-71.0%) of administered (15)N-nitrate was excreted, while 0.68% (0.44-1.17%) of (15)N-arginine was metabolized to nitrate. In conclusion, this method can be used for accurate simultaneous determination of (15)N-nitrate and total nitrate concentrations in urine and can be applied in clinical studies for noninvasive evaluation of NO metabolism in vivo.

  11. Generation, Quantification, and Tracing of Metabolically Labeled Fluorescent Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Coscia, Carolina; Parolini, Isabella; Sanchez, Massimo; Biffoni, Mauro; Boussadia, Zaira; Zanetti, Cristiana; Fiani, Maria Luisa; Sargiacomo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, the constant progression in exosome (Exo)-related studies highlighted the importance of these cell-derived nano-sized vesicles in cell biology and pathophysiology. Functional studies on Exo uptake and intracellular trafficking require accurate quantification to assess sufficient and/or necessary Exo particles quantum able to elicit measurable effects on target cells. We used commercially available BODIPY(®) fatty acid analogues to label a primary melanoma cell line (Me501) that highly and spontaneously secrete nanovesicles. Upon addition to cell culture, BODIPY fatty acids are rapidly incorporated into major phospholipid classes ultimately producing fluorescent Exo as direct result of biogenesis. Our metabolic labeling protocol produced bright fluorescent Exo that can be examined and quantified with conventional non-customized flow cytometry (FC) instruments by exploiting their fluorescent emission rather than light-scattering detection. Furthermore, our methodology permits the measurement of single Exo-associated fluorescence transfer to cells making quantitative the correlation between Exo uptake and activation of cellular processes. Thus the protocol presented here appears as an appropriate tool to who wants to investigate mechanisms of Exo functions in that it allows for direct and rapid characterization and quantification of fluorescent Exo number, intensity, size, and eventually evaluation of their kinetic of uptake/secretion in target cells. PMID:27317184

  12. Measurement of (15)N enrichment of glutamine and urea cycle amino acids derivatized with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate using liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Karakawa, Sachise; Watanabe, Akiko; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Sakai, Ryosei

    2015-05-01

    6-Aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) is an amino acid-specific derivatizing reagent that has been used for sensitive amino acid quantification by liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the ability of this method to measure the isotopic enrichment of amino acids and to determine the positional (15)N enrichment of urea cycle amino acids (i.e., arginine, ornithine, and citrulline) and glutamine. The distribution of the M and M+1 isotopomers of each natural AQC-amino acid was nearly identical to the theoretical distribution. The standard deviation of the (M+1)/M ratio for each amino acid in repeated measurements was approximately 0.1%, and the ratios were stable regardless of the injected amounts. Linearity in the measurements of (15)N enrichment was confirmed by measuring a series of (15)N-labeled arginine standards. The positional (15)N enrichment of urea cycle amino acids and glutamine was estimated from the isotopic distribution of unique fragment ions generated at different collision energies. This method was able to identify their positional (15)N enrichment in the plasma of rats fed (15)N-labeled glutamine. These results suggest the utility of LC-MS/MS detection of AQC-amino acids for the measurement of isotopic enrichment in (15)N-labeled amino acids and indicate that this method is useful for the study of nitrogen metabolism in living organisms.

  13. Theoretical Basis for Dynamic Label Propagation in Stationary Metabolic Networks under Step and Periodic Inputs.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Serguei; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of label propagation in a stationary metabolic network during an isotope labeling experiment can provide highly valuable information on the network topology, metabolic fluxes, and on the size of metabolite pools. However, major issues, both in the experimental set-up and in the accompanying numerical methods currently limit the application of this approach. Here, we propose a method to apply novel types of label inputs, sinusoidal or more generally periodic label inputs, to address both the practical and numerical challenges of dynamic labeling experiments. By considering a simple metabolic system, i.e. a linear, non-reversible pathway of arbitrary length, we develop mathematical descriptions of label propagation for both classical and novel label inputs. Theoretical developments and computer simulations show that the application of rectangular periodic pulses has both numerical and practical advantages over other approaches. We applied the strategy to estimate fluxes in a simulated experiment performed on a complex metabolic network (the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli), to further demonstrate its value in conditions which are close to those in real experiments. This study provides a theoretical basis for the rational interpretation of label propagation curves in real experiments, and will help identify the strengths, pitfalls and limitations of such experiments. The cases described here can also be used as test cases for more general numerical methods aimed at identifying network topology, analyzing metabolic fluxes or measuring concentrations of metabolites.

  14. Theoretical Basis for Dynamic Label Propagation in Stationary Metabolic Networks under Step and Periodic Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, Serguei; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of label propagation in a stationary metabolic network during an isotope labeling experiment can provide highly valuable information on the network topology, metabolic fluxes, and on the size of metabolite pools. However, major issues, both in the experimental set-up and in the accompanying numerical methods currently limit the application of this approach. Here, we propose a method to apply novel types of label inputs, sinusoidal or more generally periodic label inputs, to address both the practical and numerical challenges of dynamic labeling experiments. By considering a simple metabolic system, i.e. a linear, non-reversible pathway of arbitrary length, we develop mathematical descriptions of label propagation for both classical and novel label inputs. Theoretical developments and computer simulations show that the application of rectangular periodic pulses has both numerical and practical advantages over other approaches. We applied the strategy to estimate fluxes in a simulated experiment performed on a complex metabolic network (the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli), to further demonstrate its value in conditions which are close to those in real experiments. This study provides a theoretical basis for the rational interpretation of label propagation curves in real experiments, and will help identify the strengths, pitfalls and limitations of such experiments. The cases described here can also be used as test cases for more general numerical methods aimed at identifying network topology, analyzing metabolic fluxes or measuring concentrations of metabolites. PMID:26641860

  15. Designer labels for plant metabolism: statistical design of isotope labeling experiments for improved quantification of flux in complex plant metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Nargund, Shilpa; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-27

    Metabolic fluxes are powerful indicators of cell physiology and can be estimated by isotope-assisted metabolic flux analysis (MFA). The complexity of the compartmented metabolic networks of plants has constrained the application of isotope-assisted MFA to them, principally because of poor identifiability of fluxes from the measured isotope labeling patterns. However, flux identifiability can be significantly improved by a priori design of isotope labeling experiments (ILEs). This computational design involves evaluating the effect of different isotope label and isotopomer measurement combinations on flux identifiability, and thereby identifying optimal labels and measurements toward evaluating the fluxes of interest with the highest confidence. This article reports ILE designs for two major, compartmented plant metabolic pathways - the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt. Together, these pathways represent common motifs in plant metabolism including duplication of pathways in different subcellular compartments, reversible reactions and cyclic carbon flow. To compare various ILE designs, we employed statistical A- and D-optimality criteria. Our computations showed that 1,2-(13)C Glc is a powerful and robust label for the plant PPPs, given currently popular isotopomer measurement techniques (single quadrupole mass spectrometry [MS] and 2-D nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR]). Further analysis revealed that this label can estimate several PPP fluxes better than the popular label 1-(13)C Glc. Furthermore, the concurrent measurement of the isotopomers of hexose and pentose moieties synthesized exclusively in the cytosol or the plastid compartments (measurable through intracellular glucose or sucrose, starch, RNA ribose and histidine) considerably improves the identifiability of PPP fluxes in the individual compartments. Additionally, MS-derived isotopomer measurements outperform NMR-derived measurements in identifying PPP fluxes. The

  16. Toward hyperpolarized molecular imaging of HIV: synthesis and longitudinal relaxation properties of 15N-Azidothymidine

    PubMed Central

    Shchepin, Roman V.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Previously unreported 15N labeled Azidothymidine (AZT) was prepared as an equimolar mixture of two isotopomers: 1-15N-AZT and 3-15N-AZT. Polarization decay of 15N NMR signal was studied in high (9.4 T) and low (~50 mT) magnetic fields. 15N T1 values were 45 ± 5 s (1-15N-AZT) and 37 ± 2 s (3-15N-AZT) at 9.4 T, and 140 ± 16 s (3-15N-AZT) at 50 mT. 15N-AZT can be potentially 15N hyperpolarized by several methods. These sufficiently long 15N-AZT T1 values potentially enable hyperpolarized in vivo imaging of 15N-AZT, because of the known favorable efficient (i.e., of the time scale shorter than the longest reported here 15N T1) kinetics of uptake of injected AZT. Therefore, 3-15N-AZT can be potentially used for HIV molecular imaging using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25156931

  17. Stable isotope-labeling studies in metabolomics: new insights into structure and dynamics of metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Barrett, Michael P; Breitling, Rainer; Creek, Darren J

    2014-01-01

    The rapid emergence of metabolomics has enabled system-wide measurements of metabolites in various organisms. However, advances in the mechanistic understanding of metabolic networks remain limited, as most metabolomics studies cannot routinely provide accurate metabolite identification, absolute quantification and flux measurement. Stable isotope labeling offers opportunities to overcome these limitations. Here we describe some current approaches to stable isotope-labeled metabolomics and provide examples of the significant impact that these studies have had on our understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss recently developed software solutions for the analysis of stable isotope-labeled metabolomics data and propose the bioinformatics solutions that will pave the way for the broader application and optimal interpretation of system-scale labeling studies in metabolomics. PMID:24568354

  18. In Vivo Targeting of Metabolically Labeled Cancers with Ultra-Small Silica Nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Tang, Li; Liu, Yang; Dobrucka, Iwona T; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Yin, Lichen; Cheng, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Unnatural sugar-mediated metabolic labeling of cancer cells, coupled with efficient Click chemistry, has shown great potential for in vivo imaging and cancer targeting. Thus far, chemical labeling of cancer cells has been limited to the small-sized azido groups, with the large-sized and highly hydrophobic dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) being correspondingly used as the targeting ligand. However, surface modification of nanomedicines with DBCO groups often suffers from low ligand density, difficult functionalization, and impaired physiochemical properties. Here we report the development of DBCO-bearing unnatural sugars that could directly label LS174T colon cancer cells with DBCO groups and subsequently mediate cancer-targeted delivery of azido-modified silica nanoconjugates with easy functionalization and high azido density in vitro and in vivo. This study, for the first time, demonstrates the feasibility of metabolic labeling of cancer cells with large-sized DBCO groups for subsequent, efficient targeting of azido-modified nanomedicines. PMID:27375793

  19. In Vivo Targeting of Metabolically Labeled Cancers with Ultra-Small Silica Nanoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Tang, Li; Liu, Yang; Dobrucka, Iwona T.; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Yin, Lichen; Cheng, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Unnatural sugar-mediated metabolic labeling of cancer cells, coupled with efficient Click chemistry, has shown great potential for in vivo imaging and cancer targeting. Thus far, chemical labeling of cancer cells has been limited to the small-sized azido groups, with the large-sized and highly hydrophobic dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) being correspondingly used as the targeting ligand. However, surface modification of nanomedicines with DBCO groups often suffers from low ligand density, difficult functionalization, and impaired physiochemical properties. Here we report the development of DBCO-bearing unnatural sugars that could directly label LS174T colon cancer cells with DBCO groups and subsequently mediate cancer-targeted delivery of azido-modified silica nanoconjugates with easy functionalization and high azido density in vitro and in vivo. This study, for the first time, demonstrates the feasibility of metabolic labeling of cancer cells with large-sized DBCO groups for subsequent, efficient targeting of azido-modified nanomedicines. PMID:27375793

  20. Metabolic Labeling and Imaging of N-Linked Glycans in Arabidopsis Thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuntao; Wu, Jie; Chen, Xing

    2016-08-01

    Molecular imaging of glycans has been actively pursued in animal systems for the past decades. However, visualization of plant glycans remains underdeveloped, despite that glycosylation is essential for the life cycle of plants. Metabolic glycan labeling in Arabidopsis thaliana by using N-azidoacetylglucosamine (GlcNAz) as the chemical reporter is reported. GlcNAz is metabolized through the salvage pathway of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and incorporated into N-linked glycans, and possibly intracellular O-GlcNAc. Click-labeling with fluorescent probes enables visualization of newly synthesized N-linked glycans. N-glycosylation in the root tissue was discovered to possess distinct distribution patterns in different developmental zones, suggesting that N-glycosylation is regulated in a developmental stage-dependent manner. This work shows the utility of metabolic glycan labeling in elucidating the function of N-linked glycosylation in plants.

  1. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Quantifying plant phenotypes with isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analyses of metabolic flux using stable isotopes in plants have traditionally been restricted to tissues with presumed homogeneous cell populations such as developing seeds, cell suspensions, or cultured roots and root tips. It is now possible to describe these and other more complex tissues such a...

  3. High-throughput backbone resonance assignment of small 13C, 15N-labeled proteins by a triple-resonance experiment with four sequential connectivity pathways using chemical shift-dependent, apparent 1J ( 1H, 13C): HNCACB codedHAHB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegan, Scott; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon; Riek, Roland

    2003-12-01

    The proposed three-dimensional triple-resonance experiment HNCACB codedHAHB correlates sequential 15N, 1H moieties via the chemical shifts of 13C α, 13C β, 1H α, and 1H β. The four sequential correlation pathways are achieved by the incorporation of the concept of chemical shift-coding [J. Biomol. NMR 25 (2003) 281] to the TROSY-HNCACB experiment. The monitored 1H α and 1H β chemical shifts are then coded in the line shape of the cross-peaks of 13C α, 13C β along the 13C dimension through an apparent residual scalar coupling, the size of which depends on the attached hydrogen chemical shift. The information of four sequential correlation pathways enables a rapid backbone assignment. The HNCACB codedHAHB experiment was applied to ˜85% labeled 13C, 15N-labeled amino-terminal fragment of Vaccinia virus DNA topoisomerase I comprising residues 1-77. After one day of measurement on a Bruker Avance 700 MHz spectrometer and 8 h of manual analysis of the spectrum 93% of the backbone assignment was achieved.

  4. Relative Abundance of Integral Plasma Membrane Proteins in Arabidopsis Leaf and Root Tissue Determined by Metabolic Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bernfur, Katja; Larsson, Olaf; Larsson, Christer; Gustavsson, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic labeling of proteins with a stable isotope (15N) in intact Arabidopsis plants was used for accurate determination by mass spectrometry of differences in protein abundance between plasma membranes isolated from leaves and roots. In total, 703 proteins were identified, of which 188 were predicted to be integral membrane proteins. Major classes were transporters, receptors, proteins involved in membrane trafficking and cell wall-related proteins. Forty-one of the integral proteins, including nine of the 13 isoforms of the PIP (plasma membrane intrinsic protein) aquaporin subfamily, could be identified by peptides unique to these proteins, which made it possible to determine their relative abundance in leaf and root tissue. In addition, peptides shared between isoforms gave information on the proportions of these isoforms. A comparison between our data for protein levels and corresponding data for mRNA levels in the widely used database Genevestigator showed an agreement for only about two thirds of the proteins. By contrast, localization data available in the literature for 21 of the 41 proteins show a much better agreement with our data, in particular data based on immunostaining of proteins and GUS-staining of promoter activity. Thus, although mRNA levels may provide a useful approximation for protein levels, detection and quantification of isoform-specific peptides by proteomics should generate the most reliable data for the proteome. PMID:23990937

  5. 13C-13C and 15N-13C correlation spectroscopy of membrane-associated and uniformly labeled human immunodeficiency virus and influenza fusion peptides: Amino acid-type assignments and evidence for multiple conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, Michele L.; Gabrys, Charles M.; Struppe, Jochem O.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-02-01

    Many viruses which cause disease including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza are "enveloped" by a membrane and infection of a host cell begins with joining or "fusion" of the viral and target cell membranes. Fusion is catalyzed by viral proteins in the viral membrane. For HIV and for the influenza virus, these fusion proteins contain an ˜20-residue apolar "fusion peptide" that binds to target cell membranes and plays a critical role in fusion. For this study, the HIV fusion peptide (HFP) and influenza virus fusion peptide (IFP) were chemically synthesized with uniform C13, N15 labeling over large contiguous regions of amino acids. Two-dimensional C13-C13 and N15-C13 spectra were obtained for the membrane-bound fusion peptides and an amino acid-type C13 assignment was obtained for the labeled residues in HFP and IFP. The membrane used for the HFP sample had a lipid headgroup and cholesterol composition comparable to that of host cells of the virus, and the C13 chemical shifts were more consistent with β strand conformation than with helical conformation. The membrane used for the IFP sample did not contain cholesterol, and the chemical shifts of the dominant peaks were more consistent with helical conformation than with β strand conformation. There were additional peaks in the IFP spectrum whose shifts were not consistent with helical conformation. An unambiguous C13 and N15 assignment was obtained in an HFP sample with more selective labeling, and two shifts were identified for the Leu-9 CO, Gly-10 N, and Gly-10 Cα nuclei. These sets of two shifts may indicate two β strand registries such as parallel and antiparallel. Although most spectra were obtained on a 9.4T instrument, one C13-C13 correlation spectrum was obtained on a 16.4T instrument and was better resolved than the comparable 9.4T spectrum. More selective labeling and higher field may, therefore, be approaches to obtaining unambiguous assignments for membrane-associated fusion peptides.

  6. Metabolism of 14C-Labeled Photosynthate and Distribution of Enzymes of Glucose Metabolism in Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Reibach, Paul H.; Streeter, John G.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of translocated photosynthate by soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules was investigated by 14CO2-labeling studies and analysis of nodule enzymes. Plants were exposed to 14CO2 for 30 minutes, followed by 12CO2 for up to 5 hours. The largest amount of radioactivity in nodules was recovered in neutral sugars at all sampling times. The organic acid fraction of the cytosol was labeled rapidly. Although cyclitols and malonate were found in high concentrations in the nodules, they accumulated less than 10% of the radioactivity in the neutral and acidic fractions, respectively. Phosphate esters were found to contain very low levels of total label, which prohibited analysis of the radioactivity in individual compounds. The whole nodule-labeling patterns suggested the utilization of photosynthate for the generation of organic acids (principally malate) and amino acids (principally glutamate). The radioactivity in bacteroids as a percentage of total nodule label increased slightly with time, while the percentage in the cytosol fraction declined. The labeling patterns for the cytosol were essentially the same as whole nodule-labeling patterns, and they suggest a degradation of carbohydrates for the production of organic acids and amino acids. When it was found that most of the radioactivity in bacteroids was in sugars, the enzymes of glucose metabolism were surveyed. Bacteroids from nodules formed by Rhizobium japonicum strain 110 or strain 138 lacked activity for phosphofructokinase and NADP-dependent 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, key enzymes of glycolysis and the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathways. Enzymes of the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways were found in the cytosol fraction. In three experiments, bacteroids contained about 10 to 30% of the total radioactivity in nodules 2 to 5 hours after pulse-labeling of plants, and 60 to 65% of the radioactivity in bacteroids was in the neutral sugar fraction at all sampling times. This strongly

  7. Studies of nitrogen metabolism using /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy. 3. Synthesis of DL-(3-/sup 13/C,2-/sup 15/N)Lysine and its incorporation into streptothricin F/sup 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, S.J.; Thiruvengadam, T.K.

    1981-11-04

    A scheme for the synthesis of DL-(3-/sup 13/C, 2-/sup 15/N)Lysine, I, is presented. Data are also reported to show that the mutase reaction occurring in the biosynthesis of I occurs with an intramolecular migration of nitrogen from C-2 to C-3. (BLM)

  8. Illumination of growth, division and secretion by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Siegrist, M. Sloan; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Fox, Douglas M.; Lim, Shion An; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the essential interface between a bacterium and its surroundings. Composed primarily of molecules that are not directly genetically encoded, this highly dynamic structure accommodates the basic cellular processes of growth and division as well as the transport of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular milieu. In this review, we describe aspects of bacterial growth, division and secretion that have recently been uncovered by metabolic labeling of the cell envelope. Metabolite derivatives can be used to label a variety of macromolecules, from proteins to non-genetically-encoded glycans and lipids. The embedded metabolite enables precise tracking in time and space, and the versatility of newer chemoselective detection methods offers the ability to execute multiple experiments concurrently. In addition to reviewing the discoveries enabled by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell envelope, we also discuss the potential of these techniques for translational applications. Finally, we offer some guidelines for implementing this emerging technology. PMID:25725012

  9. Metabolic Flux Elucidation for Large-Scale Models Using 13C Labeled Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Suthers, Patrick F.; Burgard, Anthony P.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Nowroozi, Farnaz; Van Dien, Stephen; Keasling, Jay D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2007-01-01

    A key consideration in metabolic engineering is the determination of fluxes of the metabolites within the cell. This determination provides an unambiguous description of metabolism before and/or after engineering interventions. Here, we present a computational framework that combines a constraint-based modeling framework with isotopic label tracing on a large-scale. When cells are fed a growth substrate with certain carbon positions labeled with 13C, the distribution of this label in the intracellular metabolites can be calculated based on the known biochemistry of the participating pathways. Most labeling studies focus on skeletal representations of central metabolism and ignore many flux routes that could contribute to the observed isotopic labeling patterns. In contrast, our approach investigates the importance of carrying out isotopic labeling studies using a more comprehensive reaction network consisting of 350 fluxes and 184 metabolites in Escherichia coli including global metabolite balances on cofactors such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. The proposed procedure is demonstrated on an E. coli strain engineered to produce amorphadiene, a precursor to the anti-malarial drug artemisinin. The cells were grown in continuous culture on glucose containing 20% [U-13C]glucose; the measurements are made using GC-MS performed on 13 amino acids extracted from the cells. We identify flux distributions for which the calculated labeling patterns agree well with the measurements alluding to the accuracy of the network reconstruction. Furthermore, we explore the robustness of the flux calculations to variability in the experimental MS measurements, as well as highlight the key experimental measurements necessary for flux determination. Finally, we discuss the effect of reducing the model, as well as shed light onto the customization of the developed computational framework to other systems. PMID:17632026

  10. Differential cysteine labeling and global label-free proteomics reveals an altered metabolic state in skeletal muscle aging.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Brian; Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Smith, Neil T; Brownridge, Philip; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2014-11-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle aging and associated sarcopenia have been linked to an altered oxidative status of redox-sensitive proteins. Reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generated by contracting skeletal muscle are necessary for optimal protein function, signaling, and adaptation. To investigate the redox proteome of aging gastrocnemius muscles from adult and old male mice, we developed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach that includes a differential cysteine labeling step. The approach allows simultaneous identification of up- and downregulated proteins between samples in addition to the identification and relative quantification of the reversible oxidation state of susceptible redox cysteine residues. Results from muscles of adult and old mice indicate significant changes in the content of chaperone, glucose metabolism, and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, including Protein DJ-1, cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein, and a reduction in the number of redox-responsive proteins identified in muscle of old mice. Results demonstrate skeletal muscle aging causes a reduction in redox-sensitive proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response. Data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001054.

  11. α-Ketoacids as precursors for phenylalanine and tyrosine labelling in cell-based protein overexpression.

    PubMed

    Lichtenecker, Roman J; Weinhäupl, Katharina; Schmid, Walther; Konrat, Robert

    2013-12-01

    (13)C-α-ketoacid metabolic precursors of phenylalanine and tyrosine effectively enter the metabolism of a protein overexpressing E. coli strain to label Phe- and Tyr-residues devoid of any cross-labelling. The methodology gives access to highly selective labelling patterns as valuable tools in protein NMR spectroscopy without the need of (15)N-chiral amino acid synthesis using organic chemistry.

  12. Patterns of 15N assimilation and growth of methanotrophic ANME-2 archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria within structured syntrophic consortia revealed by FISH-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Orphan, Victoria J; Turk, Kendra A; Green, Abigail M; House, Christopher H

    2009-07-01

    Methane release from the oceans is controlled in large part by syntrophic interactions between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (DSS), frequently found as organized consortia. An understanding of the specifics of this symbiotic relationship and the metabolic heterogeneity existing between and within individual methane-oxidizing aggregates is currently lacking. Here, we use the microanalytical method FISH-SIMS (fluorescence in situ hybridization-secondary ion mass spectrometry) to describe the physiological traits and anabolic activity of individual methanotrophic consortia, specifically tracking (15)N-labelled protein synthesis to examine the effects of organization and size on the metabolic activity of the syntrophic partners. Patterns of (15)N distribution within individual aggregates showed enhanced (15)N assimilation in ANME-2 cells relative to the co-associated DSS revealing a decoupling in anabolic activity between the partners. Protein synthesis in ANME-2 cells was sustained throughout the core of individual ANME-2/DSS consortia ranging in size range from 4 to 20 μm. This indicates that metabolic activity of the methane-oxidizing archaea is not limited to, or noticeably enhanced at the ANME-2/DSS boundary. Overall, the metabolic activity of both syntrophic partners within consortia was greater than activity measured in representatives of the ANME-2 and DSS observed alone, with smaller ANME-2/DSS aggregates displaying a tendency for greater (15)N uptake and doubling times ranging from 3 to 5 months. The combination of (15)N-labelling and FISH-SIMS provides an important perspective on the extent of heterogeneity within methanotrophic aggregates and may aid in constraining predictive models of activity and growth by these syntrophic consortia.

  13. Dual-Label Radioisotope Method for Simultaneously Measuring Bacterial Production and Metabolism in Natural Waters †

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Robert B.; Tuttle, Jon H.; Stoner, Daphne L.; Ducklow, Hugh W.

    1988-01-01

    Bacterial production and amino acid metabolism in aquatic systems can be estimated by simultaneous incubation of water samples with both tritiated methyl-thymidine and 14C-labeled amino acids. This dual-label method not only saves time, labor, and materials, but also allows determination of these two parameters in the same microbial subcommunity. Both organic carbon incorporation and respiration can be estimated. The results obtained with the dual-label technique are not significantly different from single-radiolabel methods over a wide range of bacterial activity. The method is particularly suitable for large-scale field programs and has been used successfully with eutrophic estuarine samples as well as with oligotrophic oceanic water. In the mesohaline portion of Chesapeake Bay, thymidine incorporation ranged seasonally from 2 to 635 pmol liter−1 h−1 and amino acid turnover rates ranged from 0.01 to 28.4% h−1. Comparison of thymidine incorporation with amino acid turnover measurements made at a deep, midbay station in 1985 suggested a close coupling between bacterial production and amino acid metabolism during most of the year. However, production-specific amino acid turnover rates increased dramatically in deep bay waters during the spring phytoplankton bloom, indicating transient decoupling of bacterial production from metabolism. Ecological features such as this are readily detectable with the dual-label method. PMID:16347587

  14. Labeling Cell Surface GPIs and GPI-Anchored Proteins through Metabolic Engineering with Artificial Inositol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-08-10

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. An effective strategy was developed for the metabolic engineering of cell-surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins were then tagged with biotin on live cells through a click reaction, which allows further elaboration with streptavidin-conjugated dyes or other molecules. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies.

  15. Post-uptake metabolism affects quantification of amino acid uptake.

    PubMed

    Warren, Charles R

    2012-01-01

    • The quantitative significance of amino acids to plant nutrition remains controversial. This experiment determined whether post-uptake metabolism and root to shoot export differ between glycine and glutamine, and examined implications for estimation of amino acid uptake. • Field soil containing a Eucalyptus pauciflora seedling was injected with uniformly (13)C- and (15)N-labelled glycine or glutamine. I quantified (15)N and (13)C excess in leaves and roots and intact labelled amino acids in leaves, roots and stem xylem sap. A tunable diode laser quantified fluxes of (12)CO(2) and (13)CO(2) from leaves and soil. • 60-360 min after addition of amino acid, intact molecules of U-(13)C,(15)N glutamine were < 5% of (15)N excess in roots, whereas U-(13)C,(15)N glycine was 30-100% of (15)N excess in roots. Intact molecules of glutamine, but not glycine, were exported from roots to shoots. • Post-uptake metabolism and transport complicate interpretation of isotope labelling such that root and shoot contents of intact amino acid, (13)C and (15)N may not reflect rates of uptake. Future experiments should focus on reconciling discrepancies between intact amino acid, (13)C and (15)N by determining the turnover of amino acids within roots. Alternatively, post-uptake metabolism and transport could be minimized by harvesting plants within minutes of isotope addition.

  16. New monitoring approach for metabolic dynamics in microbial ecosystems using stable-isotope-labeling technologies.

    PubMed

    Date, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Yumiko; Fukuda, Shinji; Kato, Tamotsu; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Jun

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a new approach for monitoring the metabolic dynamics in microbial ecosystems using a combination of DNA fingerprinting and metabolome analysis based on stable-isotope-labeling technologies. Stable-isotope probing of DNA (DNA-SIP) has been used previously for the evaluation of cross-feeding in microbial communities. For the development and validation of our monitoring approach, fecal microbiota were analyzed with stable-isotope-labeled glucose used as the sole carbon source. In order to link the metabolic information and the microbial variability, we performed metabolic-microbial correlation analysis based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) profiles and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints, which successfully identified the glucose-utilizing bacteria and their related extracellular metabolites. Moreover, our approach revealed information regarding the carbon flux, in that the "first" wave of extracellular metabolites secreted by the glucose-utilizing bacteria were incorporated into the "secondary" group of substrate-utilizing bacteria, and that this "secondary" group further produced their own secondary metabolized substrates. Thus, this approach is a powerful tool for monitoring the metabolic dynamics in microbial ecosystems and allows for the tracking of the carbon flux within a microbial community.

  17. Metabolic Labeling with Noncanonical Amino Acids and Visualization by Chemoselective Fluorescent Tagging

    PubMed Central

    Dieck, Susanne tom; Müller, Anke; Nehring, Anne; Hinz, Flora I.; Bartnik, Ina; Schuman, Erin M.; Dieterich, Daniela C.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent labeling of proteins by genetically encoded fluorescent protein tags has enabled an enhanced understanding of cell biological processes but is restricted to the analysis of a limited number of identified proteins. This approach does not permit, e.g., the unbiased visualization of a full proteome in situ. We describe here a fluorescence-based method to follow proteome-wide patterns of newly synthesized proteins in cultured cells, tissue slices, and a whole organism. This technique is compatible with immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Key to this method is the introduction of a small bio-orthogonal reactive group by metabolic labeling. This is accomplished by replacing the amino acid methionine by the azide-bearing methionine surrogate azidohomoalanine (AHA) in a step very similar to classical radioisotope labeling. Subsequently, an alkyne-bearing fluorophore is covalently attached to the group by “click chemistry”—a copper(I)-catalyzed [3+2]azide-alkyne cycloaddition. By similar means, metabolic labeling can also be performed with the alkyne-bearing homopropargylglycine (HPG) and clicked to an azide-functionalized fluorophore. PMID:22968844

  18. Dual-label radioisotope method for simultaneously measuring bacterial production and metabolism in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Jonas, B.J.; Tuttle, J.H.; Stoner, D.L.; Ducklow, H.W.

    1988-03-01

    Bacterial production and amino acid metabolism in aquatic systems can be estimated by simultaneous incubation of water samples with both tritiated methyl-thymidine and /sup 14/C-labeled amino acids. This dual-label method not only saves time, labor, and materials, but also allows determination of these two parameters in the same microbial subcommunity. Both organic carbon incorporation and respiration can be estimated. The method is particularly suitable for large-scale field programs and has been used successfully with eutrophic estuarine samples as well as with oligotrophic oceanic water. In the mesohaline portion of Chesapeake Bay, thymidine incorporation ranged seasonally from 2 to 635 pmol liter/sup -1/ h/sup -1/ and amino acid turnover rates ranged from 0.01 to 28.4% h/sup -1/. Comparison of thymidine incorporation with amino acid turnover measurements made at a deep, midbay station in 1985 suggested a close coupling between bacterial production and amino acid metabolism during most of the year. However, production-specific amino acid turnover rates increased dramatically in deep bay waters during the spring phytoplankton bloom, indicating transient decoupling of bacterial production from metabolism. Ecological features such as this are readily detectable with the dual-label method.

  19. Microbial metabolism in soil at low temperatures: Mechanisms unraveled by position-specific 13C labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bore, Ezekiel

    2016-04-01

    Microbial transformation of organic substances in soil is the most important process of the C cycle. Most of the current studies base their information about transformation of organic substances on incubation studies under laboratory conditions and thus, we have a profound knowledge on SOM transformations at ambient temperatures. However, metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze microbial metabolism at low soil temperatures, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were incubated at three temperature; 5, -5 -20 oC. Soils were sampled after 1, 3 and 10 days and additionally after 30 days for samples at -20 °C. The 13C from individual molecule position was quantifed in respired CO2, bulk soil, extractable organic C and extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. 13CO2 released showed a dominance of the flux from C-1 position at 5 °C. Consequently, at 5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway of glucose metabolization. In contrast to -5 °C and -20 oC, metabolic behaviors completely switched towards a preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 position. With decreasing temperature, microorganism strongly shifted towards metabolization of glucose via glycolysis which indicates a switch to cellular maintenance. High recoveries of 13C in extractable microbial biomass at -5 °C indicates optimal growth condition for the microorganisms. PLFA analysis showed high incorporation of 13C into Gram negative bacteria at 5 °C but decreased with temperature. Gram positive bacteria out-competed Gram negatives with decreasing temperature. This study revealed a remarkable microbial activity at temperatures below 0 °C, differing significantly from that at ambient

  20. Tracking the metabolic pulse of plant lipid production with isotopic labeling and flux analyses: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Allen, Doug K; Bates, Philip D; Tjellström, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Metabolism is comprised of networks of chemical transformations, organized into integrated biochemical pathways that are the basis of cellular operation, and function to sustain life. Metabolism, and thus life, is not static. The rate of metabolites transitioning through biochemical pathways (i.e., flux) determines cellular phenotypes, and is constantly changing in response to genetic or environmental perturbations. Each change evokes a response in metabolic pathway flow, and the quantification of fluxes under varied conditions helps to elucidate major and minor routes, and regulatory aspects of metabolism. To measure fluxes requires experimental methods that assess the movements and transformations of metabolites without creating artifacts. Isotopic labeling fills this role and is a long-standing experimental approach to identify pathways and quantify their metabolic relevance in different tissues or under different conditions. The application of labeling techniques to plant science is however far from reaching it potential. In light of advances in genetics and molecular biology that provide a means to alter metabolism, and given recent improvements in instrumentation, computational tools and available isotopes, the use of isotopic labeling to probe metabolism is becoming more and more powerful. We review the principal analytical methods for isotopic labeling with a focus on seminal studies of pathways and fluxes in lipid metabolism and carbon partitioning through central metabolism. Central carbon metabolic steps are directly linked to lipid production by serving to generate the precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis and lipid assembly. Additionally some of the ideas for labeling techniques that may be most applicable for lipid metabolism in the future were originally developed to investigate other aspects of central metabolism. We conclude by describing recent advances that will play an important future role in quantifying flux and metabolic operation in plant

  1. 15N-15N Proton Assisted Recoupling in Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Józef R.; De Paëpe, Gaël; Eddy, Matthew T.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiment for obtaining 15N-15N correlation spectra. The approach yields direct information about the secondary and tertiary structure of proteins, including identification of α-helical stretches and inter-strand connectivity in antiparallel β-sheets, which are of major interest for structural studies of membrane proteins and amyloid fibrils. The method, 15N-15N proton assisted recoupling (PAR), relies on a second order mechanism, third spin assisted recoupling (TSAR), used previously in the context of 15N-13C and 13C-13C polarization transfer schemes. In comparison to 15N-15N proton driven spin diffusion experiments, the PAR technique accelerates polarization transfer between 15N’s by a factor of ~102−103, and is furthermore applicable over the entire range of currently available MAS frequencies (10–70 kHz). PMID:19334788

  2. A new metabolic cell-wall labelling method reveals peptidoglycan in Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Liechti, G W; Kuru, E; Hall, E; Kalinda, A; Brun, Y V; VanNieuwenhze, M; Maurelli, A T

    2014-02-27

    Peptidoglycan (PG), an essential structure in the cell walls of the vast majority of bacteria, is critical for division and maintaining cell shape and hydrostatic pressure. Bacteria comprising the Chlamydiales were thought to be one of the few exceptions. Chlamydia harbour genes for PG biosynthesis and exhibit susceptibility to 'anti-PG' antibiotics, yet attempts to detect PG in any chlamydial species have proven unsuccessful (the 'chlamydial anomaly'). We used a novel approach to metabolically label chlamydial PG using d-amino acid dipeptide probes and click chemistry. Replicating Chlamydia trachomatis were labelled with these probes throughout their biphasic developmental life cycle, and the results of differential probe incorporation experiments conducted in the presence of ampicillin are consistent with the presence of chlamydial PG-modifying enzymes. These findings culminate 50 years of speculation and debate concerning the chlamydial anomaly and are the strongest evidence so far that chlamydial species possess functional PG.

  3. Metabolism of radio-labelled C3: effects of in vivo activation in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, J. A.; Williams, D. G.; Naish, P.; Lachmann, P. J.; Peters, D. K.

    1974-01-01

    Turnover studies were performed in rabbits using biologically screened, highly purified, radio-labelled human C3 and C3c. Experiments were also carried out using agents known to activate the complement system in vivo—cobra venom factor, human nephritic serum and nephrotoxic antibody to rabbit glomerular basement membrane. Activation of labelled C3 by cobra factor provided information regarding the metabolic behaviour of C3d. The fractional catabolic ratio (FCR) of human C3 in normal rabbits was 2·4–2·8% of the plasma pool per hr. FCR for C3c was 4.5% per hr. Activation of C3 in vivo consistently resulted in accelerated disappearance of plasma radioactivity. Analysis of the plasma and total body radioactivity curves indicated that both hypercatabolism and extravascular sequestration of radioactivity were responsible for this phenomenon. PMID:4468849

  4. Preparation and characterization of 15N-enriched, size-defined heparan sulfate precursor oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sigulinsky, Crystal; Babu, Ponnusamy; Victor, Xylophone V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    We report the preparation of size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides from Escherichia coli-derived 15N-enriched N-acetylheparosan. Optimized growth conditions of E. coli in minimal media containing 15NH4Cl yielded [15N]N-acetylheparosan on a preparative scale. Depolymerization of [15N]N-acetylheparosan by heparitinase I yielded resolvable, even-numbered oligosaccharides ranging from disaccharide to icosaccharide. Anion-exchange chromatography-assisted fractionation afforded size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides identifiable by ESI-TOFMS. These isotopically labeled oligosaccharides will prove to be valuable research tools for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of heparin and heparan sulfate oligosaccharides and for the study of their structural biology. PMID:19945695

  5. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  6. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  7. Characterization of Metabolically Quiescent Leishmania Parasites in Murine Lesions Using Heavy Water Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Kloehn, Joachim; Saunders, Eleanor C.; O’Callaghan, Sean; Dagley, Michael J.; McConville, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    Information on the growth rate and metabolism of microbial pathogens that cause long-term chronic infections is limited, reflecting the absence of suitable tools for measuring these parameters in vivo. Here, we have measured the replication and physiological state of Leishmania mexicana parasites in murine inflammatory lesions using 2H2O labeling. Infected BALB/c mice were labeled with 2H2O for up to 4 months, and the turnover of parasite DNA, RNA, protein and membrane lipids estimated from the rate of deuterium enrichment in constituent pentose sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids, respectively. We show that the replication rate of parasite stages in these tissues is very slow (doubling time of ~12 days), but remarkably constant throughout lesion development. Lesion parasites also exhibit markedly lower rates of RNA synthesis, protein turnover and membrane lipid synthesis than parasite stages isolated from ex vivo infected macrophages or cultured in vitro, suggesting that formation of lesions induces parasites to enter a semi-quiescent physiological state. Significantly, the determined parasite growth rate accounts for the overall increase in parasite burden indicating that parasite death and turnover of infected host cells in these lesions is minimal. We propose that the Leishmania response to lesion formation is an important adaptive strategy that minimizes macrophage activation, providing a permissive environment that supports progressive expansion of parasite burden. This labeling approach can be used to measure the dynamics of other host-microbe interactions in situ. PMID:25714830

  8. Steroselective synthesis and application of L-( sup 15 N) amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J. ); Lodwig, S.N. . Div. of Science)

    1991-01-01

    We have developed two general approaches to the stereoselective synthesis of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-labeled amino acids. First, labeled serine, biosynthesized using the methylotrophic bacterium M. extorquens AM1, serves as a chiral precursor for the synthesis of other amino acids. For example, pyridoxal phosphate enzymes can be used for the conversion of L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)serine to L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tyrosine, L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tryptophan, and L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)cysteine. In the second approach, developed by Oppolzer and Tamura, an electrophilic amination'' reagent, 1-chloro-1-nitrosocyclohexane, was used to convert chiral enolates into L-{alpha}-amino acids. We prepared 1-chloro-1-({sup 15}N) nitrosocyclohexane and used it to aminate chiral enolates to produce L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)amino acids. The stereoselectivity of this scheme using the Oppolzer sultam chiral auxiliary is remarkable, producing enantiomer ratios of 200 to 1. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Combined use of δ¹³C, δ18O and δ15N tracks nitrogen metabolism and genotypic adaptation of durum wheat to salinity and water deficit.

    PubMed

    Yousfi, Salima; Serret, Maria Dolores; Márquez, Antonio José; Voltas, Jordi; Araus, José Luis

    2012-04-01

    • Accurate phenotyping remains a bottleneck in breeding for salinity and drought resistance. Here the combined use of stable isotope compositions of carbon (δ¹³C), oxygen (δ¹⁸O) and nitrogen (δ¹⁵N) in dry matter is aimed at assessing genotypic responses of durum wheat under different combinations of these stresses. • Two tolerant and two susceptible genotypes to salinity were grown under five combinations of salinity and irrigation regimes. Plant biomass, δ¹³C, δ¹⁸O and δ¹⁵N, gas-exchange parameters, ion and N concentrations, and nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities were measured. • Stresses significantly affected all traits studied. However, only δ¹³C, δ¹⁸O, δ¹⁵N, GS and NR activities, and N concentration allowed for clear differentiation between tolerant and susceptible genotypes. Further, a conceptual model explaining differences in biomass based on such traits was developed for each growing condition. • Differences in acclimation responses among durum wheat genotypes under different stress treatments were associated with δ¹³C. However, except for the most severe stress, δ¹³C did not have a direct (negative) relationship to biomass, being mediated through factors affecting δ¹⁸O or N metabolism. Based upon these results, the key role of N metabolism in durum wheat adaptation to salinity and water stress is highlighted.

  10. Experiments for a systematic comparison between stable-isotope-(deuterium) labeling and radio-((14)C) labeling for the elucidation of the in vitro metabolic pattern of pharmaceutical drugs.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Helge; Hargreaves, Patrick; Gebhardt, Klaus; Klauer, Dominique; Serafyn, Arnaud; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne; Schleimer, Michael; Schlotterbeck, Goetz; Wind, Mathias

    2013-11-01

    A systematic comparison between two labeling approaches for the investigation of the in vitro metabolic pattern of pharmaceutical drugs was performed by examining the use of (i) radiolabeled drugs analyzed with LC-MS-offline radiodetection and (ii) stable-isotope labeled drugs, used in a defined mixture with the unlabeled drug and analyzed by LC-MS with recognition of the specific isotopic pattern. (14)C was used for the radioisotope-approach and deuterium for the stable-isotope approach. Olanzapine, diclofenac and ketoconazole were chosen as model drugs, as they are commercially available in their non-, radio- and stable-isotope labeled forms. For all three model drugs, liver microsome- and hepatocyte-incubations (both from rat) were performed with various concentrations and incubation times for both, the radio- and the stable-isotope approaches. The metabolic pattern, including structure elucidation of all detected metabolites, was performed independently for all individual compounds and incubations. Subsequently, the metabolic patterns of the radio-, and the stable-isotope approaches were compared. In conclusion, all metabolites found with the radioisotope approach could also be found with the stable-isotope approach. Although the stable-isotope approach does not provide a quantitative result, it can be considered to be a highly suited analytical alternative for early in vitro metabolism investigations, especially when radiolabeled drug analogues are not yet available and quantitative results are not yet necessary.

  11. The effect of manuring on cereal and pulse amino acid δ(15)N values.

    PubMed

    Styring, Amy K; Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-06-01

    Amino acid δ(15)N values of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) grains and rachis and broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, grown in manured and unmanured soil at the experimental farm stations of Rothamsted, UK and Bad Lauchstädt, Germany, were determined by GC-C-IRMS. Manuring was found to result in a consistent (15)N-enrichment of cereal grain amino acid δ(15)N values, indicating that manuring did not affect the metabolic routing of nitrogen (N) into cereal grain amino acids. The increase in cereal grain δ(15)N values with manuring is therefore due to a (15)N-enrichment in the δ(15)N value of assimilated inorganic-N. Greater variation was observed in the (15)N-enrichment of rachis amino acids with manuring, possibly due to enhanced sensitivity to changes in growing conditions and higher turnover of N in rachis cells compared to cereal grains. Total amino acid δ(15)N values of manured and unmanured broad beans and peas were very similar, indicating that the legumes assimilated N2 from the atmosphere rather than N from the soil, since there was no evidence for routing of (15)N-enriched manure N into any of the pulse amino acids. Crop amino acid δ(15)N values thus provide insights into the sources of N assimilated by non N2-fixing and N2-fixing crops grown on manured and unmanured soils, and reveal an effect of manure on N metabolism in different crop species and plant parts.

  12. Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants and high-performance mass spectrometry for quantitative plant proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Mills, Davinia J S; Cramer, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants (HILEP) combines hydroponic plant cultivation and metabolic labeling with stable isotopes using (15)N-containing inorganic salts to label whole and mature plants. Employing (15)N salts as the sole nitrogen source for HILEP leads to the production of healthy-looking plants which contain (15)N proteins labeled to nearly 100%. Therefore, HILEP is suitable for quantitative plant proteomic analysis, where plants are grown in either (14)N- or (15)N-hydroponic media and pooled when the biological samples are collected for relative proteome quantitation. The pooled (14)N-/(15)N-protein extracts can be fractionated in any suitable way and digested with a protease for shotgun proteomics, using typically reverse phase liquid chromatography nanoelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (RPLC-nESI-MS/MS). Best results were obtained with a hybrid ion trap/FT-MS mass spectrometer, combining high mass accuracy and sensitivity for the MS data acquisition with speed and high-throughput MS/MS data acquisition, increasing the number of proteins identified and quantified and improving protein quantitation. Peak processing and picking from raw MS data files, protein identification, and quantitation were performed in a highly automated way using integrated MS data analysis software with minimum manual intervention, thus easing the analytical workflow. In this methodology paper, we describe how to grow Arabidopsis plants hydroponically for isotope labeling using (15)N salts and how to quantitate the resulting proteomes using a convenient workflow that does not require extensive bioinformatics skills.

  13. Monitoring Protein O-GlcNAc Status via Metabolic Labeling and Copper-free Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Chin Fen; Wells, Lance

    2014-01-01

    O-GlcNAc modification found on the serine and threonine residues of intracellular proteins is an inducible post-translational modification that regulates numerous biological processes. In combination with other cell biological and biochemical approaches, a robust and streamlined strategy for detecting the number and stoichiometry of O-GlcNAc modification can provide valuable insights for decoding the functions of O-GlcNAc at the molecular level. Herein, we report an optimized workflow for evaluating the O-GlcNAc status of proteins using a combination of metabolic labeling and click chemistry based mass tagging. This method is strategically complementary to the chemoenzymatic-based mass-tagging method. PMID:24995865

  14. Intein Applications: From Protein Purification and Labeling to Metabolic Control Methods*

    PubMed Central

    Wood, David W.; Camarero, Julio A.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of inteins in the early 1990s opened the door to a wide variety of new technologies. Early engineered inteins from various sources allowed the development of self-cleaving affinity tags and new methods for joining protein segments through expressed protein ligation. Some applications were developed around native and engineered split inteins, which allow protein segments expressed separately to be spliced together in vitro. More recently, these early applications have been expanded and optimized through the discovery of highly efficient trans-splicing and trans-cleaving inteins. These new inteins have enabled a wide variety of applications in metabolic engineering, protein labeling, biomaterials construction, protein cyclization, and protein purification. PMID:24700459

  15. Imaging Glycosylation In Vivo by Metabolic Labeling and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wainman, Yéléna A.; Wright, Alan; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; McGuire, Sarah; Hu, De‐En; Bulat, Flaviu; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glycosylation is a ubiquitous post‐translational modification, present in over 50 % of the proteins in the human genome,1 with important roles in cell–cell communication and migration. Interest in glycome profiling has increased with the realization that glycans can be used as biomarkers of many diseases,2 including cancer.3 We report here the first tomographic imaging of glycosylated tissues in live mice by using metabolic labeling and a gadolinium‐based bioorthogonal MRI probe. Significant N‐azidoacetylgalactosamine dependent T 1 contrast was observed in vivo two hours after probe administration. Tumor, kidney, and liver showed significant contrast, and several other tissues, including the pancreas, spleen, heart, and intestines, showed a very high contrast (>10‐fold). This approach has the potential to enable the rapid and non‐invasive magnetic resonance imaging of glycosylated tissues in vivo in preclinical models of disease. PMID:27346899

  16. Imaging Glycosylation In Vivo by Metabolic Labeling and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wainman, Yéléna A.; Wright, Alan; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; McGuire, Sarah; Hu, De‐En; Bulat, Flaviu; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glycosylation is a ubiquitous post‐translational modification, present in over 50 % of the proteins in the human genome,1 with important roles in cell–cell communication and migration. Interest in glycome profiling has increased with the realization that glycans can be used as biomarkers of many diseases,2 including cancer.3 We report here the first tomographic imaging of glycosylated tissues in live mice by using metabolic labeling and a gadolinium‐based bioorthogonal MRI probe. Significant N‐azidoacetylgalactosamine dependent T 1 contrast was observed in vivo two hours after probe administration. Tumor, kidney, and liver showed significant contrast, and several other tissues, including the pancreas, spleen, heart, and intestines, showed a very high contrast (>10‐fold). This approach has the potential to enable the rapid and non‐invasive magnetic resonance imaging of glycosylated tissues in vivo in preclinical models of disease. PMID:26633082

  17. Effect of metabolism on retention of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody in liver and blood

    SciTech Connect

    Kinuyfa, S.; Jeong, J.M.; Garmestani, K.

    1994-11-01

    The effect of a chelator structure on the metabolic fate of the {sup 111}In-labeled monoclonal antibody (Mab) T101 was investigated in normal Balb/c mice to assess the importance of this chemical parameter in the reduction of the background radioactivity in blood and liver. Mab T101 was conjugated with either 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-6-methyl-diethylaminetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) (1B4M), 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl) cyclohexyl-DTPA (CHX-B) or cyclic DTPA dianhydride (cDTPA) and then radiolabeled with {sup 111}In-labeled T101 conjugates and sacrificed in groups of five up to 5 days postinjection for comparative biodistribution studies and analyses of liver, blood and urine samples for radioindium products. The biodistribution of {sup 111}In-1B4M-T101 and {sup 111}In-CHX-B-T101 were similar to each other but significantly different from that of {sup 111}In-cDTPA-T101, particularly in the blood and liver. Size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that the concentration of the intact {sup 111}In-immunoglobulin (Ig)G in liver decreased with similar rates for the three conjugates. Meanwhile, the concentration of a small DTPA-like metabolite in liver increased to a different peak value (4.6% 1D/g for the cDTPA conjugate and 1.6% lD/g for the 1B4M and CHX-B conjugates) approximately at 24 hr and maintained a steady-state concentration up to 5 days. The thiourea linkage between T101 and the {sup 111}In-labeled chelates and a higher complex stability and higher lipophilicity of {sup 111}In-1B4M and {sup 111}In-CHX-B appear to be responsible for lower liver and higher blood radioactivity for the 1B4M and CHX conjugates. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Human dietary δ(15)N intake: representative data for principle food items.

    PubMed

    Huelsemann, F; Koehler, K; Braun, H; Schaenzer, W; Flenker, U

    2013-09-01

    Dietary analysis using δ(15)N values of human remains such as bone and hair is usually based on general principles and limited data sets. Even for modern humans, the direct ascertainment of dietary δ(15)N is difficult and laborious, due to the complexity of metabolism and nitrogen fractionation, differing dietary habits and variation of δ(15)N values of food items. The objective of this study was to summarize contemporary regional experimental and global literature data to ascertain mean representative δ(15)N values for distinct food categories. A comprehensive data set of more than 12,000 analyzed food samples was summarized from the literature. Data originated from studies dealing with (1) authenticity tracing or origin control of food items, and (2) effects of fertilization or nutrition on δ(15)N values of plants or animals. Regional German food δ(15)N values revealed no major differences compared with the mean global values derived from the literature. We found that, in contrast to other food categories, historical faunal remains of pig and poultry are significantly enriched in (15)N compared to modern samples. This difference may be due to modern industrialized breeding practices. In some food categories variations in agricultural and feeding regimens cause significant differences in δ(15)N values that may lead to misinterpretations when only limited information is available.

  19. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant.

    PubMed

    Fenilli, Tatiele A B; Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O S; Trivelin, Paulo C O; Dourado-Neto, Durval

    2007-12-01

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry. PMID:18066442

  20. Stem injection of 15N-NH4NO3 into mature Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis).

    PubMed

    Nair, Richard; Weatherall, Andrew; Perks, Mike; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Stem injection techniques can be used to introduce (15)N into trees to overcome a low variation in natural abundance and label biomass with a distinct (15)N signature, but have tended to target small and young trees, of a variety of species, with little replication. We injected 98 atom% (15)N ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) solution into 13 mature, 9- to 13-m tall edge-profile Sitka spruce trees in order to produce a large quantity of labelled litter, examining the distribution of the isotope throughout the canopy after felling in terms of both total abundance of (15)N and relative distribution of the isotope throughout individual trees. Using a simple mass balance of the canopy alone, based on observed total needle biomass and modelled branch biomass, all of the isotope injected was accounted for, evenly split between needles and branches, but with a high degree of variability both within individual trees, and among trees. Both (15)N abundance and relative within-canopy distribution were biased towards the upper and middle crown in foliage. Recovery of the label in branches was much more variable than in needles, possibly due to differences in nitrogen allocation for both growth and storage, which differ seasonally between foliage and woody biomass.

  1. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant.

    PubMed

    Fenilli, Tatiele A B; Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O S; Trivelin, Paulo C O; Dourado-Neto, Durval

    2007-12-01

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry.

  2. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  3. Metabolism of glutamine and glutamate in monkey lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Jernigan, H.M. Jr.; Zigler, J.S. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    In rat lenses, glutamine (GLN), not glutamate (GLU), from the surrounding fluids is the primary source of GLU utilized by several metabolic pathways. To study lenticular amino acid metabolism in a primate, fresh lenses from young (2-3 yr) rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were incubated at 37/sup 0/C for 3, 6, or 24 hr in balanced salt medium containing 5 mM of amino-labeled /sup 15/N-GLN or /sup 15/N-GLU. The % enrichment of /sup 15/N in several free amino acids was determined by GCMS. GLN entered the monkey lenses more rapidly than GLU, but, in contrast to rat lenses, /sup 15/N-GLN did not more rapidly label other amino acids. The % of /sup 15/N in the (GLN + GLU) pool of the monkey lenses in /sup 15/N-GLN reached 20, 35, and 60% at 3, 6, and 24 hr respectively, compared with 10, 20, and 40% in the lenses in /sup 15/N-GLU. However, in monkey lenses incubated 24 hr with /sup 15/N-GLN, the /sup 15/N in alanine, serine, proline, and (aspartate + asparagine) was only 35, 6, 7, and 30% respectively, compared with 50, 10, 7, and 50% in monkey lenses with /sup 15/N-GLU. Compared with rat lenses, monkey lenses showed slower transport, deamidation, and metabolism of GLN, and less serine, proline, and glycine synthesis. Also, part of the GLU in monkey lenses appeared to be in a slowly transaminating pool. Species differences should be considered when rats are used as a model to study changes in human lenses during aging and cataractogenesis.

  4. Compound-specific 15N analysis of amino acids in 15N tracer experiments provide an estimate of newly synthesised soil protein from inorganic and organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, Alice; Michaelides, Katerina; Evershed, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Organic N concentrations far exceed those of inorganic N in most soils and despite much investigation, the composition and cycling of this complex pool of SOM remains poorly understood. A particular problem has been separating more recalcitrant soil organic N from that actively cycling through the soil system; an important consideration in N cycling studies and for the soil's nutrient supplying capacity. The use of 15N-labelled substrates as stable isotope tracers has contributed much to our understanding of the soil system, but the complexity and heterogeneity of soil organic N prevents thorough compound-specific 15N analyses of organic N compounds and makes it difficult to examine any 15N-labelled organic products in any detail. As a result, a significant proportion of previous work has either simply assumed that since the majority of soil N is organic, all of the 15N retained in the soil is organic N (e.g. Sebilo et al., 2013) or subtracted 15N-labelled inorganic compounds from bulk values (e.g. Pilbeam et al., 1997). While the latter approach is more accurate, these methods only provide an estimate of the bulk 15N value of an extremely complex and non-uniformly labelled organic pool. A more detailed approach has been to use microbial biomass extraction (Brookes et al., 1985) and subsequent N isotopic analysis to determine the 15N value of biomass-N, representing the fraction of 15N assimilated by microbes or the 15N cycling through the 'living' or 'active' portion of soil organic N. However, this extraction method can only generate estimates and some lack of confidence in its validity and reliability remains. Here, we present an alternative technique to obtain a measure of the assimilation of an applied 15N substrate by the soil microbial biomass and an estimate of the newly synthesized soil protein, which is representative of the magnitude of the active soil microbial biomass. The technique uses a stable isotope tracer and compound-specific 15N analysis, but

  5. Hydrogen doppler spectroscopy using 15N ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, L.; Becker, H. W.; Gorris, F.; Kubsky, S.; Schulte, W. H.; Rolfs, C.

    The energy spread of atomic and molecular ion beams from the 4 MV Dynamitron tandem accelerator at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum has been studied and in part minimized. Using the ER= 6.40 MeV narrow resonance in 1H(15N,αγ)12C with an 15N energy spread of 4.55 keV, the Doppler broadening for several hydrogen-bearing gases was found to be in good agreement with expectation: e.g. for NH3 gas a rotational-vibrational Doppler width of 10.41 +/- 0.25 keV was observed (theory = 10.4 keV). Studies of the vibrational Doppler widths of H-bonds on a Si <100> surface were performed using a 4πγ-ray detection system together with UHV-chambers for sample preparation, transport, and analysis. The results showed that further improvements in the experimental set-ups are needed for such investigations.

  6. Regulation of [15N]urea synthesis from [5-15N]glutamine. Role of pH, hormones, and pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Nissim, I; Yudkoff, M; Brosnan, J T

    1996-12-01

    We have utilized both [5-15N]glutamine and [3-13C] pyruvate as metabolic tracers in order to: (i) examine the effect of pH, glucagon (GLU), or insulin on the precursor-product relationship between 15NH3, [15N]citrulline, and, thereby, [15N]urea synthesis and (ii) elucidate the mechanism(s) by which pyruvate stimulates [15N] urea synthesis. Hepatocytes isolated from rat were incubated at pH 6.8, 7.4, or 7.6 with 1 mM [5-15N]glutamine and 0.1 mM 14NH4Cl in the presence or the absence of [3-13C] pyruvate (2 mM). A separate series of experiments was performed at pH 7.4 in the presence of insulin or GLU. 15NH3 enrichment exceeded or was equal to that of [15N]citrulline under all conditions except for pH 7.6, when the 15N enrichment in citrulline exceeded that in ammonia. The formation of [15N]citrulline (atom % excess) was increased with higher pH. Flux through phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and [15N]urea synthesis were stimulated (p < 0.05) at pH 7.6 or with GLU and decreased (p < 0.05) at pH 6.8. Insulin had no significant effect on flux through PDG or on [15N]urea synthesis. Decreased [15N]urea production at pH 6.8 was associated with depleted aspartate and glutamate levels. Pyruvate attenuated this decrease in the aspartate and glutamate pools and stimulated [15N]urea synthesis. Production of Asp from pyruvate was increased with increasing medium pH. Approximately 80% of Asp was derived from [3-13C]pyruvate regardless of incubation pH or addition of hormone. Furthermore, approximately 20, 40, and 50% of the mitochondrial N-acetylglutamate (NAG) pool was derived from [3-13C]pyruvate at pH 6.8, 7.4, and 7.6, respectively. Both the concentration and formation of [13C]NAG from [3-13C]pyruvate were increased (p < 0.05) with glucagon and decreased (p < 0.05) with insulin or at pH 6.8. The data suggest a correlation between changes in [15N]urea synthesis and alterations in the level and synthesis of [13C]NAG from pyruvate. The current observations suggest that the

  7. Linking Microbial Phylogeny to Metabolic Activity at the Single-Cell Level by Using Enhanced Element Labeling-Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (EL-FISH) and NanoSIMS▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Sebastian; Lösekann, Tina; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weber, Peter K.; Ng, Wing-On; Stevenson, Bradley S.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Relman, David A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2008-01-01

    To examine phylogenetic identity and metabolic activity of individual cells in complex microbial communities, we developed a method which combines rRNA-based in situ hybridization with stable isotope imaging based on nanometer-scale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Fluorine or bromine atoms were introduced into cells via 16S rRNA-targeted probes, which enabled phylogenetic identification of individual cells by NanoSIMS imaging. To overcome the natural fluorine and bromine backgrounds, we modified the current catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique by using halogen-containing fluorescently labeled tyramides as substrates for the enzymatic tyramide deposition. Thereby, we obtained an enhanced element labeling of microbial cells by FISH (EL-FISH). The relative cellular abundance of fluorine or bromine after EL-FISH exceeded natural background concentrations by up to 180-fold and allowed us to distinguish target from non-target cells in NanoSIMS fluorine or bromine images. The method was optimized on single cells of axenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae cultures. EL-FISH/NanoSIMS was then applied to study interrelationships in a dual-species consortium consisting of a filamentous cyanobacterium and a heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium. We also evaluated the method on complex microbial aggregates obtained from human oral biofilms. In both samples, we found evidence for metabolic interactions by visualizing the fate of substrates labeled with 13C-carbon and 15N-nitrogen, while individual cells were identified simultaneously by halogen labeling via EL-FISH. Our novel approach will facilitate further studies of the ecophysiology of known and uncultured microorganisms in complex environments and communities. PMID:18359832

  8. Continuous field measurement of N2O isotopologues using FTIR spectroscopy following 15N addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. L.; Griffith, D. W.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Lugg, G.; Lawrie, R.; Macdonald, B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic additions of fertilizer nitrogen (N) have significantly increased the mole fraction of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the troposphere. Tracking the fate of fertilizer N and its transformation to N2O is important to advance knowledge of greenhouse gas emissions from soils. Transport and transformations are frequently studied using 15N labeling experiments, but instruments capable of continuous measurements of 15N-N2O at the surface of soil have only recently come to the fore. Our primary aim was to quantify emissions of N2O and the fraction of 15N emitted as N2O from an agricultural soil following 15N addition using a mobile Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. We set up a short-term field experiment on a coastal floodplain site near Nowra, New South Wales. We deployed an automated chamber system connected to a multi-pass cell (optical pathlength 24 m) and low resolution FTIR spectrometer to measure fluxes of all N2O isotopologues collected from five 0.25 m2 chambers every three hours. We measured N2O fluxes pre and post-application of 15N-labeled substrate as potassium nitrate (KNO3) or urea [CO(NH2)2] to the soil surface. Root mean square uncertainties for all isotopologue measurements were less than 0.3 nmol mol-1 for 1 minute average concentration measurements, and minimum detectable fluxes for each isotopologue were <0.1 ng N m-2 s-1. Emissions of all N2O isotopologues were evident immediately following 15N addition. Emissions of 14N15NO, 15N14NO and 15N15NO isotopologues subsided within 10 d, but 14N14NO fluxes were evident over the entire experiment. The figure provides an overview of the emissions. Cumulative 15N-N2O fluxes (sum of the three 15N isotopologues) per chamber for the 14 days following 15N addition ranged from 1.5 to 10.3 mg 15N-N2O m-2. The chambers were destructively sampled after 2 weeks and 15N analyzed in soil and plant material using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Approximately 1% (range 0.7 - 1.9%) of the total amount of

  9. Probing the Metabolic Network in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei Using Untargeted Metabolomics with Stable Isotope Labelled Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Creek, Darren J.; Mazet, Muriel; Achcar, Fiona; Anderson, Jana; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kamour, Ruwida; Morand, Pauline; Millerioux, Yoann; Biran, Marc; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Weidt, Stefan K.; Burgess, Karl E. V.; Breitling, Rainer; Watson, David G.; Bringaud, Frédéric; Barrett, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate. PMID:25775470

  10. Probing in Vivo Metabolism by Stable Isotope Labeling of Storage Lipids and Proteins in Developing Brassica napus Embryos1

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, Jörg; Ohlrogge, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Developing embryos of Brassica napus accumulate both triacylglycerols and proteins as major storage reserves. To evaluate metabolic fluxes during embryo development, we have established conditions for stable isotope labeling of cultured embryos under steady-state conditions. Sucrose supplied via the endosperm is considered to be the main carbon and energy source for seed metabolism. However, in addition to 220 to 270 mm carbohydrates (sucrose, glucose, and fructose), analysis of endosperm liquid revealed up to 70 mm amino acids as well as 6 to 15 mm malic acid. Therefore, a labeling approach with multiple carbon sources is a precondition to quantitatively reflect fluxes of central carbon metabolism in developing embryos. Mid-cotyledon stage B. napus embryos were dissected from plants and cultured for 15 d on a complex liquid medium containing 13C-labeled carbohydrates. The 13C enrichment of fatty acids and amino acids (after hydrolysis of the seed proteins) was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Analysis of 13C isotope isomers of labeled fatty acids and plastid-derived amino acids indicated that direct glycolysis provides at least 90% of precursors of plastid acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Unlabeled amino acids, when added to the growth medium, did not reduce incorporation of 13C label into plastid-formed fatty acids, but substantially diluted 13C label in seed protein. Approximately 30% of carbon in seed protein was derived from exogenous amino acids and as a consequence, the use of amino acids as a carbon source may have significant influence on the total carbon and energy balance in seed metabolism. 13C label in the terminal acetate units of C20 and C22 fatty acids that derive from cytosolic acetyl-CoA was also significantly diluted by unlabeled amino acids. We conclude that cytosolic acetyl-CoA has a more complex biogenetic origin than plastidic acetyl-CoA. Malic acid in the growth medium did not dilute 13C label incorporation into fatty acids or

  11. Synthesis, in Vitro Covalent Binding Evaluation, and Metabolism of 14C-Labeled Inhibitors of 11β-HSD1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, we reported the design and synthesis of three potent, selective, and orally bioavailable 11β-HSD1 inhibitors labeled with 14C: AMG 456 (1), AM-6949 (2), and AM-7715 (3). We evaluated the covalent protein binding of the labeled inhibitors in human liver microsomes in vitro and assessed their potential bioactivation risk in humans. We then studied the in vitro mechanism of 2 in human hepatocytes and the formation of reactive intermediates. Our study results suggest that 1 and 3 have low potential for metabolic bioactivation in humans, while 2 has relatively high risk. PMID:25408839

  12. 13N,15N isotope and kinetic evidence against hyponitrite as an intermediate in dentrification.

    PubMed

    Hollocher, T C; Garber, E; Cooper, A J; Reiman, R E

    1980-06-10

    13N- and 15N-labeling experiments were carried out with Paracoccus denitrificans, grown anaerobically on nitrate, to determine whether hyponitrite might be an obligatory intermediate in denitrification and a precursor of nitrous oxide. From experiments designed to trap [13N]- or [15N,15N]hyponitrite by dilution into authentic hyponitrite it was calculated that the intracellular concentration of a presumptive hyponitrite pool must be less than 0.4 mM. In order for a pool of this size to turn over rapidly enough to handle the flux of nitrogen during dentrifucation, the spontaneous rate of hyponitrite dehydration must be enhanced by a factor of several thousand through enzyme catalysis. Cell extracts failed to catalyze this reaction under a variety of conditions. It is concluded that hyponitrite cannot be an intermediate in dentrification. In addition, the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen was studied in P. denitrificans using 13N as tracer. At low concentrations (less than 10(-8) M) of labeled nitrate and nitrite 5 to 10% of the label was assimilated into non-volatile metabolites and 90 to 95% was reduced to N2. Similarly, with 15 mM [13N]nitrate, 5% of the label went into metabolites and 95% to N2. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis of the labeled metabolites indicated that the major pathway for assimilation of inorganic nitrogen in P. denitrificans under these conditions is through ammonia incorporation via the aspartase reaction. PMID:7372623

  13. Light-mediated 15N fractionation in Caribbean gorgonian octocorals: implications for pollution monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. M.; Kim, K.; Andras, J. P.; Sparks, J. P.

    2011-09-01

    The stable nitrogen isotope ratio ( δ 15N) of coral tissue is a useful recorder of anthropogenic pollution in tropical marine ecosystems. However, little is known of the natural environmentally induced fractionations that affect our interpretation of coral δ 15N values. In symbiotic scleractinians, light affects metabolic fractionation of N during photosynthesis, which may confound the identification of N pollution between sites of varied depth or turbidity. Given the superiority of octocorals for δ 15N studies, our goal was to quantify the effect of light on gorgonian δ 15N in the context of monitoring N pollution sources. Using field collections, we show that δ 15N declined by 1.4‰ over 20 m depth in two species of gorgonians, the common sea fan, Gorgonia ventalina, and the slimy sea plume, Pseudopterogorgia americana. An 8-week laboratory experiment with P. americana showed that light, not temperature causes this variation, whereby the lowest fractionation of the N source was observed in the highest light treatment. Finally, we used a yearlong reciprocal depth transplant experiment to quantify the time frame over which δ 15N changes in G. ventalina as a function of light regime . Over the year, δ 15N was unchanged and increased slightly in the deep control colonies and shallow colonies transplanted to the deep site, respectively. Within 6 months, colonies transplanted from deep to shallow became enriched by 0.8‰, mirroring the enrichment observed in the shallow controls, which was likely due to the combined effect of an increase in the source δ 15N and reduced fractionation. We conclude that light affects gorgonian δ 15N fractionation and should be considered in sampling designs for N pollution monitoring. However, these fractionations are small relative to differences observed between natural and anthropogenic N sources.

  14. Label-free imaging of metabolism and oxidative stress in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rupsa; Heylman, Christopher; George, Steven C.; Gratton, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate a label-free optical imaging technique to assess metabolic status and oxidative stress in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes by two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous fluorophores. Our results show the sensitivity of this method to detect shifts in metabolism and oxidative stress in the cardiomyocytes upon pathological stimuli of hypoxia and cardiotoxic drugs. This non-invasive imaging technique could prove beneficial for drug development and screening, especially for in vitro cardiac models created from stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and to study the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases and therapy. PMID:27231614

  15. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Protein Turnover by Metabolic Whole Rodent Pulse-Chase Isotopic Labeling and Shotgun Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Savas, Jeffrey N; Park, Sung Kyu; Yates, John R

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of protein half-life and degradation dynamics has proven critically important to our understanding of a broad and diverse set of biological conditions ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration. Historically these protein turnover measures have been performed in cells by monitoring protein levels after "pulse" labeling of newly synthesized proteins and subsequent chase periods. Comparing the level of labeled protein remaining as a function of time to the initial level reveals the protein's half-life. In this method we provide a detailed description of the workflow required for the determination of protein turnover rates on a whole proteome scale in vivo. Our approach starts with the metabolic labeling of whole rodents by restricting all the nitrogen in their diet to exclusively nitrogen-15 in the form of spirulina algae. After near complete organismal labeling with nitrogen-15, the rodents are then switched to a normal nitrogen-14 rich diet for time periods of days to years. Tissues are harvested, the extracts are fractionated, and the proteins are digested to peptides. Peptides are separated by multidimensional liquid chromatography and analyzed by high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS). The nitrogen-15 containing proteins are then identified and measured by the bioinformatic proteome analysis tools Sequest, DTASelect2, and Census. In this way, our metabolic pulse-chase approach reveals in vivo protein decay rates proteome-wide. PMID:26867752

  17. Thoughts on the teaching of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Robert P

    2006-03-01

    Systems biology, metabolomics, metabolic engineering, and other recent developments in biochemistry suggest that future biochemists will require a detailed familiarity with the compounds and pathways of intermediary metabolism and their biochemical control. The challenge to the biochemistry instructor is the presentation of metabolic pathways in a manner that allows student creativity in learning the pathways and their components. One approach that does permit the use of problem solving for the study of metabolic pathways involves following the fate of (13) C, (14) C, or (15) N labels, presented originally in the structure of an important metabolic starting compound, through relevant metabolic pathways. This method allows the presentation and study of problems in which such an isotopic label can be traced through two or more metabolic pathways, thus illustrating how these pathways are interconnected. The understanding that all the pathways of intermediary metabolism are interconnected provides opportunities to discuss their metabolic control by such mechanisms as signaling, feedback inhibition, location in organelles, coenzyme levels, and coenzyme recycling rates. The method is illustrated by following the fate of (14) C labels through anaerobic glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and fatty acid transport, β-oxidation, and ketone body formation. Cholesterol biosynthesis and heme formation are used to show that presentations of long and complex pathways can demonstrate important biochemical concepts by following the fate of an isotopic label using only the most important intermediates. Problems based on tracing radioactive labels through one or more metabolic pathways allow the use of cooperative learning techniques. PMID:21638643

  18. Metabolism of pyridalyl in rats: excretion, distribution, and biotransformation of dichloropropenyl-labeled pyridalyl.

    PubMed

    Nagahori, Hirohisa; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Naohiko; Kaneko, Hideo

    2009-11-25

    Metabolism of pyridalyl [2,6-dichloro-4-(3,3-dichloroallyloxy)phenyl 3-[5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridyloxy]propyl ether] labeled at position 2 of the dichloropropenyl group with 14C was investigated after single oral administration to male and female rats at 5 and 500 mg/kg. Absorbed 14C was excreted into feces (68-79%), urine (8-14%), and expired air (6-10%) in all of the groups. Regarding 14C-tissue residues on the seventh day after administration, fat showed the highest levels at 0.98-2.34 ppm and 219-221 ppm with the low and high doses, respectively. 14C-Residues in other tissues accounted for 0.03-0.32 ppm at the low dose and 3-70 ppm at the high dose. The percentages of the 14C-residue in fat were 1.50-3.16% of the dose, and those of muscle and hair and skin were also relatively high, accounting for 0.49-1.20%. Total 14C-residues in the whole body were 2.95-6.80% of the dose. Fecal metabolites in male rats treated with 500 mg/kg pyridalyl were purified by a combination of chromatographic techniques, and chemical structures of 8 metabolites were identified by NMR and MS spectrometry. The biotransformation reactions in rats were proposed to be as follows: (1) epoxidation of the double bond in the dichloropropenyl group followed by hydration, dehydrochlorination, decarboxylation, and/or mercapturic acid conjugation; (2) CO2 formation after O-dealkylation of pyridalyl and its metabolites; (3) hydroxylation of C3 in the pyridyl ring; (4) O-dealkylation of the pyridyloxy and the trimethylene groups; (5) dehydrochlorination and hydration in the dichloropropenyl group. PMID:19919122

  19. Metabolic network analysis of Bacillus clausii on minimal and semirich medium using (13)C-labeled glucose.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Torben; Christensen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-04-01

    Using (13)C-labeled glucose fed to the facultative alkalophilic Bacillus clausii producing the alkaline serine protease Savinase, the intracellular fluxes were quantified in continuous cultivation and in batch cultivation on a minimal medium. The flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was found to increase with increasing specific growth rate but at a much lower level than previously reported for Bacillus subtilis. Two futile cycles in the pyruvate metabolism were included in the metabolic network. A substantial flux in the futile cycle involving malic enzyme was estimated, whereas only a very small or zero flux through PEP carboxykinase was estimated, indicating that the latter enzyme was not active during growth on glucose. The uptake of the amino acids in a semirich medium containing 15 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins was estimated using fully labeled glucose in batch cultivations. It was found that leucine, isoleucine, and phenylalanine were taken up from the medium and not synthesized de novo from glucose. In contrast, serine and threonine were completely synthesized from other metabolites and not taken up from the medium. Valine, proline, and lysine were partly taken up from the medium and partly synthesized from glucose. The metabolic network analysis was extended to include analysis of growth on the semirich medium containing amino acids, and the metabolic flux distribution on this medium was estimated and compared with growth on minimal medium. PMID:12009795

  20. Diffusion technique for 15N and inorganic N analysis of low-N aqueous solutions and Kjeldahl digests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui Rui; Dittert, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    Diffusion of ammonia is a common sample preparation method for the stable isotope analysis of inorganic nitrogen in aqueous solution. Classical diffusion methods usually require 6-12 days of diffusion and often focus on (15)N/(14)N analysis only. More recent studies have discussed whether complete N recovery was necessary for the precise analysis of stable N isotope ratios. In this paper we present a newly revised diffusion technique that allows correct and simultaneous determination of total N and (15)N at% from aqueous solutions and Kjeldahl digests, with N concentrations down to sub-0.5-mg N L(-1) levels, and it is tested under different conditions of (15)N isotope labelling. With the modification described, the diffusion time was reduced to 72 h, while the ratios of measured and expected (15)N at% were greater than 99% and the simultaneous recovery of total N was >95%. Analysis of soil microbial biomass N and its (15)N/(14)N ratio is one of the most important applications of this diffusion technique. An experiment with soil extracts spiked with (15)N-labelled yeast showed that predigestion was necessary to prevent serious N loss during Kjeldahl digestion of aqueous samples (i.e. soil extracts). The whole method of soil microbial biomass N preparation for (15)N/(14)N analysis included chloroform fumigation, predigestion, Kjeldahl digestion and diffusion. An experiment with soil spiked with (15)N-labelled yeast was carried out to evaluate the method. Results showed a highly significant correlation of recovered and added N, with the same recovery rate (0.21) of both total N and (15)N. A k(N) value of 0.25 was obtained based on the data. In conclusion, the diffusion method works for soil extracts and microbial biomass N determination and hence could be useful in many types of soil/water studies.

  1. Discovery of an alternate metabolic pathway for urea synthesis in adult Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Scaraffia, Patricia Y; Tan, Guanhong; Isoe, Jun; Wysocki, Vicki H; Wells, Michael A; Miesfeld, Roger L

    2008-01-15

    We demonstrate the presence of an alternate metabolic pathway for urea synthesis in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that converts uric acid to urea via an amphibian-like uricolytic pathway. For these studies, female mosquitoes were fed a sucrose solution containing (15)NH4Cl, [5-(15)N]-glutamine, [(15)N]-proline, allantoin, or allantoic acid. At 24 h after feeding, the feces were collected and analyzed in a mass spectrometer. Specific enzyme inhibitors confirmed that mosquitoes incorporate (15)N from (15)NH4Cl into [5-(15)N]-glutamine and use the (15)N of the amide group of glutamine to produce labeled uric acid. More importantly, we found that [(15)N2]-uric acid can be metabolized to [(15)N]-urea and be excreted as nitrogenous waste through an uricolytic pathway. Ae. aegypti express all three genes in this pathway, namely, urate oxidase, allantoinase, and allantoicase. The functional relevance of these genes in mosquitoes was shown by feeding allantoin or allantoic acid, which significantly increased unlabeled urea levels in the feces. Moreover, knockdown of urate oxidase expression by RNA interference demonstrated that this pathway is active in females fed blood or (15)NH4Cl based on a significant increase in uric acid levels in whole-body extracts and a reduction in [(15)N]-urea excretion, respectively. These unexpected findings could lead to the development of metabolism-based strategies for mosquito control.

  2. Systematic NMR Analysis of Stable Isotope Labeled Metabolite Mixtures in Plant and Animal Systems: Coarse Grained Views of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Suto, Michitaka; Nishihara, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hirayama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Metabolic phenotyping has become an important ‘bird's-eye-view’ technology which can be applied to higher organisms, such as model plant and animal systems in the post-genomics and proteomics era. Although genotyping technology has expanded greatly over the past decade, metabolic phenotyping has languished due to the difficulty of ‘top-down’ chemical analyses. Here, we describe a systematic NMR methodology for stable isotope-labeling and analysis of metabolite mixtures in plant and animal systems. Methodology/Principal Findings The analysis method includes a stable isotope labeling technique for use in living organisms; a systematic method for simultaneously identifying a large number of metabolites by using a newly developed HSQC-based metabolite chemical shift database combined with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy; Principal Components Analysis; and a visualization method using a coarse-grained overview of the metabolic system. The database contains more than 1000 1H and 13C chemical shifts corresponding to 142 metabolites measured under identical physicochemical conditions. Using the stable isotope labeling technique in Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and Bombyx mori, we systematically detected >450 HSQC peaks in each 13C-HSQC spectrum derived from model plant, Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and the invertebrate animal model Bombyx mori. Furthermore, for the first time, efficient 13C labeling has allowed reliable signal assignment using analytical separation techniques such as 3D HCCH-COSY spectra in higher organism extracts. Conclusions/Significance Overall physiological changes could be detected and categorized in relation to a critical developmental phase change in B. mori by coarse-grained representations in which the organization of metabolic pathways related to a specific developmental phase was visualized on the basis of constituent changes of 56 identified metabolites. Based on the observed intensities of 13C atoms of

  3. Evaluation of myocardial metabolism, with /sup 13/N- and /sup 11/C-labeled amino acids and positron computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.; Barrio, J.R.; Egbert, J.E.; Hansen, H.W.; MacDonald, N.S.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-08-01

    To evaluate the utility of labeled L-amino acids (AA) for imaging regional myocardial AA metabolism by positron computed tomography (PCT), the myocardial uptake and clearance of Ala,* Glu, Gln, Asp, Leu tagged with /sup 13/N, and of /sup 11/C-tagged Asp, and oxaloacetate (Oxal), were examined in 44 experiments at control, during ischemia, and after transaminase inhibition. The myocardial time-activity curves recorded after intracoronary tracer injection had two clearance phases (an early and a late) for all /sup 13/N AA, and three (early, intermediate, late) for the two /sup 11/C compounds, with significantly different clearance half-times of 18.7 +/- 8.0 (s.d.) sec for the early phase, 141.7 +/- 56.5 sec for the intermediate, and 61.2 +/- 43.5 min for the late phase. The residual fractions ranged from 0.07 to 0.23 in normal myocardium, and consistently increased with ischemia by 0.01-0.07 for /sup 13/N-labeled Ala, Glu, Asp, and Leu, but not for /sup 13/N Gln and /sup 11/C compounds. Transaminase inhibition shortened the half-times of the late phases of /sup 13/N-labeled Ala, Glu, Asp, and Leu; had no effect on t1/2 of /sup 13/N Gln and /sup 11/C Oxal; and resulted in a loss of /sup 11/C CO/sub 2/ production and of the intermediate phase for /sup 11/C Asp. On the PCT images, /sup 13/N activity from labeled Ala and Glu was not decreased in an ischemic segment despite a significant flow reduction, as demonstrated by /sup 13/N NH/sub 3/ imaging and labeled microspheres. From the results, a three-compartment tracer kinetic model is proposed for the noninvasive quantification of Krebscycle activity, protein synthesis, and metabolic derangements related to ischemia.

  4. Distribution of 15N-chlorocholine chloride in eggs of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Songsang, A; Chakeredza, S; Thinggaard, G; Vearasilp, T; ter Meulen, U

    2002-06-01

    The distribution of Chlorocholine chloride (CCC) in the eggs of laying hens was studied using 15N-CCC. Twelve layers (37 weeks old) were divided into four groups and used in this study consisting of three feeding phases. In phase one (7 days), all the hens received a CCC-free diet [165 g CP/kg dry matter (DM); 11.58 MJ ME/kg DM]. In phase two (11 days), four levels of 15N-CCC: 0, 5, 50 and 250 ppm were added to the respective diets, while in phase three (7 days), CCC-free feed was again offered. Egg samples were taken and the 15N content of egg yolk and albumin were determined. At the end of phase two, there was a significant (p < 0.05) increase in 15N content in egg yolk from hens fed the 50 and 250 ppm CCC diets and in albumin from hens fed the 250 ppm CCC diet. The estimated 15N-CCC residue was 1.71, 6.64, 28.80 ppm in egg yolk and 1.58, 1.08 and 4.50 ppm in albumin from hens fed 5, 50 and 250 ppm CCC, respectively. The CCC residue, from quantitative analysis ranged from 0.21 to 0.93 and 0.93 to 2.43 ppm in yolk of hens fed 50 and 250 ppm CCC, respectively, whereas a range of 0.40-1.46 ppm, was found in the albumin of hens fed 250 ppm. The difference in measured CCC in yolk and albumin and that estimated from 15N-CCC could have been due to breakdown products of 15N-CCC. Seven days after withdrawal of 15N-CCC, the estimated 15N-CCC residue in egg yolk decreased to 0.43, 2.45 and 15.59 ppm, on 5, 50 and 250 ppm CCC dietary treatments, respectively, and to 2.46 ppm in albumin from hens fed 250 ppm CCC. The higher increase in 15N content could have been due to a higher incorporation of 15N-CCC into yolk than albumin during the process of rapid yolk deposition. This experiment showed that consumed CCC is distributed both into yolk and albumin in a dose dependent manner and that CCC is metabolized in laying hens. However, the level of CCC in the diet which could lead to accumulation of detectable CCC levels in eggs as observed in this study, is much higher than the

  5. The Metabolic Fate of Tritium-Labeled T-2 Toxin, a Trichothecene Mycotoxin, in Swine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corley, Richard Allen

    The metabolic fate of T-2 toxin was determined in two female crossbred swine following the intravascular administration of one millicurie of tritium-labeled T-2 toxin at a nonlethal dose of 0.15 mg/kg body weight. The plasma elimination phase half-life was 90 minutes for total tritium residues. A total of 13.1 and 1.3 percent of the administered dose was found in the gall bladders in addition to 17.9 and 42.5 percent in the urine of the two pigs, S1 and S2, respectively, 4 hours after dosing. Free metabolites, identified by thin-layer chromatography, represented less than 20 and 30 percent of the metabolite residues in bile and urine, respectively, with the parent compound, T-2 toxin, never exceeding 0.25 percent. The major free metabolites were 3'-OH HT-2 and T-2 triol. Glucuronide conjugates represented 63 and 77 percent of the metabolite residues in urine and bile, respectively. The major conjugated metabolites were glucuronides of HT-2, 3'-OH T-2, 3'-OH HT-2 and T-2 toxin. Neosolaniol, 4-deacetyl-neosolaniol and T-2 tetraol were also identified in addition to 3 unknown metabolites. In the tissues, the greatest amount of radioactivity was located in the gastrointestinal tract (15.5 and 24.1 percent of the dose for the 2 pigs, S1 and S2, respectively). The remaining tissues sampled accounted for approximately 5 percent of the dose for the 2 pigs. Twenty-one metabolites were identified in tissues following reverse phase HPLC radiochromatography. Approximately 55 percent of the extractable radioactivity in the tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, of both pigs corresponded to T-2 toxin, HT-2, deepoxy HT-2, T-2 triol, deepoxy T-2 triol, 3'-OH T-2, 3'-OH HT -2, T-2 tetraol and deepoxy T-2 tetraol. The major metabolite in tissues, PM-XV, did not correspond to any standard and represented an additional 27 percent of the extractable radioactivity.

  6. Label-free proteomics uncovers energy metabolism and focal adhesion regulations responsive for endometrium receptivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Zhang, Aijun; Yu, Feng; Gao, Jing; Liu, Yue; Yu, Chengli; Zhou, Hu; Xu, Chen

    2015-04-01

    The menstrual cycle of the female uterus leads to periodic changes of the endometrium. These changes are important for developing the endometrial receptivity and for achieving competency of embryo implantation. However, the molecular events underlying the endometrial receptivity process remain poorly understood. Here we applied an LC-MS-based label-free quantitative proteomic approach to compare the endometrial tissues in the midsecretory (receptive) phase with the endometrial tissues in the proliferative phase from age-matched woman (n = 6/group). The proteomes of endometrial tissues were extracted using an SDS-based detergent, digested by the filter-aided sample preparation procedures, and subsequently analyzed by nano-LC-MS/MS (Orbitrap XL) with a 4 h gradient. Reliable protein expression profiles were reproducibly obtained from the endometrial tissues in the receptive and proliferative phases. A total of 2138 protein groups were quantified under highly stringent criteria with a false discovery rate of <1% for peptide and protein groups. Among these proteins, 317 proteins had differences in expression that were statistically significant between the receptive and proliferative phases. Direct protein-protein interaction network analyses of these significantly changed proteins showed that the up-regulation of creatine kinase B-type (CKB) in the receptive phase may be related to endometrium receptivity. The interaction network also showed that proteins related to cell-cell adhesion were down-regulated. Moreover, the results from KEGG pathway analyses are consistent with the protein-protein interaction results. The proteins, including alpha-actinin (ACTN), extracellular matrix proteins, integrin alpha-V, and so on, that are involved in the focal adhesion pathway were down-regulated in the receptive phase compared with the proliferative phase, which may facilitate the implantation of the fertilized ovum. Selected proteins were validated by Western blot analysis and

  7. Measuring cell cycle progression kinetics with metabolic labeling and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, Helen; Wong, Judy

    2012-01-01

    metabolic processes for each cell cycle stage are useful in blocking the progression of the cell cycle to the next stage. For example, the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea halts cells at the G1/S juncture by limiting the supply of deoxynucleotides, the building blocks of DNA. Other notable chemicals include treatment with aphidicolin, a polymerase alpha inhibitor for G1 arrest, treatment with colchicine and nocodazole, both of which interfere with mitotic spindle formation to halt cells in M phase and finally, treatment with the DNA chain terminator 5-fluorodeoxyridine to initiate S phase arrest. Treatment with these chemicals is an effective means of synchronizing an entire population of cells at a particular phase. With removal of the chemical, cells rejoin the cell cycle in unison. Treatment of the test agent following release from the cell cycle blocking chemical ensures that the drug response elicited is from a uniform, cell cycle stage-specific population. However, since many of the chemical synchronizers are known genotoxic compounds, teasing apart the participation of various response pathways (to the synchronizers vs. the test agents) is challenging. Here we describe a metabolic labeling method for following a subpopulation of actively cycling cells through their progression from the DNA replication phase, through to the division and separation of their daughter cells. Coupled with flow cytometry quantification, this protocol enables for measurement of kinetic progression of the cell cycle in the absence of either mechanically- or chemically- induced cellular stresses commonly associated with other cell cycle synchronization methodologies. In the following sections we will discuss the methodology, as well as some of its applications in biomedical research. PMID:22665142

  8. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  9. Regulation of Primary Metabolism in Response to Low Oxygen Availability as Revealed by Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Redistribution.

    PubMed

    António, Carla; Päpke, Carola; Rocha, Marcio; Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R; van Dongen, Joost T

    2016-01-01

    Based on enzyme activity assays and metabolic responses to waterlogging of the legume Lotus japonicus, it was previously suggested that, during hypoxia, the tricarboxylic acid cycle switches to a noncyclic operation mode. Hypotheses were postulated to explain the alternative metabolic pathways involved, but as yet, a direct analysis of the relative redistribution of label through the corresponding pathways was not made. Here, we describe the use of stable isotope-labeling experiments for studying metabolism under hypoxia using wild-type roots of the crop legume soybean (Glycine max). [(13)C]Pyruvate labeling was performed to compare metabolism through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fermentation, alanine metabolism, and the γ-aminobutyric acid shunt, while [(13)C]glutamate and [(15)N]ammonium labeling were performed to address the metabolism via glutamate to succinate. Following these labelings, the time course for the redistribution of the (13)C/(15)N label throughout the metabolic network was evaluated with gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry. Our combined labeling data suggest the inhibition of the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, also known as complex II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, providing support for the bifurcation of the cycle and the down-regulation of the rate of respiration measured during hypoxic stress. Moreover, up-regulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid shunt and alanine metabolism explained the accumulation of succinate and alanine during hypoxia.

  10. Regulation of Primary Metabolism in Response to Low Oxygen Availability as Revealed by Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Redistribution.

    PubMed

    António, Carla; Päpke, Carola; Rocha, Marcio; Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R; van Dongen, Joost T

    2016-01-01

    Based on enzyme activity assays and metabolic responses to waterlogging of the legume Lotus japonicus, it was previously suggested that, during hypoxia, the tricarboxylic acid cycle switches to a noncyclic operation mode. Hypotheses were postulated to explain the alternative metabolic pathways involved, but as yet, a direct analysis of the relative redistribution of label through the corresponding pathways was not made. Here, we describe the use of stable isotope-labeling experiments for studying metabolism under hypoxia using wild-type roots of the crop legume soybean (Glycine max). [(13)C]Pyruvate labeling was performed to compare metabolism through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fermentation, alanine metabolism, and the γ-aminobutyric acid shunt, while [(13)C]glutamate and [(15)N]ammonium labeling were performed to address the metabolism via glutamate to succinate. Following these labelings, the time course for the redistribution of the (13)C/(15)N label throughout the metabolic network was evaluated with gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry. Our combined labeling data suggest the inhibition of the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, also known as complex II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, providing support for the bifurcation of the cycle and the down-regulation of the rate of respiration measured during hypoxic stress. Moreover, up-regulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid shunt and alanine metabolism explained the accumulation of succinate and alanine during hypoxia. PMID:26553649

  11. Regulation of Primary Metabolism in Response to Low Oxygen Availability as Revealed by Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Redistribution1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Päpke, Carola; Diab, Houssein; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2016-01-01

    Based on enzyme activity assays and metabolic responses to waterlogging of the legume Lotus japonicus, it was previously suggested that, during hypoxia, the tricarboxylic acid cycle switches to a noncyclic operation mode. Hypotheses were postulated to explain the alternative metabolic pathways involved, but as yet, a direct analysis of the relative redistribution of label through the corresponding pathways was not made. Here, we describe the use of stable isotope-labeling experiments for studying metabolism under hypoxia using wild-type roots of the crop legume soybean (Glycine max). [13C]Pyruvate labeling was performed to compare metabolism through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fermentation, alanine metabolism, and the γ-aminobutyric acid shunt, while [13C]glutamate and [15N]ammonium labeling were performed to address the metabolism via glutamate to succinate. Following these labelings, the time course for the redistribution of the 13C/15N label throughout the metabolic network was evaluated with gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry. Our combined labeling data suggest the inhibition of the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, also known as complex II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, providing support for the bifurcation of the cycle and the down-regulation of the rate of respiration measured during hypoxic stress. Moreover, up-regulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid shunt and alanine metabolism explained the accumulation of succinate and alanine during hypoxia. PMID:26553649

  12. Solid-state /sup 15/N NMR of oriented lipid bilayer bound gramicidin A'

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, L.K.; Moll, F.; Mixon, T.E.; LoGrasso, P.V.; Lay, J.C.; Cross, T.A.

    1987-10-20

    Highly oriented samples of lipid and gramicidin A' (8:1 molar ratio) have been prepared with the samples extensively hydrated (approximately 70% water v/w). These preparations have been shown to be completely in a bilayer phase with a transition temperature of 28/sup 0/C, and evidence is presented indicating that the gramicidin is in the channel conformation. An estimate of the disorder in the alignment of the bilayers parallel with the glass plates used to align the bilayers can be made from the asymmetry of the nuclear magnetic resonances (NMR). Such an analysis indicates a maximal range of disorder of +-3/sup 0/. Uniformly /sup 15/N-labeled gramicidin has been biosynthesized by Bacillus brevis grown in a media containing /sup 15/N-labeled Escherichia coli cells as the only nitrogen source. When prepared with labeled gramicidin, the oriented samples result in high-resolution /sup 15/N NMR spectra showing 12 resonances for the 20 nitrogen sites of the polypeptide. The frequency of the three major multiple resonance peaks has been interpreted to yield the approximate orientation of the N-H bonds in the peptide linkages with respect to the magnetic field. The bond orientations are only partially consistent with the extant structural models of gramicidin.

  13. Delayed labelling of brain glutamate after an intra-arterial [13C]glucose bolus: evidence for aerobic metabolism of guinea pig brain glycogen store.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J L; Rae, C; Radda, G K; Matthews, P M

    1999-07-01

    Glycogen in glial cells is the largest store of glucose equivalents in the brain. Here we describe evidence that brain glycogen contributes to aerobic energy metabolism of the guinea pig brain in vivo. Five min after an intra-arterial bolus injection of d-[U-14C]glucose, 28+/-11% of the radioactivity in brain tissue was associated with the glycogen fraction, indicating that a significant proportion of labelled glucose taken up by the brain is converted to glycogen shortly after bolus infusion. Incorporation of 13C-label into lactate generated by brains made ischaemic after d-[1-13C]glucose injection confirms that these glucose equivalents can be mobilised for anaerobic glucose metabolism. Aerobic metabolism was monitored by following the time course of 13C-incorporation into glutamate in guinea pig cortex and cerebellum in vivo. After an intra-arterial bolus injection of d-[1-13C]glucose, glutamate labelling reached a maximum 40-60 min after injection, suggesting that a slowly metabolised pool of labelled glucose equivalents was present. As the concentration of 13C-labelled glucose in blood was shown to decrease below detectable levels within 5 min of bolus injection, this late phase of glutamate labelling must occur with mobilisation of a brain storage pool of labelled glucose equivalents. We interpret this as evidence that glucose equivalents in glycogen may contribute to energy metabolism in the aerobic guinea pig brain.

  14. Metabolic Labeling of Caenorhabditis elegans Primary Embryonic Cells with Azido-Sugars as a Tool for Glycoprotein Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Burnham-Marusich, Amanda R.; Snodgrass, Casey J.; Johnson, Anna M.; Kiyoshi, Conrad M.; Buzby, Sarah E.; Gruner, Matt R.; Berninsone, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Glycobiology research with Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has benefitted from the numerous genetic and cell biology tools available in this system. However, the lack of a cell line and the relative inaccessibility of C. elegans somatic cells in vivo have limited the biochemical approaches available in this model. Here we report that C. elegans primary embryonic cells in culture incorporate azido-sugar analogs of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and that the labeled glycoproteins can be analyzed by mass spectrometry. By using this metabolic labeling approach, we have identified a set of novel C. elegans glycoprotein candidates, which include several mitochondrially-annotated proteins. This observation was unexpected given that mitochondrial glycoproteins have only rarely been reported, and it suggests that glycosylation of mitochondrially-annotated proteins might occur more frequently than previously thought. Using independent experimental strategies, we validated a subset of our glycoprotein candidates. These include a mitochondrial, atypical glycoprotein (ATP synthase α-subunit), a predicted glycoprotein (aspartyl protease, ASP-4), and a protein family with established glycosylation in other species (actin). Additionally, we observed a glycosylated isoform of ATP synthase α-subunit in bovine heart tissue and a primate cell line (COS-7). Overall, our finding that C. elegans primary embryonic cells are amenable to metabolic labeling demonstrates that biochemical studies in C. elegans are feasible, which opens the door to labeling C. elegans cells with other radioactive or azido-substrates and should enable the identification of additional post-translationally modified targets and analysis of the genes required for their modification using C. elegans mutant libraries. PMID:23152843

  15. Metabolic labeling of cellular glycoproteins with glucosamine: potential for erroneous interpretations due to nonenzymatic radiolabeling of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Briles, E.I.B.; Updyke, T.V.

    1986-05-01

    Proteins, including serum proteins of culture media, become nonenzymatically radiolabeled under conditions used for metabolic labeling of cultured cells with glucosamine. This occurs even under sterile conditions in the absence of cells. Various commercial lots of /sup 3/H or /sup 14/C glcN gave similar results: approx. 0.7% of total label was incorporated into 20% serum (14 mg/ml protein) in 48 h at 37/sup 0/C. By SDS-PAGE fluorography, labeled serum bands correspond to Coomassie stained bands. Incorporation is linear with protein concentration and label input, shows biphasic kinetics (initial rapid rate within first 3 hr, followed by slower linear rate with no sign of saturation through 120 hr), and is temperature-dependent (no reaction at 0/sup 0/C; incorporation at 20/sup 0/C is approx. 45% of that at 37/sup 0/C). Poly-D-lysine is a better acceptor than protein: 0.5 mg/ml PL accepts as much label as 7 mg/ml protein. Incorporation is inhibited by excess unlabeled glcN and ethanolamine, but not by man, gal or glucose. However, when proteins were incubated with 160 mM glcN, SDS-PAGE bands were yellow-brown, suggesting the occurrence of Maillard-type reactions. Although the chemical mechanism(s) responsible for nonmetabolic radiolabeling by glcN are not clear at this point, the fact that it occurs represents a serious artifact which may lead to erroneous interpretation of data.

  16. Stable isotope probing with 15N achieved by disentangling the effects of genome G+C content and isotope enrichment on DNA density.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Daniel H; Huangyutitham, Varisa; Hsu, Shi-Fang; Nelson, Tyrrell A

    2007-05-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool that can identify the functional capabilities of noncultivated microorganisms as they occur in microbial communities. While it has been suggested previously that nucleic acid SIP can be performed with 15N, nearly all applications of this technique to date have used 13C. Successful application of SIP using 15N-DNA (15N-DNA-SIP) has been limited, because the maximum shift in buoyant density that can be achieved in CsCl gradients is approximately 0.016 g ml-1 for 15N-labeled DNA, relative to 0.036 g ml-1 for 13C-labeled DNA. In contrast, variation in genome G+C content between microorganisms can result in DNA samples that vary in buoyant density by as much as 0.05 g ml-1. Thus, natural variation in genome G+C content in complex communities prevents the effective separation of 15N-labeled DNA from unlabeled DNA. We describe a method which disentangles the effects of isotope incorporation and genome G+C content on DNA buoyant density and makes it possible to isolate 15N-labeled DNA from heterogeneous mixtures of DNA. This method relies on recovery of "heavy" DNA from primary CsCl density gradients followed by purification of 15N-labeled DNA from unlabeled high-G+C-content DNA in secondary CsCl density gradients containing bis-benzimide. This technique, by providing a means to enhance separation of isotopically labeled DNA from unlabeled DNA, makes it possible to use 15N-labeled compounds effectively in DNA-SIP experiments and also will be effective for removing unlabeled DNA from isotopically labeled DNA in 13C-DNA-SIP applications.

  17. Stable Isotope Probing with 15N Achieved by Disentangling the Effects of Genome G+C Content and Isotope Enrichment on DNA Density▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Daniel H.; Huangyutitham, Varisa; Hsu, Shi-Fang; Nelson, Tyrrell A.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool that can identify the functional capabilities of noncultivated microorganisms as they occur in microbial communities. While it has been suggested previously that nucleic acid SIP can be performed with 15N, nearly all applications of this technique to date have used 13C. Successful application of SIP using 15N-DNA (15N-DNA-SIP) has been limited, because the maximum shift in buoyant density that can be achieved in CsCl gradients is approximately 0.016 g ml−1 for 15N-labeled DNA, relative to 0.036 g ml−1 for 13C-labeled DNA. In contrast, variation in genome G+C content between microorganisms can result in DNA samples that vary in buoyant density by as much as 0.05 g ml−1. Thus, natural variation in genome G+C content in complex communities prevents the effective separation of 15N-labeled DNA from unlabeled DNA. We describe a method which disentangles the effects of isotope incorporation and genome G+C content on DNA buoyant density and makes it possible to isolate 15N-labeled DNA from heterogeneous mixtures of DNA. This method relies on recovery of “heavy” DNA from primary CsCl density gradients followed by purification of 15N-labeled DNA from unlabeled high-G+C-content DNA in secondary CsCl density gradients containing bis-benzimide. This technique, by providing a means to enhance separation of isotopically labeled DNA from unlabeled DNA, makes it possible to use 15N-labeled compounds effectively in DNA-SIP experiments and also will be effective for removing unlabeled DNA from isotopically labeled DNA in 13C-DNA-SIP applications. PMID:17369331

  18. Measuring and modeling C flux rates through the central metabolic pathways in microbial communities using position-specific 13C-labeled tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; van Groenigen, K.; Hagerty, S.; Salpas, E.; Fairbanks, D. E.; Hungate, B. A.; KOCH, G. W.; Schwartz, E.

    2012-12-01

    The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We use position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers, combined with models of microbial metabolic organization, to analyze the response of microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, and C use efficiency (CUE) in soils, decomposing litter, and aquatic communities. The method consists of adding position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through the various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and assumptions of microbial precursor demand. This new method enables direct estimation of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, CUE, and soil organic matter formation in relatively undisturbed microbial communities. We will present results showing the range of metabolic patterns observed in these communities and discuss results from testing metabolic models.

  19. Retrieving nitrogen isotopic signatures from fresh leaf reflectance spectra: disentangling δ(15)N from biochemical and structural leaf properties.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Christine; Große-Stoltenberg, André; Lauströ, Verena; Oldeland, Jens; Werner, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Linking remote sensing methodology to stable isotope ecology provides a promising approach to study ecological processes from small to large spatial scales. Here, we show that δ(15)N can be detected in fresh leaf reflectance spectra of field samples along a spatial gradient of increasing nitrogen input from an N2-fixing invasive species. However, in field data it is unclear whether δ(15)N directly influences leaf reflectance spectra or if the relationship is based on covariation between δ(15)N and foliar nitrogen content or other leaf properties. Using a (15)N-labeling approach, we experimentally varied δ(15)N independently of any other leaf properties in three plant species across different leaf developmental and physiological states. δ(15)N could successfully be modeled by means of partial least squares (PLSs) regressions, using leaf reflectance spectra as predictor variables. PLS models explained 53-73% of the variation in δ(15)N within species. Several wavelength regions important for predicting δ(15)N were consistent across species and could furthermore be related to known absorption features of N-containing molecular bonds. By eliminating covariation with other leaf properties as an explanation for the relationship between reflectance and δ(15)N, our results demonstrate that (15)N itself has an inherent effect on leaf reflectance spectra. Thus, our study substantiates the use of spectroscopic measurements to retrieve isotopic signatures for ecological studies and encourages future development. Furthermore, our results highlight the great potential of optical measurements for up-scaling isotope ecology to larger spatial scales.

  20. Retrieving nitrogen isotopic signatures from fresh leaf reflectance spectra: disentangling δ15N from biochemical and structural leaf properties

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, Christine; Große-Stoltenberg, André; Lauströ, Verena; Oldeland, Jens; Werner, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Linking remote sensing methodology to stable isotope ecology provides a promising approach to study ecological processes from small to large spatial scales. Here, we show that δ15N can be detected in fresh leaf reflectance spectra of field samples along a spatial gradient of increasing nitrogen input from an N2-fixing invasive species. However, in field data it is unclear whether δ15N directly influences leaf reflectance spectra or if the relationship is based on covariation between δ15N and foliar nitrogen content or other leaf properties. Using a 15N-labeling approach, we experimentally varied δ15N independently of any other leaf properties in three plant species across different leaf developmental and physiological states. δ15N could successfully be modeled by means of partial least squares (PLSs) regressions, using leaf reflectance spectra as predictor variables. PLS models explained 53–73% of the variation in δ15N within species. Several wavelength regions important for predicting δ15N were consistent across species and could furthermore be related to known absorption features of N-containing molecular bonds. By eliminating covariation with other leaf properties as an explanation for the relationship between reflectance and δ15N, our results demonstrate that 15N itself has an inherent effect on leaf reflectance spectra. Thus, our study substantiates the use of spectroscopic measurements to retrieve isotopic signatures for ecological studies and encourages future development. Furthermore, our results highlight the great potential of optical measurements for up-scaling isotope ecology to larger spatial scales. PMID:25983740

  1. Nitrate removal in two relict oxbow urban wetlands: a 15N mass-balance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, M. D.; Groffman, P. M.; Mayer, P. M.; Kaushal, S.

    2012-12-01

    A mass-balance approach was used to directly determine the flow of 15NO3- to plants, algae, and sediments,with unaccounted for 15N assumed to be denitrified. During the summer, plant and algal uptake accounted for 42%, of the added 15NO3 - in oxbow 1, less than 1% remained in the water column and 57% was unaccounted for. In oxbow 2 during the summer, plant and algal uptake accounted for 63% of the added 15NO3 -, with 1% remaining in the water column and 38% unaccounted for. During the early spring, plant and algal uptake were much lower in both oxbows, ranging from 0.05 to 13.3% of the 15N added, with 97 and 87% was unaccounted for in oxbow 1 and 2, respectively. The amount of unaccounted for 15N was equivalent to estimated areal denitrification rates of 12 and 6 mg N m-2 d-1 in the summer and 78 and 15 mg N m-2 d-1 in the spring, in oxbow 1 and oxbow 2, respectively. However, the uncertainty of these estimates is high as it was difficult to detect accumulation of 15N in the sediments which could have accounted for a very large percentage of the added 15N. Our results suggest that the two relict oxbow wetlands are sinks for NO3 - during both summer and spring. Plane view of Ox1 (A) and Ox2 (B) wetlands with closed contour intervals (color scale) and surrounding stream and upland elevations (labeled in black) located at Minebank Run, near Glen Arms, MD. 15N enrichment (atom %) of measured N pools prior to (Day 0) and after (Day 5) the end of the experiment in July 2009 and April 2010 for Ox1 and Ox2. Values are mean atom % (n = 2 algae, macrophytes and sediment; n = 6 for water samples).

  2. Phenotyping hepatocellular metabolism using uniformly labeled carbon-13 molecular probes and LC-HRMS stable isotope tracing.

    PubMed

    Meissen, John K; Pirman, David A; Wan, Min; Miller, Emily; Jatkar, Aditi; Miller, Russell; Steenwyk, Rick C; Blatnik, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Metabolite stable isotope tracing is a powerful bioanalytical strategy that has the potential to unravel phenotypic markers of early pharmaceutical efficacy by monitoring enzymatic incorporation of carbon-13 atoms into targeted pathways over time. The practice of probing biological systems with carbon-13 labeled molecules using broad MS-based screens has been utilized for many years in academic laboratories but has had limited application in the pharmaceutical R&D environment. The goal of this work was to establish a LCMS analytical workflow that was capable of monitoring carbon-13 isotope changes in glycolysis, the TCA and urea cycles, and non-essential amino acid metabolism. This work applies a standardized protein precipitation with 80% cold methanol and two distinct reverse-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography methods coupled to either a positive- or negative-ion mode high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry screening method. The data herein combines thousands of single-point peak integrations into a novel metabolite network map as a visualization aid to probe and monitor stable isotope incorporation in murine hepatocytes using uniformly labeled (13)C6 glucose, (13)C3 lactate, and (13)C5 glutamine. This work also demonstrates that nitrogen metabolism may have a large influence on the TCA cycle and gluconeogenic carbon fluxes in hepatocyte cell culture. PMID:27343766

  3. In vivo imaging and tracking of host-microbiota interactions via metabolic labeling of gut anaerobic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Alvarez, David; Hudak, Jason E.; Reading, Nicola C.; Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is densely populated by anaerobic commensal bacteria. These microorganisms shape immune system development, but our understanding of host–commensal interactions is hampered by a lack of tools for studying the anaerobic intestinal environment. We applied metabolic oligosaccharide engineering and bioorthogonal click-chemistry to label various commensal anaerobes, including Bacteroides fragilis, a common and immunologically important commensal. We studied the dissemination of B. fragilis following acute peritonitis, and characterized the interactions of the intact microbe and its polysaccharide components in myeloid and B cell lineages. The distribution and colonization of labeled B. fragilis along the intestine can be assessed, as well as niche competition following coadministration of multiple species of the microbiota. Nine additional anaerobic commensals (both gram-negative and gram-positive) from three phyla common in the gut—Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria—and five families and one aerobic pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus) were also fluorescently labeled. This strategy permits visualization of the anaerobic microbial niche by various methods, including intravital two-photon microscopy and non-invasive whole-body imaging, and an approach to study microbial colonization and host–microbe interactions in real-time. PMID:26280120

  4. Metabolically sup 35 S-labeled recombinant calmodulin as a ligand for the detection of calmodulin-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Asselin, J.; Phaneuf, S.; Watterson, D.M.; Haiech, J. )

    1989-04-01

    We have developed a simplified procedure for the production of metabolically labeled calmodulin. We used bacterial clones (Escherichia coli) that were found to express VU-1 calmodulin, a calmodulin that is fully active with a variety of calmodulin-regulated enzymes. VU-1 calmodulin was labeled with sulfur-35 in bacteria maintained in a sulfur-free medium. Calmodulin was then purified by chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose. Under these conditions, the specific activity of the proteins was 150 to 400 cpm/fmol of calmodulin. To demonstrate the utility of this labeled VU-1 calmodulin, we examined the calmodulin-binding proteins in aortic myocyte preparation from Day 0 and Day 15 cultures by using both the gel and the nitrocellulose overlay protocols. The results showed that calmodulin-binding proteins are easily detected by the two procedures and that the profile of these target proteins changed in myocyte with time in culture. While most of these calmodulin-binding proteins have not been identified, the relative mobility on SDS-PAGE gels suggests that myosin light chain kinase (Mr approximately 137,000) was detected by these methods. We demonstrated here that the nitrocellulose overlay was faster than the gel overlay and that this technique can be useful for the study of calmodulin-binding proteins.

  5. Carbon Metabolism of Soil microorganisms at Low Temperatures: Position-Specific 13C Labeled Glucose Reveals the Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Bore, E. K.; Halicki, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M.

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze soil metabolism at low temperature, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were applied at three temperature levels; +5, -5 -20 oC. In additon, one sterilization treatment with sodium azide at +5 oC was also performed. Soils were incubated for 1, 3 and 10 days while soil samples at -20 oC were additionally sampled after 30 days. The 13C from individual molecule position in respired CO2 was quantifed. Incorporation of 13C in bulk soil, extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of different microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) was carried out. Our 13CO2 data showed a dominance of C-1 respiration at +5 °C for treatments with and without sodium azide, but total respiration for sodium azide inhibited treatments increased by 14%. In contrast, at -5 and -20 oC metabolic behavior showed intermingling of preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 and C-1 positions. Therefore, at +5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway used by microorganisms to metabolize glucose. The respiration increase due to NaN3 inhibition was attributed to endoenzymes released from dead organisms that are stabilized at the soil matrix and have access to suitable substrate and co-factors to permit their funtions. Our PLFA analysis showed that incorporation of glucose 13C was higher in Gram negative bacteria than other microbial groups as they are most competitive for LMWOS. Only a limited amount of microbial groups maintained their glucose utilizing activity at -5 and -20 °C and they strongly shifted towards a metabolization of glucose via both glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways indicating both growth and cellular maintenance. This study revealed a remarkable microbial acitivity

  6. Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Pernilla; Keech, Olivier; Stenlund, Hans; Gardeström, Per; Moritz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a 13CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1. The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and 13C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions. PMID:26889011

  7. Compound-specific 15N stable isotope probing of N assimilation by the soil microbial biomass: a new methodological paradigm in soil N cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, A. F.; Knowles, T. D. J.; Michaelides, K.; Evershed, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    A compound-specific nitrogen-15 stable isotope probing (15N-SIP) technique is described which allows investigation of the fate of inorganic- or organic-N amendments to soils. The technique uses gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to determine the δ15N values of individual amino acids (AAs; determined as N-acetyl, O-isopropyl derivatives) as proxies of biomass protein production. The δ15N values are used together with AA concentrations to quantify N assimilation of 15N-labelled substrates by the soil microbial biomass. The utility of the approach is demonstrated through incubation experiments using inorganic 15N-labelled substrates ammonium (15NH4+) and nitrate (15NO3-) and an organic 15N-labelled substrate, glutamic acid (15N-Glu). Assimilation of all the applied substrates was undetectable based on bulk soil properties, i.e. % total N (% TN), bulk soil N isotope composition and AA concentrations, all of which remained relatively constant throughout the incubation experiments. In contrast, compound-specific AA δ15N values were highly sensitive to N assimilation, providing qualitative and quantitative insights into the cycling and fate of the applied 15N-labelled substrates. The utility of this 15N-AA-SIP technique is considered in relation to other currently available methods for investigating the microbially-mediated assimilation of nitrogenous substrates into the soil organic N pool. This approach will be generally applicable to the study of N cycling in any soil, or indeed, in any complex ecosystem.

  8. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of the KSR1 CA1 domain

    PubMed Central

    Koveal, Dorothy; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the murine KSR1 CA1 domain have been determined based on triple-resonance experiments using uniformly [13C, 15N]-labeled protein. This assignment is the first step towards the determination of the three-dimensional structure of the unique KSR1 CA1 domain. PMID:20737253

  9. Nitrogen metabolism in Lignifying Pinus taeda cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Heerden, P. S.; Towers, G. H.; Lewis, N. G.

    1996-01-01

    The primary metabolic fate of phyenylalanine, following its deamination in plants, is conscription of its carbon skeleton for lignin, suberin, flavonoid, and related metabolite formation. Since this accounts for approximately 30-40% of all organic carbon, an effective means of recycling the liberated ammonium ion must be operative. In order to establish how this occurs, the uptake and metabolism of various 15N-labeled precursors (15N-Phe, 15NH4Cl, 15N-Gln, and 15N-Glu) in lignifying Pinus taeda cell cultures was investigated, using a combination of high performance liquid chromatography, 15N NMR, and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry analyses. It was found that the ammonium ion released during active phenylpropanoid metabolism was not made available for general amino acid/protein synthesis. Rather it was rapidly recycled back to regenerate phenylalanine, thereby providing an effective means of maintaining active phenylpropanoid metabolism with no additional nitrogen requirement. These results strongly suggest that, in lignifying cells, ammonium ion reassimilation is tightly compartmentalized.

  10. New untargeted metabolic profiling combining mass spectrometry and isotopic labeling: application on Aspergillus fumigatus grown on wheat.

    PubMed

    Cano, Patricia M; Jamin, Emilien L; Tadrist, Souria; Bourdaud'hui, Pascal; Péan, Michel; Debrauwer, Laurent; Oswald, Isabelle P; Delaforge, Marcel; Puel, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Characterization of fungal secondary metabolomes has become a challenge due to the industrial applications of many of these molecules, and also due to the emergence of fungal threats to public health and natural ecosystems. Given that, the aim of the present study was to develop an untargeted method to analyze fungal secondary metabolomes by combining high-accuracy mass spectrometry and double isotopic labeling of fungal metabolomes. The strain NRRL 35693 of Aspergillus fumigatus , an important fungal pathogen, was grown on three wheat grain substrates: (1) naturally enriched grains (99% (12)C), (2) grains enriched 96.8% with (13)C, (3) grains enriched with 53.4% with (13)C and 96.8% with (15)N. Twenty-one secondary metabolites were unambiguously identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS) analysis. AntiBase 2012 was used to confirm the identity of these metabolites. Additionally, on the basis of tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) experiments, it was possible to identify for the first time the formula and the structure of fumigaclavine D, a new member of the fumigaclavines family. Post biosynthesis degradation of tryptoquivaline F by methanol was also identified during HPLC-HRMS analysis by the detection of a carbon atom of nonfungal origin. The interest of this method lies not only on the unambiguous determination of the exact chemical formulas of fungal secondary metabolites but also on the easy discrimination of nonfungal products. Validation of the method was thus successfully achieved in this study, and it can now be applied to other fungal metabolomes, offering great possibilities for the discovery of new drugs or toxins. PMID:23901908

  11. Label-free quantitative proteomics of the lysine acetylome in mitochondria identifies substrates of SIRT3 in metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Matthew J; Newman, John C; Held, Jason M; Cusack, Michael P; Sorensen, Dylan J; Li, Biao; Schilling, Birgit; Mooney, Sean D; Kahn, C Ronald; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W

    2013-04-16

    Large-scale proteomic approaches have identified numerous mitochondrial acetylated proteins; however in most cases, their regulation by acetyltransferases and deacetylases remains unclear. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is an NAD(+)-dependent mitochondrial protein deacetylase that has been shown to regulate a limited number of enzymes in key metabolic pathways. Here, we use a rigorous label-free quantitative MS approach (called MS1 Filtering) to analyze changes in lysine acetylation from mouse liver mitochondria in the absence of SIRT3. Among 483 proteins, a total of 2,187 unique sites of lysine acetylation were identified after affinity enrichment. MS1 Filtering revealed that lysine acetylation of 283 sites in 136 proteins was significantly increased in the absence of SIRT3 (at least twofold). A subset of these sites was independently validated using selected reaction monitoring MS. These data show that SIRT3 regulates acetylation on multiple proteins, often at multiple sites, across several metabolic pathways including fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis, amino acid catabolism, and the urea and tricarboxylic acid cycles, as well as mitochondrial regulatory proteins. The widespread modification of key metabolic pathways greatly expands the number of known substrates and sites that are targeted by SIRT3 and establishes SIRT3 as a global regulator of mitochondrial protein acetylation with the capability of coordinating cellular responses to nutrient status and energy homeostasis.

  12. A method for (13)C-labeling of metabolic carbohydrates within French bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) for decomposition studies in soils.

    PubMed

    Girardin, Cyril; Rasse, Daniel P; Biron, Philippe; Ghashghaie, Jaleh; Chenu, Claire

    2009-06-01

    The molecular composition of plant residues is suspected to largely govern the fate of their constitutive carbon (C) in soils. Labile compounds, such as metabolic carbohydrates, are affected differently from recalcitrant and structural compounds by soil-C stabilisation mechanisms. Producing (13)C-enriched plant residues with specifically labeled fractions would help us to investigate the fate in soils of the constitutive C of these compounds. The objective of the present research was to test (13)C pulse chase labeling as a method for specifically enriching the metabolic carbohydrate components of plant residues, i.e. soluble sugars and starch. Bean plants were exposed to a (13)CO(2)-enriched atmosphere for 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 21 h. The major soluble sugars were then determined on water-soluble extracts, and starch on HCl-hydrolysable extracts. The results show a quick differential labeling between water-soluble and water-insoluble compounds. For both groups, (13)C-labeling increased linearly with time. The difference in delta(13)C signature between water-soluble and insoluble fractions was 7 per thousand after 0.5 h and 70 per thousand after 21 h. However, this clear isotopic contrast masked a substantial labeling variability within each fraction. By contrast, metabolic carbohydrates on the one hand (i.e. soluble sugars + starch) and other fractions (essentially cell wall components) on the other hand displayed quite homogeneous signatures within fractions, and a significant difference in labeling between fractions: delta(13)C = 414 +/- 3.7 per thousand and 56 +/- 5.5 per thousand, respectively. Thus, the technique generates labeled plant residues displaying contrasting (13)C-isotopic signatures between metabolic carbohydrates and other compounds, with homogenous signatures within each group. Metabolic carbohydrates being labile compounds, our findings suggest that the technique is particularly appropriate for investigating the effect of compound lability on the long

  13. Metabolism of guanido-labeled (C-14)arginine in rats, mice, and man

    SciTech Connect

    Frondoza, C.G.; Trivedi, S.M.; Humphrey, R.L.; Goble, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    (6-/sup 14/C)arginine, injected intraperitoneally into normal rats, was cleared from the plasma with biphasic decay kinetics. Urinary excretion was efficient (32% of the 25-..mu..Ci dose within the first 24 h) with no preferential tissue retention. In mice, the effective duration of the radiotracer's availability for protein biosynthesis was less than 30 min. When the tracer was administered iv to patients with multiple myeloma, it was similarly cleared from the plasma with biphasic kinetics, and was excreted rapidly in the urine (22% of the dose within the first 24 h). In patients, the guanido-tagged arginine labeled only tumor M component, and the labeling was most intense in patients who had far advanced disease. Estimated radiation dose to humans from a 100-..mu..Ci injection was 10 mrads. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo labeling with (6-/sup 14/C)arginine, with minimal radiation hazard, thus providing a simple, sensitive, and specific method for monitoring the synthesis of the plasmacytoma M component in patients with multiple myeloma.

  14. Yeast membrane proteomics using leucine metabolic labelling: Bioinformatic data processing and exemplary application to the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1.

    PubMed

    Nilse, Lars; Avci, Dönem; Heisterkamp, Patrick; Serang, Oliver; Lemberg, Marius K; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    We describe in detail the usage of leucine metabolic labelling in yeast in order to monitor quantitative proteome alterations, e.g. upon removal of a protease. Since laboratory yeast strains are typically leucine auxotroph, metabolic labelling with trideuterated leucine (d3-leucine) is a straightforward, cost-effective, and ubiquitously applicable strategy for quantitative proteomic studies, similar to the widely used arginine/lysine metabolic labelling method for mammalian cells. We showcase the usage of advanced peptide quantification using the FeatureFinderMultiplex algorithm (part of the OpenMS software package) for robust and reliable quantification. Furthermore, we present an OpenMS bioinformatics data analysis workflow that combines accurate quantification with high proteome coverage. In order to enable visualization, peptide-mapping, and sharing of quantitative proteomic data, especially for membrane-spanning and cell-surface proteins, we further developed the web-application Proteator (http://proteator.appspot.com). Due to its simplicity and robustness, we expect metabolic leucine labelling in yeast to be of great interest to the research community. As an exemplary application, we show the identification of the copper transporter Ctr1 as a putative substrate of the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1 by yeast membrane proteomics using d3-leucine isotopic labelling.

  15. Yeast membrane proteomics using leucine metabolic labelling: Bioinformatic data processing and exemplary application to the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1.

    PubMed

    Nilse, Lars; Avci, Dönem; Heisterkamp, Patrick; Serang, Oliver; Lemberg, Marius K; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    We describe in detail the usage of leucine metabolic labelling in yeast in order to monitor quantitative proteome alterations, e.g. upon removal of a protease. Since laboratory yeast strains are typically leucine auxotroph, metabolic labelling with trideuterated leucine (d3-leucine) is a straightforward, cost-effective, and ubiquitously applicable strategy for quantitative proteomic studies, similar to the widely used arginine/lysine metabolic labelling method for mammalian cells. We showcase the usage of advanced peptide quantification using the FeatureFinderMultiplex algorithm (part of the OpenMS software package) for robust and reliable quantification. Furthermore, we present an OpenMS bioinformatics data analysis workflow that combines accurate quantification with high proteome coverage. In order to enable visualization, peptide-mapping, and sharing of quantitative proteomic data, especially for membrane-spanning and cell-surface proteins, we further developed the web-application Proteator (http://proteator.appspot.com). Due to its simplicity and robustness, we expect metabolic leucine labelling in yeast to be of great interest to the research community. As an exemplary application, we show the identification of the copper transporter Ctr1 as a putative substrate of the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1 by yeast membrane proteomics using d3-leucine isotopic labelling. PMID:27426920

  16. (15)N Heteronuclear Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MRI.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Haifeng; Xu, Jiadi; Yadav, Nirbhay N; McMahon, Michael T; Harden, Bradley; Frueh, Dominique; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2016-09-01

    A two-step heteronuclear enhancement approach was combined with chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) to magnify (15)N MRI signal of molecules through indirect detection via water protons. Previous CEST studies have been limited to radiofrequency (rf) saturation transfer or excitation transfer employing protons. Here, the signal of (15)N is detected indirectly through the water signal by first inverting selectively protons that are scalar-coupled to (15)N in the urea molecule, followed by chemical exchange of the amide proton to bulk water. In addition to providing a small sensitivity enhancement, this approach can be used to monitor the exchange rates and thus the pH sensitivity of the participating (15)N-bound protons. PMID:27548755

  17. Plasma clearance, metabolism, and tissue accumulation of 3H-labeled catecholamines in trout

    SciTech Connect

    Nekvasil, N.P.; Olson, K.R.

    1986-03-01

    Plasma clearance, metabolism, and tissue accumulation of (3H)norepinephrine (NE) and (3H)epinephrine (E) were measured after injection into the dorsal aorta of chronically catheterized trout, Salmo gairdneri. Sucrose, an inert volume marker, was injected with the catecholamines (CAs). Ion-exchange chromatography was used to separate unmetabolized CAs from deaminated and O-methylated metabolites in plasma. Both CAs are cleared from plasma at an exponential two-component rate. By 10 min postinjection, CA-specific extraction lowered plasma (3H)NE by 65% and (3H)E by 50%. Over 80% of the 3H remaining in plasma 10 min after injection was metabolized to O-methylated and deaminated products. Thus trout are able to quickly and efficiently lower circulating CA levels through tissue accumulation and metabolism. Kidney, liver, spleen, and atrium accumulate more CA than other tissues, although most tissues bind CA to some extent. Gills preferentially accumulate CAs over sucrose. Skeletal muscle has a low affinity for CAs but by virtue of its large mass may be an important organ in CA metabolism. NE is removed from the circulation faster, and more NE is bound to tissues than E. A blood-brain barrier for E but not NE was observed.

  18. Studies of metabolic pathways of trimebutine by simultaneous administration of trimebutine and its deuterium-labeled metabolite.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Chishima, S; Takeyama, S

    1989-01-01

    Trimebutine maleate (I), (+-)-2-dimethylamino-2-phenylbutyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate hydrogen maleate, and a deuterium-labeled sample of its hydrolyzed metabolite, 2-dimethylamino-2-phenylbutanol-d3 (II-d3), were simultaneously administered to experimental animals at an oral dose of 10 or 50 mumol/kg, and distribution ratios of the two alternative initial metabolic steps, i.e., ester hydrolysis and N-demethylation, were estimated by determining the composition of the urinary alcohol-moiety metabolites, II, and its mono- and di-demethylated metabolites, III and IV, by GC/MS. In dogs, the order of quantities of the metabolites from II-d3 was II much greater than III much greater than IV, showing predominance of conjugation over N-demethylation. However, this order was reversed when the amounts of the metabolites from I were compared, indicating that I was preferentially metabolized by N-demethylation followed by ester hydrolysis and conjugation in this order. In rats, a considerable proportion of I was presumed to be metabolized by ester hydrolysis before N-demethylation. In in vitro experiments employing the liver microsomes and homogenates of liver and small intestine from rats and dogs, it was found that both ester-hydrolizing and N-demethylating activities were higher in rats than in dogs, and the conjugating activity was higher in dogs than in rats. It was also found that I, having a high lipophilicity, was more susceptible to N-demethylation than less lipophilic II. These results from the in vitro experiments could account for the species differences in the distribution ratio of the metabolic pathways of I in vivo. PMID:2571489

  19. Hypothalamic neuron projection to autonomic preganglionic levels related with glucose metabolism: a fluorescent labelling study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Portillo, F; Carrasco, M; Vallo, J J

    1996-06-01

    The location of hypothalamic paraventricular neurons projecting to sympathetic preganglionic levels and related to the autonomic regulation of various organs involved in glucose metabolism (OGM) was determined by ipsilateral injections of two fluorescent tracers, Diamidino Yellow into the left dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and Fast Blue into the left intermediolateral cell column of the T8-T9 spinal cord. Hypothalamospinal neurons were mainly located in the dorsal part of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) and the hypothalamobulbar neurons were most abundant in the ventral, medial and extreme lateral parts of the PVH. No double-labelled neurons were found in the hypothalamus. These results can help the knowledge of the neural hypothalamic network related with the autonomic hypothalamic control.

  20. High-throughput quantitation of metabolically labeled anionic glycoconjugates by scintillation proximity assay utilizing binding to cationic dyes.

    PubMed

    Rees-Milton, Karen J; Anastassiades, Tassos P

    2006-01-01

    Rapid, quantitative methods suited to a large number of samples are required for studies into the determination of disease etiology and in the evaluation of drugs and biological agents. This chapter describes an assay for anionic glycoconjugates (GCs), including glycosaminoglycans, which are major gene products of chondrocytes appearing in the extracellular matrix. The assay utilizes the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged sulfate and carboxyl groups of anionic GCs synthesized and secreted by chondrocytes with the cationic dye Alcian blue, immobilized to scintillant-coated 96-well plates. Metabolic labeling with D-[1, 6-3H (N)]-glucosamine allows all anionic GCs, including cartilage-specific and hyperglycosylated variants of fibronectin, to be quantitated. If Na235SO4 is used for the metabolic labeling instead, only glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans will be quantitated. The samples are counted using a multi-detector instrument for scintillation proximity assays, such as the Wallac 1450 Microbeta Trilux, designed for detection of samples in 96-well plates and, as such, can be a high-throughput system. The bound anionic GCs can be visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after quantitation by elution with denaturing buffers. The method can be modified to include predigestion of the sample with a specific lyase, e.g., chondroitinase ABC or testicular hyaluronidase. To separate polyanions from other digested material after ethanol precipitation, the sample can be assayed as described in this chapter for a particular subtype of anionic GC. This assay addresses the need for high-throughput applications in arthritis and other medical and biological problems. PMID:17072016

  1. Application of 13C isotope labeling using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to determining phosphate-containing metabolic incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Putluri, Vasanta; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Konde, Sai Aparna; Lydon, John P.; Sreekumar, Arun; Putluri, Nagireddy

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an approach wherein negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has used to understand the relative flux through phosphate containing metabolic intermediates associated with central carbon metabolism after administering cells with 13C-labeled substrates. The method was applied to examine the 13C incorporation through glycolysis in T47D breast cancer cells and showed reduction of glycolytic relative flux upon treatment with 2-Deoxyglucose. PMID:24338880

  2. Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Lena, Rohe

    2013-04-01

    The measurement of denitrification in soils and aquifers is still challenging and often enough associated with considerable experimental effort and high costs. Against this background, the acetylene inhibition technique (AIT) applied in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays is by far the most effective approach. However, this method has been largely criticized, as it is susceptible to underestimate denitrification rates and adds an additional carbon source to the substrates to be investigated. Here we provide evidence that the AIT is not necessarily an inappropriate approach to measure denitrification, that its reliability depends on the drivers governing the process, and that the 15N site preference of N2O (SP) may serve as a tool to assess this reliability. Two laboratory batch experiments were conducted, where sandy aquifer material and a peat soil were incubated as slurries. We established (i) a standard anaerobic treatment by adding KNO3 (10 mg N L-1), (ii) an oxygen treatment by adding KNO3 and O2 (5 mg L-1), and (iii) a glucose treatment by adding KNO3 supplemented with glucose (200 mg C L-1). Both experiments were run under 10 % (v/v) acetylene atmosphere and as 15N tracer treatments using labeled K15NO3 (60 atom % 15N). In the case of the standard anaerobic treatments, we found a very good agreement of denitrification potential obtained by the AIT and 15N tracer methods. SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between -4.8 and 2.6 ‰ which is indicative for N2O production during bacterial denitrification but not for N2O reduction to N2. In contrast, we observed substantial underestimation of denitrification by AIT for the glucose treatments compared to the 15N method, i.e. denitrification was underestimated by 36 % (sandy aquifer material) and 47 % (peat soil). SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between 4.5 and 9.6 ‰, which suggests occurrence of bacterial N2O reduction. In the case of the oxygen

  3. Modulation of (14) C-labeled glucose metabolism by zinc during aluminium induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2015-09-01

    Aluminium (Al) is one of the most prominent metals in the environment and is responsible for causing several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient that is involved in regulating brain development and function. The present study investigates the protective potential of Zn in the uptake of (14) C-labeled amino acids and glucose and their turnover in rat brain slices during Al intoxication. Male Sprague Dawley rats (140-160 g) were divided into four different groups: normal control, Al treated (100 mg/kg body weight/day via oral gavage), Zn treated (227 mg/liter in drinking water), and Al + Zn treated. Radiorespirometric assay revealed an increase in glucose turnover after Al exposure that was attenuated after Zn treatment. Furthermore, the uptake of (14) C-labeled glucose was increased after Al treatment but was appreciably decreased upon Zn supplementation. In addition, the uptakes of (14) C-lysine, (14) C-leucine, and (14) C-aspartic acid were also found to be elevated following Al exposure but were decreased after Zn treatment. Al treatment also caused alterations in the neurohistoarchitecture of the brain, which were improved after Zn coadministration. Therefore, the present study suggests that Zn provides protection against Al-induced neurotoxicity by regulating glucose and amino acid uptake in rats, indicating that Zn could be a potential candidate for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Metabolism of /sup 14/C-labeled doxylamine succinate (Bendectin) in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta)

    SciTech Connect

    Slikker, W. Jr.; Holder, C.L.; Lipe, G.W.; Korfmacher, W.A.; Thompson, H.C. Jr.; Bailey, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    The time-course of the metabolic fate of (/sup 14/C)doxylamine was determined after the p.o. administration of 13 mg/kg doxylamine succinate as Bendectin plus (/sup 14/C)doxylamine succinate to the rhesus monkey. Urine and plasma samples were analyzed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), chemical derivatization, and mass spectrometry. The cumulative 48-hr urinary metabolic profile contained 81% of the administered radiolabeled dose and consisted of at least six radiolabeled peaks. They were peak 1: unknown polar metabolites (8% of dose); peak 2: 2-(1-phenyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)ethoxy) acetic acid, 1-(1-phenyl-1(2-pyridinyl)ethoxy) methanol, and another minor metabolite(s) (31%); peak 3: doxylamine-N-oxide (1%); peak 4a: N,N-didesmethyldoxylamine (17%); peak 4b: doxylamine (4%); and peak 5: N-desmethyldoxylamine (20%). The plasma metabolic profile was the same as the urinary profile except for the absence of doxylamine-N-oxide. The maximum plasma concentrations and elapsed time to attain these concentrations were as follows. Peak 1: 540 ng/mL, 4 hr; peak 2: 1700 ng/mL, 1 hr; peak 4a: 430 ng/mL, 4 hr; peak 4b: 930 ng/mL, 2 hr; and peak 5: 790 ng/mL, 2 hr. These data suggest that in the monkey, doxylamine metabolism follows at least four pathways: a minor pathway to the N-oxide; a minor pathway to unknown polar metabolites; a major pathway to mono- and didesmethyldoxylamine via successive N-demethylation; and a major pathway to side-chain cleavage products (peak 2) via direct side-chain oxidation and/or deamination.

  5. Phenylalanine δ15N in Paleo Archives as a New Proxy for δ15N of Exported Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M.; Batista, F. C.; Vokhshoori, N. L.; Brown, J. T.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ravelo, A. C.; Sherwood, O.

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of individual amino acids (CSI-AA) is emerging as a powerful new tool for studying the paleo nitrogen cycle. Because most detrital organic nitrogen is composed of amino acids, CSI-AA can reveal the mechanistic basis for organic nitrogen diagenesis, preserve a record of past food web structure, and potentially reconstruct the δ15N values of past nitrate and primary production. Within the commonly measured amino acids, the δ15N value of phenylalanine (Phe) appears uniquely promising as a new proxy that reflects the nitrogen isotopic value of the original source. Phe δ15N values remain almost unchanged with trophic transfer through food webs, and also during at least the initial stages of organic matter degradation. Here we synthesize results from both bio-archives and recent sediments, which together suggest that at least in Holocene archives the Phe δ15N value does in fact record the average inorganic nitrogen δ15N value at the base of planktonic food webs. However, several important unknowns also remain. These include the extent of variation in amino acid isotopic fractionation patterns in phylogenetically distinct algal groups. The stability of Phe δ15N values in older sediments where organic matter has undergone extensive diagenesis is also an important research area, which may ultimately establish the temporal limit for application of this approach to study past geological epochs. Together, however, results to date suggest that of Phe δ15N values in paleo archives represent a novel molecular-level proxy which is not tied to any specific organism or group, but rather can provide an integrated estimate of δ15N value of exported primary production.

  6. Stable Isotope Labeled Tracers for Metabolic Pathway Elucidation by GC-MS and FT-MS

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), over the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly widespread metabolic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Emerging NMR and MS atom-tracking technologies and informatics is poised to revolutionize metabolomics-based research because they deliver the high information throughput (HIT) that is needed for deciphering systems biochemistry. In particular, Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) enables unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks, in a wide range of experimental systems, including human subjects. MS offers a wide range of initial capital outlay and operating costs, ranging from gas-chromatography (GC) MS affordable by many individual laboratories, to the HIT-supporting Fourier-transform (FT) class of MS that rivals NMR in cost and infrastructure support. This chapter will focus on sample preparation, instrument, and data processing procedures for these two extremes of MS instrumentation used in SIRM. PMID:25270929

  7. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  8. Live-cell vibrational imaging of choline metabolites by stimulated Raman scattering coupled with isotope-based metabolic labeling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fanghao; Wei, Lu; Zheng, Chaogu; Shen, Yihui

    2014-01-01

    Choline is a small molecule that occupies a key position in the biochemistry of all living organisms. Recent studies have strongly implicated choline metabolites in cancer, atherosclerosis and nervous system development. To detect choline and its metabolites, existing physical methods such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography, are often limited by the poor spatial resolution and substantial radiation dose. Fluorescence imaging, although with submicrometer resolution, requires introduction of bulky fluorophores and thus is difficult in labeling the small choline molecule. By combining the emerging bond-selective stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with metabolic incorporation of deuterated choline, herein we have achieved high resolution imaging of choline-containing metabolites in living mammalian cell lines, primary hippocampal neurons and multicellular organism C. elegans. Different subcellular distributions of choline metabolites are observed between cancer cells and non-cancer cells, which may reveal functional difference in the choline metabolism and lipid-mediated signaling events. In neurons, choline incorporation is visualized within both soma and neurites, where choline metabolites are more evenly distributed compared to the protein. Furthermore, choline localization is also observed in the pharynx region of C. elegans larvae, consistent with its organogenesis mechanism. These applications demonstrate the potential of isotope-based stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for future choline-related disease detection and development monitoring in vivo. PMID:24555181

  9. Effective Estimation of Dynamic Metabolic Fluxes Using 13C Labeling and Piecewise Affine Approximation: From Theory to Practical Applicability

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Robin; Wahl, S. Aljoscha

    2015-01-01

    The design of microbial production processes relies on rational choices for metabolic engineering of the production host and the process conditions. These require a systematic and quantitative understanding of cellular regulation. Therefore, a novel method for dynamic flux identification using quantitative metabolomics and 13C labeling to identify piecewise-affine (PWA) flux functions has been described recently. Obtaining flux estimates nevertheless still required frequent manual reinitalization to obtain a good reproduction of the experimental data and, moreover, did not optimize on all observables simultaneously (metabolites and isotopomer concentrations). In our contribution we focus on measures to achieve faster and robust dynamic flux estimation which leads to a high dimensional parameter estimation problem. Specifically, we address the following challenges within the PWA problem formulation: (1) Fast selection of sufficient domains for the PWA flux functions, (2) Control of over-fitting in the concentration space using shape-prescriptive modeling and (3) robust and efficient implementation of the parameter estimation using the hybrid implicit filtering algorithm. With the improvements we significantly speed up the convergence by efficiently exploiting that the optimization problem is partly linear. This allows application to larger-scale metabolic networks and demonstrates that the proposed approach is not purely theoretical, but also applicable in practice. PMID:26690237

  10. Metabolic labeling of leucine rich repeat kinases 1 and 2 with radioactive phosphate.

    PubMed

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Gao, Fangye; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2013-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinases 1 and 2 (LRRK1 and LRRK2) are paralogs which share a similar domain organization, including a serine-threonine kinase domain, a Ras of complex proteins domain (ROC), a C-terminal of ROC domain (COR), and leucine-rich and ankyrin-like repeats at the N-terminus. The precise cellular roles of LRRK1 and LRRK2 have yet to be elucidated, however LRRK1 has been implicated in tyrosine kinase receptor signaling, while LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In this report, we present a protocol to label the LRRK1 and LRRK2 proteins in cells with (32)P orthophosphate, thereby providing a means to measure the overall phosphorylation levels of these 2 proteins in cells. In brief, affinity tagged LRRK proteins are expressed in HEK293T cells which are exposed to medium containing (32)P-orthophosphate. The (32)P-orthophosphate is assimilated by the cells after only a few hours of incubation and all molecules in the cell containing phosphates are thereby radioactively labeled. Via the affinity tag (3xflag) the LRRK proteins are isolated from other cellular components by immunoprecipitation. Immunoprecipitates are then separated via SDS-PAGE, blotted to PVDF membranes and analysis of the incorporated phosphates is performed by autoradiography ((32)P signal) and western detection (protein signal) of the proteins on the blots. The protocol can readily be adapted to monitor phosphorylation of any other protein that can be expressed in cells and isolated by immunoprecipitation. PMID:24084685

  11. Metabolic Labeling of Leucine Rich Repeat Kinases 1 and 2 with Radioactive Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Gao, Fangye; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2013-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinases 1 and 2 (LRRK1 and LRRK2) are paralogs which share a similar domain organization, including a serine-threonine kinase domain, a Ras of complex proteins domain (ROC), a C-terminal of ROC domain (COR), and leucine-rich and ankyrin-like repeats at the N-terminus. The precise cellular roles of LRRK1 and LRRK2 have yet to be elucidated, however LRRK1 has been implicated in tyrosine kinase receptor signaling1,2, while LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease3,4. In this report, we present a protocol to label the LRRK1 and LRRK2 proteins in cells with 32P orthophosphate, thereby providing a means to measure the overall phosphorylation levels of these 2 proteins in cells. In brief, affinity tagged LRRK proteins are expressed in HEK293T cells which are exposed to medium containing 32P-orthophosphate. The 32P-orthophosphate is assimilated by the cells after only a few hours of incubation and all molecules in the cell containing phosphates are thereby radioactively labeled. Via the affinity tag (3xflag) the LRRK proteins are isolated from other cellular components by immunoprecipitation. Immunoprecipitates are then separated via SDS-PAGE, blotted to PVDF membranes and analysis of the incorporated phosphates is performed by autoradiography (32P signal) and western detection (protein signal) of the proteins on the blots. The protocol can readily be adapted to monitor phosphorylation of any other protein that can be expressed in cells and isolated by immunoprecipitation. PMID:24084685

  12. Uptake of stormwater nitrogen in bioretention systems demonstrated from 15N tracer techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdeshel, D.; Hultine, K. R.; Pomeroy, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Bioretention stormwater management systems are engineered ecosystems that capture urban stormwater in order to reduce the harmful effects of stormwater pollution on receiving waters. Bioretention systems have been shown to be effective at reducing the volume of runoff, and thereby reduce the nutrient loading to receiving waters from urban areas. However, little work has been done to evaluate the treatment processes that are responsible for reductions in effluent nitrogen (N). We hypothesize that the pulses of inorganic nitrogen associated with urban runoff events are captured in the plat tissues within these systems and not adsorbed to the soil media, thus creating a long-term, sustainable treatment approach to reducing the total nutrient loading to receiving waters. Nitrogen treatment performance was tested on two bioretention systems in Salt Lake City, UT: 1) an upland native community that does not require irrigation in semi-arid climates, and 2) a wetland community that requires 250 l of daily irrigation to offset the relatively high evaporative demand in the region. Each cell is sized to treat a 2.5 cm storm from a 140 m2 impervious surface: the area of the bioretention system is 10 m2. To test the N removal performance of each system, runoff events were simulated to represent an average precipitation regime using a synthetic stormwater blend starting in January, 2012. Effluent was collected from an underdrain and analyzed for total nitrogen (TN); mass removal was calculated for each month by subtracting the TN mass added to the garden minus the TN mass that flowed out of the garden. To test the hypothesis that plants assimilate stormwater N, 4 g of 100 atom% 15N NH4NO3 tracer was used as the N source in the synthetic stormwater during the first 2,000 l synthetic storm event in May. This isotopic label was calculated to enrich the total N pool of each garden to 100‰ 15N/14Nair. New growth was harvested from each plant in both cells and analyzed for 15N

  13. 15N2 Fixation by Bacteria Associated with Maize Roots at a Low Partial O2 Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, David B.; Zuberer, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation by bacteria associated with roots of intact maize plants was measured by exposing the roots to 15N2 at a partial O2 pressure (pO2) of 2 or 10 kPa. The plants were grown in a mixture of Weswood soil and sand and then transferred to plastic cylinders containing an N-free plant nutrient solution. The solution was sparged continuously with a mixture of air and N2 at a pO2 of 2 or 10 kPa. Acetylene reduction was measured after the roots were exposed to the low pO2 overnight. The air-N2 atmosphere in the cylinders was then replaced with an O2-He atmosphere at the same pO2, and the roots were exposed to 20 kPa of 15N2 for 20 to 22 h. Incorporation of 15N into the roots was 200 times greater at 2 kPa of O2 than at 10 kPa of O2. Adding l-malate (1 g of C liter−1) to the nutrient solution increased root-associated nitrogenase activity, producing a strong 15N label which could be traced into the shoots. Fixed 15N was detected in the shoots within 5 days after the plants were returned to unfertilized soil. In a similar experiment with undisturbed plants grown in fritted clay, movement of fixed 15N into the shoots was evident within 4 days after the roots were exposed to 15N2 at 2 kPa of O2. Inoculation with Azospirillum lipoferum yielded no significant differences in shoot dry weight, total nitrogen content, percent nitrogen, or 15N enrichment of plant tissues. Inoculated plants did exhibit greater root dry weight than uninoculated plants, however. PMID:16347968

  14. 14C-labeled propionate metabolism in vivo and estimates of hepatic gluconeogenesis relative to Krebs cycle flux.

    PubMed

    Landau, B R; Schumann, W C; Chandramouli, V; Magnusson, I; Kumaran, K; Wahren, J

    1993-10-01

    Purposes of this study were 1) to estimate in humans, using 14C-labeled propionate, the rate of hepatic gluconeogenesis relative to the rate of Krebs cycle flux; 2) to compare those rates with estimates previously made using [3-14C]lactate and [2-14C]acetate; 3) to determine if the amount of ATP required for that rate of gluconeogenesis could be generated in liver, calculated from that rate of Krebs cycle flux and splanchnic balance measurements, previously made, and 4) to test whether hepatic succinyl-CoA is channeled during its metabolism through the Krebs cycle. [2-14C]propionate, [3-14C]-propionate, and [2,3-14C]succinate were given along with phenyl acetate to normal subjects, fasted 60 h. Distributions of 14C were determined in the carbons of blood glucose and of glutamate from excreted phenylacetylglutamine. Corrections to the distributions for 14CO2 fixation were made from the specific activities of urinary urea and the specific activities in glucose, glutamate, and urea previously found on administering [14C]-bicarbonate. Uncertainties in the corrections and in the contributions of pyruvate and Cori cyclings limit the quantitations. The rate of gluconeogenesis appears to be two or more times the rate of Krebs cycle flux and pyruvate's decarboxylation to acetyl-CoA, metabolized in the cycle, less than one-twenty-fifth the rate of its decarboxylation. Such estimates were previously made using [3-14C]lactate. The findings support the use of phenyl acetate to sample hepatic alpha-ketoglutarate. Ratios of specific activities of glucose to glutamate and glucose to urinary urea and expired CO2 indicate succinate's extensive metabolism when presented in trace amounts to liver. Utilizations of the labeled compounds by liver relative to other tissues were in the order succinate = lactate > propionate > acetate. ATP required for gluconeogenesis and urea formation was approximately 40% of the amount of ATP generated in liver. There was no channeling of succinyl-CoA in

  15. Measurement of Histone Methylation Dynamics by One-Carbon Metabolic Isotope Labeling and High-energy Collisional Dissociation Methylation Signature Ion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hui; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Sowers, Lawrence C.; Zhang, Kangling

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cellular metabolites and nutrition levels control epigenetic modifications, including histone methylation. However, it is not currently possible to measure the metabolic control of histone methylation. Here we report a novel detection method to monitor methyl transfer from serine to histones through the one-carbon metabolic pathway, using stable-isotope labeling and detection of lysine methylation signature ions generated in high-energy-dissociation (HCD) tandem mass spectrometry. This method is a long-needed tool to study the metabolic control of histone methylation. PMID:27530234

  16. Positron emission reconstruction tomography for the assessment of regional myocardial metabolism by the administration of substrates labeled with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ter-Pogossian, M. M.; Hoffman, E. J.; Weiss, E. S.; Coleman, R. E.; Phelps, M. E.; Welch, M. J.; Sobel, B. E.

    1975-01-01

    A positron emission transverse tomograph device was developed which provides transaxial sectional images of the distribution of positron-emitting radionuclides in the heart. The images provide a quantitative three-dimensional map of the distribution of activity unencumbered by the superimposition of activity originating from regions overlying and underlying the plane of interest. PETT is used primarily with the cyclotron-produced radionuclides oxygen-15, nitrogen-13 and carbon-11. Because of the participation of these atoms in metabolism, they can be used to label metabolic substrates and intermediary molecules incorporated in myocardial metabolism.

  17. Effect of Photoperiod on the Metabolism of Deuterium-Labeled Gibberellin A53 in Spinach 1

    PubMed Central

    Gianfagna, Thomas; Zeevaart, Jan A. D.; Lusk, William J.

    1983-01-01

    Application of gibberellin A53 (GA53) to short-day (SD)-grown spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants caused an increase in petiole length and leaf angle similar to that found in plants transferred to long days (LD). [2H] GA53 was fed to plants in SD, LD, and in a SD to LD transition experiment, and the metabolites were identified by gas chromatography with selected ion monitoring. After 2, 4, or 6 SD, [2H]GA53 was converted to [2H]GA19 and [2H]GA44. No other metabolites were detected. After 2 LD, only [2H] GA20 was identified. In the transition experiment in which plants were given 4 SD followed by 2 LD, all three metabolites were found. The results demonstrate unequivocally that GA19, GA20, and GA44 are metabolic products of GA53, and strongly suggest that photoperiod regulates GA metabolism, in part, by controlling the conversion of GA19 to GA20. PMID:16662988

  18. LC-quadrupole/Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry enables stable isotope-resolved simultaneous quantification and ¹³C-isotopic labeling of acyl-coenzyme A thioesters.

    PubMed

    Frey, Alexander J; Feldman, Daniel R; Trefely, Sophie; Worth, Andrew J; Basu, Sankha S; Snyder, Nathaniel W

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesters are evolutionarily conserved, compartmentalized, and energetically activated substrates for biochemical reactions. The ubiquitous involvement of acyl-CoA thioesters in metabolism, including the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid degradation, and cholesterol metabolism highlights the broad applicability of applied measurements of acyl-CoA thioesters. However, quantitation of acyl-CoA levels provides only one dimension of metabolic information and a more complete description of metabolism requires the relative contribution of different precursors to individual substrates and pathways. Using two distinct stable isotope labeling approaches, acyl-CoA thioesters can be labeled with either a fixed [(13)C3(15)N1] label derived from pantothenate into the CoA moiety or via variable [(13)C] labeling into the acyl chain from metabolic precursors. Liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole/Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry using parallel reaction monitoring, but not single ion monitoring, allowed the simultaneous quantitation of acyl-CoA thioesters by stable isotope dilution using the [(13)C3(15)N1] label and measurement of the incorporation of labeled carbon atoms derived from [(13)C6]-glucose, [(13)C5(15)N2]-glutamine, and [(13)C3]-propionate. As a proof of principle, we applied this method to human B cell lymphoma (WSU-DLCL2) cells in culture to precisely describe the relative pool size and enrichment of isotopic tracers into acetyl-, succinyl-, and propionyl-CoA. This method will allow highly precise, multiplexed, and stable isotope-resolved determination of metabolism to refine metabolic models, characterize novel metabolism, and test modulators of metabolic pathways involving acyl-CoA thioesters. PMID:26968563

  19. A novel method for trapping and analyzing 15N in NO for tracing NO sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ronghua; Mulder, Jan; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    15N isotope tracing is an effective and direct approach to investigate the biological and chemical sources of nitric oxide (NO) in soil. However, NO is highly reactive and rapidly converted to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the presence of ozone. Various chemical conversions of NO to the more stable solutes nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) have been proposed, which allow analysing the 15N abundance without major fractionation. However, NO emissions from soils are usually small, posing major challenges to conversion efficiency and background contamination. Here we present a novel method in which NO is oxidized to NO2- by chromium trioxide (CrO3) prior to conversion to NO2- and NO3- in an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. Immediately following trapping, manganese dioxide (MnO2) and 5M HCl are added to remove excess H2O2, and to adjust the pH to around 6.0-7.0, respectively. The resulting solution can be stored until analysis and is none-toxic, allowing to use a modified denitrifier method (Zhu et al., submitted), where NO2- and NO3- are reduced quantitatively to nitrous oxide (N2O). Optimum NO conversion rates of > 90% even at extremely low initial NO concentration were obtained with 4% H2O2, 0.5 M NaOH, and 0.5 L min-1 gas flow rate. In a laboratory test, using NO gas with different 15N signals produced from unlabelled and labelled NO2-, we found an overall precision of 0.4‰ for unlabelled and 49.7‰ for NO enriched with 1.0 atom% 15N, respectively. This indicates that this method can be used for both natural abundance studies of NO, as well as in labelling studies tracing NO sources. Zhu J, Yu L, Bakken LR, Mørkved PT, Mulder J, Dörsch P. Controlled induction of denitrification in Pseudomonas aureofaciens: a modified denitrifier method for 15N and 18O analysis in NO3- from natural water samples by IRMS. Submitted.

  20. Comparison of three 15N methods to correct for microbial contamination when assessing in situ protein degradability of fresh forages.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, M; Ammar, H; Théwis, A; Beckers, Y; France, J; López, S

    2014-11-01

    The use of stable (15)N as a marker to determine microbial contamination in nylon bag incubation residues to estimate protein degradability was investigated. Three methods using (15)N were compared: (15)N-labeled forage (dilution method, LF), (15)N enrichment of rumen solids-associated bacteria (SAB), and (15)N enrichment of rumen liquid-associated bacteria (LAB). Herbage from forages differing in protein and fiber contents (early-cut Italian ryegrass, late-cut Italian ryegrass, and red clover) were freeze-dried and ground and then incubated in situ in the rumen of 3 steers for 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h using the nylon bag technique. The (15)N-labeled forages were obtained by fertilizing the plots where herbage was grown with (15)NH4 (15)NO3. Unlabeled forages (obtained from plots fertilized with NH4NO3) were incubated at the same time that ((15)NH4)2SO4 was continuously infused into the rumen of the steers, and then pellets of labeled SAB and LAB were isolated by differential centrifugation of samples of ruminal contents. The proportion of bacterial N in the incubation residues increased from 0.09 and 0.45 g bacterial N/g total N at 3 h of incubation to 0.37 and 0.85 g bacterial N/g total N at 48 h of incubation for early-cut and late-cut ryegrass, respectively. There were differences (P < 0.001) between uncorrected N degradability values and those corrected for microbial contamination with all of the methods. Apparent N degradability of the low-N, high-fiber forage (late-cut ryegrass) was 0.51, whereas the corrected values were 0.85, 0.84, and 0.77 for the LF, SAB, and LAB methods, respectively. With early-cut ryegrass and red clover, the differences between uncorrected and corrected values ranged between 6% and 13%, with small differences among the labeling methods. Generally, methods using labeled forage or labeled SAB and LAB provided similar corrected degradability values. The accuracy in estimating the extent of degradation of protein in the rumen from in situ

  1. Potential probe for examining opiate-receptor interactions: model compound study of dynamic effects on /sup 15/N INEPT enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, K.H.; Mikita, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    Model systems were chosen in an attempt to mimic the proton exchange environment of an agonist nitrogen in an opiate-receptor interaction. The two model systems studied were an ammonium: 18-crown-6 ether complex and a quinuclidine-trifluoroacetic acid ion pair. Each system was examined for their effects on /sup 15/N NMR INEPT enhancements. Both models were found to retard proton exchange dynamics, as observed by increased enhancements relative to free ions in neutral aqueous solutions. These results suggest that the confinement of a protonated nitrogen, such as that expected in receptor binding, may alter exchange dynamics to favor INEPT enhancements, while unbound agonists would remain unenhanced. As a result, /sup 15/N NMR INEPT enhancements from a solution of receptor subtypes with an appropriate /sup 15/N-labeled agonist may present a means of exploring the dynamics of direct opiate-receptor interactions.

  2. Detection of organic sulfur by {sup 15}N and {sup 19}F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of {sup 15}N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using {sup 15}N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique {sup 15}N- or, {sup 19}F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  3. Detection of organic sulfur by [sup 15]N and [sup 19]F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of [sup 15]N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using [sup 15]N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique [sup 15]N- or, [sup 19]F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  4. Altered Retinoic Acid Metabolism in Diabetic Mouse Kidney Identified by 18O Isotopic Labeling and 2D Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, Jonathan M.; Zhao, Yingxin; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; LeJeune, Wanda S.; Dey, Nilay; Luxon, Bruce A.; Kane, Maureen A.; Napoli, Joseph L.; Denner, Larry; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous metabolic pathways have been implicated in diabetes-induced renal injury, yet few studies have utilized unbiased systems biology approaches for mapping the interconnectivity of diabetes-dysregulated proteins that are involved. We utilized a global, quantitative, differential proteomic approach to identify a novel retinoic acid hub in renal cortical protein networks dysregulated by type 2 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings Total proteins were extracted from renal cortex of control and db/db mice at 20 weeks of age (after 12 weeks of hyperglycemia in the diabetic mice). Following trypsinization, 18O- and 16O-labeled control and diabetic peptides, respectively, were pooled and separated by two dimensional liquid chromatography (strong cation exchange creating 60 fractions further separated by nano-HPLC), followed by peptide identification and quantification using mass spectrometry. Proteomic analysis identified 53 proteins with fold change ≥1.5 and p≤0.05 after Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment (out of 1,806 proteins identified), including alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH1/ALDH1A1). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified altered retinoic acid as a key signaling hub that was altered in the diabetic renal cortical proteome. Western blotting and real-time PCR confirmed diabetes-induced upregulation of RALDH1, which was localized by immunofluorescence predominantly to the proximal tubule in the diabetic renal cortex, while PCR confirmed the downregulation of ADH identified with mass spectrometry. Despite increased renal cortical tissue levels of retinol and RALDH1 in db/db versus control mice, all-trans-retinoic acid was significantly decreased in association with a significant decrease in PPARβ/δ mRNA. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that retinoic acid metabolism is significantly dysregulated in diabetic kidneys, and suggest that a shift in all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism is a novel feature in

  5. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of the Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome by Combining Metabolic Labeling and Click Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeekens, Johanna M.; Chen, Weixuan; Wu, Ronghu

    2015-04-01

    Cell surface N-glycoproteins play extraordinarily important roles in cell-cell communication, cell-matrix interactions, and cellular response to environmental cues. Global analysis is exceptionally challenging because many N-glycoproteins are present at low abundances and effective separation is difficult to achieve. Here, we have developed a novel strategy integrating metabolic labeling, copper-free click chemistry, and mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics methods to analyze cell surface N-glycoproteins comprehensively and site-specifically. A sugar analog containing an azido group, N-azidoacetylgalactosamine, was fed to cells to label glycoproteins. Glycoproteins with the functional group on the cell surface were then bound to dibenzocyclooctyne-sulfo-biotin via copper-free click chemistry under physiological conditions. After protein extraction and digestion, glycopeptides with the biotin tag were enriched by NeutrAvidin conjugated beads. Enriched glycopeptides were deglycosylated with peptide- N-glycosidase F in heavy-oxygen water, and in the process of glycan removal, asparagine was converted to aspartic acid and tagged with 18O for MS analysis. With this strategy, 144 unique N-glycopeptides containing 152 N-glycosylation sites were identified in 110 proteins in HEK293T cells. As expected, 95% of identified glycoproteins were membrane proteins, which were highly enriched. Many sites were located on important receptors, transporters, and cluster of differentiation proteins. The experimental results demonstrated that the current method is very effective for the comprehensive and site-specific identification of the cell surface N-glycoproteome and can be extensively applied to other cell surface protein studies.

  6. Mass spectrometric analysis of the cell surface N-glycoproteome by combining metabolic labeling and click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Smeekens, Johanna M; Chen, Weixuan; Wu, Ronghu

    2015-04-01

    Cell surface N-glycoproteins play extraordinarily important roles in cell-cell communication, cell-matrix interactions, and cellular response to environmental cues. Global analysis is exceptionally challenging because many N-glycoproteins are present at low abundances and effective separation is difficult to achieve. Here, we have developed a novel strategy integrating metabolic labeling, copper-free click chemistry, and mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics methods to analyze cell surface N-glycoproteins comprehensively and site-specifically. A sugar analog containing an azido group, N-azidoacetylgalactosamine, was fed to cells to label glycoproteins. Glycoproteins with the functional group on the cell surface were then bound to dibenzocyclooctyne-sulfo-biotin via copper-free click chemistry under physiological conditions. After protein extraction and digestion, glycopeptides with the biotin tag were enriched by NeutrAvidin conjugated beads. Enriched glycopeptides were deglycosylated with peptide-N-glycosidase F in heavy-oxygen water, and in the process of glycan removal, asparagine was converted to aspartic acid and tagged with 18O for MS analysis. With this strategy, 144 unique N-glycopeptides containing 152 N-glycosylation sites were identified in 110 proteins in HEK293T cells. As expected, 95% of identified glycoproteins were membrane proteins, which were highly enriched. Many sites were located on important receptors, transporters, and cluster of differentiation proteins. The experimental results demonstrated that the current method is very effective for the comprehensive and site-specific identification of the cell surface N-glycoproteome and can be extensively applied to other cell surface protein studies.

  7. Aliphatic (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments of dihydrofolate reductase from the psychropiezophile Moritella profunda in complex with NADP(+) and folate.

    PubMed

    Loveridge, E Joel; Matthews, Stella M; Williams, Christopher; Whittaker, Sara B-M; Günther, Ulrich L; Evans, Rhiannon M; Dawson, William M; Crump, Matthew P; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2013-04-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from the deep-sea bacterium Moritella profunda (MpDHFR) has been (13)C/(15)N isotopically labelled and purified. Here, we report the aliphatic (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of MpDHFR in complex with NADP(+) and folate. The spectra of MpDHFR suggest considerably greater conformational heterogeneity than is seen in the closely related DHFR from Escherichia coli.

  8. Myocardial metabolism of free fatty acids. Studies with /sup 14/C-labeled substrates in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Wisneski, J.A.; Gertz, E.W.; Neese, R.A.; Mayr, M.

    1987-02-01

    Free fatty acids are considered to be the major energy source for the myocardium. To investigate the metabolic fate of this substrate in humans, 24 subjects underwent coronary sinus and arterial catheterization. 13 subjects were healthy volunteers and 11 subjects had symptoms of ischemic heart disease. (1-/sup 14/C)oleate or (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin was infused at a constant rate of 25 microCi/h. Oxidation was determined by measuring the /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production. The data demonstrated that a high percentage (84 +/- 17%) of the palmitate and oleate extracted by the myocardium underwent rapid oxidation. A highly significant correlation was present between the arterial level and the amount oxidized (r = 0.82, P less than 0.001 for palmitate; r = 0.77, P less than 0.001 for oleate). The isotope extraction ratio was greater than the chemical extraction ratio. This difference of 6 +/- 2 nmol/ml of blood in the young normal subjects was significantly less than the 12 +/- 4 nmol/ml observed in the ischemic heart disease patients (P less than 0.001).

  9. Validation of the doubly-labeled water (H/sup 3/H/sup 18/O) method for measuring water flux and energy metabolism in tenebrionid beetles

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    Doubly-labeled water (H/sup 3/H/sup 18/O) has been used to determine water flux and energy metabolism in a variety of vertebrates. This study examines the applicability of this technique to arthropods. The theory of the technique depends upon the assumption that doubly-labeled water introduced into the animal's body water equilibrates with water and carbon dioxide by the action of carbonic anhydrase. Tritium (/sup 3/H) is lost from the animal only with water while oxygen-18 is lost with both water and carbon dioxide. The difference bwtween the rates of loss of the two isotopes is proportional to CO/sub 2/ loss rate. Validation of the use of tritiated water for measuring water flux was accomplished by comparing gravimetric measurements of water gain with flux rates determined by loss of tritiated water. At room humidity, an overestimate for influx calculated from labeled water calculations was found, averaging 12 mg H/sub 2/O (g.d)/sup -1/. Comparison of CO/sub 2/ loss rate determined isotopically with rates of CO/sub 2/ loss determined by standard metabolic rates also yielded overestimates for the isotopic technique, overestimates ranging between 20 and 30%. The relevance of this for studies using labeled water for studying water fluxes and free metabolism of free-ranging arthropods is discussed.

  10. Safety and efficacy of polycalcium for improving biomarkers of bone metabolism: a 4-week open-label clinical study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Park, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Dae; Cho, Hyung Rae; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Joo-Wan

    2013-03-01

    Polycalcium is a mixture of Polycan and calcium lactate-gluconate 1:9 (w/w) with demonstrated antiosteoporosis activity in vitro and in vivo studies. These studies were a 4-week open-label, single-center trial to evaluate the efficacy of oral Polycalcium on bone metabolism and safety. In total, 30 healthy women (range 40-60 years) were administered 400 mg of Polycalcium for 4 weeks. The primary efficacy parameter was urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPYR) levels, and serum osteocalcin (OSC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), urinary cross-linked C-telopeptide of type-1 collagen (CTx), urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type-1 collagen (NTx), calcium (Ca), and phosphorus (P) levels, which were evaluated for comparison before and after administration of Polycalcium. After 4 weeks of Polycalcium administration, 27 subjects completed the test plan. Three subjects withdrew their consent to participate. The values of blood OSC, BALP, serum Ca, and serum P from baseline to 4 weeks of treatment were changed by -28.44%, 14.37%, 6.11%, and 1.42%, respectively. Biomarkers of bone resorption: urinary DPYR, serum CTx, serum NTx, urinary Ca, and urinary P, at baseline after 4 weeks of treatment were changed by -13.40%, 6.67%, -5.13%, -22.43%, and -3.04%, respectively. Additionally, when considering the subjects' adverse effects and the results of the blood and urine tests over the 4-week trial period, the dose of 400  mg Polycalcium showed efficacy for improving bone metabolism and was well tolerated and safe. Polycalcium was apparently safe and efficacious.

  11. alpha-Hydroxylation pathway in the in vitro metabolism of carcinogenic nitrosamines: N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitroso-N-methylaniline.

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger-Koepke, M B; Koepke, S R; McClusky, G A; Magee, P N; Michejda, C J

    1981-01-01

    Evolution of 15N2-labeled molecular nitrogen was used to gauge the extent of alpha-hydroxylation during rat liver homogenate metabolism of doubly 15N-labeled N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN) and N-nitrosomethylaniline (NMA). These measurements were correlated with the extent of total metabolism as measured by the disappearance of the nitrosamines and by the formation of formaldehyde. The results indicate that approximately 34% of DMN and 19% of NMA were metabolized by the alpha-hydroxylation pathway. Positive controls utilizing doubly 15N-labeled N-nitroso-N-methylurea yielded 96% of labeled nitrogen. These results are in variance with previously published data which claimed that either less than 5% or about 100% of DMN is metabolized by that route in vitro. Formaldehyde formation was shown to be a poor measure of the extent of metabolism. Semicarbazide gave rise to both formaldehyde and nitrogen, which makes it an undesirable component of the in vitro metabolism mixtures, particularly when those two substances are being measured. PMID:6947239

  12. 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance assignment and secondary structure of the cytotoxic ribonuclease alpha-Sarcin.

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Olivas, R.; Bruix, M.; Santoro, J.; Martínez del Pozo, A.; Lacadena, J.; Gavilanes, J. G.; Rico, M.

    1996-01-01

    The ribosome-inactivating protein alpha-Sarcin (alpha S) is a 150-residue fungal ribonuclease that, after entering sensitive cells, selectively cleaves a single phosphodiester bond in an universally conserved sequence of the major rRNA to inactivate the ribosome and thus exert its cytotoxic action. As a first step toward establishing the structure-dynamics-function relationships in this system, we have carried out the assignment of the 1H and 15N NMR spectrum of alpha S on the basis of homonuclear (1H-1H) and heteronuclear (1H-15N) two-dimensional correlation spectra of a uniformly 15N-labeled sample, and two selectively 15N-labeled (Tyr and Phe) samples, as well as a single three-dimensional experiment. The secondary structure of alpha S, as derived from the characteristic patterns of dipolar connectivities between backbone protons, conformational chemical shifts, and the protection of backbone amide protons against exchange, consists of a long N-terminal beta-hairpin, a short alpha-helical segment, and a C-terminal beta-sheet of five short strands arranged in a + 1, + 1, + 1, + 1 topology, connected by long loops in which the 13 Pro residues are located. PMID:8732769

  13. Analysis of 13C labeling enrichment in microbial culture applying metabolic tracer experiments using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heinzle, Elmar; Yuan, Yongbo; Kumar, Sathish; Wittmann, Christoph; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Herrmann; Wehrung, Patrick; Adam, Pierre; Albrecht, Pierre

    2008-09-15

    The applicability of gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) for the quantification of 13C enrichment of proteinogenic amino acids in metabolic tracer experiments was evaluated. Measurement of the 13C enrichment of proteinogenic amino acids from cell hydrolyzates of Corynebacterium glutamicum growing on different mixtures containing between 0.5 and 10% [1-13C]glucose shows the significance of kinetic isotope effects in metabolic flux studies at low degree of labeling. We developed a method to calculate the 13C enrichment. The approach to correct for these effects in metabolic flux studies using delta13C measurement by GC-C-IRMS uses two parallel experiments applying substrate with natural abundance and 13C-enriched tracer substrate, respectively. The fractional enrichment obtained in natural substrate is subtracted from that of the enriched one. Tracer studies with C. glutamicum resulted in a statistically identical relative fractional enrichment of 13C in proteinogenic amino acids over the whole range of applied concentrations of [1-13C]glucose. The current findings indicate a great potential of GC-C-IRMS for labeling quantification in 13C metabolic flux analysis with low labeling degree of tracer substrate directly in larger scale bioreactors.

  14. Generalized sensory stimulation of conscious rats increases labeling of oxidative pathways of glucose metabolism when the brain glucose-oxygen uptake ratio rises.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A; Wang, Robert Y; Cruz, Nancy F

    2002-12-01

    Interpretation of functional metabolic brain images requires understanding of metabolic shifts in working brain. Because the disproportionately higher uptake of glucose compared with oxygen ("aerobic glycolysis") during sensory stimulation is not fully explained by changes in levels of lactate or glycogen, metabolic labeling by [6-14C]glucose was used to evaluate utilization of glucose during brief brain activation. Increased labeling of tricarboxylic acid cycle-derived amino acids, mainly glutamate but also gamma-aminobutyric acid, reflects a rise in oxidative metabolism during aerobic glycolysis. The size of the glutamate, lactate, alanine, and aspartate pools changed during stimulation. Brain lactate was derived from blood-borne glucose and its specific activity was twice that of alanine, revealing pyruvate compartmentation. Glycogen labeling doubled during recovery compared with rest and activation; only 4% to 8% of the total 14C was recovered in lactate plus glycogen. Restoration of glycogen levels was slow, and diversion of glucose from oxidative pathways to restore its level could cause a prolonged reduction of the global O2/glucose uptake ratio. The rise in the brain glucose-oxygen uptake ratio during activation does not simply reflect an upward shift of glycolysis under aerobic conditions; instead, it involves altered fluxes into various (oxidative and biosynthetic) pathways with different time courses.

  15. Evaluation of Drosophila metabolic labeling strategies for in vivo quantitative proteomic analyses with applications to early pupa formation and amino acid starvation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Che; Tang, Hong-Wen; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Pu, Tsung-Hsien; Meng, Tzu-Ching; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Chen, Guang-Chao

    2013-05-01

    Although stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics was first developed as a cell culture-based technique, stable isotope-labeled amino acids have since been successfully introduced in vivo into select multicellular model organisms by manipulating the feeding diets. An earlier study by others has demonstrated that heavy lysine labeled Drosophila melanogaster can be derived by feeding with an exclusive heavy lysine labeled yeast diet. In this work, we have further evaluated the use of heavy lysine and/or arginine for metabolic labeling of fruit flies, with an aim to determine its respective quantification accuracy and versatility. In vivo conversion of heavy lysine and/or heavy arginine to several nonessential amino acids was observed in labeled flies, leading to distorted isotope pattern and underestimated heavy to light ratio. These quantification defects can nonetheless be rectified at protein level using the normalization function. The only caveat is that such a normalization strategy may not be suitable for every biological application, particularly when modified peptides need to be individually quantified at peptide level. In such cases, we showed that peptide ratios calculated from the summed intensities of all isotope peaks are less affected by the heavy amino acid conversion and therefore less sequence-dependent and more reliable. Applying either the single Lys8 or double Lys6/Arg10 metabolic labeling strategy to flies, we quantitatively mapped the proteomic changes during the onset of metamorphosis and upon amino acid deprivation. The expression of a number of steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone regulated proteins was found to be changed significantly during larval-pupa transition, while several subunits of the V-ATPase complex and components regulating actomyosin were up-regulated under starvation-induced autophagy conditions.

  16. A rapidly produced 125I labelled autologous fibrinogen: in vitro properties and preliminary metabolic studies in man.

    PubMed Central

    Hawker, R J; Hawker, L M

    1976-01-01

    The properties of fibrinogen extracted by a precipitation method using glycine at ambient temperatures near neutral pH are described. The simple and reproducible method gives a 73% yield of high purity plasminogen-free fibrinogen in 45 minutes from small volumes of plasma. The protein extract was labelled with 125I using chloramine-T under conditions optimal for fibrinogen stability. The extraction procedure, radio-iodination, desalting, and sterilization take only 70 minutes for completion from the time donor blood is received in the laboratory. The methods, using a specially developed extraction vessel and desalting/sterilizing column, can be used in a small hospital laboratory. Autologous fibrinogen can thus be extracted from patients' blood, eliminating the risk of transmitting hepatitis when it is re-administered. The autologous material, which is 97% clottable and contains less than 0-05% free iodide, is being routinely used as a diagnostic tool in the detection of deep vein thrombosis. The high purity of the preparation facilitates metabolic studies and in vitro experimental work. In vivo results show a mean half-life in three normal volunteers of 3-95 days and a catabolic rate of 25-23% per day with the extravascular space estimated as 24-86%. In 30 surgical patients an expected reduced half-life in plasma was determined with a mean of 3-1 days. PMID:939805

  17. Stepwise enrichment of 15N along food chains: Further evidence and the relation between δ 15N and animal age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masao; Wada, Eitaro

    1984-05-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrogen was measured in marine and fresh-water animals from the East China Sea, The Bering Sea, Lake Ashinoko and Usujiri intertidal zone. Primary producers, showed average δ15Nversus atmospheric nitrogen of +5.0%. (+3.4 to +7.5) in the Bering Sea and Lake Ashinoko, and +6.8%. (+6.0 to +7.6) in Usujiri intertidal zone. Blue green algae from the East China Sea show an average -0.55%. (-0.8 to +1.2). All consumers, Zooplankton, fish and bird exhibited Stepwise enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level. The 15N enrichment at a single feeding process ranged from +1.3 to +5.3 averaging +3.4 ± 1.1%.. This isotopic fractionation seems to be independent of habitat. The effect of age in animals was obtained by analyzing two marine mussels. The soft tissue nitrogen showed +2.0%. enrichment relative to that of primary producers, and the magnitude was almost constant with shell ages ranging from 0 to 8 years. A similar 15N enrichment occurs in all Molluscs, Crustaceans, Insecta, Amphibia, Fish, Ave and Mammal species regardless of the difference in the form of excreted nitrogen and in laboratory cultured fish, brine shrimp and mice (+2.9 to +4.9%.). The excreted ammonia from guppy was sufficiently light to balance the concentration of 15N to animal body.

  18. Synthesis of 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogen 15-N-acetylglucosaminides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, E; Namba, S; Kurihara, H; Goto, J; Matsuki, Y; Nambara, T

    1995-03-01

    The synthesis of 15-N-acetylglucosaminides of 15 alpha-hydroxyesterone, 15 alpha-hydroxyestradiol, and 15 alpha-hydroxyestriol (estetrol) is described. The latter two were prepared by condensation of 2-acetamido-1 alpha-chloro-1,2-dideoxy-3,4,6-trio-O-acetyl-D-glucopyranose with appropriately protected 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogens by the Koenigs-Knorr reaction employing cadmium carbonate as a catalyst. Subsequent removal of protecting groups with methanolic potassium hydroxide provided the desired conjugates. 15 alpha-Hydroxyestrone 15-N-acetylglucosaminide was synthesized from the corresponding 15 alpha-hydroxyestradiol derivative by Jones oxidation followed by brief alkaline hydrolysis. These conjugates underwent enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Jack beans to produce 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogens. PMID:7792832

  19. Automated microbial metabolism laboratory. [design of advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into test chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design and rationale of an advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into each of four test chambers are outlined. The feasibility for multiple addition tests was established and various details of the methodology were studied. The four chamber battery of tests include: (1) determination of the effect of various atmospheric gases and selection of that gas which produces an optimum response; (2) determination of the effect of incubation temperature and selection of the optimum temperature for performing Martian biochemical tests; (3) sterile soil is dosed with a battery of C-14 labeled substrates and subjected to experimental temperature range; and (4) determination of the possible inhibitory effects of water on Martian organisms is performed initially by dosing with 0.01 ml and 0.5 ml of medium, respectively. A series of specifically labeled substrates are then added to obtain patterns in metabolic 14CO2 (C-14)O2 evolution.

  20. Marking Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) With Rubidium or 15N.

    PubMed

    Klick, J; Yang, W Q; Bruck, D J

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) has caused significant economic damage to berry and stone fruit production regions. Markers that are systemic in plants and easily transferred to target organisms are needed to track D. suzukii exploitation of host resources and trophic interactions. High and low concentrations of the trace element, rubidium (Rb), and the stable isotope, 15N, were tested to mark D. suzukii larvae feeding on fruits of enriched strawberry plants grown in containers under greenhouse conditions. Fly marker content and proportion of flies marked 1, 7, and 14 d after emergence from enriched fruits and fly dry mass were analyzed. Nearly 100% of the flies analyzed 14 d after emerging from 15N-enriched plants were marked, whereas only 30-75% and 0-3% were marked 14 d after emerging from high and low Rb concentration plants, respectively. Rapid Rb decay, strong 15N persistence, and the economics of using these markers in the field to elucidate D. suzukii pest ecology are discussed. PMID:26470275

  1. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported.

  2. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  3. Application of (13)C and (15)N stable isotope probing to characterize RDX degrading microbial communities under different electron-accepting conditions.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Lee, Do Gyun; Fuller, Mark E; Hatzinger, Paul B; Condee, Charles W; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2015-10-30

    This study identified microorganisms capable of using the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) or its metabolites as carbon and/or nitrogen sources under different electron-accepting conditions using (13)C and (15)N stable isotope probing (SIP). Mesocosms were constructed using groundwater and aquifer solids from an RDX-contaminated aquifer. The mesocosms received succinate as a carbon source and one of four electron acceptors (nitrate, manganese(IV), iron(III), or sulfate) or no additional electron acceptor (to stimulate methanogenesis). When RDX degradation was observed, subsamples from each mesocosm were removed and amended with (13)C3- or ring-(15)N3-, nitro-(15)N3-, or fully-labeled (15)N6-RDX, followed by additional incubation and isolation of labeled nucleic acids. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA sequences, clustering in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, Clostridia, and Actinobacteria, were detected in the (13)C-DNA fractions. A total of twenty seven sequences were derived from different (15)N-DNA fractions, with the sequences clustered in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, and Clostridia. Interestingly, sequences identified as Desulfosporosinus sp. (in the Clostridia) were not only observed to incorporate the labeled (13)C or (15)N from labeled RDX, but also were detected under each of the different electron-accepting conditions. The data suggest that (13)C- and (15)N-SIP can be used to characterize microbial communities involved in RDX biodegradation, and that the dominant pathway of RDX biodegradation may differ under different electron-accepting conditions. PMID:25935409

  4. An automated growth enclosure for metabolic labeling of Arabidopsis thaliana with 13C-carbon dioxide - an in vivo labeling system for proteomics and metabolomics research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Labeling whole Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants to high enrichment with 13C for proteomics and metabolomics applications would facilitate experimental approaches not possible by conventional methods. Such a system would use the plant's native capacity for carbon fixation to ubiquitously incorporate 13C from 13CO2 gas. Because of the high cost of 13CO2 it is critical that the design conserve the labeled gas. Results A fully enclosed automated plant growth enclosure has been designed and assembled where the system simultaneously monitors humidity, temperature, pressure and 13CO2 concentration with continuous adjustment of humidity, pressure and 13CO2 levels controlled by a computer running LabView software. The enclosure is mounted on a movable cart for mobility among growth environments. Arabidopsis was grown in the enclosure for up to 8 weeks and obtained on average >95 atom% enrichment for small metabolites, such as amino acids and >91 atom% for large metabolites, including proteins and peptides. Conclusion The capability of this labeling system for isotope dilution experiments was demonstrated by evaluation of amino acid turnover using GC-MS as well as protein turnover using LC-MS/MS. Because this 'open source' Arabidopsis 13C-labeling growth environment was built using readily available materials and software, it can be adapted easily to accommodate many different experimental designs. PMID:21310072

  5. Uptake and metabolism of radioactively labeled sphingomyelin in cultured skin fibroblasts from controls and patients with Niemann-Pick disease and other lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, T; Velkoff, M A; Wenger, D A

    1983-11-01

    The metabolism of [stearoyl-1-14C]- and [choline-methyl-14C]sphingomyelin, [stearoyl-1-14C]ceramide-1-phospho-N,N-dimethylethanolamine (demethylsphingomyelin) and [choline-methyl-14C]phosphatidylcholine was measured 1, 3 and 5 days after uptake from the media of cultured skin fibroblasts. This was done to measure the relative contributions of lysosomal sphingomyelinase and plasma membrane phosphocholine transferase on the metabolism of sphingomyelin, a component of all cell membranes. By using cell lines from controls and from patients with Niemann-Pick disease and other lysosomal storage diseases, it was concluded that a significant portion (10-15%) of the observed degradation of sphingomyelin is due to exchange of the phosphocholine moiety producing phosphatidylcholine. Although cell lines from type A and B Niemann-Pick disease have only 0-2% of lysosomal sphingomyelinase activity measured in vitro, three cell lines from type B Niemann-Pick disease could metabolize 54.4% of the labeled sphingomyelin by day 3 while cell lines from type A Niemann-Pick disease could only metabolize 18.5% by day 3. This compares to 86.7% metabolized in control cells by day 3. Cells from one patient with juvenile Niemann-Pick disease and one with type D Niemann-Pick disease metabolized sphingomyelin normally while cells from two other patients with juvenile or type C Niemann-Pick disease could only metabolize 58.2% by day 3. Cells from patients with I-cell disease and 'lactosylceramidosis' also demonstrated decreased metabolism of sphingomyelin (55.1 and 54.9% by day 3, respectively). Cells from the patient with Farber disease accumulated [14C]stearic acid-labeled ceramide produced from [14C]sphingomyelin. Studies with choline-labeled sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine demonstrated that phosphocholine exchange takes place in either direction in the cells, and this is normal in Niemann-Pick disease. Studies in cells from patients with all clinical types of sphingomyelinase

  6. Conformation of alamethicin in oriented phospholipid bilayers determined by (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Bak, M; Bywater, R P; Hohwy, M; Thomsen, J K; Adelhorst, K; Jakobsen, H J; Sørensen, O W; Nielsen, N C

    2001-01-01

    The conformation of the 20-residue antibiotic ionophore alamethicin in macroscopically oriented phospholipid bilayers has been studied using (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Differently (15)N-labeled variants of alamethicin and an analog with three of the alpha-amino-isobutyric acid residues replaced by alanines have been investigated to establish experimental structural constraints and determine the orientation of alamethicin in hydrated phospholipid (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) bilayers and to investigate the potential for a major kink in the region of the central Pro(14) residue. From the anisotropic (15)N chemical shifts and (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings determined for alamethicin with (15)N-labeling on the Ala(6), Val(9), and Val(15) residues and incorporated into phospholipid bilayer with a peptide:lipid molar ratio of 1:8, we deduce that alamethicin has a largely linear alpha-helical structure spanning the membrane with the molecular axis tilted by 10-20 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In particular, we find compatibility with a straight alpha-helix tilted by 17 degrees and a slightly kinked molecular dynamics structure tilted by 11 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In contrast, the structural constraints derived by solid-state NMR appear not to be compatible with any of several model structures crossing the membrane with vanishing tilt angle or the earlier reported x-ray diffraction structure (Fox and Richards, Nature. 300:325-330, 1982). The solid-state NMR-compatible structures may support the formation of a left-handed and parallel multimeric ion channel. PMID:11509381

  7. Experimental evidence for diel δ15N-patterns in different tissues, xylem and phloem saps of castor bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    PubMed

    Peuke, A D; Gessler, A; Tcherkez, G

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen isotope signatures in plants might give insights in the metabolism and allocation of nitrogen. To obtain a deeper understanding of the modifications of the nitrogen isotope signatures, we determined δ(15)N in transport saps and in different fractions of leaves, axes and roots during a diel course along the plant axis. The most significant diel variations were observed in xylem and phloem saps where δ(15)N was significantly higher during the day compared with during the night. However in xylem saps, this was observed only in the canopy, but not at the hypocotyl positions. In the canopy, δ(15)N was correlated fairly well between phloem and xylem saps. These variations in δ(15)N in transport saps can be attributed to nitrate reduction in leaves during the photoperiod as well as to (15)N-enriched glutamine acting as transport form of N. δ(15)N of the water soluble fraction of roots and leaves partially affected δ(15)N of phloem and xylems saps. δ(15)N patterns are likely the result of a complex set of interactions and N-fluxes between plant organs. Furthermore, the natural nitrogen isotope abundance in plant tissue is not constant during the diel course - a fact that needs to be taken into account when sampling for isotopic studies.

  8. Natural (15)N Abundance in Key Amino Acids from Lamb Muscle: Exploring a New Horizon in Diet Authentication and Assessment of Feed Efficiency in Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, Gonzalo; Ortigues-Marty, Isabelle; Schiphorst, Anne-Marie; Robins, Richard J; Tea, Illa; Prache, Sophie

    2016-05-25

    Natural (15)N abundance (δ(15)N) varies between individual amino acids (AAs). We hypothesized that δ(15)N of nontransaminating and essential AAs ("source" AAs, such as phenylalanine) present in animal tissues could be used as a marker of dietary origin, whereas δ(15)N of transaminating AAs ("trophic" AAs, such as glutamic acid) could give more detailed insights into animal feed efficiency. Two diets based on dehydrated Lucerne pellets were tested in growing lambs, which promoted different feed efficiencies. No dietary effects were noted on δ(15)N of any AAs analyzed in lamb muscle. In addition, δ(15)N of phenylalanine was unexpectedly similar to that of glutamic acid, suggesting that δ(15)N of AAs is significantly derived from the metabolism of the rumen microbiota and, thus, are not suited for diet authentication in ruminants. In contrast, the δ(15)N of transaminating AAs facilitates an improved prediction of animal feed efficiency compared to the classical isotopic bulk N analysis. PMID:27148901

  9. Localization of 15N uptake in a Tibetan alpine Kobresia pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleuß, Per-Marten; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    The Kobresia Pygmea ecotone covers approximately 450.000 km2 and is of large global and regional importance due several socio-ecological aspects. For instance Kobresia pastures store high amounts of carbon, nitrogen and other nutrients, represent large grazing areas for herbivores, provide a fast regrowth after grazing events and protect against mechanical degradation and soil erosion. However, Kobresia pastures are assumed to be a grazing induced and are accompanied with distinct root mats varying in thickness between 5-30 cm. Yet, less is known about the morphology and the functions of this root mats, especially in the background of a progressing degradation due to changes of climate and management. Thus we aimed to identify the importance of single soil layers for plant nutrition. Accordingly, nitrogen uptake from different soil depths and its remain in above-ground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB) and soil were determined by using a 15N pulse labeling approach during the vegetation period in summer 2012. 15N urea was injected into six different soil depths (0.5 cm, 2.5 cm, 7.5 cm, 12.5 cm, 17.5 cm, 22.5 cm / for each 4 replicates) and plots were sampled 45 days after the labeling. For soil and BGB samples were taken in strict sample intervals of 0-1 cm, 1-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-15 cm, 15-20 cm, 20-25 cm. Results indicate that total recovery (including AGB, BGB and soil) was highest, if tracer was injected into the top 5 cm and subsequently decreased with decreasing injection depth. This is especially the case for the 15N recovery of BGB, which is clearly attributed to the root density and strongly decreased with soil depth. In contrast, the root activity derived from the 15N content of roots increased with soil depth, which is primary associated to a proportionate increase of living roots related to dead roots. However, most 15N was captured in plant biomass (67.5-85.3 % of total recovery), indicating high 15N uptake efficiency possibly due to N limitation

  10. Nitrate Reduction in a Groundwater Microcosm Determined by 15N Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Göran; Annadotter, Heléne

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic groundwater continuous-flow microcosms were designed to study nitrate reduction by the indigenous bacteria in intact saturated soil cores from a sandy aquifer with a concentration of 3.8 mg of NO3−-N liter−1. Traces of 15NO3− were added to filter-sterilized groundwater by using a Darcy flux of 4 cm day−1. Both assimilatory and dissimilatory reduction rates were estimated from analyses of 15N2, 15N2O, 15NH4+, and 15N-labeled protein amino acids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. N2 and N2O were separated on a megabore fused-silica column and quantified by electron impact-selected ion monitoring. NO3− and NH4+ were analyzed as pentafluorobenzoyl amides by multiple-ion monitoring and protein amino acids as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl ester derivatives by negative ion-chemical ionization. The numbers of bacteria and their [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation rates were simultaneously measured. Nitrate was completely reduced in the microcosms at a rate of about 250 ng g−1 day−1. Of this nitrate, 80 to 90% was converted by aerobic denitrification to N2, whereas only 35% was denitrified in the anaerobic microcosm, where more than 50% of NO3− was reduced to NH4+. Assimilatory reduction was recorded only in the aerobic microcosm, where N appeared in alanine in the cells. The nitrate reduction rates estimated for the aquifer material were low in comparison with rates in eutrophic lakes and coastal sediments but sufficiently high to remove nitrate from an uncontaminated aquifer of the kind examined in less than 1 month. PMID:16348048

  11. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  12. Measuring denitrification after grassland renewal and grassland conversion to cropland by using the 15N gas-flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchen, Caroline; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Flessa, Heinz; Giesemann, Anette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    Denitrification, the reduction of oxidized forms of inorganic N to N2O and N2 is an important pathway of gaseous nitrogen losses. Measuring denitrification, especially the reduction of N2O to N2, expressed in the product ratio (N2O/(N2O + N2)), is rather difficult and hence rarely performed under field conditions. But using the 15N gas-flux method allows determining N transformation processes in their natural environment. In order to develop effective climate mitigation strategies understanding the N2O source is essential. We used the 15N gas-flux method to determine N2O and N2 emissions following grassland renewal and conversion techniques. Therefore we selected three different treatments: control (C), mechanical grassland renovation (GR) (autumn 2013) and grassland conversion to maize (GM) (spring 2014) from field plot trials on two different sites (Histic Gleysoil and Plaggic Anthrosol) near Oldenburg, Lower Saxony, Germany. We applied 15N labeled KNO3- (60 atom. % 15N) at a rate equivalent to common farming practices (150 kg N*ha-1) using needle injection of fertilizer solution in three different depths (10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm) for homogeneous soil labeling up to 30 cm in microplots. During the first 10 days after application (May 2014) gas flux measurements from closed chambers were performed every second day and then weekly following a period of 8 weeks. Gas samples were analyzed for δ15N of N2 and N2O by IRMS according to Lewicka-Szczebak et al. (2013). Concentration and 15N enrichment of NO3- in soil water was determined on weekly samples using the SPIN-MAS technique (Stange et al. 2007). Fluxes of N2 and N2O evolved from the 15N labeled soil nitrogen pool were calculated using the equations of Spott et al. (2006). Peak events of N2 and N2O emissions occurred during the first 10 days of measurement, showing differences in soil types, as well as treatment variations. N2 fluxes up to 178 g*ha-1*day-1 and N2O fluxes up to 280 g*ha-1*day-1 were measured on the

  13. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of murine amelogenin, an enamel biomineralization protein.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Bekhazi, Jacky G.; Cort, John R.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2008-06-01

    Amelogenin is the predominant matrix protein in developing dental enamel. Making extensive use of residue-specific 15N-labeled amino acids samples, the majority of the main and side chain resonances for murine amelogenin were assigned in 2% aqueous acetic acid at pH 3.0. This research was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the US-DOE. A large part of this research was performed at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

  14. Human baby hair amino acid natural abundance 15N-isotope values are not related to the 15N-isotope values of amino acids in mother's breast milk protein.

    PubMed

    Romek, Katarzyna M; Julien, Maxime; Frasquet-Darrieux, Marine; Tea, Illa; Antheaume, Ingrid; Hankard, Régis; Robins, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    Since exclusively breast-suckled infants obtain their nutrient only from their mother's milk, it might be anticipated that a correlation will exist between the (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios of amino acids of protein of young infants and those supplied by their mother. The work presented here aimed to determine whether amino nitrogen transfer from human milk to infant hair protein synthesized within the first month of life conserves the maternal isotopic signature or whether post-ingestion fractionation dominates the nitrogen isotope spectrum. The study was conducted at 1 month post-birth on 100 mother-infant pairs. Isotope ratios (15)N/(14)N and (13)C/(12)C were measured using isotope ratio measurement by Mass Spectrometry (irm-MS) for whole maternal milk, and infant hair and (15)N/(14)N ratios were also measured by GC-irm-MS for the N-pivaloyl-O-isopropyl esters of amino acids obtained from the hydrolysis of milk and hair proteins. The δ(15)N and δ(13)C (‰) were found to be significantly higher in infant hair than in breast milk (δ(15)N, P < 0.001; δ(13)C, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the δ(15)N (‰) of individual amino acids in infant hair was also significantly higher than that in maternal milk (P < 0.001). By calculation, the observed shift in isotope ratio was shown not to be accounted for by the amino acid composition of hair and milk proteins, indicating that it is not simply due to differences in the composition in the proteins present. Rather, it would appear that each pool-mother and infant-turns over independently, and that fractionation in infant N-metabolism even in the first month of life dominates over the nutrient N-content.

  15. Increasing plant use of organic nitrogen with elevation is reflected in nitrogen uptake rates and ecosystem delta15N.

    PubMed

    Averill, Colin; Finzi, Adrien

    2011-04-01

    It is hypothesized that decreasing mean annual temperature and rates of nitrogen (N) cycling causes plants to switch from inorganic to organic forms of N as the primary mode of N nutrition. To test this hypothesis, we conducted field experiments and collected natural-abundance delta15N signatures of foliage, soils, and ectomycorrhizal sporocarps along a steep elevation-climate gradient in the White Mountains, New Hampshire, USA. Here we show that with increasing elevation organic forms of N became the dominant source of N taken up by hardwood and coniferous tree species based on dual-labeled glycine uptake analysis, an important confirmation of an emerging theory for the biogeochemistry of the N cycle. Variation in natural abundance foliar delta15N with elevation was also consistent with increasing organic N uptake, though a simple, mass balance model demonstrated that the uptake of delta15N depleted inorganic N, rather than fractionation upon transfer of N from mycorrhizal fungi, best explains variations in foliar delta15N with elevation.

  16. Solid-phase peptide synthesis and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of (Ala/sup 3/-/sup 15/N)(Val/sup 1/)gramicidin A

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, G.B.; Fields, C.G.; Petefish, J.; Van Wart, H.E.; Cross, T.A.

    1988-03-01

    (Ala/sup 3-15/N)(Val/sup 1/)Gramicidin A has been prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis and studied by solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The synthesis of desformyl(Ala/sup 3-15/N)(Val/sup 1/)gramicidin A employed N-hydroxysuccinimide esters of 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-N/sup ..cap alpha../-amino acids and completely avoided the use of acid. Since deblocking was done with piperidine and the peptide was removed from the resin by treatment with ethanolamine, this synthetic protocol prevented oxidation of the indole rings of this tryptophan-rich peptide and reduced truncations produced by acid hydrolysis. After formylation and purification by anion-exchange and high-pressure liquid chromatography, the peptide was obtained in an overall yield of 30%. Solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of this peptide and uniformly labeled (/sup 15/N)gramicidin A' oriented in hydrated lipid bilayers have been obtained, allowing unambiguous assignment of the (/sup 15/N)Ala/sup 3/ resonance in the latter. The solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance experiments provide evidence that (Val/sup 1/)gramicidin A is rotating about an axis that is perpendicular to the plane of the lipid bilayer and that the N-H axis is nearly parallel with the rotational axis. This study demonstrates that site-specifically labeled (/sup 15/N)gramicidin A analogs prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis are valuable tools in the study of the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of samples in oriented lipid bilayers.

  17. PARTITIONING THE RELATIVE INFLUENCE OF SOIL N, MYCORRHIZAE, AND FOLIAR N UPTAKE ON FOLIAR δ15N PATTERNS: CAN WE DETECT FOLIAR UPTAKE OF REACTIVE N?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallano, D.; Sparks, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation is an important sink for atmospheric reactive N in N-limited systems and may be capable of incorporating reactive N compounds directly into leaves through the foliar uptake pathway. A proxy for atmospheric reactive N entering vegetation would be useful to estimate the impact of direct foliar N uptake on plant metabolism. Natural abundance foliar N isotopic composition (δ15N) is a practical tool for this purpose because plant-available N sources often have different isotopic compositions. Current understanding of foliar δ15N suggests these values primarily represent the integration of soil δ15N, direct foliar N uptake, mycorrhizal fractionation, and within-plant fractionations. Using a potted plant mesocosm system, we estimated the influence of mycorrhizae on foliar δ15N patterns in red maple (Acer rubrum) seedlings along an N deposition gradient in New York State. We found that mycorrhizal associations altered foliar δ15N in red maple seedlings from 0.03 - 1.01‰ across sites. Along the same temporal and spatial scales, we examined the influence of soil δ15N, foliar N uptake, and mycorrhizae on foliar δ15N in adult stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), black birch (Betula lenta), red maple (A. rubrum), and red oak (Quercus rubra). Using multiple regression models, atmospheric NO2 concentration explained 0%, 69%, 23%, and 45% of the residual variation in foliar δ15N remaining in American beech, red maple, red oak, and black birch, respectively, after accounting for soil δ15N. Our results suggest that foliar δ15N may be used to estimate pollution-derived atmospheric reactive N entering vegetation via the foliar N uptake pathway.

  18. Comprehensive analysis of collagen metabolism in vitro using (4(/sup 3/H))/(/sup 14/C)proline dual-labeling and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, J.F.; Harley, V.; Chan, D.; Cole, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    A method to simultaneously quantify the production, secretion, and prolyl hydroxylation of individual types of collagen in cell culture samples has been developed. Collagens were biosynthetically labeled with a mixture of (/sup 14/C)proline and (4-/sup 3/H)proline. The labeled collagens were isolated and their component alpha-chains were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Migration of the collagen alpha-chains was determined by fluorography, and radioactivity in excised bands was quantified by scintillation counting. (/sup 14/C)Proline labeling of collagen chains was used to determine the production and secretion of the different types of collagen. The ratios of the component alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) chains of type I collagen were also determined in this way. Prolyl hydroxylation of collagen alpha-chains was readily determined by measurement of their /sup 3/H:/sup 14/C ratios. Following 4-hydroxylation, /sup 3/H was lost from the (4-3H)proline with alteration of this ratio. This dual-labeling method is suitable for the comprehensive analysis of collagen metabolism in multiple samples.

  19. Plant cell wall imaging by metabolic click-mediated labelling of rhamnogalacturonan II using azido 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Marie; Lehner, Arnaud; Vauzeilles, Boris; Malassis, Julien; Marchant, Alan; Smyth, Kevin; Linclau, Bruno; Baron, Aurélie; Mas Pons, Jordi; Anderson, Charles T; Schapman, Damien; Galas, Ludovic; Mollet, Jean-Claude; Lerouge, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    In plants, 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) is a monosaccharide that is only found in the cell wall pectin, rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II). Incubation of 4-day-old light-grown Arabidopsis seedlings or tobacco BY-2 cells with 8-azido 8-deoxy Kdo (Kdo-N3 ) followed by coupling to an alkyne-containing fluorescent probe resulted in the specific in muro labelling of RG-II through a copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. CMP-Kdo synthetase inhibition and competition assays showing that Kdo and D-Ara, a precursor of Kdo, but not L-Ara, inhibit incorporation of Kdo-N3 demonstrated that incorporation of Kdo-N3 occurs in RG-II through the endogenous biosynthetic machinery of the cell. Co-localisation of Kdo-N3 labelling with the cellulose-binding dye calcofluor white demonstrated that RG-II exists throughout the primary cell wall. Additionally, after incubating plants with Kdo-N3 and an alkynated derivative of L-fucose that incorporates into rhamnogalacturonan I, co-localised fluorescence was observed in the cell wall in the elongation zone of the root. Finally, pulse labelling experiments demonstrated that metabolic click-mediated labelling with Kdo-N3 provides an efficient method to study the synthesis and redistribution of RG-II during root growth. PMID:26676799

  20. Metabolism of fatty acid-labeled cerebroside sulfate in cultured cells from controls and metachromatic leukodystrophy patients. Use in the prenatal identification of a false positive fetus.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, T; Sattler, M; Malmstrom, J; Bitter, M A; Wenger, D A

    1981-11-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy is the name given to a group of diseases in patients having a deficiency of CS sulfatase activity. The diagnosis usually can be made by using leukocytes, urine, and cultured skin fibroblasts. The low level of enzyme activity can be measured with an artificial substrate, NCS, or suitably labeled CS. In a number of families, healthy carriers of this autosomal recessive disease have been found to have enzyme levels near those of affected patients. We prepared (14)C-stearic acid-labeled CS and studied its metabolism in cultured human cells from patients and controls, In vitro, CS sulfatase requires bile salts to stimulate the enzymatic reaction. The (14)C-CS also can be added to the medium on cultured cells, and its metabolism in the cells can be followed without the addition of bile salts. A child with late infantile MLD was identified by studies on urine and leukocytes. Studies on leukocytes from the parents revealed a very low enzyme level in the father (false positive) and a typical carrier level in the mother. A pregnancy in this family was monitored, and in vitro studies on cultured AFC revealed low CS and NCS sulfatase levels. However, the addition of (14)C-CS to the culture medium revealed normal metabolism in these cells. An unaffected fetus was predicted on the basis of the cell feeding studies. The couple elected to abort this pregnancy, and studies on the fetus confirmed it would not have been affected with MLD.

  1. Production of stable isotope-labeled acyl-coenzyme A thioesters by yeast stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Nathaniel W; Tombline, Gregory; Worth, Andrew J; Parry, Robert C; Silvers, Jacob A; Gillespie, Kevin P; Basu, Sankha S; Millen, Jonathan; Goldfarb, David S; Blair, Ian A

    2015-04-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters are key metabolites in numerous anabolic and catabolic pathways, including fatty acid biosynthesis and β-oxidation, the Krebs cycle, and cholesterol and isoprenoid biosynthesis. Stable isotope dilution-based methodology is the "gold standard" for quantitative analyses by mass spectrometry. However, chemical synthesis of families of stable isotope-labeled metabolites such as acyl-CoA thioesters is impractical. Previously, we biosynthetically generated a library of stable isotope internal standard analogs of acyl-CoA thioesters by exploiting the essential requirement in mammals and insects for pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) as a metabolic precursor for the CoA backbone. By replacing pantothenic acid in the cell medium with commercially available [(13)C3(15)N1]-pantothenic acid, mammalian cells exclusively incorporated [(13)C3(15)N1]-pantothenate into the biosynthesis of acyl-CoA and acyl-CoA thioesters. We have now developed a much more efficient method for generating stable isotope-labeled CoA and acyl-CoAs from [(13)C3(15)N1]-pantothenate using stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture (SILEC) in Pan6-deficient yeast cells. Efficiency and consistency of labeling were also increased, likely due to the stringently defined and reproducible conditions used for yeast culture. The yeast SILEC method greatly enhances the ease of use and accessibility of labeled CoA thioesters and also provides proof of concept for generating other labeled metabolites in yeast mutants.

  2. Impacts of proline on the central metabolism of an industrial erythromycin-producing strain Saccharopolyspora erythraea via (13)C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Huang, Mingzhi; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-08-10

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea E3 is an important industrial strain for erythromycin production and knowledge on its metabolism is limited. In the present work, (13)C labeling experiments were conducted to characterize the metabolism of S. erythraea E3. We found that S. erythraea E3 was difficult to grow on minimal medium with glucose as sole carbon source and the addition of proline remarkably improved the cell growth. The activity of EMP pathway was very low and ED pathway was alternatively the main glucose utilization pathway. The addition of proline resulted in remarkable changes in the fluxes of central metabolism. The fluxes in PP pathway, in TCA cycle and in ED pathway were 90% higher, 64% and 31% lower on Glc/Pro than on Glc, respectively. The maintenance energy on Glc/Pro was 58.4% lower than that on Glc. The energy charge was lower on Glc than on Glc/Pro, indicating that the cells on Glc suffered from energy burden. This study elucidates the impacts of proline on the central metabolism of S. erythraea and deepens the understanding of its metabolism. PMID:27215341

  3. Impacts of proline on the central metabolism of an industrial erythromycin-producing strain Saccharopolyspora erythraea via (13)C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Huang, Mingzhi; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-08-10

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea E3 is an important industrial strain for erythromycin production and knowledge on its metabolism is limited. In the present work, (13)C labeling experiments were conducted to characterize the metabolism of S. erythraea E3. We found that S. erythraea E3 was difficult to grow on minimal medium with glucose as sole carbon source and the addition of proline remarkably improved the cell growth. The activity of EMP pathway was very low and ED pathway was alternatively the main glucose utilization pathway. The addition of proline resulted in remarkable changes in the fluxes of central metabolism. The fluxes in PP pathway, in TCA cycle and in ED pathway were 90% higher, 64% and 31% lower on Glc/Pro than on Glc, respectively. The maintenance energy on Glc/Pro was 58.4% lower than that on Glc. The energy charge was lower on Glc than on Glc/Pro, indicating that the cells on Glc suffered from energy burden. This study elucidates the impacts of proline on the central metabolism of S. erythraea and deepens the understanding of its metabolism.

  4. Creating 13C- and 15N-enriched tree leaf litter for decomposition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlavecz, K. A.; Pitz, S.; Chang, C.; Bernard, M.

    2013-12-01

    Labeling plant material with heavy isotopes of carbon and nitrogen can produce a traceable nutrient signal that can be followed into the different trophic levels and decomposer food web. We treated 60 tree saplings with 13C-enriched CO2 gas and 15N-enriched ammonium nitrate over a three-month period to create dually-labeled plant material for future decomposition experiments. The trees included both early (Red maple, Sweetgum, Tulip poplar) and late (American beech, White oak) successional deciduous tree species, and a conifer, White pine. We constructed a 2.4 m × 2.4 m × 2.4 m environmental chamber that was climate-controlled using an air conditioning system. An Arduino microcontroller interfaced with a Vaisala GMP343 CO2 probe maintained a CO2 concentration between 500-520 ppm by controlling a solenoid valve on the CO2 tank regulator. The trees were placed into the chamber in August 2012 and remained until senescence unless they were lost to death or disease. Ammonium nitrate was added twice, in September and October. Leaf samples were collected prior to the start of the experiment and after senescence, whereas root samples were collected only in December. Samples were dried, ground and analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. American beech and White oak had 40% mortality, and 34% of tulip poplar trees were removed because of powdery mildew overgrowth or death. Most tulip poplar trees exhibited a second leaf out following senescence in late September. Nearly 1 kg of litter was produced with tulip poplar representing over half of the total mass. Levels of enrichment varied greatly by species. Beech (-14.2‰) and White oak (-4.8‰) had low levels of enrichment in comparison to early successional species such as Sweetgum (41.7‰) and Tulip poplar (30.7‰ [first leaf fall] and 238.0‰ [second leaf fall]). Leaf enrichment with 15N followed a similar pattern, though it was achieved at a higher level with δ15N values varying from 271.6‰ to 1354.2

  5. Precision and sensitivity of the measurement of 15N enrichment in D-alanine from bacterial cell walls using positive/negative ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunlid, A.; Odham, G.; Findlay, R. H.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitive detection of cellular components from specific groups of microbes can be utilized as 'signatures' in the examination of microbial consortia from soils, sediments or biofilms. Utilizing capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and stereospecific derivatizing agents, D-alanine, a component localized in the prokaryotic (bacterial) cell wall, can be detected reproducibly. Enrichments of D-[15N]alanine determined in E. coli grown with [15N]ammonia can be determined with precision at 1.0 atom%. Chemical ionization with methane gas and the detection of negative ions (M - HF)- and (M - F or M + H - HF)- formed from the heptafluorobutyryl D-2 butanol ester of D-alanine allowed as little as 8 pg (90 fmol) to be detected reproducibly. This method can be utilized to define the metabolic activity in terms of 15N incorporation at the level of 10(3)-10(4) cells, as a function of the 15N-14N ratio.

  6. Norlittorine and norhyoscyamine identified as products of littorine and hyoscyamine metabolism by (13)C-labeling in Datura innoxia hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Al Balkhi, Mohamad Houssam; Schiltz, Séverine; Lesur, David; Lanoue, Arnaud; Wadouachi, Anne; Boitel-Conti, Michèle

    2012-02-01

    The presence of two compounds, norlittorine and norhyoscyamine, has been reported in leaves and roots of Datura innoxia; however their metabolic origin in the tropane alkaloid pathway has remained unknown. Precise knowledge of this pathway is a necessary pre-requisite to optimize the production of hyoscyamine and scopolamine in D. innoxia hairy root cultures. The exact structure of norlittorine and norhyoscyamine was confirmed by LC-MS/MS and NMR analyses. Isotopic labeling experiments, using [1-(13)C]-phenylalanine, [1'-(13)C]-littorine and [1'-(13)C]-hyoscyamine, combined with elicitor treatments, using methyl jasmonate, coronalon and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, were used to investigate the metabolic origin of the N-demethylated tropane alkaloids. The results suggest that norlittorine and norhyoscyamine are induced under stress conditions by conversion of littorine and hyoscyamine. We propose the N-demethylation of tropane alkaloids as a mechanism to detoxify cells in overproducing conditions.

  7. Regional, seasonal and interspecific variation in 15N and 13C in sympatric mouse lemurs.

    PubMed

    Rakotondranary, S Jacques; Struck, Ulrich; Knoblauch, Christian; Ganzhorn, Jörg U

    2011-11-01

    Madagascar provides some of the rare examples where two or more primate species of the same genus and with seemingly identical niche requirements occur in sympatry. If congeneric primate species co-occur in other parts of the world, they differ in size in a way that is consistent with Hutchinson's rule for coexisting species, or they occupy different ecological niches. In some areas of Madagascar, mouse lemurs do not follow these "rules" and thus seem to violate one of the principles of community ecology. In order to understand the mechanisms that allow coexistence of sympatric congeneric species without obvious niche differentiation, we studied food composition of two identical sized omnivorous mouse lemur species, Microcebus griseorufus and M. murinus with the help of stable isotope analyses (δ(15)N and δ(13)C). The two species are closely related sister species. During the rich season, when food seems abundant, the two species do not differ in their nitrogen isotope composition, indicating that the two species occupy the same trophic level. But they differ in their δ(13)C values, indicating that M. griseorufus feeds more on C(4) and CAM (Crassulacean-acid-metabolism) plants than M. murinus. During the lean season, M. murinus has lower δ(15)N values, indicating that the two species feed at different trophic levels during times of food shortage. Hybrids between the two species showed intermediate food composition. The results reflect subtle differences in foraging or metabolic adaptations that are difficult to quantify by traditional observations but that represent possibilities to allow coexistence of species. PMID:21881908

  8. Regional, seasonal and interspecific variation in 15N and 13C in sympatric mouse lemurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotondranary, S. Jacques; Struck, Ulrich; Knoblauch, Christian; Ganzhorn, Jörg U.

    2011-11-01

    Madagascar provides some of the rare examples where two or more primate species of the same genus and with seemingly identical niche requirements occur in sympatry. If congeneric primate species co-occur in other parts of the world, they differ in size in a way that is consistent with Hutchinson's rule for coexisting species, or they occupy different ecological niches. In some areas of Madagascar, mouse lemurs do not follow these "rules" and thus seem to violate one of the principles of community ecology. In order to understand the mechanisms that allow coexistence of sympatric congeneric species without obvious niche differentiation, we studied food composition of two identical sized omnivorous mouse lemur species, Microcebus griseorufus and M. murinus with the help of stable isotope analyses ( δ 15N and δ 13C). The two species are closely related sister species. During the rich season, when food seems abundant, the two species do not differ in their nitrogen isotope composition, indicating that the two species occupy the same trophic level. But they differ in their δ 13C values, indicating that M. griseorufus feeds more on C4 and CAM (Crassulacean-acid-metabolism) plants than M. murinus. During the lean season, M. murinus has lower δ 15N values, indicating that the two species feed at different trophic levels during times of food shortage. Hybrids between the two species showed intermediate food composition. The results reflect subtle differences in foraging or metabolic adaptations that are difficult to quantify by traditional observations but that represent possibilities to allow coexistence of species.

  9. Nitrogen Dynamics in Stream Wood Samples Incubated with [14C]Lignocellulose and Potassium [15N]Nitrate †

    PubMed Central

    Aumen, Nicholas G.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Gregory, Stan V.

    1985-01-01

    Surface wood samples obtained from a Douglas fir log (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in a Pacific Northwest stream were incubated in vitro with [14C]lignocellulose in a defined mineral salts medium supplemented with 10 mg of N liter−1 of 15N-labeled NO3− (50 atom% 15N). Evolution of 14CO2, distribution and isotopic dilution of 15N, filtrate N concentrations, and the rates of denitrification, N2 fixation, and respiration were measured at 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation. The organic N content of the lignocellulose-wood sample mixture had increased from 132 μg of N to a maximum of 231 μg of N per treatment after 6 days of incubation. Rates of [14C]lignocellulose decomposition were greatest during the first 6 days and then began to decline over the remaining 12 days. Total CO2 evolution was also highest at day 6 and declined steadily over the remaining duration of the incubation. Filtrate NH4+-N increased from background levels to a final value of 57 μg of N per treatment. Filtrate NO3− N completely disappeared by day 6, and organic N showed a slight decline between days 12 and 18. The majority of the 15N that could be recovered appeared in the particulate organic fraction by day 6 (41 μg of N), and the filtrate NH4+ N fraction contained 11 μg of 15N by day 18. The 15N enrichment values of the filtrate NH4+ and the inorganic N associated with the particulate fraction had increased to approximately 20 atom% 15N by 18 days of incubation, whereas the particulate organic fraction reached its highest enrichment by day 6. Measurements of N2 fixation and denitrification indicated an insignificant gain or loss of N from the experimental system by these processes. The data show that woody debris in stream ecosystems might function as a rapid and efficient sink for exogenous N, resulting in stimulation of wood decomposition and subsequent activation of other N cycling processes. PMID:16346785

  10. The effect of noncollinearity of 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA tensors and rotational anisotropy on 15N relaxation, CSA/dipolar cross correlation, and TROSY.

    PubMed

    Fushman, D; Cowburn, D

    1999-02-01

    Current approaches to 15N relaxation in proteins assume that the 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA tensors are collinear. We show theoretically that, when there is significant anisotropy of molecular rotation, different orientations of the two tensors, experimentally observed in proteins, nucleic acids, and small peptides, will result in differences in site-specific correlation functions and spectral densities. The standard treatments of the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation of amide 15N nuclei, of the 15N CSA/15N-1H dipolar cross correlation, and of the TROSY experiment are extended to account for the effect of noncollinearity of the 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA (chemical shift anisotropy) tensors. This effect, proportional to the degree of anisotropy of the overall motion, (D parallel/D perpendicular - 1), is sensitive to the relative orientation of the two tensors and to the orientation of the peptide plane with respect to the diffusion coordinate frame. The effect is negligible at small degrees of anisotropy, but is predicted to become significant for D parallel/D perpendicular > or = 1.5, and at high magnetic fields. The effect of noncollinearity of 15N CSA and 15N-1H dipolar interaction is sensitive to both gross (hydrodynamic) properties and atomic-level details of protein structure. Incorporation of this effect into relaxation data analysis is likely to improve both precision and accuracy of the derived characteristics of protein dynamics, especially at high magnetic fields and for molecules with a high degree of anisotropy of the overall motion. The effect will also make TROSY efficiency dependent on local orientation in moderately anisotropic systems.

  11. /sup 13/N-labeled L-amino acids for in vivo assessment of local myocardial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, F.J.; Barrio, J.R.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.; MacDonald, N.S.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1981-06-01

    The hot cell synthesis of sterile, pyrogen-free /sup 13/N-labeled L-amino acids was accomplished by employing the appropriate immobilized enzymes on a CNBr-activated Sepharose support and using remote, semiautomated systems. The syntheses were completed 6-12 min after cyclotron production of (/sup 13/N)ammonia. Myocardial time-activity curves after intracoronary injection of /sup 13/N-labeled L-amino acids in dogs were triexponential in both normal and ischemic myocardium. Higher retention of /sup 13/N activity was observed in ischemic segments. Positron computed tomography imaging also showed increased uptake of /sup 13/N-labeled L-glutamate and L-alanine in ischemic segments compared with normal myocardium when blood flow corrections were made. Myocardial transaminases are primarily responsible for the observed retention fractions. It suggests the participation of the carbon skeletons of these amino acids in the Krebs cycle.

  12. Metabolic power of European starlings Sturnus vulgaris during flight in a wind tunnel, estimated from heat transfer modelling, doubly labelled water and mask respirometry.

    PubMed

    Ward, S; Möller, U; Rayner, J M V; Jackson, D M; Nachtigall, W; Speakman, J R

    2004-11-01

    It is technically demanding to measure the energetic cost of animal flight. Each of the previously available techniques has some disadvantage as well advantages. We compared measurements of the energetic cost of flight in a wind tunnel by four European starlings Sturnus vulgaris made using three independent techniques: heat transfer modelling, doubly labelled water (DLW) and mask respirometry. We based our heat transfer model on thermal images of the surface temperature of the birds and air flow past the body and wings calculated from wing beat kinematics. Metabolic power was not sensitive to uncertainty in the value of efficiency when estimated from heat transfer modelling. A change in the assumed value of whole animal efficiency from 0.19 to 0.07 (the range of estimates in previous studies) only altered metabolic power predicted from heat transfer modelling by 13%. The same change in the assumed value of efficiency would cause a 2.7-fold change in metabolic power if it were predicted from mechanical power. Metabolic power did not differ significantly between measurements made using the three techniques when we assumed an efficiency in the range 0.11-0.19, although the DLW results appeared to form a U-shaped power-speed curve while the heat transfer model and respirometry results increased linearly with speed. This is the first time that techniques for determining metabolic power have been compared using data from the same birds flying under the same conditions. Our data provide reassurance that all the techniques produce similar results and suggest that heat transfer modelling may be a useful method for estimating metabolic rate.

  13. Metabolic power of European starlings Sturnus vulgaris during flight in a wind tunnel, estimated from heat transfer modelling, doubly labelled water and mask respirometry.

    PubMed

    Ward, S; Möller, U; Rayner, J M V; Jackson, D M; Nachtigall, W; Speakman, J R

    2004-11-01

    It is technically demanding to measure the energetic cost of animal flight. Each of the previously available techniques has some disadvantage as well advantages. We compared measurements of the energetic cost of flight in a wind tunnel by four European starlings Sturnus vulgaris made using three independent techniques: heat transfer modelling, doubly labelled water (DLW) and mask respirometry. We based our heat transfer model on thermal images of the surface temperature of the birds and air flow past the body and wings calculated from wing beat kinematics. Metabolic power was not sensitive to uncertainty in the value of efficiency when estimated from heat transfer modelling. A change in the assumed value of whole animal efficiency from 0.19 to 0.07 (the range of estimates in previous studies) only altered metabolic power predicted from heat transfer modelling by 13%. The same change in the assumed value of efficiency would cause a 2.7-fold change in metabolic power if it were predicted from mechanical power. Metabolic power did not differ significantly between measurements made using the three techniques when we assumed an efficiency in the range 0.11-0.19, although the DLW results appeared to form a U-shaped power-speed curve while the heat transfer model and respirometry results increased linearly with speed. This is the first time that techniques for determining metabolic power have been compared using data from the same birds flying under the same conditions. Our data provide reassurance that all the techniques produce similar results and suggest that heat transfer modelling may be a useful method for estimating metabolic rate. PMID:15531650

  14. The economical synthesis of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine; preliminary conformational studies by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G; Middleton, David A; Henderson, Peter J F; Herbert, Richard B

    2003-06-21

    The synthesis of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine 11 was achieved as follows. An epimeric mixture of D-[1-(13)C]ribose 3 and D-[1-(13)C]arabinose 4 was obtained in excellent yield by condensation of K13CN with D-erythrose 2 using a modification of the Kiliani-Fischer synthesis. Efficient separation of the two aldose epimers was pivotally achieved by a novel ion-exchange (Sm3+) chromatography method. D-[2-(13)C]Ribose 5 was obtained from D-[1-(13)C]arabinose 4 using a Ni(II) diamine complex (nickel chloride plus TEMED). Combination of these procedures in a general cycling manner can lead to the very efficient preparation of specifically labelled 13C-monosaccharides of particular chirality. 15N-labelling was introduced in the preparation of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine 11 via [15N2]urea. Cross polarisation magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) were carried out on crystals of the labelled uridine to show that the inter-atomic distance between C-2' and N-1 is closely similar to that calculated from X-ray crystallographic data. The REDOR method will be used now to determine the conformation of bound substrates in the bacterial nucleoside transporters NupC and NupG.

  15. 15N Tracing Studies on In Vitro Reactions of Ferredoxin-Dependent Nitrite Reductase and Glutamate Synthase Using Reconstituted Electron Donation Systems.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Fujimori, Tamaki; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Hase, Toshiharu; Suzuki, Akira

    2015-06-01

    It is known that plants contain ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent nitrite reductase (NiR) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT). The Fd-NiR reaction produces ammonia from nitrite, and the activity is usually measured by nitrite disappearance. The Fd-GOGAT reaction forms two glutamates of different origin, from glutamine and 2-oxoglutarate, and the activity is measured by the oxidation of reductant (NADPH) or by formation of total glutamate. Here, a quantitative probe of the products and efficiency of the process was conducted using (15)N tracing techniques on these reactions in vitro. We quantified the reduction of (15)N-labeled [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] and the formation of [(15)N]glutamate and [(14)N]glutamate from [5-(15)N-amide]glutamine plus 2-oxoglutarate by NiR and GOGAT, respectively, with the reductant-Fd-NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR)-Fd system as the sequential electron donors. The supply of dithionite or NADPH to recombinant cyanobacterial NiR led to electron donation system-dependent formation of [(15)N]ammonium from [(15)N]nitrite. Addition of 20 mM NaCl and 20 mM Na-ascorbate accelerated nitrite reduction under high concentrations of NADPH. A sufficient supply of NADPH to recombinant Zea mays Fd-GOGAT generated complete GOGAT activity (transferring the [5-(15)N]amide of glutamine to 2-oxoglutarate to form [(15)N]glutamate), whereas a shortage of NADPH resulted in glutaminase activity only, which removed the amide from glutamine and released ammonia and [(14)N]glutamate. We conclude that although the recombinant Fd-GOGAT enzyme has two forms of glutamate synthesis, the first by glutaminase (ammonia release by glutamine amidotransferase) and the second by glutamate synthase (coupling of the ammonia and exogenously applied 2-oxoglutarate), the first works without NADPH, while the second is strictly dependent on NADPH availability.

  16. Retrospective characterization of ontogenetic shifts in killer whale diets via δ13C and δ15N analysis of teeth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsome, Seth D.; Etnier, Michael A.; Monson, Daniel H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolically inert, accretionary structures such as the dentin growth layers in teeth provide a life history record of individual diet with near-annual resolution. We constructed ontogenetic ??13C and ??15N profiles by analyzing tooth dentin growth layers from 13 individual killer whales Orcinus orca collected in the eastern northeast Pacific Ocean between 1961 and 2003. The individuals sampled were 6 to 52 yr old, representing 2 ecotypes-resident and transient - collected across ???25?? of latitude. The average isotopic values of transient individuals (n = 10) are consistent with a reliance on mammalian prey, while the average isotopic values of residents (n = 3) are consistent with piscivory. Regardless of ecotype, most individuals show a decrease in ??15N values of ???2.5% through the first 3 yr of life, roughly equivalent to a decrease of one trophic level. We interpret this as evidence of gradual weaning, after which, ontogenetic shifts in isotopic values are highly variable. A few individuals (n = 2) maintained relatively stable ??15N and ??13C values throughout the remainder of their lives, whereas ??15N values of most (n = 11) increased by ???1.5%, suggestive of an ontogenetic increase in trophic level. Significant differences in mean ??13C and ??15N values among transients collected off California suggest that individuality in prey preferences may be prevalent within this ecotype. Our approach provides retrospective individual life history and dietary information that cannot be obtained through traditional field observations of free-ranging and elusive species such as killer whales, including unique historic ecological information that pre-dates modern studies. By providing insights into individual diet composition, stable isotope analysis of teeth and/or bones may be the only means of evaluating a number of hypothesized historical dietary shifts in killer whales of the northeast Pacific Ocean. ?? Inter-Research 2009.

  17. Retrospective characterization of ontogenetic shifts in killer whale diets via δ13C and δ15N analysis of teeth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsome, Seth D.; Etnier, Michael A.; Monson, Daniel H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolically inert, accretionary structures such as the dentin growth layers in teeth provide a life history record of individual diet with near-annual resolution. We constructed ontogenetic δ13C and δ15N profiles by analyzing tooth dentin growth layers from 13 individual killer whales Orcinus orca collected in the eastern northeast Pacific Ocean between 1961 and 2003. The individuals sampled were 6 to 52 yr old, representing 2 ecotypes—resident and transient—collected across ~25° of latitude. The average isotopic values of transient individuals (n = 10) are consistent with a reliance on mammalian prey, while the average isotopic values of residents (n = 3) are consistent with piscivory. Regardless of ecotype, most individuals show a decrease in δ15N values of ~2.5‰ through the first 3 yr of life, roughly equivalent to a decrease of one trophic level. We interpret this as evidence of gradual weaning, after which, ontogenetic shifts in isotopic values are highly variable. A few individuals (n = 2) maintained relatively stable δ15N and δ13C values throughout the remainder of their lives, whereas δ15N values of most (n = 11) increased by ~1.5‰, suggestive of an ontogenetic increase in trophic level. Significant differences in mean δ13C and δ15N values among transients collected off California suggest that individuality in prey preferences may be prevalent within this ecotype. Our approach provides retrospective individual life history and dietary information that cannot be obtained through traditional field observations of free-ranging and elusive species such as killer whales, including unique historic ecological information that pre-dates modern studies. By providing insights into individual diet composition, stable isotope analysis of teeth and/or bones may be the only means of evaluating a number of hypothesized historical dietary shifts in killer whales of the northeast Pacific Ocean

  18. Development of a Microfluidic-Based Optical Sensing Device for Label-Free Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) Through Their Lactic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Lei, Kin-Fong; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Hsiao, Hung-Bo; Wang, Hung-Ming; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a microfluidic-based optical sensing device for label-free detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), a rare cell species in blood circulation. Based on the metabolic features of cancer cells, live CTCs can be quantified indirectly through their lactic acid production. Compared with the conventional schemes for CTC detection, this label-free approach could prevent the biological bias due to the heterogeneity of the surface antigens on cancer cells. In this study, a microfluidic device was proposed to generate uniform water-in-oil cell-encapsulating micro-droplets, followed by the fluorescence-based optical detection of lactic acid produced within the micro-droplets. To test its feasibility to quantify cancer cells, experiments were carried out. Results showed that the detection signals were proportional to the number of cancer cells within the micro-droplets, whereas such signals were insensitive to the existence and number of leukocytes within. To further demonstrate its feasibility for cancer cell detection, the cancer cells with known cell number in a cell suspension was detected based on the method. Results revealed that there was no significant difference between the detected number and the real number of cancer cells. As a whole, the proposed method opens up a new route to detect live CTCs in a label-free manner. PMID:25808775

  19. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  20. 15N2 formation and fast oxygen isotope exchange during pulsed 15N18O exposure of MnOx/CeO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-12-23

    Pulsing 15N18O onto an annealed 1% Mn16Ox/Ce16O2 catalyst resulted in very fast oxygen isotope exchange and 15N2 formation at 295 K. In the 1st 15N18O pulse, due to the presence of large number of surface oxygen defects, extensive 15N218O and 15N2 formations were observed. In subsequent pulses oxygen isotope exchange dominated as a result of highly labile oxygen in the oxide. We gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Vehicle Technologies Program for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  1. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Kennedy, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined.

  2. Differentiation of histidine tautomeric states using 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-08-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C, 15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture.

  3. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Udgaonkar, J B; Hosur, R V

    2000-10-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 degrees C, pH 6.6, using 15N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D [1H]-15N NMR spectroscopy. 15N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R2), and steady-state heteronuclear [1H]-15N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide 15N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times (tau(m)) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motion's cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface may have important implications for remote effects and regulation of the enzyme action. PMID

  4. Application of time-resolved autofluorescence to label-free in vivo optical mapping of changes in tissue matrix and metabolism associated with myocardial infarction and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lagarto, João; Dyer, Benjamin T.; Talbot, Clifford; Sikkel, Markus B.; Peters, Nicholas S.; French, Paul M. W.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Dunsby, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the potential of an instrument combining time-resolved spectrofluorometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to measure structural and metabolic changes in cardiac tissue in vivo in a 16 week post-myocardial infarction heart failure model in rats. In the scar region, we observed changes in the fluorescence signal that can be explained by increased collagen content, which is in good agreement with histology. In areas remote from the scar tissue, we measured changes in the fluorescence signal (p < 0.001) that cannot be explained by differences in collagen content and we attribute this to altered metabolism within the myocardium. A linear discriminant analysis algorithm was applied to the measurements to predict the tissue disease state. When we combine all measurements, our results reveal high diagnostic accuracy in the infarcted area (100%) and border zone (94.44%) as well as in remote regions from the scar (> 77%). Overall, our results demonstrate the potential of our instrument to characterize structural and metabolic changes in a failing heart in vivo without using exogenous labels. PMID:25780727

  5. Metabolism of nonessential N-15-labeled amino acids and the measurement of human whole-body protein synthesis rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Melnick, G.; Dempsey, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15-labeled nonessential amino acids plus (N-15)H4Cl were administered over a 10-h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted.

  6. Human Vitamin B12 Absorption and Metabolism are Measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Using Specifically Labeled 14C-Cobalamin

    SciTech Connect

    Carkeet, C; Dueker, S R; Lango, J; Buchholz, B A; Miller, J W; Green, R; Hammock, B D; Roth, J R; Anderson, P J

    2006-01-26

    There is need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B{sub 12}. Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B{sub 12} is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of {sup 14}C-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) in microliter volumes of biological samples, with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B{sub 12} in the range of normal dietary intake. The B{sub 12} used was quantitatively labeled with {sup 14}C at one particular atom of the DMB moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonellametabolism. In order to grow aerobically on ethanolamine, S. entericamust be provided with either pre-formed B{sub 12} or two of its precursors: cobinamide and dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). When provided with {sup 14}C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 mg, 2.2 KBq/59 nCi) of purified {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B{sub 12} assimilation.

  7. In Vivo Fluxes in the Ammonium-Assimilatory Pathways in Corynebacterium glutamicum Studied by 15N Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, M.; de Graaf, A. A.; Sahm, H.

    1999-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS)–glutamine 2-oxoglutarate-aminotransferase (GOGAT) represent the two main pathways of ammonium assimilation in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In this study, the ammonium assimilating fluxes in vivo in the wild-type ATCC 13032 strain and its GDH mutant were quantitated in continuous cultures. To do this, the incorporation of 15N label from [15N]ammonium in glutamate and glutamine was monitored with a time resolution of about 10 min with in vivo 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) used in combination with a recently developed high-cell-density membrane-cyclone NMR bioreactor system. The data were used to tune a standard differential equation model of ammonium assimilation that comprised ammonia transmembrane diffusion, GDH, GS, GOGAT, and glutamine amidotransferases, as well as the anabolic incorporation of glutamate and glutamine into biomass. The results provided a detailed picture of the fluxes involved in ammonium assimilation in the two different C. glutamicum strains in vivo. In both strains, transmembrane equilibration of 100 mM [15N]ammonium took less than 2 min. In the wild type, an unexpectedly high fraction of 28% of the NH4+ was assimilated via the GS reaction in glutamine, while 72% were assimilated by the reversible GDH reaction via glutamate. GOGAT was inactive. The analysis identified glutamine as an important nitrogen donor in amidotransferase reactions. The experimentally determined amount of 28% of nitrogen assimilated via glutamine is close to a theoretical 21% calculated from the high peptidoglycan content of C. glutamicum. In the GDH mutant, glutamate was exclusively synthesized over the GS/GOGAT pathway. Its level was threefold reduced compared to the wild type. PMID:10049869

  8. Fate of nitrogen deposition and decomposed nitrogen from litter in a 15N-tracer mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, R.; Perks, M.; Mencuccini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic-derived nitrogen may be a major driver of the 0.6-0.7 Pg y-1 increase in the carbon sink in historically N-limited northern and boreal forests, but the magnitude of its effect is still uncertain. A strong effect depends on the allocation of N to trees, because of their high C:N ratio in woody tissues, and isotope tracer experiments have shown that the majority of 15N tracers applied directly to the soil are lost via leeching or retained in soil pools rather than being acquired by tree root systems. However, ambient anthropogenic inputs of N to these systems are transported in the atmosphere and intercepted by foliage before they reach the soil system, while labelled fertilization experiments also can only explicitly trace the fate of the 15N-tracer from deposition, as opposed to changes in the fate of N from litter, where decomposition rates may be enhanced at low ambient levels of deposition, affecting the availability of N from this pool for tree nutrition. We present initial results from a potted Sitka Spruce mesocosm 15N-tracer experiment where ambient nitrogen deposition was supplemented with a minor (0.4 kg ha-1 y-1) input of additional N, applied to either the soil or the foliage. Either this deposition, or litter in the pots, was enriched in 15N, allowing the fate of the isotope from two different methods of deposition to be compared with that of nitrogen released from the litter under the deposition treatment.

  9. Ntrace a 15N tracing model to analyse gross N transformations and sources of gaseous N emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenically generated reactive nitrogen (N) cascades throughout the global environment ...(Galloway and Cowling, 2002). This reactive N may be lost from ecosystems via leaching, as nitrate (NO3-), or in gaseous forms such as ammonia and nitrous oxide (N2O) and the loss is governed by the N dynamics of the system. Thus, to be rendered environmentally benign NO3- must be reduced to a non-reactive form, dinitrogen (N2) which requires the evaluation of three major biological pathways of NO3- reduction: i) assimilatory NO3- reduction into biomass, ii) dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ (DNRA) and iii) dissimilatory NO3- reduction to N2 (denitrification) ...(Burger and Jackson, 2004). Advanced techniques based on 15N tracing in combination with suitable model analyses are the method of choice to analyse complex N interactions and simultaneous N transformation process. Techniques are based on dilution - enrichment principles and usually rely on the simultaneous labelling of various N pools. The data sets are then analysed by suitable 15N tracing models which allow the individual N transformation rates to be calculated based on realistic kinetic settings. The 15N tracing model Ntrace has been developed to analyse the simultaneously occurring N transformation rates in soil-plant systems and includes submodels for the evaluation of the processes associated with gaseous N emissions. The 15N tracing model and some typical model results will be presented. Literature cited .Burger, M., and Jackson, L. E. (2004). Plant and microbial use and turnover: rapid conversion of nitrate to ammonium in soil with roots. Plant and Soil 266, 289-301. Galloway, J. N., and Cowling, E. B. (2002). Reactive nitrogen and the world: 200 years of change. Ambio 31, 64-71. .

  10. Resolving the bulk δ 15N values of ancient human and animal bone collagen via compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of constituent amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styring, Amy K.; Sealy, Judith C.; Evershed, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    the biosynthetic pathway of threonine and the other amino acids. The δ 15N value of phenylalanine does not change significantly with trophic level, reflecting its conservative nature as an essential amino acid, and thus represents the isotopic composition of the nitrogen at the base of the food web. Δ 15N Glu-Phe values in particular are shown to reflect trophic level nitrogen sources within a food web. In relation to the reconstruction of ancient human diet the contribution of marine and terrestrial protein are strongly reflected in Δ 15N Glu-Phe values. Differences in nitrogen metabolism are also shown to have an influence upon individual amino acid δ 15N values with Δ 15N Glu-Phe values emphasising differences between the different physiological adaptations. The latter is demonstrated in tortoises, which can excrete nitrogen in the form of uric acid and urea and display negative Δ 15N Glu-Phe values whereas those for marine and terrestrial mammals are positive. The findings amplify the potential advantages of compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis in the study of nitrogen flow within food webs and in the reconstruction of past human diets.

  11. Metabolomics-on-a-chip and metabolic flux analysis for label-free modeling of the internal metabolism of HepG2/C3A cells.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Djomangan Adama; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Bunescu, Andrei; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Leclerc, Eric; Brochot, Céline

    2012-07-01

    In vitro microfluidic systems are increasingly used as an alternative to standard Petri dishes in bioengineering and metabolomic investigations, as they are expected to provide cellular environments close to the in vivo conditions. In this work, we combined the recently developed "metabolomics-on-a-chip" approach with metabolic flux analysis to model the metabolic network of the hepatoma HepG2/C3A cell line and to infer the distribution of intracellular metabolic fluxes in standard Petri dishes and microfluidic biochips. A high pyruvate reduction to lactate was observed in both systems, suggesting that the cells operate in oxygen-limited environments. Our results also indicate that HepG2/C3A cells in the biochip are characterized by a higher consumption rate of oxygen, presumably due to a higher oxygenation rate in the microfluidic environment. This leads to a higher entry of the ultimate glycolytic product, acetyl-CoA, into the Krebs cycle. These findings are supported by the transcriptional activity of HepG2/C3A cells in both systems since we observed that genes regulated by a HIF-1 (hypoxia-regulated factor-1) transcriptional factor were over expressed under the Petri conditions, but to a lesser extent in the biochip. PMID:22618574

  12. Mitochondria “fuel” breast cancer metabolism: Fifteen markers of mitochondrial biogenesis label epithelial cancer cells, but are excluded from adjacent stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sotgia, Federica; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Salem, Ahmed F.; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Lamb, Rebecca; Sneddon, Sharon; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present new genetic and morphological evidence that human tumors consist of two distinct metabolic compartments. First, re-analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiling data revealed that > 95 gene transcripts associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation were significantly elevated in human breast cancer cells, as compared with adjacent stromal tissue. Remarkably, nearly 40 of these upregulated gene transcripts were mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs), functionally associated with mitochondrial translation of protein components of the OXPHOS complex. Second, during validation by immunohistochemistry, we observed that antibodies directed against 15 markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation (AKAP1, GOLPH3, GOLPH3L, MCT1, MRPL40, MRPS7, MRPS15, MRPS22, NRF1, NRF2, PGC1-α, POLRMT, TFAM, TIMM9 and TOMM70A) selectively labeled epithelial breast cancer cells. These same mitochondrial markers were largely absent or excluded from adjacent tumor stromal cells. Finally, markers of mitochondrial lipid synthesis (GOLPH3) and mitochondrial translation (POLRMT) were associated with poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that human breast cancers contain two distinct metabolic compartments—a glycolytic tumor stroma, which surrounds oxidative epithelial cancer cells—that are mitochondria-rich. The co-existence of these two compartments is indicative of metabolic symbiosis between epithelial cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. As such, epithelial breast cancer cells should be viewed as predatory metabolic “parasites,” which undergo anabolic reprogramming to amplify their mitochondrial “power.” This notion is consistent with the observation that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine may be an effective anticancer agent. New anticancer therapies should be developed to target mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation in human cancer cells. PMID

  13. Quantification of the contribution of biological nitrogen fixation to tropical green manure crops and the residual benefit to a subsequent maize crop using 15N-isotope techniques.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M G; Villatoro, M A; Urquiaga, S; Alves, B J; Boddey, R M

    2001-10-01

    In this study the contribution of biological N2 fixation (BNF) to leguminous green manures was quantified in the field at different sites with different 15N methodologies. In the first experiment, conducted on a Terra Roxa soil in Cuba, the BNF contribution to three legumes (Crotalaria juncea, Mucuna aterrima and Canavalia ensiformis) was quantified by applying 15N-labelled ammonium sulphate to the soil. The second experiment was planted in a very low fertility sandy soil near Rio de Janeiro, and the 15N natural abundance technique was applied to quantify BNF in C. juncea, M. niveum and soybean. In both studies the advantages of using several non-N2-fixing reference plants was apparent and despite the much greater accumulation of the C. juncea in the experiment performed on the fertile soil of Cuba, the above ground contributions of BNF at both sites were similar (40-80 kg N x ha(-1)) and greater than for the other legumes. In a further experiment the possible contribution of root-derived N to the soil/plant system of two of the legumes was quantified using a 15N-leaf-labelling technique performed in pots. The results of this study suggested that total below-ground N could constitute as much as 39 to 49% of the total N accumulated by the legume crops. PMID:11566383

  14. An enhanced in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) model for quantification of drug metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, A Kenneth; Fallon, Padraic G; Sharp, Sheila; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Huang, Jeffrey T-J

    2015-03-01

    Many of the enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism are maintained at a low basal level and are only synthesized in response to activation of upstream sensor/effector proteins. This induction can have implications in a variety of contexts, particularly during the study of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of a candidate therapeutic compound. Previously, we combined in vivo SILAC material with a targeted high resolution single ion monitoring (tHR/SIM) LC-MS/MS approach for quantification of 197 peptide pairs, representing 51 drug metabolism enzymes (DME), in mouse liver. However, as important enzymes (for example, cytochromes P450 (Cyp) of the 1a and 2b subfamilies) are maintained at low or undetectable levels in the liver of unstimulated metabolically labeled mice, quantification of these proteins was unreliable. In the present study, we induced DME expression in labeled mice through synchronous ligand-mediated activation of multiple upstream nuclear receptors, thereby enhancing signals for proteins including Cyps 1a, 2a, 2b, 2c, and 3a. With this enhancement, 115 unique, lysine-containing, Cyp-derived peptides were detected in the liver of a single animal, as opposed to 56 in a pooled sample from three uninduced animals. A total of 386 peptide pairs were quantified by tHR/SIM, representing 68 Phase I, 30 Phase II, and eight control proteins. This method was employed to quantify changes in DME expression in the hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN) mouse. We observed compensatory induction of several enzymes, including Cyps 2b10, 2c29, 2c37, 2c54, 2c55, 2e1, 3a11, and 3a13, carboxylesterase (Ces) 2a, and glutathione S-transferases (Gst) m2 and m3, along with down-regulation of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (Hsd) 11b1 and 17b6. Using DME-enhanced in vivo SILAC material with tHR/SIM, therefore, permits the robust analysis of multiple DME of importance to xenobiotic metabolism, with improved utility for the study of

  15. Preferential flow, nitrogen transformations and 15N balance under urine-affected areas of irrigated and non-irrigated clover-based pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakro, Naser; Dillon, Peter

    1995-12-01

    Urine-affected areas can lead to considerable losses of N by leaching, ammonia volatilisation and denitrification from dairy pastures in the southeast of South Australia. Potable groundwater supplies are considered to have become contaminated by nitrate as a result of leaching from these leguminous pastures. Dairy cow urine, labelled with 15N urea, was applied to micro-plots and mini-lysimeters installed in two adjacent irrigated (white clover-rye grass) and non-irrigated (subterranean clover-annual grasses) paddocks of a dairy farm on four occasions representing different seasonal conditions. These experiments allowed measurement of nitrogen transformations, recovery of 15N in the pasture and soil, and leaching below various depths. Gaseous losses were calculated from the nitrogen balance. The results of the four experiments showed that within a day of urine application up to 40% of the applied urinary-N was leached below a depth of 150 mm as a result of macropore flow in the irrigated paddock, and up to 24% in the non-irrigated one. After application to the irrigated paddock 17% of the urinary-N moved immediately below 300 mm but only 2% below the 450-mm depth. The urinary-N remaining in the soil was converted from urea to ammonium within a day regardless of season. Within the first 7 days of application six times more nitrate was produced in summer than in winter. This has obvious implications for leaching potential. Leaching of 15N from the top 150 mm of soil, following urine applications in all seasons, was between 41% and 62% of the applied 15N in the irrigated paddock and 25-51% in the non-irrigated paddock. However, leaching losses measured at depths of 300 or 450 mm were smaller by a factor of 2-4. The leaching loss of 15N applied in spring in both paddocks was 41% below 150 mm and 12% below 450 mm. Recovery of 15N from the soil-plant system in the 450-nm deep lysimeters was ˜60% of that applied. Estimated ammonia was ˜9% of applied 15N with no paddock

  16. The measurement of sequential changes in cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism by positron computed tomography with continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled gases

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, S.; Yonekura, Y.; Senda, M.; Nishimura, K.; Tamaki, N.; Saji, H.; Fujita, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Taki, W.; Ishikawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    The use of continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled gases is a widely accepted method to measure regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/) with positron computed tomography (PCT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility to measure sequential changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ by PCT. The functional images of CBF, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and CMRO/sub 2/ were obtained using continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled carbon dioxide and oxygen. The effects of spinal drainage in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ were studied in patients with hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the rupture of intracranial aneurysm. Following the measurement in control state, 20 ml of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were withdrawn gradually through lumbar puncture, and sequential PCT scans were performed. CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ were markedly depressed in the case with hydrocephalus. The drainage of CSF significantly improved OEF and CMRO/sub 2/, whereas CBF remained depressed. In patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease, the changes in CBF were studied with inhalation of 5% carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/). CO/sub 2/ loading demonstrated the increase in CBF, while poor regional increase was observed in ''moyamoya'' disease, which permitted the assessment of vascular response to the elevation of plasma CO/sub 2/. The authors preliminary work indicated the potential usefulness of sequential PCT to study the changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ with various interventions.

  17. Anaerobic central metabolic pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1interpreted in the light of isotopic metabolite labeling, enzymeactivities and genome annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Meadows, Adam L.; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-06-27

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic oroxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses theserine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes,in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine toform serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate andglycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine itsuse of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, wegrew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source witheither trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor.Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage(>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate orpyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other keymetabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serinepathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversibleserine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significantactivity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase)reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observedto be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of acomplete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reductioncondition.

  18. Potential therapeutic radiotracers: preparation, biodistribution and metabolic characteristics of 177Lu-labeled cyclic RGDfK dimer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiyun; Liu, Zhaofei; Jia, Bing; Yu, Zilin; Zhao, Huiyun; Wang, Fan

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we reported the preparation and evaluation of (177)Lu-DOTA-RGD2, (177)Lu-DOTA-Bz-RGD2 and (177)Lu-DTPA-Bz-RGD2 (RGD2 = E[c(RGDfK)](2)) as a potential therapeutic radiotracers for the treatment of integrin alpha(v)beta(3)-positive tumors. The BALB/c nude mice bearing the U87MG human glioma xenografts were used to evaluate the biodistribution characteristics and excretion kinetics of (177)Lu-DOTA-RGD2, (177)Lu-DOTA-Bz-RGD2 and (177)Lu-DTPA-Bz-RGD2. It was found that there were no major differences in their lipophilicity and biodistribution characteristics, particularly at latter time points. A major advantage of using DTPA-Bz as the bifunctional chelator (BFC) was its high radiolabeling efficiency (fast and high yield radiolabeling) at room temperature. Using DOTA and DOTA-Bz as BFCs, the radiolabeling kinetics was slow, and heating at 100 degrees C and higher DOTA-conjugate concentration were needed for successful (177)Lu-labeling. Therefore, DTPA-Bz is an optimal BFC for routine preparation of (177)Lu-labeled cyclic RGDfK peptides, and (177)Lu-DTPA-Bz-RGD2 is worthy of further investigation for targeted radiotherapy of integrin alpha(v)beta(3)-positive tumors.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and metabolism of squalenoyl adenosine nanoparticles in mice using dual radio-labeling and radio-HPLC analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Alice; Lepetre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Mougin, Julie; Parrod, Martine; Pieters, Grégory; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Loreau, Olivier; Goncalves, Jordan; Chacun, Hélène; Courbebaisse, Yann; Clayette, Pascal; Desmaële, Didier; Rousseau, Bernard; Andrieux, Karine; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a pleiotropic endogenous nucleoside with potential neuroprotective pharmacological activity. However, clinical use of adenosine is hampered by its extremely fast metabolization. To overcome this limitation, we recently developed a new squalenoyl nanomedicine of adenosine [Squalenoyl-Adenosine (SQAd)] by covalent linkage of this nucleoside to the squalene, a natural lipid. The resulting nanoassemblies (NAs) displayed a dramatic pharmacological activity both in cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury pre-clinical models. The aim of the present study was to investigate the plasma profile and tissue distribution of SQAd NAs using both Squalenoyl-[3H]-Adenosine NAs and [14C]-Squalenoyl-Adenosine NAs as respective tracers of adenosine and squalene moieties of the SQAd bioconjugate. This study was completed by radio-HPLC analysis allowing to determine the metabolization profile of SQAd. We report here that SQAd NAs allowed a sustained circulation of adenosine under its prodrug form (SQAd) for at least 1 h after intravenous administration, when free adenosine was metabolized within seconds after injection. Moreover, the squalenoylation of adenosine and its formulation as NAs also significantly modified biodistribution, as SQAd NAs were mainly captured by the liver and spleen, allowing a significant release of adenosine in the liver parenchyma. Altogether, these results suggest that SQAd NAs provided a reservoir of adenosine into the bloodstream which may explain the previously observed neuroprotective efficacy of SQAd NAs against cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury. PMID:26087468

  20. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and metabolism of squalenoyl adenosine nanoparticles in mice using dual radio-labeling and radio-HPLC analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Alice; Lepetre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Mougin, Julie; Parrod, Martine; Pieters, Grégory; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Loreau, Olivier; Goncalves, Jordan; Chacun, Hélène; Courbebaisse, Yann; Clayette, Pascal; Desmaële, Didier; Rousseau, Bernard; Andrieux, Karine; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-08-28

    Adenosine is a pleiotropic endogenous nucleoside with potential neuroprotective pharmacological activity. However, clinical use of adenosine is hampered by its extremely fast metabolization. To overcome this limitation, we recently developed a new squalenoyl nanomedicine of adenosine [Squalenoyl-Adenosine (SQAd)] by covalent linkage of this nucleoside to the squalene, a natural lipid. The resulting nanoassemblies (NAs) displayed a dramatic pharmacological activity both in cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury pre-clinical models. The aim of the present study was to investigate the plasma profile and tissue distribution of SQAd NAs using both Squalenoyl-[(3)H]-Adenosine NAs and [(14)C]-Squalenoyl-Adenosine NAs as respective tracers of adenosine and squalene moieties of the SQAd bioconjugate. This study was completed by radio-HPLC analysis allowing to determine the metabolization profile of SQAd. We report here that SQAd NAs allowed a sustained circulation of adenosine under its prodrug form (SQAd) for at least 1h after intravenous administration, when free adenosine was metabolized within seconds after injection. Moreover, the squalenoylation of adenosine and its formulation as NAs also significantly modified biodistribution, as SQAd NAs were mainly captured by the liver and spleen, allowing a significant release of adenosine in the liver parenchyma. Altogether, these results suggest that SQAd NAs provided a reservoir of adenosine into the bloodstream which may explain the previously observed neuroprotective efficacy of SQAd NAs against cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury. PMID:26087468

  1. Variability of the 15N Chemical Shielding Tensors in the B3 Domain of Protein G from 15N Relaxation Measurements at Several Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jennifer B.; Fushman, David

    2008-01-01

    We applied a combination of 15N relaxation and CSA/dipolar cross-correlation measurements at five magnetic fields (9.4, 11.7, 14.1, 16.4, and 18.8 Tesla) to determine the 15N chemical shielding tensors for backbone amides in protein G in solution. The data were analyzed using various model-independent approaches and those based on Lipari-Szabo approximation, all of them yielding similar results. The results indicate a range of site-specific values of the anisotropy (CSA) and orientation of the 15N chemical shielding tensor, similar to those in ubiquitin. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of the 15N CSA values, the mean anisotropy is -173.9 to -177.2 ppm (for 1.02-Å NH-bond length) and the site-so-site CSA variability is ±17.6 to ±21.4 ppm, depending on the method used. This CSA variability is significantly larger than derived previously for ribonuclease H or recently, using “meta-analysis” for ubiquitin. Standard interpretation of 15N relaxation studies of backbone dynamics in proteins involves an a priori assumption of a uniform 15N CSA. We show that this assumption leads to a significant discrepancy between the order parameters obtained at different fields. Using the site-specific CSAs obtained from our study removes this discrepancy and allows simultaneous fit of relaxation data at all five fields to Lipari-Szabo spectral densities. These findings emphasize the necessity of taking into account the variability of 15N CSA for accurate analysis of protein dynamics from 15N relaxation measurements. PMID:16771499

  2. /sup 15/N-Ammonia assimilation, 2-oxoglutarate transport, and glutamate export in spinach chloroplasts in the presence of dicarboxylates in the light

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, K.C.; Boyle, F.A.; Flugge, I.U.; Heldt, H.W.

    1987-11-01

    The direct incorporation of /sup 15/NH/sub 4/Cl into amino acids in illuminated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate plus malate was determined. The amido-N of glutamine was the most highly labeled N-atom during /sup 15/NH/sub 4/ assimilation in the presence of malate. In 4 minutes the /sup 15/N-label of the amido-N of glutamine was 37% enriched. In contrast, values obtained for both the N-atom of glutamate and the amino-N of glutamine were only about 20% while that of the N-atom of aspartate was only 3%. The addition of malate during the assimilation of /sup 15/NH/sub 4/Cl and Na/sup 15/NO/sub 2/ greatly increased the /sup 15/N-label into glutamine but did not qualitatively change the order of the incorporation of /sup 15/N-label into all the amino acids examined. This evidence indicates the direct involvement of the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway for ammonia and nitrite assimilation in isolated chloroplasts. The addition of malate or succinate during ammonia assimilation also led to more than 3-fold increase in (/sup 14/C)2-oxoglutarate transport into the chloroplast as well as an increase in the export of (/sup 14/C)glutamate out of the chloroplast. Little (/sup 14/C)glutamine was detected in the medium of the chloroplast preparations. The stimulation of /sup 15/N-incorporation and (/sup 14/C)glutamate export by malate could be directly attributed to the increase in 2-oxoglutarate transport activity (via the 2-oxoglutarate translocator) observed in the presence of exogenous malate.

  3. Soil processes drive seasonal variation in retention of 15N tracers in a deciduous forest catchment.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Christine L; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Weiss, Marissa S; McCalley, K; Sparks, Jed P; Thomas, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal patterns of stream nitrate concentration have long been interpreted as demonstrating the central role of plant uptake in regulating stream nitrogen loss from forested catchments. Soil processes are rarely considered as important drivers of these patterns. We examined seasonal variation in N retention in a deciduous forest using three whole-ecosystem 15N tracer additions: in late April (post-snowmelt, pre-leaf-out), late July (mid-growing- season), and late October (end of leaf-fall). We expected that plant 15N uptake would peak in late spring and midsummer, that immobilization in surface litter and soil would peak the following autumn leaf-fall, and that leaching losses would vary inversely with 15N retention. Similar to most other 15N tracer studies, we found that litter and soils dominated ecosystem retention of added 15N. However, 15N recovery in detrital pools varied tremendously by season, with > 90% retention in spring and autumn and sharply reduced 15N retention in late summer. During spring, over half of the 15N retained in soil occurred within one day in the heavy (mineral-associated) soil fraction. During summer, a large decrease in 15N retention one week after addition coincided with increased losses of 15NO3- to soil leachate and seasonal increases in soil and stream NO3- concentrations, although leaching accounted for only a small fraction of the lost 15N (< 0.2%). Uptake of 15N into roots did not vary by season and accounted for < 4% of each tracer addition. Denitrification or other processes that lead to N gas loss may have consumed the rest. These measurements of 15N movement provide strong evidence for the dominant role of soil processes in regulating seasonal N retention and losses in this catchment and perhaps others with similar soils.

  4. Metabolism of Nonessential N15-Labeled Amino Acids and the Measurement of Human Whole-Body Protein Synthesis Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Dempsey, D. T.; Melnick, G.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15 labeled nonessential amino acids plus (15)NH4Cl were administered over a 10 h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted (Kendall coefficient of concordance W = 0.83, P is less than 0.01). Protein synthesis rates were calculated from the urinary ammonia plateau enrichment and the cumulative excretion of N-15. Glycine was one of the few amino acids that gave similar values by both methods.

  5. Peptide linkers lead to modification of liver metabolism and improved tumor targeting of copper-67-labeled antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Novak-Hofer, I; Zimmermann, K; Schubiger, P A

    2001-12-01

    In order to determine if tumor/nontarget tissue ratios of 67Cu-labeled antibody fragments can be improved, modifying the DO3A copper chelate with tripeptide linkers was investigated. The peptide-linked chelates 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclodecane-N,N',N",N"'-tetraacetate (DOTA)-triglycyl-L-p-isothiocyanato-phenylalanine (DOTA-R1-NCS), DOTA-glycyl-phenylalanyl-glycyl-L-p-isothiocyanato-phenylalanine (DOTA-R2-NCS), DOTA-glycyl-prolyl-glycyl-L-p-isothiocyanato-phenylalanine (DOTA-R3-NCS) and DOTA-glycyl-L-p-isothiocyanato-phenylalanine (DOTA-R4-NCS) were synthesized and coupled to F(ab')2 fragments of anti-colon carcinoma mAb35. In vitro, the 67Cu-labeled antibody fragments were fully immunoreactive and stable in human serum. In vivo in nude mice bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts the conjugates R1 and R3 showed improved tumor uptake and lower levels of radioactivity in the liver compared with the other conjugates. Biodistributions of the DOTA-R2-F(ab')2 showed at early time points after injection higher levels of radioactivity in the liver, lower levels of activity persisting in the blood and lower accumulation of activity in the tumor. When liver homogenates were analyzed 30 min post injection by SDS-PAGE or FPLC gel chromatography, it was found that radioactivity was released more slowly from the triglycine (R1)-F(ab')2 than from the immunoconjugates with the R2 or the R4 linker. The main radioactive metabolites were protein bands at 66 kD, 31 kD and low molecular weight fragments. The results show that the rate of cleavage of the copper complex from F(ab')2 fragments in vivo can be influenced by the amino acid sequence close to the complex, with significant consequences on biodistributions.

  6. Delivery-Corrected Imaging of Fluorescently-Labeled Glucose Reveals Distinct Metabolic Phenotypes in Murine Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frees, Amy E.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; McCachren, Samuel S.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2014-01-01

    When monitoring response to cancer therapy, it is important to differentiate changes in glucose tracer uptake caused by altered delivery versus a true metabolic shift. Here, we propose an optical imaging method to quantify glucose uptake and correct for in vivo delivery effects. Glucose uptake was measured using a fluorescent D-glucose derivative 2-(N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)Amino)-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG) in mice implanted with dorsal skin flap window chambers. Additionally, vascular oxygenation (SO2) was calculated using only endogenous hemoglobin contrast. Results showed that the delivery factor proposed for correction, “RD”, reported on red blood cell velocity and injected 2-NBDG dose. Delivery-corrected 2-NBDG uptake (2-NBDG60/RD) inversely correlated with blood glucose in normal tissue, indicating sensitivity to glucose demand. We further applied our method in metastatic 4T1 and nonmetastatic 4T07 murine mammary adenocarcinomas. The ratio 2-NBDG60/RD was increased in 4T1 tumors relative to 4T07 tumors yet average SO2 was comparable, suggesting a shift toward a “Warburgian” (aerobic glycolysis) metabolism in the metastatic 4T1 line. In heterogeneous regions of both 4T1 and 4T07, 2-NBDG60/RD increased slightly but significantly as vascular oxygenation decreased, indicative of the Pasteur effect in both tumors. These data demonstrate the utility of delivery-corrected 2-NBDG and vascular oxygenation imaging for differentiating metabolic phenotypes in vivo. PMID:25526261

  7. Dual, differential isotope labeling shows the preferential movement of labile plant constituents into mineral-bonded soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Haddix, Michelle L; Paul, Eldor A; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2016-06-01

    The formation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) are major concerns in the context of global change for carbon sequestration and soil health. It is presently believed that lignin is not selectively preserved in soil and that chemically labile compounds bonding to minerals comprise a large fraction of the SOM. Labile plant inputs have been suggested to be the main precursor of the mineral-bonded SOM. Litter decomposition and SOM formation are expected to have temperature sensitivity varying with the lability of plant inputs. We tested this framework using dual (13) C and (15) N differentially labeled plant material to distinguish the metabolic and structural components within a single plant material. Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) seedlings were grown in an enriched (13) C and (15) N environment and then prior to harvest, removed from the enriched environment and allowed to incorporate natural abundance (13) C-CO2 and (15) N fertilizer into the metabolic plant components. This enabled us to achieve a greater than one atom % difference in (13) C between the metabolic and structural components within the plant litter. This differentially labeled litter was incubated in soil at 15 and 35 °C, for 386 days with CO2 measured throughout the incubation. After 14, 28, 147, and 386 days of incubation, the soil was subsequently fractionated. There was no difference in temperature sensitivity of the metabolic and structural components with regard to how much was respired or in the amount of litter biomass stabilized. Only the metabolic litter component was found in the sand, silt, or clay fraction while the structural component was exclusively found in the light fraction. These results support the stabilization framework that labile plant components are the main precursor of mineral-associated organic matter. PMID:27142168

  8. High levels of isotope elimination improve precision and allow individual-based measurements of metabolic rates in animals using the doubly labeled water method

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Masaki; Niizuma, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Maki; Oda, Emiko; Ebine, Naoyuki; Oka, Nariko; Yoda, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Doubly labeled water (DLW) can be used to measure energy expenditure in free-ranging animals, but questions have been raised about its accuracy in different species or contexts. We investigated whether differences in the extent of isotope elimination affects the precision and accuracy of the DLW method, which can vary according to the experimental design or metabolic rate of the species. Estimated total energy expenditure by the DLW method (TEEdlw) was compared with actual total energy expenditure simultaneously measured via respirometry (TEEresp) in streaked shearwaters Calonectris leucomelas, a pelagic seabird. Subjects were divided into three groups with different experimental conditions: at rest on the ground for 24 h (Group A) or for 48 h (Group B), and at rest on the water for 24 h (Group C). TEEdlw in Group A matched TEEresp, whereas there was an overestimation of TEEdlw in both Groups B and C compared with TEEresp. However, compared with Group A, TEEdlw in Groups B and C had reduced the isotopic analytical variability and thus higher precision. The best regression model (TEEdlw = 1.37 TEEresp − 14.12) showed a high correlation (R2 = 0.82) between TEEdlw and TEEresp and allows a correction factor for field metabolic rates in streaked shearwaters. Our results demonstrate that the commonly made assumption that the DLW method is not appropriate for individual-based estimates may be incorrect in certain circumstances. Although a correction factor may be necessary when using the DLW method to estimate metabolic rate, greater levels of isotope eliminations provides DLW estimates with high precision, which can adequately represent relative individual estimates. Nevertheless, the DLW method, should be used with caution when characterizing interspecies difference of energy expenditures. PMID:26611463

  9. High levels of isotope elimination improve precision and allow individual-based measurements of metabolic rates in animals using the doubly labeled water method.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Masaki; Niizuma, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Maki; Oda, Emiko; Ebine, Naoyuki; Oka, Nariko; Yoda, Ken

    2015-11-01

    Doubly labeled water (DLW) can be used to measure energy expenditure in free-ranging animals, but questions have been raised about its accuracy in different species or contexts. We investigated whether differences in the extent of isotope elimination affects the precision and accuracy of the DLW method, which can vary according to the experimental design or metabolic rate of the species. Estimated total energy expenditure by the DLW method (TEEdlw) was compared with actual total energy expenditure simultaneously measured via respirometry (TEEresp) in streaked shearwaters Calonectris leucomelas, a pelagic seabird. Subjects were divided into three groups with different experimental conditions: at rest on the ground for 24 h (Group A) or for 48 h (Group B), and at rest on the water for 24 h (Group C). TEEdlw in Group A matched TEEresp, whereas there was an overestimation of TEEdlw in both Groups B and C compared with TEEresp. However, compared with Group A, TEEdlw in Groups B and C had reduced the isotopic analytical variability and thus higher precision. The best regression model (TEEdlw = 1.37 TEEresp - 14.12) showed a high correlation (R(2) = 0.82) between TEEdlw and TEEresp and allows a correction factor for field metabolic rates in streaked shearwaters. Our results demonstrate that the commonly made assumption that the DLW method is not appropriate for individual-based estimates may be incorrect in certain circumstances. Although a correction factor may be necessary when using the DLW method to estimate metabolic rate, greater levels of isotope eliminations provides DLW estimates with high precision, which can adequately represent relative individual estimates. Nevertheless, the DLW method, should be used with caution when characterizing interspecies difference of energy expenditures.

  10. Metabolic fate of 14C-labelled nicotinamide and adenine in germinating propagules of the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We studied the metabolic fate of [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide and [8-(14)C]adenine in segments taken from young and developing leaves, stem, hypocotyls, and roots of a shoot-root type emerging propagule of the mangrove plant Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Thin-layer chromatography was used together with a bioimaging analyser system. During 4 h of incubation, incorporation of radioactivity from [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide into NAD and trigonelline was found in all parts of the propagules; the highest incorporation rates into NAD and trigonelline were found in newly emerged stem and young leaves, respectively. Radioactivity from [8-(14)C]adenine was distributed mainly in the salvage products (adenine nucleotides and RNA), and incorporation was less in catabolites (allantoin, allantoic acid, and CO2). Adenine salvage activity was higher in young leaves and stem than in hypocotyls and roots. Over a short time, the effect of 500 mM NaCl on nicotinamide and adenine metabolism indicated that NaCl inhibits both salvage and degradation activities in roots. PMID:22888538

  11. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  12. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms.

  13. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  14. Analysis of Sphingolipid Synthesis and Transport by Metabolic Labeling of Cultured Cells with [³H]Serine.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Neale D

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of lipid biosynthesis by radioactive precursor incorporation provides information on metabolic rates and the identity of rate-limiting enzymes and transporters. The biosynthesis of sphingolipids in cultured cells is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the formation of a sphingoid base from serine and palmitoyl-CoA. N-acylation of the sphingoid base produces ceramide, which is transported to the Golgi apparatus where phosphocholine or carbohydrate headgroups are added to form sphingomyelin (SM) and complex glycosphingolipids (GSLs), respectively. Herein is described a protocol to measure ceramide and SM biosynthesis in cultured cells based on [(3)H]serine incorporation at the first step in the pathway. The method can be used to assay the effect of pharmacological and genetic manipulations on ceramide synthesis and transport to the Golgi apparatus. PMID:26552685

  15. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  16. δ 15 N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural abundance δ15N of ecosystems integrates nitrogen (N) inputs and losses, and thus reflects factors that control the long-term development of ecosystem N balances. We here report N and carbon (C) content of forest vegetation and soils, and associated δ15N, across nine Doug...

  17. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  18. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  19. δ(15) N from soil to wine in bulk samples and proline.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Mauro; Ziller, Luca; Bertoldi, Daniela; Bontempo, Luana; Larcher, Roberto; Nicolini, Giorgio; Camin, Federica

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of using δ(15) N as an additional isotopic marker able to link wine to its area of origin was investigated. The whole production chain (soil-leaves-grape-wine) was considered. Moreover, the research included evaluation of the effect of the fermentation process, the use of different types of yeast and white and red vinification, the addition of nitrogen adjuvants and ultrasound lysis simulating wine ageing. The δ(15) N of grapes and wine was measured in bulk samples and compounds, specifically in proline, for the first time. Despite isotopic fractionation from soil to wine, the δ(15) N values of leaves, grapes, wine and particularly must and wine proline conserved the variability of δ(15) N in the growing soil. Fermentation and ultrasound treatment did not affect the δ(15) N values of grape must, which was therefore conserved in wine. The addition of inorganic or organic adjuvants was able to influence the δ(15) N of bulk wine, depending on the amount and the difference between the δ(15) N of must and that of the adjuvant. The δ(15) N of wine proline was not influenced by adjuvant addition and is therefore the best marker for tracing the geographical origin of wine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. δ(15) N from soil to wine in bulk samples and proline.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Mauro; Ziller, Luca; Bertoldi, Daniela; Bontempo, Luana; Larcher, Roberto; Nicolini, Giorgio; Camin, Federica

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of using δ(15) N as an additional isotopic marker able to link wine to its area of origin was investigated. The whole production chain (soil-leaves-grape-wine) was considered. Moreover, the research included evaluation of the effect of the fermentation process, the use of different types of yeast and white and red vinification, the addition of nitrogen adjuvants and ultrasound lysis simulating wine ageing. The δ(15) N of grapes and wine was measured in bulk samples and compounds, specifically in proline, for the first time. Despite isotopic fractionation from soil to wine, the δ(15) N values of leaves, grapes, wine and particularly must and wine proline conserved the variability of δ(15) N in the growing soil. Fermentation and ultrasound treatment did not affect the δ(15) N values of grape must, which was therefore conserved in wine. The addition of inorganic or organic adjuvants was able to influence the δ(15) N of bulk wine, depending on the amount and the difference between the δ(15) N of must and that of the adjuvant. The δ(15) N of wine proline was not influenced by adjuvant addition and is therefore the best marker for tracing the geographical origin of wine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27479606

  1. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  2. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in an arid ecosystem measured by sup 15 N natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Plants dependent on nitrogen fixation have an {sup 15}N abundance similar to the atmosphere, while non-nitrogen fixing plants usually are enriched in {sup 15}N and are similar to soil nitrogen values. The natural abundance of {sup 15}N in leaf tissues and soils was determined to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation by several legumes and actinorhizal species in the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research area in central New Mexico. Comparison of {delta}{sup 15}N values for the legume Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) to adjacent Atriplex canascens (fourwing saltbush) indicated that P. glandulosa obtained 66% of its nitrogen by fixation. The legume Hoffmanseggia jamesii was found to be utilizing soil nitrogen. The {delta}{sup 15}N values for the actinorhizal plants, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Cercocarpus montanus, while below values for soil nitrogen, did not differ from associated non-fixing plants.

  3. Variation in Growth, Colonization of Maize, and Metabolic Parameters of GFP- and DsRed-Labeled Fusarium verticillioides Strains.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Conner, R L; Wang, Xiaoming; Xu, Rongqi; Li, Hongjie

    2016-08-01

    Autofluorescent proteins are frequently applied as visual markers in the labeling of filamentous fungi. Genes gfp and DsRed were transformed into the genome of Fusarium verticillioides via the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. The selected transformants displayed a bright green or red fluorescence in all the organelles of the growing fungal mycelia and spores (except for the vacuoles) both in cultures and in the maize (Zea mays) roots they colonized. The results of gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and the thermal asymmetrical interlaced (TAIL)-PCR analysis demonstrated that gfp and DsRed were integrated on different chromosomes of the fungus. Reductions in the colony growth on the plates at pH 4.0 and 5.5 was observed for the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transformant G3 and the DsRed-transformant R4, but transformants G4 and R1 grew as well as the wild-type strain at pH 4.0. The speed of growth of all the transformants was similar to the wild-type strain at pH ≥ 7. The insertion of gfp and DsRed did not alter the production of extracellular enzymes and fumonisin B by F. verticillioides. The transformants expressing GFP and DsRed proteins were able to colonize maize roots. However, the four transformants examined produced fewer CFU in the root samples than the wild-type strain during a sampling period of 7 to 28 days after inoculation. PMID:27088391

  4. Validity of using a 3-dimensional PET scanner during inhalation of 15O-labeled oxygen for quantitative assessment of regional metabolic rate of oxygen in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Yuki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Iguchi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Akihide; Enmi, Junichiro; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Morita, Naomi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Casey, Michael E.; Iida, Hidehiro

    2014-09-01

    Use of 15O labeled oxygen (15O2) and positron emission tomography (PET) allows quantitative assessment of the regional metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in vivo, which is essential to understanding the pathological status of patients with cerebral vascular and neurological disorders. The method has, however, been challenging, when a 3D PET scanner is employed, largely attributed to the presence of gaseous radioactivity in the trachea and the inhalation system, which results in a large amount of scatter and random events in the PET assessment. The present study was intended to evaluate the adequacy of using a recently available commercial 3D PET scanner in the assessment of regional cerebral radioactivity distribution during an inhalation of 15O2. Systematic experiments were carried out on a brain phantom. Experiments were also performed on a healthy volunteer following a recently developed protocol for simultaneous assessment of CMRO2 and cerebral blood flow, which involves sequential administration of 15O2 and C15O2. A particular intention was to evaluate the adequacy of the scatter-correction procedures. The phantom experiment demonstrated that errors were within 3% at the practically maximum radioactivity in the face mask, with the greatest radioactivity in the lung. The volunteer experiment demonstrated that the counting rate was at peak during the 15O gas inhalation period, within a verified range. Tomographic images represented good quality over the entire FOV, including the lower part of the cerebral structures and the carotid artery regions. The scatter-correction procedures appeared to be important, particularly in the process to compensate for the scatter originating outside the FOV. Reconstructed images dramatically changed if the correction was carried out using inappropriate procedures. This study demonstrated that accurate reconstruction could be obtained when the scatter compensation was appropriately carried out. This study also suggested the

  5. An innovative, quick and convenient labeling method for the investigation of pharmacological behavior and the metabolism of poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Stevanović, Magdalena; Maksin, Tatjana; Petković, Jana; Filipic, Metka; Uskoković, Dragan

    2009-08-19

    Nanoparticles of poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) in the size range 90-150 nm were produced using the physicochemical method with solvent/non-solvent systems. The encapsulation of the ascorbic acid in the polymer matrix was performed by homogenization of the water and organic phases. In vitro degradation and release tests of PLGA nanoparticles with and without encapsulated ascorbic acid were studied for more than 60 days in PBS and it has been determined that PLGA completely degrades within this period, fully releasing all encapsulated ascorbic acid. The cytotoxicity of PLGA and PLGA/ascorbic acid 85/15% nanoparticles was examined with human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 ECACC), in vitro. The obtained results indicate that neither PLGA nanospheres nor PLGA/ascorbic acid 85/15% nanoparticles significantly affected the viability of the HepG2 cells. The investigation of the distribution and pharmacokinetics of PLGA is crucial for the effective prediction of host responses to PLGA in particular applications. Thus we present a method of labeling PLGA nanospheres and PLGA/ascorbic acid 85/15 wt% nanoparticles by (99m)Tc which binds outside, leaving the cage intact. This enables a quick and convenient investigation of the pharmacological behavior and metabolism of PLGA. The biodistribution of (99m)Tc-labeled PLGA particles with and without encapsulated ascorbic acid after different periods of time of their installation into rats was examined. PLGA nanospheres with encapsulated ascorbic acid exhibit prolonged blood circulation accompanied by time-dependent reduction in the lungs, liver and spleen, and addition in the kidney, stomach and intestine. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, stereological analysis, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy and instant thin layer chromatography. PMID:19636100

  6. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for ex vivo metabolic studies of a rhenium-labeled radiopharmaceutical for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsi; Liao, Chen-Wei; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Chang, Yu; Men, Lee-Chung; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The radio-isotope rhenium-labeled N-[2-(triphenylmethyl)thioethyl]-3-aza-19-ethyloxycarbonyl-3-[2-(triphenylmethyl)thioethyl] octadecanoate) ligand (188Re-MN-16ET) is a novel therapeutic agent under preclinical evaluation for hepatoma. A reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a tandem mass spectrometric analysis method and diode array detector (DAD) involving a T type splitter was developed to characterize this pharmaceutical in rat liver tissue solution and determine its biotransformation rate. The separation was accomplished on a C18 column (chromolith silica, 4.6 mm x 100 mm) using an acetonitrile-ammonium acetate buffer gradient as the mobile phase. The detection was achieved by DAD set at 250nm and tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization in the positive ion mode. Re-MN-16ET displayed a retention time of 23.2 min and a transition ion pair corresponding to m/z677 --> 631 for multiple reaction monitoring. Its biotransformation reaction in rat liver homogenate proceeded for 90 min in a 37°C water bath. The characterization was conducted using aliquots that were extracted and concentrated from the reaction mixture for various incubation times. Re-MN-16ET exhibited a biotransformation half-life (t1/2) of 8-9 min in liver tissue solution and was almost completely exhausted after 90 min. Two of its metabolites, consisting of the Re-labeled carboxylic acid derivative, predominately, and its corresponding demetallized disulfide ligand were found in the liver homogenate, providing a metabolism pathway for the radio-pharmaceutical.

  7. Comparison of methods for simultaneous identification of bacterial species and determination of metabolic activity by protein-based stable isotope probing (Protein-SIP) experiments.

    PubMed

    Jehmlich, Nico; Schmidt, Frank; Taubert, Martin; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Vogt, Carsten

    2009-06-01

    We developed a concept for analysing carbon and nitrogen fluxes in microbial communities by employing protein-based stable isotope probing (Protein-SIP) in metabolic labelling experiments with stable isotope labelled substrates. For identification of microbial species intact protein profiling (IPP) can be used, whereas the assessment of their metabolic activity is achieved by shotgun mass mapping (SMM). Microbial cultures were grown on substrates containing (13)C or (15)N. For identification of species we tested both the IPP and the SMM approaches. Mass spectra (MALDI-MS) were taken from mixtures of either intact proteins or peptides from tryptic digestion for generating species-specific peak patterns. In the case of SMM, the fragmentation of peptides was additionally used to obtain sequence information for species identification. Mass spectra of peptide sequences allow calculation of the amount of (13)C or (15)N incorporation within peptides for determining metabolic activity of the specific species. The comparison of IPP and SMM revealed a higher robustness of species identification by SMM. In addition, the assessment of incorporation levels of (13)C and (15)N into peptides by SMM revealed a lower uncertainty (0.5-0.8 atom %) compared to IPP (6.4-8.9 atom %). The determination of metabolic activity and function of individual species by Protein-SIP can help to analyse carbon and nitrogen fluxes within microbial communities.

  8. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15 N over long-term forest succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven; Tepley, Alan J.; Compton, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession towards old-growth are thought to increase nitrogen (N) availability and N loss, which should increase soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across 800 years of forest succession in a topographically complex montane landscape influenced by human logging and wildfire. In contrast to expectations, we found that disturbance caused declines in surface mineral soil δ15N values, both in logged forests measured 40–50 years after disturbance, and in unlogged forests disturbed by severe wildfire within the last 200 years. Both symbiotic N fixation and N transfers from disturbed vegetation and detritus could lower soil δ15N values after disturbance. A more important role for symbiotic N fixation is suggested by lower soil δ15N values in slow-successional sites with slow canopy closure, which favors early-successional N fixers. Soil δ15N values increased only marginally throughout 800 years of succession, reflecting soil N uptake by vegetation and strong overall N retention. Although post-disturbance N inputs lowered surface soil δ15N values, steady-state mass balance calculations suggest that wildfire combustion of vegetation and detritus can dominate long-term N loss and increase whole-ecosystem δ15N. On steeper topography, declining soil δ15N values highlight erosion and accelerated soil turnover as an additional abiotic control on N balances. We conclude for N-limited montane forests that soil δ15N and N availability are less influenced by nitrate leaching and denitrification loss than by interactions between disturbance, N fixation, and erosion.

  9. A Novel [15N] Glutamine Flux using LC-MS/MS-SRM for Determination of Nucleosides and Nucleobases

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Feng; Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Putluri, Vasanta; Gu, Franklin; Gohlke, Jie; Von Rundstedt, Friedrich Carl; Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Krishnapuram, Rashmi; O’Malley, Bert W.; Sreekumar, Arun; Putluri, Nagireddy

    2016-01-01

    The growth of cancer cells relies more on increased proliferation and autonomy compared to non-malignant cells. The rate of de novo nucleotide biosynthesis correlates with cell proliferation rates. In part, glutamine is needed to sustain high rates of cellular proliferation as a key nitrogen donor in purine and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis. In addition, glutamine serves as an essential substrate for key enzymes involved in the de novo synthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides. Here, we developed a novel liquid chromatography (LC-MS) to quantify glutamine-derived [15N] nitrogen flux into nucleosides and nucleobases (purines and pyrimidines). For this, DNA from 5637 bladder cancer cell line cultured in 15N labelled glutamine and then enzymatically hydrolyzed by sequential digestion. Subsequently, DNA hydrolysates were separated by LC-MS and Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) was employed to identify the nucleobases and nucleosides. Thus, high sensitivity and reproducibility of the method make it a valuable tool to identify the nitrogen flux primarily derived from glutamine and can be further adaptable for high throughput analysis of large set of DNA in a clinical setting. PMID:27158554

  10. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes 13C and 15N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK 1 kidney cells at mass 28 ( 13C15N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of 39K, 23Na and 40Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  11. The Effect of N Fertilizer Placement on the Fate of Urea-15N and Yield of Winter Wheat in Southeast China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaoming; Wang, Huoyan; Liu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongzhe; Gao, Shuaishuai; Zhou, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    A field micro-plot experiment using nitrogen isotope (15N) labeling was conducted to determine the effects of placement methods (broadcast and band) and N rates (60, 150 and 240 kg ha–1) on the fate of urea-15N in the wheat–soil system in Guangde County of Anhui Province, China. N fertilizer applied in bands increased grain yield by 15% compared with broadcast application. The N fertilizer application rate had a significant effect on grain yield, straw yield and aboveground biomass, as well as on N uptake and N concentration of wheat. The recovery of urea-15N was a little higher for broadcast (34.0–39.0%) than for band treatment (31.2–38.2%). Most of the soil residual N was retained in the 0–20 cm soil layer. At the N rates of 60 and 240 kg ha–1, the residual 15N was higher for band (34.4 and 108.7 kg ha–1, respectively) than for broadcast application (29.6 and 88.4 kg ha–1, respectively). Compared with broadcast treatment, banded placement of N fertilizer decreased the N loss in the wheat–soil system. Band application one time is an alternative N management practice for winter wheat in this region. PMID:27082246

  12. Pathways of nitrogen assimilation in cowpea nodules studied using /sup 15/N/sub 2/ and allopurinol. [Vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, C.A.; Storer, P.J.; Pate, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the presence of 0.5 millimolar allopurinol (4-hydroxypyrazolo (3,4-d)pyrimidine), an inhibitor of NAD:xanthine oxidoreductase (EC 1.2.3.2), intact attached nodules of cowpea (vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita 3) formed (/sup 15/N)xanthine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ at rates equivalent to those of ureide synthesis, confirming the direct assimilation of fixed nitrogen into purines. Xanthine accumulated in nodules and was exported in increasing amounts in xylem of allopurinol-treated plants. Other intermediates of purine oxidation, de novo purine synthesis, and ammonia assimilation did not increase and, over the time course of experiments (4 hours), allopurinol had no effect on nitrogenase (EC 1.87.99.2) activity. Negligible /sup 15/N -labeling of asparagine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ was observed, suggesting that the significant pool (up to 14 micromoles per gram of nodule fresh weight) of this amide in cowpea nodules was not formed directly from fixation but may have accumulated as a consequence of phloem delivery.

  13. Tracing the Cycling and Fate of the Explosive 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene in Coastal Marine Systems with a Stable Isotopic Tracer, (15)N-[TNT].

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard W; Vlahos, Penny; Böhlke, J K; Ariyarathna, Thivanka; Ballentine, Mark; Cooper, Christopher; Fallis, Stephen; Groshens, Thomas J; Tobias, Craig

    2015-10-20

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been used as a military explosive for over a hundred years. Contamination concerns have arisen as a result of manufacturing and use on a large scale; however, despite decades of work addressing TNT contamination in the environment, its fate in marine ecosystems is not fully resolved. Here we examine the cycling and fate of TNT in the coastal marine systems by spiking a marine mesocosm containing seawater, sediments, and macrobiota with isotopically labeled TNT ((15)N-[TNT]), simultaneously monitoring removal, transformation, mineralization, sorption, and biological uptake over a period of 16 days. TNT degradation was rapid, and we observed accumulation of reduced transformation products dissolved in the water column and in pore waters, sorbed to sediments and suspended particulate matter (SPM), and in the tissues of macrobiota. Bulk δ(15)N analysis of sediments, SPM, and tissues revealed large quantities of (15)N beyond that accounted for in identifiable derivatives. TNT-derived N was also found in the dissolved inorganic N (DIN) pool. Using multivariate statistical analysis and a (15)N mass balance approach, we identify the major transformation pathways of TNT, including the deamination of reduced TNT derivatives, potentially promoted by sorption to SPM and oxic surface sediments.

  14. The Effect of N Fertilizer Placement on the Fate of Urea-15N and Yield of Winter Wheat in Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoming; Wang, Huoyan; Liu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongzhe; Gao, Shuaishuai; Zhou, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    A field micro-plot experiment using nitrogen isotope (15N) labeling was conducted to determine the effects of placement methods (broadcast and band) and N rates (60, 150 and 240 kg ha-1) on the fate of urea-15N in the wheat-soil system in Guangde County of Anhui Province, China. N fertilizer applied in bands increased grain yield by 15% compared with broadcast application. The N fertilizer application rate had a significant effect on grain yield, straw yield and aboveground biomass, as well as on N uptake and N concentration of wheat. The recovery of urea-15N was a little higher for broadcast (34.0-39.0%) than for band treatment (31.2-38.2%). Most of the soil residual N was retained in the 0-20 cm soil layer. At the N rates of 60 and 240 kg ha-1, the residual 15N was higher for band (34.4 and 108.7 kg ha-1, respectively) than for broadcast application (29.6 and 88.4 kg ha-1, respectively). Compared with broadcast treatment, banded placement of N fertilizer decreased the N loss in the wheat-soil system. Band application one time is an alternative N management practice for winter wheat in this region. PMID:27082246

  15. Tracing the Cycling and Fate of the Explosive 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene in Coastal Marine Systems with a Stable Isotopic Tracer, (15)N-[TNT].

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard W; Vlahos, Penny; Böhlke, J K; Ariyarathna, Thivanka; Ballentine, Mark; Cooper, Christopher; Fallis, Stephen; Groshens, Thomas J; Tobias, Craig

    2015-10-20

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been used as a military explosive for over a hundred years. Contamination concerns have arisen as a result of manufacturing and use on a large scale; however, despite decades of work addressing TNT contamination in the environment, its fate in marine ecosystems is not fully resolved. Here we examine the cycling and fate of TNT in the coastal marine systems by spiking a marine mesocosm containing seawater, sediments, and macrobiota with isotopically labeled TNT ((15)N-[TNT]), simultaneously monitoring removal, transformation, mineralization, sorption, and biological uptake over a period of 16 days. TNT degradation was rapid, and we observed accumulation of reduced transformation products dissolved in the water column and in pore waters, sorbed to sediments and suspended particulate matter (SPM), and in the tissues of macrobiota. Bulk δ(15)N analysis of sediments, SPM, and tissues revealed large quantities of (15)N beyond that accounted for in identifiable derivatives. TNT-derived N was also found in the dissolved inorganic N (DIN) pool. Using multivariate statistical analysis and a (15)N mass balance approach, we identify the major transformation pathways of TNT, including the deamination of reduced TNT derivatives, potentially promoted by sorption to SPM and oxic surface sediments. PMID:26375037

  16. The Effect of N Fertilizer Placement on the Fate of Urea-15N and Yield of Winter Wheat in Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoming; Wang, Huoyan; Liu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongzhe; Gao, Shuaishuai; Zhou, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    A field micro-plot experiment using nitrogen isotope (15N) labeling was conducted to determine the effects of placement methods (broadcast and band) and N rates (60, 150 and 240 kg ha-1) on the fate of urea-15N in the wheat-soil system in Guangde County of Anhui Province, China. N fertilizer applied in bands increased grain yield by 15% compared with broadcast application. The N fertilizer application rate had a significant effect on grain yield, straw yield and aboveground biomass, as well as on N uptake and N concentration of wheat. The recovery of urea-15N was a little higher for broadcast (34.0-39.0%) than for band treatment (31.2-38.2%). Most of the soil residual N was retained in the 0-20 cm soil layer. At the N rates of 60 and 240 kg ha-1, the residual 15N was higher for band (34.4 and 108.7 kg ha-1, respectively) than for broadcast application (29.6 and 88.4 kg ha-1, respectively). Compared with broadcast treatment, banded placement of N fertilizer decreased the N loss in the wheat-soil system. Band application one time is an alternative N management practice for winter wheat in this region.

  17. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles. PMID:25621737

  18. Production of 15N-depleted biomass during cyanobacterial N2-fixation at high Fe concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Junium, Christopher K.; Canfield, Donald E.; House, Christopher H.

    2008-09-01

    In this study we examine the effects of varying Fe, Mo, and P concentrations on δ15N fractionation during N2 fixation in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis. We show that when grown in Fe-enriched media ([Fe] ≥ 50 nM), this organism produces biomass up to 3‰ lower in δ15N than when grown in Fe-limited media ([Fe] < 50 nM). A compilation of our data with previous measurements of δ15N in N2-fixing cyanobacteria reveals a general trend toward the production of more 15N-depleted biomass at higher Fe concentrations. We discuss our results in the context of negative δ15N values preserved in Archean and some Phanerozoic sediments, generally attributed to the production of marine organic matter with low δ15N by N2 fixation (and potentially NH4+ regeneration) during periods of fluctuating nutrient dynamics. We suggest that enhanced Fe availability during periods of widespread ocean anoxia can further stimulate the production of 15N-depleted biomass by N2-fixing organisms, contributing to the isotopic record.

  19. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles.

  20. Analysis of proteome dynamics in mice by isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    Price, John C; Ghaemmaghami, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry and in vivo isotopic labeling have enabled proteome-wide analyses of protein turnover in complex organisms. Here, we describe a protocol for analyzing protein turnover rates in mouse tissues by comprehensive (15)N labeling. The procedure involves the complete isotopic labeling of blue green algae (Spirulina platensis) with (15)N and utilizing it as a source of dietary nitrogen for mice. We outline a detailed protocol for in-house production of (15)N-labeled algae, labeling of mice, and analysis of isotope incorporation kinetics by mass spectrometry. The methodology can be adapted to analyze proteome dynamics in most murine tissues and may be particularly useful in the analysis of proteostatic disruptions in mouse models of disease. PMID:24791984

  1. Radiative p 15N Capture in the Region of Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-06-01

    Within the framework of the modified potential cluster model with classification of orbital states according to the Young schemes, the possibility of describing experimental data for the astrophysical S-factor of p 15N radiative capture at energies from 50 to 1500 keV is considered. It is shown that on the basis of M1 and E1 transitions from various p 15N scattering states to the ground state of the 16O nucleus in the p 15N channel it is entirely possible to successfully explain the overall behavior of the S-factor in the considered energy region in the presence of two resonances.

  2. Leaf δ15N as a physiological indicator of the responsiveness of N2-fixing alfalfa plants to elevated [CO2], temperature and low water availability

    PubMed Central

    Ariz, Idoia; Cruz, Cristina; Neves, Tomé; Irigoyen, Juan J.; Garcia-Olaverri, Carmen; Nogués, Salvador; Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro M.; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2015-01-01

    The natural 15N/14N isotope composition (δ15N) of a tissue is a consequence of its N source and N physiological mechanisms in response to the environment. It could potentially be used as a tracer of N metabolism in plants under changing environmental conditions, where primary N metabolism may be complex, and losses and gains of N fluctuate over time. In order to test the utility of δ15N as an indicator of plant N status in N2-fixing plants grown under various environmental conditions, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants were subjected to distinct conditions of [CO2] (400 vs. 700 μmol mol−1), temperature (ambient vs. ambient +4°C) and water availability (fully watered vs. water deficiency—WD). As expected, increased [CO2] and temperature stimulated photosynthetic rates and plant growth, whereas these parameters were negatively affected by WD. The determination of δ15N in leaves, stems, roots, and nodules showed that leaves were the most representative organs of the plant response to increased [CO2] and WD. Depletion of heavier N isotopes in plants grown under higher [CO2] and WD conditions reflected decreased transpiration rates, but could also be related to a higher N demand in leaves, as suggested by the decreased leaf N and total soluble protein (TSP) contents detected at 700 μmol mol−1 [CO2] and WD conditions. In summary, leaf δ15N provides relevant information integrating parameters which condition plant responsiveness (e.g., photosynthesis, TSP, N demand, and water transpiration) to environmental conditions. PMID:26322051

  3. Leaf δ(15)N as a physiological indicator of the responsiveness of N2-fixing alfalfa plants to elevated [CO2], temperature and low water availability.

    PubMed

    Ariz, Idoia; Cruz, Cristina; Neves, Tomé; Irigoyen, Juan J; Garcia-Olaverri, Carmen; Nogués, Salvador; Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro M; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2015-01-01

    The natural (15)N/(14)N isotope composition (δ(15)N) of a tissue is a consequence of its N source and N physiological mechanisms in response to the environment. It could potentially be used as a tracer of N metabolism in plants under changing environmental conditions, where primary N metabolism may be complex, and losses and gains of N fluctuate over time. In order to test the utility of δ(15)N as an indicator of plant N status in N2-fixing plants grown under various environmental conditions, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants were subjected to distinct conditions of [CO2] (400 vs. 700 μmol mol(-1)), temperature (ambient vs. ambient +4°C) and water availability (fully watered vs. water deficiency-WD). As expected, increased [CO2] and temperature stimulated photosynthetic rates and plant growth, whereas these parameters were negatively affected by WD. The determination of δ(15)N in leaves, stems, roots, and nodules showed that leaves were the most representative organs of the plant response to increased [CO2] and WD. Depletion of heavier N isotopes in plants grown under higher [CO2] and WD conditions reflected decreased transpiration rates, but could also be related to a higher N demand in leaves, as suggested by the decreased leaf N and total soluble protein (TSP) contents detected at 700 μmol mol(-1) [CO2] and WD conditions. In summary, leaf δ(15)N provides relevant information integrating parameters which condition plant responsiveness (e.g., photosynthesis, TSP, N demand, and water transpiration) to environmental conditions. PMID:26322051

  4. Metabolic effect of TAp63α: enhanced glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway, resulting in increased antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Amelio, Ivano; Berkers, Celia R; Antonov, Alexey; Vousden, Karen H; Melino, Gerry; Zolla, Lello

    2014-09-15

    TAp63α is a member of the p53 family, which plays a central role in epithelial cancers. Recently, a role has emerged for p53 family members in cancer metabolic modulation. In order to assess whether TAp63α plays a role in cancer metabolism, we exploited p53-null osteosarcoma Tet-On Saos-2 cells, in which the expression of TAp63α was dependent on doxycycline supplementation to the medium. Metabolomics labeling experiments were performed by incubating the cells in 13C-glucose or 13C15N-glutamine-labeled culture media, as to monitor metabolic fluxes upon induced expression of TAp63α. Induced expression of TAp63α resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. From a metabolic standpoint, expression of Tap63α promoted glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway, which was uncoupled from nucleotide biosynthesis, albeit prevented oxidative stress in the form of oxidized glutathione. Double 13C-glucose and 13C15N-glutamine metabolic labeling confirmed that induced expression of TAp63α corresponded to a decreased flux of pyruvate to the Krebs cycle and decreased utilization of glutamine for catabolic purposes in the TCA cycle. Results were not conclusive in relation to anabolic utilization of labeled glutamine, since it is unclear to what extent the observed minor TAp63α-dependent increases of glutamine-derived labeling in palmitate could be tied to increased rates of reductive carboxylation and de novo synthesis of fatty acids. Finally, bioinformatics elaborations highlighted a link between patient survival rates and the co-expression of p63 and rate limiting enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway, G6PD and PGD.

  5. Metabolic effect of TAp63α: enhanced glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway, resulting in increased antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Amelio, Ivano; Berkers, Celia R; Antonov, Alexey; Vousden, Karen H; Melino, Gerry; Zolla, Lello

    2014-09-15

    TAp63α is a member of the p53 family, which plays a central role in epithelial cancers. Recently, a role has emerged for p53 family members in cancer metabolic modulation. In order to assess whether TAp63α plays a role in cancer metabolism, we exploited p53-null osteosarcoma Tet-On Saos-2 cells, in which the expression of TAp63α was dependent on doxycycline supplementation to the medium. Metabolomics labeling experiments were performed by incubating the cells in 13C-glucose or 13C15N-glutamine-labeled culture media, as to monitor metabolic fluxes upon induced expression of TAp63α. Induced expression of TAp63α resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. From a metabolic standpoint, expression of Tap63α promoted glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway, which was uncoupled from nucleotide biosynthesis, albeit prevented oxidative stress in the form of oxidized glutathione. Double 13C-glucose and 13C15N-glutamine metabolic labeling confirmed that induced expression of TAp63α corresponded to a decreased flux of pyruvate to the Krebs cycle and decreased utilization of glutamine for catabolic purposes in the TCA cycle. Results were not conclusive in relation to anabolic utilization of labeled glutamine, since it is unclear to what extent the observed minor TAp63α-dependent increases of glutamine-derived labeling in palmitate could be tied to increased rates of reductive carboxylation and de novo synthesis of fatty acids. Finally, bioinformatics elaborations highlighted a link between patient survival rates and the co-expression of p63 and rate limiting enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway, G6PD and PGD. PMID:25229745

  6. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12 C/ 13 C and 14 N/ 15 N ratios and the mystery of 15 N

    DOE PAGES

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-07-30

    We compared carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. Furthermore, we present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. All of the explosion energies and H concentrations aremore » considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.« less

  7. Carbon-rich Presolar Grains from Massive Stars: Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N Ratios and the Mystery of 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.

  8. Increase of Natural 15N Enrichment of Soybean Nodules with Mean Nodule Mass 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Bryan, Barbara A.; Kohl, Daniel H.

    1984-01-01

    The 15N abundance of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill var Harosoy) nodules is usually greater than it is for other tissues or for atmospheric N2. Results of experiments in which nodules were separated by size show that the magnitude of the 15N enrichment is correlated with nodule mass. The results support the hypothesis that 15N enrichment of nodules results from differential N isotopic fractionation for synthesis of nodule tissue versus synthesis of compounds for export from the nodule. The physiological significance of this hypothesis is that it requires that a substantial fraction of the N for nodule tissue synthesis in 15N-enriched nodules be N recently fixed within the same nodule. PMID:16663917

  9. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  10. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  11. Ecosystem N distribution and δ15N during a century of forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compton, J.E.; Hooker, T.D.; Perakis, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of terrestrial ecosystem nitrogen (N) pools reflect internal processes and input–output balances. Disturbance generally increases N cycling and loss, yet few studies have examined ecosystem δ15N over a disturbance-recovery sequence. We used a chronosequence approach to examine N distribution and δ15N during forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment. Site ages ranged from 10 to 115 years, with similar soils, climate, land-use history, and overstory vegetation (white pine Pinus strobus). Foliar N and δ15N decreased as stands aged, consistent with a progressive tightening of the N cycle during forest regrowth on agricultural lands. Over time, foliar δ15N became more negative, indicating increased fractionation along the mineralization–mycorrhizal–plant uptake pathway. Total ecosystem N was constant across the chronosequence, but substantial internal N redistribution occurred from the mineral soil to plants and litter over 115 years (>25% of ecosystem N or 1,610 kg ha−1). Temporal trends in soil δ15N generally reflected a redistribution of depleted N from the mineral soil to the developing O horizon. Although plants and soil δ15N are coupled over millennial time scales of ecosystem development, our observed divergence between plants and soil suggests that they can be uncoupled during the disturbance-regrowth sequence. The approximate 2‰ decrease in ecosystem δ15N over the century scale suggests significant incorporation of atmospheric N, which was not detected by traditional ecosystem N accounting. Consideration of temporal trends and disturbance legacies can improve our understanding of the influence of broader factors such as climate or N deposition on ecosystem N balances and δ15N.

  12. A study of folate absorption and metabolism in man utilizing carbon-14—labeled polyglutamates synthesized by the solid phase method

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, C. E.; Baugh, C. M.; Krumdieck, Carlos

    1969-01-01

    The absorption and metabolism of synthetic polyglutamates of folic acid have been compared with free pteroylglutamic acid in four subjects having chronic lymphatic leukemia and one with Hodgkin's granuloma. Pteroylpolyglutamates containing either three or seven glutamate residues were prepared by the solid-phase method permitting placement of carbon-14 labels in either the pteridine ring or in a selected glutamate unit of the gamma peptide chain. Complete dissociation was observed between biological folate activity and radioactivity of plasma after ingestion of pteroyltriglutamate labeled in the middle glutamate. This indicates cleavage to the monoglutamate form at the time of absorption from the intestine or very soon thereafter. A large portion of radioactivity liberated from the middle glutamate is recoverable as carbon dioxide in the exhaled air. Fecal losses of folate tended to be greater with increasing length of the poly-γ-glutamyl chain. Higher blood levels and greater urinary losses of folate tended to occur after ingestion of mono- and triglutamates than with the heptaglutamate. Calculations based on radioactivity determinations in feces plus urinary folate losses, judged by either radioactivity or microbiological assays, indicated net retention of 37-67% of the dose irrespective of chain length ingested and major avenue of loss. During the peak of absorption the folate circulating in plasma was active for both Streptococcus fecalis and Lactobacillus casei and carried specific radioactivity which was virtually identical with that of the administered dose. This suggests that neither methylation, conjugation, nor displacement of nonradioactive folate occurred to any significant extent during the 1st 2 hr. The specific radioactivity of 24-hr urine specimens as measured with L. casei corresponded closely with that of the administered dose. Evidence exists that methylation of the radioactive folate may occur, but significant displacement of nonradioactive

  13. Production process monitoring by serial mapping of microbial carbon flux distributions using a novel Sensor Reactor approach: II--(13)C-labeling-based metabolic flux analysis and L-lysine production.

    PubMed

    Drysch, A; El Massaoudi, M; Mack, C; Takors, R; de Graaf, A A; Sahm, H

    2003-04-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is intensively used for the industrial large-scale (fed-) batch production of amino acids, especially glutamate and lysine. However, metabolic flux analyses based on 13C-labeling experiments of this organism have hitherto been restricted to small-scale batch conditions and carbon-limited chemostat cultures, and are therefore of questionable relevance for industrial fermentations. To lever flux analysis to the industrial level, a novel Sensor Reactor approach was developed (El Massaoudi et al., Metab. Eng., submitted), in which a 300-L production reactor and a 1-L Sensor Reactor are run in parallel master/slave modus, thus enabling 13C-based metabolic flux analysis to generate a series of flux maps that document large-scale fermentation courses in detail. We describe the successful combination of this technology with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, metabolite balancing methods and a mathematical description of 13C-isotope labelings resulting in a powerful tool for quantitative pathway analysis during a batch fermentation. As a first application, 13C-based metabolic flux analysis was performed on exponentially growing, lysine-producing C. glutamicum MH20-22B during three phases of a pilot-scale batch fermentation. By studying the growth, (co-) substrate consumption and (by-) product formation, the similarity of the fermentations in production and Sensor Reactor was verified. Applying a generally applicable mathematical model, which included metabolite and carbon labeling balances for the analysis of proteinogenic amino acid 13C-isotopomer labeling data, the in vivo metabolic flux distribution was investigated during subsequent phases of exponential growth. It was shown for the first time that the in vivo reverse C(4)-decarboxylation flux at the anaplerotic node in C. glutamicum significantly decreased (70%) in parallel with threefold increased lysine formation during the investigated subsequent phases of exponential growth.

  14. Use of /sup 15/N to measure nitrogen uptake in eutrophic oceans; experimental considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    The use of /sup 15/N to measure the flux of nitrogen compounds has become increasingly popular as the techniques and instrumentation for stable isotope analysis have become more widely available. Questions concerning equations for calculating uptake, effect of isotope dilution (in the case of ammonium), duration of incubation, and relationship between disappearance of a nitrogen compound and the /sup 15/N uptake measurement have arisen, especially for the research conducted in oligotrophic regions. Fewer problems seem to have occurred ineutrophic areas. However, sufficient literature now exists to allow some generally accepted experimental procedures for /sup 15/N studies in eutrophic regions to be laid down. Incubation periods of 2-6 h appear to avoid problems related to isotope dilution and to overcome the bias introduced in some cases by initial high rate or surge uptake. During such incubation periods, assimilation is measured rather than uptake or transport into the cell. Incorporation of /sup 15/N into the particulate fraction is usually linear with time over the periods currently used. The /sup 15/N method provides a better estimate of incorporation into phytoplankton than /sup 14/N disappearance, but a small fraction appears to be lost. Although most workers suggest the loss to be a result of dissolved organic nitrogen production, direct evidence is lacking. If the considerations discussed here are applied with the /sup 15/N techniques currently available, reliable estimates of phytoplankton nitrogen flux in eutrophic areas can be obtained.

  15. Highly 15N-Enriched Chondritic Clasts in the Isheyevo Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bonal, L; Huss, G R; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-01-14

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment ({delta}{sup 15}N up to +1500{per_thousand}), similar to {delta}{sup 15}N values reported in micron-sized regions (hotspots) of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) of possibly cometary origin and fine-grained matrices of unmetamorphosed chondrites. These {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are commonly attributed to low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in the protosolar molecular cloud or in the outer part of the protoplanetary disk. The nature of the whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment of the metal-rich chondrites is not understood. We report a discovery of a unique type of primitive chondritic clasts in the CH/CB-like meteorite Isheyevo, which provides important constraints on the origin of {sup 15}N anomaly in metal-rich chondrites and nitrogen-isotope fractionation in the Solar System. These clasts contain tiny chondrules and refractory inclusions (5-15 {micro}m in size), and abundant ferromagnesian chondrule fragments (1-50 {micro}m in size) embedded in the partly hydrated, fine-grained matrix material composed of olivines, pyroxenes, poorly-organized aromatic organics, phyllosilicates and other hydrous phases. The mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of chondrules and refractory inclusions in the clasts are similar to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting formation at similar heliocentric distances. In contrast to the previously known extraterrestrial samples, the fine-grained material in the clasts is highly and rather uniformly enriched in {sup 15}N, with bulk {delta}{sup 15}N values ranging between +1000 and +1300{per_thousand}; the {delta}{sup 15}N values in rare hotspots range from +1400 to +4000{per_thousand}. Since fine-grained matrices in the lithic clasts are the only component containing thermally unprocessed (during CAI and chondrule formation or during impact melting) materials that accreted into the metal rich chondrite parent body(ies), the {sup 15}N

  16. Correction of MS data for naturally occurring isotopes in isotope labelling experiments.

    PubMed

    Millard, Pierre; Letisse, Fabien; Sokol, Serguei; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in combination with isotope labelling experiments is widely used for investigations of metabolism and other biological processes. Quantitative applications-e.g., (13)C metabolic flux analysis-require correction of raw MS data (isotopic clusters) for the contribution of all naturally abundant isotopes. This chapter describes how to perform such correction using the software IsoCor. This flexible, user-friendly software can be used to exploit any isotopic tracer, from well-known ((13)C, (15)N, (18)O, etc.) to unusual ((57)Fe, (77)Se, etc.) isotopes. It also provides options-e.g., correction for the isotopic purity of the tracer-to improve the accuracy of quantitative isotopic studies, and allows automated correction of large datasets that can be collected with modern MS methods.

  17. Identification of Human N-Myristoylated Proteins from Human Complementary DNA Resources by Cell-Free and Cellular Metabolic Labeling Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Takamitsu, Emi; Otsuka, Motoaki; Haebara, Tatsuki; Yano, Manami; Matsuzaki, Kanako; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Moriya, Koko; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    To identify physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins, 90 cDNA clones predicted to encode human N-myristoylated proteins were selected from a human cDNA resource (4,369 Kazusa ORFeome project human cDNA clones) by two bioinformatic N-myristoylation prediction systems, NMT-The MYR Predictor and Myristoylator. After database searches to exclude known human N-myristoylated proteins, 37 cDNA clones were selected as potential human N-myristoylated proteins. The susceptibility of these cDNA clones to protein N-myristoylation was first evaluated using fusion proteins in which the N-terminal ten amino acid residues were fused to an epitope-tagged model protein. Then, protein N-myristoylation of the gene products of full-length cDNAs was evaluated by metabolic labeling experiments both in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system and in transfected human cells. As a result, the products of 13 cDNA clones (FBXL7, PPM1B, SAMM50, PLEKHN, AIFM3, C22orf42, STK32A, FAM131C, DRICH1, MCC1, HID1, P2RX5, STK32B) were found to be human N-myristoylated proteins. Analysis of the role of protein N-myristoylation on the intracellular localization of SAMM50, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, revealed that protein N-myristoylation was required for proper targeting of SAMM50 to mitochondria. Thus, the strategy used in this study is useful for the identification of physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins from human cDNA resources. PMID:26308446

  18. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  19. Compound-specific δ15N and chlorin preservation in surface sediments of the Peru Margin with implications for ancient bulk δ15N records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junium, Christopher K.; Arthur, Michael A.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the processes that control the preservation of paleoceanographic proxies is of clear importance. Surface sediments from the Peru Margin oxygen-minimum zone are subject to lateral and downslope transport by bottom currents that decrease organic matter (OM) quality. Indicators of bulk OM quality (pyrolysis hydrogen index, pyrolysis S1 + S2 and C/N) demonstrate significant degradation between 150 and 400 m water depth, within the oxygen-minimum zone. Concentrations of the three most abundant chlorins (chlorophyllone, pheophytin and pyropheophytin) decrease from 750 to 150 nmol g TOC-1 from 150 to 400 m water depth though the relative abundances of the chlorins in an individual sample do not change. This suggests that the three chlorins have similar reactivity over the ambient conditions. Values for δ15N of bulk sediments (δ15Nbulk) decrease by 3‰ from the inner shelf to the upper slope (1000 m) but co-occurring compound-specific δ15N values (δ15Nchlorin) do not decrease downslope. The low variability of δ15Nchlorin values supports a single source for the chlorins, and demonstrates the recalcitrance of δ15Nchlorin values despite degradation. This set of observation raises questions about which type of OM fraction best records 'primary' signatures. We assess two possible models to guide our interpretation of these disparate datasets (1) that decreasing δ15Nbulk values are the result of degradation of a 15N-enriched fraction during downslope transport, and that δ15Nchlorin values reflect primary values; (2) that δ15Nbulk values are primary and that chlorins are derived from material transported from upslope. These data reaffirm that in active sedimentary environments such as the Eastern Tropical Pacific, transport of OM can significantly alter bulk geochemical parameters of OM integrity, but the impacts on the δ15N record of bulk sediments and chlorins are less clear, and require more study to be thoroughly understood.

  20. Importance of Nitrate Attenuation In A Small Wetland Following Forest Harvest: 18O/16O, 15N/14N in nitrate and 15N/14N) in vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoelstra, J.; Schiff, S. L.; Semkin, R. G.; Jeffries, D. S.; Elgood, R. J.

    2004-05-01

    Forest harvest can result in elevated nitrate concentrations in streams and groundwater affecting forest regeneration and downstream aquatic ecosystems. Turkey Lakes Watershed, located near Sault Ste Marie, Ontario (TLW), exhibits relatively high nitrate export due to naturally high rates of nitrification. During a forest harvest experiment at the TLW, stable isotope techniques were used to investigate nitrate attenuation in an intermediate position natural wetland receiving high concentrations of nitrate following forest clear-cutting. Isotopic analysis of nitrate (18O/16O, 15N/14N) and vegetation (15N/14N) demonstrated that denitrification and plant uptake of nitrate resulted in significantly lower nitrate concentrations in wetland outflow compared to incoming stream water and groundwater. The 0.2-hectare forested swamp, too small to show up on standard topographic maps, retained 65 to 100 percent of upgradient nitrate inputs, elevated due to increased nitrification in soils. The 15N/14N enrichment factor associated with nitrate attenuation in wetland surface water was lower than observed during denitrification in groundwaters, suggesting that denitrification proceeded to completion in some areas of the wetland. Even small, shallow, carbon rich pockets of organic matter in topographic depressions can significantly affect biogeochemical fluxes of C, N, S and Ca. Future forest management practices designed to recognize and preserve small wetlands could significantly reduce the potentially detrimental effects of forest harvest on aquatic systems.

  1. Sewage derive [sup 15]N in the Baltic traced in fucus

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbie, J.E.; Fry, B. ); Larsson, U.; Elmgren, R. )

    1990-01-09

    Himmerfjarden, a fjord-like bay on the eastern shore of the Baltic, receives treated sewage from 250,000 inhabitants. Because the inorganic N in the effluent is enriched in [sup 15]N through denitrification, nitrification, and ammonia volatilization, an analysis of the distribution of [sup 15]N in the Bay tells how far from the source the sewage nitrogen moves. The attached macroalga Fucus vesiculosus was collected in early May from rocky shore at 0-0.5 m depth and the [sup 15]N content of the tips of the fronds analyzed. This N represents uptake and storage during the previous six months and growth during March and April. The [delta][sup 15]N was uniformly high (11-13[per thousand]) in the main body of the Bay within 15 km from the sewage source. Beyond 15 km values decreased with distance to a low of 4.6[per thousand] at 35 km, where the Bay ends and the coastal waters begin. Using the 11-13 and 4.6[per thousand] as endmembers, the percentage of sewage N making up the Fucus at any point may be calculated. The [delta][sub 15]N of particulate organic matter in the offshore Baltic waters was around 0[per thousand] and Fucus had an [delta][sup 15]N about 1.5[per thousand] higher than the POM. From this and other evidence we conclude that there is a belt of coastal water with an elevated [delta][sup 15]N lying along the east coast of the Baltic. This presumably derives from sewage and perhaps from agriculture and is potentially of use as a tracer of coastal zone/pelagic zone interactions.

  2. Soil N and 15N variation with time in a California annual grassland ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, D.L.; Amundson, Ronald; Baisden, W. Troy; Kendall, C.; Harden, J.

    2001-01-01

    The %N and ??15N values of soils and plants were measured along a chronosequence spanning 3 to 3000 Ky in a California annual grassland. Total soil N decreased with increasing soil age (1.1 to 0.4 kg N m-2) while the mean ?? 15N values of the soil N increased by several ??? from the youngest to oldest sites (+3.5 to +6.2 ???). The ?? 15N values of plants varied along the gradient, reflecting changing soil N pools and differences in the form of N uptake. The decline in total N storage with time is hypothesized to be due to a shift from N to P limitation with increasing soil age. The general increase in ?? 15N values with time is interpreted using a N mass balance model, and appears to reflect a shift toward an increasing proportional losses of inorganic mineral forms of N (vs. organic forms) with increasing soil age. We develop a quantitative index of this trend (mineral vs. organic forms of N loss) using mass balance considerations and parameters. The %N and ?? 15N values along the California age gradient were compared to the published data for a comparably aged chronosequence in Hawaii. Most striking in this comparison is the observation that the California soil and plant ?? 15N values are several ??? greater than those on comparably aged Hawaiian sites. Multiple explanations are plausible, but assuming the sites have a similar range in ?? 15N values of atmospheric inputs, the isotopic differences suggest that N may be, at least seasonally, in greater excess in the strongly seasonal, semi-arid, California grassland. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Why is Mineral-Associated Organic Matter Enriched in 15N? Evidence from Grazed Pasture Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, W. T.; Wells, N. S.; Mudge, P. L.; Clough, T. J.; Schipper, L. A.; Ghani, A.; Stevenson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Throughout the scientific literature, measurements across soil depth and density fractions suggest that, with few exceptions, mineral-associated organic matter (OM) has higher δ15N than non-mineral-associated OM. This implies that the δ15N difference between N inputs and mineral-stabilized OM may characterize the microbial processes involved in stabilization and mineral association. Yet current understanding of observed N isotope fractionation in terrestrial ecosystems suggests the large isotope effects are expressed during inorganic N transformations from NH4 to gaseous loss pathways of NH3 volatilization and denitrification. How can the relative importance of N isotope fractionation during OM stabilization versus loss pathways be resolved? We recently examined N isofluxes when a temporary nitrogen excess is created by urine deposition in a New Zealand dairy pasture. We found that the N isotopic composition of volatilized NH3, and NO3 available for leaching or denitrification could not be linked back to the added N using Rayleigh distillation models. Instead, the results imply that the added N was immobilized, and the N available for losses was increasingly derived from mineralization of organic matter during the course of the experiment. These results are consistent with recent evidence of enhanced OM mineralization in urine patches, understanding of N isotope mass balances and long-standing evidence that gross mineralization and immobilization fluxes greatly exceed net mineralization and nitrification, except at very high N saturation. These results suggest that where 15N enrichment occurs due to fractionating loss pathways, the isotope effects are primarily transmitted to immobilized N, forming 15N enriched stabilized OM. This further explains earlier findings that the δ15N of soil OM represents an integrated indicator of losses, reflecting the intensity and duration of pastoral agriculture. We suggest that development of an indicator based on δ15N in

  4. Metabolism of mineral-sorbed organic matter and microbial lifestyles in fluvial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, William Ross; Niederdorfer, Robert; Gernand, Anna; Veuger, Bart; Prommer, Judith; Mooshammer, Maria; Wanek, Wolfgang; Battin, Tom J.

    2016-02-01

    In fluvial ecosystems mineral erosion, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fluxes are linked via organomineral complexation, where dissolved organic molecules bind to mineral surfaces. Biofilms and suspended aggregates represent major aquatic microbial lifestyles whose relative importance changes predictably through fluvial networks. We tested how organomineral sorption affects aquatic microbial metabolism, using organomineral particles containing a mix of 13C, 15N-labeled amino acids. We traced 13C and 15N retention within biofilm and suspended aggregate biomass and its mineralization. Organomineral complexation restricted C and N retention within biofilms and aggregates and also their mineralization. This reduced the efficiency with which biofilms mineralize C and N by 30% and 6%. By contrast, organominerals reduced the C and N mineralization efficiency of suspended aggregates by 41% and 93%. Our findings show how organomineral complexation affects microbial C:N stoichiometry, potentially altering the biogeochemical fate of C and N within fluvial ecosystems.

  5. Nitrogen Isotopic Ratios in Cometary NH2: Implication for 15N-fractionation in Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuël; Decock, Alice; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arai, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Isotopic ratios in cometary molecules are diagnostic for the physico-chemical conditions where molecules formed and are processed, from the interstellar medium to the solar nebula. Usually temperatures at the molecular formation control the fractionation of the heavier element in molecular species, e.g., D-fractionation in water.In cometary volatiles, the 14N/15N ratios in CN have been well observed (Manfroid et al. 2009, A&A, 503, 613, and reference therein) and is consistent with the ratio in HCN (a most probable parent of CN) measured in few comets (Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2008, ApJ, 679, L49). Those ratios are enriched compared to the proto-solar value by a factor of ~3. In contrast to those Nitriles, there are only few reports on 14N/15N ratios in Ammonia (as Amine) (Rousselot et al. 2014, ApJ, 780, L17; Shinnaka et al. 2014, ApJ, 782, L16). Ammonia (NH3) is usually the most abundant and HCN is the second most abundant N-bearing volatiles in cometary ice. Especially, recent observations of 15NH2 revealed the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 are comparable to those of CN. However, from the viewpoint of theoretical work, the enrichment of 15N in cometary NH3 cannot be reproduced by current chemical network models. Information about the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 of individual comets is needed to understand the formation mechanisms/environments of NH3 in the early solar system.To clarify the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in cometary NH3, we determine the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets individually which include not only Oort cloud comets but also short period comets by using the high-resolution optical spectra of NH2. These spectra were obtained with both the UVES mounted on the VLT in Chile and the HDS on the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii.The derived 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets show high 15N-enrichment compared with the elemental abundances of nitrogen in the Sun by about factor of ~3 and has no large diversity depending on

  6. δ15N natural abundance in permafrost soil indicates impact of fire on nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Conen, Franz; Yakutin, Mikhail V; Puchnin, Alexander N; Leifeld, Jens; Alewell, Christine

    2011-03-15

    The impact of fire on the nitrogen (N) cycle of natural ecosystems is arguable. Here we report and interpret an observation from boreal ecosystems in the Lena River basin, Sakha Republic (Yakutia), Russian Federation. Different types of permafrost soil (0-30 cm depth) were sampled along transects (60-150 m length) from the forest edge towards the centre of four separate thermokarst depressions under grassland. The average values of δ(15)N were remarkably similar within three transects, but differed systematically between them. Three findings point towards fire being the cause of the observed pattern. First, the spatial extent of systematic differences in soil δ(15)N coincides with the extent of typical fire scars in the region. Second, soil enrichment in (15)N is larger in the proximity of settlements, where fire is generally more frequent than in more remote places. Third, there is a significant positive correlation between δ(15)N values and the ratio of black C to total N. These findings point towards fire having a marked impact on soil δ(15)N and, accordingly, on the N cycle of this cold and dry ecosystem. PMID:21290453

  7. Hydrogen Bonds in Crystalline Imidazoles Studied by 15N NMR and ab initio MO Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Masui, Hirotsugu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Hayashi, Shigenobu

    1999-07-01

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonds of the type N-H...N in crystals of imidazole and its 4-substituted and 4,5-disubstituted derivatives were studied by 15N CP/MAS NMR and an ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculation. In the 15N CP/MAS NMR spectrum of each of the imidazole derivatives, two peaks due to the two different functional groups, >NH and =N-, were observed. The value of the 15N isotropic chemical shift for each nitrogen atom depends on both the length of the intermolecular hydrogen bond and the kind of the substituent or substituents. It was found that the difference between the experimen-tal chemical shifts of >NH and =N-varies predominantly with the hydrogen bond length but does not show any systematic dependence on the kind of substituent. The ab initio MO calculations suggest that the hydrogen bond formation influences the 15N isotropic chemical shift predominantly, and that the difference between the 15N isotropic chemical shift of >NH and =N-varies linearly with the hydrogen bond length.

  8. Rivermouth Alteration of Agricultural Impacts on Consumer Tissue δ15N

    PubMed Central

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jon M.; Nelson, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the ‘rivermouth effect’). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models. PMID:23935980

  9. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ15N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Nelson, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the ‘rivermouth effect’). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  10. Mechanistic Determination of Nitrogen Removal By Advanced Soil-Based Wastewater Treatment Systems Using 15n Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J.; Loomis, G.; Kalen, D.; Boving, T. B.; Morales, I.; Amador, J.

    2014-12-01

    Current levels of nitrogen removal by onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are inadequate, with release of N from OWTS contributing to environmental N pollution, especially in coastal zones where aquatic ecosystems are sensitive to eutrophication. Current mechanistic understand of N removal are limited and mainly attributed to denitrification in the drainfield. Loss of N from N2O production during nitrification, a sparsely researched topic, may be a significant mechanism in advanced OWTS systems that enhance O2 diffusion by sand filter pre-treatment, shallow placement of infiltrative areas and timed dosing controls to prevent drainfield saturation. Replicate (n=3) intact soil mesocosms were used with 15N isotope to evaluate the effectiveness and mechanisms of N removal in drainfields with a conventional wastewater delivery (pipe-and-stone, P&S) compared to two advanced types of drainfields, pressurized shallow narrow drainfield (SND) and Geomat (GEO), a variation of a SND drainfield. Over the 11 day experiment, dissolved O2 was 1.6 mg/L for P&S and 3.0 mg/L for SND and GEO. Removal of total N was 13.5% for P&S, 4.8% for SND and 5.4% for GEO. 15NH4 labeled nitrogen inputs to drainfields were transformed primarily to 15NO3 in all outputs. Consistent low 15N2O levels were present in P&S, with increasing levels of N2 peaking 48h after 15NH4 injection, suggesting denitrification dominated N removal. By contrast, SND and GEO 15N2O levels rose quickly, peaking 8h after 15NH4 injection, suggesting N loss by nitrification. When the whole system is considered, including sand filter removal, 26 - 27% of total N was removed by the SND and GEO systems, whereas 14% of total N was removed in the P&S system. Our results suggest the SND and GEO systems as a whole are capable of removing a greater mass of N than the P&S system.

  11. Post-grafting amination of alkyl halide-functionalized silica for applications in catalysis, adsorption, and 15N NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moschetta, Eric G; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Greenfield, Jake L; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-02-24

    An anhydrous synthesis of aminosilica materials from alkyl halide-functionalized mesoporous SBA-15 silica by post-grafting amination is introduced for applications in CO2 adsorption, cooperative catalysis, and (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The synthesis is demonstrated to convert terminal alkyl halide-functionalized silica materials containing Cl, Br, and I to primary alkylamines using anhydrous ammonia in a high-pressure reactor. The benefits of the post-grafting amination procedure include (i) use of anhydrous isotopically labeled ammonia, (15)NH3, to create aminosilica materials that can be investigated using (15)N solid-state NMR to elucidate potential intermediates and surface species in CO2 adsorption processes and catalysis, (ii) similar CO2 uptake in experiments extracting CO2 from dry simulated air experiments, and (iii) improved activity in acid-base bifunctional catalysis compared to traditional amine-grafted materials. The effects of the type of halide, the initial halide loading, and the total reaction time on the conversion of the halides to primary amines are explored. Physical and chemical characterizations of the materials show that the textural properties of the silica are unaffected by the reaction conditions and that quantitative conversion to primary amines is achieved even at short reaction times and high initial alkyl halide loadings. Additionally, preliminary (15)N solid-state NMR experiments indicate formation of nitrogen-containing species and demonstrate that the synthesis can be used to create materials useful for investigating surface species by NMR spectroscopy. The differences between the materials prepared via post-grafting amination vs traditional aminosilane grafting are attributed to the slightly increased spacing of the amines synthesized by amination because the alkylhalosilanes are initially better spaced on the silica surface after grafting, whereas the aminosilanes likely cluster to a greater extent when grafted on the

  12. Short-term and seasonal soil nitrogen dynamics and recovery by bermudagrass irrigated with 15N labeled swine lagoon effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experiment was conducted at a commercial swine operation located in Lowndes County, Mississippi in an acid Vaiden silty clay (very fine, montmorillonitic, thermic Vertic Hapludalf) used in this study is representative of the Alabama and Mississippi Blackland Prairie major land resource area. A ...

  13. Quantification of compartmented metabolic fluxes in developing soybean embryos by employing biosynthetically directed fractional (13)C labeling, two-dimensional [(13)C, (1)H] nuclear magnetic resonance, and comprehensive isotopomer balancing.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Ganesh; Fulton, D Bruce; Iyer, Vidya V; Peterson, Joan Marie; Zhou, Ruilian; Westgate, Mark E; Spalding, Martin H; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2004-10-01

    Metabolic flux quantification in plants is instrumental in the detailed understanding of metabolism but is difficult to perform on a systemic level. Toward this aim, we report the development and application of a computer-aided metabolic flux analysis tool that enables the concurrent evaluation of fluxes in several primary metabolic pathways. Labeling experiments were performed by feeding a mixture of U-(13)C Suc, naturally abundant Suc, and Gln to developing soybean (Glycine max) embryos. Two-dimensional [(13)C, (1)H] NMR spectra of seed storage protein and starch hydrolysates were acquired and yielded a labeling data set consisting of 155 (13)C isotopomer abundances. We developed a computer program to automatically calculate fluxes from this data. This program accepts a user-defined metabolic network model and incorporates recent mathematical advances toward accurate and efficient flux evaluation. Fluxes were calculated and statistical analysis was performed to obtain sds. A high flux was found through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (19.99 +/- 4.39 micromol d(-1) cotyledon(-1), or 104.2 carbon mol +/- 23.0 carbon mol per 100 carbon mol of Suc uptake). Separate transketolase and transaldolase fluxes could be distinguished in the plastid and the cytosol, and those in the plastid were found to be at least 6-fold higher. The backflux from triose to hexose phosphate was also found to be substantial in the plastid (21.72 +/- 5.00 micromol d(-1) cotyledon(-1), or 113.2 carbon mol +/-26.0 carbon mol per 100 carbon mol of Suc uptake). Forward and backward directions of anaplerotic fluxes could be distinguished. The glyoxylate shunt flux was found to be negligible. Such a generic flux analysis tool can serve as a quantitative tool for metabolic studies and phenotype comparisons and can be extended to other plant systems.

  14. Food webs in Mongolian grasslands: the analysis of 13C and 15N natural abundances.

    PubMed

    Kohzu, Ayato; Iwata, T; Kato, M; Nishikawa, J; Wada, Eitaro; Amartuvshin, N; Namkhaidorj, B; Fujita, N

    2009-09-01

    Overgrazing often lowers species richness and productivity of grassland communities. For Mongolian grassland ecosystems, a lack of detailed information about food-web structures makes it difficult to predict the effects of overgrazing on species diversity and community composition. We analysed the delta13C and delta15N signatures of herbaceous plants, arthropods (grouped by feeding habit), wild and domestic mammals, and humans in central Mongolia to understand the predominant food-web pathways in this grassland ecosystem. The delta13C and delta15N values of mammals showed little variation within species, but varied considerably with slope position for arthropods. The apparent isotopic discrimination between body tissue and hair of mammals was estimated as 2.0 per thousand for delta13C and 2.1 per thousand for delta15N, which was large enough to cause overestimation of the trophic level of mammals if not taken into account when using hair samples to measure isotopic enrichment.

  15. Hyperpolarized 15N-pyridine Derivatives as pH-Sensitive MRI Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weina; Lumata, Lloyd; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Shanrong; Kovacs, Zoltan; Sherry, A. Dean; Khemtong, Chalermchai

    2015-01-01

    Highly sensitive MR imaging agents that can accurately and rapidly monitor changes in pH would have diagnostic and prognostic value for many diseases. Here, we report an investigation of hyperpolarized 15N-pyridine derivatives as ultrasensitive pH-sensitive imaging probes. These molecules are easily polarized to high levels using standard dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) techniques and their 15N chemical shifts were found to be highly sensitive to pH. These probes displayed sharp 15N resonances and large differences in chemical shifts (Δδ >90 ppm) between their free base and protonated forms. These favorable features make these agents highly suitable candidates for the detection of small changes in tissue pH near physiological values. PMID:25774436

  16. 13C and 15N allocations of two alpine species from early and late snowmelt locations reflect their different growth strategies.

    PubMed

    Baptist, Florence; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Aubert, Serge; Pontailler, Jean-Yves; Choler, Philippe; Nogués, Salvador

    2009-01-01

    Intense efforts are currently devoted to disentangling the relationships between plant carbon (C) allocation patterns and soil nitrogen (N) availability because of their consequences for growth and more generally for C sequestration. In cold ecosystems, only a few studies have addressed whole-plant C and/or N allocation along natural elevational or topographical gradients. (12)C/(13)C and (14)N/(15)N isotope techniques have been used to elucidate C and N partitioning in two alpine graminoids characterized by contrasted nutrient economies: a slow-growing species, Kobresia myosuroides (KM), and a fast-growing species, Carex foetida (CF), located in early and late snowmelt habitats, respectively, within the alpine tundra (French Alps). CF allocated higher labelling-related (13)C content belowground and produced more root biomass. Furthermore, assimilates transferred to the roots were preferentially used for growth rather than respiration and tended to favour N reduction in this compartment. Accordingly, this species had higher (15)N uptake efficiency than KM and a higher translocation of reduced (15)N to aboveground organs. These results suggest that at the whole-plant level, there is a compromise between N acquisition/reduction and C allocation patterns for optimized growth.

  17. Inoculation of Bacillus sphaericus UPMB-10 to Young Oil Palm and Measurement of Its Uptake of Fixed Nitrogen Using the 15N Isotope Dilution Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zakry, Fitri Abdul Aziz; Shamsuddin, Zulkifli H.; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Zakaria, Zin Zawawi; Rahim, Anuar Abdul

    2012-01-01

    There are increasing applications of diazotrophic rhizobacteria in the sustainable agriculture system. A field experiment on young immature oil palm was conducted to quantify the uptake of N derived from N2 fixation by the diazotroph Bacillus sphaericus strain UPMB-10, using the 15N isotope dilution method. Eight months after 15N application, young immature oil palms that received 67% of standard N fertilizer application together with B. sphaericus inoculation had significantly lower 15N enrichment than uninoculated palms that received similar N fertilizers. The dilution of labeled N served as a marker for the occurrence of biological N2 fixation. The proportion of N uptake that was derived from the atmosphere was estimated as 63% on the whole plant basis. The inoculation process increased the N and dry matter yields of the palm leaflets and rachis significantly. Field planting of young, immature oil palm in soil inoculated with B. sphaericus UPMB-10 might mitigate inorganic fertilizer-N application through supplementation by biological nitrogen fixation. This could be a new and important source of nitrogen biofertilizer in the early phase of oil palm cultivation in the field. PMID:22446306

  18. Determination of γ -ray widths in 15N using nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szücs, T.; Bemmerer, D.; Caciolli, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Massarczyk, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Schwengner, R.; Takács, M. P.; Ur, C. A.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, L.

    2015-07-01

    Background: The stable nucleus 15N is the mirror of 15O, the bottleneck in the hydrogen burning CNO cycle. Most of the 15N level widths below the proton emission threshold are known from just one nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurement, with limited precision in some cases. A recent experiment with the AGATA demonstrator array determined level lifetimes using the Doppler shift attenuation method in 15O. As a reference and for testing the method, level lifetimes in 15N have also been determined in the same experiment. Purpose: The latest compilation of 15N level properties dates back to 1991. The limited precision in some cases in the compilation calls for a new measurement to enable a comparison to the AGATA demonstrator data. The widths of several 15N levels have been studied with the NRF method. Method: The solid nitrogen compounds enriched in 15N have been irradiated with bremsstrahlung. The γ rays following the deexcitation of the excited nuclear levels were detected with four high-purity germanium detectors. Results: Integrated photon-scattering cross sections of 10 levels below the proton emission threshold have been measured. Partial γ -ray widths of ground-state transitions were deduced and compared to the literature. The photon-scattering cross sections of two levels above the proton emission threshold, but still below other particle emission energies have also been measured, and proton resonance strengths and proton widths were deduced. Conclusions: Gamma and proton widths consistent with the literature values were obtained, but with greatly improved precision.

  19. Metabolic flux analysis of recombinant Pichia pastoris growing on different glycerol/methanol mixtures by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jordà, Joel; de Jesus, Sérgio S; Peltier, Solenne; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2014-01-25

    The yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast cell factories for the production of heterologous proteins. The readily available genetic tools and the ease of high-cell density cultivations using methanol or glycerol/methanol mixtures are among the key factors for this development. Previous studies have shown that the use of mixed feeds of glycerol and methanol seem to alleviate the metabolic burden derived from protein production, allowing for higher specific and volumetric process productivities. However, initial studies of glycerol/methanol co-metabolism in P. pastoris by classical metabolic flux analyses using (13)C-derived Metabolic Flux Ratio (METAFoR) constraints were hampered by the reduced labelling information obtained when using C3:C1 substrate mixtures in relation to the conventional C6 substrate, that is, glucose. In this study, carbon flux distributions through the central metabolic pathways in glycerol/methanol co-assimilation conditions have been further characterised using biosynthetically directed fractional (13)C labelling. In particular, metabolic flux distributions were obtained under 3 different glycerol/methanol ratios and growth rates by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids using the software tool (13)CFlux2. Specifically, cells were grown aerobically in chemostat cultures fed with 80:20, 60:40 and 40:60 (w:w) glycerol/methanol mixtures at two dilutions rates (0.05 hour(-1) and 0.16 hour(-1)), allowing to obtain additional data (biomass composition and extracellular fluxes) to complement pre-existing datasets. The performed (13)C-MFA reveals a significant redistribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism as a result of the shift in the dilution rate, while the ratio of carbon sources has a lower impact on carbon flux distribution in cells growing at the same dilution rate. At low growth rate, the percentage of methanol directly dissimilated to CO2 ranges

  20. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  1. Organically treated biochar increases plant production and reduces N2O emissions: mechanistic insights by 15N tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Claudia; Messerschmidt, Nicole; Clough, Tim; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Marhan, Sven; Koyro, Hans-Werner; Steffens, Diedrich; Müller, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (biochar) offers considerable potential for carbon capture and soil storage (CCSS) compared to other, less recalcitrant soil-C additives. Recent meta-analysis demonstrated that it can significantly reduce agricultural N2O emissions. Freshly produced biochars, however, do not always have yield-improving effects, i.e. there is no immediate economic incentive for using it. Hence, combining biochar with organic nutrient-rich amendments may be a promising agricultural strategy to accelerate CCSS, but it is unclear if biochar still reduces N2O emissions, in particular when it may act as nutrient carrier. We explored the potential of biochar to improve the GHG-cost/yield ratio and thereby its socio-economic value as soil amendment in two subsequent studies under controlled conditions: (1) A proof-of-concept study where the effects of untreated biochar were compared to those of co-composted biochar combined with stepwise improved nutritional regimes (+/- compost; +/- mineral-N application), and (2) a 15N-labeling-tracing study to unravel N exchange on biochar particles and N2O production and reduction mechanisms. Both studies were carried out in nutrient-poor sandy soils, the most likely initial target soils for biochar-CCSS strategies. While the untreated biochar reduced plant growth under N-limiting conditions, or at best did not reduce it, the co-composted biochar always significantly stimulated plant growth. The relative stimulation was largest with the lowest nutrient additions (305% versus 61% of control with untreated biochar). Electro-ultra-filtration analyses revealed that the co-composted but not the untreated biochar carried considerable amounts of easily extractable as well as more strongly sorbed plant nutrients, in particular nitrate and phosphorus. The subsequent 15N labelling-tracing study revealed that the co-composted biochar still (i) acted as a mineral-N exchange site for nitrate and ammonium despite its N-preloading, (ii) reduced N2O

  2. The degree of urbanization across the globe is not reflected in the δ(15)N of seagrass leaves.

    PubMed

    Christiaen, Bart; Bernard, Rebecca J; Mortazavi, Behzad; Cebrian, Just; Ortmann, Alice C

    2014-06-30

    Many studies show that seagrass δ(15)N ratios increase with the amount of urbanization in coastal watersheds. However, there is little information on the relationship between urbanization and seagrass δ(15)N ratios on a global scale. We performed a meta-analysis on seagrass samples from 79 independent locations to test if seagrass δ(15)N ratios correlate with patterns of population density and fertilizer use within a radius of 10-200 km around the sample locations. Our results show that seagrass δ(15)N ratios are more influenced by intergeneric and latitudinal differences than the degree of urbanization or the amount of fertilizer used in nearby watersheds. The positive correlation between seagrass δ(15)N ratios and latitude hints at an underlying pattern in discrimination or a latitudinal gradient in the (15)N isotopic signature of nitrogen assimilated by the plants. The actual mechanisms responsible for the correlation between δ(15)N and latitude remain unknown.

  3. Direct measurements of protein backbone 15N spin relaxation rates from peak line-width using a fully-relaxed Accordion 3D HNCO experiment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2009-03-01

    Protein backbone (15)N spin relaxation rates measured by solution NMR provide useful dynamic information with a site-specific resolution. The conventional method is to record a series of 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra with varied relaxation delays, and derive relaxation rate from the following curve fitting on the resonance intensities. Proteins with poorly resolved spectra often require several 3D HNCO spectra to be collected on a (15)N/(13)C double labeled protein sample. In order to reduce the relaxation dimension Carr et al. (P.A. Carr, D.A. Fearing, A.G. Palmer, 3D accordion spectroscopy for measuring N-15 and (CO)-Carbon-13 relaxation rates in poorly resolved NMR spectra, J. Magn. Reson. 132 (1998) 25-33) employed an Accordion type HNCO pulse sequence to obtain (15)N or (13)C T(1) relaxation rates by numerical fitting of the relaxation interfered free induction decay (FID) data. To avoid intensive analysis of the time domain data, we propose a modified protocol to measure (15)N T(1) and T(2) relaxation rates from easily obtained line-widths in an Accordion HNCO spectrum. Both T(1) and T(2) relaxation could be simultaneously convoluted into the constant-time evolution periods of (13)C' and (15)N, respectively. The relaxation delay was allowed to reach at least 3 x T(1) or 3 x T(2) so that the signal was substantially decayed by the end of the FID, and the resulting peak full-width at half height (FWHH) could be directly used to calculate relaxation rate. When applied to the 76-residue Ubiquitin and the 226-residue glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP), this method yielded T(1) and T(2) values deviating on average by 4-6% and 5-7%, respectively, from the measurements based on the conventional 2D method. In comparison, the conventional methods possessed intrinsic error ranges of 2-4% for T(1) and 3-6% for T(2). In addition to comparable accuracy, the fully-relaxed Accordion HNCO method presented here allowed measurements of relaxation rates for resonances unresolved in

  4. Stable nitrogen and carbon isotope (δ 15N and δ 13C) variability in shallow tropical Pacific soft coral and black coral taxa and implications for paleoceanographic reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Branwen; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2010-09-01

    Soft corals and black corals are useful proxy tools for paleoceanographic reconstructions. However, most work has focused on deep-water taxa and few studies have used these corals as proxy organisms in shallow water (<200 m). To facilitate the use of stable nitrogen and carbon isotope (δ 15N and δ 13C) records from shallow-water soft coral and black coral taxa for paleoceanographic reconstructions, quantification of the inherent variability in skeletal isotope values between sites, across depth, and among taxa is needed. Here, skeletal δ 15N and δ 13C values were measured in multiple colonies from eleven genera of soft corals and two genera of black corals from across a depth transect (5-105 m) at two sites in Palau located in the tropical western Pacific Ocean. Overall, no difference in skeletal δ 15N and δ 13C values between sites was present. Skeletal δ 15N values significantly increased and δ 13C values decreased with depth. This is consistent with changes in isotope values of suspended particulate organic matter (POM) across the photic zone, suggesting that the primary food source to these corals is suspended POM and that the stable isotopic composition of POM controls the skeletal isotopic composition of these corals. Thus, to compare the isotope records of corals collected across a depth range in the photic zone, first order depth corrections of -0.013‰ m -1 and +0.023‰ m -1 are recommended for δ 15N and δ 13C, respectively. Average depth-corrected δ 15N values were similar between black corals and soft corals, indicating that corals in these orders feed at a similar trophic level. In contrast, average depth-corrected δ 13C values of black corals were significantly lower than that of soft corals, potentially resulting from metabolic processes associated with differing skeletal compositions among the orders (i.e., gorgonin vs. chitin based). Thus, a correction of +1.0‰ is recommended for black corals when comparing their δ 13C-based proxy

  5. Compound-Specific δ15N Amino Acid Measurements in Littoral Mussels in the California Upwelling Ecosystem: A New Approach to Generating Baseline δ15N Isoscapes for Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ15N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ15N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ15N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ15N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼7‰ to ∼12‰, R2 = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ15N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ15N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ15N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with15N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ15N values of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ15N values. We hypothesize δ15NPhe values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ15N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ15NPhe values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ15N values. We propose that δ15NPhe isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ15N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives. PMID:24887109

  6. Nitrate Removal in Two Relict Oxbow Urban Wetlands: A 15N Mass-balance Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 15N-tracer method was used to quantify nitrogen (N) removal processes in two relict oxbow wetlands located adjacent to the Minebank Run restored stream reach in Baltimore County (Maryland, USA) during summer 2009 and early spring 2010. A mass-balance approach was used to determ...

  7. Using a Macroalgal δ15N Bioassay to Detect Cruise Ship Waste Water Effluent Inputs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  8. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  9. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts. PMID:26590548

  10. The use of delta(15)N in assessing sewage stress on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Risk, Michael J; Lapointe, Brian E; Sherwood, Owen A; Bedford, Bradley J

    2009-06-01

    While coral reefs decline, scientists argue, and effective strategies to manage land-based pollution lag behind the extent of the problem. There is need for objective, cost-effective, assessment methods. The measurement of stable nitrogen isotope ratios, delta(15)N, in tissues of reef organisms shows promise as an indicator of sewage stress. The choice of target organism will depend upon study purpose, availability, and other considerations such as conservation. Algae are usually plentiful and have been shown faithfully to track sewage input. The organic matrix of bivalve shells can provide time series spanning, perhaps, decades. Gorgonians have been shown to track sewage, and can provide records potentially centuries-long. In areas where baseline data are lacking, which is almost everywhere, delta(15)N in gorgonians can provide information on status and trends. In coral tissue, delta(15)N combined with insoluble residue determination can provide information on both sewage and sediment stress in areas lacking baseline data. In the developed world, delta(15)N provides objective assessment in a field complicated by conflicting opinions. Sample handling and processing are simple and analysis costs are low. This is a method deserving widespread application.

  11. Tracing Nitrogen through Landscapes to Coastal Wetlands using d15N of Larval Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to evaluate the use of the nitrogen stable isotope value (d15N) of larval fish as an indicator of incipient anthropogenic nitrogen loading to coastal wetlands in the Great Lakes. We sampled coastal wetlands in five Lake Superior south shore tributaries that had ...

  12. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  13. Backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments for the Cyanothece 51142 protein cce_0567: a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Sofia, Heidi J.

    2008-06-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 (contig 83.1_1_243_746) contains the sequence for an hypothetical protein that falls into the DUF683 family. As observed for the other 54 DUF683 proteins currently listed in the GenBank database, this 78-residue (9.0 kDa) protein in Cyanothece is also found in a nitrogen fixation gene cluster suggesting that it is involved in the process. To date no structural information exists for any of the proteins in the DUF683 family. In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 may play in nitrogen fixation and to obtain structural information for a member of the DUF683 protein family, a construct containing DUF683 from Cyanothece 51142 was generated, expressed, purified, and the solution properties characterized. A total rotational correlation time (tc) of 17.1 ns was estimated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggesting a molecular weight of ~ 40 kDa, an observation dictating that DUF683 is a tetramer in solution. Using triple-labeled (2H, 13C, 15N) and residue-specific 15N-labeled amino acids (L, K, V, and E/Q) samples, most of the backbone and side chain resonances for DUF683 were assigned. The 13C alpha chemical shifts and NOESY NMR data indicate that the protein is helical from K18-E75.

  14. Vertical δ13C and δ15N changes during pedogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunn, Melanie; Spielvogel, Sandra; Wells, Andrew; Condron, Leo; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2015-04-01

    The natural abundance of soil organic matter (SOM) stable C and N isotope ratios are subjected to vertical changes throughout the soil profile. This vertical distribution is a widely reported phenomenon across varieties of ecosystems and constitutes important insights of soil carbon cycling. In most ecosystems, SOM becomes enriched in heavy isotopes by several per mill in the first few centimeters of the topsoil. The enrichment of 13C in SOM with soil depth is attributed to biological and physical-chemical processes in soil e.g., plant physiological impacts, microbial decomposition, sorption and transport processes. Such vertical trends in 13C and 15N abundance have rarely been related to SOM composition during pedogenesis. The aims of our study were to investigate short and long-term δ13C and δ15N depth changes and their interrelations under progressing pedogenesis and ecosystem development. We sampled soils across the well studied fordune progradation Haast-chronosequence, a dune ridge system under super-humid climate at the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island (43° 53' S, 169° 3' E). Soils from 11 sites with five replicates each covered a time span of around 2870 yr of soil development (from Arenosol to Podzol). Vertical changes of δ13C and δ15N values of SOM were investigated in the organic layers and in 1-cm depth intervals of the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. With increasing soil depth SOM became enriched in δ13C by 1.9 ± SE 0.1 o and in δ15N by 6.0 ± 0.4 ‰˙Litter δ13C values slightly decreased with increasing soil age (r = -0.61; p = 0.00) likely due to less efficient assimilation linked to nutrient limitations. Fractionation processes during mycorrhizal transfer appeared to affect δ15N values in the litter. We found a strong decrease of δ15N in the early succession stages ≤ 300 yr B.P. (r = -0.95; p = 0.00). Positive relations of vertical 13C and 15N enrichment with soil age might be related to decomposition and appeared to be

  15. Evaluating δ(15)N-body size relationships across taxonomic levels using hierarchical models.

    PubMed

    Reum, Jonathan C P; Marshall, Kristin N

    2013-12-01

    Ecologists routinely set out to estimate the trophic position of individuals, populations, and species composing food webs, and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ(15)N) are a widely used proxy for trophic position. Although δ(15)N values are often sampled at the level of individuals, estimates and confidence intervals are frequently sought for aggregations of individuals. If individual δ(15)N values are correlated as an artifact of sampling design (e.g., clustering of samples in space or time) or due to intrinsic groupings (e.g., life history stages, social groups, taxonomy), such estimates may be biased and exhibit overly optimistic confidence intervals. However, these issues can be accommodated using hierarchical modeling methods. Here, we demonstrate how hierarchical models offer an additional quantitative tool for investigating δ(15)N variability and we explicitly evaluate how δ(15)N varies with body size at successively higher levels of taxonomic aggregation in a diverse fish assemblage. The models take advantage of all available data, better account for uncertainty in parameters estimates, may improve inferences on coefficients corresponding to groups with small to moderate sample sizes, and partition variation across model levels, which provides convenient summaries of the 'importance' of each level in terms of unexplained heterogeneity in the data. These methods can easily be applied to diet-based studies of trophic position. Although hierarchical models are well-understood and established tools, their benefits have yet to be fully reaped by stable isotope and food web ecologists. We suggest that hierarchical models can provide a robust framework for conceptualizing and statistically modeling trophic position at multiple levels of aggregation. PMID:23812110

  16. Stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) of organic matrix from coral skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Muscatine, Leonard; Goiran, Claire; Land, Lynton; Jaubert, Jean; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Alleman