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Sample records for 15n nmr assignments

  1. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of phenazopyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Mora-Pérez, Yolanda; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    Phenazopyridine hydrochloride (1), a drug in clinical use for many decades, and some derivatives were studied by one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR methodology. The assignments, combined with DFT calculations, reveal that the preferred protonation site of the drug is the pyridine ring nitrogen atom. The chemoselective acetylation of phenazopyridine (2) and its influence on the polarization of the azo nitrogen atoms were evidenced by the (15)N NMR spectra. Molecular calculations of the phenazopyridines 2-4 show that the pyridine and phenyl groups are oriented in an antiperiplanar conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-b atom and the C-2 amino group preserving the E-azo stereochemistry.

  2. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Verma, Deepshikha; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2016-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a 150-residue long calmodulin-like calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6), as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization.

  3. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule's introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening. Results We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better. Conclusions Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. PMID:22536902

  4. Natural-abundance 15N NMR studies of Turkey ovomucoid third domain. Assignment of peptide 15N resonances to the residues at the reactive site region via proton-detected multiple-quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Polo, Gilberto; Krishnamoorthi, R.; Markley, John L.; Live, David H.; Davis, Donald G.; Cowburn, David

    Heteronuclear two-dimensional 1H{ 15N} multiple-quantum (MQ) spectroscopy has been applied to a protein sample at natural abundance: ovomucoid third domain from turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo), a serine proteinase inhibitor of 56 amino acid residues. Peptide amide 1H NMR assignments obtained by two-dimensional 1H{ 1H} NMR methods (R. Krishnamoorthi and J. L. Markley, unpublished data) led to identification of the corresponding 1H{ 15N} MQ coherence cross peaks. From these, 15N NMR chemical shifts were determined for several specific backbone amide groups of amino acid residues located around the reactive site region of the inhibitor. The results suggest that amide 15N chemical shifts, which are readily obtained in this way, may serve as sensitive probes for conformational studies of proteins.

  5. Triosephosphate isomerase: 15N and 13C chemical shift assignments and conformational change upon ligand binding by magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yimin; Lorieau, Justin; McDermott, Ann E

    2010-03-19

    Microcrystalline uniformly (13)C,(15)N-enriched yeast triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is sequentially assigned by high-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Assignments are based on intraresidue and interresidue correlations, using dipolar polarization transfer methods, and guided by solution NMR assignments of the same protein. We obtained information on most of the active-site residues involved in chemistry, including some that were not reported in a previous solution NMR study, such as the side-chain carbons of His95. Chemical shift differences comparing the microcrystalline environment to the aqueous environment appear to be mainly due to crystal packing interactions. Site-specific perturbations of the enzyme's chemical shifts upon ligand binding are studied by SSNMR for the first time. These changes monitor proteinwide conformational adjustment upon ligand binding, including many of the sites probed by solution NMR and X-ray studies. Changes in Gln119, Ala163, and Gly210 were observed in our SSNMR studies, but were not reported in solution NMR studies (chicken or yeast). These studies identify a number of new sites with particularly clear markers for ligand binding, paving the way for future studies of triosephosphate isomerase dynamics and mechanism.

  6. Natural abundance 15N NMR assignments delineate structural differences between intact and reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthi, R; Nemmers, S; Tobias, B

    1992-06-15

    15N NMR assignments were made to the backbone amide nitrogen atoms at natural isotopic abundance of intact and reactive-site (Arg5-Ile6) hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III and CMTI-III*, respectively) by means of 2D proton-detected heteronuclear single bond chemical shift correlation (HSBC) spectroscopy, utilizing the previously made sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments (Krishnamoorthi et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 898-904). Comparison of the 15N chemical shifts of the two forms of the inhibitor molecule revealed significant changes not only for residues located near the reactive-site region, but also for those distantly located. Residues Cys3, Arg5, Leu7, Met8, Cys10, Cys16, Glu19, His25, Tyr27, Cys28 and Gly29 showed significant chemical shift changes ranging from 0.3 to 6.1 ppm, thus indicating structural perturbations that were transmitted throughout the molecule. These findings confirm the earlier conclusions based on 1H NMR investigations.

  7. Backbone (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR resonance assignments of the Krüppel-like factor 4 activation domain.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Brigid S; Weiss, Emma R; Smith, Steven P; Langelaan, David N

    2017-04-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a transcription factor involved in diverse biological processes, including development, cellular differentiation and proliferation, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. KLF4 has also been associated with disease states, such as cardiovascular disease and several cancers. KLF4 contains an activation domain, repression domain, and a structurally characterized C-terminal zinc finger domain that mediates its binding to DNA. The structurally uncharacterized KLF4 activation domain is critical for transactivation by KLF4 and mediates its binding to the transcriptional coactivator CBP/p300. Here, we report the (1)H, (15)N, (13)CO, (13)Cα and (13)Cβ NMR chemical shift assignments of KLF41-130, which contains the KLF4 activation domain. Narrow chemical shift dispersion in the (1)H dimension of the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum suggests that the KLF41-130 fragment is intrinsically disordered.

  8. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part I: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Mayaro virus (MAYV).

    PubMed

    Melekis, Efstathios; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Chasapis, Christos T; Margiolaki, Irene; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-04-01

    Macro domains are ADP-ribose-binding modules present in all eukaryotic organisms, bacteria and archaea. They are also found in non-structural proteins of several positive strand RNA viruses such as alphaviruses. Here, we report the high yield expression and preliminary structural analysis through solution NMR spectroscopy of the macro domain from New World Mayaro Alphavirus. The recombinant protein was well-folded and in a monomeric state. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure determined by TALOS+.

  9. Sequential assignment of 1H, 15N, 13C resonances and secondary structure of human calmodulin-like protein determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, H.; Rogers, M. S.; Schleucher, J.; Edlund, U.; Strehler, E. E.; Sethson, I.

    1998-01-01

    Human calmodulin-like protein (CLP) is closely related to vertebrate calmodulin, yet its unique cell specific expression pattern, overlapping but divergent biochemical properties, and specific target proteins suggest that it is not an isoform of calmodulin. To gain insight into the structural differences that may underlie the difference target specificities and biochemical properties of CLP when compared to calmodulin, we determined the sequential backbone assignment and associated secondary structure of 144 out of the 148 residues of Ca2+-CLP by using multinuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Despite a very high overall degree of structural similarity between CLP and calmodulin, a number of significant differences were found mainly in the length of alpha-helices and in the central nonhelical flexible region. Interestingly, the regions of greatest primary sequence divergence between CLP and calmodulin in helices III and VIII displayed only minor secondary structure differences. The data suggest that the distinct differences in target specificity and biochemical properties of CLP and calmodulin result from the sum of several minor structural and side-chain changes spread over multiple domains in these proteins. PMID:9828009

  10. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part II: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV).

    PubMed

    Makrynitsa, Garyfallia I; Ntonti, Dioni; Marousis, Konstantinos D; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-10-01

    Macro domains consist of 130-190 amino acid residues and appear to be highly conserved in all kingdoms of life. Intense research on this field has shown that macro domains bind ADP-ribose and other similar molecules, but their exact function still remains intangible. Macro domains are highly conserved in the Alphavirus genus and the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a member of this genus that causes fatal encephalitis to equines and humans. In this study we report the high yield recombinant expression and preliminary solution NMR study of the macro domain of VEEV. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure predicted by TALOS+. The protein shows a unique mixed α/β-fold.

  11. 15N NMR of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Goba, Inguna; Liepinsh, Edvards

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we describe the characteristic (15)N and (1)HN NMR chemical shifts and (1)J((15)N-(1)H) coupling constants of various symmetrically and unsymmetrically substituted 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives. The NMR chemical shifts and coupling constants are discussed in terms of their relationship to structural features such as character and position of the substituent in heterocycle, N-alkyl substitution, nitrogen lone pair delocalization within the conjugated system, and steric effects.

  12. Proton-coupled 15N NMR spectra of neutral and protonated ethenoadenosine and ethenocytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Sierzputowska-Gracz, H; Wiewiórowski, M; Kozerski, L; von Philipsborn, W

    1984-01-01

    The 15N chemical shifts and 15N, 1H spin coupling constants were determined in the title compounds using the INEPT pulse sequence and assigned with the aid of selective proton decoupling. The delta/15N/ and J/N, H/ values are discussed in terms of involvement of the imidazole ring created by ethenobridging in the electronic structure of the whole molecule. Both spectral parameters indicate that the diligant nitrogen in this ring is the primary site of protonation in these modified nucleosides. It is concluded that 15N NMR of nucleoside bases can be largely a complementary method to 1H and 13C NMR studies and, in addition, can serve as a direct probe for studies of nitrogen environment in oligomeric fragments of nucleic acids even at moderately strong magnetic fields due to the higher spectral dispersion compared with 1H and 13C NMR spectra. PMID:6473107

  13. Solvent effects on 15N NMR coordination shifts.

    PubMed

    Kleinmaier, Roland; Arenz, Sven; Karim, Alavi; Carlsson, Anna-Carin C; Erdélyi, Máté

    2013-01-01

    (15)N NMR chemical shift became a broadly utilized tool for characterization of complex structures and comparison of their properties. Despite the lack of systematic studies, the influence of solvent on the nitrogen coordination shift, Δ(15)N(coord), was hitherto claimed to be negligible. Herein, we report the dramatic impact of the local environment and in particular that of the interplay between solvent and substituents on Δ(15)N(coord). The comparative study of CDCl(3) and CD(3)CN solutions of silver(I)-bis(pyridine) and silver(I)-bis(pyridylethynyl)benzene complexes revealed the strong solvent dependence of their (15)N NMR chemical shift, with a solvent dependent variation of up to 40 ppm for one and the same complex. The primary influence of the effect of substituent and counter ion on the (15)N NMR chemical shifts is rationalized by corroborating Density-Functional Theory (nor discrete Fourier transform) calculations on the B3LYP/6-311 + G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. Cooperative effects have to be taken into account for a comprehensive description of the coordination shift and thus the structure of silver complexes in solution. Our results demonstrate that interpretation of Δ(15)N(coord) in terms of coordination strength must always consider the solvent and counter ion. The comparable magnitude of Δ(15)N(coord) for reported transition metal complexes makes the principal findings most likely general for a broad scale of complexes of nitrogen donor ligands, which are in frequent use in modern organometallic chemistry.

  14. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported.

  15. Derivatives of pyrazinecarboxylic acid: 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Wolfgang; Eller, Gernot A; Datterl, Barbara; Habicht, Daniela

    2009-07-01

    NMR spectroscopic studies are undertaken with derivatives of 2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid. Complete and unambiguous assignment of chemical shifts ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N) and coupling constants ((1)H,(1)H; (13)C,(1)H; (15)N,(1)H) is achieved by combined application of various 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques. Unequivocal mapping of (13)C,(1)H spin coupling constants is accomplished by 2D (delta,J) long-range INEPT spectra with selective excitation. Phenomena such as the tautomerism of 3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid are discussed.

  16. Optimization of amino acid type-specific 13C and 15N labeling for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins by solution- and solid-state NMR with the UPLABEL algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hefke, Frederik; Bagaria, Anurag; Reckel, Sina; Ullrich, Sandra Johanna; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens; Güntert, Peter

    2011-02-01

    We present a computational method for finding optimal labeling patterns for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins and other large proteins that cannot be assigned by conventional strategies. Following the approach of Kainosho and Tsuji (Biochemistry 21:6273-6279 (1982)), types of amino acids are labeled with (13)C or/and (15)N such that cross peaks between (13)CO(i - 1) and (15)NH(i) result only for pairs of sequentially adjacent amino acids of which the first is labeled with (13)C and the second with (15)N. In this way, unambiguous sequence-specific assignments can be obtained for unique pairs of amino acids that occur exactly once in the sequence of the protein. To be practical, it is crucial to limit the number of differently labeled protein samples that have to be prepared while obtaining an optimal extent of labeled unique amino acid pairs. Our computer algorithm UPLABEL for optimal unique pair labeling, implemented in the program CYANA and in a standalone program, and also available through a web portal, uses combinatorial optimization to find for a given amino acid sequence labeling patterns that maximize the number of unique pair assignments with a minimal number of differently labeled protein samples. Various auxiliary conditions, including labeled amino acid availability and price, previously known partial assignments, and sequence regions of particular interest can be taken into account when determining optimal amino acid type-specific labeling patterns. The method is illustrated for the assignment of the human G-protein coupled receptor bradykinin B2 (B(2)R) and applied as a starting point for the backbone assignment of the membrane protein proteorhodopsin.

  17. Stereospecific assignments of glycine in proteins by stereospecific deuteration and {sup 15}N labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Curley, R.W. Jr.; Panigot, M.J.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Stereospecific assignments are important for accurately determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins through the use of multidimensional NMR techniques. It is especially important to stereospecifically assign the glycine {alpha}-protons in proteins because of the potential for different backbone conformations of this residue. These stereospecific assignments are critical for interpreting the {sup 3}J{sub NH,{alpha}H} coupling constants and NOEs involving the glycine {alpha}-protons that determine the conformation of this part of the protein. However, it is often difficult to unambiguously obtain the stereospecific assignments for glycine residues by using only NOE data. In this poster, we present a method for unambiguous, stereospecific assignment of the {alpha}-protons of glycine residues. This method involves synthesis of stereo-specifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gly using a slightly modified procedure originally described by Woodard and coworkers for the stereoselective deuteration of glycine. The stereospecifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gy has been incorporated into recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial systems (FKBP) and mammalian cells (u-PA). Two- and three-dimensional isotope-filtered and isotope-edited NMR experiments were used to obtain the stereospecific assignments of the glycine {alpha}-protons for these proteins.

  18. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for E73 from Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus ragged hills, a hyperthermophilic crenarchaeal virus from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Casey; Menon, Smita; Lawrence, C Martin; Copié, Valérie

    2009-12-01

    Crenarchaeal viruses are commonly found in hyperthermal acidic environments such as those of Yellowstone National Park. These remarkable viruses not only exhibit unusual morphologies, but also display extreme genetic diversity. However, little is known about crenarchaeal viral life cycles, virus-host interactions, and their adaptation to hyperthermophilic environments. In an effort to better understand the functions of crenarchaeal viruses and the proteins encoded by their genomes, we have undertaken detailed structural and functional studies of gene products encoded in the open reading frames of Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus ragged hills. Herein, we report ((15)N, (13)C, (1)H) resonance assignments of backbone and side chain atoms of a 19.1 kDa homodimeric E73 protein of SSVRH.

  19. Experimental and calculated 1H, 13C, 15N NMR spectra of famotidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barańska, M.; Czarniecki, K.; Proniewicz, L. M.

    2001-05-01

    Famotidine, 3-[[[2-[(aminoiminomethyl)amino]-4-thiazolyl]methyl]thio]- N-(aminosulfonyl), is a histamine H 2-receptor blocker that has been used mainly for the treatment of peptic ulcers and the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Its NMR spectra in different solvents were reported earlier; however, detailed interpretation has not been done thus far. In this work, experimental 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectra of famotidine dissolved in DMSO-d 6 are shown. The assignment of observed chemical shifts is based on quantum chemical calculation at the Hartree-Fock/6-31G ∗ level. The geometry optimization of the famotidine molecule with two internal hydrogen bonds, i.e. [N(3)-H(23)⋯N(9) and N(3)⋯H(34)-N(20)], is done by using the B3LYP method with the 6-31G ∗ basis set.

  20. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  1. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  2. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  3. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches.

  4. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Quantitative and qualitative 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopic investigation of the urea-formaldehyde resin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Steinhof, Oliver; Kibrik, Éléonore J; Scherr, Günter; Hasse, Hans

    2014-04-01

    Urea-formaldehyde resins are bulk products of the chemical industry. Their synthesis involves a complex reaction network. The present work contributes to its elucidation by presenting results from detailed NMR spectroscopic studies with different methods. Besides (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR, (15)N NMR spectroscopy is also applied. (15)N-enriched urea was used for the investigations. A detailed NMR signal assignment and a model of the reaction network of the hydroxymethylation step of the synthesis are presented. Because of its higher spectral dispersion and the fact that all key reactions directly involve the nitrogen centers, (15)N NMR provides a much larger amount of detail than do (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Symmetric and asymmetric dimethylol urea can be clearly distinguished and separated from monomethylol urea, trimethylol urea, and methylene-bridged urea. The existence of hemiformals of methylol urea is confirmed. 1,3,5-Oxadiazinan-4-on (uron) and its derivatives were not found in the reaction mixtures investigated here but were prepared via alternative routes. The molar ratios of formaldehyde to urea were 1, 2, and 4, the pH values 7.5 and 8.5, and the reaction temperature 60 °C.

  6. Sequence-specific sup 1 H and sup 15 N resonance assignments for human dihydrofolate reductase in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Nirmala, N.R.; Wagner, G. ); Delcamp, T.J.; DeYarman, M.T.; Freisheim, J.H. )

    1992-01-14

    Dihydrofolate reductase is an intracellular target enzyme for folate antagonists, including the anticancer drug methotrexate. In order to design novel drugs with altered binding properties, a detailed description of protein-drug interactions in solution is desirable to understand the specificity of drug binding. As a first step in this process, heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been used to make sequential resonance assignments for more than 90% of the residues in human dihydrofolate reductase complexed with methotrexate. Uniform enrichment of the 21.5-kDa protein with {sup 15}N was required to obtain the resonance assignments via heteronuclear 3D NMR spectroscopy since homonuclear 2D spectra did not provide sufficient {sup 1}H resonance dispersion. Medium- and long-range NOE's have been used to characterize the secondary structure of the binary ligand-enzyme complex in solution.

  7. Ner protein of phage Mu: Assignments using {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strzelecka, T.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    The Ner protein is a small (74-amino acid) DNA-binding protein that regulates a switch between the lysogenic and lytic stages of phage Mu. It inhibits expression of the C repressor gene and down-regulates its own expression. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled protein provided most of the backbone and some of the sidechain proton assignments. The secondary structure determination using two-dimensional NOESY experiments showed that Ner consists of five {alpha}-helices. However, because most of the sidechain protons could not be assigned, the full structure was not determined. Using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled Ner and a set of three-dimensional experiments, we were able to assign all of the backbone and 98% of the sidechain protons. In particular, the CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH experiments were used to sequentially assign the C{alpha} and C{beta} resonances; the HCCH-CTOCSY and HCCH-COSY were used to assign sidechain carbon and proton resonances.

  8. Benchmark Theoretical and Experimental Study on (15)N NMR Shifts of Oxidatively Damaged Guanine.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Šála, Michal; Klepetářová, Blanka; Šebera, Jakub; Fukal, Jiří; Holečková, Veronika; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Nencka, Radim; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2016-02-11

    The (15)N NMR shifts of 9-ethyl-8-oxoguanine (OG) were calculated and measured in liquid DMSO and in crystal. The OG molecule is a model for oxidatively damaged 2'-deoxyguanosine that occurs owing to oxidative stress in cell. The DNA lesion is repaired with human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) base-excision repair enzyme, however, the exact mechanism of excision of damaged nucleobase with hOGG1 is currently unknown. This benchmark study on (15)N NMR shifts of OG aims their accurate structural interpretation and calibration of the calculation protocol utilizable in future studies on mechanism of hOGG1 enzyme. The effects of NMR reference, DFT functional, basis set, solvent, structure, and dynamics on calculated (15)N NMR shifts were first evaluated for OG in crystal to calibrate the best performing calculation method. The effect of large-amplitude motions on (15)N NMR shifts of OG in liquid was calculated employing molecular dynamics. The B3LYP method with Iglo-III basis used for B3LYP optimized geometry with 6-311++G(d,p) basis and including effects of solvent and molecular dynamic was the calculation protocol used for calculation of (15)N NMR shifts of OG. The NMR shift of N9 nitrogen of OG was particularly studied because the atom is involved in an N-glycosidic bond that is cleaved with hOGG1. The change of N9 NMR shift owing to oxidation of 9-ethylguanine (G) measured in liquid was -27.1 ppm. The calculated N9 NMR shift of OG deviated from experiment in crystal and in liquid by 0.45 and 0.65 ppm, respectively. The calculated change of N9 NMR shift owing to notable N9-pyramidalization of OG in one previously found polymorph was 20.53 ppm. We therefore assume that the pyramidal geometry of N9 nitrogen that could occur for damaged DNA within hOGG1 catalytic site might be detectable with (15)N NMR spectroscopy. The calculation protocol can be used for accurate structural interpretation of (15)N NMR shifts of oxidatively damaged guanine DNA residue.

  9. 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shift assignments of the thioredoxin from the obligate anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Garcin, Edwige B; Bornet, Olivier; Pieulle, Laetitia; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne

    2011-10-01

    Thioredoxins are ubiquitous key antioxidant enzymes which play an essential role in cell defense against oxidative stress. They maintain the redox homeostasis owing to the regulation of thiol-disulfide exchange. In the present paper, we report the full resonance assignments of (1)H, (13)C and (15)N atoms for the reduced and oxidized forms of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough thioredoxin 1 (Trx1). 2D and 3D heteronuclear NMR experiments were performed using uniformly (15)N-, (13)C-labelled Trx1. Chemical shifts of 97% of the backbone and 90% of the side chain atoms were obtained for the oxidized and reduced form (BMRB deposits with accession number 17299 and 17300, respectively).

  10. Determination of 15N chemical shift anisotropy from a membrane-bound protein by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Ahuja, Shivani; Pichumani, Kumar; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-06-21

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors are essential in the structural and dynamic studies of proteins using NMR spectroscopy. Results from relaxation studies in biomolecular solution and solid-state NMR experiments on aligned samples are routinely interpreted using well-characterized CSA tensors determined from model compounds. Since CSA tensors, particularly the (15)N CSA, highly depend on a number of parameters including secondary structure, electrostatic interaction, and the amino acid sequence, there is a need for accurately determined CSA tensors from proteins. In this study, we report the backbone amide-(15)N CSA tensors for a 16.7-kDa membrane-bound and paramagnetic-heme containing protein, rabbit Cytochrome b(5) (cytb(5)), determined using the (15)N CSA/(15)N-(1)H dipolar transverse cross-correlation rates. The mean values of (15)N CSA determined for residues in helical, sheet, and turn regions are -187.9, -166.0, and -161.1 ppm, respectively, with an overall average value of -171.7 ppm. While the average CSA value determined from this study is in good agreement with previous solution NMR experiments on small globular proteins, the CSA value determined for residues in helical conformation is slightly larger, which may be attributed to the paramagnetic effect from Fe(III) of the heme unit in cytb(5). However, like in previous solution NMR studies, the CSA values reported in this study are larger than the values measured from solid-state NMR experiments. We believe that the CSA parameters reported in this study will be useful in determining the structure, dynamics, and orientation of proteins, including membrane proteins, using NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  12. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  13. Efficient Synthesis of Nicotinamide-1-15N for Ultrafast NMR Hyperpolarization Using Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide (a vitamin B3 amide) is one of the key vitamins as well as a drug for treatment of M. tuberculosis, HIV, cancer, and other diseases. Here, an improved Zincke reaction methodology is presented allowing for straightforward and scalable synthesis of nicotinamide-1-15N with an excellent isotopic purity (98%) and good yield (55%). 15N nuclear spin label in nicotinamide-1-15N can be NMR hyperpolarized in seconds using parahydrogen gas. NMR hyperpolarization using the process of temporary conjugation between parahydrogen and to-be-hyperpolarized biomolecule on hexacoordinate iridium complex via the Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) method significantly increases detection sensitivity (e.g., >20 000-fold for nicotinamide-1-15N at 9.4 T) as has been shown by Theis T. et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404), and hyperpolarized in this fashion, nicotinamide-1-15N can be potentially used to probe metabolic processes in vivo in future studies. Moreover, the presented synthetic methodology utilizes mild reaction conditions, and therefore can also be potentially applied to synthesis of a wide range of 15N-enriched N-heterocycles that can be used as hyperpolarized contrast agents for future in vivo molecular imaging studies. PMID:26999571

  14. Contact replacement for NMR resonance assignment

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fei; Pandurangan, Gopal; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Complementing its traditional role in structural studies of proteins, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in functional studies. NMR dynamics experiments characterize motions involved in target recognition, ligand binding, etc., while NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments identify and localize protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions. The key bottleneck in these studies is to determine the backbone resonance assignment, which allows spectral peaks to be mapped to specific atoms. This article develops a novel approach to address that bottleneck, exploiting an available X-ray structure or homology model to assign the entire backbone from a set of relatively fast and cheap NMR experiments. Results: We formulate contact replacement for resonance assignment as the problem of computing correspondences between a contact graph representing the structure and an NMR graph representing the data; the NMR graph is a significantly corrupted, ambiguous version of the contact graph. We first show that by combining connectivity and amino acid type information, and exploiting the random structure of the noise, one can provably determine unique correspondences in polynomial time with high probability, even in the presence of significant noise (a constant number of noisy edges per vertex). We then detail an efficient randomized algorithm and show that, over a variety of experimental and synthetic datasets, it is robust to typical levels of structural variation (1–2 AA), noise (250–600%) and missings (10–40%). Our algorithm achieves very good overall assignment accuracy, above 80% in α-helices, 70% in β-sheets and 60% in loop regions. Availability: Our contact replacement algorithm is implemented in platform-independent Python code. The software can be freely obtained for academic use by request from the authors. Contact: gopal@cs.purdue.edu; cbk@cs.dartmouth.edu PMID:18586716

  15. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments for the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-36α.

    PubMed

    Goradia, Nishit; Wißbrock, Amelie; Wiedemann, Christoph; Bordusa, Frank; Ramachandran, Ramadurai; Imhof, Diana; Ohlenschläger, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-36α (IL-36α) is a recently characterised member of the interleukin-1 superfamily. It is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis in one third of psoriasis patients. By binding of IL-36α to its receptor IL-36R via the NF-κB pathway other cytokines involved in inflammatory and apoptotic cascade are activated. The efficacy of complex formation is controlled by N-terminal processing. To obtain a more detailed view on the structure function relationship we performed a heteronuclear multidimensional NMR investigation and here report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments for the backbone and side chain nuclei of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-36α.

  16. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  17. Complete (1) H NMR assignment of cedranolides.

    PubMed

    Perez-Hernandez, Nury; Gordillo-Roman, Barbara; Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Cerda-Garcia-Rojas, Carlos M; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    Complete and unambiguous (1) H NMR chemical shift assignment of α-cedrene (2) and cedrol (9), as well as for α-pipitzol (1), isocedrol (10), and the six related compounds 3-8 has been established by iterative full spin analysis using the PERCH NMR software (PERCH Solutions Ltd., Kuopio, Finland). The total sets of coupling constants are described and correlated with the conformational equilibria of the five-membered ring of 1-10, which were calculated using the complete basis set method. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. NMR assignment method for amide signals with cell-free protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods are widely used to determine the three-dimensional structures of proteins, to estimate protein folding, and to discover high-affinity ligands for proteins. However, one of the problems to apply such NMR methods to proteins is that we should obtain mg quantities of (15)N and/or (13)C labeled pure proteins of interest. Here, we describe the method to produce dual amino acid-selective (13)C-(15)N labeled proteins for NMR study using the improved wheat germ cell-free system, which enables sequence-specific assignments of amide signals simply even for very large protein.

  19. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  20. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGES

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; ...

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  1. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported.

  2. (15)N CSA tensors and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static (15)N NMR techniques for the determination of the (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and (15)N-(1)H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone (15)N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the (15)N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the (15)N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the "magic sandwich" SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the (15)N-(1)H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples.

  3. 15N Solid-State NMR as a Probe of Flavin H-bonding

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dongtao; Koder, Ronald L.; Dutton, P. Leslie; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2011-01-01

    Flavins mediate a wide variety of different chemical reactions in biology. To learn how one cofactor can be made to execute different reactions in different enzymes, we are developing solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to probe the flavin electronic structure, via the 15N chemical shift tensor principal values (δii). We find that SSNMR has superior responsiveness to H-bonds, compared to solution NMR. H-bonding to a model of the flavodoxin active site produced an increase of 10 ppm in the δ11 of N5 although none of the H-bonds directly engage N5, and solution NMR detected only a 4 ppm increase in the isotropic chemical shift (δiso). Moreover SSNMR responded differently to different H-bonding environments as H-bonding with water caused δ11 to decrease by 6 ppm whereas δiso increased by less than 1 ppm. Our density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations reproduce the observations, validating the use of computed electronic structures to understand how H-bonds modulate the flavin’s reactivity. PMID:21619002

  4. 15N solid-state NMR provides a sensitive probe of oxidized flavin reactive sites.

    PubMed

    Koder, Ronald L; Walsh, Joseph D; Pometun, Maxim S; Dutton, P Leslie; Wittebort, Richard J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2006-11-29

    Flavins are central to the reactivity of a wide variety of enzymes and electron transport proteins. There is great interest in understanding the basis for the different reactivities displayed by flavins in different protein contexts. We propose solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) as a tool for directly observing reactive positions of the flavin ring and thereby obtaining information on their frontier orbitals. We now report the SS-NMR signals of the redox-active nitrogens N1 and N5, as well as that of N3. The chemical shift tensor of N5 is over 720 ppm wide, in accordance with the predictions of theory and our calculations. The signal of N3 can be distinguished on the basis of coupling to 1H absent for N1 and N5, as well as the shift tensor span of only 170 ppm, consistent with N3's lower aromaticity and lack of a nonbonding lone pair. The isotropic shifts and spans of N5 and N1 reflect two opposite extremes of the chemical shift range for "pyridine-type" N's, consistent with their electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical reactivities, respectively. Upon flavin reduction, N5's chemical shift tensor contracts dramatically to a span of less than 110 ppm, and the isotropic chemical shift changes by approximately 300 ppm. Both are consistent with loss of N5's nonbonding lone pair and decreased aromaticity, and illustrate the responsiveness of the 15N chemical shift principal values to electronic structure. Thus. 15N chemical shift principal values promise to be valuable tools for understanding electronic differences that underlie variations in flavin reactivity, as well as the reactivities of other heterocyclic cofactors.

  5. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  6. Rapid Proton-Detected NMR Assignment for Proteins with Fast Magic Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using a set of six 1H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5–30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide 2H/1H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary 13C/15N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR. PMID:25102442

  7. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-03

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  8. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the (15)N/(13)C/(1)H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins.

  9. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the 15N/13C/1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins. PMID:26788853

  10. Heteronuclear NMR studies of cobalamins. 11. sup 15 N NMR studies of the axial nucleotide and amide side chains of cyanocobalamin and dicyanocobamides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.; Brooks, H.B.; Xiang, Zou ); Victor, M.; Ray, A. ); Timkovich, R. )

    1990-11-28

    Spectroscopic and thermodynamic evidence for the structure of cobalamines and dicyanocobalamin (CN){sub 2}Cbl have been previously reported. The structure indicated the occurrence of the so-called tuck-in species. Further observations and characterization of the tuck-in species of (CN){sub 2}Cbl by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy are presented herein. These results represent the first observation of the {sup 15}N NMR spectrum of benzimidazole nucleotide of cobalamins. The first NMR observation of the amide protons of cobalamins and their connectivity to the amide nitrogens are also reported. 50 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. 1H and 15N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially 1H-15N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate 15N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS 15N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via 1H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D 1H and 2D 1H-15N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  12. A closer look at the nitrogen next door: 1H-15N NMR methods for glycosaminoglycan structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beni, Szabolcs; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, experimental conditions were presented for the detection of the N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) NHSO3- or sulfamate 1H and 15N NMR resonances of the pharmaceutically and biologically important glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin in aqueous solution. In the present work, we explore further the applicability of nitrogen-bound proton detection to provide structural information for GAGs. Compared to the detection of 15N chemical shifts of aminosugars through long-range couplings using the IMPACT-HNMBC pulse sequence, the more sensitive two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiments provided additional structural data. The IMPACT-HNMBC experiment remains a powerful tool as demonstrated by the spectrum measured for the unsubstituted amine of 3-O-sulfoglucosamine (GlcN(3S)), which cannot be observed with the 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiment due to the fast exchange of the amino group protons with solvent. The 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectrum reported for the mixture of model compounds GlcNS and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrate the broad utility of this approach. Measurements for the synthetic pentasaccharide drug Arixtra® (Fondaparinux sodium) in aqueous solution illustrate the power of this NMR pulse sequence for structural characterization of highly similar N-sulfoglucosamine residues in GAG-derived oligosaccharides.

  13. 1H, 15N and 13C backbone resonance assignments of the archetypal serpin α1-antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Nyon, Mun Peak; Kirkpatrick, John; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John; Gooptu, Bibek

    2012-10-01

    Alpha(1)-antitrypsin is a 45-kDa (394-residue) serine protease inhibitor synthesized by hepatocytes, which is released into the circulatory system and protects the lung from the actions of neutrophil elastase via a conformational transition within a dynamic inhibitory mechanism. Relatively common point mutations subvert this transition, causing polymerisation of α(1)-antitrypsin and deficiency of the circulating protein, predisposing carriers to severe lung and liver disease. We have assigned the backbone resonances of α(1)-antitrypsin using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. These assignments provide the starting point for a detailed solution state characterization of the structural properties of this highly dynamic protein via NMR methods.

  14. Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15N, 13C, and 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Hoatson, G. L.; Holloway, B. C.; Vold, R. L.; Reilly, A. C.

    2003-11-01

    The nitrogen bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is examined with 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests revealed an elastic recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. The NMR results show that nitrogen bonding in this material is consistent with sp2 hybridized nitrogen incorporated in an aromatic carbon environment. The data also indicate that the a-CNx prepared for this study has very low hydrogen content and is hydrophilic. Specifically, analysis of 15N and 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning and 1H NMR experiments suggests that water preferentially protonates nitrogen sites.

  15. 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of an intramolecular Lmo2-LIM2/Ldb1-LID complex.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson-White, Lorna E; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Kwan, Ann H; Ryan, Daniel P; Mackay, Joel P; Matthews, Jacqueline M

    2010-10-01

    Lmo2 is a LIM-only protein involved in hematopoiesis and the development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Here we report backbone and side chain NMR assignments for an engineered intramolecular complex of the C-terminal LIM domain from Lmo2 tethered to the LIM interaction domain (LID) from LIM domain binding protein 1 (Ldb1).

  16. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of translation initiation factor 1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Alejandra; Hu, Yanmei; Palmer, Stephanie O; Silva, Aaron; Bullard, James; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen and a primary cause of infection in humans. P. aeruginosa can acquire resistance against multiple groups of antimicrobial agents, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones, and multidrug resistance is increasing in this organism which makes treatment of the infections difficult and expensive. This has led to the unmet need for discovery of new compounds distinctly different from present antimicrobials. Protein synthesis is an essential metabolic process and a validated target for the development of new antibiotics. Translation initiation factor 1 from P. aeruginosa (Pa-IF1) is the smallest of the three initiation factors that acts to establish the 30S initiation complex to initiate translation during protein biosynthesis, and its structure is unknown. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments of Pa-IF1 as the basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified five β-strands with an unusually extended β-strand at the C-terminal end of the protein and one short α-helix arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-β3-α1-β4-β5. This is further supported by (15)N-{(1)H} hetero NOEs. These secondary structure elements suggest the Pa-IF1 adopts the typical β-barrel structure and is composed of an oligomer-binding motif.

  17. 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of light organ-associated fatty acid-binding protein of Taiwanese fireflies.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kai-Li; Lee, Yi-Zong; Chen, Yun-Ru; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2016-04-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are a family of proteins that modulate the transfer of various fatty acids in the cytosol and constitute a significant portion in many energy-consuming cells. The ligand binding properties and specific functions of a particular type of FABP seem to be diverse and depend on the respective binding cavity as well as the cell type from which this protein is derived. Previously, a novel FABP (lcFABP; lc: Luciola cerata) was identified in the light organ of Taiwanese fireflies. The lcFABP was proved to possess fatty acids binding capabilities, especially for fatty acids of length C14-C18. However, the structural details are unknown, and the structure-function relationship has remained to be further investigated. In this study, we finished the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of (15)N/(13)C-enriched lcFABP by solution NMR spectroscopy. In addition, the secondary structure distribution was revealed based on the backbone N, H, Cα, Hα, C and side chain Cβ assignments. These results can provide the basis for further structural exploration of lcFABP.

  18. Near-complete 1H, 13C, 15N resonance assignments of dimethylsulfoxide-denatured TGFBIp FAS1-4 A546T.

    PubMed

    Kulminskaya, Natalia V; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Runager, Kasper; Sørensen, Charlotte S; Bjerring, Morten; Andreasen, Maria; Otzen, Daniel E; Enghild, Jan J; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Mulder, Frans A A

    2016-04-01

    The transforming growth factor beta induced protein (TGFBIp) is a major protein component of the human cornea. Mutations occurring in TGFBIp may cause corneal dystrophies, which ultimately lead to loss of vision. The majority of the disease-causing mutations are located in the C-terminal domain of TGFBIp, referred as the fourth fascilin-1 (FAS1-4) domain. In the present study the FAS1-4 Ala546Thr, a mutation that causes lattice corneal dystrophy, was investigated in dimethylsulfoxide using liquid-state NMR spectroscopy, to enable H/D exchange strategies for identification of the core formed in mature fibrils. Isotope-labeled fibrillated FAS1-4 A546T was dissolved in a ternary mixture 95/4/1 v/v/v% dimethylsulfoxide/water/trifluoroacetic acid, to obtain and assign a reference 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum for the H/D exchange analysis. Here, we report the near-complete assignments of backbone and aliphatic side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances for unfolded FAS1-4 A546T at 25 °C.

  19. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei.

  20. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for Escherichia coli ytfP, a member of the broadly conserved UPF0131 protein domain family

    SciTech Connect

    Aramini, James M.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Huang, Yuanpeng; Rajan, Paranji K.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    Protein ytfP from Escherichia coli (Swiss-Prot ID: YTFP-ECOLI; NESG target ID: ER111; Wunderlich et al., 2004) is a 113-residue member of the UPF0131 protein family (Pfam ID: PF03674) of unknown function. This domain family is found in organisms from all three kingdoms, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 97% of backbone and 91% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a mixed a/b topology,????????. BMRB deposit with Accession No. 6448. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  1. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for the protein coded by gene locus BB0938 of Bordetella bronchiseptica

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Paolo; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Xiao, Rong; Ho, Chi K.; Ma, LiChung; Acton, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    The product of gene locus BB0938 from Bordetella bronchiseptica (Swiss-Prot ID: Q7WNU7-BORBR; NESG target ID: BoR11; Wunderlich et al., 2004; Pfam ID: PF03476) is a 128-residue protein of unknown function. This broadly conserved protein family is found in eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 98% of backbone and 94% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a b topology with a seven-residue helical insert, ??????????. BMRB deposit with accession number 6693. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  2. 15N NMR investigation of the reduction and binding of TNT in an aerobic bench scale reactor simulating windrow composting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Hayes, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    T15NT was added to a soil of low organic carbon content and composted for 20 days in an aerobic bench scale reactor. The finished whole compost and fulvic acid, humic acid, humin, and lignocellulose fractions extracted from the compost were analyzed by solid-state CP/MAS and DP/MAS 15N NMR. 15N NMR spectra provided direct spectroscopic evidence for reduction of TNT followed by covalent binding of the reduced metabolites to organic matter of the composted soil, with the majority of metabolite found in the lignocellulose fraction, by mass also the major fraction of the compost. In general, the types of bonds formed between soil organic matter and reduced TNT amines in controlled laboratory reactions were observed in the spectra of the whole compost and fractions, confirming that during composting TNT is reduced to amines that form covalent bonds with organic matter through aminohydroquinone, aminoquinone, heterocyclic, and imine linkages, among others. Concentrations of imine nitrogens in the compost spectra suggestthat covalent binding bythe diamines 2,4DANT and 2,6DANT is a significant process in the transformation of TNT into bound residues. Liquid-phase 15N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid and humin fractions provided possible evidence for involvement of phenoloxidase enzymes in covalent bond formation.

  3. (13)C and (15)N NMR characterization of amine reactivity and solvent effects in CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Perinu, Cristina; Arstad, Bjørnar; Bouzga, Aud M; Jens, Klaus-J

    2014-08-28

    Factors influencing the reactivity of selected amine absorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, in terms of the tendency to form amine carbamate, have been studied. Four linear primary alkanolamines at varying chain lengths (MEA, 3A1P, 4A1B , and 5A1P ), two primary amines with different substituents in the β-position to the nitrogen (1A2P and ISOB), a secondary alkanolamine (DEA), and a sterically hindered primary amine (AMP) were investigated. The relationship between the (15)N NMR data of aqueous amines and their ability to form carbamate, as determined at equilibrium by quantitative (13)C NMR experiments, was analyzed, taking into account structural-chemical properties. For all the amines, the (15)N chemical shifts fairly reflected the observed reactivity for carbamate formation. In addition to being a useful tool for the investigation of amine reactivity, (15)N NMR data clearly provided evidence of the importance of solvent effects for the understanding of chemical dynamics in CO2 capture by aqueous amine absorbents.

  4. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  5. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  6. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Kennedy, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined.

  7. Target-specific NMR detection of protein-ligand interactions with antibody-relayed (15)N-group selective STD.

    PubMed

    Hetényi, Anasztázia; Hegedűs, Zsófia; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Monostori, Éva; Kövér, Katalin E; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-12-01

    Fragment-based drug design has been successfully applied to challenging targets where the detection of the weak protein-ligand interactions is a key element. (1)H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for this work but it requires pure homogeneous proteins as targets. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-relayed (15)N-GS STD spectroscopy has been developed to resolve the problem of protein mixtures and impure proteins. A (15)N-labelled target-specific mAb is selectively irradiated and the saturation is relayed through the target to the ligand. Tests on the anti-Gal-1 mAb/Gal-1/lactose system showed that the approach is experimentally feasible in a reasonable time frame. This method allows detection and identification of binding molecules directly from a protein mixture in a multicomponent system.

  8. 15N and 13C NMR Determination of Allantoin Metabolism in Developing Soybean Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Coker, George T.; Schaefer, Jacob

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of allantoin by immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max L. cv Elf) grown in culture was investigated using solid state 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance. All of the nitrogens of allantoin were incorporated into protein in a manner similar to that of each other and to the amide nitrogen of glutamine. The C-2 of allantoin was not incorporated into cellular material; presumably it was lost as CO2. About 50% of the C-5 of allantoin was incorporated into cellular material as a methylene carbon; the other 50% was presumably also lost as CO2. The 13C-15N bonds of [5-13C;1-15N] and [2-13C;1,3-15N]allantoin were broken prior to the incorporation of the nitrogens into protein. These data are consistent with allantoin's degradation to two molecules of urea and one two-carbon fragment. Cotyledons grown on allantoin as a source of nitrogen accumulated 21% of the nitrogen of cotyledons grown on glutamine. Only 50% of the nitrogen of the degraded allantoin was incorporated into the cotyledon as organic nitrogen; the other 50% was recovered as NH4+ in the media in which the cotyledons had been grown. The latter results suggests that the lower accumulation of nitrogen by cotyledons grown on allantoin was in part due to failure to assimilate NH4+ produced from allantoin. The seed coats had a higher activity of glutamine synthetase and a higher rate of allantoin degradation than cotyledons indicating that seed coats play an important role in the assimilation and degradation of allantoin. PMID:16663995

  9. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of CmPI-II, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from marine snail Cenchritis muricatus.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Alonso-del-Rivero Antigua, Maday; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A protease inhibitor (CmPI-II) (UNIPROT: IPK2_CENMR) from the marine mollusc Cenchritis muricatus, has been isolated and characterized. It is the first member of a new group (group 3) of non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors. CmPI-II is a tight-binding inhibitor of serine proteases: trypsin, human neutrophil elastase (HNE), subtilisin A and pancreatic elastase. This specificity is exceptional in the members of Kazal-type inhibitor family. Several models of three-dimensional structure of CmPI-II have been constructed by homology with other inhibitors of the family but its structure has not yet been solved experimentally. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of CmPI-II as basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified three β-strands β1: residues 14-19, β2: 23-35 and β3: 43-45 and one helix α1: 28-37 arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-α1-β3. These secondary structure elements suggest that CmPI-II adopts the typical scaffold of a Kazal-type inhibitor.

  10. Sequential protein NMR assignments in the liquid state via sequential data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Bellstedt, Peter; Kirschstein, Anika; Häfner, Sabine; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2014-02-01

    Two different NMR pulse schemes involving sequential 1H data acquisition are presented for achieving protein backbone sequential resonance assignments: (i) acquisition of 3D {HCCNH and HNCACONH} and (ii) collection of 3D {HNCOCANH and HNCACONH} chemical shift correlation spectra using uniformly 13C,15N labelled proteins. The sequential acquisition of these spectra reduces the overall experimental time by a factor of ≈2 as compared to individual acquisitions. The suitability of this approach is experimentally demonstrated for the C-terminal winged helix (WH) domain of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex of Sulfolobus solfataricus.

  11. Backbone NMR assignments of a topologically knotted protein in urea-denatured state.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shu-Ju Micky; Mallam, Anna L; Jackson, Sophie E; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2014-10-01

    YbeA is a 3-methylpseudoridine methyltransferase from Escherichia coli that forms a stable homodimer in solution. It is one of the deeply trefoil 31 knotted proteins, of which the knot encompasses the C-terminal helix that threads through a long loop. Recent studies on the knotted protein folding pathways using YbeA have suggested that the protein knot remains present under chemically denaturing conditions. Here, we report (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments for urea-denatured YbeA, which will serve as the basis for further structural characterisations using solution state NMR spectroscopy with paramagnetic spin labeled and partial alignment media.

  12. Mechanism of Solid-State Thermolysis of Ammonia Boraine: 15N NMR Study Using Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Gupta, Shalabh; Caporini, Marc A; Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Pruski, Marek

    2014-08-28

    The solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) was explored using state-of-the-art 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including 2D indirectly detected 1H{15N} heteronuclear correlation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 15N{1H} cross-polarization experiments as well as 11B NMR. The complementary use of 15N and 11B NMR experiments, supported by density functional theory calculations of the chemical shift tensors, provided insights into the dehydrogenation mechanism of AB—insights that have not been available by 11B NMR alone. Specifically, highly branched polyaminoborane derivatives were shown to form from AB via oligomerization in the “head-to-tail” manner, which then transform directly into hexagonal boron nitride analog through the dehydrocyclization reaction, bypassing the formation of polyiminoborane.

  13. The Styrene Probe Applied to 15N and 77Se NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Se, in chemical energetics and organic synthesis increase the value of learning more of their bonding properties through NMR. In the last 10-15 years...change of the substituent chemical shift of the cyanide carbon and the adjacent ring carbon to be reversed from each other: as X became more e withdrawing...the ring carbon became more deshielded (+ slope) and the cyanide carbon became more shielded (- slope), shown in XXVIII(A): [32] NOTE: Within this

  14. 13C and 15N spectral editing inside histidine imidazole ring through solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenhui; Zhou, Lei; Su, Yongchao; Han, Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Histidine usually exists in three different forms (including biprotonated species, neutral τ and π tautomers) at physiological pH in biological systems. The different protonation and tautomerization states of histidine can be characteristically determined by (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts of imidazole ring. In this work, solid-state NMR techniques were developed for spectral editing of (13)C and (15)N sites in histidine imidazole ring, which provides a benchmark to distinguish the existing forms of histidine. The selections of (13)Cγ, (13)Cδ2, (15)Nδ1, and (15)Nε2 sites were successfully achieved based on one-bond homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole interactions. Moreover, it was demonstrated that (1)H, (13)C, and (15) chemical shifts were roughly linearly correlated with the corresponding atomic charge in histidine imidazole ring by theoretical calculations. Accordingly, the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts variation in different protonation and tautomerization states could be ascribed to the atomic charge change due to proton transfer in biological process.

  15. Backbone assignments and secondary structure of the Escherichia coli enzyme-II mannitol A domain determined by heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Kroon, G. J.; Grötzinger, J.; Dijkstra, K.; Scheek, R. M.; Robillard, G. T.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the backbone assignments and the secondary structure determination of the A domain of the Escherichia coli mannitol transport protein, enzyme-IImtl. The backbone resonances were partially assigned using three-dimensional heteronuclear 1H NOE 1H-15N single-quantum coherence (15N NOESY-HSQC) spectroscopy and three-dimensional heteronuclear 1H total correlation 1H-15N single-quantum coherence (15N TOCSY-HSQC) spectroscopy on uniformly 15N enriched protein. Triple-resonance experiments on uniformly 15N/13C enriched protein were necessary to complete the backbone assignments, due to overlapping 1H and 15N frequencies. Data obtained from three-dimensional 1H-15N-13C alpha correlation experiments (HNCA and HN(CO)CA), a three-dimensional 1H-15N-13CO correlation experiment (HNCO), and a three-dimensional 1H alpha-13C alpha-13CO correlation experiment (COCAH) were combined using SNARF software, and yielded the assignments of virtually all observed backbone resonances. Determination of the secondary structure of IIAmtl is based upon NOE information from the 15N NOESY-HSQC and the 1H alpha and 13C alpha secondary chemical shifts. The resulting secondary structure is considerably different from that reported for IIAglc of E. coli and Bacillus subtilis determined by NMR and X-ray. PMID:8401218

  16. High Resolution NMR ^15N and ^31P NMR Of Antiferroelectric Phase Transition in Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate and Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaydin-Sen, Ozge

    2005-03-01

    Natural abundance ^15N CPMAS NMR has been used to investigate the paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition of NH4H2AsO4 (ADA) (TN˜216K) and of NH4H2PO4 (ADP) (148K), with a focus on the role of the NH4^+ ion. Isotropic chemical shift of ^15N for ADA exhibits an almost linear temperature dependence to within TN±1K, and then changes discontinuously, followed by another almost linear dependence. The spectra of the paraelectric and antiferroelectric phases coexist around the TN. The sharp anomaly around TN implies that the NH4^+ ions undergo a displacive transition, whereas the protons in the O-HO bonds undergo an order-disorder transition. The ^15N data thus support a mixed order-disorder-displacive mechanism for this transition. The ^15N data on ADP exhibit somewhat different behavior. ^31P CPMAS measurements will also be presented and discussed in terms of the above model.

  17. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  18. 15N NMR study of nitrate ion structure and dynamics in hydrotalcite-like compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hou, X.; James, Kirkpatrick R.; Yu, P.; Moore, D.; Kim, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report here the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic study of the dynamical and structural behavior of nitrate on the surface and in the interlayer of hydrotalcite-like compounds (15NO3--HT). Spectroscopically resolvable surface-absorbed and interlayer NO3- have dramatically different dynamical characteristics. The interlayer nitrate shows a well defined, temperature independent uniaxial chemical shift anisotropy (CS A) powder pattern. It is rigidly held or perhaps undergoes rotation about its threefold axis at all temperatures between -100 ??C and +80 ??C and relative humidities (R.H.) from 0 to 100% at room temperature. For surface nitrate, however, the dynamical behavior depends substantially on temperature and relative humidity. Analysis of the temperature and R.H. dependences of the peak width yields reorieritational frequencies which increase from essentially 0 at -100 ??C to 2.6 ?? 105 Hz at 60 ??C and an activation energy of 12.6 kJ/mol. For example, for samples at R.H. = 33%, the surface nitrate is isotropically mobile at frequencies greater than 105 Hz at room temperature, but it becomes rigid or only rotates on its threefold axis at -100 ??C. For dry samples and samples heated at 200 ??C (R.H. near 0%), the surface nitrate is not isotropically averaged at room temperature. In contrast to our previous results for 35Cl--containing hydrotalcite (35Cl--HT), no NMR detectable structural phase transition is observed for 15NO3--HT. The mobility of interlayer nitrate in HT is intermediate between that of carbonate and chloride.

  19. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and second structure information of Fag s 1: Fagales allergen from Fagus sylvatica.

    PubMed

    Moraes, A H; Asam, C; Batista, A; Almeida, F C L; Wallner, M; Ferreira, F; Valente, A P

    2016-04-01

    Fagales allergens belonging to the Bet v 1 family account responsible for the majority of spring pollinosis in the temperate climate zones in the Northern hemisphere. Among them, Fag s 1 from beech pollen is an important trigger of Fagales pollen associated allergic reactions. The protein shares high similarity with birch pollen Bet v 1, the best-characterized member of this allergen family. Of note, recent work on Bet v 1 and its homologues found in Fagales pollen demonstrated that not all allergenic members of this family have the capacity to induce allergic sensitization. Fag s 1 was shown to bind pre-existing IgE antibodies most likely primarily directed against other members of this multi-allergen family. Therefore, it is especially interesting to compare the structures of Bet v 1-like pollen allergens, which have the potential to induce allergic sensitization with allergens that are mainly cross-reactive. This in the end will help to identify allergy eliciting molecular pattern on Bet v 1-like allergens. In this work, we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C NMR assignment of beech pollen Fag s 1 as well as the secondary structure information based on backbone chemical shifts.

  20. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of translation initiation factor 1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Alejandra; Hu, Yanmei; Palmer, Stephanie O.; Silva, Aaron; Bullard, James; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen and a primary cause of infection in humans. P. aeruginosa can acquire resistance against multiple groups of antimicrobial agents, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones, and multidrug resistance is increasing in this organism which makes treatment of the infections difficult and expensive. This has led to the unmet need for discovery of new compounds distinctly different from present antimicrobials. Protein synthesis is an essential metabolic process and a validated target for the development of new antibiotics. Translation initiation factor 1 from P. aeruginosa (Pa-IF1) is the smallest of the three initiation factors that acts to establish the 30S initiation complex to initiate translation during protein biosynthesis, and its structure is unknown. Here we report the 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shift assignments of Pa-IF1 as the basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified five β-strands with an unusually extended β-strand at the C-terminal end of the protein and one short α-helix arranged in the sequential order β1–β2–β3–α1–β4–β5. This is further supported by 15N–{1H} hetero NOEs. These secondary structure elements suggest the Pa-IF1 adopts the typical β-barrel structure and is composed of an oligomer-binding motif. PMID:26983940

  1. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments for intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein complexed with palmitate (15.4 kDA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hodsdon, M.E.; Toner, J.J.; Cistola, D.P.

    1994-12-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein (I-FABP) belongs to a family of soluble, cytoplasmic proteins that are thought to function in the intracellular transport and trafficking of polar lipids. Individual members of this protein family have distinct specificities and affinities for fatty acids, cholesterol, bile salts, and retinoids. We are comparing several retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins from intestine in order to define the factors that control molecular recognition in this family of proteins. We have established sequential resonance assignments for uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-enriched I-FABP complexed with perdeuterated palmitate at pH7.2 and 37{degrees}C. The assignment strategy was similar to that introduced for calmodulin. We employed seven three-dimensional NMR experiments to establish scalar couplings between backbone and sidechain atoms. Backbone atoms were correlated using triple-resonance HNCO, HNCA, TOCSY-HMQC, HCACO, and HCA(CO)N experiments. Sidechain atoms were correlated using CC-TOCSY, HCCH-TOCSY, and TOCSY-HMQC. The correlations of peaks between three-dimensional spectra were established in a computer-assisted manner using NMR COMPASS (Molecular Simulations, Inc.) Using this approach, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments have been established for 120 of the 131 residues of I-FABP. For 18 residues, amide {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances were unobservable, apparently because of the rapid exchange of amide protons with bulk water at pH 7.2. The missing amide protons correspond to distinct amino acid patterns in the protein sequence, which will be discussed. During the assignment process, several sources of ambiguity in spin correlations were observed. To overcome this ambiguity, the additional inter-residue correlations often observed in the HNCA experiment were used as cross-checks for the sequential backbone assignments.

  2. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  3. 15N, 17O NMR and X-ray diffraction study of mesoionic 1,2,3,4-thiatriazolium-5-olate and its ethylated derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaźiwińsk, J.; Staszewska, O.; Staszewski, P.; Stefaniak, L.; Wiench, J. W.; Webb, G. A.

    1999-02-01

    Two mesoionic compounds with oxygenous exocyclic groups: 3-phenyl-1,2,3,4-thiatriazolium-5-olate 1 and its ethylated derivative 2 were investigated by means of 15N, 17O NMR and X-ray diffraction techniques. The exocyclic C5-O6 bond of thiatriazole 1 [1.224(3) Å] has a strong double bond character. Bond lengths in the thiatriazole ring are intermediate between single and double bond values except for S1-C5 [1.800(2) Å] which is close to a single Csp 3-S bond. The C5-O6 bond is significantly longer for the ethylated derivative 2 [1.314(4) Å]. The ethyl group attached to O6 is located in the trans position in relation to the ring S1 atom. The experimental data are compared with the results of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The calculated absolute nuclear shieldings, chemical shifts and charge densities, in spite of some limitations, can be useful as an aid to signal assignments and for an understanding of the NMR parameters.

  4. Biomolecular NMR using a microcoil NMR probe--new technique for the chemical shift assignment of aromatic side chains in proteins.

    PubMed

    Peti, Wolfgang; Norcross, James; Eldridge, Gary; O'Neil-Johnson, Mark

    2004-05-12

    A specially designed microcoil probe for use in biomolecular NMR spectroscopy is presented. The microcoil probe shows a mass-based sensitivity increase of a minimal factor of 7.5, allowing for the first time routine biomolecular NMR spectroscopy with microgram amounts of proteins. In addition, the exceptional radio frequency capabilities of this probe allowed us to record an aliphatic-aromatic HCCH-TOCSY spectrum for the first time. Using this spectrum, the side chains of aliphatic and aromatic amino acids can be completely assigned using only a single experiment. Using the conserved hypothetical protein TM0979 from Thermotoga maritima, we demonstrate the capabilities of this microcoil NMR probe to completely pursue the sequence specific backbone assignment with less than 500 microg of (13)C,(15)N labeled protein.

  5. Assigning the NMR Spectrum of Glycidol: An Advanced Organic Chemistry Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Eric; Arpaia, Nicholas; Widener, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Various one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments have been found to be extremely useful for assigning the proton and carbon NMR spectra of glycidol. The technique provides extremely valuable information aiding in the complete assignment of the peaks.

  6. COVALENT BINDING OF REDUCED METABOLITES OF [15N3] TNT TO SOIL ORGANIC MATTER DURING A BIOREMEDIATION PROCESS ANALYZED BY 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY. (R826646)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of
    biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-15N3-trinitrotoluene
    (TNT) to different soil fractions (humic acids, fulvic
    acids, and humin) using liquid 15N NMR spectroscopy. A
    silylation p...

  7. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignment of the cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin 1 from the pathogen Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Monica; Sturlese, Mattia; Manta, Bruno; Löhr, Frank; Mammi, Stefano; Comini, Marcelo; Bellanda, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasites responsible for several tropical and subtropical diseases, such as Chaga's disease, sleeping sickness and Leishmaniasis. In contrast to the mammalian host, the thiol-redox metabolism of these pathogens depends on trypanothione [bis-glutathionylspermidine, T(SH)2] instead of glutathione (GSH) providing a set of lineage-specific proteins as drug target candidates. Glutaredoxins (Grx) are ubiquitous small thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases that belong to the thioredoxin-fold family. They play a central role in redox homeostasis and iron sulfur-cluster biogenesis. Each species, including trypanosomes, possesses its own set of isoforms distributed in different subcellular compartments. The genome of trypanosomatids encodes for two class I (dithiolic) Grxs named 2-C-Grx1 and 2-C-Grx2. Both proteins were shown to efficiently reduce different disulfides at the expenses of T(SH)2 using a mechanism that involves the two cysteines in the active site. Moreover, the cytosolic Trypanosoma brucei 2-C-Grx1 but not the mitochondrial 2-C-Grx2 was able to coordinate an iron-sulfur cluster with T(SH)2 or GSH as ligand. As a first step to unravel the structural basis for the specificity observed in the trypanosomal glutaredoxins, we present here the NMR resonance assignment of 2-C-Grx1 from the parasite T. brucei brucei.

  8. Automated Pre-processing for NMR Assignments with Reduced Tedium

    SciTech Connect

    Pawley, Norma; Gans, Jason

    2004-05-11

    An important rate-limiting step in the reasonance asignment process is accurate identification of resonance peaks in MNR spectra. NMR spectra are noisy. Hence, automatic peak-picking programs must navigate between the Scylla of reliable but incomplete picking, and the Charybdis of noisy but complete picking. Each of these extremes complicates the assignment process: incomplete peak-picking results in the loss of essential connectivities, while noisy picking conceals the true connectivities under a combinatiorial explosion of false positives. Intermediate processing can simplify the assignment process by preferentially removing false peaks from noisy peak lists. This is accomplished by requiring consensus between multiple NMR experiments, exploiting a priori information about NMR spectra, and drawing on empirical statistical distributions of chemical shift extracted from the BioMagResBank. Experienced NMR practitioners currently apply many of these techniques "by hand", which is tedious, and may appear arbitrary to the novice. To increase efficiency, we have created a systematic and automated approach to this process, known as APART. Automated pre-processing has three main advantages: reduced tedium, standardization, and pedagogy. In the hands of experienced spectroscopists, the main advantage is reduced tedium (a rapid increase in the ratio of true peaks to false peaks with minimal effort). When a project is passed from hand to hand, the main advantage is standardization. APART automatically documents the peak filtering process by archiving its original recommendations, the accompanying justifications, and whether a user accepted or overrode a given filtering recommendation. In the hands of a novice, this tool can reduce the stumbling block of learning to differentiate between real peaks and noise, by providing real-time examples of how such decisions are made.

  9. Screening enoxaparin tetrasaccharide SEC fractions for 3-O-sulfo-N-sulfoglucosamine residues using [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC NMR.

    PubMed

    Beecher, Consuelo N; Manighalam, Matthew S; Nwachuku, Adanma F; Larive, Cynthia K

    2016-02-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) are important in mediating a variety of biological processes through binding to myriad different proteins. Specific structural elements along the polysaccharide chains are essential for high affinity protein binding, such as the 3-O-sulfated N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS3S) residue, a relatively rare modification essential for heparin's anticoagulant activity. The isolation of 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides from complex mixtures is challenging because of their low abundance. Although methods such as affinity chromatography are useful in isolating oligosaccharides that bind specific proteins with high affinity, other important 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides may easily be overlooked. Screening preparative-scale size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) fractions of heparin or HS digests using [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC NMR allows the identification of fractions containing 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides through the unique (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts of the GlcNS3S residue. Those SEC fractions containing 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides can then be isolated using strong anion-exchange (SAX)-HPLC. Compared with the results obtained by pooling the fractions comprising a given SEC peak, SAX-HPLC analysis of individual SEC fractions produces a less complicated chromatogram in which the 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides are enriched relative to more abundant components. The utility of this approach is demonstrated for tetrasaccharide SEC fractions of the low molecular weight heparin drug enoxaparin facilitating the isolation and characterization of an unsaturated 3-O-sulfated tetrasaccharide containing a portion of the antithrombin-III binding sequence.

  10. Structure and reactivity of lithium amides. /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies and colligative measurements of lithium diphenylamide and lithium diphenylamide-lithium bromide complex solvated by tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    DePue, J.S.; Collum, D.B.

    1988-08-03

    /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of lithium diphenylamide in THF/hydrocarbon solutions (THF = tetrahydrofuran) detected two different species. /sup 6/Li and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of (/sup 6/Li, /sup 15/N)lithium diphenylamide showed the species observed at low THF concentrations to be a cyclic oligomer. Structural analogies provided strong support for a dimer while colligative measurements at 0/degrees/C indicated the dimer to be di- or trisolvated. On the basis of the observed mass action effects, the species appearing at intermediate THF concentrations is assigned as a contact or solvent-separated ion-paired monomer. Lithium diphenylamide forms a 1:1 adduct with lithium bromide at low THF concentrations. A combination of /sup 6/Li-/sup 15/N double labeling studies and colligative measurements supports a trisolvated cyclic mixed dimer structure. Although detailed spectroscopic studies at elevated THF concentrations were precluded by high fluctionality, the similarity of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts of lithium diphenylamide in the presence and absence of lithium bromide provide indirect evidence that the mixed dimer undergoes a THF concentration dependent dissociation to the monomeric amide and free lithium bromide. 24 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Efficient Resonance Assignment of Proteins in MAS NMR by Simultaneous Intra- and Inter-residue 3D Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Daviso, Eugenio; Eddy, Matthew T.; Andreas, Loren B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Herzfeld, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Resonance assignment is the first step in NMR structure determination. For magic angle spinning NMR, this is typically achieved with a set of heteronuclear correlation experiments (NCaCX, NCOCX, CONCa) that utilize SPECIFIC-CP 15N-13C transfers. However, the SPECIFIC-CP transfer efficiency is often compromised by molecular dynamics and probe performance. Here we show that one-bond ZF-TEDOR 15N-13C transfers provide simultaneous NCO and NCa transfers with at least as much sensitivity as SPECIFIC-CP for some non-crystalline samples. Furthermore, a 3D TEDOR-CC experiment provides heteronuclear sidechains correlations and robustness with respect to proton decoupling and radiofrequency power instabilities. We demonstrate transfer efficiencies and connectivities by application of 3D ZF-TEDOR-DARR to a model microcrystalline protein, GB1, and a less ideal system, GvpA in intact gas vesicles. PMID:23334347

  12. A Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm for sequential resonance assignment in solid state NMR of uniformly labeled proteins with magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert; Hu, Kan-Nian

    2010-08-01

    We describe a computational approach to sequential resonance assignment in solid state NMR studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins with magic-angle spinning. As input, the algorithm uses only the protein sequence and lists of 15N/ 13C α crosspeaks from 2D NCACX and NCOCX spectra that include possible residue-type assignments of each crosspeak. Assignment of crosspeaks to specific residues is carried out by a Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm, implemented in the program MC_ASSIGN1. The algorithm tolerates substantial ambiguity in residue-type assignments and coexistence of visible and invisible segments in the protein sequence. We use MC_ASSIGN1 and our own 2D spectra to replicate and extend the sequential assignments for uniformly-labeled HET-s(218-289) fibrils previously determined manually by Siemer et al. (J. Biomol. NMR, 34 (2006) 75-87) from a more extensive set of 2D and 3D spectra. Accurate assignments by MC_ASSIGN1 do not require data that are of exceptionally high quality. Use of MC_ASSIGN1 (and its extensions to other types of 2D and 3D data) is likely to alleviate many of the difficulties and uncertainties associated with manual resonance assignments in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins, where spectral resolution and signal-to-noise are often sub-optimal.

  13. (1)H, (15)N, (13)C backbone resonance assignments of human soluble catechol O-methyltransferase in complex with S-adenosyl-L-methionine and 3,5-dinitrocatechol.

    PubMed

    Czarnota, Sylwia; Baxter, Nicola J; Cliff, Matthew J; Waltho, Jonathan P; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2017-04-01

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an enzyme that plays a major role in catechol neurotransmitter deactivation. Inhibition of COMT can increase neurotransmitter levels, which provides a means of treatment for Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and depression. COMT exists as two isozymes: a soluble cytoplasmic form (S-COMT), expressed in the liver and kidneys and a membrane-bound form (MB-COMT), found mostly in the brain. Here we report the backbone (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of S-COMT in complex with S-adenosyl-L-methionine, 3,5-dinitrocatechol and Mg(2+). Assignments were obtained by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. In total, 97 % of all backbone resonances were assigned in the complex, with 205 out of a possible 215 residues assigned in the (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectrum. Prediction of solution secondary structure from a chemical shift analysis using the TALOS+ webserver is in good agreement with published X-ray crystal structures.

  14. A Set of Efficient nD NMR Protocols for Resonance Assignments of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Bellstedt, Peter; Häfner, Sabine; Herbst, Christian; Bordusa, Frank; Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2016-07-04

    The RF pulse scheme RN[N-CA HEHAHA]NH, which provides a convenient approach to the acquisition of different multidimensional chemical shift correlation NMR spectra leading to backbone resonance assignments, including those of the proline residues of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), is experimentally demonstrated. Depending on the type of correlation data required, the method involves the generation of in-phase ((15) N)(x) magnetisation via different magnetisation transfer pathways such as H→N→CO→N, HA→CA→CO→N, H→N→CA→N and H→CA→N, the subsequent application of (15) N-(13) C(α) heteronuclear Hartmann-Hahn mixing over a period of ≈100 ms, chemical-shift labelling of relevant nuclei before and after the heteronuclear mixing step and amide proton detection in the acquisition dimension. It makes use of the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of (1) JCαN and (2) JCαN couplings to achieve efficient correlation of the backbone resonances of each amino acid residue "i" with the backbone amide resonances of residues "i-1" and "i+1". It can be implemented in a straightforward way through simple modifications of the RF pulse schemes commonly employed in protein NMR studies. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated using a uniformly ((15) N,(13) C) labelled sample of α-synuclein. The different possibilities for obtaining the amino-acid-type information, simultaneously with the connectivity data between the backbone resonances of sequentially neighbouring residues, have also been outlined.

  15. 3D NMR Experiments for Measuring 15N Relaxation Data of Large Proteins: Application to the 44 kDa Ectodomain of SIV gp41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, Michael; Kaufman, Joshua; Stahl, Stephen J.; Wingfield, Paul T.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Clore, G. Marius

    1998-12-01

    A suite of 3D NMR experiments for measuring15N-{1H} NOE,15NT1, and15NT1ρvalues in large proteins, uniformly labeled with15N and13C, is presented. These experiments are designed for proteins that exhibit extensive spectral overlap in the 2D1H-15N HSQC spectrum. The pulse sequences are readily applicable to perdeuterated samples, which increases the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, thereby permitting the characterization of protein dynamics to be extended to larger protein systems. Application of the pulse sequences is demonstrated on a perdeuterated13C/15N-labeled sample of the 44 kDa ectodomain of SIV gp41.

  16. CcpNmr AnalysisAssign: a flexible platform for integrated NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Simon P; Fogh, Rasmus H; Boucher, Wayne; Ragan, Timothy J; Mureddu, Luca G; Vuister, Geerten W

    2016-10-01

    NMR spectroscopy is an indispensably powerful technique for the analysis of biomolecules under ambient conditions, both for structural- and functional studies. However, in practice the complexity of the technique has often frustrated its application by non-specialists. In this paper, we present CcpNmr version-3, the latest software release from the Collaborative Computational Project for NMR, for all aspects of NMR data analysis, including liquid- and solid-state NMR data. This software has been designed to be simple, functional and flexible, and aims to ensure that routine tasks can be performed in a straightforward manner. We have designed the software according to modern software engineering principles and leveraged the capabilities of modern graphics libraries to simplify a variety of data analysis tasks. We describe the process of backbone assignment as an example of the flexibility and simplicity of implementing workflows, as well as the toolkit used to create the necessary graphics for this workflow. The package can be downloaded from www.ccpn.ac.uk/v3-software/downloads and is freely available to all non-profit organisations.

  17. Computational identification of a phospholipidosis toxicophore using (13)C and (15)N NMR-distance based fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Svetoslav H; Wilkes, Jon G; Buzatu, Dan A; Kruhlak, Naomi L; Willard, James M; Hanig, Joseph P; Beger, Richard D

    2014-12-01

    Modified 3D-SDAR fingerprints combining (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts augmented with inter-atomic distances were used to model the potential of chemicals to induce phospholipidosis (PLD). A curated dataset of 328 compounds (some of which were cationic amphiphilic drugs) was used to generate 3D-QSDAR models based on tessellations of the 3D-SDAR space with grids of different density. Composite PLS models averaging the aggregated predictions from 100 fully randomized individual models were generated. On each of the 100 runs, the activities of an external blind test set comprised of 294 proprietary chemicals were predicted and averaged to provide composite estimates of their PLD-inducing potentials (PLD+ if PLD is observed, otherwise PLD-). The best performing 3D-QSDAR model utilized a grid with a density of 8ppm×8ppm in the C-C region, 8ppm×20ppm in the C-N region and 20ppm×20ppm in the N-N region. The classification predictive performance parameters of this model evaluated on the basis of the external test set were as follows: accuracy=0.70, sensitivity=0.73 and specificity=0.66. A projection of the most frequently occurring bins on the standard coordinate space suggested a toxicophore composed of an aromatic ring with a centroid 3.5-7.5Å distant from an amino-group. The presence of a second aromatic ring separated by a 4-5Å spacer from the first ring and at a distance of between 5.5Å and 7Å from the amino-group was also associated with a PLD+ effect. These models provide comparable predictive performance to previously reported models for PLD with the added benefit of being based entirely on non-confidential, publicly available training data and with good predictive performance when tested in a rigorous, external validation exercise.

  18. A 1H, 13C and 15N NMR study in solution and in the solid state of six N-substituted pyrazoles and indazoles.

    PubMed

    Claramunt, Rosa M; Santa María, M Dolores; Sanz, Dionisia; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2006-05-01

    Three N-substituted pyrazoles and three N-substituted indazoles [1-(4-nitrophenyl)-3,5-dimethylpyrazole (1), 1-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-3,5-dimethylpyrazole (2), 1-tosyl-pyrazole (3), 1-p-chlorobenzoylindazole (4), 1-tosylinda-zole (5) and 2-(2-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl)-indazole (6)] have been studied by NMR spectroscopy in solution (1H, 13C, 15N) and in the solid state (13C, 15N). The chemical shifts have been compared with GIAO/DFT calculated absolute shieldings. Some discrepancies have been analyzed.

  19. Investigation of Uña De Gato I. 7-Deoxyloganic acid and 15N NMR spectroscopic studies on pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids from Uncaria tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, I; Dunbar, D C; Khan, R A; Ganzera, M; Khan, I A

    2001-07-01

    The C-8-(S) isomer of deoxyloganic acid (7-deoxyloganic acid), together with beta-sitosteryl glucoside, five known stereoisomeric pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids and the tetracyclic oxindole isorhyncophylline, were isolated from the inner bark of Uncaria tomentosa. Structures of the isolated compounds were based on 1H and 13C NMR data, mainly 2D NMR experiments, including 1H-13C HMBC and 1H-1H NOESY correlation. Furthermore, the hitherto unreported 15N chemical shifts of the isomeric oxindole alkaloids, using 1H-15N HMBC experiments, were utilized to facilitate their characterization. Uncarine D showed weak cytotoxic activity against SK-MEL, KB, BT-549 and SK-OV-3 cell lines with IC(50) values between 30 and 40 microg/ml, while uncarine C exhibited weak cytotoxicity only against ovarian carcinoma (IC(50) at 37 microg/ml).

  20. Backbone 1H, 13C and 15N assignments of YibK and avariant containing a unique cysteine residue at C-terminus in 8 M urea-denatured states [corrected].

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shu-Ju Micky; Mallam, Anna L; Jackson, Sophie E; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2014-10-01

    YibK is a tRNA methyltransferase from Haemophilus influenzae, which forms a stable homodimer in solution and contains a deep trefoil 31 knot encompassing the C-terminal helix that threads through a long loop. It has been a model system for investigating knotted protein folding pathways. Recent data have shown that the polypeptide chain of YibK remains loosely knotted under highly denaturing conditions. Here, we report (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments for YibK and its variant in the presence of 8 M urea. This work forms the basis for further analysis using NMR techniques such as paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, residual dipolar couplings and spin-relaxation dynamics analysis.

  1. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of an enzymatically active domain from the catalytic component (CDTa, residues 216-420) of a binary toxin from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Roth, Braden M; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Varney, Kristen M; Rustandi, Richard R; Weber, David J

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterial pathogen and is the most commonly reported source of nosocomial infection in industrialized nations. Symptoms of C. difficile infection (CDI) include antibiotic-associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis and death. Over the last decade, rates and severity of hospital infections in North America and Europe have increased dramatically and correlate with the emergence of a hypervirulent strain of C. difficile characterized by the presence of a binary toxin, CDT (C. difficile toxin). The binary toxin consists of an enzymatic component (CDTa) and a cellular binding component (CDTb) that together form the active binary toxin complex. CDTa harbors a pair of structurally similar but functionally distinct domains, an N-terminal domain (residues 1-215; (1-215)CDTa) that interacts with CDTb and a C-terminal domain (residues 216-420; (216-420)CDTa) that harbors the intact ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) active site. Reported here are the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the 23 kDa, 205 amino acid C-terminal enzymatic domain of CDTa, termed (216-420)CDTa. These NMR resonance assignments for (216-420)CDTa represent the first for a family of ART binary toxins and provide the framework for detailed characterization of the solution-state protein structure determination, dynamic studies of this domain, as well as NMR-based drug discovery efforts.

  2. A facile method for expression and purification of 15N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis

    PubMed Central

    Armand, Tara; Ball, K. Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with 15N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the 15N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼6 mg/L culture for 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and 1H–15N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with 15N and 13C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants. PMID:26231074

  3. Sequence-specific 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of Art v 1: a proline-rich allergen of Artemisia vulgaris pollen.

    PubMed

    Razzera, Guilherme; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Almeida, Marcius S; Ferreira, Fatima; Almeida, Fabio C L; Valente, Ana Paula

    2009-06-01

    Art v 1 is the major allergen of Artemisia vulgaris. The IgE raised against Art v 1 not only can cross-react with other proteins from the Asteraceae family members but also with components of various forms of food. Art v 1 is an important target for immunotherapy strategies, including vaccination with hypoallergenic derivatives or chimeras. We report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of the recombinant Art v 1 and identification of secondary structures based on (13)C chemical shifts.

  4. 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of domain 5 of Dictyostelium discoideum gelation factor (ABP-120) in its native and 8M urea-denatured states.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John; Dobson, Christopher M

    2009-06-01

    The gelation factor from Dictyostelium discoideum (ABP-120) is an actin binding protein consisting of six immunoglobulin (Ig) domains in the C-terminal rod domain. We have recently used the pair of domains 5 and 6 of ABP-120 as a model system for studying multi-domain nascent chain folding on the ribosome. Here we present the NMR assignments of domain 5 in its native and 8M urea-denatured states.

  5. 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shift assignments of cyanobacteriochrome NpR6012g4 in the red-absorbing dark state.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qinhong; Lim, Sunghyuk; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Clark Lagarias, J; Ames, James B

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) photosensory proteins are phytochrome homologs using bilin chromophores for light sensing across the visible spectrum. NpR6012g4 is a CBCR from Nostoc punctiforme that serves as a model for a widespread CBCR subfamily with red/green photocycles. We report NMR chemical shift assignments for both the protein backbone and side-chain resonances of the red-absorbing dark state of NpR6012g4 (BMRB no. 26582).

  6. Complete backbone and DENQ side chain NMR assignments in proteins from a single experiment: implications to structure-function studies.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jithender G; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2014-03-01

    Resonance assignment is the first and the most crucial step in all nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on structure-function relationships in biological macromolecules. Often, the assignment exercise has to be repeated several times when specific interactions with ligands, substrates etc., have to be elucidated for understanding the functional mechanisms. While the protein backbone serves to provide a scaffold, the side chains interact directly with the ligands. Such investigations will be greatly facilitated, if there are rapid methods for obtaining exhaustive information with minimum of NMR experimentation. In this context, we present here a pulse sequence which exploits the recently introduced technique of parallel detection of multiple nuclei, e.g. (1)H and (13)C, and results in two 3D-data sets simultaneously. These yield complete backbone resonance assignment ((1)H(N), (15)N, (13)CO, (1)Hα/(13)Cα, and (1)Hβ/(13)Cβ chemical shifts) and side chain assignment of D, E, N and Q residues. Such an exhaustive assignment has the potential of yielding accurate 3D structures using one or more of several algorithms which calculate structures of the molecules very reliably on the basis of NMR chemical shifts alone. The side chain assignments of D, E, N, and Q will be extremely valuable for interaction studies with different ligands; D and E side chains are known to be involved in majority of catalytic activities. Utility of this experiment has been demonstrated with Ca(2+) bound M-crystallin, which contains largely D, E, N and Q residues at the metal binding sites.

  7. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  8. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the full-length 40 kDa S. acidocaldarius Y-family DNA polymerase, dinB homolog.

    PubMed

    Moro, Sean L; Cocco, Melanie J

    2015-10-01

    The dinB homolog (Dbh) is a member of the Y-family of translesion DNA polymerases, which are specialized to accurately replicate DNA across from a wide variety of lesions in living cells. Lesioned bases block the progression of high-fidelity polymerases and cause detrimental replication fork stalling; Y-family polymerases can bypass these lesions. The active site of the translesion synthesis polymerase is more open than that of a replicative polymerase; consequently Dbh polymerizes with low fidelity. Bypass polymerases also have low processivity. Short extension past the lesion allows the high-fidelity polymerase to switch back onto the site of replication. Dbh and the other Y-family polymerases have been used as structural models to investigate the mechanisms of DNA polymerization and lesion bypass. Many high-resolution crystal structures of Y-family polymerases have been reported. NMR dynamics studies can complement these structures by providing a measure of protein motions. Here we report the (15)N, (1)H, and (13)C backbone resonance assignments at two temperatures (35 and 50 °C) for Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Dbh polymerase. Backbone resonance assignments have been obtained for 86 % of the residues. The polymerase active site is assigned as well as the majority of residues in each of the four domains.

  9. 1H, 13C, and 15N backbone and side chain resonance assignments of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus cyclophilin-A

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Michael; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2014-04-01

    Cyclophilins catalyze the reversible peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of their substrates and are present across all kingdoms of life from humans to bacteria. Although numerous biological roles have now been discovered for cyclophilins, their function was initially ascribed to their chaperone-like activity in protein folding where they catalyze the often rate-limiting step of proline isomerization. This chaperone-like activity may be especially important under extreme conditions where cyclophilins are often over expressed, such as in tumors for human cyclophilins {Lee, 2010 #1167}, but also in organisms that thrive under extreme conditions, such as theromophilic bacteria. Moreover, the reversible nature of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerization reaction catalyzed by cyclophilins has allowed these enzymes to serve as model systems for probing the role of conformational changes during catalytic turnover {Eisenmesser, 2002 #20;Eisenmesser, 2005 #203}. Thus, we present here the resonance assignments of a thermophilic cyclophilin from Geobacillus kaustophilus derived from deep-sea sediment {Takami, 2004 #1384}. This thermophilic cyclophilin may now be studied at a variety of temperatures to provide insight into the comparative structure, dynamics, and catalytic mechanism of cyclophilins.

  10. Solid-state NMR chemical shift assignments for AL-09 VL immunoglobulin light chain fibrils.

    PubMed

    Piehl, Dennis W; Blancas-Mejía, Luis M; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Rienstra, Chad M

    2017-04-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a systemic disease characterized by the formation of immunoglobulin light-chain fibrils in critical organs of the body. The light-chain protein AL-09 presents one severe case of cardiac AL amyloidosis, which contains seven mutations in the variable domain (VL) relative to its germline counterpart, κI O18/O8 VL. Three of these mutations are non-conservative-Y87H, N34I, and K42Q-and previous work has shown that they are responsible for significantly reducing the protein's thermodynamic stability, allowing fibril formation to occur with fast kinetics and across a wide-range of pH conditions. Currently, however, there is extremely limited structural information available which explicitly describes the residues that are involved in supporting the misfolded fibril structure. Here, we assign the site-specific (15)N and (13)C chemical shifts of the rigid residues of AL-09 VL fibrils by solid-state NMR, reporting on the regions of the protein involved in the fibril as well as the extent of secondary structure.

  11. Oligomeric complexes of some heteroaromatic ligands and aromatic diamines with rhodium and molybdenum tetracarboxylates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR and density functional theory studies.

    PubMed

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Kamieński, Bohdan; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-05-01

    Seven new oligomeric complexes of 4,4'-bipyridine; 3,3'-bipyridine; benzene-1,4-diamine; benzene-1,3-diamine; benzene-1,2-diamine; and benzidine with rhodium tetraacetate, as well as 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetraacetate, have been obtained and investigated by elemental analysis and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR. The known complexes of pyrazine with rhodium tetrabenzoate, benzoquinone with rhodium tetrapivalate, 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetrakistrifluoroacetate and the 1 : 1 complex of 2,2'-bipyridine with rhodium tetraacetate exhibiting axial-equatorial ligation mode have been obtained as well for comparison purposes. Elemental analysis revealed 1 : 1 complex stoichiometry of all complexes. The (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra of all new complexes consist of one narrow signal, indicating regular uniform structures. Benzidine forms a heterogeneous material, probably containing linear oligomers and products of further reactions. The complexes were characterized by the parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δcomplex  - δligand). This parameter ranged from around -40 to -90 ppm in the case of heteroaromatic ligands, from around -12 to -22 ppm for diamines and from -16 to -31 ppm for the complexes of molybdenum tetracarboxylates with 4,4'-bipyridine. The experimental results have been supported by a density functional theory computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts and complexation shifts at the non-relativistic Becke, three-parameter, Perdew-Wang 91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] and GGA-PBE/QZ4P levels of theory and at the relativistic scalar and spin-orbit zeroth order regular approximation/GGA-PBE/QZ4P level of theory. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts have been calculated for the selected compounds.

  12. Comparative analysis of the orientation of transmembrane peptides using solid-state (2)H- and (15)N-NMR: mobility matters.

    PubMed

    Grage, Stephan L; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Esteban-Martín, Santiago; Salgado, Jesús; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-05-01

    Many solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approaches for membrane proteins rely on orientation-dependent parameters, from which the alignment of peptide segments in the lipid bilayer can be calculated. Molecules embedded in liquid-crystalline membranes, such as monomeric helices, are highly mobile, leading to partial averaging of the measured NMR parameters. These dynamic effects need to be taken into account to avoid misinterpretation of NMR data. Here, we compare two common NMR approaches: (2)H-NMR quadrupolar waves, and separated local field (15)N-(1)H polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle (PISEMA) spectra, in order to identify their strengths and drawbacks for correctly determining the orientation and mobility of α-helical transmembrane peptides. We first analyzed the model peptide WLP23 in oriented dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes and then contrasted it with published data on GWALP23 in dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). We only obtained consistent tilt angles from the two methods when taking dynamics into account. Interestingly, the two related peptides differ fundamentally in their mobility. Although both helices adopt the same tilt in their respective bilayers (~20°), WLP23 undergoes extensive fluctuations in its azimuthal rotation angle, whereas GWALP23 is much less dynamic. Both alternative NMR methods are suitable for characterizing orientation and dynamics, yet they can be optimally used to address different aspects. PISEMA spectra immediately reveal the presence of large-amplitude rotational fluctuations, which are not directly seen by (2)H-NMR. On the other hand, PISEMA was unable to define the azimuthal rotation angle in the case of the highly dynamic WLP23, though the helix tilt could still be determined, irrespective of any dynamics parameters.

  13. 1H, 15N, 13C resonance assignment of 9.7 M urea-denatured state of the GTPase effector domain (GED) of dynamin.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Jeetender; Sharma, Shilpy; Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2009-06-01

    The GTPase effector domain (GED) of dynamin, a multi-domain protein involved in endocytosis, forms a megadalton-sized self-assembly (even at micromolar concentrations) in native conditions in vitro. While such large assemblies have remained inaccessible to detailed NMR structural characterization, till date, a significant recent achievement has been the elucidation of the GED association pathway starting from a Gdn-HCl denatured monomer. Since, the nature of the denaturant has a strong influence on the conformational preferences in the denatured states, and hence on the association pathways, or even on the final assembly, we report here the NMR resonance assignment of 9.7 M urea-denatured GED from Homo sapiens. This will form the basis for the characterization of the association pathways and the final assembly driven by urea dilution.

  14. The theoretical investigation of solvent effects on the relative stability and 15N NMR shielding of antidepressant heterocyclic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahan, Arezoo; Khojandi, Mahya; Salari, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) and Tomasi's polarized continuum model (PCM) were used for the investigation of solvent polarity and its dielectric constant effects on the relative stability and NMR shielding tensors of antidepressant mirtazapine (MIR). The obtained results indicated that the relative stability in the polar solvents is higher than that in non-polar solvents and the most stable structure was observed in the water at the B3LYP/6-311++G ( d, p) level of theory. Also, natural bond orbital (NBO) interpretation demonstrated that by increase of solvent dielectric constant, negative charge on nitrogen atoms of heterocycles and resonance energy for LP(N10) → σ* and π* delocalization of the structure's azepine ring increase and the highest values of them were observed in water. On the other hand, NMR calculations showed that with an increase in negative charge of nitrogen atoms, isotropic chemical shielding (σiso) around them increase and nitrogen of piperazine ring (N19) has the highest values of negative charge and σiso among nitrogen atoms. NMR calculations also represented that direct solvent effect on nitrogen of pyridine ring (N15) is more than other nitrogens, while its effect on N19 is less than other ones. Based on NMR data and NBO interpretation, it can be deduced that with a decrease in the negative charge on nitrogen atoms, the intramolecular effects on them decrease, while direct solvent effect increases.

  15. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the RodA hydrophobin from the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Pille, Ariane; Kwan, Ann H; Cheung, Ivan; Hampsey, Matthew; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Delepierre, Muriel; Latge, Jean-Paul; Sunde, Margaret; Guijarro, J Iñaki

    2015-04-01

    Hydrophobins are fungal proteins characterised by their amphipathic properties and an idiosyncratic pattern of eight cysteine residues involved in four disulphide bridges. The soluble form of these proteins spontaneously self-assembles at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces to form an amphipathic monolayer. The RodA hydrophobin of the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus forms an amyloid layer with a rodlet morphology that covers the surface of fungal spores. This rodlet layer bestows hydrophobicity to the spores facilitating their dispersal in the air and rendering the conidia inert relative to the human immune system. As a first step in the analysis of the solution structure and self-association of RodA, we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the soluble monomeric form of RodA.

  16. Flavonoids from Curcuma longa leaves and their NMR assignments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Sheng-Fa; Lee, Shoei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the n-BuOH-soluble fraction of the EtOH extract of the aerial part of Curcuma longa led to the isolation of 11 flavonol glycosides and one dihydroflavonol glucoside (1) via chromatography over Sephadex LH-20 and Lobar RP-18 columns. Although they are known, the 1H and 13C NMR data recorded in CD3OD rather than the common DMSO-d6 are doubly checked via extensive 2D NMR spectroscopic analyses, leading to some revisions of the reported data, especially for the glycon part.

  17. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for two new angular furanocoumarin glycosides from Peucedanum praeruptorum.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haitao; Okada, Yoshihito; Okuyama, Toru; Tu, Pengfei

    2007-07-01

    Two novel angular-type furanocoumarin glycosides, peucedanoside A (1) and peucedanoside B (2), along with a known compound apterin (3), were isolated from the roots of Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn. Their chemical structures were determined by MS, NMR spectroscopy and chemical analysis. Complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic data were achieved by 1D and 2D NMR experiments including DEPT, HSQC, HMBC and ROESY.

  18. Complete Assignment of (1)H-NMR Resonances of the King Cobra Neurotoxin CM-11.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu-Xi; Liu, Wei-Dong; Liu, Ai-Zhuo; Pei, Feng-Kui

    1997-01-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus Hannah) neurotoxin CM-Il is long-chain peptide with 72 amino acid residues. Its complete assignment of (1)H-NMR resonances was obtained using various 2D-NMR technologies, including DQF-COSY, clean-TOCSY and NOESY.

  19. Identification of allosteric PIF-pocket ligands for PDK1 using NMR-based fragment screening and 1H-15N TROSY experiments.

    PubMed

    Stockman, Brian J; Kothe, Michael; Kohls, Darcy; Weibley, Laura; Connolly, Brendan J; Sheils, Alissa L; Cao, Qing; Cheng, Alan C; Yang, Lily; Kamath, Ajith V; Ding, Yuan-Hua; Charlton, Maura E

    2009-02-01

    Aberrant activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway because of genetic mutations of essential signalling proteins has been associated with human diseases including cancer and diabetes. The pivotal role of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 in the PI3K signalling cascade has made it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. The N-terminal lobe of the 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 catalytic domain contains a docking site which recognizes the non-catalytic C-terminal hydrophobic motifs of certain substrate kinases. The binding of substrate in this so-called PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket allows interaction with 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 and enhanced phosphorylation of downstream kinases. NMR spectroscopy was used to a screen 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 domain construct against a library of chemically diverse fragments in order to identify small, ligand-efficient fragments that might interact at either the ATP site or the allosteric PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket. While majority of the fragment hits were determined to be ATP-site binders, several fragments appeared to interact with the PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket. Ligand-induced changes in 1H-15N TROSY spectra acquired using uniformly 15N-enriched PDK1 provided evidence to distinguish ATP-site from PDK1 Interacting Fragment-site binding. Caliper assay data and 19F NMR assay data on the PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket fragments and structurally related compounds identified them as potential allosteric activators of PDK1 function.

  20. sup 13 C and sup 15 N NMR studies on the interaction between 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine and lumazine protein

    SciTech Connect

    Vervoort, J.; Mueller, F. ); O'Kane, D.J.; Lee, J. ); Bacher, A.; Strobl, G. )

    1990-02-20

    The interaction between the prosthetic group 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1{prime}-D-ribityl)lumazine and the lumazine apoproteins from two marine bioluminescent bacteria, one from a relatively thermophilic species, Photobacterium leiognathi, and the other from a psychrophilic species, Photobacterium phosphoreum, was studied by {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N NMR using various selectively enriched derivatives. It is shown that the electron distribution in the protein-bound 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine differs from that of free 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine in buffer. The {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N chemical shifts indicate that the protein-bound 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine is embedded in a polar environment and that the ring system is strongly polarized. It is concluded that the two carbonyl groups play an important role in the polarization of the molecule. The N(3)-H group is not accessible to bulk solvent. The N(8) atom is sp{sup 2} hybridized and has {delta}+ character. Nuclear Overhauser effect studies indicate that the 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine ring is rigidly bound with no internal mobility. The NMR results indicate that the interaction between the ring system and the two apoproteins is almost the same.

  1. Robust and low cost uniform (15)N-labeling of proteins expressed in Drosophila S2 cells and Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells for NMR applications.

    PubMed

    Meola, Annalisa; Deville, Célia; Jeffers, Scott A; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Vasiliauskaite, Ieva; Sizun, Christina; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Malosse, Christian; van Heijenoort, Carine; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Krey, Thomas; Guittet, Eric; Pêtres, Stéphane; Rey, Félix A; Bontems, François

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool to study structural and functional properties of proteins, provided that they can be enriched in stable isotopes such as (15)N, (13)C and (2)H. This is usually easy and inexpensive when the proteins are expressed in Escherichiacoli, but many eukaryotic (human in particular) proteins cannot be produced this way. An alternative is to express them in insect cells. Labeled insect cell growth media are commercially available but at prohibitive prices, limiting the NMR studies to only a subset of biologically important proteins. Non-commercial solutions from academic institutions have been proposed, but none of them is really satisfying. We have developed a (15)N-labeling procedure based on the use of a commercial medium depleted of all amino acids and supplemented with a (15)N-labeled yeast autolysate for a total cost about five times lower than that of the currently available solutions. We have applied our procedure to the production of a non-polymerizable mutant of actin in Sf9 cells and of fragments of eukaryotic and viral membrane fusion proteins in S2 cells, which typically cannot be produced in E. coli, with production yields comparable to those obtained with standard commercial media. Our results support, in particular, the putative limits of a self-folding domain within a viral glycoprotein of unknown structure.

  2. DFT calculations in the assignment of solid-state NMR and crystal structure elucidation of a lanthanum(iii) complex with dithiocarbamate and phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vasantha; Laitinen, Risto S; Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Larsson, Anna-Carin; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Lantto, Perttu

    2016-12-06

    The molecular, crystal, and electronic structures as well as spectroscopic properties of a mononuclear heteroleptic lanthanum(iii) complex with diethyldithiocarbamate and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands (3 : 1) were studied by solid-state (13)C and (15)N cross-polarisation (CP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A substantially different powder XRD pattern and (13)C and (15)N CP-MAS NMR spectra indicated that the title compound is not isostructural to the previously reported analogous rare earth complexes with the space group P21/n. Both (13)C and (15)N CP-MAS NMR revealed the presence of six structurally different dithiocarbamate groups in the asymmetric unit cell, implying a non-centrosymmetric packing arrangement of molecules. This was supported by single-crystal X-ray crystallography showing that the title compound crystallised in the triclinic space group P1[combining macron]. In addition, the crystal structure also revealed that one of the dithiocarbamate ligands has a conformational disorder. NMR chemical shift calculations employing the periodic gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) approach supported the assignment of the experimental (13)C and (15)N NMR spectra. However, the best correspondences were obtained with the structure where the atomic positions in the X-ray unit cell were optimised at the DFT level. The roles of the scalar and spin-orbit relativistic effects on NMR shielding were investigated using the zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) method with the outcome that already the scalar relativistic level qualitatively reproduces the experimental chemical shifts. The electronic properties of the complex were evaluated based on the results of the natural bond orbital (NBO) and topology of the electron density analyses. Overall, we apply a multidisciplinary approach acquiring comprehensive information about the solid-state structure and the

  3. Simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR experiments for sequential assignment of oriented membrane protein samples.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, T; Mote, Kaustubh R; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins reconstituted in mechanically or magnetically aligned lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living (15)N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through (15)N-(15)N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish (15)N-(15)N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR-mixing experiments.

  4. NMR Assignments for a Helical 40 kDa Membrane Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Oxenoid, Kirill; Kim, Hak J.; Jacob, Jaison; Soennichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2004-04-28

    Backbone nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments were achieved for diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) in detergent micelles. DAGK is a homotrimeric integral membrane protein comprised of 121 residue subunits, each having three transmembrane segments. Assignments were made using TROSY-based pulse sequences. DAGK was found to be an almost exclusively helical protein. This work points to the feasibility of both solving the structure of DAGK using solution NMR methods and using NMR as a primary tool in structural studies of other helical integral membrane proteins of similar size and complexity.

  5. Identifying the African Wintering Grounds of Hybrid Flycatchers Using a Multi–Isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Assignment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Wilgenburg, Steven L.; Hobson, Keith A.; Folmer, Eelke; Font, Laura; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival, which would be expected if their migration strategy had been a mix of the parent species' strategies potentially resulting in an intermediate route crossing the Sahara desert to different wintering grounds. Previously, we compared isotope ratios and found no significant difference in stable-nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) in winter-grown feathers between the parental species and hybrids, but stable-carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in hybrids significantly clustered only with those of pied flycatchers. We followed up on these findings and additionally analyzed the same feathers for stable-hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) and conducted spatially explicit multi-isotope assignment analyses. The assignment results overlapped with presumed wintering ranges of the two species, highlighting the efficacy of the method. In contrast to earlier findings, hybrids clustered with both parental species, though most strongly with pied flycatcher. PMID:24847717

  6. 1H, 13C, and 15N backbone, side-chain, and heme chemical shift assignments for oxidized and reduced forms of the monoheme c-type cytochrome ApcA isolated from the acidophilic metal-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum.

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Swenson, Michael; Magnuson, Timothy S.

    2011-03-04

    We report the 1H, 13C, and 15N chemical shift assignments of both oxidized and reduced forms of an abundant periplasmic c-type cytochrome, designated ApcA, from the acidophilic gram-negative facultatively anaerobic metal-reducing alpha-proteobacterium Acidiphilium cryptum. These resonance assignments prove that ApcA is a monoheme cytochrome c2 and the product of the Acry_2099 gene. An absence of resonance peaks in the NMR spectra for the 21 N-terminal residues suggests that a predicted N-terminal signal sequence is cleaved. We also describe the preparation and purification of the protein in labeled form from laboratory cultures of A. cryptum growing on 13C- and 15N- labeled substrates.

  7. NVR-BIP: Nuclear Vector Replacement using Binary Integer Programming for NMR Structure-Based Assignments.

    PubMed

    Apaydin, Mehmet Serkan; Çatay, Bülent; Patrick, Nicholas; Donald, Bruce R

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important experimental technique that allows one to study protein structure and dynamics in solution. An important bottleneck in NMR protein structure determination is the assignment of NMR peaks to the corresponding nuclei. Structure-based assignment (SBA) aims to solve this problem with the help of a template protein which is homologous to the target and has applications in the study of structure-activity relationship, protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. We formulate SBA as a linear assignment problem with additional nuclear overhauser effect constraints, which can be solved within nuclear vector replacement's (NVR) framework (Langmead, C., Yan, A., Lilien, R., Wang, L. and Donald, B. (2003) A Polynomial-Time Nuclear Vector Replacement Algorithm for Automated NMR Resonance Assignments. Proc. the 7th Annual Int. Conf. Research in Computational Molecular Biology (RECOMB), Berlin, Germany, April 10-13, pp. 176-187. ACM Press, New York, NY. J. Comp. Bio., (2004), 11, pp. 277-298; Langmead, C. and Donald, B. (2004) An expectation/maximization nuclear vector replacement algorithm for automated NMR resonance assignments. J. Biomol. NMR, 29, 111-138). Our approach uses NVR's scoring function and data types and also gives the option of using CH and NH residual dipolar coupling (RDCs), instead of NH RDCs which NVR requires. We test our technique on NVR's data set as well as on four new proteins. Our results are comparable to NVR's assignment accuracy on NVR's test set, but higher on novel proteins. Our approach allows partial assignments. It is also complete and can return the optimum as well as near-optimum assignments. Furthermore, it allows us to analyze the information content of each data type and is easily extendable to accept new forms of input data, such as additional RDCs.

  8. A constraint-based assignment system for automating long side chain assignments in protein 2D NMR spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Leishman, S.; Gray, P.; Fothergill, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The sequential assignment of protein 2D NMR data has been tackled by many automated and semi-automated systems. One area that these systems have not tackled is the searching of the TOCSY spectrum looking for cross peaks and chemical shift values for hydrogen nuclei that are at the end of long side chains. This paper describes our system for solving this problem using constraint logic programming and compares our constraint satisfaction algorithm to a standard backtracking version.

  9. Analysis of internal motions of interleukin-13 variant associated with severe bronchial asthma using {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Takeda, Chika; Kuroki, Ryota; Izuhara, Kenji; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi . E-mail: ueda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-22

    The single nucleotide polymorphism interleukin-13 (IL-13) R110Q is associated with severe bronchial asthma because its lower affinity leads to the augmentation of local IL-13 concentration, resulting in an increase in the signal transduction via IL-13R. Since the mutation site does not directly bind to IL-13R{alpha}2, we carried out NMR relaxation analyses of the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q in order to examine whether the R110Q mutation affects the internal motions in IL-13 molecules. The results showed that the internal motion in the micro- to millisecond time scale on helix D, which is suggested to be important for the interaction between IL-13 and IL-13R{alpha}2, is increased in IL-13-R110Q compared with that in the wild-type IL-13. It therefore appears that the difference in the internal motions on helix D between the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q may be involved in their affinity differences with IL-13R{alpha}2.

  10. NMR studies on /sup 15/N-labeled creatine (CR), creatinine (CRN), phosphocreatine (PCR), and phosphocreatinine (PCRN), and on barriers to rotation in creatine kinase-bound creatine in the enzymatic reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, G.L.; Reddick, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    Recently, the authors have synthesized /sup 15/N-2-Cr, /sup 15/N-3-Crn, /sup 15/N-2-Crn, /sup 15/N-3-PCrn, /sup 15/N-3-PCr, and /sup 15/N-2-PCr. /sup 1/H, /sup 15/N, /sup 31/P NMR data show that Crn protonates exclusively at the non-methylated ring nitrogen, confirm that PCrn is phosphorylated at the exocyclic nitrogen, and demonstrate that the /sup 31/P-/sup 15/N one-bond coupling constant in /sup 15/N-3-PCr is 18 Hz, not 3 Hz as previously reported by Brindle, K.M., Porteous, R. and Radda, G.K.. The authors have found that creatine kinase is capable of catalyzing the /sup 14/N//sup 15/N positional isotope exchange of 3-/sup 15/N-PCr in the presence of MgADP, but not in its absence. Further, the exchange does not take place when labeled PCr is resynthesized exclusively from the ternary complex E X Cr X MgATP as opposed to either E X Cr or free Cr. This suggests that the enzyme both imparts an additional rotational barrier to creatine in the complex and catalyzes the transfer of phosphoryl group with essentially complete regiospecificity.

  11. The HSP90 binding mode of a radicicol-like E-oxime from docking, binding free energy estimations, and NMR 15N chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Spichty, Martin; Taly, Antoine; Hagn, Franz; Kessler, Horst; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We determine the binding mode of a macrocyclic radicicol-like oxime to yeast HSP90 by combining computer simulations and experimental measurements. We sample the macrocyclic scaffold of the unbound ligand by parallel tempering simulations and dock the most populated conformations to yeast HSP90. Docking poses are then evaluated by the use of binding free energy estimations with the linear interaction energy method. Comparison of QM/MM-calculated NMR chemical shifts with experimental shift data for a selective subset of back-bone 15N provides an additional evaluation criteria. As a last test we check the binding modes against available structure-activity-relationships. We find that the most likely binding mode of the oxime to yeast HSP90 is very similar to the known structure of the radicicol-HSP90 complex. PMID:19482409

  12. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  13. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by 15N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons.

    PubMed

    Live, D H; Cowburn, D; Breslow, E

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, 15N labeling being used to identify specific backbone 15N and 1H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence of hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neurophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of 15N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene:  Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Thorne, Philip G.; Cox, Larry G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  15. Review of Methods to Assign the NMR Peaks of Reductively Methylated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Kevin J.; Macnaughtan, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    Reductive methylation of lysyl side-chain amines has been a successful tool in the advancement of high resolution structural biology. The utility of this method has continuously gained ground as a protein chemical modification; first, as a tool to aid protein crystallization and later, as a probe in protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. As an isotope-labeling strategy for NMR studies, reductive methylation has contributed to the study of protein-protein interactions and global conformational changes. While more detailed structural studies using this labeling strategy are possible, the hurdle of assigning the NMR peaks to the corresponding reductively methylated amine hinders its use. In this review, we discuss and compare strategies used to assign the NMR peaks of reductively methylated protein-amines. PMID:25175010

  16. NMR assignment and secondary structure of coiled coil domain of C-terminal myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok K; Rigby, Alan C

    2014-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions between the C-terminal domain of Myosin Binding Subunit (MBS) of MLC Phosphatase (MBS(CT180); C-terminal 180 aa) and the N-terminal coiled coil (CC) leucine zipper (LZ) domain of PKGIα, PKG-Iα(1-159) play an important role in the process of Smooth Muscle Cell relaxation. The paucity of three-dimensional structural information for MBS(CT180) prevents an atomic level understanding of the MBS-PKG contractile complex. MBS(CT180) is comprised of three structurally different sub-domains including a non-canonical CC, a CC, and a LZ. Recently we reported polypeptide purification and biophysical characterization of the CC domain and the LZ domain of MBS(CT180) (Sharma et al, Prot Expr Purif 2012). Here we report (1)H, (13)C, (15)N chemical shift assignments of homodimeric CC MBS domain encompassing amino acid residues Asp931-Leu980 using 2D and 3D heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Secondary structure analyses deduced from these NMR chemical shift data have identified a contiguous stretch of 36 residues from Phe932 to Ala967 that is involved in the formation of coiled coil α-helical region within CC MBS domain. The N-terminal residue Asp931 and the C-terminally positioned residues Thr968-Ala975, Arg977, and Ser978 adopt nonhelical loop conformations.

  17. Synthesis of stereospecifically deuterated desoxypodophyllotoxins and 1H-nmr assignment of desoxypodophyllotoxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pullockaran, A. J.; Kingston, D. G.; Lewis, N. G.

    1989-01-01

    [4 beta- 2H1]Desoxypodophyllotoxin [3], [4 alpha- 2H1]desoxypodophyllotoxin [4], and [4, 4- 2 H2]desoxypodophyllotoxin [9] were prepared from podophyllotoxin [1] via its chloride [5]. A complete assignment of the 1H-nmr spectrum of desoxypodophyllotoxin [2] was made on the basis of the spectra of the deuterated compounds [3] and [4].

  18. NMR assignments of the macro domain from Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Ping; Cho, Chao-Cheng; Chang, Chi-Fon; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2016-10-01

    The newly emerging human pathogen, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), contains a macro domain in the highly conserved N-terminal region of non-structural protein 3. Intense research has shown that macro domains bind ADP-ribose and other derivatives, but it still remains intangible about their exact function. In this study we report the preliminary structural analysis through solution NMR spectroscopy of the MERS-CoV macro domain. The near complete NMR assignments of MERS-CoV macro domain provide the basis for subsequent structural and biochemical investigation in the context of protein function.

  19. Conformational evaluation and detailed 1H and 13C NMR assignments of eremophilanolides.

    PubMed

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Hernández, Luis R; Reséndiz-Villalobos, Adriana Y; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2004-10-01

    Extensive application of 1D and 2D NMR methodology, combined with molecular modeling, allowed the complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of eremophilanolides from Senecio toluccanus. Comparison of the experimental 1H, 1H coupling constant values with those generated employing a generalized Karplus-type relationship, using dihedral angles extracted from MMX and DFT calculations, revealed that the epoxidized eremophilanolides 1 and 2 show conformational rigidity at room temperature, whereas molecules 3-6, containing an isolated double bond, are conformationally mobile.

  20. NMR assignments and X-ray diffraction spectra for two unusual kaurene diterpenes from Erythroxylum barbatum.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Claudio Costa; Sousa Lima, Mary Anne; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; de Simone, Carlos Alberto; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha

    2005-12-01

    The structural characterization of two new, unusual kaurene diterpenes isolated from roots of Erythroxylum barbatum is described. 1D NMR and several 2D shift-correlated NMR pulse sequences (1H,1H-COSY, HMQC, HMBC and NOESY) were used for structure elucidation and the unambiguous 1H and 13C chemical shifts assignments. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was also used to confirm the final relative configuration of the compounds possessing the C-20 methyl and the CH2-15 methylene groups in cis-orientation.

  1. An assignment of intrinsically disordered regions of proteins based on NMR structures.

    PubMed

    Ota, Motonori; Koike, Ryotaro; Amemiya, Takayuki; Tenno, Takeshi; Romero, Pedro R; Hiroaki, Hidekazu; Dunker, A Keith; Fukuchi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not adopt stable three-dimensional structures in physiological conditions, yet these proteins play crucial roles in biological phenomena. In most cases, intrinsic disorder manifests itself in segments or domains of an IDP, called intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), but fully disordered IDPs also exist. Although IDRs can be detected as missing residues in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography, no protocol has been developed to identify IDRs from structures obtained by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). Here, we propose a computational method to assign IDRs based on NMR structures. We compared missing residues of X-ray structures with residue-wise deviations of NMR structures for identical proteins, and derived a threshold deviation that gives the best correlation of ordered and disordered regions of both structures. The obtained threshold of 3.2Å was applied to proteins whose structures were only determined by NMR, and the resulting IDRs were analyzed and compared to those of X-ray structures with no NMR counterpart in terms of sequence length, IDR fraction, protein function, cellular location, and amino acid composition, all of which suggest distinct characteristics. The structural knowledge of IDPs is still inadequate compared with that of structured proteins. Our method can collect and utilize IDRs from structures determined by NMR, potentially enhancing the understanding of IDPs.

  2. A set of 4D NMR experiments of enhanced resolution for easy resonance assignment in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Koźmiński, Wiktor

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents examples of techniques based on the principle of random sampling that allows acquisition of NMR spectra featuring extraordinary resolution. This is due to increased dimensionality and maximum evolution time reached. The acquired spectra of CsPin protein and maltose binding protein were analyzed statistically with the aim to evaluate each technique. The results presented include exemplary spectral cross-sections. The spectral data provided by the proposed techniques allow easy assignment of backbone and side-chain resonances.

  3. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael; Pedrini, Bill; Herrmann, Torsten; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90% of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 hours. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [1H,1H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination. PMID:25428764

  4. NMR assignments of SPOC domain of the human transcriptional corepressor SHARP in complex with a C-terminal SMRT peptide.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Suzuka; Kanaba, Teppei; Ito, Yutaka; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-10-01

    The transcriptional corepressor SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein (SHARP) recruits histone deacetylases. Human SHARP protein is thought to function in processes involving steroid hormone responses and the Notch signaling pathway. SHARP consists of RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region and the spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain in the C-terminal region. It is known that the SPOC domain binds the LSD motif in the C-terminal tail of corepressors silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptor (SMRT)/nuclear receptor corepressor (NcoR). We are interested in delineating the mechanism by which the SPOC domain recognizes the LSD motif of the C-terminal tail of SMRT/NcoR. To this end, we are investigating the tertiary structure of the SPOC/SMRT peptide using NMR. Herein, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the SPOC domain in complex with a SMRT peptide, which contributes towards a structural understanding of the SPOC/SMRT peptide and its molecular recognition.

  5. Enhanced biosynthetically directed fractional carbon-13 enrichment of proteins for backbone NMR Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Wenrich, Broc R.; Sonstrom, Reilly E.; Gupta, Riju A.; Rovnyak, David

    2015-01-01

    Routes to carbon-13 enrichment of bacterially expressed proteins include achieving uniform or positionally selective (e.g. ILV-Me, or 13C′, etc.) enrichment. We consider the potential for biosynthetically directed fractional enrichment (e.g. carbon-13 incorporation in the protein less than 100%) for performing routine n-(D)dimensional NMR spectroscopy of proteins. First, we demonstrate an approach to fractional isotope addition where the initial growth media containing natural abundance glucose is replenished at induction with a small amount (e.g. 10%w/w u-13C-glucose) of enriched nutrient. The approach considered here is to add 10% (e.g. 200 mg for a 2 g/L culture) u-13C-glucose at the induction time (OD600=0.8), resulting in a protein with enhanced 13C incorporation that gives almost the same NMR signal levels as an exact 20% 13C sample. Second, whereas fractional enrichment is used for obtaining stereospecific methyl assignments, we find that 13C incorporation levels no greater than 20%w/w yield 13C and 13C-13C spin pair incorporation sufficient to conduct typical 3D-bioNMR backbone experiments on moderate instrumentation (600 MHz, RT probe). Typical 3D-bioNMR experiments of a fractionally enriched protein yield expected backbone connectivities, and did not show amino acid biases in this work, with one exception. When adding 10% u-13C glucose to expression media at induction, there is poor preservation of 13Cα-13Cβ spin pairs in the amino acids ILV, leading to the absence of Cβ signals in HNCACB spectra for ILV, a potentially useful editing effect. Enhanced fractional carbon-13 enrichment provides lower-cost routes to high throughput protein NMR studies, and makes modern protein NMR more cost-accessible. PMID:26256059

  6. Resin-bound chiral derivatizing agents for assignment of configuration by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Porto, Silvia; Seco, José Manuel; Espinosa, Juan Félix; Quiñoá, Emilio; Riguera, Ricardo

    2008-08-01

    A general methodology for assigning the configuration of chiral mono- and polyfunctional compounds by NMR is presented. The approach is based on the use of polystyrene-bound chiral derivatizing agents (CDA-resins) specifically designed to achieve the high-yield formation of the covalent linkages (amide or ester bonds) between the substrate and the chiral auxiliary within the NMR tube, without the need for other manipulations, on a microscale level and in a short time. The deuterated NMR solvents (CDCl3, CD3CN, CS2/CD2Cl2) are also the reaction solvents and separations, purifications or workups of any kind are not necessary prior to recording the spectra. The CDA-resins prepared included MPA, 9-AMA, BPG, MTPA, and 2-NTBA as auxiliary agents incorporated either as single enantiomers or as mixed combinations of the (R)- and the (S)-enantiomers at unequal and known ratios. The high versatility of these systems was successfully demonstrated in a variety of ways based on double and single derivatization, low temperature experiments, or the formation of metal complexes. The approach allowed the absolute configurations of chiral primary amines, primary and secondary alcohols, cyanohydrins, thiols, diols, triols, and amino alcohols to be determined. Extensive high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR experiments allowed the characterization of the new CDA-resins and enabled the study of their stability and regioselectivity.

  7. A tabu search approach for the NMR protein structure-based assignment problem.

    PubMed

    Cavuşlar, Gizem; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an experimental technique which exploits the magnetic properties of specific nuclei and enables the study of proteins in solution. The key bottleneck of NMR studies is to map the NMR peaks to corresponding nuclei, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this computationally challenging problem by using prior information about the protein obtained from a homologous structure. NVR-BIP used the Nuclear Vector Replacement (NVR) framework to model SBA as a binary integer programming problem. In this paper, we prove that this problem is NP-hard and propose a tabu search (TS) algorithm (NVR-TS) equipped with a guided perturbation mechanism to efficiently solve it. NVR-TS uses a quadratic penalty relaxation of NVR-BIP where the violations in the Nuclear Overhauser Effect constraints are penalized in the objective function. Experimental results indicate that our algorithm finds the optimal solution on NVRBIP’s data set which consists of seven proteins with 25 templates (31 to 126 residues). Furthermore, it achieves relatively high assignment accuracies on two additional large proteins, MBP and EIN (348 and 243 residues, respectively), which NVR-BIP failed to solve. The executable and the input files are available for download at http://people.sabanciuniv.edu/catay/NVR-TS/NVR-TS.html.

  8. Total (1)H NMR assignment of 3β-acetoxypregna-5,16-dien-20-one.

    PubMed

    Becerra-Martinez, Elvia; Ramírez-Gualito, Karla E; Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    This work describes the total and unambiguous assignment of the 750 MHz (1)H NMR spectrum of 3β-acetoxypregna-5,16-dien-20-one or 16-DPA (1), the well-known intermediate utilized in the synthesis of biological important commercial steroids. The task was accomplished by extracting the coupling constant values in the overlapped spectrum region by HSQC, and using these values in the (1)H iterative full spin analysis integrated in the PERCH NMR software. Comparison of the experimental vicinal coupling constants of 1 with the values calculated using Altona provides an excellent correlation. The same procedure, when applied to the published data of progesterone (2) and testosterone (3), afforded an acceptable correlation for 2 and a poor correlation for 3. In the last case, this suggested the reassignment of all four vicinal coupling constants for the methylene signals at the C-15 and C-16 positions, demonstrating the utility of this methodology.

  9. Complete assignment of NMR data of 22 phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivatives.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Aline Lima; Alves de Oliveira, Carlos Henrique; Mairink, Laura Maia; Pazini, Francine; Menegatti, Ricardo; Lião, Luciano Morais

    2011-08-01

    Complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and J((1)H/(1)H and (1)H/(19)F) coupling constants for 22 1-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivates were performed using the concerted application of (1)H 1D and (1)H, (13)C 2D gs-HSQC and gs-HMBC experiments. All 1-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivatives were synthesized as described by Finar and co-workers. The formylated 1-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivatives were performed under Duff's conditions.

  10. High-throughput backbone resonance assignment of small 13C, 15N-labeled proteins by a triple-resonance experiment with four sequential connectivity pathways using chemical shift-dependent, apparent 1J ( 1H, 13C): HNCACB codedHAHB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegan, Scott; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon; Riek, Roland

    2003-12-01

    The proposed three-dimensional triple-resonance experiment HNCACB codedHAHB correlates sequential 15N, 1H moieties via the chemical shifts of 13C α, 13C β, 1H α, and 1H β. The four sequential correlation pathways are achieved by the incorporation of the concept of chemical shift-coding [J. Biomol. NMR 25 (2003) 281] to the TROSY-HNCACB experiment. The monitored 1H α and 1H β chemical shifts are then coded in the line shape of the cross-peaks of 13C α, 13C β along the 13C dimension through an apparent residual scalar coupling, the size of which depends on the attached hydrogen chemical shift. The information of four sequential correlation pathways enables a rapid backbone assignment. The HNCACB codedHAHB experiment was applied to ˜85% labeled 13C, 15N-labeled amino-terminal fragment of Vaccinia virus DNA topoisomerase I comprising residues 1-77. After one day of measurement on a Bruker Avance 700 MHz spectrometer and 8 h of manual analysis of the spectrum 93% of the backbone assignment was achieved.

  11. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1.

    PubMed

    Parnham, Stuart; Gaines, William A; Duggan, Brendan M; Marcotte, William R; Hennig, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The building blocks of spider dragline silk are two fibrous proteins secreted from the major ampullate gland named spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1, MaSp2). These proteins consist of a large central domain composed of approximately 100 tandem copies of a 35-40 amino acid repeat sequence. Non-repetitive N and C-terminal domains, of which the C-terminal domain has been implicated to transition from soluble and insoluble states during spinning, flank the repetitive core. The N-terminal domain until recently has been largely unknown due to difficulties in cloning and expression. Here, we report nearly complete assignment for all (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonances in the 14 kDa N-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1-N) of the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes.

  12. Low resolution 1H NMR assignment of proton populations in pound cake and its polymeric ingredients.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Waterschoot, J; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Hills, B; Delcour, J A

    2013-08-15

    Based on a model system approach, five different proton populations were distinguished in pound cake crumb using one dimensional low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In free induction decay (FID) measurements, proton populations were assigned to (i) non-exchanging CH protons of crystalline starch, proteins and crystalline fat and (ii) non-exchanging CH protons of amorphous starch and gluten, which are in little contact with water. In Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements, three proton populations were distinguished. The CPMG population with the lowest mobility and the FID population with the highest mobility represent the same proton population. The two CPMG proton populations with the highest mobility were assigned to exchanging protons (i.e., protons of water, starch, gluten, egg proteins and sugar) and protons of lipids (i.e., protons of egg yolk lipids and amorphous lipid fraction of margarine) respectively. Based on their spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), two dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy further resolved the two proton populations with the highest mobility into three and two proton populations, respectively.

  13. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  14. NMR resonance assignments of the lantibiotic immunity protein NisI from Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Carolin; Christ, Nina Alexandra; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Korn, Sophie; Berninger, Lucija; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2015-10-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a small antimicrobial peptide which acts against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria. Nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis strains express four genes for self-protection against their own antimicrobial compound. This immunity system consists of the lipoprotein NisI and the ABC transporter NisFEG. NisI is attached to the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane via a covalently linked diacylglycerol anchor. Both the lipoprotein and the ABC transporter are needed for full immunity but the exact immunity mechanism is still unclear. To gain insights into the highly specific immunity mechanism of nisin producing strains on a structural level we present here the backbone resonance assignment of NisI (25.8 kDa) as well as the virtually complete (1)H,(15)N,(13)C chemical shift assignments for the isolated 12.7 kDa N-terminal and 14.6 kDa C-terminal domains of NisI.

  15. Design of a hyperpolarized (15)N NMR probe that induces a large chemical-shift change upon binding of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Hata, Ryunosuke; Nonaka, Hiroshi; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2015-08-07

    Ca(2+) is a fundamental metal ion for physiological functioning. Therefore, molecular probes for Ca(2+) analysis are required. Recently, a hyperpolarized NMR probe has emerged as a promising tool. Here, we report a new design of a hyperpolarized NMR probe for Ca(2+), which showed a large chemical shift change upon binding to Ca(2+) and was applied for Ca(2+) sensing in a hyperpolarized state.

  16. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  17. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  18. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  19. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. )

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  20. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of six saponins from Sapindus trifoliatus.

    PubMed

    Grover, Rajesh K; Roy, Abhijeet D; Roy, Raja; Joshi, S K; Srivastava, Vandita; Arora, Sudershan K

    2005-12-01

    Complete 1H and 13C spectral assignments are reported for six saponins from the pericarp of Sapindus trifoliatus (Hindi name: Reetha) collected from Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra, India, using only 1D and 2D NMR methods. The structures of the compounds were elucidated as hederagenin 3-O-(3-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-ara-binopyranoside, hederagenin 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylop-yranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-arabinop-yranoside, hederagenin 3-O-(3,4-O-diacetyl-beta-D-xylopy-ranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-arabinopy-ranoside, hederagenin 3-O-(3,4-O-diacetyl-alpha-L-arabinop-yranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-arabinop-yranoside, hederagenin 3-O-(beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside and he-deragenin 3-O-(alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamno-pyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside. It is concluded that saponins of this complexity approach the limit of structural complexity, which can be solved by NMR alone, precisely and quickly.

  1. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for three new arylnaphthalene lignan from Justicia procumbens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Wu, Jun; Si, Jianyong; Wang, Junmei; Yang, Meihua

    2008-03-01

    Three new arylnaphthalene lignans, named neojusticin C (1), procumbenoside C (2) and procumbenoside D (3), have been isolated from the whole plant of Justicia procumbens, together with three known ones, justicidinoside B (4), justicidinoside C (5), and diphyllin-1-O-beta-D-apiofuranoside (6). The complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for three new lignans were first obtained by means of 2D NMR techniques, including HSQC and HMBC.

  2. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for seven arylnaphthalide lignans from Justicia procumbens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meihua; Wu, Jun; Cheng, Fan; Zhou, Yuan

    2006-07-01

    Three new arylnaphthalide lignans named 6'-hydroxy justicidin A (1), 6'-hydroxy justicidin B (2) and 6'-hydroxy justicidin C (3) have been isolated from the whole plant of Justicia procumbens, together with four known ones, neojusticin A (4), chinensinaphthol methyl ester (5), isodiphyllin (6) and taiwanin C (7). The complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for the new lignans and the 13C NMR chemical shifts for the known lignans were obtained for the first time by means of 2D NMR techniques, including HSQC and HMBC.

  3. The acyl nitroso Diels-Alder (ANDA) reaction of sorbate derivatives: an X-ray and 15N NMR study with an application to amino-acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bollans, Lee; Bacsa, John; Iggo, Jonathan A; Morris, Gareth A; Stachulski, Andrew V

    2009-11-07

    We present a study of the acyl nitroso Diels-Alder (ANDA) reaction of sorbate esters and sorbic alcohol derivatives, using alkoxycarbonyl nitroso dienophiles. An optimisation of the reaction conditions for ethyl sorbate is first presented, and the product is used in an efficient synthesis of 5-methylornithine. Structure-reactivity trends in sorbic alcohol (E,E-2,4-hexadien-1-ol) and its acylated analogues are then discussed. We present single-crystal X-ray structural proof for key adducts in both series and present in detail a novel HMBC/HSQC ((1)H-(15)N) criterion for ready distinction of regioisomers arising from such ANDA reactions.

  4. Solution-state (15)N NMR spectroscopic study of alpha-C-phycocyanin: implications for the structure of the chromophore-binding pocket of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Janina; Kühne, Ronald; Schmieder, Peter

    2007-12-17

    The detailed structure of the chromophore-binding pocket in phytochrome proteins and the structural changes associated with its photocycle are still matters of debate. Insight into the structure and dynamics of the binding pocket has been gained through the comparison of a (15)N NMR spectrum of alpha-C-phycocyanin, which is often used as a model system for the study of phytochromes, with the previously described (15)N NMR spectrum of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. The former spectrum supports the hypothesis that all four nitrogen atoms of the alpha-C-phycocyanin chromophore are protonated, in analogy with the proposed protonation state for the P(r) and P(fr) forms of Cph1. The spectra show that the chromophores in both proteins exhibit a distinct dynamic behavior, as also indicated by a NOESY spectrum of Cph1. Finally, stereochemical arguments and a Cph1 homology model support the hypothesis that the chromophore in Cph1 is most likely in the ZZZssa conformation in the P(r) form of the protein.

  5. Heteronuclear NMR assignments and secondary structure of the coiled coil trimerization domain from cartilage matrix protein in oxidized and reduced forms.

    PubMed Central

    Wiltscheck, R.; Kammerer, R. A.; Dames, S. A.; Schulthess, T.; Blommers, M. J.; Engel, J.; Alexandrescu, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The C-terminal oligomerization domain of chicken cartilage matrix protein is a trimeric coiled coil comprised of three identical 43-residue chains. NMR spectra of the protein show equivalent magnetic environments for each monomer, indicating a parallel coiled coil structure with complete threefold symmetry. Sequence-specific assignments for 1H-, 15N-, and 13C-NMR resonances have been obtained from 2D 1H NOESY and TOCSY spectra, and from 3D HNCA, 15N NOESY-HSQC, and HCCH-TOCSY spectra. A stretch of alpha-helix encompassing five heptad repeats (35 residues) has been identified from intra-chain HN-HN and HN-H alpha NOE connectivities. 3JHNH alpha coupling constants, and chemical shift indices. The alpha-helix begins immediately downstream of inter-chain disulfide bonds between residues Cys 5 and Cys 7, and extends to near the C-terminus of the molecule. The threefold symmetry of the molecule is maintained when the inter-chain disulfide bonds that flank the N-terminus of the coiled coil are reduced. Residues Ile 21 through Glu 36 show conserved chemical shifts and NOE connectivities, as well as strong protection from solvent exchange in the oxidized and reduced forms of the protein. By contrast, residues Ile 10 through Val 17 show pronounced chemical shift differences between the oxidized and reduced protein. Strong chemical exchange NOEs between HN resonances and water indicate solvent exchange on time scales faster than 10 s, and suggests a dynamic fraying of the N-terminus of the coiled coil upon reduction of the disulfide bonds. Possible roles for the disulfide crosslinks of the oligomerization domain in the function of cartilage matrix protein are proposed. PMID:9260286

  6. Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Haruhiro; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin (OXT) in phosphate buffer was elucidated by one-dimensional (1D)- and two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques, which involve the assignment of peptide amide NH protons and carbamoyl NH(2) protons. The (1)H-(15)N correlation of seven amide NH protons and three carbamoyl NH(2) protons were also shown by HSQC NMR of OXT without (15)N enrichment.

  7. NMR resonance assignments for the N-terminal domain of the δ subunit of the E. coli γ clamp loader complex.

    PubMed

    Alyami, Esmael M; Rizzo, Alessandro A; Beuning, Penny J; Korzhnev, Dmitry M

    2017-03-06

    The β-clamp protein and the γ clamp loader complex are essential components of bacterial DNA replication machinery. The β-clamp is a ring-shaped homodimer that encircles DNA and increases the efficiency of replication by providing a binding platform for DNA polymerases and other replication-related proteins. The β-clamp is loaded onto DNA by the five-subunit γ clamp loader complex in a multi-step ATP-dependent process. The initial steps of this process involve the cooperative binding of the β-clamp by the five subunits of ATP-bound clamp loader, which induces or traps an open conformation of the clamp. Remarkably, the δ subunit of the E. coli clamp loader, or even its 140 residue N-terminal domain (called mini-δ), alone can shift conformational equilibrium of the β-clamp towards the open state. Here we report nearly complete backbone and side-chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR resonance assignments of mini-δ that will facilitate NMR studies of the mechanisms of β-clamp opening and its loading on DNA by the clamp loader.

  8. 1H and 13C NMR signal assignments of a novel Baeyer-Villiger originated diterpene lactone.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Henriete S; Takahashi, Jacqueline A; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; Boaventura, Maria Amélia D

    2006-02-01

    A highly rearranged novel dilactone was the single product isolated from Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a norketone prepared from grandiflorenic acid, a natural kaurane diterpene. The complete 1H and 13C NMR assignment is presented for this novel compound that showed discrete in vitro antibacterial activity.

  9. Backbone dynamics of a biologically active human FGF-1 monomer, complexed to a hexasaccharide heparin-analogue, by 15N NMR relaxation methods.

    PubMed

    Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Fayos, Rosa; Angulo, Jesús; Ojeda, Rafael; Martín-Pastor, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Lozano, Rosa; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2006-08-01

    The binding site and backbone dynamics of a bioactive complex formed by the acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and a specifically designed heparin hexasaccharide has been investigated by HSQC and relaxation NMR methods. The comparison of the relaxation data for the free and bound states has allowed showing that the complex is monomeric, and still induces mutagenesis, and that the protein backbone presents reduced motion in different timescale in its bound state, except in certain points that are involved in the interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR).

  10. Elucidating the guest-host interactions and complex formation of praziquantel and cyclodextrin derivatives by (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arrúa, Eva C; Ferreira, M João G; Salomon, Claudio J; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-12-30

    Praziquantel is the drug of choice to treat several parasitic infections including the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis. Due to its low aqueous solubility, cyclodextrins have been tested as potential host candidates to prepare praziquantel inclusion complexes with improved solubility. For the first time, the interactions of praziquantel with β-cyclodextrin and β-cyclodextrin derivatives (methyl-β-cyclodextrin and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin) were investigated using high resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The results of this work confirmed that solid-state NMR experiments provided structural characterization, demonstrating the formation of inclusion complexes most probably with PZQ adopting an anti conformation, also the most likely in amorphous raw PZQ. Further information on the interaction of praziquantel with methyl-β-cyclodextrin was obtained from proton rotating-frame relaxation time measurements, sensitive to kilohertz-regime motions but modulated by spin-diffusion. Evidences were presented in all cases for praziquantel complexation through the aromatic ring. In addition, 1:2 drug:carrier molar ratio appears to be the most probable and therefore suitable stoichiometry to improve pharmaceutical formulations of this antischistosomal drug.

  11. The structural plasticity of heparan sulfate NA-domains and hence their role in mediating multivalent interactions is confirmed by high-accuracy 15N-NMR relaxation studies

    PubMed Central

    Mobli, Mehdi; Nilsson, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Considering the biological importance of heparan sulfate (HS) and the significant activity of its highly-sulfated regions (S-domains), the paucity of known functions for the non-sulfated NA-domains is somewhat puzzling. It has been suggested that chain dynamics within the NA-domains are the key to their functional role in HS. In this study, we investigate this hypothesis using state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at multiple frequencies. To resolve the problem of severe overlap in 1H-NMR spectra of repetitive polysaccharides from proteoglycans, we have prepared oligosaccharides with the chemical structure of HS NA-domains containing the 15N nucleus, which has enough chemical shift dispersion to probe the central residues of octasaccharides at atomic resolution using 600 MHz NMR. By performing NMR relaxation experiments at three magnetic-field strengths, high quality data on internal dynamics and rotational diffusion was obtained. Furthermore, translational diffusion could also be measured by NMR using pulse field gradients. These experimental data were used, in concert with molecular dynamics simulations, to provide information on local molecular shape, greatly aiding our relaxation analyses. Our results, which are more accurate than those presented previously, confirm the higher flexibility of the NA-domains as compared with reported data on S-domains. It is proposed that this flexibility has two functional roles. First, it confers a greater area of interaction from the anchoring point on the core protein for the bioactive S-domains. Secondly, it allows multiple interactions along the same HS chain that are dynamically independent of each other. Electronic Supplementary Material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10719-007-9081-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18080183

  12. Complete assignment of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of cis and trans isonucleoside derivatives of purine with a tetrahydropyran ring.

    PubMed

    Besada, Pedro; Costas, Tamara; Terán, Carmen

    2010-06-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of cis and trans isonucleoside analogues of purine in which the furanose moiety is substituted by a tetrahydropyran ring were completely assigned using one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments that include NOE, DEPT, COSY and HSQC. The significant (1)H and (13)C NMR signals differentiating between the cis and trans stereoisomers were compared.

  13. Enzyme IIBcellobiose of the phosphoenol-pyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli: backbone assignment and secondary structure determined by three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ab, E.; Schuurman-Wolters, G. K.; Saier, M. H.; Reizer, J.; Jacuinod, M.; Roepstorff, P.; Dijkstra, K.; Scheek, R. M.; Robillard, G. T.

    1994-01-01

    The assignment of backbone resonances and the secondary structure determination of the Cys 10 Ser mutant of enzyme IIBcellobiose of the Escherichia coli cellobiose-specific phosphoenol-pyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system are presented. The backbone resonances were assigned using 4 triple resonance experiments, the HNCA and HN(CO)CA experiments, correlating backbone 1H, 15N, and 13C alpha resonances, and the HN(CA)CO and HNCO experiments, correlating backbone 1H,15N and 13CO resonances. Heteronuclear 1H-NOE 1H-15N single quantum coherence (15N-NOESY-HSQC) spectroscopy and heteronuclear 1H total correlation 1H-15N single quantum coherence (15N-TOCSY-HSQC) spectroscopy were used to resolve ambiguities arising from overlapping 13C alpha and 13CO frequencies and to check the assignments from the triple resonance experiments. This procedure, together with a 3-dimensional 1H alpha-13C alpha-13CO experiment (COCAH), yielded the assignment for all observed backbone resonances. The secondary structure was determined using information both from the deviation of observed 1H alpha and 13C alpha chemical shifts from their random coil values and 1H-NOE information from the 15N-NOESY-HSQC. These data show that enzyme IIBcellobiose consists of a 4-stranded parallel beta-sheet and 5 alpha-helices. In the wild-type enzyme IIBcellobiose, the catalytic residue appears to be located at the end of a beta-strand. PMID:8003964

  14. Probing Hydronium Ion Histidine NH Exchange Rate Constants in the M2 Channel via Indirect Observation of Dipolar-Dephased (15)N Signals in Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Miao, Yimin; Qin, Huajun; Cross, Timothy A

    2016-12-14

    Water-protein chemical exchange in membrane-bound proteins is an important parameter for understanding how proteins interact with their aqueous environment, but has been difficult to observe in membrane-bound biological systems. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of probing specific water-protein chemical exchange in membrane-bound proteins in solid-state MAS NMR. By spin-locking the (1)H magnetization along the magic angle, the (1)H spin diffusion is suppressed such that a water-protein chemical exchange process can be monitored indirectly by dipolar-dephased (15)N signals through polarization transfer from (1)H. In the example of the Influenza A full length M2 protein, the buildup of dipolar-dephased (15)N signals from the tetrad of His37 side chains have been observed as a function of spin-lock time. This confirms that hydronium ions are in exchange with protons in the His37 NH bonds at the heart of the M2 proton conduction mechanism, with an exchange rate constant of ∼1750 s(-1) for pH 6.2 at -10 °C.

  15. 13C-direct detected NMR experiments for the sequential J-based resonance assignment of RNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Christian; Kovacs, Helena; Buck, Janina; Wacker, Anna; Fürtig, Boris; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We present here a set of 13C-direct detected NMR experiments to facilitate the resonance assignment of RNA oligonucleotides. Three experiments have been developed: (1) the (H)CC-TOCSY-experiment utilizing a virtual decoupling scheme to assign the intraresidual ribose 13C-spins, (2) the (H)CPC-experiment that correlates each phosphorus with the C4′ nuclei of adjacent nucleotides via J(C,P) couplings and (3) the (H)CPC-CCH-TOCSY-experiment that correlates the phosphorus nuclei with the respective C1′,H1′ ribose signals. The experiments were applied to two RNA hairpin structures. The current set of 13C-direct detected experiments allows direct and unambiguous assignment of the majority of the hetero nuclei and the identification of the individual ribose moieties following their sequential assignment. Thus, 13C-direct detected NMR methods constitute useful complements to the conventional 1H-detected approach for the resonance assignment of oligonucleotides that is often hindered by the limited chemical shift dispersion. The developed methods can also be applied to large deuterated RNAs. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10858-010-9429-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20544375

  16. Improving the efficiency of branch-and-bound complete-search NMR assignment using the symmetry of molecules and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Andrés; Castillo, Andrés M.; González, Fabio; Patiny, Luc; Wist, Julien

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignment of small molecules is presented as a typical example of a combinatorial optimization problem in chemical physics. Three strategies that help improve the efficiency of solution search by the branch and bound method are presented: 1. reduction of the size of the solution space by resort to a condensed structure formula, wherein symmetric nuclei are grouped together; 2. partitioning of the solution space based on symmetry, that becomes the basis for an efficient branching procedure; and 3. a criterion of selection of input restrictions that leads to increased gaps between branches and thus faster pruning of non-viable solutions. Although the examples chosen to illustrate this work focus on small-molecule NMR assignment, the results are generic and might help solving other combinatorial optimization problems.

  17. Improving the efficiency of branch-and-bound complete-search NMR assignment using the symmetry of molecules and spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Andrés; Patiny, Luc; Castillo, Andrés M.; González, Fabio; Wist, Julien

    2015-02-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignment of small molecules is presented as a typical example of a combinatorial optimization problem in chemical physics. Three strategies that help improve the efficiency of solution search by the branch and bound method are presented: 1. reduction of the size of the solution space by resort to a condensed structure formula, wherein symmetric nuclei are grouped together; 2. partitioning of the solution space based on symmetry, that becomes the basis for an efficient branching procedure; and 3. a criterion of selection of input restrictions that leads to increased gaps between branches and thus faster pruning of non-viable solutions. Although the examples chosen to illustrate this work focus on small-molecule NMR assignment, the results are generic and might help solving other combinatorial optimization problems.

  18. NMR assignments of the FKBP-type PPIase domain of the human aryl-hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP).

    PubMed

    Linnert, Miriam; Haupt, Katja; Lin, Yi-Jan; Kissing, Sandra; Paschke, Anne-Katrin; Fischer, Gunter; Weiwad, Matthias; Lücke, Christian

    2012-10-01

    The aryl-hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) interacts with several protein binding partners and has been associated with pituitary tumor development. Here, we report nearly complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments for the N-terminal AIP(2-166) segment, which has been predicted to represent a FKBP-type PPIase domain. Sequence alignment with the prototypic FKBP12, however, reveals disagreements between the AIP chemical shift index consensus and the corresponding FKBP12 secondary structure elements.

  19. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments of spiro-cycloalkylidenehomo- and methanofullerenes by the DFT-GIAO method.

    PubMed

    Khalilov, L M; Tulyabaev, A R; Yanybin, V M; Tuktarov, A R

    2011-06-01

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of spiro-cycloalkylidene[60]fullerenes were assigned using experimental NMR data and the Density Functional Theory (DFT)-Gauge Independence Of Atomic Orbitals method (GAIO) calculation method in the Perdew Burke Ernzerhof (PBE)/3z approach. The calculated values of the (13)C NMR chemical shifts adequately reproduce the experimental values at this quantum chemistry approach. Similar assignments will be helpful for (13)C NMR spectral analysis of homo- and methano[60]fullerene derivatives for structure elucidation and to determine the influence of fullerene frames on substituents and the influence of substituents on fullerene cores.

  20. Structure elucidation and NMR assignments of an unusual triterpene saponin derivative from Ilex kudincha.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wenjian; Wang, Qinghu; Li, Wen; Sha, Yi; Li, Xian; Wang, Jinhui

    2012-04-01

    One unusual triterpenoid derivative, ilekudinchoside E (1), was isolated from the leaves of Ilex kudincha. The structure was established by various spectroscopic techniques, including one- and two-dimensional NMR, HRTOFMS and CD spectra.

  1. Structure elucidation and complete NMR spectral assignments of four new diterpenoids from Smallantus sonchifolius.

    PubMed

    Dou, De-Qiang; Tian, Fang; Qiu, Ying-Kun; Kang, Ting-Guo; Dong, Feng

    2008-08-01

    Four new diterpenoids, named smaditerpenic acid A-D, together with five known compounds, were isolated from the H(2)O extract of the leaves of Smallantus sonchifolius (yacon) cultivated in Liaoning, China and their structures were elucidated on the basis of one- and two-dimensional NMR (including (1)H, (13)C-NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, TOCSY, HMBC, and ROESY), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and chemical methods.

  2. Stereospecific assignment of 1H resonances through chemical shift calculation and their use in structure determination by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Timothy S.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    1995-04-01

    Understanding of the factors which influence proton chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of proteins has advanced steadily as the number of proteins, for which assignments in conjunction with high resolution structures have been obtained, has increased. Progress has been made in both the calculation of chemical shifts from given coordinates, both empirically for 1H (Williamson & Asakura J. Magn. Reson. (1991) 94, 557) and using ab initio approaches for calculation of 13C (De Dios et al. Science (1993) 260, 1491). Concomitantly Wishart et al. (J. Mol. Biol. (1992) 222, 311), using statistical methods have clarified the relationship between Hα chemical shift and regular secondary structure in proteins to a high degree of accuracy. We recently demonstrated the significant amount of structural information present in the Hα chemical shift through the use of chemical shift restrained molecular dynamics simulations (Harvey & van Gunsteren Techniques in Protein Chemistry IV (1993) 615, Academic Press). Here we apply a similar methodology to the stereospecific assignment of methylene and methyl proton resonances in proteins. Stereospecific assignment of such 1H resonances dramatically increases the degree of precision of ensembles of structures derived from NMR data. However, this is often a cumbersome process, requiring detailed analysis of large amounts of data. Furthermore, experimental considerations such as poor signal-to-noise ratios, spectral overlap and spin diffusion combine to make this process somewhat unreliable. We present calculations of the chemical shifts for the known structures of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Mw 6.5 kDa) and the α-amylase inhibitor tendamistat (Mw 8 kDa), for which stereospecific assignments and high resolution structures from both NMR and crystallographic studies are available. The methods described are also applied to the ensemble of structures obtained for protein S (Mw 19 kDa) for both structure

  3. NMR resonance assignments for the tetramethylrhodamine binding RNA aptamer 3 in complex with the ligand 5-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine.

    PubMed

    Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Juen, Michael; Kreutz, Christoph; Wöhnert, Jens

    2017-04-01

    RNA aptamers are used in a wide range of biotechnological or biomedical applications. In many cases the high resolution structures of these aptamers in their ligand-complexes have revealed fundamental aspects of RNA folding and RNA small molecule interactions. Fluorescent RNA-ligand complexes in particular find applications as optical sensors or as endogenous fluorescent tags for RNA tracking in vivo. Structures of RNA aptamers and aptamer ligand complexes constitute the starting point for rational function directed optimization approaches. Here, we present the NMR resonance assignment of an RNA aptamer binding to the fluorescent ligand tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) in complex with the ligand 5-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine (5-TAMRA) as a starting point for a high-resolution structure determination using NMR spectroscopy in solution.

  4. Two-dimensional sup 1 H NMR studies on HPr protein from Staphylococcus aureus: Complete sequential assignments and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbitzer, H.R.; Neidig, K.P. ); Hengstenberg, W. )

    1991-11-19

    Complete sequence-specific assignments of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of HPr protein from Staphylococcus aureus were obtained by two-dimensional NMR methods. Important secondary structure elements that can be derived from the observed nuclear Overhauser effects are a large antiparallel {beta}-pleated sheet consisting of four strands, A, B, C, D, a segment S{sub AB} consisting of an extended region around the active-center histidine (His-15) and an {alpha}-helix, a half-turn between strands B and C, a segment S{sub CD} which shows no typical secondary structure, and the {alpha}-helical, C-terminal segment S{sub term}. These general structural features are similar to those found earlier in HPr proteins from different microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Streptococcus faecalis.

  5. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments and Z/E-stereoconfiguration determination of isomers of 1,4-diketone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guohua; Yin, Guodong; Guo, Wenbo; Wu, Anxin; Cui, Yanfang

    2008-01-01

    Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments and Z/E-stereoconfiguration determination for a series of new isomers of 1,4-diketone derivatives obtained via self-sorting tandem reaction were accomplished by means of one- and two-dimentional NMR experiments including 1H, 13C, gCOSY, gHSQC, gHMBC, and NOESY.

  6. 1H and 13C NMR signal assignment of cucurbitacin derivatives from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader and Ecballium elaterium L. (Cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Seger, Christoph; Sturm, Sonja; Mair, Maria-Elisabeth; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Stuppner, Hermann

    2005-06-01

    2D NMR-derived 1H and 13C NMR signal assignments of six structurally closely related cucurbitacin derivatives are presented. The investigated 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylcucurbitacins I, J, K, and L were obtained from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader whereas the aglyca cucurbitacin E and I were isolated from Ecballium elaterium L.

  7. 1H NMR assignments of apo calcyclin and comparative structural analysis with calbindin D9k and S100 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Potts, B. C.; Carlström, G.; Okazaki, K.; Hidaka, H.; Chazin, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    The homodimeric S100 protein calcyclin has been studied in the apo state by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy. Using a combination of scalar correlation and NOE experiments, sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments were obtained for all but one backbone and > 90% of the side-chain resonances. To our knowledge, the 2 x 90 residue (20 kDa) calcyclin dimer is the largest protein system for which such complete assignments have been made by purely homonuclear methods. Sequential and medium-range NOEs and slowly exchanging backbone amide protons identified directly the four helices and the short antiparallel beta-type interaction between the two binding loops that comprise each subunit of the dimer. Further analysis of NOEs enabled the unambiguous assignment of 556 intrasubunit distance constraints, 24 intrasubunit hydrogen bonding constraints, and 2 x 26 intersubunit distance constraints. The conformation of the monomer subunit was refined by distance geometry and restrained molecular dynamics calculations using the intrasubunit constraints only. Calculation of the dimer structure starting from this conformational ensemble has been reported elsewhere. The extent of structural homology among the apo calcyclin subunit, the monomer subunit of apo S100 beta, and monomeric apo calbindin D9k has been examined in detail by comparing 1H NMR chemical shifts and secondary structures. This analysis was extended to a comprehensive comparison of the three-dimensional structures of the calcyclin monomer subunit and calbindin D9k, which revealed greater similarity in the packing of their hydrophobic cores than was anticipated previously. Together, these results support the hypothesis that all members of the S100 family have similar core structures and similar modes of dimerization. Analysis of the amphiphilicity of Helix IV is used to explain why calbindin D9k is monomeric, but full-length S100 proteins form homodimers. PMID:8931135

  8. Structure elucidation and NMR assignments of two unusual monoterpene indole alkaloids from Psychotria stachyoides.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Antonia Torres Avila; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Delprete, Piero Giuseppe; de Souza, Elnatan Bezerra; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha; Lima, Mary Anne Sousa

    2010-09-01

    Two unusual monoterpene indole alkaloids, stachyoside (1) and nor-methyl-23-oxo-correantoside (2), have been isolated from the aerial parts of Psychotria stachyoides. The structural elucidation of both compounds was performed by the aid of HRESIMS, FT-IR, and 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques including COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY.

  9. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  10. Computational Chemistry to the Rescue: Modern Toolboxes for the Assignment of Complex Molecules by GIAO NMR Calculations.

    PubMed

    Grimblat, Nicolas; Sarotti, Ariel M

    2016-08-22

    The calculations of NMR properties of molecules using quantum chemical methods have deeply impacted several branches of organic chemistry. They are particularly important in structural or stereochemical assignments of organic compounds, with implications in total synthesis, stereoselective reactions, and natural products chemistry. In studying the evolution of the strategies developed to support (or reject) a structural proposal, it becomes clear that the most effective and accurate ones involve sophisticated procedures to correlate experimental and computational data. Owing to their relatively high mathematical complexity, such calculations (CP3, DP4, ANN-PRA) are often carried out using additional computational resources provided by the authors (such as applets or Excel files). This Minireview will cover the state-of-the-art of these toolboxes in the assignment of organic molecules, including mathematical definitions, updates, and discussion of relevant examples.

  11. An automated framework for NMR resonance assignment through simultaneous slice picking and spin system forming.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ahmed; Guo, Xianrong; Jing, Bing-Yi; Gao, Xin

    2014-06-01

    Despite significant advances in automated nuclear magnetic resonance-based protein structure determination, the high numbers of false positives and false negatives among the peaks selected by fully automated methods remain a problem. These false positives and negatives impair the performance of resonance assignment methods. One of the main reasons for this problem is that the computational research community often considers peak picking and resonance assignment to be two separate problems, whereas spectroscopists use expert knowledge to pick peaks and assign their resonances at the same time. We propose a novel framework that simultaneously conducts slice picking and spin system forming, an essential step in resonance assignment. Our framework then employs a genetic algorithm, directed by both connectivity information and amino acid typing information from the spin systems, to assign the spin systems to residues. The inputs to our framework can be as few as two commonly used spectra, i.e., CBCA(CO)NH and HNCACB. Different from the existing peak picking and resonance assignment methods that treat peaks as the units, our method is based on 'slices', which are one-dimensional vectors in three-dimensional spectra that correspond to certain ([Formula: see text]) values. Experimental results on both benchmark simulated data sets and four real protein data sets demonstrate that our method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods while using a less number of spectra than those methods. Our method is freely available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx.

  12. NMR characterization of cellulose acetate: chemical shift assignments, substituent effects, and chemical shift additivity.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Hisaho; Shimizu, Yuuichi

    2015-03-15

    A series of cellulose acetates (CA) with degrees of substitution (DS) ranging from 2.92-0.92 dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-d6 and cellulose dissolved in tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF)/DMSO-d6 were investigated by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR spectroscopic analysis allowed the determination of the (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the eight anhydroglucose units (AGUs) that contain CA: 2,3,6-tri-, 2,3-di-, 2,6-di-, 3,6-di-, 2-mono-, 3-mono-, 6-mono-, and unacetylated AGUs. A comparative analysis of the chemical shift data revealed the substituent effect of acetyl groups at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions on the (1)H and (13)C nuclei in the same AGU. In addition, chemical shift additivity could be applied to the (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of CA because the chemical shifts of the diacetylated and triacetylated AGUs could be almost completely explained by the acetyl substituent effects at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions.

  13. Periodic ab initio calculation of nuclear quadrupole parameters as an assignment tool in solid-state NMR spectroscopy: applications to 23Na NMR spectra of crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Clive; Moore, Elaine A; Mortimer, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Periodic ab initio HF calculations using the CRYSTAL code have been used to calculate (23)Na NMR quadrupole parameters for a wide range of crystalline sodium compounds including Na(3)OCl. An approach is developed that can be used routinely as an alternative to point-charge modelling schemes for the assignment of distinct lines in (23)Na NMR spectra to specific crystallographic sodium sites. The calculations are based on standard 3-21 G and 6-21 G molecular basis sets and in each case the same modified basis set for sodium is used for all compounds. The general approach is extendable to other quadrupolar nuclei. For the 3-21 G calculations a 1:1 linear correlation between experimental and calculated values of C(Q)((23)Na) is obtained. The 6-21 G calculations, including the addition of d-polarisation functions, give better accuracy in the calculation of eta((23)Na). The sensitivity of eta((23)Na) to hydrogen atom location is shown to be useful in testing the reported hydrogen-bonded structure of Na(2)HPO(4).

  14. Solution structural characterization of cyanometmyoglobin: Resonance assignment of heme cavity residues by two-dimensional NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, S.D.; La Mar, G.N. )

    1990-02-13

    Steady-state nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE), two-dimensional (2D) nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), and 2D spin correlation spectroscopy (COSY) have been applied to the fully paramagnetic low-spin, cyanide-ligated complex of sperm whale ferric myoglobin to assign the majority of the heme pocket side-chain proton signals and the remainder of the heme signals. It is shown that the 2D NOESY map reveals essentially all dipolar connectivities observed in ordinary 1D NOE experiments and expected on the basis of crystal coordinates, albeit often more weakly than in a diamagnetic analogue. For extremely broad ({approximately}600-Hz) and rapidly relaxing (T{sub 1} {approximately} 3 ms) signals which show no NOESY peaks, the authors demonstrate that conventional steady-state NOEs obtained under very rapid pulsing conditions still allow detection of the critical dipolar connectivities that allow unambiguous assignments. Numerous critical COSY cross peaks between strongly hyperfine-shifted peaks were resolved and assigned. In all, 95% (53 of 56 signals) of the total proton sets within {approximately}7.5 {angstrom} of the iron, the region experiencing the strongest hyperfine shifts and paramagnetic relaxation, are now unambiguously assigned. Hence it is clear that the 2D methods can be profitably applied to paramagnetic proteins. The scope and limitations of such application are discussed. The resulting hyperfine shift pattern for the heme confirmed expectations based on model compounds.

  15. NMR sequential assignment of Escherichia coli thioredoxin utilizing random fractional deuteriation

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.; Richards, F.M.

    1988-01-12

    All non-proline residues except for the N-terminal dipeptide have been assigned in the 108-residue protein Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Central to these experiments has been the use of protein samples in which all carbon-bound hydrogen positions are substituted to 75% with deuterium by bacterial growth on partially deuteriated carbon sources and media. The dilution of the local proton density gives rise to narrower line widths with little loss in sensitivity. In addition, passive or secondary coupling to protons not directly involved in the coherence transfer process of correlation experiments is largely suppressed, thus significantly improving the resolution for side-chain couplings. Simultaneous multiresidue-type assignments have been obtained by incorporation of several amino acids with differing selective ..cap alpha.. and/or ..beta..-deuteriation into a fractionally deuteriated background. Combined with several single residue type labeling experiments, these selective labelings have yielded direct residue type assignments for two-thirds of the protein. In addition to improved resolution, the amide to carbon-bound proton NOESY spectra offered equivalent sensitivity while the amide to amide NOESY spectra offered superior sensitivity to that observed for natural abundance samples. The resultant sequential assignment has an average number of nearest-neighbor NOE connectivities of 2.35 out of the possible 3 ..cap alpha..-amide, ..beta..-amide, and amide-amide connectivities.

  16. 4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase, a 41-kDa homohexamer: backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, solution secondary structure, and location of active site residues by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Stivers, J. T.; Abeygunawardana, C.; Whitman, C. P.; Mildvan, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), a homohexamer consisting of 62 residues per subunit, catalyzes the isomerization of unsaturated alpha-keto acids using Pro-1 as a general base (Stivers et al., 1996a, 1996b). We report the backbone and side-chain 1H, 15N, and 13C NMR assignments and the solution secondary structure for 4-OT using 2D and 3D homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR methods. The subunit secondary structure consists of an alpha-helix (residues 13-30), two beta-strands (beta 1, residues 2-8; beta 2, residues 39-45), a beta-hairpin (residues 50-57), two loops (I, residues 9-12; II, 34-38), and two turns (I, residues 30-33; II, 47-50). The remaining residues form coils. The beta 1 strand is parallel to the beta 2 strand of the same subunit on the basis of cross stand NH(i)-NH(j) NOEs in a 2D 15N-edited 1H-NOESY spectrum of hexameric 4-OT containing two 15N-labeled subunits/hexamer. The beta 1 strand is also antiparallel to another beta 1 strand from an adjacent subunit forming a subunit interface. Because only three such pairwise interactions are possible, the hexamer is a trimer of dimers. The diffusion constant, determined by dynamic light scattering, and the rotational correlation time (14.5 ns) estimated from 15N T1/T2 measurements, are consistent with the hexameric molecular weight of 41 kDa. Residue Phe-50 is in the active site on the basis of transferred NOEs to the bound partial substrate 2-oxo-1,6-hexanedioate. Modification of the general base, Pro-1, with the active site-directed irreversible inhibitor, 3-bromopyruvate, significantly alters the amide 15N and NH chemical shifts of residues in the beta-hairpin and in loop II, providing evidence that these regions change conformation when the active site is occupied. PMID:8845763

  17. Protein residue linking in a single spectrum for magic-angle spinning NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Stanek, Jan; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Bertarello, Andrea; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Lalli, Daniela; Krejčíková, Magdaléna; Doyen, Camille; Öster, Carl; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Felli, Isabella C; Pierattelli, Roberta; Dixon, Nicholas E; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2015-07-01

    Here we introduce a new pulse sequence for resonance assignment that halves the number of data sets required for sequential linking by directly correlating sequential amide resonances in a single diagonal-free spectrum. The method is demonstrated with both microcrystalline and sedimented deuterated proteins spinning at 60 and 111 kHz, and a fully protonated microcrystalline protein spinning at 111 kHz, with as little as 0.5 mg protein sample. We find that amide signals have a low chance of ambiguous linkage, which is further improved by linking in both forward and backward directions. The spectra obtained are amenable to automated resonance assignment using general-purpose software such as UNIO-MATCH.

  18. NMR-Profiles of Protein Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Serrano, Pedro; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    NMR-Profiles are quantitative one-dimensional presentations of two-dimensional [15N,1H]-correlation spectra used to monitor the quality of protein solutions prior to and during NMR structure determinations and functional studies. In our current use in structural genomics projects, a NMR-Profile is recorded at the outset of a structure determination, using a uniformly 15N-labeled micro-scale sample of the protein. We thus assess the extent to which polypeptide backbone resonance assignments can be achieved with given NMR techniques, for example, conventional triple resonance experiments or APSY-NMR. With the availability of sequence-specific polypeptide backbone resonance assignments in the course of the structure determination, an “Assigned NMR-Profile” is generated, which visualizes the variation of the 15N–1H correlation cross peak intensities along the sequence and thus maps the sequence locations of polypeptide segments for which the NMR line shapes are affected by conformational exchange or other processes. The Assigned NMR-Profile provides a guiding reference during later stages of the structure determination, and is of special interest for monitoring the protein during functional studies, where dynamic features may be modulated during physiological functions. PMID:23839514

  19. Complete NMR assignment and conformational analysis of 17-α-ethinylestradiol by using RDCs obtained in grafted graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    França, José A A; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Lei, Xinxiang; Sun, Han; Griesinger, Christian; Hallwass, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    The (1) H and (13) C NMR spectra of 17-α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), a well-known contraceptive, including diastereotopic methylene groups, were fully assigned with the help of residual dipolar couplings (RDC) measured in the recently developed grafted graphene oxide orienting medium. RDC analysis, which included all (1) DCH couplings and the long-range (2) DCH(1) H-C≡(13) C coupling, also pointed to the presence of a minor conformation arising from pseudo-rotation of the steroid B ring. Saturation-transfer difference (STD) measurements revealed that the most likely interaction between EE2 and orienting medium occurred on the C and D ring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. NMR Spectroscopic Assignment of Backbone and Side-Chain Protons in Fully Protonated Proteins: Microcrystals, Sedimented Assemblies, and Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Jan; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Cala, Diane; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Schubeis, Tobias; Akopjana, Inara; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Tars, Kaspars; Pica, Andrea; Leone, Serena; Picone, Delia; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Dixon, Nicholas E; Martinez, Denis; Berbon, Mélanie; El Mammeri, Nadia; Noubhani, Abdelmajid; Saupe, Sven; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-12-12

    We demonstrate sensitive detection of alpha protons of fully protonated proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy with 100-111 kHz magic-angle spinning (MAS). The excellent resolution in the Cα-Hα plane is demonstrated for 5 proteins, including microcrystals, a sedimented complex, a capsid and amyloid fibrils. A set of 3D spectra based on a Cα-Hα detection block was developed and applied for the sequence-specific backbone and aliphatic side-chain resonance assignment using only 500 μg of sample. These developments accelerate structural studies of biomolecular assemblies available in submilligram quantities without the need of protein deuteration.

  1. Anisotropy effect of three-membered rings in (1)H NMR spectra: quantification by TSNMRS and assignment of the stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, Erich; Krüger, Stefanie; Koch, Andreas

    2015-05-07

    The spatial magnetic properties (through space NMR shieldings, TSNMRSs) of cyclopropane; of the heteroanalogous oxirane, thiirane, and aziridine; and of various substituted mono-, dis-, and tris-cyclic analogues have been computed by the GIAO perturbation method employing the nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) concept and visualized as iso-chemical-shielding surfaces (ICSSs) of various size and direction. The TSNMRS values, thus obtained, can be employed to visualize the anisotropy (ring current) effect of the cyclopropane ring moiety. This approach has been employed to qualify and quantify substituent influences and contributions of appropriate ring heteroatoms O, NH, and S on the anisotropy (ring current) effect of three-membered ring moieties, and to assign the stereochemistry of mono-, bis-, and tris-cyclic structures containing cyclopropane as a structural element. Characteristic examples are included.

  2. Proton NMR assignments and secondary structure of the snake venom protein echistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chen; Baum, J. ); Pitzenberger, S.M.; Garsky, V.M.; Lumma, P.K.; Sanyal, G. )

    1991-12-17

    The snake venom protein echistatin is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. The inhibitory properties of echistatin have been attributed to the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence at residues 24-26. In this paper, sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments are presented for the proton resonances of echistatin in water. The single-chain protein contains 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges. All of the backbone amide, C{sub alpha}H, and side-chain resonances, except for the {eta}-NH of the arginines, have been assigned. The secondary structure of the protein was characterized from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from the identification of slowly exchanging amide protons, from {sup 3}J{sub c{alpha}H-NH} coupling constants, and from circular dichroism studies. The data suggest that the secondary structure consists of a type I {beta}-turn, a short {beta}-hairpin, and a short-, irregular, antiparallel {beta}-sheet and that the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is in a flexible loop connecting two strands of the distorted antiparallel {beta}-sheet.

  3. Complete NMR assignments of bioactive rotameric (3 → 8) biflavonoids from the bark of Garcinia hombroniana.

    PubMed

    Jamila, Nargis; Khairuddean, Melati; Khan, Sadiq Noor; Khan, Naeem

    2014-07-01

    The genus Garcinia is reported to possess antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, hepatoprotective and anti-HIV activities. Garcinia hombroniana in Malaysia is used to treat itching and as a protective medicine after child birth. This study was aimed to isolate the chemical constituents from the bark of G. hombroniana and explore their possible pharmacological potential. Ethyl acetate extract afforded one new (1) and six (2-7) known 3 → 8 rotameric biflavonoids. Their structures were elucidated by UV, IR and NMR (1D and 2D) spectroscopy together with electron ionization/ESI mass spectrometric techniques and were identified as (2R, 3S) volkensiflavone-7-O-rhamnopyranoside (1), volkensiflavone (2), 4″-O-methyl-volkensiflavone (3), volkensiflavone-7-O-glucopyranoside (4), morelloflavone (5), 3″-O-methyl-morelloflavone (6) and morelloflavone-7-O-glucopyranoside (7). The absolute configuration of compound 1 was assigned by circular dichroism spectroscopy as 2R, 3S. The coexistence of conformers of isolated biflavonoids in solution at 25 °C in different solvents was confirmed by variable temperature NMR studies. At room temperature (25 °C), compounds 1-7 exhibited duplicate NMR signals, while at elevated temperature (90 °C), a single set of signals was obtained. Compound 5 showed significant in vitro antioxidant activities against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethyl benzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radicals. The antibacterial studies showed that compounds 5 and 6 are the most active against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. Compounds 3 and 6 also showed moderate antituberculosis activity against H38 Rv. Based on the research findings, G. hombroniana could be concluded as a rich source of flavanone-flavone (3 → 8) biflavonoids that exhibit rotameric behaviour at room temperature and display significant antioxidant and antibacterial activities.

  4. Semi-synthesis and NMR spectral assignments of flavonoid and chalcone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohitesh; Lu, Yuting; Elliott, Alysha G; Kavanagh, Angela M; Cooper, Matthew A; Davis, Rohan A

    2016-11-01

    Previous investigations of the aerial parts of the Australian plant Eremophila microtheca and Syzygium tierneyanum resulted in the isolation of the antimicrobial flavonoid jaceosidin (4) and 2',6'-dihydroxy-4'-methoxy-3',5'-dimethyl chalcone (7), respectively. In this current study, compounds 4 and 7 were derivatized by acetylation, pivaloylation, and methylation reactions. The final products, 5,7,4'-triacetoxy jaceosidin (10), 5,7,4'-tripivaloyloxy jaceosidin (11), 5,7,4'-trimethoxy jaceosidin (12), 2',6'-diacetoxy-4'-methoxy-3',5'-dimethyl chalcone (13), 2'-hydroxy-4'-methoxy-6'-pivaloyloxy-3',5'-dimethyl chalcone (14), and 2'-hydroxy-4',6'-dimethoxy-3',5'-dimethyl chalcone (15) were all fully characterized by NMR and MS. Derivatives 10 and 13 have been previously reported but were only partially characterized. This is the first reported synthesis of 11 and 14. The natural products and their derivatives were evaluated for their antibacterial and antifungal properties, and the natural product, jaceosidin (4) and the acetylated derivative, 5,7,4'-triacetoxy jaceosidin (10), showed modest antibacterial activity (32-128 µg/ml) against Staphylococcus aureus strains. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  6. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations.

  7. A novel approach to the rapid assignment of (13)C NMR spectra of major components of vegetable oils such as avocado, mango kernel and macadamia nut oils.

    PubMed

    Retief, Liezel; McKenzie, Jean M; Koch, Klaus R

    2009-09-01

    Assignment of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of major fatty acid components of South African produced vegetable oils was attempted using a method in which the vegetable oil was spiked with a standard triacylglycerol. This proved to be inadequate and therefore a new rapid and potentially generic graphical linear correlation method is proposed for assignment of the (13)C NMR spectra of major fatty acid components of apricot kernel, avocado pear, grapeseed, macadamia nut, mango kernel and marula vegetable oils. In this graphical correlation method, chemical shifts of fatty acids present in a known standard triacylglycerol is plotted against the corresponding chemical shifts of fatty acids present in the vegetable oils. This new approach (under carefully defined conditions and concentrations) was found especially useful for spectrally crowded regions where significant peak overlap occurs and was validated with the well-known (13)C NMR spectrum of olive oil which has been extensively reported in the literature. In this way, a full assignment of the (13)C{1H} NMR spectra of the vegetable oils, as well as tripalmitolein was readily achieved and the resonances belonging to the palmitoleic acid component of the triacylglycerols in the case of macadamia nut and avocado pear oil resonances were also assigned for the first time in the (13)C NMR spectra of these oils.

  8. Properties of sesame oil by detailed 1H and 13C NMR assignments before and after ozonation and their correlation with iodine value, peroxide value, and viscosity measurements.

    PubMed

    Sega, Alessandro; Zanardi, Iacopo; Chiasserini, Luisa; Gabbrielli, Alessandro; Bocci, Velio; Travagli, Valter

    2010-02-01

    Gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated triglyceride substrates leading to ozonated derivatives with a wide potential applications, ranging from the petrochemical to the pharmaceutical industry. To date, an ultimate understanding of the ozone reactivity during sesame oil ozonation process as well as detailed (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments are lacking. A practical advantage of NMR is that a single NMR sample measurement can explain many issues, while similar analysis by traditional methods may require several independent and time-consuming measurements. Moreover, significant relationships among NMR spectra and both conventional chemical analysis and viscosity measurements have been found. Eventually, NMR could play an important role for quality attributes of ozonated oil derivatives.

  9. The covariance of the differences between experimental and theoretical chemical shifts as an aid for assigning two-dimensional heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernek, Jiří; Brus, Jiří

    2014-07-01

    A robust method for the assignment of two-dimensional heteronuclear correlations in the solid-state NMR spectra is described. It statistically evaluates the differences between measured and theoretical (obtained from first-principles calculations of the NMR chemical shielding property of periodic materials) chemical shifts. The values of the covariance of these differences, and of the standard deviations of the respective linear correlations, are elucidative for the spectral assignment process. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated for three crystalline systems: L-tyrosine hydrochloride, L-tyrosine ansolvate, and the polymorphic form I of o-acetylsalicylic acid.

  10. Sequential sup 1 H NMR assignments of kistrin, a potent platelet aggregation inhibitor and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.; Wagner, G. )

    1992-02-04

    Sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonances assignments have been obtained for the protons of kistrin. Kistrin is a small naturally occurring snake venom protein that inhibits platelet aggregation by blocking the interaction of fibrinogen with the membrane-bound glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GP IIb-IIIa), a receptor from the integrin family. Kistrin has an Arg-Gly-Asp sequence which is believed to form an adhesion recognition sequence that is essential for activity. Therefore, the interaction between kistrin and GP IIb-IIIa may provide important information on the motif used by integrins to recognize their target proteins which bear RGD sequences. Kistrin consists of 68 residues and contains six intramolecular disulfide bonds. Although one-third of the amide protons are protected from exchange with the solvent, there appears to be little or no regular secondary structure. The large number of NOE's between residues separated by two and three positions in the sequence indicates that the protein contains a large number of tightly packed loops. Along with the sequential assignments, this paper also discusses the construction and use of computerized data bases for manipulating NMR results. A strategy for computer-assisted sequential resonance using these data bases is also presented.

  11. Isolation, purification, and full NMR assignments of cyclopamine from Veratrum californicum

    PubMed Central

    Oatis, John E; Brunsfeld, Pam; Rushing, James W; Moeller, Peter D; Bearden, Daniel W; Gallien, Thomas N; Cooper, George

    2008-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog signaling pathway is essential for embryogenesis and for tissue homeostasis in the adult. However, it may induce malignancies in a number of tissues when constitutively activated, and it may also have a role in other forms of normal and maladaptive growth. Cyclopamine, a naturally occurring steroidal alkaloid, specifically inhibits the Hedgehog pathway by binding directly to Smoothened, an important Hedgehog response element. To use cyclopamine as a tool to explore and/or inhibit the Hedgehog pathway in vivo, a substantial quantity is required, and as a practical matter cyclopamine has been effectively unavailable for usage in animals larger than mice. Results In this paper, we report a rapid and efficient isolation and purification of large quantities of cyclopamine from the roots and rhizomes of Veratrum californicum Dur. (the Corn Lily or Western false hellebore). We also provide unambiguous assignments of the carbon and proton resonances by using the multinuclear spectra and the spin coupling networks. Conclusion This method could meet a very real need within diverse scientific communities by allowing cyclopamine to become more readily available. PMID:18577213

  12. Backbone and side–chain heteronuclear resonance assignments and hyperfine NMR shifts in horse cytochrome c

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weixia; Rumbley, Jon; Englander, S. Walter; Wand, A. Joshua

    2003-01-01

    The [H26N, H33N] mutant of horse heart cytochrome c was expressed in E. coli during growth on isotopically enriched minimal media. Complete resonance assignments of both the diamagnetic reduced (spin zero) and paramagnetic oxidized (spin ½) states of the protein were obtained using standard triple resonance and total correlation spectroscopy using the previously determined 1H chemical shifts of the wild-type protein as a guide. The correspondence of chemical shifts between the wild type and the mutant protein is excellent, indicating that they have nearly identical structures. The expanded library of chemical shifts for both redox states in both proteins allowed the refinement of the electron spin g-tensor of the oxidized states. The g-tensors of the oxidized states of the wild-type and [H26N, H33N] mutant proteins are closely similar, indicating that the subtle details of the ligand fields are nearly identical. The refined g-tensors were then used to probe for redox-dependent structure change in the two proteins. PMID:12931009

  13. Complete (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift assignments of mono-, di-, and trisaccharides as basis for NMR chemical shift predictions of polysaccharides using the computer program casper.

    PubMed

    Roslund, Mattias U; Säwén, Elin; Landström, Jens; Rönnols, Jerk; Jonsson, K Hanna M; Lundborg, Magnus; Svensson, Mona V; Widmalm, Göran

    2011-08-16

    The computer program casper uses (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data of mono- to trisaccharides for the prediction of chemical shifts of oligo- and polysaccharides. In order to improve the quality of these predictions the (1)H and (13)C, as well as (31)P when applicable, NMR chemical shifts of 30 mono-, di-, and trisaccharides were assigned. The reducing sugars gave two distinct sets of NMR resonances due to the α- and β-anomeric forms. In total 35 (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data sets were obtained from the oligosaccharides. One- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were used for the chemical shift assignments and special techniques were employed in some cases such as 2D (1)H,(13)C-HSQC Hadamard Transform methodology which was acquired approximately 45 times faster than a regular t(1) incremented (1)H,(13)C-HSQC experiment and a 1D (1)H,(1)H-CSSF-TOCSY experiment which was able to distinguish spin-systems in which the target protons were only 3.3Hz apart. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts were subsequently refined using total line-shape analysis with the PERCH NMR software. The acquired NMR data were then utilized in the casper program (http://www.casper.organ.su.se/casper/) for NMR chemical shift predictions of the O-antigen polysaccharides from Klebsiella O5, Shigella flexneri serotype X, and Salmonella arizonae O62. The data were compared to experimental data of the polysaccharides from the two former strains and the lipopolysaccharide of the latter strain showing excellent agreement between predicted and experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

  14. Solution behavior and complete sup 1 H and sup 13 C NMR assignments of the coenzyme B sub 12 derivative (5 prime -deoxyadenosyl)cobinamide using modern 2D NMR experiments, including 600-MHz sup 1 H NMR data

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, T.G.; Yohannes, P.G.; Marzilli, L.G. ); Hay, B.P.; Scott, J.R.; Finke, R.G. )

    1989-02-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) NMR methods have been used to assign completely the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra of the (5{prime}-deoxyadenosyl)cobinamide cation (AdoCbi{sup +}) in D{sub 2}O. Most of the {sup 1}H spectral assignments were made by using 2D homonuclear shift correlation spectroscopy (COSY), homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn spectroscopy (HOHAHA), absorption-mode (phase sensitive) 2D nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) spectroscopy, and spin-locked NOE spectroscopy (also called ROESY, for rotating-frame Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy). Most of the protonated carbon resonances were assigned by using {sup 1}H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy. The nonprotonated carbon resonances, as well as the remaining unassigned {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR signals, were assigned from long-range {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C connectivities determined from {sup 1}H-detected multiple-bond heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence spectroscopy (HMBC). Comparison of the {sup 13}C chemical shifts and {sup 1}H NOEs of AdoCbi{sup +} with those of coenzyme B{sup 12} ((5{prime}-deoxyadenosyl)cobalamin) and its benzimidazole-protonated, base-off form indicates that the electronic properties and structure of AdoCbi{sup +} are similar to that of coenzyme B{sup 12} in the protonated, base-off form. The {sup 13}C chemical shifts of most of the carbons of AdoCbi{sup +} do not vary significantly from those of base-off, benzimidazole-protonated coenzyme B{sup 12}, indicating that the electronic environment of the corrin ring is also similar in both compounds. However, significant differences in the chemical shifts of some of the corresponding carbons of the b, d, e, and f corrin side chains in AdoCbi{sup +} and in base-off, benzimidazole-protonated coenzyme B{sub 12} indicate that the positions of these side chains may be different in AdoCbi{sup +} compared to base-off coenzyme B{sup 12}.

  15. Infrared and NMR spectra, tautomerism, vibrational assignment, normal coordinate analysis, and quantum mechanical calculations of 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifi, Mahmoud S.; Farag, Rabei S.; Shaaban, Ibrahim A.; Wilson, Lee D.; Zoghaib, Wajdi M.; Mohamed, Tarek A.

    2013-07-01

    The infrared (4000-200 cm-1) spectrum for 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile (APC, C5H4N4) was acquired in the solid phase. In addition, the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of APC were obtained in DMSO-d6 along with its mass spectrum. Initially, six isomers were hypothesized and then investigated by means of DFT/B3LYP and MP2(full) quantum mechanical calculations using a 6-31G(d) basis set. Moreover, the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were predicted using a GIAO approximation at the 6-311+G(d,p) basis set and the B3LYP method with (and without) solvent effects using PCM method. The correlation coefficients showed good agreement between the experimental/theoretical chemical shift values of amino tautomers (1 and 2) rather than the eliminated imino tautomers (3-6), in agreement with the current quantum mechanical calculations. Structures 3-6 are less stable than the amino tautomers (1 and 2) by about 5206-8673 cm-1 (62.3-103.7 kJ/mol). The MP2(full)/6-31G(d) computational results favor the amino structure 1 with a pyramidal NH2 moiety and calculated real vibrational frequencies, however; structure 2 is considered a transition state owing to the calculated imaginary frequency. It is worth mentioning that, the calculated structural parameters suggest a strong conjugation between the amino nitrogen and pyrimidine ring. Aided by frequency calculations, normal coordinate analysis, force constants and potential energy distributions (PEDs), a complete vibrational assignment for the observed bands is proposed herein. Finally, NH2 internal rotation barriers for the stable non-planar isomer (1) were carried out using MP2(full)/6-31G(d) optimized structural parameters. Our results are discussed herein and compared to structural parameters for similar molecules whenever appropriate.

  16. Fragment Assembly Approach Based on Graph/Network Theory with Quantum Chemistry Verifications for Assigning Multidimensional NMR Signals in Metabolite Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kengo; Tsutsumi, Yu; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-15

    The abundant observation of chemical fragment information for molecular complexities is a major advantage of biological NMR analysis. Thus, the development of a novel technique for NMR signal assignment and metabolite identification may offer new possibilities for exploring molecular complexities. We propose a new signal assignment approach for metabolite mixtures by assembling H-H, H-C, C-C, and Q-C fragmental information obtained by multidimensional NMR, followed by the application of graph and network theory. High-speed experiments and complete automatic signal assignments were achieved for 12 combined mixtures of (13)C-labeled standards. Application to a (13)C-labeled seaweed extract showed 66 H-C, 60 H-H, 326 C-C, and 28 Q-C correlations, which were successfully assembled to 18 metabolites by the automatic assignment. The validity of automatic assignment was supported by quantum chemical calculations. This new approach can predict entire metabolite structures from peak networks of biological extracts.

  17. Synthesis and complete assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 6-substituted and 2,6-disubstituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones.

    PubMed

    Besada, Pedro; Costas, Tamara; Vila, Noemi; Chessa, Carla; Terán, Carmen

    2011-07-01

    Several pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives were synthesized starting from alkyl furans using oxidation with singlet oxygen to give 4-methoxy or 4-hydroxybutenolides, key intermediates of the synthetic strategy followed. For all pyridazinones reported, a complete assignment of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, which included NOE, DEPT, COSY, HSQC and HMBC experiments, was accomplished. Correlations between the chemical shifts of the heterocyclic ring atoms and substituents at N-2 and C-6 were analyzed.

  18. 1H, 13C, 15N resonance assignments of the extracellular loop 1 domain (ECL1) of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 FtsX, an essential cell division protein

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yue; Bruce, Kevin E.; Rued, Britta; Winkler, Malcolm E.; Giedroc, David P.

    2015-01-01

    FtsX is an integral membrane protein from Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) that harbors an extracellular loop 1 domain (FtsXECL1Spn) that interacts with PcsB, an peptidoglycan hydrolase that is essential for cell growth and division. Here, we report nearly complete backbone and side chain resonance assignments and a secondary structural analysis of FtsXECL1Spn (residues 47–168 of FtsX) as first steps toward structure determination of FtsXECL1Spn. PMID:26370567

  19. 1H-NMR study of diamagnetic cytochrome P450cam: assignment of heme resonances and substrate dependance of one cysteinate beta proton.

    PubMed

    Mouro, C; Bondon, A; Simonneaux, G; Jung, C

    1997-09-08

    The 1H-NMR study of diamagnetic cytochrome P450cam FeII-CO has been performed for the first time. Chemical shifts of the cysteinate fifth ligand protons and of several heme protons have been assigned through 1- and 2-dimensional spectra at 500 MHz. A substrate dependance has been observed for the resonance of the cysteinate proton detected in the high-field region.

  20. 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of pyrolyzed metal-polyaniline cathode catalysts for oxygen reduction in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Shigeki; Hosaka, Yo; Yamauchi, Chiharu; Nagata, Shinsuke; Sonoda, Mayu

    2015-09-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of pyrolyzed metal-free and metal (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu)-containing polyaniline (PANI) in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) was studied. The metal-free PANI800 shows quite poor ORR catalytic activity, whilst the metal-containing PANIMe800 display a better ORR activity. The 15N CP/MAS NMR spectra of PANINi800 and PANICu800 show one weak peak at 118 ppm and there is no peak observed in PANIFe800, against that of PANI800, PANIMn800, PANICo800 and PANINi800 show two peaks at 273 and 118 ppm assigned to the pyridinic and pyridinium nitrogens. It is because of the paramagnetic effect of metal ions. The 15N spin-echo NMR spectra of PANIMe800 with fast recycle delay show the peaks at 140 and 270 ppm assigned to the graphitic and pyridinic nitrogens, against that of PANI800 shows no peak. The spectra of PANIMn800, PANICo800, PANINi800 and PANICu600 also contain a very broaden peak at 430 ppm assigned to the nitrogen with Fermi-contact effect from metal ions. The spectra of PANIFe800 show some spinning side bands and the average Fe3+-15N distance can be calculated. The some amount of iron ion are relieved and average Fe3+-15N distance increase after acid washing and the ORR activity decreases.

  1. Facilitating quality control for spectra assignments of small organic molecules: nmrshiftdb2--a free in-house NMR database with integrated LIMS for academic service laboratories.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Stefan; Schlörer, Nils E

    2015-08-01

    nmrshiftdb2 supports with its laboratory information management system the integration of an electronic lab administration and management into academic NMR facilities. Also, it offers the setup of a local database, while full access to nmrshiftdb2's World Wide Web database is granted. This freely available system allows on the one hand the submission of orders for measurement, transfers recorded data automatically or manually, and enables download of spectra via web interface, as well as the integrated access to prediction, search, and assignment tools of the NMR database for lab users. On the other hand, for the staff and lab administration, flow of all orders can be supervised; administrative tools also include user and hardware management, a statistic functionality for accounting purposes, and a 'QuickCheck' function for assignment control, to facilitate quality control of assignments submitted to the (local) database. Laboratory information management system and database are based on a web interface as front end and are therefore independent of the operating system in use.

  2. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  3. 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shift Assignments and Conformational Analysis for the Two Diastereomers of the Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Inhibitor Brodifacoum

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Cho, Herman M.

    2009-10-01

    Proton and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments and 1H-1H scalar couplings for the two diastereomers of the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) inhibitor brodifacoum have been determined from acetone solutions containing both diastereomers. Data were obtained from homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra acquired at 1H frequencies of 750 and 900 MHz over a 268-303 K temperature range. Conformations inferred from scalar coupling and 1-D NOE measurements exhibit large differences between the diastereomers. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  4. Sequential NMR resonance assignment and structure determination of the Kunitz-type inhibitor domain of the Alzheimer's beta-amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Heald, S L; Tilton, R F; Hammond, L J; Lee, A; Bayney, R M; Kamarck, M E; Ramabhadran, T V; Dreyer, R N; Davis, G; Unterbeck, A

    1991-10-29

    Certain precursor proteins (APP751 and APP770) of the amyloid beta-protein (AP) present in Alzheimer's disease contain a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (APPI). In this study, the domain is obtained as a functional inhibitor through both recombinant (APPIr) and synthetic (APPIs) methodologies, and the solution structure of APPI is determined by 1H 2D NMR techniques. Complete sequence-specific resonance assignments (except for P13 and G37 NH) for both APPIr and APPIs are achieved using standard procedures. Ambiguities arising from degeneracies in the NMR resonances are resolved by varying sample conditions. Qualitative interpretation of short- and long-range NOEs reveals secondary structural features similar to those extensively documented by NMR for bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). A more rigorous interpretation of the NOESY spectra yields NOE-derived interresidue distance restraints which are used in conjunction with dynamic simulated annealing to generate a family of APPI structures. Within this family, the beta-sheet and helical regions are in good agreement with the crystal structure of BPTI, whereas portions of the protease-binding loops deviate from those in BPTI. These deviations are consistent with those recently described in the crystal structure of APPI (Hynes et al., 1990). Also supported in the NMR study is the hydrophobic patch in the protease-binding domain created by side chain-side chain NOE contacts between M17 and F34. In addition, the NMR spectra indicate that the rotation of the W21 ring in APPI is hindered, unlike Y21 in BPTI, showing a greater than 90% preference for one orientation in the hydrophobic groove.

  5. Assignment of histidine resonances in the sup 1 H NMR (500 MHz) spectrum of subtilisin BPN prime using site-directed mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bycroft, M.; Fersht, A.R. )

    1988-09-20

    A spin-echo pulse sequence has been used to resolve the six histidine C-2H protons in the 500-MHz NMR spectrum of subtilisin BPN{prime}. Five of these residues have been substituted by site-directed mutagenesis, and this has enabled a complete assignment of these protons to be obtained. Analysis of the pH titration curves of these signals has provided microscopic pK{sub a}'s for the six histidines in this enzyme. The pK{sub a}'s of the histidine residues in subtilisin BPN{prime} have been compared with the values obtained for the histidines in the homologous enzyme from Bacillus licheniformis (subtilisin Carlsberg). Four of the five conserved histidines titrate with essentially identical pK{sub a}'s in the two enzymes. It therefore appears that the assignments made for these residues in subtilisin BPN{prime} can be transferred to subtilisin Carlsberg. On the basis of these assignments, the one histidine that titrates with a substantially different pK{sub a} in the two enzymes can be assigned to histidine-238. This difference in pK{sub a} has been attributed to a Trp to Lys substitution at position 241 in subtilisin Carlsberg.

  6. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases 15N-1H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include 1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the Discriminating Power (DP) score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and 2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  7. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2012-01-01

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation (1H–15N 2D HMQC) and proton–proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (1H–1H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino resonances for a majority

  8. Spectral analysis, vibrational assignments, NBO analysis, NMR, UV-Vis, hyperpolarizability analysis of 2-aminofluorene by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Jone Pradeepa, S; Sundaraganesan, N

    2014-05-05

    In this present investigation, the collective experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational analysis and NBO analysis has been reported for 2-aminofluorene. FT-IR spectrum was recorded in the range 4000-400 cm(-1). FT-Raman spectrum was recorded in the range 4000-50 cm(-1). The molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) were calculated for 2-aminofluorene using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based on B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) model chemistry. (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts of 2-aminofluorene were calculated using GIAO method. The computed vibrational and NMR spectra were compared with the experimental results. The total energy distribution (TED) was derived to deepen the understanding of different modes of vibrations contributed by respective wavenumber. The experimental UV-Vis spectra was recorded in the region of 400-200 nm and correlated with simulated spectra by suitably solvated B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) model. The HOMO-LUMO energies were measured with time dependent DFT approach. The nonlinearity of the title compound was confirmed by hyperpolarizabilty examination. Using theoretical calculation Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) was investigated.

  9. Infrared, Raman and NMR spectra, conformational stability and vibrational assignment of 7,8-Dihydroxy-4-Methylcoumarin.

    PubMed

    Erdogdu, Yusuf; Saglam, Semran

    2014-11-11

    We report a combined some (infrared, Raman and NMR) spectroscopic and quantum chemistry study on 7,8-Dihydroxy-4-Methylcoumarin molecule (78D4MC). The Raman and IR spectra of 78D4MC molecule were recorded and analyzed in the region 3500-50 cm(-1) and 4000-400 cm(-1), respectively. Potential energy scans were performed at the MMFF level of theory. All possible conformers, which are results at the MMFF level theory, were re-computed at the B3LYP functional with cc-pVDZ basis set. The optimized geometrical parameters, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers and NMR chemical shifts of the most stable conformer were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p), cc-pVTZ and cc-pVQZ level in the proximity of the isolated molecule. DFT calculations were combined with Pulay's scaled quantum mechanics force field (SQMFF) methodology in order to fit the theoretical wavenumbers to the experimental ones.

  10. A sequential assignment procedure for proteins that have intermediate line widths in MAS NMR spectra: amyloid fibrils of human CA150.WW2.

    PubMed

    Becker, Johanna; Ferguson, Neil; Flinders, Jeremy; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Fersht, Alan R; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2008-08-11

    The second WW domain (WW2) of CA150, a human transcriptional activator, forms amyloid fibrils in vitro under physiological conditions. Based on experimental constraints from MAS NMR spectroscopy experiments, alanine scanning and electron microscopy, a structural model of CA150.WW2 amyloid fibrils was calculated earlier. Here, the assignment strategy is presented and suggested as a general approach for proteins that show intermediate line width. The (13)C,(13)C correlation experiments were recorded on fully or partially (13)C-labelled fibrils. The earlier (13)C assignment (26 residues) was extended to 34 of the 40 residues by direct (13)C-excitation experiments by using a deuterated sample that showed strongly improved line width. A 3D HNC-TEDOR (transferred-echo double-resonance) experiment with deuterated CA150.WW2 fibrils yielded 14 amide nitrogen and proton resonance assignments. The obtained chemical shifts were compared with the chemical shifts determined with the natively folded WW domain. TALOS (Torsion angle likelihood obtained from shift and sequence similarity) predictions confirmed that, under physiological conditions, the fibrillar form of CA150.WW2 adopts a significantly different beta structure than the native WW-domain fold.

  11. Solid-State 15N NMR of 15N-Labeled Nylon 6 and Nylon 11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-22

    S. Veeman, E. M. Menger, W. Ritchey, and E. de Boer, Macromolecules, 1979, 12, 924. 2. A. N. Garroway , W. M. Ritchey and W. B. Moniz, Macromolecules...S. Veeman and E. M. Menger, Bull. Magn. Reson., 1980, 2, 77. 26. D. L. VanderHart and A. N. Garroway , J. Chem. Phys., 1979, 71, 2773. 27. M. D

  12. 13C direct detected COCO-TOCSY: A tool for sequence specific assignment and structure determination in protonless NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Jiménez, Beatriz; Piccioli, Mario

    2006-10-01

    A novel experiment is proposed to provide inter-residue sequential correlations among carbonyl spins in 13C detected, protonless NMR experiments. The COCO-TOCSY experiment connects, in proteins, two carbonyls separated from each other by three, four or even five bonds. The quantitative analysis provides structural information on backbone dihedral angles ϕ as well as on the side chain dihedral angles of Asx and Glx residues. This is the first dihedral angle constraint that can be obtained via a protonless approach. About 75% of backbone carbonyls in Calbindin D 9K, a 75 aminoacid dicalcium protein, could be sequentially connected via a COCO-TOCSY spectrum. 49 3J values were measured and related to backbone ϕ angles. Structural information can be extended to the side chain orientation of aminoacids containing carbonyl groups. Additionally, long range homonuclear coupling constants, 4JCC and 5JCC, could be measured. This constitutes an unprecedented case for proteins of medium and small size.

  13. NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}: Assignment of {sup 19}F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-15

    The {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shifts (δ{sub iso}) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding {sup 19}F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M{sub 4}F{sub 20}] units of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values and calculated {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shielding σ{sub iso} values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF{sub 5}. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M–F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5}, distorted multiplets, arising from {sup 1}J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the {sup 19}F and {sup 93}Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of {sup 93}Nb–{sup 19}F {sup 1}J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites. - Graphical abstract: The complete assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} allow establishing relationships between the {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values, the nature of the fluorine atoms

  14. NbF5 and TaF5: Assignment of 19F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-01

    The 19F isotropic chemical shifts (δiso) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF5 and TaF5, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D 19F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding 19F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M4F20] units of NbF5 and TaF5 being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the 19F NMR lines of NbF5 and TaF5 is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental 19F δiso values and calculated 19F isotropic chemical shielding σiso values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF5. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M-F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the 19F NMR lines of NbF5, distorted multiplets, arising from 1J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the 19F and 93Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of 93Nb-19F 1J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites.

  15. Assignments of proton populations in dough and bread using NMR relaxometry of starch, gluten, and flour model systems.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Geertrui M; Lagrain, Bert; Deleu, Lomme J; Fierens, Ellen; Hills, Brian P; Delcour, Jan A

    2012-05-30

    Starch-water, gluten-water, and flour-water model systems as well as straight-dough bread were investigated with (1)H NMR relaxometry using free induction decay and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences. Depending on the degree of interaction between polymers and water, different proton populations could be distinguished. The starch protons in the starch-water model gain mobility owing to amylopectin crystal melting, granule swelling, and amylose leaching, whereas water protons lose mobility due to increased interaction with starch polymers. Heating of the gluten-water sample induces no pronounced changes in proton distributions. Heating changes the proton distributions of the flour-water and starch-water models in a similar way, implying that the changes are primarily attributable to starch gelatinization. Proton distributions of the heated flour-water model system and those of fresh bread crumb are very similar. This allows identifying the different proton populations in bread on the basis of the results from the model systems.

  16. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for new heterocyclic TAM leuco dyes, (2Z,2'E)-2,2'-(2-phenyl propane-1,3-diylidene) bis(1,3,3-trimethylindoline) derivatives. Part II.

    PubMed

    Keum, Sam-Rok; Roh, Se-Jung; Lee, Min-Hyung; Sauriol, Francoise; Buncel, Erwin

    2008-09-01

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of the novel heterocyclic Leuco-TAM dyes, (2Z, 2'E)-2,2'-(2-phenyl propane-1,3-diylidene) bis(1,3,3-trimethylindoline) derivatives 1-4 as precursors of triarylmethane (TAM)(+) (Malachite Green FB-analog) dyes were completely assigned by 1D and 2D NMR experiments, including DEPT, COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY. Especially, the diastereotopic gem-dimethyl protons at the C3 and C3' positions of the FB rings were definitively assigned. The (Z,E) isomers adopt the energetically favored three-bladed propeller conformation in solution.

  17. Assignment of selected hyperfine proton NMR resonances in the met forms of Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and comparisons with sperm whale metmyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.; Pandey, R.K.; Leung, H.K.; Smith, K.M.

    1988-04-19

    This work indicates a high degree of purity for our preparations of all three of the primary Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and details assignments of the heme methyl and vinyl protons in the hyperfine shift region of the ferric (aquo.) protein forms. The assignments were carried out by reconstituting the apoproteins of each component with selectively deuteriated hemes. The results indicate that even though the individual component preparations consist of essentially a single protein, the proton NMR spectra indicate spectroscopic heterogeneity. Evidence is presented for identification and classification of major and minor protein forms that are present in solutions of each component. Finally, in contrast to previous results, a detailed analysis of the proton hyperfine shift patterns of the major and minor forms of each component, in comparison to the major and minor forms of metmyoglobin, leads to the conclusions that the corresponding forms of the proteins from each species have strikingly similar heme-globin contacts and display nearly identical heme electronic structures and coordination numbers.

  18. Binding modes of phosphonic acid derivatives adsorbed on TiO2 surfaces: Assignments of experimental IR and NMR spectra based on DFT/PBC calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldof, D.; Tassi, M.; Carleer, R.; Adriaensens, P.; Roevens, A.; Meynen, V.; Blockhuys, F.

    2017-01-01

    A DFT study on the adsorption of a series of phosphonic acids (PAs) on the TiO2 anatase (101) and (001) surfaces was performed. The adsorption energies and geometries of the most stable binding modes were compared to literature data and the effect of the inclusion of dispersion forces in the energy calculations was gauged. As the (101) surface is the most exposed surface of TiO2 anatase, the calculated chemical shifts and vibrational frequencies of PAs adsorbed on this surface were compared to experimental 31P and 17O NMR and IR data in order to assign the two possible binding modes (mono- and bidentate) to peaks and bands in these spectra; due to the corrugated nature of anatase (101) tridentate binding is not possible on this surface. Analysis of the calculated and experimental 31P chemical shifts indicates that both monodentate and bidentate binding modes are present. For the reactive (001) surface, the results of the calculations indicate that both bi- and tridentate binding modes result in stable systems. Due to the particular sensitivity of 17O chemical shifts to hydrogen bonding and solvent effects, the model used is insufficient to assign these spectra at present. Comparison of calculated and experimental IR spectra leads to the conclusion that IR spectroscopy is not suitable for the characterization of the different binding modes of the adsorption complexes.

  19. The “Speedy” Synthesis of Atom-Specific 15N Imino/Amido-Labeled RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Christoph; Micura, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous reports on the synthesis of atom-specific 15N-labeled nucleosides exist, fast and facile access to the corresponding phosphoramidites for RNA solid-phase synthesis is still lacking. This situation represents a severe bottleneck for NMR spectroscopic investigations on functional RNAs. Here, we present optimized procedures to speed up the synthesis of 15N(1) adenosine and 15N(1) guanosine amidites, which are the much needed counterparts of the more straightforward-to-achieve 15N(3) uridine and 15N(3) cytidine amidites in order to tap full potential of 1H/15N/15N-COSY experiments for directly monitoring individual Watson–Crick base pairs in RNA. Demonstrated for two preQ1 riboswitch systems, we exemplify a versatile concept for individual base-pair labeling in the analysis of conformationally flexible RNAs when competing structures and conformational dynamics are encountered. PMID:26237536

  20. Characterization of Nylon 6 by 15N Solid State NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-31

    M.; Ritchey, W.; de Boer, E. Macromolecules, 1979, 12, 924. 2. Garroway , A. N.; Ritchey, W. M.; Moniz, W. B.; Macromolecules, 1982, It, 1051. 3...E. Macromolecules, 1982, 15, 1406. 23. Veeman, W. S.; Menger, E. M. Bull. Magn. Reson., 1980,2,77. 24. VanderHart, D. L.; Garroway , A. N. J. Chem

  1. Complete 1H assignments of the non-exchangeable protons of the non self-complementary heptadeoxyribonucleotide d[(GTCGTCA).(TGACGAC)] and its component strands by high field NMR.

    PubMed

    Lown, J W; Hanstock, C C; Lobe, C G; Bleackley, C

    1985-06-01

    The non self complementary heptadeoxyribonucleotides d(GTCGTCA) and d(TGACGAC) were synthesized by the phosphotriester method. While complete 1H-NMR assignments of the former were obtained by a combination of one and two-dimensional techniques at room temperature, extensive stacking of the latter under these conditions dictated analysis at 50 degrees C when the lines were sharply resolved. The duplex form of the annealed strands under the conditions of the 1H-NMR experiment was established independently of the NMR evidence by 32P end labeling with T4 polynucleotide kinase followed by butt end joining using the absolute specificity of T4 ligase for double strand DNA. Analysis of the resulting ladder of polymers was performed using gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Complete 1H-NMR assignments of the non-exchangeable protons in the self complementary heptamer was achieved. The assignments were confirmed using NOE differences, and two-dimensional COSY, and HH-INADEQUATE experiments at 400 and 500 MHz. The assignments are in accord with a conformation for the heptamer belonging to the B family of structures.

  2. Direct NMR resonance assignments of the active site histidine residue in Escherichia coli thioesterase I/protease I/lysophospholipase L1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jin; Tyukhtenko, Sergiy I; Huang, Tai-Huang

    2006-11-01

    Owing to the hydrogen-bond interaction and rapid exchange rate with the bulk water, the transverse relaxation time for the N(delta1)-H proton of the catalytic histidine in Escherichia coli thioesterase I/protease I/lysophospholipase L1 (TEP-I) is rather short. Because of its catalytic importance, it is desirable to detect and assign this proton resonance. In this paper, we report the first direct NMR correlation between the short-lived N(delta1)-H proton and its covalently attached N(delta1)-nitrogen of the catalytic His157 residue in E. coli thioesterase/protease I. We have used gradient-enhanced jump-return spin-echo HMQC (GE-JR SE HMQC) to obtain a direct correlation between the short-lived N(delta1)-H proton and its covalently attached N(delta1)-nitrogen. The sensitivity of detection for the short-lived N(delta1)-H proton was enhanced substantially by improved water suppression, in particular, the suppression of radiation damping via pulsed field gradients.

  3. Sequence-specific 1H-NMR assignment and secondary structure of black mamba dendrotoxin I, a highly selective blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Foray, M F; Lancelin, J M; Hollecker, M; Marion, D

    1993-02-01

    The secondary structure of dendrotoxin I, an important constituent of the venom of the African black mamba snake Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis, was determined in aqueous solution by two-dimensional methods. Complete sequence-specific 1H-NMR assignment was obtained with the exception of the backbone amide proton of Gly39 and Cys40. Dendrotoxin I is based on a central antiparallel beta-sheet and two small helices located at the N- and the C-terminal extremities. These secondary-structural units occur at exactly the same places in the amino acid sequence as those of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), with which dendrotoxin I shares 33% sequence similarity. According to the disulfide-bridge positions and the long-range NOE observed these secondary-structural elements fold in a similar manner to BPTI. This similarity allows an hypothesis according to which dendrotoxin I could derive from an ancestral Künitz-type proteinase inhibitor. This ancestor would have been heavily mutated at amino acid positions not critical for gross structure. The spatial locations of the solvent-exposed amino acids concerned could therefore serve as a guideline for interpretation of the structure/activity relationship of dendrotoxin I for the blockage of voltage-sensitive potassium channels of which dendrotoxin I is a strong inhibitor. The possible connections with other polypeptide toxins that block related ion currents is discussed.

  4. 1H and 13C NMR Assignments of Cytotoxic 3S-1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic Acid from the Leaves of Cichorium endivia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Xin; Deng, An-Jun; Wei, Jin-Feng; Qin, Hai-Lin; Wang, Ai-Ping

    2012-01-01

    An amino acid, 3S-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acid, was isolated for the first time from the leaves of Cichorium endivia. The complete assignment of its 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic data was carried out also for the first time based on extensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. Cytotoxicity of this isolated compound against HCT-8 and HepG2 human cancer cell lines was evaluated for the first time, with moderate activities being found. PMID:23304641

  5. 6-Aminopenicillanic acid revisited: A combined solid state NMR and in silico refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Daniel Lima Marques de; San Gil, Rosane Aguiar da Silva; Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca de; Souza, Eugenio Furtado de; Borré, Leandro Bandeira; Vaiss, Viviane da Silva; Leitão, Alexandre Amaral

    2016-09-01

    13C/15N (experimental and ab initio) solid-state NMR was used to achieve an affordable way to improve hydrogen refinement of 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) structure. The lattice effect on the isotropic chemical shifts was probed by using two different magnetic shielding calculations: isolated molecules and periodic crystal structure. The electron density difference maps of optimized and non-optimized structures were calculated in order to investigate the interactions inside the 6-APA unit cell. The 13C and 15N chemical shifts assignments were unambiguously stablished. In addition, some of the literature 13C resonances ambiguities could be properly solved.

  6. Study on molecular structure, spectroscopic investigation (IR, Raman and NMR), vibrational assignments and HOMO-LUMO analysis of L-sodium folinate using DFT: a combined experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Cai, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, an exhaustive conformational search of N-[4-[[(2-amino-5-formyl-(6S)-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-4-oxo-6-pteridinyl)methyl]amino]benzoyl]-L-glutamic acid disodium salt (L-SF) has been preformed. The optimized structure of the molecule, vibrational frequencies and NMR spectra studies have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. IR and FT-Raman spectra for L-SF have been recorded in the region of 400-4000 cm(-1) and 100-3500 cm(-1), respectively. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated based on the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Finally all of the calculation results were applied to simulate IR, Raman, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectrum of the title compound which showed excellent agreement with observed spectrum. Furthermore, reliable vibrational assignments which have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) and characteristic vibratinonal absorption bands of the title compound in IR and Raman have been figured out. HOMO-LUMO energy and Mulliken atomic charges have been evaluated, either.

  7. A straightforward method for stereospecific assignment of val and leu prochiral methyl groups by solid-state NMR: Scrambling in the [2-13C]Glucose labeling scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Guohua; Faßhuber, Hannes Klaus; Loquet, Antoine; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Vijayan, Vinesh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2013-03-01

    The unambiguous stereospecific assignment of the prochiral methyl groups in Val and Leu plays an important role in the structural investigation of proteins by NMR. Here, we present a straightforward method for their stereospecific solid-state NMR assignment based on [2-13C]Glucose ([2-13C]Glc) as the sole carbon source during protein expression. The approach is fundamentally based on the stereo-selective biosynthetic pathway of Val and Leu, and the co-presence of [2-13C]pyruvate produced mainly by glycolysis and [3-13C]/[1,3-13C]pyruvate most probably formed through scrambling in the pentose phosphate pathway. As a consequence, the isotope spin pairs 13Cβ-13Cγ2 and 13Cα-13Cγ1 in Val, and 13Cγ-13Cδ2 and 13Cβ-13Cδ1 in Leu are obtained. The approach is successfully demonstrated with the stereospecific assignment of the methyl groups of Val and Leu of type 3 secretion system PrgI needles and microcrystalline ubiquitin.

  8. Total NMR assignments of new [C7-O-C7'']-biflavones from leaves of the limonene-carvone chemotype of Lippia alba (Mill) N. E. Brown.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Francisco Geraldo; Lima, Mary Anne Sousa; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha

    2005-04-01

    Phytochemical analysis of leaves of the limonene-carvone chemotype of Lippia alba led to the isolation of two biflavonoids with a new structural pattern with an ether linkage: 5,5''-dihydroxy-6,4',6'',3''',4'''-pentamethoxy-[C(7)--O--C(7'')]-biflavone (1) and 4',4,5,5''-tetrahydroxy-6,6'',3'''-trimethoxy-[C(7)--O--C(7'')]-biflavone (2). Structural elucidation of the new compounds was established on the basis of spectral data, through the use of 1D NMR and several 2D shift correlated NMR pulse sequences (COSY, HMQC, HMBC and NOESY).

  9. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin–lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C). PMID:28067292

  10. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin–lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C).

  11. Partial sup 1 H NMR assignments of the Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase complex with folate: Evidence for a unique conformation of bound folate

    SciTech Connect

    Falzone, C.J.; Benkovic, S.J. ); Wright, P.E. )

    1990-10-01

    Sequence-specific {sup 1}H assignments have been made for over 25% of the amino acid side chains of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase complexed with folate by using a variety of two-dimensional techniques. Proton resonances were assigned by using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and a knowledge of the X-ray crystal structure. Unique sets of NOE connectivities present in hydrophobic pockets were matched with the X-ray structure and used to assign many of the residues. Other residues, particularly those near or in the active site, were assigned by site-directed mutagenesis. The ability to assign unambiguosly the proton resonances of these catalytically important residues allowed for extensive networks of NOE connectivities to follow from these assignments. As a consequence of these assignments, the orientation of the pterin ring of folate could be determined, and its conformation is similar to that of the productive dihydrofolate complex. Under these experimental conditions, only one bound form of the pterin ring could be detected.

  12. SideLink: Automated side-chain assignment of biopolymers from NMR data by relative-hypothesis-prioritization-based simulated logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, James E.; Keller, Rochus; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2006-07-01

    Previously we published the development of AutoLink, a program to assign the backbone resonances of macromolecules. The primary limitation of this program has proven to be its inability to directly recognize spectral data, relying on the user to define peak positions in its input. Here, we introduce a new program for the assignment of side-chain resonances. Like AutoLink, this new program, called SideLink, uses Relative Hypothesis Prioritization to emulate "human" logic. To address the higher complexity of side-chain assignment problems, the RHP algorithm has itself been advanced, making it capable of processing almost any combinatorial logic problem. Additionally, SideLink directly examines spectral data, overcoming the need and limitations of prior data interpretation by users.

  13. NMR Scalar Couplings across Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds between Zinc-Finger Histidine Side Chains and DNA Phosphate Groups.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Esadze, Alexandre; Roy, Sourav; Iwahara, Junji

    2016-10-10

    NMR scalar couplings across hydrogen bonds represent direct evidence for the partial covalent nature of hydrogen bonds and provide structural and dynamic information on hydrogen bonding. In this article, we report heteronuclear (15)N-(31)P and (1)H-(31)P scalar couplings across the intermolecular hydrogen bonds between protein histidine (His) imidazole and DNA phosphate groups. These hydrogen-bond scalar couplings were observed for the Egr-1 zinc-finger-DNA complex. Although His side-chain NH protons are typically undetectable in heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N correlation spectra due to rapid hydrogen exchange, this complex exhibited two His side-chain NH signals around (1)H 14.3 ppm and (15)N 178 ppm at 35 °C. Through various heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments, these signals were assigned to two zinc-coordinating His side chains in contact with DNA phosphate groups. The data show that the Nδ1 atoms of these His side chains are protonated and exhibit the (1)H-(15)N cross-peaks. Using heteronuclear (1)H, (15)N, and (31)P NMR experiments, we observed the hydrogen-bond scalar couplings between the His (15)Nδ1/(1)Hδ1 and DNA phosphate (31)P nuclei. These results demonstrate the direct involvement of the zinc-coordinating His side chains in the recognition of DNA by the Cys2His2-class zinc fingers in solution.

  14. Reactions, characterization and uptake of ammoxidized kraft lignin labeled with 15N.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, F; Varela, G; Delgado, E; López-Dellamary, F; Zúñiga, V; González, V; Faix, O; Meier, D

    2007-05-01

    Ammoxidation of kraft lignin was carried out in a Parr reactor using (15)NH(3) as the main nitrogen source. Reaction parameters were set up until a total nitrogen content of approximately 13 wt.% in lignin was achieved, in accordance with conditions of previous studies. Analytical tools such as FTIR, Py-GC/MS, and solid state NMR were used in this research. The nature of nitrogen bondings is discussed. The incorporation of the (15)N from ammoxidized lignin was followed in pumpkins (Zucchini cucurbita pepo L.) by means of (15)N emission spectroscopy.

  15. Selective excitation for spectral editing and assignment in separated local field experiments of oriented membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroloff, Sophie N.; Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic assignment of NMR spectra for oriented uniformly labeled membrane proteins embedded in their native-like bilayer environment is essential for their structure determination. However, sequence-specific assignment in oriented-sample (OS) NMR is often complicated by insufficient resolution and spectral crowding. Therefore, the assignment process is usually done by a laborious and expensive "shotgun" method involving multiple selective labeling of amino acid residues. Presented here is a strategy to overcome poor spectral resolution in crowded regions of 2D spectra by selecting resolved "seed" residues via soft Gaussian pulses inserted into spin-exchange separated local-field experiments. The Gaussian pulse places the selected polarization along the z-axis while dephasing the other signals before the evolution of the 1H-15N dipolar couplings. The transfer of magnetization is accomplished via mismatched Hartmann-Hahn conditions to the nearest-neighbor peaks via the proton bath. By optimizing the length and amplitude of the Gaussian pulse, one can also achieve a phase inversion of the closest peaks, thus providing an additional phase contrast. From the superposition of the selective spin-exchanged SAMPI4 onto the fully excited SAMPI4 spectrum, the 15N sites that are directly adjacent to the selectively excited residues can be easily identified, thereby providing a straightforward method for initiating the assignment process in oriented membrane proteins.

  16. A new method for distinguishing between enantiomers and racemates and assignment of enantiomeric purity by means of solid-state NMR. Examples from oxazaphosphorinanes.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, Marek J; Tadeusiak, Elzbieta; Misiura, Konrad; Ciesielski, Włodzimierz; Bujacz, Grzegorz; Tekely, Piotr

    2002-11-04

    It is shown that enantiomers and racemates that have identical isotropic NMR chemical shift as well as anisotropic chemical-shift tensor parameters can be easily distinguished by means of the ODESSA (One Dimensional Exchange Spectroscopy by Sideband Alternation) technique. The method is based on the fact that the molecular symmetries and packing of enantiomers and racemates are usually significantly different. The power of the proposed approach is demonstrated by employing as model compounds P-chiral oxazaphosphorine derivatives, which are widely used in clinical oncology. Correlation of the amplitude of the ODESSA decay (AOD) with enantiomeric excess is also presented.

  17. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Hassan M; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A

    2015-05-05

    The structure, vibrational and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G(∗∗) calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN∼0°) structures being about 2-6kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN∼180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26ppm, respectively.

  18. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure, vibrational and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN ∼ 0°) structures being about 2-6 kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN ∼ 180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26 ppm, respectively.

  19. ¹H, ¹³C, ¹⁵N backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for the N-terminal RNA recognition motif of the HvGR-RBP1 protein involved in the regulation of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) senescence.

    PubMed

    Mason, Katelyn E; Tripet, Brian P; Parrott, David; Fischer, Andreas M; Copié, Valérie

    2014-04-01

    Leaf senescence is an important process in the developmental life of all plant species. Senescence efficiency influences important agricultural traits such as grain protein content and plant growth, which are often limited by nitrogen use. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating this highly orchestrated process. To enhance our understanding of leaf senescence and its regulation, we have undertaken the structural and functional characterization of previously unknown proteins that are involved in the control of senescence in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Previous microarray analysis highlighted several barley genes whose transcripts are differentially expressed during senescence, including a specific gene which is greater than 40-fold up-regulated in the flag leaves of early- as compared to late-senescing near-isogenic barley lines at 14 and 21 days past flowering (anthesis). From inspection of its amino acid sequence, this gene is predicted to encode a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein herein referred to as HvGR-RBP1. HvGR-RBP1 has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli, and preliminary NMR data analysis has revealed that its glycine-rich C-terminal region [residues: 93-162] is structurally disordered whereas its N-terminal region [residues: 1-92] forms a well-folded domain. Herein, we report the complete (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of backbone and sidechain atoms, and the secondary structural topology of the N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain of HvGR-RBP1, as a first step to unraveling its structural and functional role in the regulation of barley leaf senescence.

  20. Further exploration of the conformational space of α-synuclein fibrils: solid-state NMR assignment of a high-pH polymorph.

    PubMed

    Verasdonck, Joeri; Bousset, Luc; Gath, Julia; Melki, Ronald; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism is a common and important phenomenon for protein fibrils which has been linked to the appearance of strains in prion and other neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson disease is a frequently occurring neurodegenerative pathology, tightly associated with the formation of Lewy bodies. These deposits mainly consist of α-synuclein in fibrillar, β-sheet-rich form. α-synuclein is known to form numerous different polymorphs, which show distinct structural features. Here, we describe the chemical shift assignments, and derive the secondary structure, of a polymorph that was fibrillized at higher-than-physiological pH conditions. The fibrillar core contains residues 40-95, with both the C- and N-terminus not showing any ordered, rigid parts. The chemical shifts are similar to those recorded previously for an assigned polymorph that was fibrillized at neutral pH.

  1. Synthesis and NMR characterization of seven new substituted pyridine N-oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihia, K.; Puszko, A.; Kolehmainen, E.; Lorenc, J.

    2008-10-01

    Seven 3-substituted (alkylamino, alkylnitramino and alkylnitrosoamino) derivatives of pyridine N-oxide have been prepared and their 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shifts assigned based on PFG 1H, 13C HMQC and PFG 1H, X (X = 13C or 15N) HMBC experiments. In the sterically most crowded congener, 3-ethylnitramino-4-nitropyridine N-oxide, chemical non-equivalence or diastereotopicity of the N-CH 2 protons was observed probably due to the chirality of the adjacent amino nitrogen caused by its restricted inversion. The coalescence temperature for the 1H NMR chemical shifts of these geminal protons has been determined and the corresponding Δ G∗ for the energy barrier of the dynamic process has been estimated.

  2. Sequence-specific sup 1 H NMR assignments, secondary structure, and location of the calcium binding site in the first epidermal growth factor like domain of blood coagulation factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.H.; Cheng, H.; Sweeney, W.V. ); Pardi, A. ); Tam, J.P. )

    1991-07-30

    Factor IX is a blood clotting protein that contains three regions, including a {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain, two tandemly connected epidermal growth factor like (EGF-like) domains, and a serine protease region. The protein exhibits a high-affinity calcium binding site in the first EGF0like domain, in addition to calcium binding in the Gla domain. The first EGF-like domain, factor IX (45-87), has been synthesized. Sequence-specific resonance assignment of the peptide has been made by using 2D NMR techniques, and its secondary structure has been determined. The protein is found to have two antiparallel {beta}-sheets, and preliminary distance geometry calculations indicate that the protein has two domains, separated by Trp{sup 28}, with the overall structure being similar to that of EGF. An NMR investigation of the calcium-bound first EGF-like domain indicates the presence and location of a calcium binding site involving residues on both strands of one of the {beta}-sheets as well as the N-terminal region of the peptide. These results suggest that calcium binding in the first EGF-like domain could induce long-range (possibly interdomain) conformational changes in factor IX, rather than causing structural alterations in the EGF-like domain itself.

  3. FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR spectra, density functional computations of the vibrational assignments (for monomer and dimer) and molecular geometry of anticancer drug 7-amino-2-methylchromone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariappan, G.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2014-04-01

    Vibrational assignments for the 7-amino-2-methylchromone (abbreviated as 7A2MC) molecule using a combination of experimental vibrational spectroscopic measurements and ab initio computational methods are reported. The optimized geometry, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, first order hyperpolarizability and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of 7A2MC have been investigated with the help of B3LYP density functional theory method. The calculated molecular geometry parameters, the theoretically computed vibrational frequencies for monomer and dimer and relative peak intensities were compared with experimental data. DFT calculations using the B3LYP method and 6-31 + G(d,p) basis set were found to yield results that are very comparable to experimental IR and Raman spectra. Detailed vibrational assignments were performed with DFT calculations and the potential energy distribution (PED) obtained from the Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) program. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) study revealed the characteristics of the electronic delocalization of the molecular structure. 13C and 1H NMR spectra have been recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Furthermore, All the possible calculated values are analyzed using correlation coefficients linear fitting equation and are shown strong correlation with the experimental data.

  4. Solid-state NMR studies of form I of atorvastatin calcium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei David; Gao, Xudong; Strohmeier, Mark; Wang, Wei; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2012-03-22

    Solid-state (13)C, (19)F, and (15)N magic angle spinning NMR studies of Form I of atorvastatin calcium are reported, including chemical shift tensors of all resolvable carbon sites and fluorine sites. The complete (13)C and (19)F chemical shift assignments are given based on an extensive analysis of (13)C-(1)H HETCOR and (13)C-(19)F HETCOR results. The solid-state NMR data indicate that the asymmetric unit of this material contains two atorvastatin molecules. A possible structure of Form I of atorvastatin calcium (ATC-I), derived from solid-state NMR data and density functional theory calculations of various structures, is proposed for this important active pharmaceutical ingredient (API).

  5. Production of 15N-labeled α-amanitin in Galerina marginata

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Brandon; Sgambelluri, R. Michael; Angelos, Evan R.; Li, Xuan; Holmes, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    α-Amanitin is the major causal constituent of deadly Amanita mushrooms that account for the majority of fatal mushroom poisonings worldwide. It is also an important biochemical tool for the study of its target, RNA polymerase II. The commercial supply of this bicyclic peptide comes directly from A. phalloides, the death cap mushroom, which is collected from its natural habitat. Isotopically labeled amanitin could be useful for clinical and forensic applications, but α-amanitin has not been chemically synthesized and A. phalloides cannot be cultured on artificial medium. Using Galerina marginata, an unrelated saprobic mushroom that grows and produces α-amanitin in culture, we describe a method for producing 15N-labeled α-amanitin using growth media containing 15N as sole nitrogen source. A key to success was preparing 15N-enriched yeast extract via a novel method designated “glass bead-assisted maturation.” In the presence of the labeled yeast extract and 15N-NH4Cl, α-amanitin was produced with >97% isotope enrichment. The labeled product was confirmed by HPLC, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and NMR. PMID:26100667

  6. Production of (15)N-labeled α-amanitin in Galerina marginata.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; DuBois, Brandon; Sgambelluri, R Michael; Angelos, Evan R; Li, Xuan; Holmes, Daniel; Walton, Jonathan D

    2015-09-01

    α-Amanitin is the major causal constituent of deadly Amanita mushrooms that account for the majority of fatal mushroom poisonings worldwide. It is also an important biochemical tool for the study of its target, RNA polymerase II. The commercial supply of this bicyclic peptide comes from Amanita phalloides, the death cap mushroom, which is collected from the wild. Isotopically labeled amanitin could be useful for clinical and forensic applications, but α-amanitin has not been chemically synthesized and A. phalloides cannot be cultured on artificial medium. Using Galerina marginata, an unrelated saprotrophic mushroom that grows and produces α-amanitin in culture, we describe a method for producing (15)N-labeled α-amanitin using growth media containing (15)N as sole nitrogen source. A key to success was preparing (15)N-enriched yeast extract via a novel method designated "glass bead-assisted maturation." In the presence of the labeled yeast extract and (15)N-NH4Cl, α-amanitin was produced with >97% isotope enrichment. The labeled product was confirmed by HPLC, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and NMR.

  7. NMR conformational properties of an Anthrax Lethal Factor domain studied by multiple amino acid-selective labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vourtsis, Dionysios J.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Pairas, George; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A polypeptide, N-ALF{sub 233}, was overexpressed in E. coli and successfully isolated. • We produced {sup 2}H/{sup 15}N/{sup 13}C labeled protein samples. • Amino acid selective approaches were applied. • We acquired several heteronuclear NMR spectra, to complete the backbone assignment. • Prediction of the secondary structure was performed. - Abstract: NMR-based structural biology urgently needs cost- and time-effective methods to assist both in the process of acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra and their subsequent analysis. Especially for bigger proteins (>20 kDa) selective labeling is a frequently used means of sequence-specific assignment. In this work we present the successful overexpression of a polypeptide of 233 residues, corresponding to the structured part of the N-terminal domain of Anthrax Lethal Factor, using Escherichia coli expression system. The polypeptide was subsequently isolated in pure, soluble form and analyzed structurally by solution NMR spectroscopy. Due to the non-satisfying quality and resolution of the spectra of this 27 kDa protein, an almost complete backbone assignment became feasible only by the combination of uniform and novel amino acid-selective labeling schemes. Moreover, amino acid-type selective triple-resonance NMR experiments proved to be very helpful.

  8. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    +)-tagged GB1 mutants to rapidly determine the global protein fold in a de novo fashion. Remarkably, these studies required quantitative measurements of only approximately four or five backbone amide (15)N longitudinal paramagnetic relaxation enhancements per residue, in the complete absence of the usual internuclear distance restraints. Importantly, this paramagnetic solid-state NMR methodology is general and can be directly applied to larger proteins and protein complexes for which a significant fraction of the signals can be assigned in standard 2D and 3D MAS NMR chemical shift correlation spectra.

  9. Probing intermolecular interactions in a diethylcarbamazine citrate salt by fast MAS (1)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy and GIPAW calculations.

    PubMed

    Venâncio, Tiago; Oliveira, Lyege Magalhaes; Ellena, Javier; Boechat, Nubia; Brown, Steven P

    2017-03-02

    Fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR is used to probe intermolecular interactions in a diethylcarbamazine salt, that is widely used as a treatment against adult worms of Wuchereria bancrofti which cause a common disease in tropical countries named filariasis. Specifically, a dihydrogen citrate salt that has improved thermal stability and solubility as compared to the free form is studied. One-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N and two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C and (14)N-(1)H heteronuclear correlation NMR experiments under moderate and fast MAS together with GIPAW (CASTEP) calculations enable the assignment of the (1)H, (13)C and (14)N/(15)N resonances. A two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H double-quantum (DQ) -single-quantum (SQ) MAS spectrum recorded with BaBa recoupling at 60kHz MAS identifies specific proton-proton proximities associated with citrate-citrate and citrate-diethylcarbamazine intermolecular interactions.

  10. Solid-state 19F-NMR analysis of 19F-labeled tryptophan in gramicidin A in oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L; Wang, Junfeng; Cross, Timothy A; Ulrich, Anne S

    2002-01-01

    The response of membrane-associated peptides toward the lipid environment or other binding partners can be monitored by solid-state NMR of suitably labeled side chains. Tryptophan is a prominent amino acid in transmembrane helices, and its (19)F-labeled analogues are generally biocompatible and cause little structural perturbation. Hence, we use 5F-Trp as a highly sensitive NMR probe to monitor the conformation and dynamics of the indole ring. To establish this (19)F-NMR strategy, gramicidin A was labeled with 5F-Trp in position 13 or 15, whose chi(1)/chi(2) torsion angles are known from previous (2)H-NMR studies. First, the alignment of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor within the membrane was deduced by lineshape analysis of oriented samples. Next, the three principal axes of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor were assigned within the molecular frame of the indole ring. Finally, determination of chi(1)/chi(2) for 5F-Trp in the lipid gel phase showed that the side chain alignment differs by up to 20 degrees from its known conformation in the liquid crystalline state. The sensitivity gain of (19)F-NMR and the reduction in the amount of material was at least 10-fold compared with previous (2)H-NMR studies on the same system and 100-fold compared with (15)N-NMR. PMID:12496101

  11. Full differentiation and assignment of boron species in the electrolytes Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuniger, Thomas; Pilz, Thomas; Chandran, C. Vinod; Jansen, Martin

    2012-10-15

    The syntheses of two new fluorooxoborates, Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2}, which possess considerable ion conductivity at higher temperatures, have been reported recently. Here, we describe the characterisation of these compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. The complex central-transition MAS spectra, resulting from overlap of sub-spectra contributed by the individual boron species in the crystal structures, could be clearly separated by acquisition and analysis of 3QMAS spectra. By numerical fit of these sub-spectra, the isotropic chemical shift {delta}{sub iso}, the quadrupolar coupling constant {chi}, and the asymmetry {eta} were determined. Using known relations between boron coordination and chemical shift as well as quadrupolar coupling, the individual {sup 11}B NMR resonances have been ascribed to boron species in tetrahedral or trigonal environment. To remove remaining assignment ambiguities, the response of the {sup 11}B resonances to {sup 19}F decoupling was qualitatively analysed. Thus, by using the combined information conveyed by chemical shift, quadrupolar and dipolar interaction, a complete assignment of the complex {sup 11}B line shapes exhibited by the fluorooxoborates has been achieved. - Graphical abstract: Structure and solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectrum of Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterisation of title compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-spectra of boron species separated by evaluation of 3QMAS spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotropic chemical shift and quadrupolar interaction parameters determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full boron assignment based on NMR parameters and response to {sup 19}F decoupling.

  12. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with (2)H, (13)C and (15)N in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-06-01

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80% can be achieved for (15)N and (13)C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For (2)H,(15)N and (2)H,(13)C,(15)N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73%, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins.

  13. Conformation of alamethicin in oriented phospholipid bilayers determined by (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Bak, M; Bywater, R P; Hohwy, M; Thomsen, J K; Adelhorst, K; Jakobsen, H J; Sørensen, O W; Nielsen, N C

    2001-01-01

    The conformation of the 20-residue antibiotic ionophore alamethicin in macroscopically oriented phospholipid bilayers has been studied using (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Differently (15)N-labeled variants of alamethicin and an analog with three of the alpha-amino-isobutyric acid residues replaced by alanines have been investigated to establish experimental structural constraints and determine the orientation of alamethicin in hydrated phospholipid (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) bilayers and to investigate the potential for a major kink in the region of the central Pro(14) residue. From the anisotropic (15)N chemical shifts and (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings determined for alamethicin with (15)N-labeling on the Ala(6), Val(9), and Val(15) residues and incorporated into phospholipid bilayer with a peptide:lipid molar ratio of 1:8, we deduce that alamethicin has a largely linear alpha-helical structure spanning the membrane with the molecular axis tilted by 10-20 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In particular, we find compatibility with a straight alpha-helix tilted by 17 degrees and a slightly kinked molecular dynamics structure tilted by 11 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In contrast, the structural constraints derived by solid-state NMR appear not to be compatible with any of several model structures crossing the membrane with vanishing tilt angle or the earlier reported x-ray diffraction structure (Fox and Richards, Nature. 300:325-330, 1982). The solid-state NMR-compatible structures may support the formation of a left-handed and parallel multimeric ion channel. PMID:11509381

  14. EPIC- and CHANCE-HSQC: Two 15N Photo-CIDNP-Enhanced Pulse Sequences for the Sensitive Detection of Solvent-Exposed Tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, Ashok; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) of nuclei other than 1H offers a tremendous potential for sensitivity enhancement in liquid state NMR under mild, physiologically relevant conditions. Photo-CIDNP enhancements of 15N magnetization are much larger than those typically observed for 1H. However, the low gyromagnetic ratio of 15N prevents a full fruition of the potential signal-to-noise gains attainable via 15N photo-CIDNP. Here, we propose two novel pulse sequences, EPIC- and CHANCE-HSQC, tailored to overcome the above limitation. EPIC-HSQC exploits the strong 1H polarization and its subsequent transfer to non-equilibrium Nz magnetization prior to 15N photo-CIDNP laser irradiation. CHANCE-HSQC synergistically combines 1H and 15N photo-CIDNP. The above pulse sequences, tested on tryptophan (Trp) and the Trp-containing protein apoHmpH, were found to display up to two-fold higher sensitivity than the reference NPE-SE-HSQC pulse train (based on simple 15N photo-CIDNP followed by N-H polarization transfer), and up to a ca. 3-fold increase in sensitivity over the corresponding dark pulse schemes (lacking laser irradiation). The observed effects are consistent with the predictions from a theoretical model of photo-CIDNP and prove the potential of 15N and 1H photo-CIDNP in liquid state heteronuclear correlation NMR. PMID:19643649

  15. δ15N Value Does Not Reflect Fasting in Mysticetes

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Alex; Giménez, Joan; Gómez–Campos, Encarna; Cardona, Luís; Borrell, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    The finding that tissue δ15N values increase with protein catabolism has led researchers to apply this value to gauge nutritive condition in vertebrates. However, its application to marine mammals has in most occasions failed. We investigated the relationship between δ15N values and the fattening/fasting cycle in a model species, the fin whale, a migratory capital breeder that experiences severe seasonal variation in body condition. We analyzed two tissues providing complementary insights: one with isotopic turnover (muscle) and one that keeps a permanent record of variations in isotopic values (baleen plates). In both tissues δ15N values increased with intensive feeding but decreased with fasting, thus contradicting the pattern previously anticipated. The apparent inconsistency during fasting is explained by the fact that a) individuals migrate between different isotopic isoscapes, b) starvation may not trigger significant negative nitrogen balance, and c) excretion drops and elimination of 15N-depleted urine is minimized. Conversely, when intensive feeding is resumed in the northern grounds, protein anabolism and excretion start again, triggering 15N enrichment. It can be concluded that in whales and other mammals that accrue massive depots of lipids as energetic reserves and which have limited access to drinking water, the δ15N value is not affected by fasting and therefore cannot be used as an indicatior of nutritive condition. PMID:24651388

  16. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  17. Nitrogen-15 NMR studies of tetrazole complexes of pentamminecobalt(III). Implications concerning the transition state for linkage isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hubinger, S.; Hall, J.H.; Purcell, W.L. Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1993-05-26

    Synthesis of the N1-bonded (5-methyltetrazolato)pentaamminecobalt(III) complex utilizing sodium azide enriched in [sup 1]N at the terminal nitrogen has produced a complex enriched specifically at the N2 and N4 ring positions. This has permitted the assignment of all four nitrogen signals in the natural-abundance NMR spectrum for a novel chelated amidine complex which is also N1 bonded is reported along with its synthesis and purification. Following the [sup 15]N NMR of the linkage isomerization of the enriched complex in solution to the N2-bonded form has also permitted an [eta][sup 5] and certain [eta][sup 3] transition-state structures to be eliminated from consideration for the isomerization process. The data suggest an [eta][sup 2] transition state is utilized. A subsequent N2-to-N3 isomerization of the N2-bonded complex has also been discovered from the [sup 15]N NMR study. The enrichment study also indicates that previous assignments of ring nitrogen signals N1 and N4 is similar N2-bonded tetrazolato complexes of cobalt(III) may be in error.

  18. Phenylalanine δ15N in Paleo Archives as a New Proxy for δ15N of Exported Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M.; Batista, F. C.; Vokhshoori, N. L.; Brown, J. T.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ravelo, A. C.; Sherwood, O.

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of individual amino acids (CSI-AA) is emerging as a powerful new tool for studying the paleo nitrogen cycle. Because most detrital organic nitrogen is composed of amino acids, CSI-AA can reveal the mechanistic basis for organic nitrogen diagenesis, preserve a record of past food web structure, and potentially reconstruct the δ15N values of past nitrate and primary production. Within the commonly measured amino acids, the δ15N value of phenylalanine (Phe) appears uniquely promising as a new proxy that reflects the nitrogen isotopic value of the original source. Phe δ15N values remain almost unchanged with trophic transfer through food webs, and also during at least the initial stages of organic matter degradation. Here we synthesize results from both bio-archives and recent sediments, which together suggest that at least in Holocene archives the Phe δ15N value does in fact record the average inorganic nitrogen δ15N value at the base of planktonic food webs. However, several important unknowns also remain. These include the extent of variation in amino acid isotopic fractionation patterns in phylogenetically distinct algal groups. The stability of Phe δ15N values in older sediments where organic matter has undergone extensive diagenesis is also an important research area, which may ultimately establish the temporal limit for application of this approach to study past geological epochs. Together, however, results to date suggest that of Phe δ15N values in paleo archives represent a novel molecular-level proxy which is not tied to any specific organism or group, but rather can provide an integrated estimate of δ15N value of exported primary production.

  19. Modeling 15N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence.

  20. Protein dynamics from chemical shift and dipolar rotational spin-echo sup 15 N NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Garbow, J.R.; Jacob, G.S.; Stejskal, E.O.; Schaefer, J. )

    1989-02-07

    The partial collapse of dipolar and chemical shift tensors for peptide NH and for the amide NH at cross-link sites in cell wall peptidoglycan, of intact lyophilized cells of Aerococcus viridans, indicates NH vector root-mean-square fluctuations of 23{degree}. This result is consistent with the local mobility calculated in typical picosecond regime computer simulations of protein dynamics in the solid state. The experimental root-mean-square angular fluctuations for both types of NH vectors increase to 37{degree} for viable wet cells at 10{degree}C. The similarity in mobilities for both general protein and cell wall peptidoglycan suggests that one additional motion in wet cells involves cooperative fluctuations of segments of cell walls, attached proteins, and associated cytoplasmic proteins.

  1. **1**5N-NMR INVESTIGATION OF HYDROXYLAMINE DERIVATIZED HUMIC SUBSTANCES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.; Mikita, Michael A.

    1986-01-01

    Humic substances are the most abundant naturally occurring refactory organic compounds in soils and water. They have a broad range of physical, chemical and physiological properties. In soils, humic substances contribute to the cation exchange capacity, help maintain the physical structure, and play a role in plant growth and nutrition. In aquatic systems, humic substances serve to regulate the levels of inorganic constituents, yield trihalomethanes upon chlorination, and transport or concentrate organic and inorganic pollutants. The oxygen containing functional groups of humic and fulvic acids are believed to play a key role in the chemical properties of humic substances. This study was undertaken to gain additional information on the specific types of oxygen functionalities in humic substances. Since the analysis of hydroxyl moieties had been earlier established, we focused our attention on the analysis of ketone and aldehyde functional groups in humic substances.

  2. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence.

  3. Fischer indolisation of N-(α-ketoacyl)anthranilic acids into 2-(indol-2-carboxamido)benzoic acids and 2-indolyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-ones and their NMR study.

    PubMed

    Proisl, Karel; Kafka, Stanislav; Urankar, Damijana; Gazvoda, Martin; Kimmel, Roman; Košmrlj, Janez

    2014-12-21

    N-(α-ketoacyl)anthranilic acids reacted with phenylhydrazinium chloride in boiling acetic acid to afford 2-(indol-2-carboxamido)benzoic acids in good to excellent yields and 2-indolyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-ones as by-products. The formation of the latter products could easily be suppressed by a hydrolytic workup. Alternatively, by increasing the reaction temperature and/or time, 2-indolyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-ones can be obtained exclusively. Optimisations of the reaction conditions as well as the scope and the course of the transformations were investigated. The products were characterized by (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR spectroscopy. The corresponding resonances were assigned on the basis of the standard 1D and gradient selected 2D NMR experiments ((1)H-(1)H gs-COSY, (1)H-(13)C gs-HSQC, (1)H-(13)C gs-HMBC) with (1)H-(15)N gs-HMBC as a practical tool to determine (15)N NMR chemical shifts at the natural abundance level of (15)N isotope.

  4. Expression, purification, and solid-state NMR characterization of the membrane binding heme protein nitrophorin 7 in two electronic spin states.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Sabu; Yang, Fei; Pacheco, Victor; Wrede, Kathrin; Medvedev, Alexander; Ogata, Hideaki; Knipp, Markus; Heise, Henrike

    2013-10-08

    The nitrophorins (NPs) comprise a group of NO transporting ferriheme b proteins found in the saliva of the blood sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus . In contrast to other nitrophorins (NP1-4), the recently identified membrane binding isoform NP7 tends to form oligomers and precipitates at higher concentrations in solution. Hence, solid-state NMR (ssNMR) was employed as an alternative method to gain structural insights on the precipitated protein. We report the expression and purification of (13)C,(15)N isotopically labeled protein together with the first ssNMR characterization of NP7. Because the size of NP7 (21 kDa) still provides a challenge for ssNMR, the samples were reverse labeled with Lys and Val to reduce the number of crosspeaks in two-dimensional spectra. The two electronic spin states with S = 1/2 and S = 0 at the ferriheme iron were generated by the complexation with imidazole and NO, respectively. ssNMR spectra of both forms are well resolved, which allows for sequential resonance assignments of 22 residues. Importantly, the ssNMR spectra demonstrate that aggregation does not affect the protein fold. Comparison of the spectra of the two electronic spin states allows the determination of paramagnetically shifted cross peaks due to pseudocontact shifts, which assists the assignment of residues close to the heme center.

  5. Unequivocal assignments of flavonoids from Tephrosia sp. (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Arriaga, A M C; Lima, J Q; Vasconcelos, J N; de Oliveira, M C F; Andrade-Neto, M; Santiago, G M P; Uchoa, D E A; Malcher, G T; Mafezoli, J; Braz-Filho, R

    2009-06-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of praecansone B, pongaflavone and dehydrorotenone isolated from Tephrosia egregia Sandw and obovatin from T. toxicaria Pers. were unambiguously assigned by 1D and 2D NMR experiments including (1)H, (1)H COSY, gHMQC and gHMBC, allowing the correction of literature assignments.

  6. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    PubMed Central

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies. PMID:28281640

  7. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  8. MUSIC in triple-resonance experiments: amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations

    PubMed

    Schubert; Smalla; Schmieder; Oschkinat

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH(2) or XH(3) (X can be (15)N or (13)C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. MUSIC in Triple-Resonance Experiments: Amino Acid Type-Selective 1H- 15N Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Mario; Smalla, Maika; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective 1H-15N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH2 or XH3 (X can be 15N or 13C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains.

  10. 14N15N detectability in Pluto’s atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, Kandis Lea; Gladstone, G. R.; Heays, A. N.; Gibson, S. T.; Lewis, B. R.; Stark, G.

    2013-11-01

    Based on the vapor pressure behavior of Pluto’s surface ices, Pluto’s atmosphere is expected to be predominantly composed of N2 gas. Measurement of the N2 isotopologue 15N/14N ratio within Pluto’s atmosphere would provide important clues to the evolution of Pluto’s atmosphere from the time of formation to its present state. The most straightforward way of determining the N2 isotopologue 15N/14N ratio in Pluto’s atmosphere is via spectroscopic observation of the 14N15N gas species. Recent calculations of the 80-100 nm absorption behavior of the 14N2 and 14N15N isotopologues by Heays et al. (Heays, A.N. et al. [2011]. J. Chem. Phys. 135, 244301), Lewis et al. (Lewis, B.R., Heays, A.N., Gibson, S.T., Lefebvre-Brion, H., Lefebvre, R. [2008]. J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164306); Lewis et al. (Lewis, B.R., Gibson, S.T., Zhang, W., Lefebvre-Brion, H., Robbe, J.-M. [2005]. J. Chem. Phys. 122, 144302), and Haverd et al. (Haverd, V.E., Lewis, B.R., Gibson, S.T., Stark, G. [2005]. J. Chem. Phys. 123, 214304) show that the peak magnitudes of the 14N2 and 14N15N absorption bandhead cross-sections are similar, but the locations of the bandhead peaks are offset in wavelength by ∼0.05-0.1 nm. These offsets make the segregation of the 14N2 and 14N15N absorption signatures possible. We use the most recent N2 isotopologue absorption cross-section calculations and the atmospheric density profiles resulting from photochemical models developed by Krasnopolsky and Cruickshank (Krasnopolsky, V.A., Cruickshank, D.P. [1999]. J. Geophys. Res. 104, 21979-21996) to predict the level of solar light that will be transmitted through Pluto’s atmosphere as a function of altitude during a Pluto solar occultation. We characterize the detectability of the isotopic absorption signature per altitude assuming 14N15N concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 2% of the 14N2 density and instrumental spectral resolutions ranging from 0.01 to 0.3 nm. Our simulations indicate that optical depth of unity is

  11. Stepwise enrichment of 15N along food chains: Further evidence and the relation between δ 15N and animal age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masao; Wada, Eitaro

    1984-05-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrogen was measured in marine and fresh-water animals from the East China Sea, The Bering Sea, Lake Ashinoko and Usujiri intertidal zone. Primary producers, showed average δ15Nversus atmospheric nitrogen of +5.0%. (+3.4 to +7.5) in the Bering Sea and Lake Ashinoko, and +6.8%. (+6.0 to +7.6) in Usujiri intertidal zone. Blue green algae from the East China Sea show an average -0.55%. (-0.8 to +1.2). All consumers, Zooplankton, fish and bird exhibited Stepwise enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level. The 15N enrichment at a single feeding process ranged from +1.3 to +5.3 averaging +3.4 ± 1.1%.. This isotopic fractionation seems to be independent of habitat. The effect of age in animals was obtained by analyzing two marine mussels. The soft tissue nitrogen showed +2.0%. enrichment relative to that of primary producers, and the magnitude was almost constant with shell ages ranging from 0 to 8 years. A similar 15N enrichment occurs in all Molluscs, Crustaceans, Insecta, Amphibia, Fish, Ave and Mammal species regardless of the difference in the form of excreted nitrogen and in laboratory cultured fish, brine shrimp and mice (+2.9 to +4.9%.). The excreted ammonia from guppy was sufficiently light to balance the concentration of 15N to animal body.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance assignment and secondary structure of an ankyrin-like repeat-bearing protein: myotrophin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Rao, N S; Walker, E; Sen, S; Qin, J

    1997-06-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR has been applied to the structural analysis of myotrophin, a novel protein identified from spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts and hypertrophic human hearts. Myotrophin has been shown to stimulate protein synthesis in myocytes and likely plays an important role in the initiation of cardiac hypertrophy, a major cause of mortality in humans. Recent cDNA cloning revealed that myotrophin has 11B amino acids containing 2.5 contiguous ANK repeats, a motif known to be involved in a wide range of macromolecular recognition. A series of two- and three-dimensional heteronuclear bond correlation NMR experiments have been performed on uniformly 15N-labeled or uniformly 15N/13C-labeled protein to obtain the 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shift assignments. The secondary structure of myotrophin has been determined by a combination of NOEs, NH exchange data, 3JHN alpha coupling constants, and chemical shifts of 1H alpha, 13C alpha, and 13 C beta. The protein has been found to consist of seven helices, all connected by turns or loops. Six of the seven helices (all but the C-terminal helix) form three separate helix-turn-helix motifs. The two full ANK repeats in myotrophin are characteristic of multiple turns followed by a helix-turn-helix motif. A hairpin-like turn involving L32-R36 in ANK repeat #1 exhibits slow conformational averaging on the NMR time scale and appears dynamically different from the corresponding region (D65-169) of ANK repeat #2.

  14. Marking Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) With Rubidium or 15N.

    PubMed

    Klick, J; Yang, W Q; Bruck, D J

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) has caused significant economic damage to berry and stone fruit production regions. Markers that are systemic in plants and easily transferred to target organisms are needed to track D. suzukii exploitation of host resources and trophic interactions. High and low concentrations of the trace element, rubidium (Rb), and the stable isotope, 15N, were tested to mark D. suzukii larvae feeding on fruits of enriched strawberry plants grown in containers under greenhouse conditions. Fly marker content and proportion of flies marked 1, 7, and 14 d after emergence from enriched fruits and fly dry mass were analyzed. Nearly 100% of the flies analyzed 14 d after emerging from 15N-enriched plants were marked, whereas only 30-75% and 0-3% were marked 14 d after emerging from high and low Rb concentration plants, respectively. Rapid Rb decay, strong 15N persistence, and the economics of using these markers in the field to elucidate D. suzukii pest ecology are discussed.

  15. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  16. Tautomeric states of the active-site histidines of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated IIIGlc, a signal-transducing protein from Escherichia coli, using two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J. G.; Torchia, D. A.; Meadow, N. D.; Roseman, S.

    1993-01-01

    IIIGlc is an 18.1-kDa signal-transducing phosphocarrier protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase system from Escherichia coli. The 1H, 15N, and 13C histidine ring NMR signals of both the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of IIIGlc have been assigned using two-dimensional 1H-15N and 1H-13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) experiments and a two-dimensional 13C-13C-1H correlation spectroscopy via JCC coupling experiment. The data were acquired on uniformly 15N-labeled and uniformly 15N/13C-labeled protein samples. The experiments rely on one-bond and two-bond J couplings that allowed for assignment of the signals without the need for the analysis of through-space (nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) correlations. The 15N and 13C chemical shifts were used to determine that His-75 exists predominantly in the N epsilon 2-H tautomeric state in both the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of IIIGlc, and that His-90 exists primarily in the N delta 1-H state in the unphosphorylated protein. Upon phosphorylation of the N epsilon 2 nitrogen of His-90, the N delta 1 nitrogen remains protonated, resulting in the formation of a charged phospho-His-90 moiety. The 1H, 15N, and 13C signals of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated proteins showed only minor shifts in the pH range from 6.0 to 9.0. These data indicate that the pK alpha values for both His-75 and His-90 in IIIGlc and His-75 in phospho-IIIGlc are less than 5.0, and that the pK alpha value for phospho-His-90 is greater than 10. The results are presented in relation to previously obtained structural data on IIIGlc, and implications for proposed mechanisms of phosphoryl transfer are discussed. PMID:8518729

  17. Near-complete backbone resonance assignments of acid-denatured human cytochrome c in dimethylsulfoxide: a prelude to studying interactions with phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Karsisiotis, Andreas Ioannis; Deacon, Oliver M; Macdonald, Colin; Blumenschein, Tharin M A; Moore, Geoffrey R; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2017-03-04

    Human cytochrome c plays a central role in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain and in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Through the interaction with the phospholipid cardiolipin, cytochrome c triggers release of pro-apoptotic factors, including itself, from the mitochondrion into the cytosol of cells undergoing apoptosis. The cytochrome c/cardiolipin complex has been extensively studied through various spectroscopies, most recently with high-field solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, but there is no agreement between the various studies on key structural features of cytochrome c in its complex with cardiolipin. In the present study, we report backbone (1)H, (13)C, (15)N resonance assignments of acid-denatured human cytochrome c in the aprotic solvent dimethylsulfoxide. These have led to the assignment of a reference 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum in which out of the 99 non-proline residues 87% of the backbone amides are assigned. These assignments are being used in an interrupted H/D exchange strategy to map the binding site of cardiolipin on human cytochrome c.

  18. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  19. In Vivo Fluxes in the Ammonium-Assimilatory Pathways in Corynebacterium glutamicum Studied by 15N Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, M.; de Graaf, A. A.; Sahm, H.

    1999-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS)–glutamine 2-oxoglutarate-aminotransferase (GOGAT) represent the two main pathways of ammonium assimilation in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In this study, the ammonium assimilating fluxes in vivo in the wild-type ATCC 13032 strain and its GDH mutant were quantitated in continuous cultures. To do this, the incorporation of 15N label from [15N]ammonium in glutamate and glutamine was monitored with a time resolution of about 10 min with in vivo 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) used in combination with a recently developed high-cell-density membrane-cyclone NMR bioreactor system. The data were used to tune a standard differential equation model of ammonium assimilation that comprised ammonia transmembrane diffusion, GDH, GS, GOGAT, and glutamine amidotransferases, as well as the anabolic incorporation of glutamate and glutamine into biomass. The results provided a detailed picture of the fluxes involved in ammonium assimilation in the two different C. glutamicum strains in vivo. In both strains, transmembrane equilibration of 100 mM [15N]ammonium took less than 2 min. In the wild type, an unexpectedly high fraction of 28% of the NH4+ was assimilated via the GS reaction in glutamine, while 72% were assimilated by the reversible GDH reaction via glutamate. GOGAT was inactive. The analysis identified glutamine as an important nitrogen donor in amidotransferase reactions. The experimentally determined amount of 28% of nitrogen assimilated via glutamine is close to a theoretical 21% calculated from the high peptidoglycan content of C. glutamicum. In the GDH mutant, glutamate was exclusively synthesized over the GS/GOGAT pathway. Its level was threefold reduced compared to the wild type. PMID:10049869

  20. NMR Polypeptide Backbone Conformation of the E. coli Outer Membrane Protein W

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Reto; Stanczak, Pawel; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The outer membrane proteins (Omp) are key factors for bacterial survival and virulence. Among the Omps which have been structurally characterized either by X-ray crystallography or by NMR in solution, the crystal structure of OmpW stands out because three of its four extracellular loops are well defined, whereas long extracellular loops in other E. coli Omps are disordered in the crystals as well as in NMR structures. OmpW thus presented an opportunity for detailed comparison of the extracellular loops in a β-barrel membrane protein structure in crystals and in non-crystalline milieus. Here the polypeptide backbone conformation of OmpW in 30-Fos micelles was determined. Complete backbone NMR assignments were obtained and the loops were structurally characterized. In combination with the OmpW crystal structure, NMR line shape analyses and 15N{1H}-NOE data, these results showed that intact regular secondary structures in the loops undergo slow hinge motions at the detergent–solvent interface. PMID:25017731

  1. Backbone chemical shift assignments for Xanthomonas campestris peroxiredoxin Q in the reduced and oxidized states: a dramatic change in backbone dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Perkins, Arden; Parsonage, Derek; Poole, Leslie B; Karplus, P Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are ubiquitous enzymes that reduce peroxides as part of antioxidant defenses and redox signaling. While Prx catalytic activity and sensitivity to hyperoxidative inactivation depend on their dynamic properties, there are few examples where their dynamics has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Here, we provide a foundation for studies of the solution properties of peroxiredoxin Q from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (XcPrxQ) by assigning the observable (1)H(N), (15)N, (13)C(α), (13)C(β), and (13)C' chemical shifts for both the reduced (dithiol) and oxidized (disulfide) states. In the reduced state, most of the backbone amide resonances (149/152, 98 %) can be assigned in the XcPrxQ (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum. In contrast, a remarkable 51 % (77) of these amide resonances are not visible in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum of the disulfide state of the enzyme, indicating a substantial change in backbone dynamics associated with the formation of an intramolecular C48-C84 disulfide bond.

  2. ¹⁵N, ¹³C and ¹H resonance assignments and secondary structure determination of a variable heavy domain of a heavy chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Christine E; Waters, Lorna C; Muskett, Frederick W; Veverka, Vaclav; Addis, Philip W; Griffin, Laura M; Baker, Terry S; Lawson, Alastair D G; Wernery, Ulrich; Kinne, Jorg; Henry, Alistair J; Taylor, Richard J; Carr, Mark D

    2014-04-01

    Heavy chain antibodies differ in structure to conventional antibodies lacking both the light chain and the first heavy chain constant domain (CH1). Characteristics of the antigen-binding variable heavy domain of the heavy chain antibody (VHH) including the smaller size, high solubility and stability make them an attractive alternative to more traditional antibody fragments for detailed NMR-based structural analysis. Here we report essentially complete backbone and side chain (15)N, (13)C and (1)H assignments for a free VHH. Analysis of the backbone chemical shift data obtained indicates that the VHH is comprised predominantly of β-sheets corresponding to nearly 60% of the protein backbone.

  3. Functional binding surface of a β-hairpin VEGF receptor targeting peptide determined by NMR spectroscopy in living cells.

    PubMed

    Diana, Donatella; Russomanno, Anna; De Rosa, Lucia; Di Stasi, Rossella; Capasso, Domenica; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Romanelli, Alessandra; Russo, Luigi; D'Andrea, Luca D; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2015-01-02

    In this study, the functional interaction of HPLW peptide with VEGFR2 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2) was determined by using fast (15)N-edited NMR spectroscopic experiments. To this aim, (15)N uniformly labelled HPLW has been added to Porcine Aortic Endothelial Cells. The acquisition of isotope-edited NMR spectroscopic experiments, including (15)N relaxation measurements, allowed a precise characterization of the in-cell HPLW epitope recognized by VEGFR2.

  4. Lipid Bilayer-Bound Conformation of an Integral Membrane Beta Barrel Protein by Multidimensional MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Matthew T.; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms 2-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for 13C line width and less than 0.5 ppm 15N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  5. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Matthew T; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-04-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5-0.3 ppm for (13)C line widths and <0.5 ppm (15)N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  6. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  7. Proton-decoupled CPMG: a better experiment for measuring (15)N R2 relaxation in disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2014-04-01

    (15)N R2 relaxation is one of the most informative experiments for characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Small changes in nitrogen R2 rates are often used to determine how IDPs respond to various biologically relevant perturbations such as point mutations, posttranslational modifications and weak ligand interactions. However collecting high-quality (15)N relaxation data can be difficult. Of necessity, the samples of IDPs are often prepared with low protein concentration and the measurement time can be limited because of rapid sample degradation. Furthermore, due to hardware limitations standard experiments such as (15)N spin-lock and CPMG can sample the relaxation decay only to ca. 150ms. This is much shorter than (15)N T2 times in disordered proteins at or near physiological temperature. As a result, the sampling of relaxation decay profiles in these experiments is suboptimal, which further lowers the precision of the measurements. Here we report a new implementation of the proton-decoupled (PD) CPMG experiment which allows one to sample (15)N R2 relaxation decay up to ca. 0.5-1s. The new experiment has been validated through comparison with the well-established spin-lock measurement. Using dilute samples of denatured ubiquitin, we have demonstrated that PD-CPMG produces up to 3-fold improvement in the precision of the data. It is expected that for intrinsically disordered proteins the gains may be even more substantial. We have also shown that this sequence has a number of favorable properties: (i) the spectra are recorded with narrow linewidth in nitrogen dimension; (ii) (15)N offset correction is small and easy to calculate; (iii) the experiment is immune to various spurious effects arising from solvent exchange; (iv) the results are stable with respect to pulse miscalibration and rf field inhomogeneity; (v) with minimal change, the pulse sequence can also be used to measure R2 relaxation of (15)N(ε) spins in arginine side chains. We

  8. Backbone resonance assignments for the PHD-Bromo dual-domain of the human chromatin reader TRIM24.

    PubMed

    Walser, Reto; Renshaw, Jonathan; Milbradt, Alexander G

    2016-04-01

    Plant homeodomains (PHD) and Bromo domains are both chromatin reader domains that recognise histone methylation degree and acetylation state, respectively. The tripartite motif protein TRIM24 is a multidomain protein carrying a PHD-Bromo motif at its C-terminus, through which it is able to bind to histone 3 (H3) N-terminal tails with a specific modification pattern, namely unmethylated at K4 and acetylated at K23 (H3-K4me0K23ac). Here we report the 1H, 13C and 15N backbone resonance assignment of this 23 kDa motif, which we have obtained by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore we show that the secondary Cα and Cβ chemical shifts are in good agreement with a previously published crystal structure.

  9. Enhancing NMR of insensitive nuclei by transfer of SABRE spin hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Zimmermann, Herbert; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the performance of methods for enhancing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signals of "insensitive", but important NMR nuclei, which are based on the SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) technique, i.e., on spin order transfer from parahydrogen (H2 molecule in its nuclear singlet spin state) to a substrate in a transient organometallic complex. Here such transfer is performed at high magnetic fields by INEPT-type NMR pulse sequences, modified for SABRE. Signal enhancements up to three orders of magnitude are obtained for 15N nuclei; the possibility of sensitive detection of 2D-NMR 1H-15N spectra of SABRE complexes and substrates is demonstrated.

  10. Proton-decoupled CPMG: A better experiment for measuring 15N R2 relaxation in disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuwen, Tairan; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R.

    2014-04-01

    15N R2 relaxation is one of the most informative experiments for characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Small changes in nitrogen R2 rates are often used to determine how IDPs respond to various biologically relevant perturbations such as point mutations, posttranslational modifications and weak ligand interactions. However collecting high-quality 15N relaxation data can be difficult. Of necessity, the samples of IDPs are often prepared with low protein concentration and the measurement time can be limited because of rapid sample degradation. Furthermore, due to hardware limitations standard experiments such as 15N spin-lock and CPMG can sample the relaxation decay only to ca. 150 ms. This is much shorter than 15N T2 times in disordered proteins at or near physiological temperature. As a result, the sampling of relaxation decay profiles in these experiments is suboptimal, which further lowers the precision of the measurements. Here we report a new implementation of the proton-decoupled (PD) CPMG experiment which allows one to sample 15N R2 relaxation decay up to ca. 0.5-1 s. The new experiment has been validated through comparison with the well-established spin-lock measurement. Using dilute samples of denatured ubiquitin, we have demonstrated that PD-CPMG produces up to 3-fold improvement in the precision of the data. It is expected that for intrinsically disordered proteins the gains may be even more substantial. We have also shown that this sequence has a number of favorable properties: (i) the spectra are recorded with narrow linewidth in nitrogen dimension; (ii) 15N offset correction is small and easy to calculate; (iii) the experiment is immune to various spurious effects arising from solvent exchange; (iv) the results are stable with respect to pulse miscalibration and rf field inhomogeneity; (v) with minimal change, the pulse sequence can also be used to measure R2 relaxation of 15Nε spins in arginine side chains. We anticipate that

  11. Assessing the fate and transformation of plant residues in the terrestrial environment using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Brian P.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Simpson, Andre J.

    2006-08-01

    Plant litter decomposition plays a fundamental role in carbon and nitrogen cycles, provides key nutrients to the soil environment and represents a potentially large positive feedback to atmospheric CO 2. However, the full details of decomposition pathways and products are unknown. Here we present the first application of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy on 13C and 15N labeled plant materials, and apply this approach in a preliminary study to monitor the environmental degradation of the pine and wheatgrass residues over time. In HR-MAS, is it possible to acquire very high resolution NMR data of plant biomass, and apply the vast array of multidimensional experiments available in conventional solution-state NMR. High levels of isotopic enrichment combined with HR-MAS significantly enhance the detection limits, and provide a wealth of information that is unattainable by any other method. Diffusion edited HR-MAS NMR data reveal the rapid loss of carbohydrate structures, while two-dimensional (2-D) HR-MAS NMR spectra demonstrate the relatively fast loss of both hydrolysable and condensed tannin structures from all plant tissues studied. Aromatic (partially lignin) and aliphatic components (waxes, cuticles) tend to persist, along with a small fraction of carbohydrate, and become highly functionalized over time. While one-dimensional (1-D) 13C HR-MAS NMR spectra of fresh plant tissue reflect compositional differences between pine and grass, these differences become negligible after decomposition suggesting that recalcitrant carbon may be similar despite the plant source. Two-dimensional 1H- 15N HR-MAS NMR analysis of the pine residue suggests that nitrogen from specific peptides is either selectively preserved or used for the synthesis of what appears to be novel structures. The amount of relevant data generated from plant components in situ using HR-MAS NMR is highly encouraging, and demonstrates that complete assignment will yield unprecedented structural knowledge of plant cell

  12. Tracking the incorporation of 15N from labeled beech litter into mineral-organic associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, M.; Hatton, P.; Derrien, D.; Lajtha, K.; Zeller, B.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen containing organic compounds are thought to have a role in the complex web of processes that control the turnover time of soil organic matter. The sequential density fractionation technique is increasingly used for the purpose of investigating the association of organic materials with the mineral matrix. Organic materials in the denser fractions (>2.0 kg L-1) typically show 13C NMR signals indicative of carbohydrate and aliphatic structures, an absence of lignin and tannin structures and a narrow C:N ratio, suggesting a microbial origin of organic matter in these fractions. Here we take advantage of a labeling experiment conducted at two different sites in Germany and in France to investigate the incorporation of organic nitrogen into physical fractions of increasing density, representing a proximity gradient to mineral surfaces. 15N labeled beech litter was applied to two acidic forest topsoils 8 and 12 years ago. Although there are differences in the distribution patterns between the two soils, and the majority of the organic nitrogen was recovered in fractions representing organic matter of plant origin and not bound to the mineral matrix, our data clearly show that after a decade, significant amounts of the nitrogen had been incorporated in mineral-organic fractions of supposedly slow turnover. It remains to be shown to which extent the N in the densest fractions was incorporated by soil microbiota and associated with mineral surfaces in organic form or adsorbed to mineral surfaces in inorganic form (NH4+).

  13. Quantification of ammonia binding sites in Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant : a solid-state Nitrogen-15 MAS NMR spectroscopy investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian Ray

    2004-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of ammonia binding sites in the Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant using solid-state {sup 15}N MAS NMR spectroscopy is reported. By utilizing 15N enriched ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) gas, the different adsorption/binding sites within the zeolite were investigated as a function of NH{sub 3} loading. Using {sup 15}N MAS NMR multiple sites were resolved that have distinct cross-polarization dynamics and chemical shift behavior. These differences in the {sup 15}N NMR were used to characterize the adsorption environments in both the pure 3A zeolite and the silicone-molded forms of the desiccant.

  14. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James M; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone and (13)Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2-1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9-1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments.

  15. Detection and classification of hyperfine-shifted 1H, 2H, and 15N resonances of the Rieske ferredoxin component of toluene 4-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Xia, B; Pikus, J D; Xia, W; McClay, K; Steffan, R J; Chae, Y K; Westler, W M; Markley, J L; Fox, B G

    1999-01-12

    T4MOC is a 12.3 kDa soluble Rieske ferredoxin that is obligately required for electron transfer between the oxidoreductase and diiron hydroxylase components of toluene 4-monooxygenase from Pseudomonas mendocina KR1. Our preliminary 1H NMR studies of oxidized and reduced T4MOC [Markley, J. L., Xia, B., Chae, Y. K., Cheng, H., Westler, W. M., Pikus, J. D., and Fox, B. G. (1996) in Protein Structure Function Relationships (Zaidi, Z., and Smith, D., Eds.) pp 135-146, Plenum Press, London] revealed the presence of hyperfine-shifted 1H resonances whose short relaxation times made it impractical to use nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) measurements for assignment purposes. We report here the use of selective isotopic labeling to analyze the hyperfine-shifted 1H, 2H, and 15N signals from T4MOC. Selective deuteration led to identification of signals from the four Hbeta atoms of cluster ligands C45 and C64 in the oxidized and reduced forms of T4MOC. In the reduced state, the Curie temperature dependence of the Hbeta protons corresponded to that predicted from the simple vector spin-coupling model for nuclei associated with the localized ferric site. The signal at 25.5 ppm in the 1H spectrum of reduced T4MOC was assigned on the basis of selective 2H labeling to the His Hepsilon1 atom of one of the cluster ligands (H47 or H67). This assignment was corroborated by a one bond 1H-13C correlation (at 25.39 ppm 1H and 136.11 ppm 13C) observed in spectra of [U-13C]T4MOC with a 1H-13C coupling constant of approximately 192 Hz. The carbon chemical shift and one bond coupling constant are those expected for 1Hepsilon1-13Cepsilon1 in the imidazolium ring of histidine and are inconsistent with values expected for cysteine 1Halpha-13Calpha. The His Hepsilon1 proton exhibited weak Curie temperature dependence from 283 to 303 K, contrary to the anti-Curie temperature dependence predicted from the spin coupling model for nuclei associated with the localized ferrous site. A 1H peak at -12.3 ppm

  16. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  17. Effective rotational correlation times of proteins from NMR relaxation interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghan; Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effective rotational correlation times, τc, for the modulation of anisotropic spin-spin interactions in macromolecules subject to Brownian motion in solution is of key interest for the practice of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. The value of τc enables an estimate of the NMR spin relaxation rates, and indicates possible aggregation of the macromolecular species. This paper reports a novel NMR pulse scheme, [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT, which is based on transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy and permits to determine τc for 15N- 1H bonds without interference from dipole-dipole coupling of the amide proton with remote protons. [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT is highly efficient since only a series of one-dimensional NMR spectra need to be recorded. Its use is suggested for a quick estimate of the rotational correlation time, to monitor sample quality and to determine optimal parameters for complex multidimensional NMR experiments. Practical applications are illustrated with the 110 kDa 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase from Staphylococcus aureus, the uniformly 15N-labeled Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) in 60 kDa mixed OmpX/DHPC micelles with approximately 90 molecules of unlabeled 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), and the 16 kDa pheromone-binding protein from Bombyx mori, which cover a wide range of correlation times.

  18. Ultrahigh resolution protein structures using NMR chemical shift tensors

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Franks, W. Trent; Oldfield, Eric; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs) in proteins, as well as their orientations, represent an important new restraint class for protein structure refinement and determination. Here, we present the first determination of both CST magnitudes and orientations for 13Cα and 15N (peptide backbone) groups in a protein, the β1 IgG binding domain of protein G from Streptococcus spp., GB1. Site-specific 13Cα and 15N CSTs were measured using synchronously evolved recoupling experiments in which 13C and 15N tensors were projected onto the 1H-13C and 1H-15N vectors, respectively, and onto the 15N-13C vector in the case of 13Cα. The orientations of the 13Cα CSTs to the 1H-13C and 13C-15N vectors agreed well with the results of ab initio calculations, with an rmsd of approximately 8°. In addition, the measured 15N tensors exhibited larger reduced anisotropies in α-helical versus β-sheet regions, with very limited variation (18 ± 4°) in the orientation of the z-axis of the 15N CST with respect to the 1H-15N vector. Incorporation of the 13Cα CST restraints into structure calculations, in combination with isotropic chemical shifts, transferred echo double resonance 13C-15N distances and vector angle restraints, improved the backbone rmsd to 0.16 Å (PDB ID code 2LGI) and is consistent with existing X-ray structures (0.51 Å agreement with PDB ID code 2QMT). These results demonstrate that chemical shift tensors have considerable utility in protein structure refinement, with the best structures comparable to 1.0-Å crystal structures, based upon empirical metrics such as Ramachandran geometries and χ1/χ2 distributions, providing solid-state NMR with a powerful tool for de novo structure determination. PMID:21969532

  19. Automated NMR structure determination of stereo-array isotope labeled ubiquitin from minimal sets of spectra using the SAIL-FLYA system.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Teppei; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Jee, Jun-Goo; Kainosho, Masatsune; Güntert, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) has been combined with the fully automated NMR structure determination algorithm FLYA to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein ubiquitin from different sets of input NMR spectra. SAIL provides a complete stereo- and regio-specific pattern of stable isotopes that results in sharper resonance lines and reduced signal overlap, without information loss. Here we show that as a result of the superior quality of the SAIL NMR spectra, reliable, fully automated analyses of the NMR spectra and structure calculations are possible using fewer input spectra than with conventional uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. FLYA calculations with SAIL ubiquitin, using a single three-dimensional "through-bond" spectrum (and 2D HSQC spectra) in addition to the 13C-edited and 15N-edited NOESY spectra for conformational restraints, yielded structures with an accuracy of 0.83-1.15 A for the backbone RMSD to the conventionally determined solution structure of SAIL ubiquitin. NMR structures can thus be determined almost exclusively from the NOESY spectra that yield the conformational restraints, without the need to record many spectra only for determining intermediate, auxiliary data of the chemical shift assignments. The FLYA calculations for this report resulted in 252 ubiquitin structure bundles, obtained with different input data but identical structure calculation and refinement methods. These structures cover the entire range from highly accurate structures to seriously, but not trivially, wrong structures, and thus constitute a valuable database for the substantiation of structure validation methods.

  20. Insight into interactions of the von-Willebrand-factor-A-like domain 2 with the FNIII-like domain 9 of collagen VII by NMR and SPR.

    PubMed

    Leineweber, Sarah; Schönig, Sarah; Seeger, Karsten

    2011-06-23

    Type VII collagen as component of anchoring fibrils plays an important role in skin architecture, however, no detailed structural information is available. Here, we describe the recombinant expression, isotope labeling, and (1)H, (15)N, (13)C chemical shift assignment of a subdomain of the murine type VII collagen - the von-Willebrand-factor-A-like domain 2 (mvWFA2). vWFA2 interacts with type I collagen and plays a central role in certain skin blistering diseases. Based on these assignments a secondary structure prediction was performed showing a properly folded protein. An interaction of mvWFA2 with its neighboring domain mFNIII-9 was characterized with NMR spectroscopy and SPR.

  1. Distribution of 15N Among Plant Parts of Nodulating and Nonnodulating Isolines of Soybeans 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Kohl, Daniel H.; Harper, James E.

    1980-01-01

    Differences among plant parts in the natural abundance of 15N are of interest from the point of view of developing a sampling strategy for using 15N measurements to estimate the contribution of symbiotically fixed N to N2 fixing plants, and because they reflect isotopic fractionation associated with degradation, transport, and resynthesis of N-bearing molecules. This paper reports such differences in nodulating and nonnodulating isolines of soybeans (Glycine max [L] (Merrill, variety Harosoy)) grown under several different conditions. Nodules were strikingly enriched in 15N compared to other plant parts (by an average of 8.3‰ excess 15N), and the enrichment increased with time during the growing season. 15N was much more uniformly distributed among other plant parts. Although there were significant differences among other plant parts, the maximum deviation of the 15N abundance of any plant part from that of the entire plant was about 2‰ 15N excess. The 15N abundance of the seed N was most representative of the whole plant. There were significant differences between isolines in the distribution of 15N. The distribution of 15N within plants also varied with experimental conditions. The implications of these results for estimation of N2 fixation from measurements of the natural abundance of 15N are discussed. PMID:16661393

  2. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly 13C/15N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive 13C/15N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of 13C/15N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% 13C-glycerol and 0.5% 15N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of 13C/15N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  3. Investigation of the Use of Solid State Cp/mas NMR for Characterization of Thermoplastic Polyamides and Unique Thermally Curable Polyamides Containing the Cyclobutene Moiety.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Douglas Graham

    1990-08-01

    A series of model diamides was synthesized from mono- and disubstituted amines with the diacid chloride of cyclobutene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid. Relative rates of thermolysis (by DSC) were dependent on the number and type of substituents. Thermolysis products were Diels-Alder dimers and spontaneously formed polymers. Thermal imidization of cycloadducts was possible in some cases with concomitant oxidation to N, N^'-disubstituted aromatic bisimides. Polyamides were prepared from cyclobutene-1,2 -dicarboxylic acid using low temperature condensation reaction conditions. The unusual solubility characteristics of the diacid as well as the instability of the diacid chloride severely limited formation of high molecular weight polymers. Secondary monomers were synthesized in order to take advantage of the more predictable reactivity of the aromatic carboxyl group. Secondary monomers were polymerized with diamine comonomers using low temperature condensation methods. Solid state ^{13}C CP/MAS NMR confirmed the polymer structure. The thermalized product was found to be insoluble, although swellable, in polar aprotic solvents. Solid state ^{13 }C NMR spectra of the thermal products confirmed crosslinking by intermolecular Diels-Alder cycloaddition. Several important aliphatic polyamides were characterized using high resolution techniques with an emphasis on the ^{15}N nucleus. Chemical shifts from ^{15}N CP/MAS were found to correlate with the alpha and gamma crystal forms found in aliphatic polyamides. This chemical shift difference is rationalized as a conformationally dependent interaction of the amide nitrogen with its substituents. Evidence is presented from molecular orbital calculations which support this theory. Nylon 6 and nylon 11 were synthesized with 20% and 99% ^{15}N enrichment, respectively. ^{15}N CP/MAS of the enriched nylon 6 showed the amorphous region of the polymer for the first time. ^{15 }N relaxation times (T_1, T_1_rho) confirmed the assignment of the

  4. Resonance assignments and secondary structure of a phytocystatin from Sesamum indicum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu-Jun; Irene, Deli; Lo, Chi-Jen; Cai, Yong-Liang; Tzen, T-C; Lin, Ta-Hsien; Chyan, Chia-Lin

    2015-10-01

    A cDNA encoding a cysteine protease inhibitor, cystatin was cloned from sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seed. This clone was constructed into an expression vector and expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneous. The recombinant sesame cystatin (SiCYS) showed effectively inhibitory activity toward C1 cysteine proteases. In order to unravel its inhibitory action from structural point of view, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques were used to characterize the structure of SiCYS. The full (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C resonances of SiCYS were assigned. The secondary structure of SiCYS was identified by using the assigned chemical shifts of (1)H(α), (13)C(α), (13)C(β), and (13)CO through the consensus chemical shift index (CSI). The results of CSI analysis of SiCYS suggest eight β-strands (residues 33-46, 51-61, 63-75, 80-87, 150-155, 157-169, 172-183, and 192-195) and two α-helices (residues 16-30, and 120-135).

  5. Resonance assignment of PsbP: an extrinsic protein from photosystem II of Spinacia oleracea.

    PubMed

    Rathner, Adriana; Chandra, Kousik; Rathner, Petr; Horničáková, Michaela; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Müller, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    PsbP (23 kDa) is an extrinsic eukaryotic protein of photosystem II found in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants and green algae. It has been proven to be indispensable for proper functioning of the oxygen evolving complex. By interaction with other extrinsic proteins (PsbQ, PsbO and PsbR), it modulates the concentration of two cofactors of the water splitting reaction, Ca(2+) and Cl(-). The crystallographic structure of PsbP from Spinacia oleracea lacks the N-terminal part as well as two inner regions which were modelled as loops. Those unresolved parts are believed to be functionally crucial for the binding of PsbP to the thylakoid membrane. In this NMR study we report (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of the backbone and side chain atoms of the PsbP protein. Based on these data, an estimate of the secondary structure has been made. The structural motifs found fit the resolved parts of the crystallographic structure very well. In addition, the complete assignment set provides preliminary insight into the dynamic regions.

  6. Resonance assignments and secondary structure of a phytocystatin from Ananas comosus.

    PubMed

    Irene, Deli; Chen, Bo-Jiun; Lo, Si-Hung; Liu, Ting-Hang; Tzen, Jason T-C; Chyan, Chia-Lin

    2012-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a cysteine protease inhibitor, cystatin was cloned from pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) stem. This clone was constructed into an expression vector and expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneous. The recombinant pineapple cystatins (AcCYS) showed effectively inhibitory activity toward cysteine proteases including papain, bromelain, and cathepsin B. In order to unravel its inhibitory action from structural point of view, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques were used to characterize the structure of AcCYS. The full (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C resonance assignments of AcCYS were determined. The secondary structure of AcCYS was identified by using the assigned chemical shift of (1)Hα, (13)Cα, (13)Cβ, and (13)CO through the consensus chemical shift index (CSI). The results of CSI analysis suggest 5 β-strands (residues 45-47, 84-91, 94-104, 106-117, and 123-130) and one α-helix (residues 55-73).

  7. Automatic NOESY assignment in CS-RASREC-Rosetta.

    PubMed

    Lange, Oliver F

    2014-07-01

    We have developed an approach for simultaneous structure calculation and automatic Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) assignment to solve nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures from unassigned NOESY data. The approach, autoNOE-Rosetta, integrates Resolution Adapted Structural RECombination (RASREC) Rosetta NMR calculations with algorithms for automatic NOE assignment. The method was applied to two proteins in the 15-20 kDa size range for which both, NMR and X-ray data, is available. The autoNOE-Rosetta calculations converge for both proteins and yield accurate structures with an RMSD of 1.9 Å to the X-ray reference structures. The method greatly expands the radius of convergence for automatic NOE assignment, and should be broadly useful for NMR structure determination.

  8. Estimation of nitric oxide synthase activity via LC-MS/MS determination of 15N3-citrulline in biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Beom Soo; Fung, Ho-Leung; Upadhyay, Mahesh; Shin, Soyoung

    2015-01-01

    Rationale We showed that the metabolite peaks of 15N3-citrulline (15N3-CIT) and 15N3-arginine (15N3-ARG) could be detected when 15N4-ARG was metabolized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in endothelial cells. The usefulness of these metabolites as potential surrogate indices of nitric oxide (NO) generation is evaluated. Methods A hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometric assay (LC-MS/MS) was utilized for the simultaneous analysis of 15N4-ARG, ARG, CIT, 15N3-CIT and 15N3-ARG. 15N3-CIT and 15N3-ARG from impurities of 15N4-ARG were determined and corrected for the calculation of their concentration. 15N4-ARG-derived NO, i.e., 15NO formation was determined by analyzing 15N-nitrite accumulation by another LC-MS/MS assay. Results After EA.hy926 human endothelial cells were challenged with 15N4-ARG for 2 hours, the peak intensities of 15N3-CIT and 15N3-ARG significantly increased with 15N4-ARG concentration and positively correlated with 15N-nitrite production. The estimated Km values were independent of the metabolite (i.e., 15N3-CIT, 15N3-CIT+15N3-ARG or 15N-nitrite) used for calculation. However, after correction for its presence as a chemical contaminant of 15N4-ARG, 15N3-ARG was only a marginal contributor for the estimation of NOS activity. Conclusions These data suggest that the formation of 15N3-CIT can be used as an indicator of NOS activity when 15N4-ARG is used as a substrate. This approach may be superior to the radioactive 14C-CIT method which can be contaminated by 14C-urea, and to the 14N-nitrite method which lacks sensitivity. PMID:26349467

  9. sup 13 C and sup 15 N nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of the ionization state of substrates bound to bovine dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Selinsky, B.S.; Perlman, M.E.; London, R.E. ); Unkefer, C.J. ); Mitchell, J. ); Blakley, R.L. Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis )

    1990-02-06

    The state of protonation of substrates bound to mammalian dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) has significance for the mechanism of catalysis. To investigate this, dihydrofolate and dihydropteroylpentaglutamate have been synthesized with {sup 15}N enrichment at N-5. {sup 15}N NMR studies have been performed on the binary complexes formed by bovine DHFR with these compounds and with (5-{sup 15}N)dihydrobiopterin. The results indicate that there is no protonation at N-5 in the binary complexes, and this was confirmed by {sup 13}C NMR studies with folate and dihydrofolate synthesized with {sup 13}C enrichment at C-6. The chemical shift displacements produced by complex formation are in the same direction as those which result from deprotonation of the N-3/C-4-O amide group and are consistent with at least partial loss of the proton from N-3. This would be possible if, as crystallographic data indicate, there is interaction of N-3 and the 2-amino group of the bound ligands with the carboxylate of the active site glutamate residue (Glu{sup 30}).

  10. REDOR NMR of stable-isotope-labeled protein binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, J.

    1994-12-01

    Rotational-echo, double resonance (REDOR) NMR, a new analytical spectroscopic technique for solids spinning at the magic angle, has been developed over the last 5 years. REDOR provides a direct measure of heteronuclear dipolar coupling between isolated pairs of labeled nuclei. In a solid with a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N labeled pair, for example, the {sup 13}C rotational echoes that form each rotor period following a{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization transfer can be prevented from reaching full intensity by insertion of a {sup 15}N {pi} pulse each half rotor period. The REDOR difference (the difference between a {sup 13}C NMR spectrum obtained under these conditions and one obtained with no {sup 15}N {pi} pulses) has a strong dependence on the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar coupling, and hence, the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N internuclear distance. REDOR is described as double-resonance even though three radio frequencies (typically {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N) are used because the protons are removed from the important evolution part of the experiment by resonant decoupling. The dephasing of magnetization in REDOR arises from a local dipolar {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N field gradient and involves no polarization transfer. REDOR has no dependence on {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N chemical-shift tensors and does not require resolution of a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N coupling in the chemical-shift dimension.

  11. Protein NMR Studies of substrate binding to human blood group A and B glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas; Grimm, Lena Lisbeth; Weissbach, Sophie; Flügge, Friedemann; Begemann, Nora; Palcic, Monica

    2017-03-03

    Donor and acceptor substrate binding to human blood group A and B glycosyltransferases (GTA, GTB) has been studied by a variety of protein NMR experiments. Prior crystallographic studies have shown these enzymes to adopt an open conformation in the absence of substrates. Binding of either the donor substrate UDP-Gal, or of UDP induces a semi-closed conformation. In the presence of both, donor- and acceptor substrates, the enzymes shift towards a closed conformation with ordering of an internal loop and the C-terminal residues, which then completely cover the donor-binding pocket. Chemical shift titrations of uniformly 2H,15N labeled GTA or GTB with UDP affected about 20% of all cross peaks in 1H,15N-TROSY-HSQC spectra reflecting substantial plasticity of the enzymes. On the other hand, it is this conformational flexibility that impedes NH backbone assignments. Chemical shift perturbation experiments using 1-13C-methyl Ile labeled samples revealed two Ile residues, Ile123 at the bottom of the UDP binding pocket, and Ile192 as part of the internal loop that were significantly disturbed upon stepwise addition of UDP and H-disaccharide, also revealing long-range perturbations. Finally, methyl TROSY based relaxation dispersion experiments do not reveal s to ms time scale motions. Although this study reveals substantial conformational plasticity of GTA and GTB it remains enigmatic how binding of substrates shifts the enzymes into catalytically competent states.

  12. [15N-flow after in sacco incubation and feeding of sheep and goats with untreated wheat straw or straw treated with 15N horse urine].

    PubMed

    Schubert, R; Flachowsky, G; Bochröder, B

    1994-01-01

    Chopped wheat straw was homogeneously mixed with urine of horses (5.75 gN per 1, 16.88 atom-% 15N-excess) and airtightly stored in plastic containers for 6 months. Three rumen fistulated sheep and goats each were fed with untreated or urine treated straw. Concentrate was added to straw. Untreated and urine treated straw were given in nylon bags and incubated in the rumen of sheep and goats for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. A three compartment exponential function was used to fit the measurements of 15N-excess and 15N-amount of bag content. The curves and the calculated partial Y-values of the three compartments show the inflow and outflow of 15N into or from the bags and allow conclusions about the binding of urine N. Most N of urine was not compactly bound by straw during storage. Primarily microbial N was attached to the straw in the rumen. About 6% of urine N were bound more compact to the straw. Similar curves were calculated for 15N-excess and 15N-amount of nylon bags. The curves allow conclusions about tracer flows without quantitative knowledge. There were no significant differences between animal species.

  13. Soil processes drive seasonal variation in retention of 15N tracers in a deciduous forest catchment.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Christine L; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Weiss, Marissa S; McCalley, K; Sparks, Jed P; Thomas, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal patterns of stream nitrate concentration have long been interpreted as demonstrating the central role of plant uptake in regulating stream nitrogen loss from forested catchments. Soil processes are rarely considered as important drivers of these patterns. We examined seasonal variation in N retention in a deciduous forest using three whole-ecosystem 15N tracer additions: in late April (post-snowmelt, pre-leaf-out), late July (mid-growing- season), and late October (end of leaf-fall). We expected that plant 15N uptake would peak in late spring and midsummer, that immobilization in surface litter and soil would peak the following autumn leaf-fall, and that leaching losses would vary inversely with 15N retention. Similar to most other 15N tracer studies, we found that litter and soils dominated ecosystem retention of added 15N. However, 15N recovery in detrital pools varied tremendously by season, with > 90% retention in spring and autumn and sharply reduced 15N retention in late summer. During spring, over half of the 15N retained in soil occurred within one day in the heavy (mineral-associated) soil fraction. During summer, a large decrease in 15N retention one week after addition coincided with increased losses of 15NO3- to soil leachate and seasonal increases in soil and stream NO3- concentrations, although leaching accounted for only a small fraction of the lost 15N (< 0.2%). Uptake of 15N into roots did not vary by season and accounted for < 4% of each tracer addition. Denitrification or other processes that lead to N gas loss may have consumed the rest. These measurements of 15N movement provide strong evidence for the dominant role of soil processes in regulating seasonal N retention and losses in this catchment and perhaps others with similar soils.

  14. Nutrient Status and δ15N Values in Leaves and Soils: A Cross-Biome Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, J. R.; Schuur, E. A.; Turner, B. L.; Wright, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Stable nitrogen (N) isotope ratios (δ15N) are often assumed to provide an integrated measure of multiple nitrogen cycling processes. For instance, shifts in the bioavailability of soil N forms are thought to alter plant δ15N values. Demonstrating this relationship is important as ecosystems undergo anthropogenic disturbances. We evaluated patterns and implied mechanisms of the N cycle using ecosystem δ15N values from 16 plots in boreal black spruce (Picea mariana) forest and lowland wet tropical forest. Fertilizer N and phosphorus (P) was applied annually for five and 11 years prior to measurement of ecosystem δ15N values. Full sun canopy foliage and soil extractable nitrate, ammonium, and dissolved organic N (DON) were sampled in fertilized and control plots and analyzed for δ15N. In boreal forest, N fertilization reduced DON concentrations and caused a depletion of δ15N in foliage and fungal sporocarps. Of four species occurring in all plots in the tropical forest, one (Alseis blackiana) had increased foliar δ15N values following N fertilization, one (Tetragastris panamensis) had increased foliar δ15N values following P fertilization, and one (Oenocarpus mapora) had increased foliar δ15N following N+P fertilization. Surprisingly, soil nitrate in the boreal forest became substantially 15N-enriched under P fertilization, whereas nitrate in the tropical forest soil was enriched only under N or N+P fertilization. Collectively, nitrate enrichment is likely due to enhanced rates of soil denitrification as evidenced by elevated resin extractable soil nitrate concentrations and close correlations between δ15N and δ18O values. On average, foliar δ15N in tropical trees corresponded well with δ15N in soil nitrate in control and P fertilized plots, but was 2-3% more enriched than DON under N and N+P fertilization. In boreal forests, N and N+P fertilization increased foliar N concentration and δ15N values indicating substantial use of applied fertilizer. Taken

  15. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  16. Efficient Measurement of 3JN,Cγ and 3JC‧,Cγ Coupling Constants of Aromatic Residues in 13C, 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhr, Frank; Rüterjans, Heinz

    2000-09-01

    An NMR pulse sequence is proposed for the simultaneous determination of side chain χ1 torsion-angle related 3JN,Cγ and 3JC‧,Cγ couplings in aromatic amino acid spin systems. The method is of the quantitative J correlation type and takes advantage of attenuated 15N and 1H transverse relaxation by means of the TROSY principle. Unlike previously developed schemes for the measurement of either of the two coupling types, spectra contain internal reference peaks that are usually recorded in separate experiments. Therefore, the desired information is extracted from a single rather than four data sets. The new method is demonstrated with uniformly 13C/15N labeled Desulfovibrio vulgaris flavodoxin, which contains 14 aromatic out of 147 total amino acid residues.

  17. An NMR study and ab initio molecular orbital calculation of substituted benzofuroxans and the salt of 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmoch, P.; Wiench, J. W.; Stefaniak, L.; Webb, G. A.

    1999-09-01

    13C, 15N and 17O NMR data are reported for a series of substituted benzofuroxans in aprotic and acidic solutions and for a potassium salt of a substituted benzofuroxan. Some of the title compounds can exhibit fast furoxan valence equilibrium at room temperature regardless of a solvent used, whereas for the others no evidence of above-mentioned process exists. The NMR parameters most sensitive to salt formation are the chemical shifts of the C7, N1, N3 and all of the oxygen nuclei. Hence these are reported as the most satisfactory chemical shifts to be used in distinguishing between the salt and non-ionic forms of the substituted benzofuroxans studied. Calculated energies at the self-consistent field (SCF) level of theory for both tautomeric forms (N1- and N3-oxide) of some compounds studied are used for predicting the tautomeric equilibrium constants. Absolute 17O shieldings are employed in the reversal of the assignments of 17O NMR signals existing in the literature.

  18. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  19. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms.

  20. δ(15) N from soil to wine in bulk samples and proline.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Mauro; Ziller, Luca; Bertoldi, Daniela; Bontempo, Luana; Larcher, Roberto; Nicolini, Giorgio; Camin, Federica

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of using δ(15) N as an additional isotopic marker able to link wine to its area of origin was investigated. The whole production chain (soil-leaves-grape-wine) was considered. Moreover, the research included evaluation of the effect of the fermentation process, the use of different types of yeast and white and red vinification, the addition of nitrogen adjuvants and ultrasound lysis simulating wine ageing. The δ(15) N of grapes and wine was measured in bulk samples and compounds, specifically in proline, for the first time. Despite isotopic fractionation from soil to wine, the δ(15) N values of leaves, grapes, wine and particularly must and wine proline conserved the variability of δ(15) N in the growing soil. Fermentation and ultrasound treatment did not affect the δ(15) N values of grape must, which was therefore conserved in wine. The addition of inorganic or organic adjuvants was able to influence the δ(15) N of bulk wine, depending on the amount and the difference between the δ(15) N of must and that of the adjuvant. The δ(15) N of wine proline was not influenced by adjuvant addition and is therefore the best marker for tracing the geographical origin of wine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  2. δ 15 N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural abundance δ15N of ecosystems integrates nitrogen (N) inputs and losses, and thus reflects factors that control the long-term development of ecosystem N balances. We here report N and carbon (C) content of forest vegetation and soils, and associated δ15N, across nine Doug...

  3. Structure of the putative 32 kDa myrosinase-binding protein from Arabidopsis (At3g16450.1) determined by SAIL-NMR.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Sugimori, Nozomi; Torizawa, Takuya; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Ono, Akira M; Yagi, Hirokazu; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Kato, Koichi; Ikeya, Teppei; Jee, Jungoo; Güntert, Peter; Aceti, David J; Markley, John L; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2008-12-01

    The product of gene At3g16450.1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is a 32 kDa, 299-residue protein classified as resembling a myrosinase-binding protein (MyroBP). MyroBPs are found in plants as part of a complex with the glucosinolate-degrading enzyme myrosinase, and are suspected to play a role in myrosinase-dependent defense against pathogens. Many MyroBPs and MyroBP-related proteins are composed of repeated homologous sequences with unknown structure. We report here the three-dimensional structure of the At3g16450.1 protein from Arabidopsis, which consists of two tandem repeats. Because the size of the protein is larger than that amenable to high-throughput analysis by uniform (13)C/(15)N labeling methods, we used stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) technology to prepare an optimally (2)H/(13)C/(15)N-labeled sample. NMR data sets collected using the SAIL protein enabled us to assign (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts to 95.5% of all atoms, even at a low concentration (0.2 mm) of protein product. We collected additional NOESY data and determined the three-dimensional structure using the cyana software package. The structure, the first for a MyroBP family member, revealed that the At3g16450.1 protein consists of two independent but similar lectin-fold domains, each composed of three beta-sheets.

  4. Stable Isotope Tracking of Endangered Sea Turtles: Validation with Satellite Telemetry and δ15N Analysis of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Seminoff, Jeffrey A.; Benson, Scott R.; Arthur, Karen E.; Eguchi, Tomoharu; Dutton, Peter H.; Tapilatu, Ricardo F.; Popp, Brian N.

    2012-01-01

    Effective conservation strategies for highly migratory species must incorporate information about long-distance movements and locations of high-use foraging areas. However, the inherent challenges of directly monitoring these factors call for creative research approaches and innovative application of existing tools. Highly migratory marine species, such as marine turtles, regularly travel hundreds or thousands of kilometers between breeding and feeding areas, but identification of migratory routes and habitat use patterns remains elusive. Here we use satellite telemetry in combination with compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids to confirm that insights from bulk tissue stable isotope analysis can reveal divergent migratory strategies and within-population segregation of foraging groups of critically endangered leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) across the Pacific Ocean. Among the 78 turtles studied, we found a distinct dichotomy in δ15N values of bulk skin, with distinct “low δ15N” and “high δ15N” groups. δ15N analysis of amino acids confirmed that this disparity resulted from isotopic differences at the base of the food chain and not from differences in trophic position between the two groups. Satellite tracking of 13 individuals indicated that their bulk skin δ15N value was linked to the particular foraging region of each turtle. These findings confirm that prevailing marine isoscapes of foraging areas can be reflected in the isotopic compositions of marine turtle body tissues sampled at nesting beaches. We use a Bayesian mixture model to show that between 82 and 100% of the 78 skin-sampled turtles could be assigned with confidence to either the eastern Pacific or western Pacific, with 33 to 66% of all turtles foraging in the eastern Pacific. Our forensic approach validates the use of stable isotopes to depict leatherback turtle movements over broad spatial ranges and is timely for establishing wise conservation efforts in

  5. Preparation and characterization of 15N-enriched, size-defined heparan sulfate precursor oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sigulinsky, Crystal; Babu, Ponnusamy; Victor, Xylophone V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    We report the preparation of size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides from Escherichia coli-derived 15N-enriched N-acetylheparosan. Optimized growth conditions of E. coli in minimal media containing 15NH4Cl yielded [15N]N-acetylheparosan on a preparative scale. Depolymerization of [15N]N-acetylheparosan by heparitinase I yielded resolvable, even-numbered oligosaccharides ranging from disaccharide to icosaccharide. Anion-exchange chromatography-assisted fractionation afforded size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides identifiable by ESI-TOFMS. These isotopically labeled oligosaccharides will prove to be valuable research tools for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of heparin and heparan sulfate oligosaccharides and for the study of their structural biology. PMID:19945695

  6. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in an arid ecosystem measured by sup 15 N natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Plants dependent on nitrogen fixation have an {sup 15}N abundance similar to the atmosphere, while non-nitrogen fixing plants usually are enriched in {sup 15}N and are similar to soil nitrogen values. The natural abundance of {sup 15}N in leaf tissues and soils was determined to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation by several legumes and actinorhizal species in the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research area in central New Mexico. Comparison of {delta}{sup 15}N values for the legume Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) to adjacent Atriplex canascens (fourwing saltbush) indicated that P. glandulosa obtained 66% of its nitrogen by fixation. The legume Hoffmanseggia jamesii was found to be utilizing soil nitrogen. The {delta}{sup 15}N values for the actinorhizal plants, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Cercocarpus montanus, while below values for soil nitrogen, did not differ from associated non-fixing plants.

  7. Compound-specific 15N analysis of amino acids in 15N tracer experiments provide an estimate of newly synthesised soil protein from inorganic and organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, Alice; Michaelides, Katerina; Evershed, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Organic N concentrations far exceed those of inorganic N in most soils and despite much investigation, the composition and cycling of this complex pool of SOM remains poorly understood. A particular problem has been separating more recalcitrant soil organic N from that actively cycling through the soil system; an important consideration in N cycling studies and for the soil's nutrient supplying capacity. The use of 15N-labelled substrates as stable isotope tracers has contributed much to our understanding of the soil system, but the complexity and heterogeneity of soil organic N prevents thorough compound-specific 15N analyses of organic N compounds and makes it difficult to examine any 15N-labelled organic products in any detail. As a result, a significant proportion of previous work has either simply assumed that since the majority of soil N is organic, all of the 15N retained in the soil is organic N (e.g. Sebilo et al., 2013) or subtracted 15N-labelled inorganic compounds from bulk values (e.g. Pilbeam et al., 1997). While the latter approach is more accurate, these methods only provide an estimate of the bulk 15N value of an extremely complex and non-uniformly labelled organic pool. A more detailed approach has been to use microbial biomass extraction (Brookes et al., 1985) and subsequent N isotopic analysis to determine the 15N value of biomass-N, representing the fraction of 15N assimilated by microbes or the 15N cycling through the 'living' or 'active' portion of soil organic N. However, this extraction method can only generate estimates and some lack of confidence in its validity and reliability remains. Here, we present an alternative technique to obtain a measure of the assimilation of an applied 15N substrate by the soil microbial biomass and an estimate of the newly synthesized soil protein, which is representative of the magnitude of the active soil microbial biomass. The technique uses a stable isotope tracer and compound-specific 15N analysis, but

  8. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15 N over long-term forest succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven; Tepley, Alan J.; Compton, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession towards old-growth are thought to increase nitrogen (N) availability and N loss, which should increase soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across 800 years of forest succession in a topographically complex montane landscape influenced by human logging and wildfire. In contrast to expectations, we found that disturbance caused declines in surface mineral soil δ15N values, both in logged forests measured 40–50 years after disturbance, and in unlogged forests disturbed by severe wildfire within the last 200 years. Both symbiotic N fixation and N transfers from disturbed vegetation and detritus could lower soil δ15N values after disturbance. A more important role for symbiotic N fixation is suggested by lower soil δ15N values in slow-successional sites with slow canopy closure, which favors early-successional N fixers. Soil δ15N values increased only marginally throughout 800 years of succession, reflecting soil N uptake by vegetation and strong overall N retention. Although post-disturbance N inputs lowered surface soil δ15N values, steady-state mass balance calculations suggest that wildfire combustion of vegetation and detritus can dominate long-term N loss and increase whole-ecosystem δ15N. On steeper topography, declining soil δ15N values highlight erosion and accelerated soil turnover as an additional abiotic control on N balances. We conclude for N-limited montane forests that soil δ15N and N availability are less influenced by nitrate leaching and denitrification loss than by interactions between disturbance, N fixation, and erosion.

  9. The effect of manuring on cereal and pulse amino acid δ(15)N values.

    PubMed

    Styring, Amy K; Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-06-01

    Amino acid δ(15)N values of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) grains and rachis and broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, grown in manured and unmanured soil at the experimental farm stations of Rothamsted, UK and Bad Lauchstädt, Germany, were determined by GC-C-IRMS. Manuring was found to result in a consistent (15)N-enrichment of cereal grain amino acid δ(15)N values, indicating that manuring did not affect the metabolic routing of nitrogen (N) into cereal grain amino acids. The increase in cereal grain δ(15)N values with manuring is therefore due to a (15)N-enrichment in the δ(15)N value of assimilated inorganic-N. Greater variation was observed in the (15)N-enrichment of rachis amino acids with manuring, possibly due to enhanced sensitivity to changes in growing conditions and higher turnover of N in rachis cells compared to cereal grains. Total amino acid δ(15)N values of manured and unmanured broad beans and peas were very similar, indicating that the legumes assimilated N2 from the atmosphere rather than N from the soil, since there was no evidence for routing of (15)N-enriched manure N into any of the pulse amino acids. Crop amino acid δ(15)N values thus provide insights into the sources of N assimilated by non N2-fixing and N2-fixing crops grown on manured and unmanured soils, and reveal an effect of manure on N metabolism in different crop species and plant parts.

  10. Alternative SAIL-Trp for robust aromatic signal assignment and determination of the χ(2) conformation by intra-residue NOEs.

    PubMed

    Miyanoiri, Yohei; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Jee, JunGoo; Ono, Akira M; Okuma, Kosuke; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2011-12-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) residues are frequently found in the hydrophobic cores of proteins, and therefore, their side-chain conformations, especially the precise locations of the bulky indole rings, are critical for determining structures by NMR. However, when analyzing [U-(13)C,(15)N]-proteins, the observation and assignment of the ring signals are often hampered by excessive overlaps and tight spin couplings. These difficulties have been greatly alleviated by using stereo-array isotope labeled (SAIL) proteins, which are composed of isotope-labeled amino acids optimized for unambiguous side-chain NMR assignment, exclusively through the (13)C-(13)C and (13)C-(1)H spin coupling networks (Kainosho et al. in Nature 440:52-57, 2006). In this paper, we propose an alternative type of SAIL-Trp with the [ζ2,ζ3-(2)H(2); δ1,ε3,η2-(13)C(3); ε1-(15)N]-indole ring ([(12)C (γ,) ( 12) C(ε2)] SAIL-Trp), which provides a more robust way to correlate the (1)H(β), (1)H(α), and (1)H(N) to the (1)H(δ1) and (1)H(ε3) through the intra-residue NOEs. The assignment of the (1)H(δ1)/(13)C(δ1) and (1)H(ε3)/(13)C(ε3) signals can thus be transferred to the (1)H(ε1)/(15)N(ε1) and (1)H(η2)/(13)C(η2) signals, as with the previous type of SAIL-Trp, which has an extra (13)C at the C(γ) of the ring. By taking advantage of the stereospecific deuteration of one of the prochiral β-methylene protons, which was (1)H(β2) in this experiment, one can determine the side-chain conformation of the Trp residue including the χ(2) angle, which is especially important for Trp residues, as they can adopt three preferred conformations. We demonstrated the usefulness of [(12)C(γ),(12)C(ε2)] SAIL-Trp for the 12 kDa DNA binding domain of mouse c-Myb protein (Myb-R2R3), which contains six Trp residues.

  11. 15N Content Reflects Development of Mycorrhizae and Nitrogen Dynamics During Primary Succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Jumpponen, A.

    2004-05-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous symbionts on terrestrial plants that are particularly important for plant nitrogen nutrition. 15N content appears to be a useful marker of the mycorrhizal role in plant nitrogen supply because of an apparent fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from mycorrhizal fungi to host plants. Because plants developing during primary succession are gradually colonized by mycorrhizal fungi, such situations provide good opportunities to study interactions between mycorrhizal colonization and plant 15N content. Here, we present results of a study of nitrogen isotope patterns in ecosystem components during the first 100 years of ecosystem development after glacial retreat, and compare those patterns with those on adjacent mature terrain. Soils in primary succession were depleted in 15N relative to nitrogen-fixing plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants generally colonized by ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, or arbuscular fungi showed similar 15N content very early in succession (-4 to -6‰ ), corresponding to low colonization levels of all plant species. Subsequent colonization of evergreen plants by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid fungi led to a 5-6‰ decline in 15N content, indicating transfer of 15N-depleted N from fungi to plants. The values recorded (-10 to -14‰ ) are among the lowest yet observed in vascular plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi did not decline in 15N content. Most ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi were similar in 15N content in early succession (-1 to -3‰ ), with the notable exception of ectomycorrhizal fungi suspected of proteolytic capabilities, which were 15N enriched relative to all other fungi. 15N contents in both plants and soil from the mature site were 5‰ greater than in recently exposed sites. We conclude that 1) the primary nitrogen source to this ecosystem must be atmospheric deposition, 2) low plant 15N content generally corresponds with greater

  12. Climate-Dependence of Plant-Soil 15N/14N Interactions Across Tropical Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Sigman, D. M.; Hedin, L. O.

    2005-12-01

    In most areas of the world, the 15N/14N of bulk soils is higher than that of plant leaves, and the isotopic signatures of these two ecosystem N pools progressively diverge with increasing rainfall. However, both the cause for this isotopic trend and its implications for understanding interactions between climate and N cycles are largely unknown. We report 15N/14N measurements of nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N in soil extracts from a highly constrained rainfall sequence in Hawaii, across which this trend in ecosystem 15N/14N is captured, to examine the competing explanations for plant-soil 15N/14N uncouplings. While the isotopic influences of microbial transfers of N between nitrate and ammonium pools and plant-mycorrhizae interactions have been posited in plant-soil 15N/14N relationships, our data did not support an important role for either of these mechanisms. Instead, preferential regeneration of 14N during the breakdown of DON to ammonium explains why the 15N/14N of plants is lower than that of bulk soils. Fractionation at this step leads to two isotopically distinct N subcycles in each forest, a lower-15N/14N subcycle composed of ammonium, nitrate, and bulk plant biomass N that `spins' rapidly and a higher-15N/14N subcycle composed of bulk soil N and DON that is much less dynamic. The increased difference between soil and plant 15N/14N is due to changes in the impacts of nitrification and denitrification on the 15N/14N of ammonium and nitrate, coupled with a switch from nitrate to ammonium uptake by plants under the wettest conditions. For instance, the particularly large (~6 per mil) 15N/14N difference between plants and soils in the wettest sites is due to the lack of 15N-enrichment of ammonium by nitrification coupled with plant dependence on ammonium uptake only. Our results highlight the importance of interactions between DON breakdown, ecosystem N recycling, and gaseous N losses in the explaining the interactions between the 15N signatures of

  13. Nitrogen Fractionation in Protoplanetary Disks from the H13CN/HC15N Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, V. V.; Öberg, K. I.; Huang, J.; Loomis, R.; Qi, C.

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen fractionation is commonly used to assess the thermal history of solar system volatiles. With ALMA it is for the first time possible to directly measure {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratios in common molecules during the assembly of planetary systems. We present ALMA observations of the {{{H}}}13{CN} and {{HC}}15{{N}} J=3-2 lines at 0.″5 angular resolution, toward a sample of six protoplanetary disks, selected to span a range of stellar and disk structure properties. Adopting a typical {}12{{C}}/{}13{{C}} ratio of 70, we find comet-like {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratios of 80–160 in five of the disks (3 T Tauri and 2 Herbig Ae disks) and lack constraints for one of the T Tauri disks (IM Lup). There are no systematic differences between T Tauri and Herbig Ae disks, or between full and transition disks within the sample. In addition, no correlation is observed between disk-averaged D/H and {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratios in the sample. One of the disks, V4046 Sgr, presents unusually bright HCN isotopologue emission, enabling us to model the radial profiles of {{{H}}}13{CN} and {{HC}}15{{N}}. We find tentative evidence of an increasing {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratio with radius, indicating that selective photodissociation in the inner disk is important in setting the {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratio during planet formation.

  14. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles.

  15. Steroselective synthesis and application of L-( sup 15 N) amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J. ); Lodwig, S.N. . Div. of Science)

    1991-01-01

    We have developed two general approaches to the stereoselective synthesis of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-labeled amino acids. First, labeled serine, biosynthesized using the methylotrophic bacterium M. extorquens AM1, serves as a chiral precursor for the synthesis of other amino acids. For example, pyridoxal phosphate enzymes can be used for the conversion of L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)serine to L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tyrosine, L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tryptophan, and L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)cysteine. In the second approach, developed by Oppolzer and Tamura, an electrophilic amination'' reagent, 1-chloro-1-nitrosocyclohexane, was used to convert chiral enolates into L-{alpha}-amino acids. We prepared 1-chloro-1-({sup 15}N) nitrosocyclohexane and used it to aminate chiral enolates to produce L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)amino acids. The stereoselectivity of this scheme using the Oppolzer sultam chiral auxiliary is remarkable, producing enantiomer ratios of 200 to 1. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  16. The Failed Writing Assignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swyt, Wendy

    1995-01-01

    Discusses an unsuccessful English 101 writing assignment in which students were asked to analyze a Gary Larson cartoon. Examines critically the type of assignment that seeks to address and incorporate the student writer's "local knowledge" of cultural texts, while at the same time containing what counts as knowledge within limited parameters of…

  17. An in-cell NMR study of monitoring stress-induced increase of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hembram, Dambarudhar Shiba Sankar; Haremaki, Takahiro; Hamatsu, Jumpei; Inoue, Jin; Kamoshida, Hajime; Ikeya, Teppei; Mishima, Masaki; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Ito, Yutaka

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •We performed time-resolved NMR observations of calbindin D{sub 9k} in HeLa cells. •Stress-induced increase of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration was observed by in-cell NMR. •Calbindin D{sub 9k} showed the state-transition from Mg{sup 2+}- to Ca{sup 2+}-bound state in cells. •We provide a useful tool for in situ monitoring of the healthiness of the cells. -- Abstract: Recent developments in in-cell NMR techniques have allowed us to study proteins in detail inside living eukaryotic cells. The lifetime of in-cell NMR samples is however much shorter than that in culture media, presumably because of various stresses as well as the nutrient depletion in the anaerobic environment within the NMR tube. It is well known that Ca{sup 2+}-bursts occur in HeLa cells under various stresses, hence the cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration can be regarded as a good indicator of the healthiness of cells in NMR tubes. In this study, aiming at monitoring the states of proteins resulting from the change of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration during experiments, human calbindin D{sub 9k} (P47M + C80) was used as the model protein and cultured HeLa cells as host cells. Time-resolved measurements of 2D {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N SOFAST–HMQC experiments of calbindin D{sub 9k} (P47M + C80) in HeLa cells showed time-dependent changes in the cross-peak patterns in the spectra. Comparison with in vitro assignments revealed that calbindin D{sub 9k} (P47M + C80) is initially in the Mg{sup 2+}-bound state, and then gradually converted to the Ca{sup 2+}-bound state. This conversion process initiates after NMR sample preparation. These results showed, for the first time, that cells inside the NMR tube were stressed, presumably because of cell precipitation, the lack of oxygen and nutrients, etc., thereby releasing Ca{sup 2+} into cytosol during the measurements. The results demonstrated that in-cell NMR can monitor the state transitions of stimulated cells through the observation of

  18. Application and Reliability of Solid-State NMR in Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    For the characterization of soil organic matter, a suite of analytical approaches are available. Chemical degradative methods involve an extraction scheme with which the soluble part of the mixture is isolated and analyzed by colorimetrical or chromatographic means. Macromolecular structures can be subjected to thermolytic or combined thermochemolytic degradation. Because secondary reactions (rearrangement, cracking, hydrogenation and polymerization) in a heterogeneous mixture cannot be excluded, it is obvious that conclusions regarding the original structure in the macromolecular phase have to be drawn with caution. A powerful alternative represents solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, allowing the examination of the bulk sample without major pre-treatment In environmental sciences, this technique mostly involves the isotope 13C to study the chemical composition of organic matter in soils, sediments or compost to study the temporal development of humic material or chemical alterations due to variation in environmental parameters. Due to its low sensibility solid-state 15N NMR studies on such samples are only found occasionally. The emphasis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy is not only to determine the gross chemical composition of the material under study via a chemical shift assignment but also a quantitative correlation between the different signal intensities and the relative contribution of the respective C or N types to the total organic C or N content. However, despite increasing popularity, this approach is still viewed as mysterious techniques, in particular with respect to quantification. Accordingly, the purpose of this review is to give a short overview on the possibilities and limitations of this technique in environmental science and in particular for the study of soil organic matter. In general, solid-state 13C NMR spectra of soil organic matter are obtained with the cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) technique. This

  19. Carbon-rich Presolar Grains from Massive Stars: Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N Ratios and the Mystery of 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.

  20. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12 C/ 13 C and 14 N/ 15 N ratios and the mystery of 15 N

    DOE PAGES

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; ...

    2015-07-30

    We compared carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. Furthermore, we present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. All of the explosion energies and H concentrations aremore » considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.« less

  1. Reduced dimensionality 3D HNCAN for unambiguous HN, CA and N assignment in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Manoj Kumar; Mishra, Pushpa; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2012-03-01

    We present here an improvisation of HNN (Panchal, Bhavesh et al., 2001) called RD 3D HNCAN for backbone (HN, CA and 15N) assignment in both folded and unfolded proteins. This is a reduced dimensionality experiment which employs CA chemical shifts to improve dispersion. Distinct positive and negative peak patterns of various triplet segments along the polypeptide chain observed in HNN are retained and these provide start and check points for the sequential walk. Because of co-incrementing of CA and 15N, peaks along one of the dimensions appear at sums and differences of the CA and 15N chemical shifts. This changes the backbone assignment protocol slightly and we present this in explicit detail. The performance of the experiment has been demonstrated using Ubiquitin and Plasmodium falciparum P2 proteins. The experiment is particularly valuable when two neighboring amino acid residues have nearly identical backbone 15N chemical shifts.

  2. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  3. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  4. Characterization of heroin samples by 1H NMR and 2D DOSY 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Retailleau, Emmanuel; Bertrand, Geneviève; Escot, Marie-Pierre; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Gilard, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-four samples of heroin from different illicit drug seizures were analyzed using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR) and two-dimensional diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (2D DOSY) (1)H NMR. A careful assignment and quantification of (1)H signals enabled a comprehensive characterization of the substances present in the samples investigated: heroin, its main related impurities (6-acetylmorphine, acetylcodeine, morphine, noscapine and papaverine) and cutting agents (caffeine and acetaminophen in nearly all samples as well as lactose, lidocaine, mannitol, piracetam in one sample only), and hence to establish their spectral signatures. The good agreement between the amounts of heroin, noscapine, caffeine and acetaminophen determined by (1)H NMR and gas chromatography, the reference method in forensic laboratories, demonstrates the validity of the (1)H NMR technique. In this paper, 2D DOSY (1)H NMR offers a new approach for a whole characterization of the various components of these complex mixtures.

  5. Influence of N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds on the (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensors in crystalline acetaminophen: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi; Hadipour, Nasser L

    2007-06-01

    A computational investigation was carried out to characterize the (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensors in crystalline acetaminophen. We found that N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds around the acetaminophen molecule in the crystal lattice have different influences on the calculated (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding eigenvalues and their orientations in the molecular frame of axes. The calculations were performed with the B3LYP method and 6-311++G(d, p) and 6-311+G(d) standard basis sets using the Gaussian 98 suite of programs. Calculated chemical shielding tensors were used to evaluate the (17)O, (15)N, and (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors in crystalline acetaminophen, which are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The difference between the calculated NMR parameters of the monomer and molecular clusters shows how much hydrogen-bonding interactions affect the chemical shielding tensors of each nucleus. The computed (17)O chemical shielding tensor on O(1), which is involved in two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, shows remarkable sensitivity toward the choice of the cluster model, whereas the (17)O chemical shielding tensor on O(2) involved in one N-H...O hydrogen bond, shows smaller improvement toward the hydrogen-bonding interactions. Also, a reasonably good agreement between the experimentally obtained solid-state (15)N and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculations is achievable only in molecular cluster model where a complete hydrogen-bonding network is considered. Moreover, at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) level of theory, the calculated (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensor orientations are able to reproduce the experimental values to a reasonably good degree of accuracy.

  6. Ecosystem N distribution and δ15N during a century of forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compton, J.E.; Hooker, T.D.; Perakis, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of terrestrial ecosystem nitrogen (N) pools reflect internal processes and input–output balances. Disturbance generally increases N cycling and loss, yet few studies have examined ecosystem δ15N over a disturbance-recovery sequence. We used a chronosequence approach to examine N distribution and δ15N during forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment. Site ages ranged from 10 to 115 years, with similar soils, climate, land-use history, and overstory vegetation (white pine Pinus strobus). Foliar N and δ15N decreased as stands aged, consistent with a progressive tightening of the N cycle during forest regrowth on agricultural lands. Over time, foliar δ15N became more negative, indicating increased fractionation along the mineralization–mycorrhizal–plant uptake pathway. Total ecosystem N was constant across the chronosequence, but substantial internal N redistribution occurred from the mineral soil to plants and litter over 115 years (>25% of ecosystem N or 1,610 kg ha−1). Temporal trends in soil δ15N generally reflected a redistribution of depleted N from the mineral soil to the developing O horizon. Although plants and soil δ15N are coupled over millennial time scales of ecosystem development, our observed divergence between plants and soil suggests that they can be uncoupled during the disturbance-regrowth sequence. The approximate 2‰ decrease in ecosystem δ15N over the century scale suggests significant incorporation of atmospheric N, which was not detected by traditional ecosystem N accounting. Consideration of temporal trends and disturbance legacies can improve our understanding of the influence of broader factors such as climate or N deposition on ecosystem N balances and δ15N.

  7. Angular distributions for /sup 16/O(/gamma/,p)/sup 15/N at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.S.; Kinney, E.R.; Matthews, J.L.; Sapp, W.W.; Soos, T.; Owens, R.O.; Turley, R.S.; Pignault, G.

    1988-12-01

    The photoproton knockout reaction on /sup 16/O leaving /sup 15/N in low-lying bound states has been observed over the photon energy range from 196 to 361 MeV. The angular distribution for the reaction populating the ground state of /sup 15/N develops sharp structure as the photon energy is increased but that for population of the excited states is smooth. The results are not explained by existing theoretical models.

  8. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  9. NMR Determines Transient Structure and Dynamics in the Disordered C-Terminal Domain of WASp Interacting Protein

    PubMed Central

    Haba, Noam Y.; Gross, Renana; Novacek, Jiri; Shaked, Hadassa; Zidek, Lukas; Barda-Saad, Mira; Chill, Jordan H.

    2013-01-01

    WASp-interacting protein (WIP) is a 503-residue proline-rich polypeptide expressed in human T cells. The WIP C-terminal domain binds to Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) and regulates its activation and degradation, and the WIP-WASp interaction has been shown to be critical for actin polymerization and implicated in the onset of WAS and X-linked thrombocytopenia. WIP is predicted to be an intrinsically disordered protein, a class of polypeptides that are of great interest because they violate the traditional structure-function paradigm. In this first (to our knowledge) study of WIP in its unbound state, we used NMR to investigate the biophysical behavior of WIPC, a C-terminal domain fragment of WIP that includes residues 407–503 and contains the WASp-binding site. In light of the poor spectral dispersion exhibited by WIPC and the high occurrence (25%) of proline residues, we employed 5D-NMR13C-detected NMR experiments with nonuniform sampling to accomplish full resonance assignment. Secondary chemical-shift analysis, 15N relaxation rates, and protection from solvent exchange all concurred in detecting transient structure located in motifs that span the WASp-binding site. Residues 446–456 exhibited a propensity for helical conformation, and an extended conformation followed by a short, capped helix was observed for residues 468–478. The 13C-detected approach allows chemical-shift assignment in the WIPC polyproline stretches and thus sheds light on their conformation and dynamics. The effects of temperature on chemical shifts referenced to a denatured sample of the polypeptide demonstrate that heating reduces the structural character of WIPC. Thus, we conclude that the disordered WIPC fragment is comprised of regions with latent structure connected by flexible loops, an architecture with implications for binding affinity and function. PMID:23870269

  10. NMR observation of Tau in Xenopus oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodart, Jean-François; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Amniai, Laziza; Leroy, Arnaud; Landrieu, Isabelle; Rousseau-Lescuyer, Arlette; Vilain, Jean-Pierre; Lippens, Guy

    2008-06-01

    The observation by NMR spectroscopy of microinjected 15N-labelled proteins into Xenopus laevis oocytes might open the way to link structural and cellular biology. We show here that embedding the oocytes into a 20% Ficoll solution maintains their structural integrity over extended periods of time, allowing for the detection of nearly physiological protein concentrations. We use these novel conditions to study the neuronal Tau protein inside the oocytes. Spectral reproducibility and careful comparison of the spectra of Tau before and after cell homogenization is presented. When injecting Tau protein into immature oocytes, we show that both its microtubule association and different phosphorylation events can be detected.

  11. Highly 15N-Enriched Chondritic Clasts in the Isheyevo Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bonal, L; Huss, G R; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-01-14

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment ({delta}{sup 15}N up to +1500{per_thousand}), similar to {delta}{sup 15}N values reported in micron-sized regions (hotspots) of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) of possibly cometary origin and fine-grained matrices of unmetamorphosed chondrites. These {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are commonly attributed to low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in the protosolar molecular cloud or in the outer part of the protoplanetary disk. The nature of the whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment of the metal-rich chondrites is not understood. We report a discovery of a unique type of primitive chondritic clasts in the CH/CB-like meteorite Isheyevo, which provides important constraints on the origin of {sup 15}N anomaly in metal-rich chondrites and nitrogen-isotope fractionation in the Solar System. These clasts contain tiny chondrules and refractory inclusions (5-15 {micro}m in size), and abundant ferromagnesian chondrule fragments (1-50 {micro}m in size) embedded in the partly hydrated, fine-grained matrix material composed of olivines, pyroxenes, poorly-organized aromatic organics, phyllosilicates and other hydrous phases. The mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of chondrules and refractory inclusions in the clasts are similar to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting formation at similar heliocentric distances. In contrast to the previously known extraterrestrial samples, the fine-grained material in the clasts is highly and rather uniformly enriched in {sup 15}N, with bulk {delta}{sup 15}N values ranging between +1000 and +1300{per_thousand}; the {delta}{sup 15}N values in rare hotspots range from +1400 to +4000{per_thousand}. Since fine-grained matrices in the lithic clasts are the only component containing thermally unprocessed (during CAI and chondrule formation or during impact melting) materials that accreted into the metal rich chondrite parent body(ies), the {sup 15}N

  12. Development of solid-state NMR techniques for the characterisation of pharmaceutical compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatton, Andrew S.

    Structural characterisation in the solid state is an important step in understanding the physical and chemical properties of a material. Solid-state NMR techniques applied to solid delivery forms are presented as an alternative to more established structural characterisation methods. The effect of homonuclear decoupling upon heteronuclear couplings is investigated using a combination of experimental and density-matrix simulation results acquired from a 13C-1H spinecho pulse sequence, modulated by scalar couplings. It is found that third-order cross terms under MAS and homonuclear decoupling contribute to strong dephasing effects in the NMR signal. Density-matrix simulations allow access to parameters currently unattainable in experiment, and demonstrate that higher homonuclear decoupling rf nutation frequencies reduce the magnitude of third-order cross terms. 15N-1H spinecho experiments were applied to pharmaceutically relevant samples to differentiate between the number of directly attached protons. Using this method, proton transfer in an acid-base reaction is proven in pharmaceutical salts. The indirect detection of 14N lineshapes via protons obtained using 2D 14N-1H HMQC experiments is presented, where coherence transfer is achieved via heteronuclear through-space dipolar couplings. The importance of fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated, and it is found that increasing the recoupling duration reveals longer range NH proximities. The 2D 14N-1H HMQC method is used to demonstrate the presence of specific hydrogen bonding interactions, and thus aid in identifying molecular association in a cocrystal and an amorphous dispersion. In addition, hydrogen bonding motifs were identified by observing the changes in the 14N quadrupolar parameters between individual molecular components relative to the respective solid delivery form. First-principles calculations of NMR chemical shifts and quadrupolar parameters using the GIPAW method were combined with 14N-1H experimental

  13. My Favorite Assignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Robert E.; Johnson, Jack E.

    1982-01-01

    Presents two assignments that show (1) how George Orwell's "Politics and the English Language" can be applied to business writing and (2) how structured student-teacher conferences can generate enthusiasm for oral expression in a business communication course. (AEA)

  14. Fair Package Assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaie, Sébastien; Parkes, David C.

    We consider the problem of fair allocation in the package assignment model, where a set of indivisible items, held by single seller, must be efficiently allocated to agents with quasi-linear utilities. A fair assignment is one that is efficient and envy-free. We consider a model where bidders have superadditive valuations, meaning that items are pure complements. Our central result is that core outcomes are fair and even coalition-fair over this domain, while fair distributions may not even exist for general valuations. Of relevance to auction design, we also establish that the core is equivalent to the set of anonymous-price competitive equilibria, and that superadditive valuations are a maximal domain that guarantees the existence of anonymous-price competitive equilibrium. Our results are analogs of core equivalence results for linear prices in the standard assignment model, and for nonlinear, non-anonymous prices in the package assignment model with general valuations.

  15. Isolation and 2D NMR Studies of Alkaloids from Comptonella sessilifoliola1.

    PubMed

    Pusset, J; Lopez, J L; Pais, M; Neirabeyeh, M A; Veillon, J M

    1991-04-01

    Six known furanoquinoline alkaloids have been isolated from the wood and trunk bark of COMPTONELLA SESSILIFOLIOLA (Guillaumin) Hartley (Rutaceae). 2D NMR experiments gave the assignment of all the signals for both (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. Pteleine and kokusaginine were used as models. The two-dimensional carbon-proton correlation experiments, performed for the first time on furanoquinoline alkaloids, led us to correct (13)C-NMR assignments previously described in the literature.

  16. Separation of Anisotropy and Exchange Broadening Using 15N CSA- 15N- 1H Dipole-Dipole Relaxation Cross-Correlation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Christian; Holak, Tad A.

    2000-08-01

    Based on the measurement of cross-correlation rates between 15N CSA and 15N-1H dipole-dipole relaxation we propose a procedure for separating exchange contributions to transverse relaxation rates (R2 = 1/T2) from effects caused by anisotropic rotational diffusion of the protein molecule. This approach determines the influence of anisotropy and chemical exchange processes independently and therefore circumvents difficulties associated with the currently standard use of T1/T2 ratios to determine the rotational diffusion tensor. We find from computer simulations that, in the presence of even small amounts of internal flexibility, fitting T1/T2 ratios tends to underestimate the anisotropy of overall tumbling. An additional problem exists when the N-H bond vector directions are not distributed homogeneously over the surface of a unit sphere, such as in helix bundles or β-sheets. Such a case was found in segment 4 of the gelation factor (ABP 120), an F-actin cross-linking protein, in which the diffusion tensor cannot be calculated from T1/T2 ratios. The 15N CSA tensor of the residues for this β-sheet protein was found to vary even within secondary structure elements. The use of a common value for the whole protein molecule therefore might be an oversimplification. Using our approach it is immediately apparent that no exchange broadening exists for segment 4 although strongly reduced T2 relaxation times for several residues could be mistaken as indications for exchange processes.

  17. Estimate of production of gaseous nitrogen in the human body based on (15)N analysis of breath N2 after administration of [(15)N2]urea.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Peter

    2013-01-01

    After oral administration of [(15)N2]urea (1.5 mmol, 95 atom% (15)N), we found that breath N2 was significantly (15)N-labelled. The result suggests that molecular nitrogen in breath must be partly produced endogenously. Based on a metabolic model, the endogenous N2 production was estimated to be 0.40±0.25 mmol kg(-1) d(-1) or 2.9±1.8 % of the total (urinary and faecal) N excretion in fasted healthy subjects (n=4). In patients infected with Helicobacter pylori (n=5), the endogenous N2 production was increased to 1.24±0.59 mmol kg(-1) d(-1) or 9.0±4.3 % of the total N excretion compared to the healthy controls (p<0.05). We conclude that N balance and gas exchange measurements may be affected by endogenously produced nitrogen, especially in metabolic situations with elevated nitrosation, for instance in oxidative and nitrosative stress-related diseases such as H. pylori infections.

  18. Importance of Nitrate Attenuation In A Small Wetland Following Forest Harvest: 18O/16O, 15N/14N in nitrate and 15N/14N) in vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoelstra, J.; Schiff, S. L.; Semkin, R. G.; Jeffries, D. S.; Elgood, R. J.

    2004-05-01

    Forest harvest can result in elevated nitrate concentrations in streams and groundwater affecting forest regeneration and downstream aquatic ecosystems. Turkey Lakes Watershed, located near Sault Ste Marie, Ontario (TLW), exhibits relatively high nitrate export due to naturally high rates of nitrification. During a forest harvest experiment at the TLW, stable isotope techniques were used to investigate nitrate attenuation in an intermediate position natural wetland receiving high concentrations of nitrate following forest clear-cutting. Isotopic analysis of nitrate (18O/16O, 15N/14N) and vegetation (15N/14N) demonstrated that denitrification and plant uptake of nitrate resulted in significantly lower nitrate concentrations in wetland outflow compared to incoming stream water and groundwater. The 0.2-hectare forested swamp, too small to show up on standard topographic maps, retained 65 to 100 percent of upgradient nitrate inputs, elevated due to increased nitrification in soils. The 15N/14N enrichment factor associated with nitrate attenuation in wetland surface water was lower than observed during denitrification in groundwaters, suggesting that denitrification proceeded to completion in some areas of the wetland. Even small, shallow, carbon rich pockets of organic matter in topographic depressions can significantly affect biogeochemical fluxes of C, N, S and Ca. Future forest management practices designed to recognize and preserve small wetlands could significantly reduce the potentially detrimental effects of forest harvest on aquatic systems.

  19. Compound-specific δ15N amino acid measurements in littoral mussels in the California upwelling ecosystem: a new approach to generating baseline δ15N Isoscapes for coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ(15)N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ(15)N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ(15)N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ(15)N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼ 7‰ to ∼ 12‰, R(2) = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ(15)N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ(15)N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ(15)N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with (15)N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ(15)N values of phenylalanine (δ(15)NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ(15)N values. We hypothesize δ(15)N(Phe) values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ(15)N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ(15)N(Phe) values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ(15)N values. We propose that δ(15)N(Phe) isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ(15)N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives.

  20. Microgram-scale protein structure determination by NMR.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Rossi, Paolo; Anklin, Clemens; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2007-06-01

    Using conventional triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with a 1 mm triple-resonance microcoil NMR probe, we determined near complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the 68-residue Methanosarcina mazei TRAM protein using only 72 mug (6 microl, 1.4 mM) of protein. This first example of a complete solution NMR structure determined using microgram quantities of protein demonstrates the utility of microcoil-probe NMR technologies for protein samples that can be produced in only limited quantities.

  1. Efficient polarization transfer between spin-1/2 and ¹⁴N nuclei in solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Basse, Kristoffer; Jain, Sheetal Kumar; Bakharev, Oleg; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2014-07-01

    Polarization transfer between spin-1/2 nuclei and quadrupolar spin-1 nuclei such as (14)N in solid-state NMR is severely challenged by the typical presence of large quadrupole coupling interactions. This has effectively prevented the use of the abundant (14)N spin as a probe to structural information and its use as an element in multi-dimensional solid-state NMR correlation experiments for assignment and structural characterization. In turn, this has been a contributing factor to the extensive use of isotope labeling in biological solid-state NMR, where (14)N is replaced with (15)N. The alternative strategy of using the abundant (14)N spins calls for methods enabling efficient polarization transfer between (14)N and its binding partners. This work demonstrates that the recently introduced (RESPIRATION)CP transfer method can be optimized to achieve efficient (1)H ↔(14)N polarization transfer under magic angle spinning conditions. The method is demonstrated numerically and experimentally on powder samples of NH4NO3 and L-alanine.

  2. Soil N and 15N variation with time in a California annual grassland ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, D.L.; Amundson, Ronald; Baisden, W. Troy; Kendall, C.; Harden, J.

    2001-01-01

    The %N and ??15N values of soils and plants were measured along a chronosequence spanning 3 to 3000 Ky in a California annual grassland. Total soil N decreased with increasing soil age (1.1 to 0.4 kg N m-2) while the mean ?? 15N values of the soil N increased by several ??? from the youngest to oldest sites (+3.5 to +6.2 ???). The ?? 15N values of plants varied along the gradient, reflecting changing soil N pools and differences in the form of N uptake. The decline in total N storage with time is hypothesized to be due to a shift from N to P limitation with increasing soil age. The general increase in ?? 15N values with time is interpreted using a N mass balance model, and appears to reflect a shift toward an increasing proportional losses of inorganic mineral forms of N (vs. organic forms) with increasing soil age. We develop a quantitative index of this trend (mineral vs. organic forms of N loss) using mass balance considerations and parameters. The %N and ?? 15N values along the California age gradient were compared to the published data for a comparably aged chronosequence in Hawaii. Most striking in this comparison is the observation that the California soil and plant ?? 15N values are several ??? greater than those on comparably aged Hawaiian sites. Multiple explanations are plausible, but assuming the sites have a similar range in ?? 15N values of atmospheric inputs, the isotopic differences suggest that N may be, at least seasonally, in greater excess in the strongly seasonal, semi-arid, California grassland. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Sewage derive [sup 15]N in the Baltic traced in fucus

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbie, J.E.; Fry, B. ); Larsson, U.; Elmgren, R. )

    1990-01-09

    Himmerfjarden, a fjord-like bay on the eastern shore of the Baltic, receives treated sewage from 250,000 inhabitants. Because the inorganic N in the effluent is enriched in [sup 15]N through denitrification, nitrification, and ammonia volatilization, an analysis of the distribution of [sup 15]N in the Bay tells how far from the source the sewage nitrogen moves. The attached macroalga Fucus vesiculosus was collected in early May from rocky shore at 0-0.5 m depth and the [sup 15]N content of the tips of the fronds analyzed. This N represents uptake and storage during the previous six months and growth during March and April. The [delta][sup 15]N was uniformly high (11-13[per thousand]) in the main body of the Bay within 15 km from the sewage source. Beyond 15 km values decreased with distance to a low of 4.6[per thousand] at 35 km, where the Bay ends and the coastal waters begin. Using the 11-13 and 4.6[per thousand] as endmembers, the percentage of sewage N making up the Fucus at any point may be calculated. The [delta][sub 15]N of particulate organic matter in the offshore Baltic waters was around 0[per thousand] and Fucus had an [delta][sup 15]N about 1.5[per thousand] higher than the POM. From this and other evidence we conclude that there is a belt of coastal water with an elevated [delta][sup 15]N lying along the east coast of the Baltic. This presumably derives from sewage and perhaps from agriculture and is potentially of use as a tracer of coastal zone/pelagic zone interactions.

  4. 42 CFR 433.146 - Rights assigned; assignment method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rights assigned; assignment method. 433.146 Section 433.146 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Assignment of Rights to Benefits § 433.146 Rights assigned; assignment method. (a) Except as specified...

  5. Mechanism of dilute-spin-exchange in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-03-28

    In the stationary, aligned samples used in oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings are not attenuated as they are in magic angle spinning solid-state NMR; consequently, they are available for participation in dipolar coupling-based spin-exchange processes. Here we describe analytically the pathways of {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N spin-exchange mediated by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings. The mixed-order proton-relay mechanism can be differentiated from the third spin assisted recoupling mechanism by setting the {sup 1}H to an off-resonance frequency so that it is at the “magic angle” during the spin-exchange interval in the experiment, since the “magic angle” irradiation nearly quenches the former but only slightly attenuates the latter. Experimental spectra from a single crystal of N-acetyl leucine confirm that this proton-relay mechanism plays the dominant role in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N dilute-spin-exchange in OS solid-state NMR in crystalline samples. Remarkably, the “forbidden” spin-exchange condition under “magic angle” irradiation results in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N cross-peaks intensities that are comparable to those observed with on-resonance irradiation in applications to proteins. The mechanism of the proton relay in dilute-spin-exchange is crucial for the design of polarization transfer experiments.

  6. Complete 1H and 13C spectral assignment of floridoside.

    PubMed

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Kervarec, Nelly; Pichon, Roger; Deslandes, Eric

    2002-02-11

    Floridoside (2-O-alpha-D-galactopyranosylglycerol) was extracted from the red marine alga Rhodymenia palmata, and purified by ion-exchange chromatography: 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy experiments were used to unambiguously assign the complete 1H and 13C spectra.

  7. A Solution NMR Investigation into the Murine Amelogenin Splice-Variant LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein).

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Roberts, Jacky; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2010-09-01

    Amelogenins are the dominant proteins present in ameloblasts during the early stages of enamel biomineralization, making up >90% of the matrix protein. Along with the full-length protein there are several splice-variant isoforms of amelogenin present including LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein), a protein that consists of the first 33 and the last 26 residues of full-length amelogenin. Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy we have assigned the 1H-15N HSQC spectrum of murine LRAP (rp(H)LRAP) in 2% acetic acid at pH 3.0 by making extensive use of previous chemical shift assignments for full-length murine amelogenin (rp(H)M180). This correlation was possible because LRAP, like the full-length protein, is intrinsically disordered under these solution conditions. The major difference between the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of rp(H)M180 and rp(H)LRAP was an additional set of amide resonances for each of the seven non-proline residues between S12* and Y12 at the N-terminus of rp(H)LRAP indicating that the N-terminal region of LRAP exists in two different conformations. Analysis of the proline carbon chemical shifts suggest that the molecular basis for the two states is not a cis-trans isomerization of one or more of the proline residues in the N-terminal region and is likely due to a slow exchange process. As observed with rp(H)M180, residue specific changes in molecular dynamics, manifested by the reduction in intensity and disappearance of 1H-15N HSQC cross peaks, were observed with the addition of NaCl to rp(H)LRAP. These perturbations may signal early events governing supramolecular self-assembly of rp(H)LRAP into nanospheres. However, the different pattern of 1H-15N HSQC cross peak perturbation between rp(H)LRAP and rp(H)M180 in high salt suggest that the termini may behave differently in their respective nanospheres, and perhaps, these differences account for the cell signaling properties attributable to LRAP but not the full-length protein.

  8. A solution NMR investigation into the murine amelogenin splice-variant LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein).

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Tarasevich, Barbara J; Roberts, Jacky; Snead, Malcolm L; Shaw, Wendy J

    2010-09-01

    Amelogenins are the dominant proteins present in ameloblasts during the early stages of enamel biomineralization, making up >90% of the matrix protein. Along with the full-length protein there are several splice-variant isoforms of amelogenin present including LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein), a protein that consists of the first 33 and the last 26 residues of full-length amelogenin. Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy we have assigned the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum of murine LRAP (rp(H)LRAP) in 2% acetic acid at pH 3.0 by making extensive use of previous chemical shift assignments for full-length murine amelogenin (rp(H)M180). This correlation was possible because LRAP, like the full-length protein, is intrinsically disordered under these solution conditions. The major difference between the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of rp(H)M180 and rp(H)LRAP was an additional set of amide resonances for each of the seven non-proline residues between S12 and Y12 near the N-terminus of rp(H)LRAP indicating that the N-terminal region of LRAP exists in two different conformations. Analysis of the proline carbon chemical shifts suggests that the molecular basis for the two states is not a cis-trans isomerization of one or more of the proline residues in the N-terminal region. Starting from 2% acetic acid, where rp(H)LRAP was monomeric in solution, NaCl addition effected residue specific changes in molecular dynamics manifested by the reduction in intensity and disappearance of (1)H-(15)N HSQC cross peaks. As observed for the full-length protein, these perturbations may signal early events governing supramolecular self-assembly of rp(H)LRAP into nanospheres. However, the different patterns of (1)H-(15)N HSQC cross peak perturbation between rp(H)LRAP and rp(H)M180 in high salt suggest that the termini may behave differently in their respective nanospheres, and perhaps, these differences contribute to the cell signaling properties attributable to LRAP but not to the full

  9. A solution NMR investigation into the murine amelogenin splice-variant LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein)

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Roberts, Jacky; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2010-01-01

    Amelogenins are the dominant proteins present in ameloblasts during the early stages of enamel biomineralization, making up >90% of the matrix protein. Along with the full-length protein there are several splice-variant isoforms of amelogenin present including LRAP (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein), a protein that consists of the first 33 and the last 26 residues of full-length amelogenin. Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy we have assigned the 1H-15N HSQC spectrum of murine LRAP (rp(H)LRAP) in 2% acetic acid at pH 3.0 by making extensive use of previous chemical shift assignments for full-length murine amelogenin (rp(H)M180). This correlation was possible because LRAP, like the full-length protein, is intrinsically disordered under these solution conditions. The major difference between the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of rp(H)M180 and rp(H)LRAP was an additional set of amide resonances for each of the seven non-proline residues between S12* and Y12 at the N-terminus of rp(H)LRAP indicating that the N-terminal region of LRAP exists in two different conformations. Analysis of the proline carbon chemical shifts suggest that the molecular basis for the two states is not a cis-trans isomerization of one or more of the proline residues in the N-terminal region. Starting from 2% acetic acid, where rp(H)LRAP was monomeric in solution, NaCl addition effected residue specific changes in molecular dynamics manifested by the reduction in intensity and disappearance of 1H-15N HSQC cross peaks. As observed for the full length protein, these perturbations may signal early events governing supramolecular self-assembly of rp(H)LRAP into nanospheres. However, the different pattern of 1H-15N HSQC cross peak perturbation between rp(H)LRAP and rp(H)M180 in high salt suggest that the termini may behave differently in their respective nanospheres, and perhaps, these differences contribute to the cell signaling properties attributable to LRAP but not the full-length protein. PMID:20304108

  10. ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N resonance assignments and second structure information of Gad m 1: a β-parvalbumin allergen from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Moraes, A H; Ackerbauer, D; Kostadinova, M; Bublin, M; Ferreira, F; Almeida, F C L; Breiteneder, H; Valente, A P

    2013-10-01

    Gad m 1 is the major allergen from Atlantic cod. It belongs to β-parvalbumin protein family and is characterized by the presence of two calcium-binding sites so called EF-hand motifs. β-Parvalbumins such as Gad m 1 are the most important fish allergens and their high cross-reactivity is the cause of the observed polysensitization to various fish species in allergic patients. Despite extensive efforts, the complete elucidation of β-parvalbumin-IgE complexes has not been achieved yet. Allergen structural studies are essential for the development of novel immunotherapy strategies, including vaccination with hypoallergenic derivatives and chimeric molecules. Here, we report for the first time the NMR study of a β-parvalbumin: Gad m 1. This report includes: (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of Gad m 1 as well as the second structure information based on the (13)C chemical shifts.

  11. Nitrogen Isotopic Ratios in Cometary NH2: Implication for 15N-fractionation in Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuël; Decock, Alice; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arai, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Isotopic ratios in cometary molecules are diagnostic for the physico-chemical conditions where molecules formed and are processed, from the interstellar medium to the solar nebula. Usually temperatures at the molecular formation control the fractionation of the heavier element in molecular species, e.g., D-fractionation in water.In cometary volatiles, the 14N/15N ratios in CN have been well observed (Manfroid et al. 2009, A&A, 503, 613, and reference therein) and is consistent with the ratio in HCN (a most probable parent of CN) measured in few comets (Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2008, ApJ, 679, L49). Those ratios are enriched compared to the proto-solar value by a factor of ~3. In contrast to those Nitriles, there are only few reports on 14N/15N ratios in Ammonia (as Amine) (Rousselot et al. 2014, ApJ, 780, L17; Shinnaka et al. 2014, ApJ, 782, L16). Ammonia (NH3) is usually the most abundant and HCN is the second most abundant N-bearing volatiles in cometary ice. Especially, recent observations of 15NH2 revealed the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 are comparable to those of CN. However, from the viewpoint of theoretical work, the enrichment of 15N in cometary NH3 cannot be reproduced by current chemical network models. Information about the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 of individual comets is needed to understand the formation mechanisms/environments of NH3 in the early solar system.To clarify the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in cometary NH3, we determine the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets individually which include not only Oort cloud comets but also short period comets by using the high-resolution optical spectra of NH2. These spectra were obtained with both the UVES mounted on the VLT in Chile and the HDS on the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii.The derived 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets show high 15N-enrichment compared with the elemental abundances of nitrogen in the Sun by about factor of ~3 and has no large diversity depending on

  12. A new method to track seed dispersal and recruitment using 15N isotope enrichment.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Tomás A; Tewksbury, Joshua J; Martínez Del Río, Carlos

    2009-12-01

    Seed dispersal has a powerful influence on population dynamics, genetic structuring, evolutionary rates, and community ecology. Yet, patterns of seed dispersal are difficult to measure due to methodological shortcomings in tracking dispersed seeds from sources of interest. Here we introduce a new method to track seed dispersal: stable isotope enrichment. It consists of leaf-feeding plants with sprays of 15N-urea during the flowering stage such that seeds developed after applications are isotopically enriched. We conducted a greenhouse experiment with Solanum americanum and two field experiments with wild Capsicum annuum in southern Arizona, USA, to field-validate the method. First, we show that plants sprayed with 15N-urea reliably produce isotopically enriched progeny, and that delta 15N (i.e., the isotopic ratio) of seeds and seedlings is a linear function of the 15N-urea concentration sprayed on mothers. We demonstrate that three urea dosages can be used to distinctly enrich plants and unambiguously differentiate their offspring after seeds are dispersed by birds. We found that, with high urea dosages, the resulting delta 15N values in seedlings are 10(3) - 10(4) times higher than the delta 15N values of normal plants. This feature allows tracking not only where seeds arrive, but in locations where seeds germinate and recruit, because delta 15N enrichment is detectable in seedlings that have increased in mass by at least two orders of magnitude before fading to normal delta 15N values. Last, we tested a mixing model to analyze seed samples in bulk. We used the delta 15N values of batches (i.e., combined seedlings or seeds captured in seed traps) to estimate the number of enriched seeds coming from isotopically enriched plants in the field. We confirm that isotope enrichment, combined with batch-sampling, is a cheap, reliable, and user-friendly method for bulk-processing seeds and is thus excellent for the detection of rare dispersal events. This method could

  13. Using a macroalgal δ15N bioassay to detect cruise ship waste water effluent inputs.

    PubMed

    Kaldy, James

    2011-08-01

    Green macroalgae bioassays were used to determine if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in a small harbor. Opportunistic green macroalgae (Ulva spp.) were collected, cultured under nutrient depleted conditions and characterized with regard to N content and δ15N. Samples of algae were used in controlled incubations to evaluate the direction of isotope shift from exposure to CSWWE. Algae samples exposed to CSWWE exhibited an increase of 1-2.5‰ in δ15N values indicating that the CSWWE had an enriched isotope signature. In contrast, algae samples exposed to field conditions exhibited a significant decrease in the observed δ15N indicating that a light N source was used. Isotopically light, riverine nitrogen derived from N2-fixing trees in the watershed may be a N source utilized by algae. These experiments indicate that the δ15N CSWWE signature was not detectable under the CSWWE loading conditions of this experiment.

  14. Stem injection of 15N-NH4NO3 into mature Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis).

    PubMed

    Nair, Richard; Weatherall, Andrew; Perks, Mike; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Stem injection techniques can be used to introduce (15)N into trees to overcome a low variation in natural abundance and label biomass with a distinct (15)N signature, but have tended to target small and young trees, of a variety of species, with little replication. We injected 98 atom% (15)N ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) solution into 13 mature, 9- to 13-m tall edge-profile Sitka spruce trees in order to produce a large quantity of labelled litter, examining the distribution of the isotope throughout the canopy after felling in terms of both total abundance of (15)N and relative distribution of the isotope throughout individual trees. Using a simple mass balance of the canopy alone, based on observed total needle biomass and modelled branch biomass, all of the isotope injected was accounted for, evenly split between needles and branches, but with a high degree of variability both within individual trees, and among trees. Both (15)N abundance and relative within-canopy distribution were biased towards the upper and middle crown in foliage. Recovery of the label in branches was much more variable than in needles, possibly due to differences in nitrogen allocation for both growth and storage, which differ seasonally between foliage and woody biomass.

  15. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant.

    PubMed

    Fenilli, Tatiele A B; Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O S; Trivelin, Paulo C O; Dourado-Neto, Durval

    2007-12-01

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry.

  16. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ15N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Nelson, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the ‘rivermouth effect’). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  17. Nitrate reductase 15N discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Aspergillus niger, Pichea angusta, and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Eli; Yarnes, Chris; Toney, Michael D.; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Stable 15N isotopes have been used to examine movement of nitrogen (N) through various pools of the global N cycle. A central reaction in the cycle involves the reduction of nitrate (NO−3) to nitrite (NO−2) catalyzed by nitrate reductase (NR). Discrimination against 15N by NR is a major determinant of isotopic differences among N pools. Here, we measured in vitro 15N discrimination by several NRs purified from plants, fungi, and a bacterium to determine the intrinsic 15N discrimination by the enzyme and to evaluate the validity of measurements made using 15N-enriched NO−3. Observed NR isotope discrimination ranged from 22 to 32‰ (kinetic isotope effects of 1.022–1.032) among the different isozymes at natural abundance 15N (0.37%). As the fractional 15N content of substrate NO−3 increased from natural abundance, the product 15N fraction deviated significantly from that expected based on substrate enrichment and 15N discrimination measured at natural abundance. Additionally, isotopic discrimination by denitrifying bacteria used to reduce NO−3 and NO−2 in some protocols became a greater source of error as 15N enrichment increased. We briefly discuss potential causes of the experimental artifacts with enriched 15N and recommend against the use of highly enriched 15N tracers to study N discrimination in plants or soils. PMID:25071800

  18. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  19. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP).

  20. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in

  1. Correlation of tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay parameters with sup 1 H NMR-determined rotamer conformations: (tryptophan sup 2 )oxytocin

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.B.A.; Schwartz, G.P.; Laws, W.R. ); Wyssbrod, H.R.; Porter, R.A. ); Michaels, C.A. )

    1992-02-18

    While the fluorescence decay kinetics of tyrosine model compounds can be explained in terms of heterogeneity derived from the three ground-state {chi}{sup 1} rotamers, a similar correlation has yet to be directly observed for a tryptophan residue. In addition, the asymmetric indole ring might also lead to heterogeneity from {chi}{sup 2} rotations. In this paper, the time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence properties of (tryptophan{sup 2})oxytocin at pH 3 are presented and compared with {sup 1}H NMR results. According to the unrestricted analyses of individual fluorescence decay curves taken as a function of emission wavelength-independent decay constants, only three exponential terms are required. In addition, the preexponential weighting factors (amplitudes) have the same relative relationship (weights) as the {sup 1}H NMR-determined {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations of the indole side chain. {sup 15}N was used in heteronuclear coupling experiments to confirm the rotamer assignments. Inclusion of a linked function restricting the decay amplitudes to the {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations in the individual decay curve analyses and in the global analysis confirms this correlation. According to qualitative nuclear Overhauser data, there are two {chi}{sup 2} populations.

  2. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  3. The position dependent 15N enrichment of nitrous oxide in the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Röckmann, T; Kaiser, J; Brenninkmeijer, C A; Brand, W A; Borchers, R; Crowley, J N; Wollenhaupt, M; Crutzen, P J

    2001-01-01

    The position dependent 15N fractionation of nitrous oxide (N2O), which cannot be obtained from mass spectrometric analysis on molecular N2O itself, can be determined with high precision using isotope ratio mass spectrometry on the NO+ fragment that is formed on electron impact in the source of an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Laboratory UV photolysis experiments show that strong position dependent 15N fractionations occur in the photolysis of N2O in the stratosphere, its major atmospheric sink. Measurements on the isotopic composition of stratospheric N2O indeed confirm the presence of strong isotope enrichments, in particular the difference in the fractionation constants for 15N14NO and 14N15NO. The absolute magnitudes of the fractionation constants found in the stratosphere are much smaller, however, than those found in the lab experiments, demonstrating the importance of dynamical and also additional chemical processes like the reaction of N2O with O(1D).

  4. Determination of γ -ray widths in 15N using nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szücs, T.; Bemmerer, D.; Caciolli, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Massarczyk, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Schwengner, R.; Takács, M. P.; Ur, C. A.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, L.

    2015-07-01

    Background: The stable nucleus 15N is the mirror of 15O, the bottleneck in the hydrogen burning CNO cycle. Most of the 15N level widths below the proton emission threshold are known from just one nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurement, with limited precision in some cases. A recent experiment with the AGATA demonstrator array determined level lifetimes using the Doppler shift attenuation method in 15O. As a reference and for testing the method, level lifetimes in 15N have also been determined in the same experiment. Purpose: The latest compilation of 15N level properties dates back to 1991. The limited precision in some cases in the compilation calls for a new measurement to enable a comparison to the AGATA demonstrator data. The widths of several 15N levels have been studied with the NRF method. Method: The solid nitrogen compounds enriched in 15N have been irradiated with bremsstrahlung. The γ rays following the deexcitation of the excited nuclear levels were detected with four high-purity germanium detectors. Results: Integrated photon-scattering cross sections of 10 levels below the proton emission threshold have been measured. Partial γ -ray widths of ground-state transitions were deduced and compared to the literature. The photon-scattering cross sections of two levels above the proton emission threshold, but still below other particle emission energies have also been measured, and proton resonance strengths and proton widths were deduced. Conclusions: Gamma and proton widths consistent with the literature values were obtained, but with greatly improved precision.

  5. Chemical shift assignments of the first and second RRMs of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK-target RNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2017-03-11

    Negative regulator differentiation 1 (Nrd1), a fission yeast RNA binding protein, modulates cytokinesis and sexual development and contributes to stress granule formation in response to environmental stresses. Nrd1 comprises four RRM domains and binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA that encodes the myosin II light chain. Nrd1 binds the Cpc2 fission-yeast RACK1 homolog, and the interaction promotes Nrd1 localization to stress granules. Interestingly, Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylates Thr40 in the unstructured N-terminal region and Thr126 in the first RRM domain of Nrd1. Phosphorylation significantly reduces RNA-binding activity and likely modulates Nrd1 function. To reveal the relationship between the structure and function of Nrd1 and how phosphorylation affects structure, we used heteronuclear NMR techniques to investigate the three-dimensional structure of Nrd1. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of RRM1-RRM2 (residues 108-284) comprising the first and second RRMs obtained using heteronuclear NMR techniques. Secondary structures derived from the chemical shifts are reported. These data should contribute to the understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the RRM1-RRM2 region of Nrd1 and the perturbation caused by phosphorylation.

  6. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  7. NMR Structural Studies of Antimicrobial Peptides: LPcin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji-Ho; Kim, Ji-Sun; Choi, Sung-Sub; Kim, Yongae

    2016-01-01

    Lactophoricin (LPcin), a component of proteose peptone (113–135) isolated from bovine milk, is a cationic amphipathic antimicrobial peptide consisting of 23 amino acids. We designed a series of N- or C-terminal truncated variants, mutated analogs, and truncated mutated analogs using peptide-engineering techniques. Then, we selected three LPcin analogs of LPcin-C8 (LPcin-YK1), LPcin-T2WT6W (LPcin-YK2), and LPcin-T2WT6W-C8 (LPcin-YK3), which may have better antimicrobial activities than LPcin, and successfully expressed them in E. coli with high yield. We elucidated the 3D structures and topologies of the three LPcin analogs in membrane environments by conducting NMR structural studies. We investigated the purity of the LPcin analogs and the α-helical secondary structures by performing 1H-15N 2D HSQC and HMQC-NOESY liquid-state NMR spectroscopy using protein-containing micelle samples. We measured the 3D structures and tilt angles in membranes by conducting 15N 1D and 2D 1H-15N SAMMY type solid-state NMR spectroscopy with an 800 MHz in-house-built 1H-15N double-resonance solid-state NMR probe with a strip-shield coil, using protein-containing large bicelle samples aligned and confirmed by molecular-dynamics simulations. The three LPcin analogs were found to be curved α-helical structures, with tilt angles of 55–75° for normal membrane bilayers, and their enhanced activities may be correlated with these topologies. PMID:26789765

  8. Making Effective Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Alan M., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Although the focus of this issue of the "Virginia English Bulletin" is on making effective assignments, most of the articles also emphasize the importance and power of writing. Articles deal with the following topics: (1) the use of I-search (as explained by Kenneth Macrorie in "Searching Writing") as a form of research paper…

  9. The degree of urbanization across the globe is not reflected in the δ(15)N of seagrass leaves.

    PubMed

    Christiaen, Bart; Bernard, Rebecca J; Mortazavi, Behzad; Cebrian, Just; Ortmann, Alice C

    2014-06-30

    Many studies show that seagrass δ(15)N ratios increase with the amount of urbanization in coastal watersheds. However, there is little information on the relationship between urbanization and seagrass δ(15)N ratios on a global scale. We performed a meta-analysis on seagrass samples from 79 independent locations to test if seagrass δ(15)N ratios correlate with patterns of population density and fertilizer use within a radius of 10-200 km around the sample locations. Our results show that seagrass δ(15)N ratios are more influenced by intergeneric and latitudinal differences than the degree of urbanization or the amount of fertilizer used in nearby watersheds. The positive correlation between seagrass δ(15)N ratios and latitude hints at an underlying pattern in discrimination or a latitudinal gradient in the (15)N isotopic signature of nitrogen assimilated by the plants. The actual mechanisms responsible for the correlation between δ(15)N and latitude remain unknown.

  10. Cold brittleness of corrosion-resistant maraging steel 08Kh15N5D2T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhneva, T. M.

    2012-03-01

    Results of a study of the effect of the method of remelting and of heat treatment modes on the behavior of serial curves of impact toughness and on the position of cold-shortness threshold in steel 08Kh15N5D2T are presented.

  11. Nitrate Removal in Two Relict Oxbow Urban Wetlands: A 15N Mass-balance Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 15N-tracer method was used to quantify nitrogen (N) removal processes in two relict oxbow wetlands located adjacent to the Minebank Run restored stream reach in Baltimore County (Maryland, USA) during summer 2009 and early spring 2010. A mass-balance approach was used to determ...

  12. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  13. Plant delta 15N correlates with the transpiration efficiency of nitrogen acquisition in tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Winter, Klaus; Turner, Benjamin L

    2009-11-01

    Based upon considerations of a theoretical model of (15)N/(14)N fractionation during steady-state nitrate uptake from soil, we hypothesized that, for plants grown in a common soil environment, whole-plant delta(15)N (deltaP) should vary as a function of the transpiration efficiency of nitrogen acquisition (F(N)/v) and the difference between deltaP and root delta(15)N (deltaP - deltaR). We tested these hypotheses with measurements of several tropical tree and liana species. Consistent with theoretical expectations, both F(N)/v and deltaP - deltaR were significant sources of variation in deltaP, and the relationship between deltaP and F(N)/v differed between non-N(2)-fixing and N(2)-fixing species. We interpret the correlation between deltaP and F(N)/v as resulting from variation in mineral nitrogen efflux-to-influx ratios across plasma membranes of root cells. These results provide a simple explanation of variation in delta(15)N of terrestrial plants and have implications for understanding nitrogen cycling in ecosystems.

  14. (15)N natural abundance of non-fixing woody species in the Brazilian dry forest (caatinga).

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Ana Dolores Santiago; de Sa Barretto Sampaio, Everardo Valadares; Menezes, Romulo Simoes Cezar; Tiessen, Holm

    2010-06-01

    Foliar delta(15)N values are useful to calculate N(2) fixation and N losses from ecosystems. However, a definite pattern among vegetation types is not recognised and few data are available for semi-arid areas. We sampled four sites in the Brazilian caatinga, along a water availability gradient. Sites with lower annual rainfall (700 mm) but more uniform distribution (six months) had delta(15)N values of 9.4 and 10.1 per thousand, among the highest already reported, and significantly greater than those (6.5 and 6.3 per thousand) of sites with higher rainfall (800 mm) but less uniform distribution (three months). There were no significant differences at each site among species or between non-fixing legume and non-legume species, in spite of the higher N content of the first group. Therefore, they constitute ideal reference plants in estimations of legume N(2) fixation. The higher values could result from higher losses of (15)N depleted gases or lower losses of enriched (15)N material.

  15. 15N fractionation in star-forming regions and Solar System objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirström, E. S.; Adande, G.; Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.; Cordiner, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    We briefly review what is currently known of 14N/15N ratios in interstellar molecules. We summarize the fractionation ratios measured in HCN, HNC, CN, N2 and NH3, and compare these to theoretical predictions and to the isotopic inventory of cometary volatiles.

  16. Using a Macroalgal δ15N Bioassay to Detect Cruise Ship Waste Water Effluent Inputs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  17. Tracing Nitrogen through Landscapes to Coastal Wetlands using d15N of Larval Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to evaluate the use of the nitrogen stable isotope value (d15N) of larval fish as an indicator of incipient anthropogenic nitrogen loading to coastal wetlands in the Great Lakes. We sampled coastal wetlands in five Lake Superior south shore tributaries that had ...

  18. 13C and 15N CP/MAS, 1H-15N SCT CP/MAS and FTIR spectroscopy as tools for qualitative detection of the presence of zwitterionic and non-ionic forms of ansa-macrolide 3-formylrifamycin SV and its derivatives in solid state.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pyta, Krystian; Klich, Katarzyna; Schilf, Wojciech; Kamieński, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    (13)C, (15)N CP/MAS, including (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N short contact time CP/MAS experiments, and FTIR methods were applied for detailed structural characterization of ansa-macrolides as 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its derivatives (2-6) in crystal and in powder forms. Although HPLC chromatograms for 2/CH3 OH and 2/CH3 CCl3 were the same for rifampicin crystals dissolved in respective solvents, the UV-vis data recorded for them were different in 300-375 nm region. Detailed solid state (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR and FTIR studies revealed that rifampicin (2), in contrast to 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its amino derivatives (3-6), can occur in pure non-ionic or zwitterionic forms in crystal and in pure these forms or a mixture of them in a powder. Multinuclear CP/MAS and FTIR studies demonstrated also that 3-6 derivatives were present exclusively in pure zwitterionic forms, both in powder and in crystal. On the basis of the solid state NMR and FTIR studies, two conformers of 3-formylrifamycin SV were detected in powder form due to the different orientations of carbonyl group of amide moiety. The PM6 molecular modeling at the semi-empirical level of theory, allowed visualization the most energetically favorable non-ionic and zwitterionic forms of 1-6 antibiotics, strongly stabilized via intramolecular H-bonds. FTIR studies indicated that the originally adopted forms of these type antibiotics in crystal or in powder are stable in standard laboratory conditions in time. The results presented point to the fact that because of a possible presence of two forms of rifampicin (compound 2), quantification of the content of this antibiotic in relevant pharmaceuticals needs caution.

  19. Compound-Specific δ15N Amino Acid Measurements in Littoral Mussels in the California Upwelling Ecosystem: A New Approach to Generating Baseline δ15N Isoscapes for Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ15N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ15N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ15N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ15N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼7‰ to ∼12‰, R2 = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ15N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ15N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ15N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with15N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ15N values of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ15N values. We hypothesize δ15NPhe values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ15N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ15NPhe values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ15N values. We propose that δ15NPhe isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ15N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives. PMID:24887109

  20. Vertical δ13C and δ15N changes during pedogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunn, Melanie; Spielvogel, Sandra; Wells, Andrew; Condron, Leo; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2015-04-01

    The natural abundance of soil organic matter (SOM) stable C and N isotope ratios are subjected to vertical changes throughout the soil profile. This vertical distribution is a widely reported phenomenon across varieties of ecosystems and constitutes important insights of soil carbon cycling. In most ecosystems, SOM becomes enriched in heavy isotopes by several per mill in the first few centimeters of the topsoil. The enrichment of 13C in SOM with soil depth is attributed to biological and physical-chemical processes in soil e.g., plant physiological impacts, microbial decomposition, sorption and transport processes. Such vertical trends in 13C and 15N abundance have rarely been related to SOM composition during pedogenesis. The aims of our study were to investigate short and long-term δ13C and δ15N depth changes and their interrelations under progressing pedogenesis and ecosystem development. We sampled soils across the well studied fordune progradation Haast-chronosequence, a dune ridge system under super-humid climate at the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island (43° 53' S, 169° 3' E). Soils from 11 sites with five replicates each covered a time span of around 2870 yr of soil development (from Arenosol to Podzol). Vertical changes of δ13C and δ15N values of SOM were investigated in the organic layers and in 1-cm depth intervals of the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. With increasing soil depth SOM became enriched in δ13C by 1.9 ± SE 0.1 o and in δ15N by 6.0 ± 0.4 ‰˙Litter δ13C values slightly decreased with increasing soil age (r = -0.61; p = 0.00) likely due to less efficient assimilation linked to nutrient limitations. Fractionation processes during mycorrhizal transfer appeared to affect δ15N values in the litter. We found a strong decrease of δ15N in the early succession stages ≤ 300 yr B.P. (r = -0.95; p = 0.00). Positive relations of vertical 13C and 15N enrichment with soil age might be related to decomposition and appeared to be

  1. Simple wavelength assignment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryaputra, Stephen; Touch, Joseph D.; Bannister, Joseph A.

    2000-10-01

    IP routers can be coupled with wavelength-selective optical cross- connects to support existing Internet infrastructure in a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical network. Because optical wavelength routing is transparent to IP, packets can bypass traditional forwarding and pass directly through the optical cross-connect, resulting in very high throughput and low delay routing. This approach shares features with label switching, but wavelengths are much more scarce resource than labels. Because optical switches have larger switching times than electronic switches, and wavelength conversions are expensive, wavelength label swapping is not easily done. Wavelength label assignments must consider these limitations to be practical in an optical environment. The performance of an instance of this approach, called Packet over Wavelengths (POW) has been simulated and studied. A new signaling protocol, Simple Wavelength Assignment Protocol (SWAP) is devised to be POW signaling protocol. SWAP takes into account the optical device limitations, and is designed to minimize wavelength conversion, utilize wavelengths with the merging of flows, and reduce the reconfiguration of optical switches. SWAP, to our knowledge, is the first approach to combine signaling and wavelength assignment in an on- line protocol. This paper describes high level SWAP design challenges, decision, and overhead.

  2. [Characteristics of urea 15N absorption, allocation, and utilization by sweet-cherry (Prunus avium L.)].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Xia; Jiang, Yuan-Mao; Peng, Fu-Tian; Gao, Xiang-Bin; Liu, Bing-Hua; Wang, Hai-Yun; Zhao, Lin

    2008-03-01

    With five-year old 'Zaodaguo' sweet-cherry (Prunus avium L.) as test material, this paper studied the characteristics of its urea 15N absorption, allocation, and utilization when applied before bud-break. The results showed that the Ndff of different organs increased gradually with time, and was higher in fine roots and storage organs at full-blooming stage. At fruit core-hardening stage, the Ndff of long shoots and leaves increased quickly, reaching to 0.72% and 0.59% , respectively. From fruit core-hardening to harvesting stage, the Ndff of fruit had a rapid increase, with the peak (1.78%) at harvesting stage. After harvest, the Ndff of neonatal organs increased slowly while that of storage organs increased quickly. At full-blooming stage, the absorbed 15N in roots was firstly allocated to storage organs, with the highest allocation rate (54.91%) in large roots. At fruit core-hardening stage, the allocation rate in fine roots and storage organs decreased from 85.43% to 55.11%, while that in neonatal branches and leaves increased to 44.89%. At harvesting stage, the allocation rate in different organs had no significant change, but after harvest, the absorbed 15N had a rapid translocation to storage organs, and the allocation rate in fine roots and storage organs reached the highest (72.26%) at flower bud differentiation stage. The 15N allocation rate in neonatal branches and leaves at flower bud differentiation stage was decreased by 19.31%, compared with that at harvesting stage. From full-blooming to flower bud differentiation stage, the utilization rate of urea 15N was increasing, and reached the peak (16.86%) at flower bud differentiation stage.

  3. Variable δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors among sharks: implications for trophic position, diet and food web models.

    PubMed

    Olin, Jill A; Hussey, Nigel E; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W; Wintner, Sabine P; Fisk, Aaron T

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆(15)N). As ∆(15)N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆(15)N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆(15)N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆(15)N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ(15)N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆(15)N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ(15)N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆(15)N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆(15)N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 9‰) whereas a ∆(15)N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆(15)N-dietary δ(15)N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆(15)N values that reflect the predators' δ(15)N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a

  4. Variable δ15N Diet-Tissue Discrimination Factors among Sharks: Implications for Trophic Position, Diet and Food Web Models

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Jill A.; Hussey, Nigel E.; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W.; Wintner, Sabine P.; Fisk, Aaron T.

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ15N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆15N). As ∆15N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆15N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆15N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆15N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ15N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆15N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ15N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆15N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆15N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ15N = 9‰) whereas a ∆15N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ15N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆15N-dietary δ15N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆15N values that reflect the predators’ δ15N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a species’ ecological role in their

  5. Influence of open ocean nitrogen supply on the skeletal δ15N of modern shallow-water scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen T.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Cohen, Anne L.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Cobb, Kim M.; Erler, Dirk V.; Stolarski, Jarosław; Kitahara, Marcelo V.; Ren, Haojia

    2016-05-01

    The isotopic composition of skeleton-bound organic nitrogen in shallow-water scleractinian corals (hereafter, CS-δ15N) is an emerging tool for studying the marine nitrogen cycle in the past. The CS-δ15N has been shown to reflect the δ15N of nitrogen (N) sources to corals, with most applications to date focusing on the anthropogenic/terrestrial N inputs to reef environments. However, many coral reefs receive their primary N sources from the open ocean, and the CS-δ15N of these corals may provide information on past changes in the open ocean regional and global N cycle. Using a recently developed persulfate/denitrifier-based method, we measured CS-δ15N in modern shallow-water scleractinian corals from 8 sites proximal to the open ocean. At sites with low open ocean surface nitrate concentrations typical of the subtropics and tropics, measured CS-δ15N variation on seasonal and annual timescales is most often less than 2‰. In contrast, a broad range in CS-δ15N (of ∼10‰) is measured across these sites, with a strong correlation between CS-δ15N and the δ15N of the deep nitrate supply to the surface waters near the reefs. While CS-δ15N can be affected by other N sources as well and can vary in response to local reef conditions as well as coral/symbiont physiological changes, this survey indicates that, when considering corals proximal to the open ocean, the δ15N of the subsurface nitrate supply to surface waters drives most of the CS-δ15N variation across the global ocean. Thus, CS-δ15N is a promising proxy for reconstructing the open ocean N cycle in the past.

  6. Backbone resonance assignments of an artificially engineered TEM-1/PSE-4 Class A β-lactamase chimera.

    PubMed

    Morin, Sébastien; Clouthier, Christopher M; Gobeil, Sophie; Pelletier, Joelle N; Gagné, Stéphane M

    2010-10-01

    The rapid evolution of Class A β-lactamases, which procure resistance to an increasingly broad panel of β-lactam antibiotics, underscores the urgency to better understand the relation between their sequence variation and their structural and functional features. To date, more than 300 clinically-relevant β-lactamase variants have been reported, and this number continues to increase. With the aim of obtaining insights into the evolutionary potential of β-lactamases, an artificially engineered, catalytically active chimera of the Class A TEM-1 and PSE-4 β-lactamases is under study by kinetics and NMR. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignments for the 30 kDa chimera cTEM-17m. Despite its high molecular weight, the data provide evidence that this artificially-evolved chimeric enzyme is well folded. The hydrolytic activity of cTEM-17m was determined using the chromogenic substrate CENTA, with K (M) = 160 ± 35 μM and k (cat) = 20 ± 4 s(-1), which is in the same range as the values for TEM-1 and PSE-4 β-lactamases.

  7. Isotopic variability of cave bears (δ15N, δ13C) across Europe during MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajcarz, Magdalena; Pacher, Martina; Krajcarz, Maciej T.; Laughlan, Lana; Rabeder, Gernot; Sabol, Martin; Wojtal, Piotr; Bocherens, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, the organic fraction of bone, records the isotopic parameters of consumed food for carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). This relationship of isotopic signature between diet and tissue is an important tool for the study of dietary preferences of modern and fossil animal species. Since the first information on the isotopic signature of cave bear was reported, numerous data from Europe have become available. The goal of this work is to track the geographical variation of cave bear collagen isotopic values in Europe during Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (about 60,000-25,000 yr BP). In this study the results of new δ13C and δ15N isotopic analyses of cave bear collagen from four Central-Eastern European sites are presented, as well as a review of all published isotopic data for cave bears of the same period. The main conclusion is a lack of geographical East-West pattern in the variations of δ13C and δ15N values of cave bear collagen. Moreover, no relationship was found between cave bear taxonomy and isotopic composition. The cave bears from Central-Eastern Europe exhibit δ13C and δ15N values near the average of the range of Central, Western and Southern European cave bears. Despite the fact that most cave bear sites follow an altitudinal gradient, separate groups of sites exhibit shift in absolute values of δ13C, what disturbs an altitude-related isotopic pattern. The most distinct groups are: high Alpine sites situated over 1500 m a.s.l. - in terms of δ13C; and two Romanian sites Peştera cu Oase and Urşilor - in case of δ15N. Although the cave bear isotopic signature is driven by altitude, the altitudinal adjustment of isotopic data is not enough to explain the isotopic dissimilarity of these cave bears. The unusually high δ15N signature of mentioned Romanian sites is an isolated case in Europe. Cave bears from relatively closely situated Central-Eastern European sites and other Romanian sites are more similar to Western European than to Romanian

  8. The origin of nitrogen on Jupiter and Saturn from the 15N/14N ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Greathouse, T. K.; Orton, G. S.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Mousis, O.; Sinclair, J. A.; Giles, R. S.

    2014-08-01

    The Texas Echelon cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES), mounted on NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), was used to map mid-infrared ammonia absorption features on both Jupiter and Saturn in February 2013. Ammonia is the principle reservoir of nitrogen on the giant planets, and the ratio of isotopologues (15N/14N) can reveal insights into the molecular carrier (e.g., as N2 or NH3) of nitrogen to the forming protoplanets, and hence the source reservoirs from which these worlds accreted. We targeted two spectral intervals (900 and 960 cm-1) that were relatively clear of terrestrial atmospheric contamination and contained close features of 14NH3 and 15NH3, allowing us to derive the ratio from a single spectrum without ambiguity due to radiometric calibration (the primary source of uncertainty in this study). We present the first ground-based determination of Jupiter’s 15N/14N ratio (in the range from 1.4×10-3 to 2.5×10-3), which is consistent with both previous space-based studies and with the primordial value of the protosolar nebula. On Saturn, we present the first upper limit on the 15N/14N ratio of no larger than 2.0×10-3 for the 900-cm-1 channel and a less stringent requirement that the ratio be no larger than 2.8×10-3 for the 960-cm-1 channel (1σ confidence). Specifically, the data rule out strong 15N-enrichments such as those observed in Titan’s atmosphere and in cometary nitrogen compounds. To the extent possible with ground-based radiometric uncertainties, the saturnian and jovian 15N/14N ratios appear indistinguishable, implying that 15N-enriched ammonia ices could not have been a substantial contributor to the bulk nitrogen inventory of either planet. This result favours accretion of primordial N2 on both planets, either in the gas phase from the solar nebula, or as ices formed at very low temperatures. Finally, spatially-resolved TEXES observations are used to derive zonal contrasts in tropospheric temperatures, phosphine and 14NH3 on both

  9. NMR and Mutational Identification of the Collagen-Binding Site of the Chaperone Hsp47

    PubMed Central

    Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yoshikawa, Sumi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Nishi, Yohei; Kurimoto, Eiji; Ishida, Yoshihito; Homma, Takayuki; Hoseki, Jun; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Koide, Takaki; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kato, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 47 (Hsp47) acts as a client-specific chaperone for collagen and plays a vital role in collagen maturation and the consequent embryonic development. In addition, this protein can be a potential target for the treatment of fibrosis. Despite its physiological and pathological importance, little is currently known about the collagen-binding mode of Hsp47 from a structural aspect. Here, we describe an NMR study that was conducted to identify the collagen-binding site of Hsp47. We used chicken Hsp47, which has higher solubility than its human counterpart, and applied a selective 15N-labeling method targeting its tryptophan and histidine residues. Spectral assignments were made based on site-directed mutagenesis of the individual residues. By inspecting the spectral changes that were observed upon interaction with a trimeric collagen peptide and the mutational data, we successfully mapped the collagen-binding site in the B/C β-barrel domain and a nearby loop in a 3D-homology model based upon a serpin fold. This conclusion was confirmed by mutational analysis. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the design of compounds that target the interaction between Hsp47 and procollagen as therapeutics for fibrotic diseases. PMID:23049894

  10. Military Personnel Assignments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-09

    of Defense, Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Defense Agencies," > f , February 4, 1970 (hereby canceled) (d) DoD Directive 1315.14...34DoD Components"). 2. Does not apply to service members in non-DoD activities covered by DoD Directive 1000.17 (reference ( f )). C. DEFINITIONS Terms...possible, shall be allowed to extend any assignment voluntarily beyond the prescribed tour. f . Through the grades of 0-5 for officers and E-8 for enlisted

  11. Combining insights from solid-state NMR and first principles calculation: applications to the 19F NMR of octafluoronaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Andrew J; Ng, William T K; Jochym, Dominik; Keal, Thomas W; Clark, Stewart J; Tozer, David J; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2007-05-21

    Advances in solid-state NMR methodology and computational chemistry are applied to the (19)F NMR of solid octafluoronaphthalene. It is demonstrated experimentally, and confirmed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, that the spectral resolution in the magic-angle spinning spectrum is limited by the anisotropy of the bulk magnetic susceptibility (ABMS). This leads to the unusual observation that the resolution improves as the sample is diluted. DFT calculations provide assignments of each of the peaks in the (19)F spectrum, but the predictions are close to the limits of accuracy and correlation information from 2-D NMR is invaluable in confirming the assignments. The effects of non-Gaussian lineshapes on the use of 2-D NMR for mapping correlations of spectral frequencies (e.g. due to the ABMS) are also discussed.

  12. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ15N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Francisca P.; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ15N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ15N and δ13C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ15N values span the entire gradient, soil δ15N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ15N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ15N values. PMID:26956399

  13. Pathways to assignment of payees.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Marc I; Ablondi, Karen; Black, Anne C; Serowik, Kristin L; Rowe, Michael

    2014-04-01

    How clients come to be assigned representative payees and/or conservators to manage their funds is not well understood. We compared clients assigned a payee during a clinical trial of a money management-based intervention to those not assigned payees and examined antecedents to payee assignment. One year after randomization, significantly more clients assigned to the advisor teller money manager (ATM) money management intervention were assigned payees than participants in the control condition (10 of 47 vs. 2 of 43; p = .02); those assigned payees had lower baseline GAF scores and participated more in study therapies. Several ATM clients were assigned payees after third parties paid more attention to clients' finances, and others after having negotiated storage of their funds with the ATM money manager during the study. Assignment of payees appears to be influenced by whether third parties critically attend to how clients' manage funds and by clients' receptiveness to having a payee.

  14. 250 GHz CW gyrotron oscillator for dynamic nuclear polarization in biological solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Woskov, Paul P.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator, a critical component of an integrated system for magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at 9 T, corresponding to 380 MHz 1H frequency. The 250 GHz gyrotron is the first gyro-device designed with the goal of seamless integration with an NMR spectrometer for routine DNP enhanced NMR spectroscopy and has operated under computer control for periods of up to 21 days with a 100% duty cycle. Following a brief historical review of the field, we present studies of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) using DNP enhanced multidimensional NMR. These results include assignment of active site resonances in [U- 13C, 15N]-bR and demonstrate the utility of DNP for studies of membrane proteins. Next, we review the theory of gyro-devices from quantum mechanical and classical viewpoints and discuss the unique considerations that apply to gyrotron oscillators designed for DNP experiments. We then characterize the operation of the 250 GHz gyrotron in detail, including its long-term stability and controllability. We have measured the spectral purity of the gyrotron emission using both homodyne and heterodyne techniques. Radiation intensity patterns from the corrugated waveguide that delivers power to the NMR probe were measured using two new techniques to confirm pure mode content: a thermometric approach based on the temperature-dependent color of liquid crystalline media applied to a substrate and imaging with a pyroelectric camera. We next present a detailed study of the mode excitation characteristics of the gyrotron. Exploration of the operating characteristics of several fundamental modes reveals broadband continuous frequency tuning of up to 1.8 GHz as a function of the magnetic field alone, a feature that may be exploited in future tunable gyrotron designs. Oscillation of the 250 GHz gyrotron at the second harmonic of cyclotron resonance begins at extremely low beam currents (as

  15. 250 GHz CW Gyrotron Oscillator for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Biological Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Woskov, Paul P.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator, a critical component of an integrated system for magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at 9T, corresponding to 380 MHz 1H frequency. The 250 GHz gyrotron is the first gyro-device designed with the goal of seamless integration with an NMR spectrometer for routine DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy and has operated under computer control for periods of up to 21 days with a 100% duty cycle. Following a brief historical review of the field, we present studies of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) using DNP-enhanced multidimensional NMR. These results include assignment of active site resonances in [U-13C,15N]-bR and demonstrate the utility of DNP for studies of membrane proteins. Next, we review the theory of gyro-devices from quantum mechanical and classical viewpoints and discuss the unique considerations that apply to gyrotron oscillators designed for DNP experiments. We then characterize the operation of the 250 GHz gyrotron in detail, including its long-term stability and controllability. We have measured the spectral purity of the gyrotron emission using both homodyne and heterodyne techniques. Radiation intensity patterns from the corrugated waveguide that delivers power to the NMR probe were measured using two new techniques to confirm pure mode content: a thermometric approach based on the temperature-dependent color of liquid crystalline media applied to a substrate and imaging with a pyroelectric camera. We next present a detailed study of the mode excitation characteristics of the gyrotron. Exploration of the operating characteristics of several fundamental modes reveals broadband continuous frequency tuning of up to 1.8 GHz as a function of the magnetic field alone, a feature that may be exploited in future tunable gyrotron designs. Oscillation of the 250 GHz gyrotron at the second harmonic of cyclotron resonance begins at extremely low beam currents (as low

  16. Secondary structure and zinc ligation of human recombinant short-form stromelysin by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Gooley, P R; Johnson, B A; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Hagmann, W K; Esser, C K; Springer, J P

    1993-12-07

    Stromelysin-1, a member of the matrix metalloendoprotease family, is a zinc protease involved in the degradation of connective tissue in the extracellular matrix. As a step toward determining the structure of this protein, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR experiments have been applied to an inhibited truncated form of human stromelysin-1. Extensive 1H, 13C, and 15N sequential assignments have been obtained with a combination of three- and four-dimensional experiments. On the basis of sequential and short-range NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts, two helices have been delineated, spanning residues Asp-111 to Val-127 and Leu-195 to Ser-206. A third helix spanning residues Asp-238 to Gly-247 is characterized by sequential NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts, but not short-range NOEs. The lack of the latter NOEs suggests that this helix is either distorted or mobile. Similarly, sequential and interstrand NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts characterize a four-stranded beta-sheet with three parallel strands (Arg-100 to Ile-101, Ile-142 to Ala-147, Asp-177 to Asp-181) and one antiparallel strand (Ala-165 to Tyr-168). Two zinc sites have been identified in stromelysin [Salowe et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4535-4540]. The NMR spectral properties, including chemical shift, pH dependence, and proton coupling of the imidazole nitrogens of six histidine residues (151, 166, 179, 201, 205, and 211), invariant in the matrix metalloendoprotease family, suggest that these residues are zinc ligands. NOE data indicate that these histidines form two clusters: one ligates the catalytic zinc (His-201, -205, and -211), and the other ligates a structural zinc (His-151, -166, and -179). Heteronuclear multiple quantum correlated spectra and specific labeling experiments indicate His-151, -179, -201, -205, and -211 are in the N delta 1H tautomer and His-166 is in the N epsilon 2H tautomer.

  17. Monoterpene Unknowns Identified Using IR, [to the first power]H-NMR, [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR, DEPT, COSY, and HETCOR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.

    2005-01-01

    A study identifies a compound from a set of monoterpenes using infrared (IR) and one-dimensional (1D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. After identifying the unknown, each carbon and proton signal can be interpreted and assigned to the structure using the information in the two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, correlation spectroscopy…

  18. Community 15N isoscapes to resolve plant-plant-interactions at the spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Christine; Rascher, Katherine G.; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Isoscapes have greatly improved our ability to understand biogeochemical processes on continental to global scales. However, the isoscapes framework may also have significant potential to resolve the spatial component of within-community interactions. For example, exotic plant invaders often exert strong impacts on ecosystem functioning, particularly regarding water-, carbon- and nutrient-cycles, but the spatial extent of such alterations is largely unknown. Here we show that massive N input by the N2-fixing exotic invasive Acacia longifolia to a Portuguese dune system can be traced using spatially resolved information on native plants' leaf δ15N. We found isotopic signatures of N to differ strongly between the native system (δ15N c. -10 o) and the atmospherically derived N in A. longifolia phyllodes (δ15N c. 0 o). Thus, sources of N for native plants could be readily distinguished. Leaf δ15N of a native, non-fixing species was increasingly enriched the closer the plant grew to the invader, indicating uptake of fixed N provided by A. longifolia. The enrichment was evident far beyond the stands of the invader, demonstrating that A. longifolia affected N budgets of native species up to a distance of 8 m exceeding the margin of the canopy. Furthermore, using the isoscapes approach, we were able to quantify the total area of N enrichment and could thus show that the area affected by invasion was at least 3.5 times larger than the area actually occupied by the invader. However, a native N2-fixing species had no such effects. Thus, downscaling isoscapes to the community level opens new frontiers in quantifying the spatial dimension of functional changes associated with plant invasions. Moreover, considering the feasibility and applicability of this approach, it may provide a promising tool to identify, quantify and monitor different types of functional plant-plant interactions within communities at a spatially explicit scale.

  19. Asymmetric Induction by a Nitrogen (14) N/(15) N Isotopomer in Conjunction with Asymmetric Autocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Arimasa; Ozaki, Hanae; Harada, Shunya; Tada, Kyohei; Ayugase, Tomohiro; Ozawa, Hitomi; Kawasaki, Tsuneomi; Soai, Kenso

    2016-12-05

    Chirality arising from isotope substitution, especially with atoms heavier than the hydrogen isotopes, is usually not considered a source of chirality in a chemical reaction. An N(2) ,N(2) ,N(3) ,N(3) -tetramethyl-2,3-butanediamine containing nitrogen ((14) N/(15) N) isotope chirality was synthesized and it was revealed that this isotopically chiral diamine compound acts as a chiral initiator for asymmetric autocatalysis.

  20. Asymmetric Induction by a Nitrogen 14N/15N Isotopomer in Conjunction with Asymmetric Autocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Hanae; Harada, Shunya; Tada, Kyohei; Ayugase, Tomohiro; Ozawa, Hitomi; Kawasaki, Tsuneomi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chirality arising from isotope substitution, especially with atoms heavier than the hydrogen isotopes, is usually not considered a source of chirality in a chemical reaction. An N 2 ,N 2 ,N 3 ,N 3‐tetramethyl‐2,3‐butanediamine containing nitrogen (14N/15N) isotope chirality was synthesized and it was revealed that this isotopically chiral diamine compound acts as a chiral initiator for asymmetric autocatalysis. PMID:27754589

  1. (15)N investigation of nitrogen released from tobacco-waste to be utilized by maize crop.

    PubMed

    Karaman, M Rüştü; Brohi, A Reşit; Inal, Ali; Aydeniz, Akgün

    2004-12-01

    The (15)N study aimed to estimate the portion of nitrogen released from tobacco-waste to be utilized by maize crop. Tobacco-waste at the levels of 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 g pot(-1) and ((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) as nitrogen fertilizer labelled with 5 at.% exc. at the levels of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 mg N pot(-1) together with a basal dressing of some nutrients were added to pots with Pioneer maize variety. After the harvest, dry matter yield was recorded and (15)N determinations and calculations were made. Tobacco-waste had a positive effect on the growth and on the nitrogen uptake of maize crop. Increasing the rates of tobacco-waste increased the dry matter yield of maize crop from 4.64 g pot(-1) (at control) to 7.22 g pot(-1) (at the tobacco-waste treatment of 8 g pot(-1)). The values of (15)N in the plant derived from nitrogenous fertilizer also increased with increasing nitrogen fertilizer levels, whereas they decreased from 0.427 % to 0.249 % with increasing tobacco-waste treatments from 0 to 8 g pot(-1), respectively. The average values of per cent nitrogen derived from nitrogenous fertilizer (Ndff) varied from 4.32 % to 7.95 % at the rates of 4-16 mg N pot(-1), respec-tively. However, Ndff decreased from 8.54 % to 4.99 % with increasing tobacco-waste treatments from 0 to 8 g pot(-1), respectively. Per cent nitrogen derived from tobacco-waste (Ndft) increased from 21.8 % to 38.5 % with increasing tobacco-waste treatments from 2 to 8 g pot(-1), respectively. The results have revealed that (15)N tracer technique was confidently used for the investigation of nitrogen levels released from tobacco-waste as organic waste to be utilized by maize crop.

  2. δ15N in the turtle grass from the Mexican Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talavera-Saenz, A.; Sanchez, A.; Ortiz-Hernandez, M.

    2013-05-01

    Nutrient inputs associated with population growth threaten the integrity of coastal ecosystems. To assess the rapid increase in tourism, we compared the δ15N from Thalassia testudinum collected at sites with different levels of tourism development and population to detect the N inputs of wastewater discharge (WD) along the coast of Quintana Roo. The contributions of nitrogen enriched in 15N are directly related to the increase of WD inputs in areas of high tourism development (Nichupte Lagoon in Cancun, >3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.7 million of resident population) and decreased towards Bahia Akumal and Tulum (>3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.15 million of resident population). The δ15N from T. testudinum was significantly lower at Mahahual and Puerto Morelos (about 0.4 million tourists per year in 2007 to 2011 and 0.25 million of resident population) than other the sites. In areas of the lowest development and with tourist activity restricted and small population, such as the Yum Balam Reserve and Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve, the δ15N values were in much higher enrichment that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. Therefore is suggested that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos may be used for baseline isotopic monitoring, over environmental pressure on the reef lagoon ecosystem, where tourist activities and population are growing very slow rate. The anthropogenic N input has the potential to impact, both environmentally and economically, the seagrass meadows and the coral reefs along the coast of Quintana Roo and the Caribbean.

  3. Mycorrhizal Fungi Provide Most of the Nitrogen for Symbiotic Arctic Plants: 15N Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, J. E.; Hobbie, E. A.

    2004-12-01

    When soil nitrogen is in short supply, most terrestrial plants form symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizae) in which fine hyphal threads take up soil nitrogen, transport it into plant roots, and in return receive plant sugars. Because the transfer rates are very difficult to measure in nature, ecologists need new tools by which to assess the role of mycorrhizal fungi in carbon and nitrogen cycling. Recent studies indicate that the natural abundance of 15N taken up from the soil by hyphae is changed during transfer of nitrogen to roots; the result is large differences among the natural abundance of 15N in soil, symbiotic plants, and symbiotic fungi that depend on the mass balance of nitrogen in the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Measurements were carried out in acidic tussock tundra at the Toolik Lake LTER site in Arctic Alaska (68\\deg N 149\\deg W). The \\delta15N of soil N was 1.5%, of soil ammonium was 1.5%, of ericoid and ectomycorrhizal plants was -5.0%, and of ectomycorrhizal fungi was 7.0 parts per mille%. The mass balance of the 15N shows that the plants received 61-86% of their nitrogen from the fungal hyphae. These values, when combined with known plant growth rates, reveal that the plants provided 7-16% of their photosynthetic carbon to the fungi for growth and respiration, or about 25% of all carbon allocated to belowground processes. This analytical technique could be readily applied to other nitrogen-limited ecosystems such as many temperate and boreal forests to quantify the importance for terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling of mycorrhizally mediated transfers at the plant-soil interface.

  4. Determination of the δ15N of total nitrogen in solids; RSIL lab code 2893

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2893 is to determine the δ(15N/14N), abbreviated as δ15N , of total nitrogen in solid samples. A Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA) is used to convert total nitrogen in a solid sample into N2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines relative difference in the isotope-amount ratios of stable nitrogen isotopes (15N/14N)of the product N2 gas. The combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. Samples are placed in a tin capsule and loaded into the Costech Zero Blank Autosampler of the EA. Under computer control, samples are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where the combustion takes place in a helium atmosphere containing an excess of oxygen gas. Combustion products are transported by a helium carrier through a reduction tube to remove excess oxygen and convert all nitrous oxides into N2 and through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly CO2 and N2, are separated by a gas chromatograph. The gas is then introduced into the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) through a Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) ConFlo II interface, which also is used to inject N2 reference gas and helium for sample dilution. The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus CF-IRMS. It has a universal triple collector, two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle, capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 28, 29, 30, simultaneously. The ion beams from N2 are as follows: m/z 28 = N2 = 14N14N; m/z 29 = N2 = 14N15N primarily; m/z 30 = NO = 14N16O primarily, which is a sign of contamination or incomplete reduction.

  5. Food webs of two intermittently open estuaries receiving 15N-enriched sewage effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadwen, Wade L.; Arthington, Angela H.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures were used to assess the response of food webs to sewage effluent discharged into two small intermittently open estuaries in northern New South Wales, Australia. One of these systems, Tallows Creek, has a history of direct sewage inputs, whilst the other, Belongil Creek, receives wastewater via an extensive wetland treatment system. The food webs of both systems were driven by algal sources of carbon, reflecting high autotrophic productivity in response to the nutrients entering the system from sewage effluent. All aquatic biota collected from Tallows Creek had significantly enriched δ15N signatures relative to their conspecifics from Belongil Creek, indicating that sewage nitrogen had been assimilated and transferred throughout the Tallows Creek food web. These δ15N values were higher than those reported from studies in permanently open estuaries receiving sewage effluent. We suggest that these enriched signatures and the transfer of nitrogen throughout the entire food web reflect differences in hydrology and associated nitrogen cycling processes between permanently open and intermittently open estuaries. Although all organisms in Tallows Creek were generally 15N-enriched, isotopically light (less 15N-enriched) individuals of estuary perchlet ( Ambassis marianus) and sea mullet ( Mugil cephalus) were also collected. These individuals were most likely recent immigrants into Tallows Creek, as this system had only recently been opened to the ocean. This isotopic discrimination between resident (enriched) and immigrant (significantly less enriched) individuals can provide information on fish movement patterns and the role of heavily polluted intermittently open estuaries in supporting commercially and recreationally valuable estuarine species.

  6. Dynamic nuclear polarization NMR spectroscopy allows high-throughput characterization of microporous organic polymers.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Chong, Samantha Y; McDonald, Tom O; Adams, Dave J; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc A; Cooper, Andrew I

    2013-10-16

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR was used to obtain natural abundance (13)C and (15)N CP MAS NMR spectra of microporous organic polymers with excellent signal-to-noise ratio, allowing for unprecedented details in the molecular structure to be determined for these complex polymer networks. Sensitivity enhancements larger than 10 were obtained with bis-nitroxide radical at 14.1 T and low temperature (∼105 K). This DNP MAS NMR approach allows efficient, high-throughput characterization of libraries of porous polymers prepared by combinatorial chemistry methods.

  7. Impact of seaweed beachings on dynamics of δ(15)N isotopic signatures in marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Lemesle, Stéphanie; Mussio, Isabelle; Rusig, Anne-Marie; Menet-Nédélec, Florence; Claquin, Pascal

    2015-08-15

    A fine-scale survey of δ(15)N, δ(13)C, tissue-N in seaweeds was conducted using samples from 17 sampling points at two sites (Grandcamp-Maisy (GM), Courseulles/Mer (COU)) along the French coast of the English Channel in 2012 and 2013. Partial triadic analysis was performed on the parameter data sets and revealed the functioning of three areas: one estuary (EstA) and two rocky areas (GM(∗), COU(∗)). In contrast to oceanic and anthropogenic reference points similar temporal dynamics characterized δ(15)N signatures and N contents at GM(∗) and COU(∗). Nutrient dynamics were similar: the N-concentrations in seawater originated from the River Seine and local coastal rivers while P-concentrations mainly from these local rivers. δ(15)N at GM(∗) were linked to turbidity suggesting inputs of autochthonous organic matter from large-scale summer seaweed beachings made up of a mixture of Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Chlorophyta species. This study highlights the coupling between seaweed beachings and nitrogen sources of intertidal macroalgae.

  8. Dynamics of Antibody Domains Studied by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Bang K.; Walsh, Joseph D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ishima, Rieko

    2012-01-01

    Information on local dynamics of antibodies is important to evaluate stability, to rationally design variants, and to clarify conformational disorders at the epitope binding sites. Such information may also be useful for improved understanding of antigen recognition. NMR can be used for characterization of local protein dynamics at the atomic level through relaxation measurements. Due to the complexity of the NMR spectra, an extensive use of this method is limited to small protein molecules, for example, antibody domains and some scFv. Here, we describe a protocol that was used to study the dynamics of an antibody domain in solution using NMR. We describe protein preparation for NMR studies, NMR sample optimization, signal assignments, and dynamics experiments. PMID:19252840

  9. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu; Morishita, Ryo; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially {sup 15}N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [{sup 1}H, {sup 15}N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has

  10. Selectively labeling the heterologous protein in Escherichia coli for NMR studies: a strategy to speed up NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almeida, F C; Amorim, G C; Moreau, V H; Sousa, V O; Creazola, A T; Américo, T A; Pais, A P; Leite, A; Netto, L E; Giordano, R J; Valente, A P

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The (1)H/(15)N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective (15)N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good (1)H/(15)N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The (15)N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the (1)H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  11. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  12. Rotary echo nutation NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R.; Tijink, G. A. H.; Veeman, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment which combines rotary echoes and nutation NMR is investigated and used to study different sodium sites in zeolite NaA. It is shown that with this technique sodium ions with different relaxation rates in the rotating frame can be distinguished.

  13. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  14. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  15. A novel method for trapping and analyzing 15N in NO for tracing NO sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ronghua; Mulder, Jan; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    15N isotope tracing is an effective and direct approach to investigate the biological and chemical sources of nitric oxide (NO) in soil. However, NO is highly reactive and rapidly converted to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the presence of ozone. Various chemical conversions of NO to the more stable solutes nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) have been proposed, which allow analysing the 15N abundance without major fractionation. However, NO emissions from soils are usually small, posing major challenges to conversion efficiency and background contamination. Here we present a novel method in which NO is oxidized to NO2- by chromium trioxide (CrO3) prior to conversion to NO2- and NO3- in an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. Immediately following trapping, manganese dioxide (MnO2) and 5M HCl are added to remove excess H2O2, and to adjust the pH to around 6.0-7.0, respectively. The resulting solution can be stored until analysis and is none-toxic, allowing to use a modified denitrifier method (Zhu et al., submitted), where NO2- and NO3- are reduced quantitatively to nitrous oxide (N2O). Optimum NO conversion rates of > 90% even at extremely low initial NO concentration were obtained with 4% H2O2, 0.5 M NaOH, and 0.5 L min-1 gas flow rate. In a laboratory test, using NO gas with different 15N signals produced from unlabelled and labelled NO2-, we found an overall precision of 0.4‰ for unlabelled and 49.7‰ for NO enriched with 1.0 atom% 15N, respectively. This indicates that this method can be used for both natural abundance studies of NO, as well as in labelling studies tracing NO sources. Zhu J, Yu L, Bakken LR, Mørkved PT, Mulder J, Dörsch P. Controlled induction of denitrification in Pseudomonas aureofaciens: a modified denitrifier method for 15N and 18O analysis in NO3- from natural water samples by IRMS. Submitted.

  16. Paleoenvironmental implications of taxonomic variation among δ 15 N values of chloropigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Meytal B.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Robinson, Rebecca S.; Qin, Yelun; Saito, Mak A.; Pearson, Ann

    2011-11-01

    Natural variations in the ratios of nitrogen isotopes in biomass reflect variations in nutrient sources utilized for growth. In order to use δ 15N values of chloropigments of photosynthetic organisms to determine the corresponding δ 15N values of biomass - and by extension, surface waters - the isotopic offset between chlorophyll and biomass must be constrained. Here we examine this offset in various geologically-relevant taxa, grown using nutrient sources that may approximate ocean conditions at different times in Earth's history. Phytoplankton in this study include cyanobacteria (diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic), eukaryotic algae (red and green), and anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (Proteobacteria), as well as environmental samples from sulfidic lake water. Cultures were grown using N 2, NO 3-, and NH 4+ as nitrogen sources, and were examined under different light regimes and growth conditions. We find surprisingly high variability in the isotopic difference (δ 15N biomass - δ 15N chloropigment) for prokaryotes, with average values for species ranging from -12.2‰ to +11.7‰. We define this difference as ɛpor, a term that encompasses diagenetic porphyrins and chlorins, as well as chlorophyll. Negative values of ɛpor reflect chloropigments that are 15N-enriched relative to biomass. Notably, this enrichment appears to occur only in cyanobacteria. The average value of ɛpor for freshwater cyanobacterial species is -9.8 ± 1.8‰, while for marine cyanobacteria it is -0.9 ± 1.3‰. These isotopic effects group environmentally but not phylogenetically, e.g., ɛpor values for freshwater Chroococcales resemble those of freshwater Nostocales but differ from those of marine Chroococcales. Our measured values of ɛpor for eukaryotic algae (range = 4.7-8.7‰) are similar to previous reports for pure cultures. For all taxa studied, values of ɛpor do not depend on the type of nitrogen substrate used for growth. The observed environmental control of

  17. Delta15N values of tropical savanna and monsoon forest species reflect root specialisations and soil nitrogen status.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S; Stewart, G R

    2003-03-01

    A large number of herbaceous and woody plants from tropical woodland, savanna, and monsoon forest were analysed to determine the impact of environmental factors (nutrient and water availability, fire) and biological factors (microbial associations, systematics) on plant delta(15)N values. Foliar delta(15)N values of herbaceous and woody species were not related to growth form or phenology, but a strong relationship existed between mycorrhizal status and plant delta(15)N. In woodland and savanna, woody species with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) associations and putative N(2)-fixing species with ECM/arbuscular (AM) associations had lowest foliar delta(15)N values (1.0-0.6 per thousand ), AM species had mostly intermediate delta(15)N values (average +0.6 per thousand ), while non-mycorrhizal Proteaceae had highest delta(15)N values (+2.9 to +4.1 per thousand ). Similar differences in foliar delta(15)N were observed between AM (average 0.1 and 0.2 per thousand ) and non-mycorrhizal (average +0.8 and +0.3 per thousand ) herbaceous species in woodland and savanna. Leguminous savanna species had significantly higher leaf N contents (1.8-2.5% N) than non-fixing species (0.9-1.2% N) indicating substantial N acquisition via N(2) fixation. Monsoon forest species had similar leaf N contents (average 2.4% N) and positive delta(15)N values (+0.9 to +2.4 per thousand ). Soil nitrification and plant NO(3)(-) use was substantially higher in monsoon forest than in woodland or savanna. In the studied communities, higher soil N content and nitrification rates were associated with more positive soil delta(15)N and plant delta(15)N. In support of this notion, Ficus, a high NO(3)(-) using taxa associated with NO(3)(-) rich sites in the savanna, had the highest delta(15)N values of all AM species in the savanna. delta(15)N of xylem sap was examined as a tool for studying plant delta(15)N relations. delta(15)N of xylem sap varied seasonally and between differently aged Acacia and other savanna

  18. Foliar retention of 15N-nitrate and 15N-ammonium by red maple (Acer rubrum) and white oak (Quercus alba) leaves from simulated rain

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; Hanson, Paul J

    1990-07-01

    Studies of nitrogen cycling in forests indicate that trees assimilate atmospheric nitrate and ammonium and that differences between atmospheric deposition to the forest canopy and deposition measured in forest throughfall can be attributed to the removal of these ions from rain by tree leaves. Red maple and white oak leaves were exposed to artificial rain solutions (pH 4.1) containing {sup 15}N-labeled nitrate (3.5 {micro}g N/ml) or ammonium (2.2 {micro}g N/ml). At two time intervals after exposure (2 hr and 2 days) an exposed leaf and a control (non-exposed) leaf were removed from replicate seedlings. Based on results from {sup 15}N analysis, most of the nitrate applied to tree leaves was removed by washing with water; the mean per cent removal ({+-} standard error, N = 4) was 87 {+-} 1 and 73 {+-} 4% of the {sup 15}NO-N Applied to red maple and white oak leaves, respectively. Relative retention of {sup 15}NH{sub 4}-N by the leaves was greater than that observed for {sup 15}NO{sub 3}-N. In red maple and white oak leaves, 58 {+-} 9 and 84 {+-} 7% (mean {+-} standard error, N = 4), respectively, of the applied ammonium was not removed by washing treatments. Our results show that the foliar uptake of {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} from simulated rain by deciduous tree leaves is greater than that for {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Greater retention of NH{sub 4}{sup +} than NO{sub 3}{sup -} ions by red maple and white oak leaves from simulated rainfall is consistent with field observations showing a preferential retention of ammonium from rainfall by forest canopies. As nitrogen chemistry and the relative importance of nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere change in response to proposed emission reductions (and possibly climate change), an improved understanding of the fate of airborne nitrogen compounds in forest biogeochemical cycles will be necessary.

  19. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  20. Plant and Soil Natural Abundance delta-15N: Indicators of Nitrogen Cycling in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.; Lovett, G. M.; Weathers, K.; Arthur, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    We examined the potential use of natural abundance 15N of plants and soils as an indicator of forest nitrogen (N) cycling rates within the Catskill Mountains, NY. These watersheds receive among the highest rates of N deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Many studies have shown a link between increased N cycling rates and 15N enrichment of soil and plant pools. Faster rates of N cycling processes, especially nitrification, lead to fractionation of 14/15N, creating N products that are relatively depleted in 15N. This can lead to enrichment of soil pools, as lighter 14N is lost from the system via leaching or denitrification. Plant N pools can become increasingly enriched as they take up 15N-enriched soil N. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across the Catskill Mountains, forests dominated by different tree species appear to vary in the amount of N retained or lost to nearby streams. To determine if plant and soil 15N could be used as indicators of N cycling rates, we collected foliage, wood, litterfall, organic and mineral soil, and fine roots from single species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine roots and soil 15N were highest within sugar maple stands (p<0.05). Sugar maple soils also had the highest rates of net nitrification and N leaching. Therefore, soil 15N appears to correlate with forest N retention and loss. However, 15N enrichment was highest within foliage, litterfall and wood of beech trees (p<0.05). The decoupling between foliage 15N and N cycling, as well as between 15N of foliage and fine roots, illustrates that it may not be possible to use a single plant pool as an indicator of N cycling rates.

  1. Long-term 15N tracking from biological N fixation across different plant and humus components of the boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroniz-Crespo, Maria; Jones, David L.; Zackrisson, Olle; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2014-05-01

    Biological N2 fixation by cyanobacteria associated with feather mosses is an important cog in the nitrogen (N) cycle of boreal forests; still, our understanding of the turnover and fate of N fixed by this association remains greatly incomplete. The 15N signature of plants and soil serves as a powerful tool to explore N dynamics in forest ecosystems. In particular, in the present study we aimed to investigate the contribution of N2 fixation to δ15N signatures of plants and humus component of the boreal forest. Here we present results from a long-term (7 years) tacking of labelled 15N2 across the humus layer, seedlings of the tree species Pinus sylvestris, two common dwarf shrub species (Empetrum hermaphroditum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and the feather moss Pleurozium schreibery. The enriched experiment was conducted in 2005 in a natural boreal forest in northern Sweden. Two different treatments (10% 15N2 headspace enrichment and control) were setup in nine different plots (0.5 x 0.5 m) within the forest. We observed a significant reduction of δ15N signature of the 15N-enriched moss that could be explained by a growth dilution effect. Nevertheless, after 5 years since 15N2 enrichment some of the label 15N was still detected on the moss and in particular in the dead tissue. We could not detect a clear transfer of the labelled 15N2 from the moss-cyanobacteria system to other components of the ecosystem. However, we found consistence relationship through time between increments of δ15N signature of some of the forest components in plots which exhibited higher N fixation rates in the moss. In particular, changes in natural abundance δ15N that could be associated with N fixation were more apparent in the humus layer, the dwarf shrub Vaccinium vitis-idaea and the pine seedlings when comparing across plots and years.

  2. Structural Case Assignment in Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koak, Heeshin

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I aim to provide a theory on the distribution of structural Case in Korean. I propose the following Structural Case Assignment Hypothesis (SCAH) regarding the assignment of structural Case: "Structural Case is assigned by phase heads (C: nominative; v: accusative) to every argument in the c-command domain of the phase…

  3. Automated resonance assignment of the 21 kDa stereo-array isotope labeled thioldisulfide oxidoreductase DsbA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Elena; Ikeya, Teppei; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Löhr, Frank; Buchner, Lena; Ito, Yutaka; Kainosho, Masatsune; Güntert, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The automated chemical shift assignment algorithm FLYA has been extended for use with stereo-array isotope labeled (SAIL) proteins to determine the sequence-specific resonance assignments of large proteins. Here we present the assignment of the backbone and sidechain chemical shifts of the 21 kDa thioldisulfide oxidoreductase DsbA from Escherichia coli that were determined with the SAIL-FLYA algorithm in conjunction with automated peak picking. No manual corrections of peak lists or assignments were applied. The assignments agreed with manually determined reference assignments in 95.4% of the cases if 16 input spectra were used, 94.1% if only 3D 13C/15N-resolved NOESY, CBCA(CO)NH, and 2D [13C/15N,1H]-HSQC were used, and 86.8% if exclusively 3D 13C/15N-resolved NOESY spectra were used. Considering only the assignments that are classified as reliable by the SAIL-FLYA algorithm, the degrees of agreement increased to 97.5%, 96.5%, and 94.2%, respectively. With our approach it is thus possible to automatically obtain almost complete and correct assignments of proteins larger than 20 kDa.

  4. Protein Motions and Folding Investigated by NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2002-03-01

    NMR spin relaxation spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for globally characterizing conformational dynamics of proteins in solution. Laboratory frame relaxation measurements are sensitive to overall rotational diffusion and internal motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, while rotating frame relaxation measurements are sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales. The former approach is illustrated by ^15N laboratory-frame relaxation experiments as a function of temperature for the helical subdomain HP36 of the F-actin-binding headpiece domain of chicken villin. The data are analyzed using the model-free formalism to characterize order parameters and effective correlation times for intramolecular motions of individual ^15N sites. The latter approach is illustrated by ^13C Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation measurements for the de novo designed α_2D protein and by ^15N rotating-frame relaxation measurements for the peripheral subunit-binding domain (PSBD) from the dihydrolopoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Bacillus stearothermophilus. These experiments are used to determine the folding and unfolding kinetic rate constants for the two proteins. The results for HP36, α_2D, and PSBD illustrate the capability of current NMR methods for characterizing dynamic processes on multiple time scales in proteins.

  5. The signatures of stable isotopes δ 15N and δ 13C in anadromous and non-anadromous Coilia nasus living in the Yangtze River, and the adjacent sea waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Tang, Wenqiao; Dong, Wenxia

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotopes are increasingly used to investigate seasonal migrations of aquatic organisms. This study employed stable isotopes ( δ 13C and δ 15N) for Coilia nasus from the lower Yangtze River and the adjacent East China Sea to distinguish different ecotypic groups, ascertain trophic nutrition positions, and reflect environmental influences on C. nasus. δ 13C signatures of C. nasus sampled from Zhoushan (ZS), Chongming (CM), and Jingjiang (JJ) waters were significantly higher than those from the Poyang Lake (PYL) ( P < 0.05). By contrast, δ 15N signatures of C. nasus in ZS, CM, and JJ groups were significantly lower than those in PYL group ( P < 0.05). Basing on δ 13C and δ 15N signatures, we could distinguish anadromous (ZS, CM, and JJ) and non-anadromous (PYL) groups. The trophic level (TL) of anadromous C. nasus ranged from 2.90 to 3.04, whereas that of non-anadromous C. nasus was 4.38. C. nasus occupied the middle and top nutrition positions in the marine and Poyang Lake food webs, respectively. C. nasus in Poyang Lake were significantly more enriched in δ 15N but depleted in δ 13C, suggesting that anthropogenic nutrient inputs and terrigenous organic carbon are important to the Poyang Lake food web. This study is the first to apply δ 15N and δ 13C to population assignment studies of C. nasus in the Yangtze River and its affiliated waters. Analysis of stable isotopes ( δ 15N and δ 13C) is shown to be a useful tool for discriminating anadromous and non-anadromous C. nasus.

  6. Carbon (δ13C) and Nitrogen (δ15N) Stable Isotope Signatures in Bat Fur Indicate Swarming Sites Have Catchment Areas for Bats from Different Summering Areas

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Jordi L.; Broders, Hugh G.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory patterns of bats are not well understood and traditional methods to study this, like capture-mark-recapture, may not provide enough detail unless there are many records. Stable isotope profiles of many animal species have been used to make inferences about migration. Each year Myotis lucifugus and M. septentrionalis migrate from summering roosts to swarming caves and mines in the fall, but the pattern of movement between them is not well understood. In this study, fur δ13C and δ15N values of 305 M. lucifugus and 200 M. septentrionalis were analyzed to make inferences about migration patterns between summering areas and swarming sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. We expected that there would be greater variability in δ13C and δ15N among individuals at swarming sites because it was believed that these sites are used by individuals originating from many summering areas. There was extensive overlap in the standard ellipse area, corrected for small sample sizes (SEAc), of bats at swarming sites and much less overlap in SEAc among groups sampled at summering areas. Meaningful inference could not be made on M. septentrionalis because their low variation in SEAc may have been the result of sampling only 3 summering areas. However, for M. lucifugus, swarming sites had larger SEAc than summering areas and predictive discriminant analysis assigned swarming bats to multiple summering areas, supporting the contention that swarming bats are mixed aggregations of bats from several summering areas. Together, these data support the contention that swarming sites have catchment areas for bats from multiple summering areas and it is likely that the catchment areas for swarming sites overlap. These data suggest that δ13C and δ15N profiling of bat fur offer some potential to make inferences about regional migration in bats. PMID:25923696

  7. Carbon (δ13C) and Nitrogen (δ15N) Stable Isotope Signatures in Bat Fur Indicate Swarming Sites Have Catchment Areas for Bats from Different Summering Areas.

    PubMed

    Segers, Jordi L; Broders, Hugh G

    2015-01-01

    Migratory patterns of bats are not well understood and traditional methods to study this, like capture-mark-recapture, may not provide enough detail unless there are many records. Stable isotope profiles of many animal species have been used to make inferences about migration. Each year Myotis lucifugus and M. septentrionalis migrate from summering roosts to swarming caves and mines in the fall, but the pattern of movement between them is not well understood. In this study, fur δ13C and δ15N values of 305 M. lucifugus and 200 M. septentrionalis were analyzed to make inferences about migration patterns between summering areas and swarming sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. We expected that there would be greater variability in δ13C and δ15N among individuals at swarming sites because it was believed that these sites are used by individuals originating from many summering areas. There was extensive overlap in the standard ellipse area, corrected for small sample sizes (SEAc), of bats at swarming sites and much less overlap in SEAc among groups sampled at summering areas. Meaningful inference could not be made on M. septentrionalis because their low variation in SEAc may have been the result of sampling only 3 summering areas. However, for M. lucifugus, swarming sites had larger SEAc than summering areas and predictive discriminant analysis assigned swarming bats to multiple summering areas, supporting the contention that swarming bats are mixed aggregations of bats from several summering areas. Together, these data support the contention that swarming sites have catchment areas for bats from multiple summering areas and it is likely that the catchment areas for swarming sites overlap. These data suggest that δ13C and δ15N profiling of bat fur offer some potential to make inferences about regional migration in bats.

  8. Dynamics of Reassembled Thioredoxin Studied by Magic Angle Spinning NMR: Snapshots from Different Timescales

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Tasayco, Maria Luisa; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to probe internal protein dynamics in the absence of the overall molecular tumbling. In this study, we report 15N backbone dynamics in differentially enriched 1-73(U-13C, 15N)/74-108(U-15N) reassembled thioredoxin on multiple timescales using a series of 2D and 3D MAS NMR experiments probing the backbone amide 15N longitudinal relaxation, 1H-15N dipolar order parameters, 15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), and signal intensities in the temperature-dependent and 1H T2′ -filtered NCA experiments. The spin-lattice relaxation rates R1(R1 = 1/T1) were observed in the range from 0.012 to 0.64 s-1 indicating large site-to-site variations in dynamics on pico- to nanosecond time scales. The 1H-15N dipolar order parameters, , and 15N CSA anisotropies, δσ reveal the backbone mobilities in reassembled thioredoxin, as reflected in the average = 0.89 ± 0.06 and δσ = 92.3 ± 5.2 ppm, respectively. From the aggregate of experimental data from different dynamics methods, some degree of correlation between the motions on the different time scales has been suggested. Analysis of the dynamics parameters derived from these solid-state NMR experiments indicates higher mobilities for the residues constituting irregular secondary structure elements than for those located in the α-helices and β-sheets, with no apparent systematic differences in dynamics between the α-helical and β-sheet residues. Remarkably, the dipolar order parameters derived from the solid-state NMR measurements and the corresponding solution NMR generalized order parameters display similar qualitative trends as a function of the residue number. The comparison of the solid-state dynamics parameters to the crystallographic B-factors has identified the contribution of static disorder to the B-factors. The combination of longitudinal relaxation, dipolar order parameter, and CSA line shape analyses employed in this study provides snapshots of dynamics and a new

  9. Macroalgae δ15N values in well-mixed estuaries: Indicator of anthropogenic nitrogen input or macroalgae metabolism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Guillou, Gaël; Mornet, Françoise; Richard, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Although nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in macroalgae is widely used as a bioindicator of anthropogenic nitrogen inputs to the coastal zone, recent studies suggest the possible role of macroalgae metabolism in δ15N variability. Simultaneous determinations of δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) along the land-sea continuum, inter-species variability of δ15N and its sensitivity to environmental factors are necessary to confirm the efficiency of macroalgae δ15N in monitoring nitrogen origin in mixed-use watersheds. In this study, δ15N of annual and perennial macroalgae (Ulva sp., Enteromorpha sp., Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus) are compared to δ15N-DIN along the Charente Estuary, after characterizing δ15N of the three main DIN sources (i.e. cultivated area, pasture, sewage treatment plant outlet). During late winter and spring, when human activities produce high DIN inputs, DIN sources exhibit distinct δ15N signals in nitrate (NO) and ammonium (NH): cultivated area (+6.5 ± 0.6‰ and +9.0 ± 11.0‰), pasture (+9.2 ± 1.8‰ and +12.4‰) and sewage treatment plant discharge (+16.9 ± 8.7‰ and +25.4 ± 5.9‰). While sources show distinct δN- in this multiple source catchment, the overall mixture of NO sources - generally >95% DIN - leads to low variations of δN-NO at the mouth of the estuary (+7.7 to +8.4‰). Even if estuarine δN-NO values are not significantly different from pristine continental and oceanic site (+7.3‰ and +7.4‰), macroalgae δ15N values are generally higher at the mouth of the estuary. This highlights high anthropogenic DIN inputs in the estuary, and enhanced contribution of 15N-depleted NH in oceanic waters. Although seasonal variations in δN-NO are low, the same temporal trends in macroalgae δ15N values at estuarine and oceanic sites, and inter-species differences in δ15N values, suggest that macroalgae δ15N values might be modified by the metabolic response of macroalgae to environmental parameters (e

  10. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templer, P.H.; Mack, M.C.; Chapin, F. S.; Christenson, L.M.; Compton, J.E.; Crook, H.D.; Currie, W.S.; Curtis, C.J.; Dail, D.B.; D'Antonio, C. M.; Emmett, B.A.; Epstein, H.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Gundersen, P.; Hobbie, S.E.; Holland, K.; Hooper, D.U.; Hungate, B.A.; Lamontagne, S.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Osenberg, C.W.; Perakis, S.S.; Schleppi, P.; Schimel, J.; Schmidt, I.K.; Sommerkorn, M.; Spoelstra, J.; Tietema, A.; Wessel, W.W.; Zak, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3–18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C: N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N·ha-1·yr-1 above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer addition.

  11. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies.

    PubMed

    Templer, P H; Mack, M C; Chapin, F S; Christenson, L M; Compton, J E; Crook, H D; Currie, W S; Curtis, C J; Dail, D B; D'Antonio, C M; Emmett, B A; Epstein, H E; Goodale, C L; Gundersen, P; Hobbie, S E; Holland, K; Hooper, D U; Hungate, B A; Lamontagne, S; Nadelhoffer, K J; Osenberg, C W; Perakis, S S; Schleppi, P; Schimel, J; Schmidt, I K; Sommerkorn, M; Spoelstra, J; Tietema, A; Wessel, W W; Zak, D R

    2012-08-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) a