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Sample records for 15n nmr assignments

  1. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  2. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of phenazopyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Mora-Pérez, Yolanda; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    Phenazopyridine hydrochloride (1), a drug in clinical use for many decades, and some derivatives were studied by one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR methodology. The assignments, combined with DFT calculations, reveal that the preferred protonation site of the drug is the pyridine ring nitrogen atom. The chemoselective acetylation of phenazopyridine (2) and its influence on the polarization of the azo nitrogen atoms were evidenced by the (15)N NMR spectra. Molecular calculations of the phenazopyridines 2-4 show that the pyridine and phenyl groups are oriented in an antiperiplanar conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-b atom and the C-2 amino group preserving the E-azo stereochemistry.

  3. A spectral correlation function for efficient sequential NMR assignments of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Bartels, C; Wüthrich, K

    1994-11-01

    A new computer-based approach is described for efficient sequence-specific assignment of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins. For this purpose three-dimensional (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra are divided up into two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H strips which extend over the entire spectral width along one dimension and have a width of ca. 100 Hz, centered about the amide proton chemical shifts along the other dimension. A spectral correlation function enables sorting of these strips according to proximity of the corresponding residues in the amino acid sequence. Thereby, starting from a given strip in the spectrum, the probability of its corresponding to the C-terminal neighboring residue is calculated for all other strips from the similarity of their peak patterns with a pattern predicted for the sequentially adjoining residue, as manifested in the scalar product of the vectors representing the predicted and measured peak patterns. Tests with five different proteins containing both α-helices and β-sheets, and ranging in size from 58 to 165 amino acid residues show that the discrimination achieved between the sequentially neighboring residue and all other residues compares well with that obtained with an unguided interactive search of pairs of sequentially neighboring strips, with important savings in the time needed for complete analysis of 3D (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra. The integration of this routine into the program package XEASY ensures that remaining ambiguities can be resolved by visual inspection of the strips, combined with reference to the amino acid sequence and information on spin-system types obtained from additional NMR spectra.

  4. NMR study of Met-1 human Angiogenin: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment.

    PubMed

    Tsika, Aikaterini C; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Leonidas, Demetres D; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2016-10-01

    Here, we report the high yield expression and preliminary structural analysis via solution hetero-nuclear NMR spectroscopy of the recombinant Met-1 human Angiogenin. The analysis reveals a well folded as well as, a monomeric polypeptide. Τhe sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances at high percentage was obtained. Also, using TALOS+ its secondary structure elements were determined.

  5. Natural-abundance 15N NMR studies of Turkey ovomucoid third domain. Assignment of peptide 15N resonances to the residues at the reactive site region via proton-detected multiple-quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Polo, Gilberto; Krishnamoorthi, R.; Markley, John L.; Live, David H.; Davis, Donald G.; Cowburn, David

    Heteronuclear two-dimensional 1H{ 15N} multiple-quantum (MQ) spectroscopy has been applied to a protein sample at natural abundance: ovomucoid third domain from turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo), a serine proteinase inhibitor of 56 amino acid residues. Peptide amide 1H NMR assignments obtained by two-dimensional 1H{ 1H} NMR methods (R. Krishnamoorthi and J. L. Markley, unpublished data) led to identification of the corresponding 1H{ 15N} MQ coherence cross peaks. From these, 15N NMR chemical shifts were determined for several specific backbone amide groups of amino acid residues located around the reactive site region of the inhibitor. The results suggest that amide 15N chemical shifts, which are readily obtained in this way, may serve as sensitive probes for conformational studies of proteins.

  6. 1H- and 15N-NMR assignment and solution structure of the chemotactic Escherichia coli Che Y protein.

    PubMed

    Bruix, M; Pascual, J; Santoro, J; Prieto, J; Serrano, L; Rico, M

    1993-08-01

    Che Y is a 129-residue parallel alpha/beta protein involved in bacterial chemotaxis. We have used this protein as a model to study the folding reaction of parallel alpha/beta proteins. As a first step we carried out the complete assignment of the 1H and 15N spectra from Escherichia coli Che Y protein on the basis of two-dimensional 1H homonuclear and 1H-15N heteronuclear experiments by using sequence-specific methods. Our assignments differ from the preliminary assignments made by Kar et al. [Kar, L., Matsumura, P. & Johnson, M.E. (1992) Biochem. J. 287, 521-531] of aromatic residues obtained by comparison of NOEs with short proton-proton distances in the crystal structure of Che Y. The analysis of the extension of the secondary elements, as well as a preliminary calculation of the three-dimensional structure, indicate that the solution structure is closely coincident with the single crystal structure determined by X-ray diffraction.

  7. Assignment of the sup 1 H and sup 15 N NMR spectra of Rhodobacter capsulatus ferrocytochrome c sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gooley, P.R.; Caffrey, M.S.; Cusanovich, M.A.; MacKenzie, N.E. )

    1990-03-06

    The peptide resonances of the {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of ferrocytochrome c{sub 2} from Rhodobacter capsulatus are sequentially assigned by a combination of 2D {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N spectroscopy, the latter performed on {sup 15}N-enriched protein. Short-range nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data show {alpha}-helices from residues 3-17, 55-65, 69-88, and 103-115. Within the latter two {alpha}-helices, there are three single 3{sub 10} turns, 70-72, 76-78, and 107-109. In addition {alpha}H-NH{sub i+1} and {alpha}H-NH{sub i+2} NOEs indicate that the N-terminal helix (3-17) is distorted. Compared to horse or tuna cytochrome c and cytochrome c{sub 2} of Rhodospirillium rubrum, there is a 6-residue insertion at residues 23-29 in R. capsulatus cytochrome c{sub 2}. The NOE data show that this insertion forms a loop, probably an {Omega} loop. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation experiments are used to follow NH exchange over a period of 40 h. As the 2D spectra are acquired in short time periods (30 min), rates for intermediate exchanging protons can be measured. Comparison of the NH exchange data for the N-terminal helix of cytochrome c{sub 2} of R. capsulatus with the highly homologous horse heart cytochrome c shows that this helix is less stable in cytochrome c{sub 2}.

  8. 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments of StnII-Y111N, a highly impaired mutant of the sea anemone actinoporin Sticholysin II.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Cea, Miguel A; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Martínez-del-Pozo, Alvaro; Gavilanes, José G; Bruix, Marta

    2010-04-01

    Sticholysin II is an actinoporin of 175 amino acids produced by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. Several studies with different mutants have been performed to characterize its molecular properties and activity. As a first step towards a 3D structural characterization and its interaction with membrane models at a residue level, herein we report the nearly complete NMR (15)N, (13)C and (1)H chemical shifts assignments of the Y111N variant at pH 4.0 and 25 degrees C (BMRB No. 16630). The assignment is complete for the biologically relevant residues, specially for those implicated in membrane interactions.

  9. Complete 15N and 1H NMR assignments for the amino-terminal domain of the phage 434 repressor in the urea-unfolded form

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Dario; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    The amino-terminal domain of the phage 434 repressor consisting of residues 1-69 forms a globular structure of five tightly packed helices, with nearly identical molecular architectures in crystals and in solution. Upon addition of urea to an aqueous solution of this protein, the NMR spectrum of a second form of the protein appears in addition to the native form, and at a urea concentration of 7 M, this urea-unfolded form is the only species observed. At intermediate urea concentrations, the two forms of the protein inter-convert at a rate that allows the observation of the exchange process by NMR. Starting from the previous assignments for the native protein, we obtained nearly complete sequence-specific 1H and 15N NMR assignments for the unfolded form of the protein. For most amino acid residues, the 1H chemical shifts of the urea-unfolded protein are very similar to the random coil values, but some discrete regions of the polypeptide chain were identified that are likely to retain residual nonrandom spatial structure as evidenced by deviations of 1H chemical shifts and amide proton exchange rates from the expected random coil values. PMID:1584772

  10. Backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments for the Cyanothece 51142 protein cce_0567: a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Sofia, Heidi J.

    2008-06-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 (contig 83.1_1_243_746) contains the sequence for an hypothetical protein that falls into the DUF683 family. As observed for the other 54 DUF683 proteins currently listed in the GenBank database, this 78-residue (9.0 kDa) protein in Cyanothece is also found in a nitrogen fixation gene cluster suggesting that it is involved in the process. To date no structural information exists for any of the proteins in the DUF683 family. In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 may play in nitrogen fixation and to obtain structural information for a member of the DUF683 protein family, a construct containing DUF683 from Cyanothece 51142 was generated, expressed, purified, and the solution properties characterized. A total rotational correlation time (tc) of 17.1 ns was estimated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggesting a molecular weight of ~ 40 kDa, an observation dictating that DUF683 is a tetramer in solution. Using triple-labeled (2H, 13C, 15N) and residue-specific 15N-labeled amino acids (L, K, V, and E/Q) samples, most of the backbone and side chain resonances for DUF683 were assigned. The 13C alpha chemical shifts and NOESY NMR data indicate that the protein is helical from K18-E75.

  11. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part I: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Mayaro virus (MAYV).

    PubMed

    Melekis, Efstathios; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Chasapis, Christos T; Margiolaki, Irene; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-04-01

    Macro domains are ADP-ribose-binding modules present in all eukaryotic organisms, bacteria and archaea. They are also found in non-structural proteins of several positive strand RNA viruses such as alphaviruses. Here, we report the high yield expression and preliminary structural analysis through solution NMR spectroscopy of the macro domain from New World Mayaro Alphavirus. The recombinant protein was well-folded and in a monomeric state. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure determined by TALOS+.

  12. 1H, 15N, and 13C backbone chemical shift assignments, secondary structure, and magnesium-binding characteristics of the Bacillus subtilis response regulator, Spo0F, determined by heteronuclear high-resolution NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Feher, V. A.; Zapf, J. W.; Hoch, J. A.; Dahlquist, F. W.; Whiteley, J. M.; Cavanagh, J.

    1995-01-01

    Spo0F, sporulation stage 0 F protein, a 124-residue protein responsible, in part, for regulating the transition of Bacillus subtilis from a vegetative state to a dormant endospore, has been studied by high-resolution NMR. The 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shift assignments for the backbone residues have been determined from analyses of 3D spectra, 15N TOCSY-HSQC, 15N NOESY-HSQC, HNCA, and HN(CO)CA. Assignments for many sidechain proton resonances are also reported. The secondary structure, inferred from short- and medium-range NOEs, 3JHN alpha coupling constants, and hydrogen exchange patterns, define a topology consistent with a doubly wound (alpha/beta)5 fold. Interestingly, comparison of the secondary structure of Spo0F to the structure of the Escherichia coli response regulator, chemotaxis Y protein (CheY) (Volz K, Matsumura P, 1991, J Biol Chem 266:15511-15519; Bruix M et al., 1993, Eur J Biochem 215:573-585), show differences in the relative length of secondary structure elements that map onto a single face of the tertiary structure of CheY. This surface may define a region of binding specificity for response regulators. Magnesium titration of Spo0F, followed by amide chemical shift changes, gives an equilibrium dissociation constant of 20 +/- 5 mM. Amide resonances most perturbed by magnesium binding are near the putative site of phosphorylation, Asp 54. PMID:8528078

  13. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part II: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV).

    PubMed

    Makrynitsa, Garyfallia I; Ntonti, Dioni; Marousis, Konstantinos D; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-10-01

    Macro domains consist of 130-190 amino acid residues and appear to be highly conserved in all kingdoms of life. Intense research on this field has shown that macro domains bind ADP-ribose and other similar molecules, but their exact function still remains intangible. Macro domains are highly conserved in the Alphavirus genus and the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a member of this genus that causes fatal encephalitis to equines and humans. In this study we report the high yield recombinant expression and preliminary solution NMR study of the macro domain of VEEV. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure predicted by TALOS+. The protein shows a unique mixed α/β-fold.

  14. 15N-15N Proton Assisted Recoupling in Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Józef R.; De Paëpe, Gaël; Eddy, Matthew T.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiment for obtaining 15N-15N correlation spectra. The approach yields direct information about the secondary and tertiary structure of proteins, including identification of α-helical stretches and inter-strand connectivity in antiparallel β-sheets, which are of major interest for structural studies of membrane proteins and amyloid fibrils. The method, 15N-15N proton assisted recoupling (PAR), relies on a second order mechanism, third spin assisted recoupling (TSAR), used previously in the context of 15N-13C and 13C-13C polarization transfer schemes. In comparison to 15N-15N proton driven spin diffusion experiments, the PAR technique accelerates polarization transfer between 15N’s by a factor of ~102−103, and is furthermore applicable over the entire range of currently available MAS frequencies (10–70 kHz). PMID:19334788

  15. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported.

  16. Stereospecific assignments of glycine in proteins by stereospecific deuteration and {sup 15}N labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Curley, R.W. Jr.; Panigot, M.J.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Stereospecific assignments are important for accurately determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins through the use of multidimensional NMR techniques. It is especially important to stereospecifically assign the glycine {alpha}-protons in proteins because of the potential for different backbone conformations of this residue. These stereospecific assignments are critical for interpreting the {sup 3}J{sub NH,{alpha}H} coupling constants and NOEs involving the glycine {alpha}-protons that determine the conformation of this part of the protein. However, it is often difficult to unambiguously obtain the stereospecific assignments for glycine residues by using only NOE data. In this poster, we present a method for unambiguous, stereospecific assignment of the {alpha}-protons of glycine residues. This method involves synthesis of stereo-specifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gly using a slightly modified procedure originally described by Woodard and coworkers for the stereoselective deuteration of glycine. The stereospecifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gy has been incorporated into recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial systems (FKBP) and mammalian cells (u-PA). Two- and three-dimensional isotope-filtered and isotope-edited NMR experiments were used to obtain the stereospecific assignments of the glycine {alpha}-protons for these proteins.

  17. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  18. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for E73 from Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus ragged hills, a hyperthermophilic crenarchaeal virus from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Casey; Menon, Smita; Lawrence, C Martin; Copié, Valérie

    2009-12-01

    Crenarchaeal viruses are commonly found in hyperthermal acidic environments such as those of Yellowstone National Park. These remarkable viruses not only exhibit unusual morphologies, but also display extreme genetic diversity. However, little is known about crenarchaeal viral life cycles, virus-host interactions, and their adaptation to hyperthermophilic environments. In an effort to better understand the functions of crenarchaeal viruses and the proteins encoded by their genomes, we have undertaken detailed structural and functional studies of gene products encoded in the open reading frames of Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus ragged hills. Herein, we report ((15)N, (13)C, (1)H) resonance assignments of backbone and side chain atoms of a 19.1 kDa homodimeric E73 protein of SSVRH.

  19. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  20. Overcoming the overlap problem in the assignment of 1H NMR spectra of larger proteins by use of three-dimensional heteronuclear 1H-15N Hartmann-Hahn-multiple quantum coherence and nuclear Overhauser-multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy: application to interleukin 1 beta.

    PubMed

    Marion, D; Driscoll, P C; Kay, L E; Wingfield, P T; Bax, A; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1989-07-25

    The application of three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to the sequential assignment of the 1H NMR spectra of larger proteins is presented, using uniformly labeled (approximately 95%) [15N]interleukin 1 beta, a protein of 153 residues and molecular mass of 17.4 kDa, as an example. The two-dimensional (2D) 600-MHz spectra of interleukin 1 beta are too complex for complete analysis, owing to extensive cross-peak overlap and chemical shift degeneracy. We show that the combined use of 3D 1H-15N Hartmann-Hahn-multiple quantum coherence (HOHAHA-HMQC) and nuclear Overhauser-multiple quantum coherence (NOESY-HMQC) spectroscopy, designed to provide the necessary through-bond and through-space correlations for sequential assignment, provides a practical general-purpose method for resolving ambiguities which severely limit the analysis of conventional 2D NMR spectra. The absence of overlapping cross-peaks in these 3D spectra allows the unambiguous identification of C alpha H(i)-NH(i+1) and NH(i)-NH(i+1) through-space nuclear Overhauser connectivities necessary for connecting a particular C alpha H(i)-NH(i) through-bond correlation with its associated through-space sequential cross-peak The problem of amide NH chemical shift degeneracy in the 1H NMR spectrum is therefore effectively removed, and the assignment procedure simply involves inspecting a series of 2D 1H-1H slices edited by the chemical shift of the directly bonded 15N atom. Connections between residues can be identified almost without any knowledge of the spin system types involved, though this type of information is clearly required for the eventual placement of the connected residues within the primary sequence.

  1. 15N chemical shift tensors and conformation of solid polypeptides containing 15N-labeled glycine residue by 15N NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Akira; Ozaki, Takuo; Fujito, Teruaki; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ando, Isao; Magoshi, Jun

    1998-01-01

    The correlation between the isotropic 15N chemical shift ( δiso) and 15N chemical shift tensor components ( δ11, δ22 and δ33) and the main-chain conformation such as the polyglycine I (PGI: β-sheet), II (PGII: 3 1-helix), α-helix and β-sheet forms of solid polypeptides [Gly∗,X] n consisting of 15N-labeled glycine (Gly∗) and other amino acids (X: natural abundance of 15N) has been studied by solid-state 15N NMR method. A series of polypeptides [Gly∗,X] n (X = glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-valine, L-isoleucine, β-benzyl L-aspartate, γ-benzyl L-glutamate, ɛ-carbobenzoxy L-lysine, and sarcosine) were synthesized by the α-amino acid N-carboxy anhydride (NCA) method. Conformations of these polypeptides in the solid state were characterized on the basis of conformation-dependent 13C chemical shifts in the 13C cross-polarization-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) NMR spectra and by the characteristic bands in the IR and far-IR spectra. The δiso, δ11, δ22 and δ33 of the polypetides were determined from the 15N CP-MAS and 15N CP-static (powder pattern) spectra. It was found that the δiso, δ11, δ22 and δ33 in the PGI form (δ 83.5, 185, 40.7 and 25 ppm, resp.) are upfield from those in the PGII form (88.5, 194, 42.1 and 29 ppm, resp.), which were reproduced by the calculated 15N shielding constants using the finite perturbation theory (FPT)-INDO method. It was also found that the δ22 of the Gly∗ of [Gly∗,X] n is closely related to the main-chain conformation and the neighboring amino acid sequence, although the δiso is almost independent of the glycine content and conformation. Consequently, the δ22 value of Gly∗ containing copolypeptides is useful for the structural (main-chain conformation and neighboring amino acid sequence) analysis in the solid state by 15N NMR, if the 15N-labeled copolypeptide or natural protein can be provided. In addition, it is shown that the δiso of the glycine residue is useful for the conformational study of some

  2. Experimental and calculated 1H, 13C, 15N NMR spectra of famotidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barańska, M.; Czarniecki, K.; Proniewicz, L. M.

    2001-05-01

    Famotidine, 3-[[[2-[(aminoiminomethyl)amino]-4-thiazolyl]methyl]thio]- N-(aminosulfonyl), is a histamine H 2-receptor blocker that has been used mainly for the treatment of peptic ulcers and the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Its NMR spectra in different solvents were reported earlier; however, detailed interpretation has not been done thus far. In this work, experimental 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectra of famotidine dissolved in DMSO-d 6 are shown. The assignment of observed chemical shifts is based on quantum chemical calculation at the Hartree-Fock/6-31G ∗ level. The geometry optimization of the famotidine molecule with two internal hydrogen bonds, i.e. [N(3)-H(23)⋯N(9) and N(3)⋯H(34)-N(20)], is done by using the B3LYP method with the 6-31G ∗ basis set.

  3. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  4. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  5. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  6. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Sequence-specific sup 1 H and sup 15 N resonance assignments for human dihydrofolate reductase in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Nirmala, N.R.; Wagner, G. ); Delcamp, T.J.; DeYarman, M.T.; Freisheim, J.H. )

    1992-01-14

    Dihydrofolate reductase is an intracellular target enzyme for folate antagonists, including the anticancer drug methotrexate. In order to design novel drugs with altered binding properties, a detailed description of protein-drug interactions in solution is desirable to understand the specificity of drug binding. As a first step in this process, heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been used to make sequential resonance assignments for more than 90% of the residues in human dihydrofolate reductase complexed with methotrexate. Uniform enrichment of the 21.5-kDa protein with {sup 15}N was required to obtain the resonance assignments via heteronuclear 3D NMR spectroscopy since homonuclear 2D spectra did not provide sufficient {sup 1}H resonance dispersion. Medium- and long-range NOE's have been used to characterize the secondary structure of the binary ligand-enzyme complex in solution.

  8. Ner protein of phage Mu: Assignments using {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strzelecka, T.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    The Ner protein is a small (74-amino acid) DNA-binding protein that regulates a switch between the lysogenic and lytic stages of phage Mu. It inhibits expression of the C repressor gene and down-regulates its own expression. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled protein provided most of the backbone and some of the sidechain proton assignments. The secondary structure determination using two-dimensional NOESY experiments showed that Ner consists of five {alpha}-helices. However, because most of the sidechain protons could not be assigned, the full structure was not determined. Using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled Ner and a set of three-dimensional experiments, we were able to assign all of the backbone and 98% of the sidechain protons. In particular, the CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH experiments were used to sequentially assign the C{alpha} and C{beta} resonances; the HCCH-CTOCSY and HCCH-COSY were used to assign sidechain carbon and proton resonances.

  9. 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance assignment and secondary structure of the cytotoxic ribonuclease alpha-Sarcin.

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Olivas, R.; Bruix, M.; Santoro, J.; Martínez del Pozo, A.; Lacadena, J.; Gavilanes, J. G.; Rico, M.

    1996-01-01

    The ribosome-inactivating protein alpha-Sarcin (alpha S) is a 150-residue fungal ribonuclease that, after entering sensitive cells, selectively cleaves a single phosphodiester bond in an universally conserved sequence of the major rRNA to inactivate the ribosome and thus exert its cytotoxic action. As a first step toward establishing the structure-dynamics-function relationships in this system, we have carried out the assignment of the 1H and 15N NMR spectrum of alpha S on the basis of homonuclear (1H-1H) and heteronuclear (1H-15N) two-dimensional correlation spectra of a uniformly 15N-labeled sample, and two selectively 15N-labeled (Tyr and Phe) samples, as well as a single three-dimensional experiment. The secondary structure of alpha S, as derived from the characteristic patterns of dipolar connectivities between backbone protons, conformational chemical shifts, and the protection of backbone amide protons against exchange, consists of a long N-terminal beta-hairpin, a short alpha-helical segment, and a C-terminal beta-sheet of five short strands arranged in a + 1, + 1, + 1, + 1 topology, connected by long loops in which the 13 Pro residues are located. PMID:8732769

  10. (13)C, (15)N CPMAS NMR and GIAO DFT calculations of stereoisomeric oxindole alkaloids from Cat's Claw (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wolniak, Michał; Pisklak, Maciej; Gliński, Jan A; Davey, Matthew H; Wawer, Iwona

    2008-11-01

    Oxindole alkaloids, isolated from the bark of Uncaria tomentosa [Willd. ex Schult.] Rubiaceae, are considered to be responsible for the biological activity of this herb. Five pentacyclic and two tetracyclic alkaloids were studied by solid-state NMR and theoretical GIAO DFT methods. The (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra were recorded for mitraphylline, isomitraphylline, pteropodine (uncarine C), isopteropodine (uncarine E), speciophylline (uncarine D), rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline. Theoretical GIAO DFT calculations of shielding constants provide arguments for identification of asymmetric centers and proper assignment of NMR spectra. These alkaloids are 7R/7S and 20R/20S stereoisomeric pairs. Based on the (13)C CP MAS chemical shifts the 7S alkaloids (delta C3 70-71ppm) can be easily and conveniently distinguished from 7R (deltaC3 74.5-74.9ppm), also 20R (deltaC20 41.3-41.7ppm) from the 20S (deltaC20 36.3-38.3ppm). The epiallo-type isomer (3R, 20S) of speciophylline is characterized by a larger (15)N MAS chemical shift of N4 (64.6ppm) than the allo-type (3S, 20S) of isopteropodine (deltaN4 53.3ppm). (15)N MAS chemical shifts of N1-H in pentacyclic alkaloids are within 131.9-140.4ppm.

  11. hNCOcanH pulse sequence and a robust protocol for rapid and unambiguous assignment of backbone ((1)H(N), (15)N and (13)C') resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence named as hNCOcanH has been described to aid rapid sequential assignment of backbone resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. The experiment has been derived by a simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147]; t2 evolution is used to frequency label (13)C' rather than (15)N (similar trick has also been used in the design of hNCAnH pulse sequence from hNcaNH [Frueh et al., JACS, 131 (2009) 12880-12881]). The modification results in a spectrum equivalent to HNCO, but in addition to inter-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi , Ci-1), the spectrum also contains additional intra-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi-1 , Ci-1) in the direct proton dimension which has maximum resolution. This is the main strength of the experiment and thus, even a small difference in amide (1) H chemical shifts (5-6 Hz) can be used for establishing a sequential connectivity. This experiment in combination with the HNN experiment described previously [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] leads to a more robust assignment protocol for backbone resonances ((1) H(N) , (15)N) than could be derived from the combination of HNN and HN(C)N experiments [Bhavesh et al., Biochemistry, 40 (2001) 14727-14735]. Further, this new protocol enables assignment of (13)C' resonances as well. We believe that the experiment and the protocol presented here will be of immense value for structural-and functional-proteomics research by NMR. Performance of this experiment has been demonstrated using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin.

  12. hNCOcanH pulse sequence and a robust protocol for rapid and unambiguous assignment of backbone ((1)H(N), (15)N and (13)C') resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence named as hNCOcanH has been described to aid rapid sequential assignment of backbone resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. The experiment has been derived by a simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147]; t2 evolution is used to frequency label (13)C' rather than (15)N (similar trick has also been used in the design of hNCAnH pulse sequence from hNcaNH [Frueh et al., JACS, 131 (2009) 12880-12881]). The modification results in a spectrum equivalent to HNCO, but in addition to inter-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi , Ci-1), the spectrum also contains additional intra-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi-1 , Ci-1) in the direct proton dimension which has maximum resolution. This is the main strength of the experiment and thus, even a small difference in amide (1) H chemical shifts (5-6 Hz) can be used for establishing a sequential connectivity. This experiment in combination with the HNN experiment described previously [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] leads to a more robust assignment protocol for backbone resonances ((1) H(N) , (15)N) than could be derived from the combination of HNN and HN(C)N experiments [Bhavesh et al., Biochemistry, 40 (2001) 14727-14735]. Further, this new protocol enables assignment of (13)C' resonances as well. We believe that the experiment and the protocol presented here will be of immense value for structural-and functional-proteomics research by NMR. Performance of this experiment has been demonstrated using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin. PMID:21818779

  13. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  14. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  15. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  16. Hydrogen Bonds in Crystalline Imidazoles Studied by 15N NMR and ab initio MO Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Masui, Hirotsugu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Hayashi, Shigenobu

    1999-07-01

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonds of the type N-H...N in crystals of imidazole and its 4-substituted and 4,5-disubstituted derivatives were studied by 15N CP/MAS NMR and an ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculation. In the 15N CP/MAS NMR spectrum of each of the imidazole derivatives, two peaks due to the two different functional groups, >NH and =N-, were observed. The value of the 15N isotropic chemical shift for each nitrogen atom depends on both the length of the intermolecular hydrogen bond and the kind of the substituent or substituents. It was found that the difference between the experimen-tal chemical shifts of >NH and =N-varies predominantly with the hydrogen bond length but does not show any systematic dependence on the kind of substituent. The ab initio MO calculations suggest that the hydrogen bond formation influences the 15N isotropic chemical shift predominantly, and that the difference between the 15N isotropic chemical shift of >NH and =N-varies linearly with the hydrogen bond length.

  17. Incorporation of (15)N-TNT transformation products into humifying plant organic matter as revealed by one- and two-dimensional solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Knicker, Heike

    2003-06-01

    Solid-state double cross polarization magic angle spinning (DCPMAS) 15N 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied to study the incorporation of TNT transformation products into humifying plant organic matter. For this approach, 13C-enriched plant material (Lolium perenne) was mixed with quartz sand and aerobically incubated for 11 months after addition of 15N(3)-2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). After successive extraction of the incubate with water, methanol and ethyl acetate, approximately 60% of the 15N added as 15N(3)-TNT (15N(add)) remained in the solid organic residue (SOR-fraction). The acid insoluble fraction (AI) obtained after NaOH and HCl extractions contained approximately 20% of 15N(add). For both fractions, 15N NMR spectroscopy revealed an almost complete reduction of the TNT after 11 months of aerobic incubation. Most of the reduced nitrogen groups underwent further condensation. The corresponding DCPMAS NMR spectra allowed the identification of amides that are further substituted by alkyl groups that resist even acid hydrolysis. This assigns them to relatively stable compounds rather than to newly synthesized microbial peptides. The results of this study suggest further that the covalent binding of TNT transformation products to plant derived organic matter is mediated by alkylation and acetylation reactions, rather than by 1,4 addition of TNT-derived nitrogenous groups to quinones of the humic material.

  18. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shifts assignments for human endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide EMAP II.

    PubMed

    Lozhko, Dmytro; Stanek, Jan; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Kozminski, Wiktor; Zhukov, Igor; Kornelyuk, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Endothelial and monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation, apoptosis and angiogenesis processes in tumour tissues. Structurally, the EMAP II is a 169 amino acid residues long C-terminal domain (residues 147-312) of auxiliary tRNA binding protein p43. In spite of existence in pdb databank of two X-ray structures there are some important aspects of EMAP II cytokine function which are still not fully understood in detail. To obtain information about 3D structure and backbone dynamic processes in solution we perform structure evaluation of human EMAP II cytokine by NMR spectroscopy. The standard approach to sequence-specific backbone assignment using 3D NMR data sets was not successful in our studies and was supplemented by recently developed 4D NMR experiments with random sampling of evolution time space. Here we report the backbone and side chain (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shifts in solution for recombinant EMAP II cytokine together with secondary structure provided by TALOS + software.

  19. A solution NMR study of the selectively 13C, 15N-labeled peptaibol chrysospermin C in methanol.

    PubMed

    Anders, R; Wenschuh, H; Soskic, V; Fischer-Frühholz, S; Ohlenschläger, O; Dornberger, K; Brown, L R

    1998-07-01

    The conformation of the 19-residue peptaibol chrysospermin C in methanol has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy using selective 15N and 13C labeling of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues. Complete 1H and 13C sequential assignments, including stereospecific assignments for the heavily overlapped resonances from the two Cbeta methyl groups of the eight Aib residues, are reported for a peptaibol for the first time. An Aib residue followed by a Pro is an exception to previous suggestions regarding stereospecific assignment of the two Cbeta methyl groups of Aib residues. Local nuclear Overhauser effects and 3J(HNC') and 3J(HNCbeta) scalar couplings indicate that the phi angles of the Aib residues are restricted sterically to local conformations consistent with right-handed helices. Despite these constraints on the eight Aib residues, the NMR data for chrysospermin C in methanol are generally most consistent with an ensemble of transient conformations, including backbone conformations inconsistent with helical structures. Initial NMR measurements for chrysospermin C bound to micelles suggest structural and dynamic differences relative to alamethicin bound to micelles which may be related to differences in gating voltages for formation of ion channels.

  20. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  1. Error tolerant NMR backbone resonance assignment and automated structure generation.

    PubMed

    Alipanahi, Babak; Gao, Xin; Karakoc, Emre; Li, Shuai Cheng; Balbach, Frank; Feng, Guangyu; Donaldson, Logan; Li, Ming

    2011-02-01

    Error tolerant backbone resonance assignment is the cornerstone of the NMR structure determination process. Although a variety of assignment approaches have been developed, none works sufficiently well on noisy fully automatically picked peaks to enable the subsequent automatic structure determination steps. We have designed an integer linear programming (ILP) based assignment system (IPASS) that has enabled fully automatic protein structure determination for four test proteins. IPASS employs probabilistic spin system typing based on chemical shifts and secondary structure predictions. Furthermore, IPASS extracts connectivity information from the inter-residue information and the (automatically picked) (15)N-edited NOESY peaks which are then used to fix reliable fragments. When applied to automatically picked peaks for real proteins, IPASS achieves an average precision and recall of 82% and 63%, respectively. In contrast, the next best method, MARS, achieves an average precision and recall of 77% and 36%, respectively. The assignments generated by IPASS are then fed into our protein structure calculation system, FALCON-NMR, to determine the 3D structures without human intervention. The final models have backbone RMSDs of 1.25Å, 0.88Å, 1.49Å, and 0.67Å to the reference native structures for proteins TM1112, CASKIN, VRAR, and HACS1, respectively. The web server is publicly available at http://monod.uwaterloo.ca/nmr/ipass.

  2. Triple resonance experiments for aligned sample solid-state NMR of 13C and 15N labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Neeraj; Grant, Christopher V.; Park, Sang Ho; Brown, Jonathan Miles; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Initial steps in the development of a suite of triple-resonance 1H/13C/15N solid-state NMR experiments applicable to aligned samples of 13C and 15N labeled proteins are described. The experiments take advantage of the opportunities for 13C detection without the need for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling presented by samples with two different patterns of isotopic labeling. In one type of sample, the proteins are ~20% randomly labeled with 13C in all backbone and side chain carbon sites and ~100% uniformly 15N labeled in all nitrogen sites; in the second type of sample, the peptides and proteins are 13C labeled at only the α-carbon and 15N labeled at the amide nitrogen of a few residues. The requirement for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling while detecting 13C signals is avoided in the first case because of the low probability of any two 13C nuclei being bonded to each other; in the second case, the labeled 13Cα sites are separated by at least three bonds in the polypeptide chain. The experiments enable the measurement of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C and 15N–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies associated with the 13Cα and 13C′ backbone sites, which provide orientation constraints complementary to those derived from the 15N labeled amide backbone sites. 13C/13C spin-exchange experiments identify proximate carbon sites. The ability to measure 13C–15N dipolar coupling frequencies and correlate 13C and 15N resonances provides a mechanism for making backbone resonance assignments. Three-dimensional combinations of these experiments ensure that the resolution, assignment, and measurement of orientationally dependent frequencies can be extended to larger proteins. Moreover, measurements of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies for nearly all side chain sites enable the complete three-dimensional structures of proteins to be determined with this approach. PMID:17293139

  3. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  4. Solid-state /sup 15/N NMR of oriented lipid bilayer bound gramicidin A'

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, L.K.; Moll, F.; Mixon, T.E.; LoGrasso, P.V.; Lay, J.C.; Cross, T.A.

    1987-10-20

    Highly oriented samples of lipid and gramicidin A' (8:1 molar ratio) have been prepared with the samples extensively hydrated (approximately 70% water v/w). These preparations have been shown to be completely in a bilayer phase with a transition temperature of 28/sup 0/C, and evidence is presented indicating that the gramicidin is in the channel conformation. An estimate of the disorder in the alignment of the bilayers parallel with the glass plates used to align the bilayers can be made from the asymmetry of the nuclear magnetic resonances (NMR). Such an analysis indicates a maximal range of disorder of +-3/sup 0/. Uniformly /sup 15/N-labeled gramicidin has been biosynthesized by Bacillus brevis grown in a media containing /sup 15/N-labeled Escherichia coli cells as the only nitrogen source. When prepared with labeled gramicidin, the oriented samples result in high-resolution /sup 15/N NMR spectra showing 12 resonances for the 20 nitrogen sites of the polypeptide. The frequency of the three major multiple resonance peaks has been interpreted to yield the approximate orientation of the N-H bonds in the peptide linkages with respect to the magnetic field. The bond orientations are only partially consistent with the extant structural models of gramicidin.

  5. Differentiation of histidine tautomeric states using 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-08-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C, 15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture.

  6. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of murine amelogenin, an enamel biomineralization protein.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Bekhazi, Jacky G.; Cort, John R.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2008-06-01

    Amelogenin is the predominant matrix protein in developing dental enamel. Making extensive use of residue-specific 15N-labeled amino acids samples, the majority of the main and side chain resonances for murine amelogenin were assigned in 2% aqueous acetic acid at pH 3.0. This research was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the US-DOE. A large part of this research was performed at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

  7. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; Kispal, Brianna M.; Mireault, Christopher R.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W.

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  8. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported. PMID:25451865

  9. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  10. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of the KSR1 CA1 domain

    PubMed Central

    Koveal, Dorothy; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the murine KSR1 CA1 domain have been determined based on triple-resonance experiments using uniformly [13C, 15N]-labeled protein. This assignment is the first step towards the determination of the three-dimensional structure of the unique KSR1 CA1 domain. PMID:20737253

  11. Expression, purification, and mass spectrometric analysis of 15N, 13C-labeled RGD-hirudin, expressed in Pichia pastoris, for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yinong; Zhang, Yanling; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jue; Liu, Xingang; Dai, Linsen; Wang, Longsheng; Yu, Min; Mo, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A novel recombinant hirudin, RGD-hirudin, inhibits the activity of thrombin and the aggregation of platelets. Here, we successfully expressed (15)N, (13)C-labeled RGD-hirudin in Pichia pastoris in a fermenter. The protein was subsequently purified to yield sufficient quantities for structural and functional studies. The purified protein was characterized by HPLC and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. Analysis revealed that the protein was pure and uniformly labeled with (15)N and (13)C. A bioassay showed that the anti-thrombin activity and the anti-platelet aggregation ability of the labeled protein were the same as those of unlabeled RGD-hirudin. Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine almost complete backbone (15)N, (13)C and (1)H resonance assignments of the r-RGD-Hirudin. The (15)N-(1)H HSQC spectrum of uniformly (15)N, (13)C-labeled RGD-hirudin allowed successful assignment of the signals. Examples of the quality of the data are provided for the (15)N-(l)H correlation spectrum, and by selected planes of the CBCA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and HNCO experiments. These results provide a basis for further studies on the structure-function relationship of RGD-hirudin with thrombin and platelets. PMID:22879918

  12. 15N solid-state NMR provides a sensitive probe of oxidized flavin reactive sites.

    PubMed

    Koder, Ronald L; Walsh, Joseph D; Pometun, Maxim S; Dutton, P Leslie; Wittebort, Richard J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2006-11-29

    Flavins are central to the reactivity of a wide variety of enzymes and electron transport proteins. There is great interest in understanding the basis for the different reactivities displayed by flavins in different protein contexts. We propose solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) as a tool for directly observing reactive positions of the flavin ring and thereby obtaining information on their frontier orbitals. We now report the SS-NMR signals of the redox-active nitrogens N1 and N5, as well as that of N3. The chemical shift tensor of N5 is over 720 ppm wide, in accordance with the predictions of theory and our calculations. The signal of N3 can be distinguished on the basis of coupling to 1H absent for N1 and N5, as well as the shift tensor span of only 170 ppm, consistent with N3's lower aromaticity and lack of a nonbonding lone pair. The isotropic shifts and spans of N5 and N1 reflect two opposite extremes of the chemical shift range for "pyridine-type" N's, consistent with their electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical reactivities, respectively. Upon flavin reduction, N5's chemical shift tensor contracts dramatically to a span of less than 110 ppm, and the isotropic chemical shift changes by approximately 300 ppm. Both are consistent with loss of N5's nonbonding lone pair and decreased aromaticity, and illustrate the responsiveness of the 15N chemical shift principal values to electronic structure. Thus. 15N chemical shift principal values promise to be valuable tools for understanding electronic differences that underlie variations in flavin reactivity, as well as the reactivities of other heterocyclic cofactors. PMID:17117871

  13. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  14. Simultaneous cross polarization to 13C and 15N with 1H detection at 60 kHz MAS solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe high resolution MAS solid-state NMR experiments that utilize 1H detection with 60 kHz magic angle spinning; simultaneous cross-polarization from 1H to 15N and 13C nuclei; bidirectional cross-polarization between 13C and 15N nuclei; detection of both amide nitrogen and aliphatic carbon 1H; and measurement of both 13C and 15N chemical shifts through multi-dimensional correlation experiments. Three-dimensional experiments correlate amide 1H and alpha 1H selectively with 13C or 15N nuclei in a polypeptide chain. Two separate three-dimensional spectra correlating 1Hα/13Cα/1HN and 1HN/15N/1Hα are recorded simultaneously in a single experiment, demonstrating that a twofold savings in experimental time is potentially achievable. Spectral editing using bidirectional coherence transfer pathways enables simultaneous magnetization transfers between 15N, 13Cα(i) and 13C‧(i-1), facilitating intra- and inter-residue correlations for sequential resonance assignment. Non-uniform sampling is integrated into the experiments, further reducing the length of experimental time.

  15. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  16. hnCOcaNH and hncoCANH pulse sequences for rapid and unambiguous backbone assignment in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Reddy, Jithender G; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2010-09-01

    Time-saving in data acquisition is a major thrust of NMR pulse sequence development in the context of structural proteomics research. The conventional HNCA and HN(CA)CO pulse sequences, routinely used for sequential backbone assignment, have the limitation that they cannot distinguish inter- and intra-residue correlations. In order to remove this ambiguity, one has to record HNCO and HN(CO)CA or sequential HNCA experiments which provide unambiguous information of sequential correlations. However, this almost doubles the experimental time. Besides, they require repeated scanning through the (15)N planes to search for the matching peaks along the carbon dimension. In this background, we present here two pulse sequences, termed as hncoCANH and hnCOcaNH that lead to spectra equivalent to HNCA and HN(CA)CO spectra, respectively, but with direct distinction of inter- and intra-residue peaks; these occur with opposite signs in the new experiments. The two pulse sequences have been derived by simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] to frequency-label (13)C(alpha) or (13)C' instead of (15)N during the t(1) period. Like HN(C)N, these spectra also exhibit special patterns of self and sequential peaks around glycines and prolines, which enable direct identification of certain triplets of residues and thus provide internal checks during the sequential assignment walk. The spectra enable rapid and unambiguous assignment of H(N), (15)N and (13)C(alpha) (or (13)C') in a single experiment, and thus would be of great value in high-throughput structural proteomics. PMID:20643567

  17. Backbone dynamics of the oligomerization domain of p53 determined from 15N NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Omichinski, J G; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1995-05-01

    The backbone dynamics of the tetrameric p53 oligomerization domain (residues 319-360) have been investigated by two-dimensional inverse detected heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy at 500 and 600 MHz. 15N T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOEs were measured for 39 of 40 non-proline backbone NH vectors at both field strengths. The overall correlation time for the tetramer, calculated from the T1/T2 ratios, was found to be 14.8 ns at 35 degrees C. The correlation times and amplitudes of the internal motions were extracted from the relaxation data using the model-free formalism (Lipari G, Szabo A, 1982, J Am Chem Soc 104:4546-4559). The internal dynamics of the structural core of the p53 oligomerization domain are uniform and fairly rigid, with residues 327-354 exhibiting an average generalized order parameter (S2) of 0.88 +/- 0.08. The N- and C-termini exhibit substantial mobility and are unstructured in the solution structure of p53. Residues located at the N- and C-termini, in the beta-sheet, in the turn between the alpha-helix and beta-sheet, and at the C-terminal end of the alpha-helix display two distinct internal motions that are faster than the overall correlation time. Fast internal motions (< or = 20 ps) are within the extreme narrowing limit and are of uniform amplitude. The slower motions (0.6-2.2 ns) are outside the extreme narrowing limit and vary in amplitude.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663341

  18. Heteronuclear NMR studies of cobalamins. 11. sup 15 N NMR studies of the axial nucleotide and amide side chains of cyanocobalamin and dicyanocobamides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.; Brooks, H.B.; Xiang, Zou ); Victor, M.; Ray, A. ); Timkovich, R. )

    1990-11-28

    Spectroscopic and thermodynamic evidence for the structure of cobalamines and dicyanocobalamin (CN){sub 2}Cbl have been previously reported. The structure indicated the occurrence of the so-called tuck-in species. Further observations and characterization of the tuck-in species of (CN){sub 2}Cbl by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy are presented herein. These results represent the first observation of the {sup 15}N NMR spectrum of benzimidazole nucleotide of cobalamins. The first NMR observation of the amide protons of cobalamins and their connectivity to the amide nitrogens are also reported. 50 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the 15N/13C/1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins. PMID:26788853

  20. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-09-07

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin.

  1. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  2. 1H and 15N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially 1H-15N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate 15N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS 15N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via 1H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D 1H and 2D 1H-15N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  3. 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of the N-terminal domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED26.

    PubMed

    Peruzzini, Riccardo; Lens, Zoé; Verger, Alexis; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Baert, Jean-Luc; Villeret, Vincent; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cantrelle, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    MED26 is a subunit of the Mediator, a very large complex involved in regulation of gene transcription by RNA Polymerase II. MED26 regulates the switch between initiation and elongation phases of the transcription. This function requires interaction of its N-terminal domain (NTD) with several protein partners implicated in transcriptional regulation. Molecular details of the structure and interaction mode of MED26 NTD would improve understanding of this complex regulation. As a first step towards structural characterization, sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N assignments for MED26 NTD was performed based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. TALOS+ analysis of the chemical shifts data revealed a domain solely composed of helices. Assignments will be further used to solve NMR structure and dynamics of MED26 NTD and investigate the molecular details of its interaction with protein partners.

  4. A closer look at the nitrogen next door: 1H-15N NMR methods for glycosaminoglycan structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beni, Szabolcs; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, experimental conditions were presented for the detection of the N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) NHSO3- or sulfamate 1H and 15N NMR resonances of the pharmaceutically and biologically important glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin in aqueous solution. In the present work, we explore further the applicability of nitrogen-bound proton detection to provide structural information for GAGs. Compared to the detection of 15N chemical shifts of aminosugars through long-range couplings using the IMPACT-HNMBC pulse sequence, the more sensitive two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiments provided additional structural data. The IMPACT-HNMBC experiment remains a powerful tool as demonstrated by the spectrum measured for the unsubstituted amine of 3-O-sulfoglucosamine (GlcN(3S)), which cannot be observed with the 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiment due to the fast exchange of the amino group protons with solvent. The 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectrum reported for the mixture of model compounds GlcNS and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrate the broad utility of this approach. Measurements for the synthetic pentasaccharide drug Arixtra® (Fondaparinux sodium) in aqueous solution illustrate the power of this NMR pulse sequence for structural characterization of highly similar N-sulfoglucosamine residues in GAG-derived oligosaccharides.

  5. A new strategy for sequential assignment of intrinsically unstructured proteins based on 15N single isotope labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Gerard, Melanie; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy

    2013-11-01

    We describe a new efficient strategy for the sequential assignment of amide resonances of a conventional 15N-1H HSQC spectrum of intrinsically unfolded proteins, based on composite NOESY-TOCSY and TOCSY-NOESY mixing times. These composite mixing times lead to a Hα-proton mediated unidirectional transfer of amide to amide proton. We have implemented the composite mixing times in an HSQC-NOESY-HSQC manner to obtain directional connectivity between amides of neighbouring residues. We experimentally determine the optimal mixing times for both transfer schemes, and demonstrate its use in the assignment for both a fragment of the neuronal tau protein and for α-synuclein.

  6. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignments and dynamic properties of the PDZ tandem of Whirlin.

    PubMed

    Delhommel, Florent; Wolff, Nicolas; Cordier, Florence

    2016-10-01

    Mammals perceive sounds thanks to mechanosensory hair cells located in the inner ear. The stereocilia of these cells are tightly bound together in bundles by a network of cadherins and scaffolding proteins. Stereocilia deflection induces stretching of this network and is responsible for hair cell depolarization that triggers the neuronal message, transducing the mechanical signal into an electric signal transmissible to the brain. Nearly all proteins involved in this mechano-electrical transduction network contain short C-terminal motifs of interaction with PDZ domains (PSD-95, Discs Large, ZO-1). Interestingly only two of these proteins encompass PDZ domains: Harmonin and Whirlin. As our first step towards a comprehensive structural study of Whirlin, we have assigned the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonances of a tandem formed by the first two PDZ domains of Whirlin, reported the secondary structure elements of this tandem as predicted by the TALOS+ server and evaluated its dynamics from (15)N relaxation measurements.

  7. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for Escherichia coli ytfP, a member of the broadly conserved UPF0131 protein domain family

    SciTech Connect

    Aramini, James M.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Huang, Yuanpeng; Rajan, Paranji K.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    Protein ytfP from Escherichia coli (Swiss-Prot ID: YTFP-ECOLI; NESG target ID: ER111; Wunderlich et al., 2004) is a 113-residue member of the UPF0131 protein family (Pfam ID: PF03674) of unknown function. This domain family is found in organisms from all three kingdoms, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 97% of backbone and 91% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a mixed a/b topology,????????. BMRB deposit with Accession No. 6448. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  8. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for the protein coded by gene locus BB0938 of Bordetella bronchiseptica

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Paolo; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Xiao, Rong; Ho, Chi K.; Ma, LiChung; Acton, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    The product of gene locus BB0938 from Bordetella bronchiseptica (Swiss-Prot ID: Q7WNU7-BORBR; NESG target ID: BoR11; Wunderlich et al., 2004; Pfam ID: PF03476) is a 128-residue protein of unknown function. This broadly conserved protein family is found in eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 98% of backbone and 94% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a b topology with a seven-residue helical insert, ??????????. BMRB deposit with accession number 6693. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  9. Detection of organic sulfur by {sup 15}N and {sup 19}F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of {sup 15}N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using {sup 15}N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique {sup 15}N- or, {sup 19}F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  10. An sup 15 N NMR method for the characterization of organic sulfur in coal and coal products via iminosulfurane formation

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, J.A.; Lamb, C.N.; Linehan, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The indirect of organic sulfur by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy in the solid state is feasible by facile reactions providing the iminosulfurane structures. Unfortunately, nitrogen chemical shifts appear to be insufficiently sensitive to the nature of the sulfur substituent to be useful for structural studies. Further work is underway to determine the {sup 15}N chemical shifts of iminosulfuranes formed from dibenzothiophene, 4-4{prime}-dimethoxydiphenyl sulfide, and a sulfur-containing, methylated asphaltene to determine the sensitivity of {sup 15}N shifts to a broader variation of aromatic structure. Although double cross-polarization experiments or rotational echo experiments could make use of iminosulfurane formation for detection of carbon in proximity to sulfur, the difficulties in quantitation using these methods are not encouraging for coal product mixtures. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Detection of organic sulfur by [sup 15]N and [sup 19]F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of [sup 15]N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using [sup 15]N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique [sup 15]N- or, [sup 19]F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  12. Slow motions in microcrystalline proteins as observed by MAS-dependent 15N rotating-frame NMR relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; Zinkevich, Tatiana; Reif, Bernd; Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-11-01

    15N NMR relaxation rate R1ρ measurements reveal that a substantial fraction of residues in the microcrystalline chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain protein undergoes dynamics in the μs-ms timescale range. On the basis of a comparison of 2D site-resolved with 1D integrated 15N spectral intensities, we demonstrate that the significant fraction of broad signals in the 2D spectrum exhibits the most pronounced slow mobility. We show that 15N R1ρ's in proton-diluted protein samples are practically free from the coherent spin-spin contribution even at low MAS rates, and thus can be analysed quantitatively. Moderate MAS rates (10-30 kHz) can be more advantageous in comparison with the rates >50-60 kHz when slow dynamics are to be identified and quantified by means of R1ρ experiments.

  13. 15N NMR investigation of the reduction and binding of TNT in an aerobic bench scale reactor simulating windrow composting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Hayes, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    T15NT was added to a soil of low organic carbon content and composted for 20 days in an aerobic bench scale reactor. The finished whole compost and fulvic acid, humic acid, humin, and lignocellulose fractions extracted from the compost were analyzed by solid-state CP/MAS and DP/MAS 15N NMR. 15N NMR spectra provided direct spectroscopic evidence for reduction of TNT followed by covalent binding of the reduced metabolites to organic matter of the composted soil, with the majority of metabolite found in the lignocellulose fraction, by mass also the major fraction of the compost. In general, the types of bonds formed between soil organic matter and reduced TNT amines in controlled laboratory reactions were observed in the spectra of the whole compost and fractions, confirming that during composting TNT is reduced to amines that form covalent bonds with organic matter through aminohydroquinone, aminoquinone, heterocyclic, and imine linkages, among others. Concentrations of imine nitrogens in the compost spectra suggestthat covalent binding bythe diamines 2,4DANT and 2,6DANT is a significant process in the transformation of TNT into bound residues. Liquid-phase 15N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid and humin fractions provided possible evidence for involvement of phenoloxidase enzymes in covalent bond formation.

  14. 2D 1H and 3D 1H-15N NMR of zinc-rubredoxins: contributions of the beta-sheet to thermostability.

    PubMed Central

    Richie, K. A.; Teng, Q.; Elkin, C. J.; Kurtz, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    Based on 2D 1H-1H and 2D and 3D 1H-15N NMR spectroscopies, complete 1H NMR assignments are reported for zinc-containing Clostridium pasteurianum rubredoxin (Cp ZnRd). Complete 1H NMR assignments are also reported for a mutated Cp ZnRd, in which residues near the N-terminus, namely, Met 1, Lys 2, and Pro 15, have been changed to their counterparts, (-), Ala and Glu, respectively, in rubredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf Rd). The secondary structure of both wild-type and mutated Cp ZnRds, as determined by NMR methods, is essentially the same. However, the NMR data indicate an extension of the three-stranded beta-sheet in the mutated Cp ZnRd to include the N-terminal Ala residue and Glu 15, as occurs in Pf Rd. The mutated Cp Rd also shows more intense NOE cross peaks, indicating stronger interactions between the strands of the beta-sheet and, in fact, throughout the mutated Rd. However, these stronger interactions do not lead to any significant increase in thermostability, and both the mutated and wild-type Cp Rds are much less thermostable than Pf Rd. These correlations strongly suggest that, contrary to a previous proposal [Blake PR et al., 1992, Protein Sci 1:1508-1521], the thermostabilization mechanism of Pf Rd is not dominated by a unique set of hydrogen bonds or electrostatic interactions involving the N-terminal strand of the beta-sheet. The NMR results also suggest that an overall tighter protein structure does not necessarily lead to increased thermostability. PMID:8732760

  15. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  16. 15N, 13C and 1H backbone resonance assignments of an artificially engineered TEM-1/PSE-4 class A β-lactamase chimera and its deconvoluted mutant.

    PubMed

    Gobeil, Sophie M C; Gagné, Donald; Doucet, Nicolas; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2016-04-01

    The widespread use of β-lactam antibiotics has given rise to a dramatic increase in clinically-relevant β-lactamases. Understanding the structure/function relation in these variants is essential to better address the ever-growing incidence of antibiotic resistance. We previously reported the backbone resonance assignments of a chimeric protein constituted of segments of the class A β-lactamases TEM-1 and PSE-4 (Morin et al. in Biomol NMR Assign 4:127-130, 2010. doi: 10.1007/s12104-010-9227-8 ). That chimera, cTEM17m, held 17 amino acid substitutions relative to TEM-1 β-lactamase, resulting in a well-folded and fully functional protein with increased dynamics. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of chimera cTEM-19m, which includes 19 substitutions and exhibits increased active-site perturbation, as well as one of its deconvoluted variants, as the first step in the analysis of their dynamic behaviours.

  17. A new algorithm for reliable and general NMR resonance assignment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elena; Güntert, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The new FLYA automated resonance assignment algorithm determines NMR chemical shift assignments on the basis of peak lists from any combination of multidimensional through-bond or through-space NMR experiments for proteins. Backbone and side-chain assignments can be determined. All experimental data are used simultaneously, thereby exploiting optimally the redundancy present in the input peak lists and circumventing potential pitfalls of assignment strategies in which results obtained in a given step remain fixed input data for subsequent steps. Instead of prescribing a specific assignment strategy, the FLYA resonance assignment algorithm requires only experimental peak lists and the primary structure of the protein, from which the peaks expected in a given spectrum can be generated by applying a set of rules, defined in a straightforward way by specifying through-bond or through-space magnetization transfer pathways. The algorithm determines the resonance assignment by finding an optimal mapping between the set of expected peaks that are assigned by definition but have unknown positions and the set of measured peaks in the input peak lists that are initially unassigned but have a known position in the spectrum. Using peak lists obtained by purely automated peak picking from the experimental spectra of three proteins, FLYA assigned correctly 96-99% of the backbone and 90-91% of all resonances that could be assigned manually. Systematic studies quantified the impact of various factors on the assignment accuracy, namely the extent of missing real peaks and the amount of additional artifact peaks in the input peak lists, as well as the accuracy of the peak positions. Comparing the resonance assignments from FLYA with those obtained from two other existing algorithms showed that using identical experimental input data these other algorithms yielded significantly (40-142%) more erroneous assignments than FLYA. The FLYA resonance assignment algorithm thus has the

  18. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts. PMID:26590548

  19. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  20. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Kennedy, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined.

  1. Membrane orientation of the N-terminal segment of alamethicin determined by solid-state 15N NMR.

    PubMed Central

    North, C L; Barranger-Mathys, M; Cafiso, D S

    1995-01-01

    Alamethicin was synthesized with 15N incorporated into alanine at position 6 in the peptide sequence. In dispersions of hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, solid-state 15N NMR yields an axially symmetric powder pattern indicating that the peptide is reorienting with a single axis of symmetry when associated with lamellar lipids. When incorporated into bilayers that are uniformly oriented with the bilayer normal parallel to the B(o) field, the position of the observed 15N chemical shift is 171 ppm. This is coincident with the sigma parallel to edge of the axially symmetric powder pattern for non-oriented hydrated samples. Thus the axis of motional averaging lies along the bilayer normal. Two-dimensional separated local field spectra were obtained that provide a measure of the N-H dipolar coupling in one dimension and the 15N chemical shift in the other. These data yield a dipolar coupling of 17 kHz corresponding to an average angle of 24 degrees for the N-H bond with respect to the B(o) field axis. An analysis of the possible structures and orientations that could produce the observed spectral parameters show that these values are consistent with an alpha-helical conformation inserted along the bilayer normal. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 PMID:8599645

  2. Catalytic Roles of βLys87 in Tryptophan Synthase: 15N Solid State NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Caulkins, Bethany G.; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4′ for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-15N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. PMID:25688830

  3. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of CmPI-II, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from marine snail Cenchritis muricatus.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Alonso-del-Rivero Antigua, Maday; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A protease inhibitor (CmPI-II) (UNIPROT: IPK2_CENMR) from the marine mollusc Cenchritis muricatus, has been isolated and characterized. It is the first member of a new group (group 3) of non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors. CmPI-II is a tight-binding inhibitor of serine proteases: trypsin, human neutrophil elastase (HNE), subtilisin A and pancreatic elastase. This specificity is exceptional in the members of Kazal-type inhibitor family. Several models of three-dimensional structure of CmPI-II have been constructed by homology with other inhibitors of the family but its structure has not yet been solved experimentally. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of CmPI-II as basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified three β-strands β1: residues 14-19, β2: 23-35 and β3: 43-45 and one helix α1: 28-37 arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-α1-β3. These secondary structure elements suggest that CmPI-II adopts the typical scaffold of a Kazal-type inhibitor. PMID:26547437

  4. Complete 1H, 15N and 13C assignment of trappin-2 and 1H assignment of its two domains, elafin and cementoin.

    PubMed

    Loth, Karine; Alami, Soha Abou Ibrahim; Habès, Chahrazed; Garrido, Solène; Aucagne, Vincent; Delmas, Agnès F; Moreau, Thierry; Zani, Marie-Louise; Landon, Céline

    2016-04-01

    Trappin-2 is a serine protease inhibitor with a very narrow inhibitory spectrum and has significant anti-microbial activities. It is a 10 kDa cationic protein composed of two distinct domains. The N-terminal domain (38 residues) named cementoin is known to be intrinsically disordered when it is not linked to the elafin. The C-terminal domain (57 residues), corresponding to elafin, is a cysteine-rich domain stabilized by four disulfide bridges and is characterized by a flat core and a flexible N-terminal part. To our knowledge, there is no structural data available on trappin-2. We report here the complete (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignment of the recombinant trappin-2 and the (1)H assignments of cementoin and elafin, under the same experimental conditions. This is the first step towards the 3D structure determination of the trappin-2.

  5. Exploiting Image Registration for Automated Resonance Assignment in NMR

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Stephens, Thomas; Liu, Jian; Tjandra, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Summary Analysis of protein NMR data involves the assignment of resonance peaks in a number of multidimensional data sets. To establish resonance assignment a three-dimensional search is used to match a pair of common variables, such as chemical shifts of the same spin system, in different NMR spectra. We show that by displaying the variables to be compared in two-dimensional plots the process can be simplified. Moreover, by utilizing a fast Fourier transform (FFT) cross-correlation algorithm, more common to the field of image registration or pattern matching, we can automate this process. Here, we use sequential NMR backbone assignment as an example to show that the combination of correlation plots and segmented pattern matching establishes fast backbone assignment in fifteen proteins of varying sizes. For example, the 265-residue RalBP1 protein was 95.4% correctly assigned in 10 seconds. The same concept can be applied to any multidimensional NMR data set where analysis comprises the comparison of two variables. This modular and robust approach offers high efficiency with excellent computational scalability and could be easily incorporated into existing assignment software. PMID:25828257

  6. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins.

  7. Mechanism of Solid-State Thermolysis of Ammonia Boraine: 15N NMR Study Using Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Gupta, Shalabh; Caporini, Marc A; Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Pruski, Marek

    2014-08-28

    The solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) was explored using state-of-the-art 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including 2D indirectly detected 1H{15N} heteronuclear correlation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 15N{1H} cross-polarization experiments as well as 11B NMR. The complementary use of 15N and 11B NMR experiments, supported by density functional theory calculations of the chemical shift tensors, provided insights into the dehydrogenation mechanism of AB—insights that have not been available by 11B NMR alone. Specifically, highly branched polyaminoborane derivatives were shown to form from AB via oligomerization in the “head-to-tail” manner, which then transform directly into hexagonal boron nitride analog through the dehydrocyclization reaction, bypassing the formation of polyiminoborane.

  8. Assignment of congested NMR spectra: Carbonyl backbone enrichment via the Entner Doudoroff pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbourt, Amir; Day, Loren A.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2007-12-01

    In NMR spectra of complex proteins, sparse isotope enrichment can be important, in that the removal of many 13C- 13C homonuclear J-couplings can narrow the lines and thereby facilitate the process of spectral assignment and structure elucidation. We present a simple scheme for selective yet extensive isotopic enrichment applicable for production of proteins in organisms utilizing the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) metabolic pathway. An enrichment scheme so derived is demonstrated in the context of a magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR (MAS SSNMR) study of Pf1 bacteriophage, the host of which is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain K (PAK), an organism that uses the ED pathway for glucose catabolism. The intact and infectious Pf1 phage in this study was produced by infected PAK cells grown on a minimal medium containing 1- 13C D-glucose ( 13C in position 1) as the sole carbon source, as well as 15NH 4Cl as the only nitrogen source. The 37 MDa Pf1 phage consists of about 93% major coat protein, 1% minor coat proteins, and 6% single-stranded, circular DNA. As a consequence of this composition and the enrichment scheme, the resonances in the MAS SSNMR spectra of the Pf1 sample were almost exclusively due to carbonyl carbons in the major coat protein. Moreover, 3D heteronuclear NCOCX correlation experiments also show that the amino acids leucine, serine, glycine, and tyrosine were not isotopically enriched in their carbonyl positions (although most other amino acids were), which is as expected based upon considerations of the ED metabolic pathway. 3D NCOCX NMR data and 2D 15N- 15N data provided strong verification of many previous assignments of 15N amide and 13C carbonyl shifts in this highly congested spectrum; both the semi-selective enrichment patterns and the narrowed linewidths allowed for greater certainty in the assignments as compared with use of uniformly enriched samples alone.

  9. Automated analysis of protein NMR assignments using methods from artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, D E; Kulikowski, C A; Huang, Y; Feng, W; Tashiro, M; Shimotakahara, S; Chien, C; Powers, R; Montelione, G T

    1997-06-20

    An expert system for determining resonance assignments from NMR spectra of proteins is described. Given the amino acid sequence, a two-dimensional 15N-1H heteronuclear correlation spectrum and seven to eight three-dimensional triple-resonance NMR spectra for seven proteins, AUTOASSIGN obtained an average of 98% of sequence-specific spin-system assignments with an error rate of less than 0.5%. Execution times on a Sparc 10 workstation varied from 16 seconds for smaller proteins with simple spectra to one to nine minutes for medium size proteins exhibiting numerous extra spin systems attributed to conformational isomerization. AUTOASSIGN combines symbolic constraint satisfaction methods with a domain-specific knowledge base to exploit the logical structure of the sequential assignment problem, the specific features of the various NMR experiments, and the expected chemical shift frequencies of different amino acids. The current implementation specializes in the analysis of data derived from the most sensitive of the currently available triple-resonance experiments. Potential extensions of the system for analysis of additional types of protein NMR data are also discussed.

  10. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  11. Post-grafting amination of alkyl halide-functionalized silica for applications in catalysis, adsorption, and 15N NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moschetta, Eric G; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Greenfield, Jake L; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-02-24

    An anhydrous synthesis of aminosilica materials from alkyl halide-functionalized mesoporous SBA-15 silica by post-grafting amination is introduced for applications in CO2 adsorption, cooperative catalysis, and (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The synthesis is demonstrated to convert terminal alkyl halide-functionalized silica materials containing Cl, Br, and I to primary alkylamines using anhydrous ammonia in a high-pressure reactor. The benefits of the post-grafting amination procedure include (i) use of anhydrous isotopically labeled ammonia, (15)NH3, to create aminosilica materials that can be investigated using (15)N solid-state NMR to elucidate potential intermediates and surface species in CO2 adsorption processes and catalysis, (ii) similar CO2 uptake in experiments extracting CO2 from dry simulated air experiments, and (iii) improved activity in acid-base bifunctional catalysis compared to traditional amine-grafted materials. The effects of the type of halide, the initial halide loading, and the total reaction time on the conversion of the halides to primary amines are explored. Physical and chemical characterizations of the materials show that the textural properties of the silica are unaffected by the reaction conditions and that quantitative conversion to primary amines is achieved even at short reaction times and high initial alkyl halide loadings. Additionally, preliminary (15)N solid-state NMR experiments indicate formation of nitrogen-containing species and demonstrate that the synthesis can be used to create materials useful for investigating surface species by NMR spectroscopy. The differences between the materials prepared via post-grafting amination vs traditional aminosilane grafting are attributed to the slightly increased spacing of the amines synthesized by amination because the alkylhalosilanes are initially better spaced on the silica surface after grafting, whereas the aminosilanes likely cluster to a greater extent when grafted on the

  12. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Udgaonkar, J B; Hosur, R V

    2000-10-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 degrees C, pH 6.6, using 15N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D [1H]-15N NMR spectroscopy. 15N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R2), and steady-state heteronuclear [1H]-15N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide 15N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times (tau(m)) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motion's cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface may have important implications for remote effects and regulation of the enzyme action. PMID

  13. Graphical interpretation of Boolean operators for protein NMR assignments.

    PubMed

    Verdegem, Dries; Dijkstra, Klaas; Hanoulle, Xavier; Lippens, Guy

    2008-09-01

    We have developed a graphics based algorithm for semi-automated protein NMR assignments. Using the basic sequential triple resonance assignment strategy, the method is inspired by the Boolean operators as it applies "AND"-, "OR"- and "NOT"-like operations on planes pulled out of the classical three-dimensional spectra to obtain its functionality. The method's strength lies in the continuous graphical presentation of the spectra, allowing both a semi-automatic peaklist construction and sequential assignment. We demonstrate here its general use for the case of a folded protein with a well-dispersed spectrum, but equally for a natively unfolded protein where spectral resolution is minimal. PMID:18762868

  14. Stereospecificity of (1) H, (13) C and (15) N shielding constants in the isomers of methylglyoxal bisdimethylhydrazone: problem with configurational assignment based on (1) H chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Ushakov, Igor A; Keiko, Natalia A

    2012-07-01

    In the (13) C NMR spectra of methylglyoxal bisdimethylhydrazone, the (13) C-5 signal is shifted to higher frequencies, while the (13) C-6 signal is shifted to lower frequencies on going from the EE to ZE isomer following the trend found previously. Surprisingly, the (1) H-6 chemical shift and (1) J(C-6,H-6) coupling constant are noticeably larger in the ZE isomer than in the EE isomer, although the configuration around the -CH═N- bond does not change. This paradox can be rationalized by the C-H⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond in the ZE isomer, which is found from the quantum-chemical calculations including Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis. This hydrogen bond results in the increase of δ((1) H-6) and (1) J(C-6,H-6) parameters. The effect of the C-H⋯N hydrogen bond on the (1) H shielding and one-bond (13) C-(1) H coupling complicates the configurational assignment of the considered compound because of these spectral parameters. The (1) H, (13) C and (15) N chemical shifts of the 2- and 8-(CH(3) )(2) N groups attached to the -C(CH(3) )═N- and -CH═N- moieties, respectively, reveal pronounced difference. The ab initio calculations show that the 8-(CH(3) )(2) N group conjugate effectively with the π-framework, and the 2-(CH(3) )(2) N group twisted out from the plane of the backbone and loses conjugation. As a result, the degree of charge transfer from the N-2- and N-8- nitrogen lone pairs to the π-framework varies, which affects the (1) H, (13) C and (15) N shieldings. PMID:22615146

  15. 15N NMR study of nitrate ion structure and dynamics in hydrotalcite-like compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hou, X.; James, Kirkpatrick R.; Yu, P.; Moore, D.; Kim, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report here the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic study of the dynamical and structural behavior of nitrate on the surface and in the interlayer of hydrotalcite-like compounds (15NO3--HT). Spectroscopically resolvable surface-absorbed and interlayer NO3- have dramatically different dynamical characteristics. The interlayer nitrate shows a well defined, temperature independent uniaxial chemical shift anisotropy (CS A) powder pattern. It is rigidly held or perhaps undergoes rotation about its threefold axis at all temperatures between -100 ??C and +80 ??C and relative humidities (R.H.) from 0 to 100% at room temperature. For surface nitrate, however, the dynamical behavior depends substantially on temperature and relative humidity. Analysis of the temperature and R.H. dependences of the peak width yields reorieritational frequencies which increase from essentially 0 at -100 ??C to 2.6 ?? 105 Hz at 60 ??C and an activation energy of 12.6 kJ/mol. For example, for samples at R.H. = 33%, the surface nitrate is isotropically mobile at frequencies greater than 105 Hz at room temperature, but it becomes rigid or only rotates on its threefold axis at -100 ??C. For dry samples and samples heated at 200 ??C (R.H. near 0%), the surface nitrate is not isotropically averaged at room temperature. In contrast to our previous results for 35Cl--containing hydrotalcite (35Cl--HT), no NMR detectable structural phase transition is observed for 15NO3--HT. The mobility of interlayer nitrate in HT is intermediate between that of carbonate and chloride.

  16. 1H, 15N, and 13C resonance assignments and secondary structure of the SWIRM domain of human BAF155, a chromatin remodeling complex component.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sunjin; Shin, Joon; Lee, Dongju; Seong, Rho H; Lee, Weontae

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian SWI/SNF complexes are evolutionary conserved, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling units. BAF155 in the SWI/SNF complex contains several highly conserved domains, including SANT, SWIRM, and leucine zipper domains. The biological roles of the SWIRM domain remain unclear; however, both structural and biochemical analyses of this domain have suggested that it could mediate protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions during the chromatin remodeling process. The human BAF155 SWIRM domain was cloned into the Escherichia coli expression vector pMAL-c2X and purified using affinity chromatography for structural analysis. We report the backbone (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C resonance assignments and secondary structure of this domain using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and the TALOS+ program. The secondary structure consists of five α-helices that form a typical histone fold for DNA interactions. Our data suggest that the BAF155 SWIRM domain interacts with nucleosome DNA (Kd = 0.47 μM).

  17. Aliphatic (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments of dihydrofolate reductase from the psychropiezophile Moritella profunda in complex with NADP(+) and folate.

    PubMed

    Loveridge, E Joel; Matthews, Stella M; Williams, Christopher; Whittaker, Sara B-M; Günther, Ulrich L; Evans, Rhiannon M; Dawson, William M; Crump, Matthew P; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2013-04-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from the deep-sea bacterium Moritella profunda (MpDHFR) has been (13)C/(15)N isotopically labelled and purified. Here, we report the aliphatic (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of MpDHFR in complex with NADP(+) and folate. The spectra of MpDHFR suggest considerably greater conformational heterogeneity than is seen in the closely related DHFR from Escherichia coli.

  18. Solid-state NMR study and assignments of the KcsA potassium ion channel of S. lividans.

    PubMed

    Varga, Krisztina; Tian, Lin; McDermott, Ann E

    2007-12-01

    The extraordinary efficiency and selectivity of potassium channels have made them ideal systems for biophysical and functional studies of ion conduction. We carried out solid-state NMR studies of the selectivity filter region of the protein. Partial site-specific assignments of the NMR signals were obtained based on high field multidimensional solid-state NMR spectra of uniformly (13)C, (15)N enriched KcsA potassium channel from Streptomyces lividans. Both backbone and sidechain atoms were assigned for residues V76-D80 and P83-L90, in and near the selectivity filter region of the protein; this region exhibits good dispersion and useful chemical shift fingerprints. This study will enable structure, dynamic and mechanistic studies of ion conduction by NMR.

  19. 1H, 13C and 15N assignment of the C-terminal domain of GNA2132 from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Veronica; Musi, Valeria; Veggi, Daniele; Pastore, Annalisa; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2010-04-01

    GNA2132 (Genome-derived Neisseria Antigen 2132) is a surface-exposed lipoprotein discovered by reverse vaccinology and expressed by genetically diverse Neisseria meningitidis strains (Pizza et al. 2000). The protein induces bactericidal antibodies against most strains of Meningococccus and has been included in a multivalent recombinant vaccine against N. meningitidis serogroup B. Structure determination of GNA2132 is important for understanding the antigenic properties of the protein in view of increased efficiency vaccine development. We report practically complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N assignment of the detectable spectrum of a highly conserved C-terminal region of GNA2132 (residues 245-427) in micellar solution, a medium used to improve the spectral quality. The first 32 residues of our construct up to residue 277 were not visible in the spectrum, presumably because of line broadening due to solvent and/or conformational exchange. Secondary structure predictions based on chemical shift information indicate the presence of an all beta-protein with eight beta strands.

  20. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of translation initiation factor 1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Alejandra; Hu, Yanmei; Palmer, Stephanie O.; Silva, Aaron; Bullard, James; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen and a primary cause of infection in humans. P. aeruginosa can acquire resistance against multiple groups of antimicrobial agents, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones, and multidrug resistance is increasing in this organism which makes treatment of the infections difficult and expensive. This has led to the unmet need for discovery of new compounds distinctly different from present antimicrobials. Protein synthesis is an essential metabolic process and a validated target for the development of new antibiotics. Translation initiation factor 1 from P. aeruginosa (Pa-IF1) is the smallest of the three initiation factors that acts to establish the 30S initiation complex to initiate translation during protein biosynthesis, and its structure is unknown. Here we report the 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shift assignments of Pa-IF1 as the basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified five β-strands with an unusually extended β-strand at the C-terminal end of the protein and one short α-helix arranged in the sequential order β1–β2–β3–α1–β4–β5. This is further supported by 15N–{1H} hetero NOEs. These secondary structure elements suggest the Pa-IF1 adopts the typical β-barrel structure and is composed of an oligomer-binding motif. PMID:26983940

  1. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments for intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein complexed with palmitate (15.4 kDA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hodsdon, M.E.; Toner, J.J.; Cistola, D.P.

    1994-12-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein (I-FABP) belongs to a family of soluble, cytoplasmic proteins that are thought to function in the intracellular transport and trafficking of polar lipids. Individual members of this protein family have distinct specificities and affinities for fatty acids, cholesterol, bile salts, and retinoids. We are comparing several retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins from intestine in order to define the factors that control molecular recognition in this family of proteins. We have established sequential resonance assignments for uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-enriched I-FABP complexed with perdeuterated palmitate at pH7.2 and 37{degrees}C. The assignment strategy was similar to that introduced for calmodulin. We employed seven three-dimensional NMR experiments to establish scalar couplings between backbone and sidechain atoms. Backbone atoms were correlated using triple-resonance HNCO, HNCA, TOCSY-HMQC, HCACO, and HCA(CO)N experiments. Sidechain atoms were correlated using CC-TOCSY, HCCH-TOCSY, and TOCSY-HMQC. The correlations of peaks between three-dimensional spectra were established in a computer-assisted manner using NMR COMPASS (Molecular Simulations, Inc.) Using this approach, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments have been established for 120 of the 131 residues of I-FABP. For 18 residues, amide {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances were unobservable, apparently because of the rapid exchange of amide protons with bulk water at pH 7.2. The missing amide protons correspond to distinct amino acid patterns in the protein sequence, which will be discussed. During the assignment process, several sources of ambiguity in spin correlations were observed. To overcome this ambiguity, the additional inter-residue correlations often observed in the HNCA experiment were used as cross-checks for the sequential backbone assignments.

  2. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  3. Accurate determination of order parameters from 1H,15N dipolar couplings in MAS solid-state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2009-10-01

    A reliable site-specific estimate of the individual N-H bond lengths in the protein backbone is the fundamental basis of any relaxation experiment in solution and in the solid-state NMR. The N-H bond length can in principle be influenced by hydrogen bonding, which would result in an increased N-H distance. At the same time, dynamics in the backbone induces a reduction of the experimental dipolar coupling due to motional averaging. We present a 3D dipolar recoupling experiment in which the (1)H,(15)N dipolar coupling is reintroduced in the indirect dimension using phase-inverted CP to eliminate effects from rf inhomogeneity. We find no variation of the N-H dipolar coupling as a function of hydrogen bonding. Instead, variations in the (1)H,(15)N dipolar coupling seem to be due to dynamics of the protein backbone. This is supported by the observed correlation between the H(N)-N dipolar coupling and the amide proton chemical shift. The experiment is demonstrated for a perdeuterated sample of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain. Perdeuteration is a prerequisite to achieve high accuracy. The average error in the analysis of the H-N dipolar couplings is on the order of +/-370 Hz (+/-0.012 A) and can be as small as 150 Hz, corresponding to a variation of the bond length of +/-0.005 A.

  4. A general Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm for resonance assignment in NMR of uniformly labeled biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We describe a general computational approach to site-specific resonance assignments in multidimensional NMR studies of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled biopolymers, based on a simple Monte Carlo/simulated annealing (MCSA) algorithm contained in the program MCASSIGN2. Input to MCASSIGN2 includes lists of multidimensional signals in the NMR spectra with their possible residue-type assignments (which need not be unique), the biopolymer sequence, and a table that describes the connections that relate one signal list to another. As output, MCASSIGN2 produces a high-scoring sequential assignment of the multidimensional signals, using a score function that rewards good connections (i.e., agreement between relevant sets of chemical shifts in different signal lists) and penalizes bad connections, unassigned signals, and assignment gaps. Examination of a set of high-scoring assignments from a large number of independent runs allows one to determine whether a unique assignment exists for the entire sequence or parts thereof. We demonstrate the MCSA algorithm using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) solid state NMR spectra of several model protein samples (α-spectrin SH3 domain and protein G/B1 microcrystals, HET-s218–289 fibrils), obtained with magic-angle spinning and standard polarization transfer techniques. The MCSA algorithm and MCASSIGN2 program can accommodate arbitrary combinations of NMR spectra with arbitrary dimensionality, and can therefore be applied in many areas of solid state and solution NMR. PMID:21710190

  5. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignments for the 36 proline-containing, full length 29 kDa human chimera-type galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Ippel, Hans; Miller, Michelle C; Berbís, Manuel Alvaro; Suylen, Dennis; André, Sabine; Hackeng, Tilman M; Cañada, F Javier; Weber, Christian; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Mayo, Kevin H

    2015-04-01

    Galectin-3, an adhesion/growth regulatory lectin, has a unique trimodular design consisting of the canonical carbohydrate recognition domain, a collagen-like tandem-repeat section, and an N-terminal peptide with two sites for Ser phosphorylation. Structural characterization of the full length protein with its non-lectin part (115 of 250 residues total) will help understand the multi functionality of this potent cellular effector. Here, we report (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments as determined by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy .

  6. COVALENT BINDING OF REDUCED METABOLITES OF [15N3] TNT TO SOIL ORGANIC MATTER DURING A BIOREMEDIATION PROCESS ANALYZED BY 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY. (R826646)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of
    biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-15N3-trinitrotoluene
    (TNT) to different soil fractions (humic acids, fulvic
    acids, and humin) using liquid 15N NMR spectroscopy. A
    silylation p...

  7. Assigning the NMR Spectrum of Glycidol: An Advanced Organic Chemistry Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Eric; Arpaia, Nicholas; Widener, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Various one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments have been found to be extremely useful for assigning the proton and carbon NMR spectra of glycidol. The technique provides extremely valuable information aiding in the complete assignment of the peaks.

  8. Screening enoxaparin tetrasaccharide SEC fractions for 3-O-sulfo-N-sulfoglucosamine residues using [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC NMR.

    PubMed

    Beecher, Consuelo N; Manighalam, Matthew S; Nwachuku, Adanma F; Larive, Cynthia K

    2016-02-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) are important in mediating a variety of biological processes through binding to myriad different proteins. Specific structural elements along the polysaccharide chains are essential for high affinity protein binding, such as the 3-O-sulfated N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS3S) residue, a relatively rare modification essential for heparin's anticoagulant activity. The isolation of 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides from complex mixtures is challenging because of their low abundance. Although methods such as affinity chromatography are useful in isolating oligosaccharides that bind specific proteins with high affinity, other important 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides may easily be overlooked. Screening preparative-scale size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) fractions of heparin or HS digests using [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC NMR allows the identification of fractions containing 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides through the unique (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts of the GlcNS3S residue. Those SEC fractions containing 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides can then be isolated using strong anion-exchange (SAX)-HPLC. Compared with the results obtained by pooling the fractions comprising a given SEC peak, SAX-HPLC analysis of individual SEC fractions produces a less complicated chromatogram in which the 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides are enriched relative to more abundant components. The utility of this approach is demonstrated for tetrasaccharide SEC fractions of the low molecular weight heparin drug enoxaparin facilitating the isolation and characterization of an unsaturated 3-O-sulfated tetrasaccharide containing a portion of the antithrombin-III binding sequence.

  9. Structure and reactivity of lithium amides. /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies and colligative measurements of lithium diphenylamide and lithium diphenylamide-lithium bromide complex solvated by tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    DePue, J.S.; Collum, D.B.

    1988-08-03

    /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of lithium diphenylamide in THF/hydrocarbon solutions (THF = tetrahydrofuran) detected two different species. /sup 6/Li and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of (/sup 6/Li, /sup 15/N)lithium diphenylamide showed the species observed at low THF concentrations to be a cyclic oligomer. Structural analogies provided strong support for a dimer while colligative measurements at 0/degrees/C indicated the dimer to be di- or trisolvated. On the basis of the observed mass action effects, the species appearing at intermediate THF concentrations is assigned as a contact or solvent-separated ion-paired monomer. Lithium diphenylamide forms a 1:1 adduct with lithium bromide at low THF concentrations. A combination of /sup 6/Li-/sup 15/N double labeling studies and colligative measurements supports a trisolvated cyclic mixed dimer structure. Although detailed spectroscopic studies at elevated THF concentrations were precluded by high fluctionality, the similarity of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts of lithium diphenylamide in the presence and absence of lithium bromide provide indirect evidence that the mixed dimer undergoes a THF concentration dependent dissociation to the monomeric amide and free lithium bromide. 24 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Automated Pre-processing for NMR Assignments with Reduced Tedium

    2004-05-11

    An important rate-limiting step in the reasonance asignment process is accurate identification of resonance peaks in MNR spectra. NMR spectra are noisy. Hence, automatic peak-picking programs must navigate between the Scylla of reliable but incomplete picking, and the Charybdis of noisy but complete picking. Each of these extremes complicates the assignment process: incomplete peak-picking results in the loss of essential connectivities, while noisy picking conceals the true connectivities under a combinatiorial explosion of false positives.more » Intermediate processing can simplify the assignment process by preferentially removing false peaks from noisy peak lists. This is accomplished by requiring consensus between multiple NMR experiments, exploiting a priori information about NMR spectra, and drawing on empirical statistical distributions of chemical shift extracted from the BioMagResBank. Experienced NMR practitioners currently apply many of these techniques "by hand", which is tedious, and may appear arbitrary to the novice. To increase efficiency, we have created a systematic and automated approach to this process, known as APART. Automated pre-processing has three main advantages: reduced tedium, standardization, and pedagogy. In the hands of experienced spectroscopists, the main advantage is reduced tedium (a rapid increase in the ratio of true peaks to false peaks with minimal effort). When a project is passed from hand to hand, the main advantage is standardization. APART automatically documents the peak filtering process by archiving its original recommendations, the accompanying justifications, and whether a user accepted or overrode a given filtering recommendation. In the hands of a novice, this tool can reduce the stumbling block of learning to differentiate between real peaks and noise, by providing real-time examples of how such decisions are made.« less

  11. A Monte Carlo/Simulated Annealing Algorithm for Sequential Resonance Assignment in Solid State NMR of Uniformly Labeled Proteins with Magic-Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert; Hu, Kan-Nian

    2010-01-01

    We describe a computational approach to sequential resonance assignment in solid state NMR studies of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled proteins with magic-angle spinning. As input, the algorithm uses only the protein sequence and lists of 15N/13Cα crosspeaks from 2D NCACX and NCOCX spectra that include possible residue-type assignments of each crosspeak. Assignment of crosspeaks to specific residues is carried out by a Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm, implemented in the program MC_ASSIGN1. The algorithm tolerates substantial ambiguity in residue-type assignments and coexistence of visible and invisible segments in the protein sequence. We use MC_ASSIGN1 and our own 2D spectra to replicate and extend the sequential assignments for uniformly labeled HET-s(218-289) fibrils previously determined manually by Siemer et al. (J. Biomolec. NMR, vol. 34, pp. 75-87, 2006) from a more extensive set of 2D and 3D spectra. Accurate assignments by MC_ASSIGN1 do not require data that are of exceptionally high quality. Use of MC_ASSIGN1 (and its extensions to other types of 2D and 3D data) is likely to alleviate many of the difficulties and uncertainties associated with manual resonance assignments in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins, where spectral resolution and signal-to-noise are often sub-optimal. PMID:20547467

  12. Semiautomatic sequence-specific assignment of proteins based on the tertiary structure--the program st2nmr.

    PubMed

    Pristovsek, Primoz; Rüterjans, Heinz; Jerala, Roman

    2002-02-01

    The sequence-specific assignment of resonances is still the most time-consuming procedure that is necessary as the first step in high-resolution NMR studies of proteins. In many cases a reliable three-dimensional (3D) structure of the protein is available, for example, from X-ray spectroscopy or homology modeling. Here we introduce the st2nmr program that uses the 3D structure and Nuclear Overhauser Effect spectroscopy (NOESY) peak list(s) to evaluate and optimize trial sequence-specific assignments of spin systems derived from correlation spectra to residues of the protein. A distance-dependent target function that scores trial assignments based on the presence of expected NOESY crosspeaks is optimized in a Monte Carlo fashion. The performance of the program st2nmr is tested on real NMR data of an alpha-helical (cytochrome c) and beta-sheet (lipocalin) protein using homology models and/or X-ray structures; it succeeded in completely reproducing the correct sequence-specific assignments in most cases using 2D and/or 15N/13C Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. Additionally to amino acid residues the program can also handle ligands that are bound to the protein, such as heme, and can be used as a complementary tool to fully automated assignment procedures. PMID:11908496

  13. Exogenous proline relieves growth inhibition caused by NaCl in petunia cells: Metabolism of L-( sup 15 M)-proline followed by sup 15 N NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Heyser, J.W.; Chacon, M.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Exogenous proline stimulated the growth of Petunia hybrida cells on 195 mM NaCl 10-fold as compared with cells grown on 195 mM CaCl medium minus proline. L-({sup 15}N)-proline was fed to cells growing on 0 and 195 mM CaCl, and its metabolism was followed by {sup 15}N NMR analysis of cell extracts. Total proline and amino acids were determined by ninhydrin assay. Proline and primary amino acids were easily resolved in NMR spectra and the amount of {sup 15}N-label which remained in proline was determined. Reduced catabolism of proline in cells grown on NaCl was evident. The role of exogenous proline in conferring increased NaCl tolerance in this nonhalophyte will be discussed.

  14. Reliable resonance assignments of selected residues of proteins with known structure based on empirical NMR chemical shift prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da-Wei; Meng, Dan; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    A robust NMR resonance assignment method is introduced for proteins whose 3D structure has previously been determined by X-ray crystallography. The goal of the method is to obtain a subset of correct assignments from a parsimonious set of 3D NMR experiments of 15N, 13C labeled proteins. Chemical shifts of sequential residue pairs are predicted from static protein structures using PPM_One, which are then compared with the corresponding experimental shifts. Globally optimized weighted matching identifies the assignments that are robust with respect to small changes in NMR cross-peak positions. The method, termed PASSPORT, is demonstrated for 4 proteins with 100-250 amino acids using 3D NHCA and a 3D CBCA(CO)NH experiments as input producing correct assignments with high reliability for 22% of the residues. The method, which works best for Gly, Ala, Ser, and Thr residues, provides assignments that serve as anchor points for additional assignments by both manual and semi-automated methods or they can be directly used for further studies, e.g. on ligand binding, protein dynamics, or post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation.

  15. Characterization of the nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N NMR, and EXAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, D.K.; Smith, C.A.; Zwick, B.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Conradson, S.D.

    1993-12-01

    Nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) are studied in solutions containing nitrate up to 13 molar (M). Three major nitrato complexes are observed and identified using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) as Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}. The possibility that Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 1}{sup 3+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 1+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}{sup 1{minus}} are major species in solution is not consistent with these results and an upper limit of 0.10 can be set on the fraction for each of these three nitrate complexes in nitrate containing solutions. Fraction of the three major species in nitric acid over the 1--13 M range were calculated from absorption spectra data. The fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} as a function of nitric acid concentration is in good agreement with the literature, whereas the fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} species differ from previous studies. We have modeled the chemical equilibria up to moderate ionic strength ( < 6 molal) using the specific ion interaction theory (SM. Comparison of our experimental observations to literature stability constants that assume the presence of mononitrate species is poor. Stability constant at zero ionic strength for the dinitrato complex is determined to be log({beta}{sub 2}{sup 0})=3.77 {plus_minus} 0.14 (2{sigma}).

  16. Computational identification of a phospholipidosis toxicophore using (13)C and (15)N NMR-distance based fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Svetoslav H; Wilkes, Jon G; Buzatu, Dan A; Kruhlak, Naomi L; Willard, James M; Hanig, Joseph P; Beger, Richard D

    2014-12-01

    Modified 3D-SDAR fingerprints combining (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts augmented with inter-atomic distances were used to model the potential of chemicals to induce phospholipidosis (PLD). A curated dataset of 328 compounds (some of which were cationic amphiphilic drugs) was used to generate 3D-QSDAR models based on tessellations of the 3D-SDAR space with grids of different density. Composite PLS models averaging the aggregated predictions from 100 fully randomized individual models were generated. On each of the 100 runs, the activities of an external blind test set comprised of 294 proprietary chemicals were predicted and averaged to provide composite estimates of their PLD-inducing potentials (PLD+ if PLD is observed, otherwise PLD-). The best performing 3D-QSDAR model utilized a grid with a density of 8ppm×8ppm in the C-C region, 8ppm×20ppm in the C-N region and 20ppm×20ppm in the N-N region. The classification predictive performance parameters of this model evaluated on the basis of the external test set were as follows: accuracy=0.70, sensitivity=0.73 and specificity=0.66. A projection of the most frequently occurring bins on the standard coordinate space suggested a toxicophore composed of an aromatic ring with a centroid 3.5-7.5Å distant from an amino-group. The presence of a second aromatic ring separated by a 4-5Å spacer from the first ring and at a distance of between 5.5Å and 7Å from the amino-group was also associated with a PLD+ effect. These models provide comparable predictive performance to previously reported models for PLD with the added benefit of being based entirely on non-confidential, publicly available training data and with good predictive performance when tested in a rigorous, external validation exercise.

  17. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  18. Sequence-specific 1H, 13C and 15N backbone resonance assignments of the plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin.

    PubMed

    Jeeves, Mark; Fogl, Claudia; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Chidgey, Martyn; Overduin, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The plakin repeat domain is a distinctive hallmark of the plakin superfamily of proteins, which are found within all epithelial tissues. Plakin repeat domains mediate the interactions of these proteins with the cell cytoskeleton and are critical for the maintenance of tissue integrity. Despite their biological importance, no solution state resonance assignments are available for any homologue. Here we report the essentially complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone chemical shift assignments of the singular 22 kDa plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin, providing the means to investigate its interactions with ligands including intermediate filaments. PMID:26590577

  19. Dihydrofolate reductase: Sequential resonance assignments using 2D and 3D NMR and secondary structure determination in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.D.; Birdsall, B.; Jimenez-Barbero, J.; Polshakov, V.I.; McCormick, J.E.; Feeney, J.; Frenkiel, T.A.; Bauer, C.J. ); Roberts, G.C.K. )

    1991-06-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR techniques have been used to make sequential {sup 1}H and {sup 15}H resonance assignments for most of the residues of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a monomeric protein of molecular mass 18,300 Da. A uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled sample of the protein was prepared and its complex with methotrexate (MTX) studied by 3D {sup 15}N/{sup 1}H nuclear Overhauserheteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (NOESY-HMQC), Harmann-Hahn-heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HOHAHA-HMQC), and HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiments. These experiments overcame most of the spectral overlap problems caused by chemical shift degeneracies in 2D spectra and allowed the {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H through-space and through-bond connectivities to be identified unambiguously, leading to the resonance assignments. The novel HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment allows NOE cross peaks to be detected between NH protons even when their {sup 1}H chemical shifts are degenerate as long as the amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts are nondegenerate. The 3D experiments, in combination with conventional 2D NOESY, COSY, and HOHAHA experiments on unlabelled and selectively deuterated DHFR, provide backbone assignments for 146 of the 162 residues and side-chain assignments for 104 residues of the protein. Data from the NOE-based experiments and identification of the slowly exchanging amide protons provide detailed information about the secondary structure of the binary complex of the protein with methotrexate.

  20. Reduced dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH experiment: an efficient backbone assignment tool for NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-09-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment of proteins forms the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone ((1)H, (15)N, (13)C(α) and (13)C') resonances of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality experiment--(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone ((13)C(α) and (13)C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text). The resulted increased dispersion of peaks--which is different in sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) frequency regions--greatly facilitates the analysis of the spectrum by resolving the problems (associated with routine assignment strategies) arising because of degenerate amide (15)N and backbone (13)C chemical shifts. Further, the spectrum provides direct distinction between intra- and inter-residue correlations because of their opposite peak signs. The other beneficial feature of the spectrum is that it provides: (a) multiple unidirectional sequential (i→i + 1) (15)N and (13)C correlations and (b) facile identification of certain specific triplet sequences which serve as check points for mapping the stretches of sequentially connected HSQC cross peaks on to the primary sequence for assigning the resonances sequence specifically. On top of all this, the F₂-F₃ planes of the spectrum corresponding to sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) chemical shifts enable rapid and unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks through matching their coordinates in these two planes (see the text). Overall, the experiment presented here will serve as an important backbone assignment tool for variety of structural and functional proteomics and drug discovery research programs by NMR involving well behaved small folded proteins (MW

  1. An intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH experiment for the assignment of main-chain resonances in 15N, 13C labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Mäntylahti, Sampo; Tossavainen, Helena; Hellman, Maarit; Permi, Perttu

    2009-11-01

    An improved pulse sequence, intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH, is described for establishing solely (13)C'(i), (15)N(i), (1)HN(i) connectivities in uniformly 15N/13C-labeled proteins. In comparison to the "out-and-back" style intra-HN(CA)CO experiment, the new pulse sequence offers at least two-fold higher experimental resolution in the (13)C' dimension and on average 1.6 times higher sensitivity especially for residues in alpha-helices. Performance of the new experiment was tested on a small globular protein ubiquitin and an intrinsically unfolded 110-residue cancer/testis antigen CT16/PAGE5. Use of intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH experiment in combination with the established HNCO experiment was crucial for the assignment of highly disordered CT16. PMID:19768387

  2. NMR assignments for the telokin-like domain of bacteriophage P22 coat protein

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Alessandro A.; Fraser, LaTasha C. R.; Sheftic, Sarah R.; Suhanovsky, Margaret M.; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Alexandrescu, Andrei T.

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriophage P22 virion is assembled from identical coat protein monomers in a complex reaction that is generally conserved among tailed, double-stranded DNA bacteriophages and viruses. Many coat proteins of dsDNA viruses have structures based on the HK97 fold, but in some viruses and phages there are additional domains. In the P22 coat protein a “telokin-like” domain was recently identified, whose structure has not yet been characterized at high-resolution. Two recently published low-resolution cryo-EM reconstructions suggest markedly different folds for the telokin-like domain, that lead to alternative conclusions about its function in capsid assembly and stability. Here we report 1H, 15N, and 13C NMR resonance assignments for the telokin-like domain. The secondary structure predicted from the chemical shift values obtained in this work shows significant discrepancies from both cryo-EM models but agrees better with one of the models. In particular, the functionally important “D-loop” in one model shows chemical shifts and solvent exchange protection more consistent with β-sheet structure. Our work will set the basis for a high-resolution NMR structure determination of the telokin-like domain that will help improve the cryo-EM models, and in turn lead to a better understanding of how coat protein monomers assemble into the icosahedral capsids required for virulence. PMID:22987227

  3. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of Nostoc sp. C139A variant of the heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) domain.

    PubMed

    Alexandropoulos, Ioannis I; Argyriou, Aikaterini I; Marousis, Kostas D; Topouzis, Stavros; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2016-10-01

    The H-NOX (Heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding) domain is conserved across eukaryotes and bacteria. In human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) the H-NOX domain functions as a sensor for the gaseous signaling agent nitric oxide (NO). sGC contains the heme-binding H-NOX domain at its N-terminus, which regulates the catalytic site contained within the C-terminal end of the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of GTP (guanosine 5'-triphosphate) to GMP (guanylyl monophosphate). Here, we present the backbone and side-chain assignments of the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances of the 183-residue H-NOX domain from Nostoc sp. through solution NMR.

  4. DFT calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants, chemical shifts and complexation shifts in complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with some nitrogenous organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-03-01

    Benchmark calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants for a set of model complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with nine organic ligands using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods have been carried out. The calculations were performed by means of several methods: the non-relativistic, relativistic scalar ZORA, and spin-orbit ZORA approaches at the CGA-PBE/QZ4P theory level, and the GIAO NMR method using the B3PW91 functional with the 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and the Stuttgart basis set for the Rh atom. The geometry of compounds was optimised either by the same basis set as for the NMR calculations or applying the B3LYP functional with the 6-31G(2d) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and LANL2DZ for the Rh atom. Computed 15N NMR shielding constants σ were compatible with experimental 15N chemical shifts δ of complexes exhibiting similar structure and fulfil the linear equation δ = aσ + b. The a and b parameters for all data sets have been estimated by means of linear regression analysis. In contrast to the correlation method giving "scaled" chemical shifts, the conversion of shielding constants to chemical shifts with respect to the reference shielding of CH3NO2 provided very inaccurate "raw" δ values. The application of the former to the calculation of complexation shifts Δδ (Δδ = δcompl - δlig) reproduced experimental values qualitatively or semi-quantitatively. The non-relativistic B3PW91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] theory level reproduced the NMR parameters as good as the more expensive relativistic CGA-PBE//QZ4P ZORA approaches.

  5. Solid-phase peptide synthesis and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of (Ala/sup 3/-/sup 15/N)(Val/sup 1/)gramicidin A

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, G.B.; Fields, C.G.; Petefish, J.; Van Wart, H.E.; Cross, T.A.

    1988-03-01

    (Ala/sup 3-15/N)(Val/sup 1/)Gramicidin A has been prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis and studied by solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The synthesis of desformyl(Ala/sup 3-15/N)(Val/sup 1/)gramicidin A employed N-hydroxysuccinimide esters of 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-N/sup ..cap alpha../-amino acids and completely avoided the use of acid. Since deblocking was done with piperidine and the peptide was removed from the resin by treatment with ethanolamine, this synthetic protocol prevented oxidation of the indole rings of this tryptophan-rich peptide and reduced truncations produced by acid hydrolysis. After formylation and purification by anion-exchange and high-pressure liquid chromatography, the peptide was obtained in an overall yield of 30%. Solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of this peptide and uniformly labeled (/sup 15/N)gramicidin A' oriented in hydrated lipid bilayers have been obtained, allowing unambiguous assignment of the (/sup 15/N)Ala/sup 3/ resonance in the latter. The solid-state /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance experiments provide evidence that (Val/sup 1/)gramicidin A is rotating about an axis that is perpendicular to the plane of the lipid bilayer and that the N-H axis is nearly parallel with the rotational axis. This study demonstrates that site-specifically labeled (/sup 15/N)gramicidin A analogs prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis are valuable tools in the study of the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of samples in oriented lipid bilayers.

  6. (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of the CDTb-interacting domain (CDTaBID) from the Clostridium difficile binary toxin catalytic component (CDTa, residues 1-221).

    PubMed

    Roth, Braden M; Varney, Kristen M; Rustandi, Richard R; Weber, David J

    2016-10-01

    Once considered a relatively harmless bacterium, Clostridium difficile has become a major concern for healthcare facilities, now the most commonly reported hospital-acquired pathogen. C. difficile infection (CDI) is usually contracted when the normal gut microbiome is compromised by antibiotic therapy, allowing the opportunistic pathogen to grow and produce its toxins. The severity of infection ranges from watery diarrhea and abdominal cramping to pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis, or death. The past decade has seen a marked increase in the frequency and severity of CDI among industrialized nations owing directly to the emergence of a highly virulent C. difficile strain, NAP1. Along with the large Clostridial toxins expressed by non-epidemic strains, C. difficile NAP1 produces a binary toxin, C. difficile transferase (CDT). As the name suggests, CDT is a two-component toxin comprised of an ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) component (CDTa) and a cell-binding/translocation component (CDTb) that function to destabilize the host cytoskeleton by covalent modification of actin monomers. Central to the mechanism of binary toxin-induced pathogenicity is the formation of CDTa/CDTb complexes at the cell surface. From the perspective of CDTa, this interaction is mediated by the N-terminal domain (residues 1-215) and is spatially and functionally independent of ART activity, which is located in the C-terminal domain (residues 216-420). Here we report the (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of a 221 amino acid, ~26 kDa N-terminal CDTb-interacting domain (CDTaBID) construct by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. These NMR assignments represent the first component coordination domain for a family of Clostridium or Bacillus species harboring ART activity. Our assignments lay the foundation for detailed solution state characterization of structure-function relationships, toxin complex formation, and NMR-based drug discovery efforts.

  7. Cerebral glutamine metabolism under hyperammonemia determined in vivo by localized 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cudalbu, Cristina; Lanz, Bernard; Duarte, João MN; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Pilloud, Yves; Mlynárik, Vladimir; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Brain glutamine synthetase (GS) is an integral part of the glutamate–glutamine cycle and occurs in the glial compartment. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allows noninvasive measurements of the concentrations and synthesis rates of metabolites. 15N MRS is an alternative approach to 13C MRS. Incorporation of labeled 15N from ammonia in cerebral glutamine allows to measure several metabolic reactions related to nitrogen metabolism, including the glutamate–glutamine cycle. To measure 15N incorporation into the position 5N of glutamine and position 2N of glutamate and glutamine, we developed a novel 15N pulse sequence to simultaneously detect, for the first time, [5-15N]Gln and [2-15N]Gln+Glu in vivo in the rat brain. In addition, we also measured for the first time in the same experiment localized 1H spectra for a direct measurement of the net glutamine accumulation. Mathematical modeling of 1H and 15N MRS data allowed to reduce the number of assumptions and provided reliable determination of GS (0.30±0.050 μmol/g per minute), apparent neurotransmission (0.26±0.030 μmol/g per minute), glutamate dehydrogenase (0.029±0.002 μmol/g per minute), and net glutamine accumulation (0.033±0.001 μmol/g per minute). These results showed an increase of GS and net glutamine accumulation under hyperammonemia, supporting the concept of their implication in cerebral ammonia detoxification. PMID:22167234

  8. A facile method for expression and purification of (15)N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Armand, Tara; Ball, K Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with (15)N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the (15)N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼ 6 mg/L culture for (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with (15)N and (13)C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants.

  9. Structure Determination of an Ag(I) -Mediated Cytosine-Cytosine Base Pair within DNA Duplex in Solution with (1) H/(15) N/(109) Ag NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dairaku, Takenori; Furuita, Kyoko; Sato, Hajime; Šebera, Jakub; Nakashima, Katsuyuki; Kondo, Jiro; Yamanaka, Daichi; Kondo, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Itaru; Ono, Akira; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Kojima, Chojiro; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    The structure of an Ag(I) -mediated cytosine-cytosine base pair, C-Ag(I) -C, was determined with NMR spectroscopy in solution. The observation of 1-bond (15) N-(109) Ag J-coupling ((1) J((15) N,(109) Ag): 83 and 84 Hz) recorded within the C-Ag(I) -C base pair evidenced the N3-Ag(I) -N3 linkage in C-Ag(I) -C. The triplet resonances of the N4 atoms in C-Ag(I) -C demonstrated that each exocyclic N4 atom exists as an amino group (-NH2 ), and any isomerization and/or N4-Ag(I) bonding can be excluded. The 3D structure of Ag(I) -DNA complex determined with NOEs was classified as a B-form conformation with a notable propeller twist of C-Ag(I) -C (-18.3±3.0°). The (109) Ag NMR chemical shift of C-Ag(I) -C was recorded for cytidine/Ag(I) complex (δ((109) Ag): 442 ppm) to completed full NMR characterization of the metal linkage. The structural interpretation of NMR data with quantum mechanical calculations corroborated the structure of the C-Ag(I) -C base pair. PMID:27505707

  10. Structure Determination of an Ag(I) -Mediated Cytosine-Cytosine Base Pair within DNA Duplex in Solution with (1) H/(15) N/(109) Ag NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dairaku, Takenori; Furuita, Kyoko; Sato, Hajime; Šebera, Jakub; Nakashima, Katsuyuki; Kondo, Jiro; Yamanaka, Daichi; Kondo, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Itaru; Ono, Akira; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Kojima, Chojiro; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    The structure of an Ag(I) -mediated cytosine-cytosine base pair, C-Ag(I) -C, was determined with NMR spectroscopy in solution. The observation of 1-bond (15) N-(109) Ag J-coupling ((1) J((15) N,(109) Ag): 83 and 84 Hz) recorded within the C-Ag(I) -C base pair evidenced the N3-Ag(I) -N3 linkage in C-Ag(I) -C. The triplet resonances of the N4 atoms in C-Ag(I) -C demonstrated that each exocyclic N4 atom exists as an amino group (-NH2 ), and any isomerization and/or N4-Ag(I) bonding can be excluded. The 3D structure of Ag(I) -DNA complex determined with NOEs was classified as a B-form conformation with a notable propeller twist of C-Ag(I) -C (-18.3±3.0°). The (109) Ag NMR chemical shift of C-Ag(I) -C was recorded for cytidine/Ag(I) complex (δ((109) Ag): 442 ppm) to completed full NMR characterization of the metal linkage. The structural interpretation of NMR data with quantum mechanical calculations corroborated the structure of the C-Ag(I) -C base pair.

  11. NMR resonance assignments of the major apple allergen Mal d 1.

    PubMed

    Ahammer, Linda; Grutsch, Sarina; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The major apple allergen Mal d 1 is the predominant cause of apple (Malus domestica) allergies in large parts of Europe and Northern America. Allergic reactions against this 17.5 kDa protein are the consequence of initial sensitization to the structurally homologous major allergen from birch pollen, Bet v 1. Consumption of apples can subsequently provoke immunologic cross-reactivity of Bet v 1-specific antibodies with Mal d 1 and trigger severe oral allergic syndroms, affecting more than 70 % of all individuals that are sensitized to birch pollen. While the accumulated immunological data suggest that Mal d 1 has a three-dimensional fold that is similar to Bet v 1, experimental structural data for this protein are not available to date. In a first step towards structural characterization of Mal d 1, backbone and side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts of the isoform Mal d 1.0101 were assigned. The NMR-chemical shift data show that this protein is composed of seven β-strands and three α-helices, which is in accordance with the reported secondary structure of the major birch pollen allergen, indicating that Mal d 1 and Bet v 1 indeed have similar three-dimensional folds. The next stage in the characterization of Mal d 1 will be to utilize these resonance assignments in solving the solution structure of this protein. PMID:27165578

  12. 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shift assignments of cyanobacteriochrome NpR6012g4 in the red-absorbing dark state.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qinhong; Lim, Sunghyuk; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Clark Lagarias, J; Ames, James B

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) photosensory proteins are phytochrome homologs using bilin chromophores for light sensing across the visible spectrum. NpR6012g4 is a CBCR from Nostoc punctiforme that serves as a model for a widespread CBCR subfamily with red/green photocycles. We report NMR chemical shift assignments for both the protein backbone and side-chain resonances of the red-absorbing dark state of NpR6012g4 (BMRB no. 26582).

  13. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with {sup 15}N solid-state NMR shift tensor data

    SciTech Connect

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K.; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T.

    2015-11-21

    The {sup 15}N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated {sup 15}N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2–3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X–Y and X–H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of {sup 15}N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved {sup 1}H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental {sup 15}N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than {sup 13}C tensors due to nitrogen’s greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  14. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  15. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the full-length 40 kDa S. acidocaldarius Y-family DNA polymerase, dinB homolog.

    PubMed

    Moro, Sean L; Cocco, Melanie J

    2015-10-01

    The dinB homolog (Dbh) is a member of the Y-family of translesion DNA polymerases, which are specialized to accurately replicate DNA across from a wide variety of lesions in living cells. Lesioned bases block the progression of high-fidelity polymerases and cause detrimental replication fork stalling; Y-family polymerases can bypass these lesions. The active site of the translesion synthesis polymerase is more open than that of a replicative polymerase; consequently Dbh polymerizes with low fidelity. Bypass polymerases also have low processivity. Short extension past the lesion allows the high-fidelity polymerase to switch back onto the site of replication. Dbh and the other Y-family polymerases have been used as structural models to investigate the mechanisms of DNA polymerization and lesion bypass. Many high-resolution crystal structures of Y-family polymerases have been reported. NMR dynamics studies can complement these structures by providing a measure of protein motions. Here we report the (15)N, (1)H, and (13)C backbone resonance assignments at two temperatures (35 and 50 °C) for Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Dbh polymerase. Backbone resonance assignments have been obtained for 86 % of the residues. The polymerase active site is assigned as well as the majority of residues in each of the four domains. PMID:26154586

  16. The economical synthesis of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine; preliminary conformational studies by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G; Middleton, David A; Henderson, Peter J F; Herbert, Richard B

    2003-06-21

    The synthesis of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine 11 was achieved as follows. An epimeric mixture of D-[1-(13)C]ribose 3 and D-[1-(13)C]arabinose 4 was obtained in excellent yield by condensation of K13CN with D-erythrose 2 using a modification of the Kiliani-Fischer synthesis. Efficient separation of the two aldose epimers was pivotally achieved by a novel ion-exchange (Sm3+) chromatography method. D-[2-(13)C]Ribose 5 was obtained from D-[1-(13)C]arabinose 4 using a Ni(II) diamine complex (nickel chloride plus TEMED). Combination of these procedures in a general cycling manner can lead to the very efficient preparation of specifically labelled 13C-monosaccharides of particular chirality. 15N-labelling was introduced in the preparation of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine 11 via [15N2]urea. Cross polarisation magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) were carried out on crystals of the labelled uridine to show that the inter-atomic distance between C-2' and N-1 is closely similar to that calculated from X-ray crystallographic data. The REDOR method will be used now to determine the conformation of bound substrates in the bacterial nucleoside transporters NupC and NupG.

  17. 1H, 13C, and 15N backbone and side chain resonance assignments of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus cyclophilin-A.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Michael J; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G; Armstrong, Geoffrey S; Eisenmesser, Elan Z

    2014-04-01

    Cyclophilins catalyze the reversible peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of their substrates and are present across all kingdoms of life from humans to bacteria. Although numerous biological roles have now been discovered for cyclophilins, their function was initially ascribed to their chaperone-like activity in protein folding where they catalyze the often rate-limiting step of proline isomerization. This chaperone-like activity may be especially important under extreme conditions where cyclophilins are often over expressed, such as in tumors for human cyclophilins (Lee Archiv Pharm Res 33(2): 181-187, 2010), but also in organisms that thrive under extreme conditions, such as theromophilic bacteria. Moreover, the reversible nature of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerization reaction catalyzed by cyclophilins has allowed these enzymes to serve as model systems for probing the role of conformational changes during catalytic turnover (Eisenmesser et al. Science 295(5559): 1520-1523, 2002; Eisenmesser et al. Nature 438(7064): 117-121, 2005). Thus, we present here the resonance assignments of a thermophilic cyclophilin from Geobacillus kaustophilus derived from deep-sea sediment (Takami et al. Extremophiles 8(5): 351-356, 2004). This thermophilic cyclophilin may now be studied at a variety of temperatures to provide insight into the comparative structure, dynamics, and catalytic mechanism of cyclophilins.

  18. 1H, 13C, and 15N backbone and side chain resonance assignments of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus cyclophilin-A

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Michael; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2014-04-01

    Cyclophilins catalyze the reversible peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of their substrates and are present across all kingdoms of life from humans to bacteria. Although numerous biological roles have now been discovered for cyclophilins, their function was initially ascribed to their chaperone-like activity in protein folding where they catalyze the often rate-limiting step of proline isomerization. This chaperone-like activity may be especially important under extreme conditions where cyclophilins are often over expressed, such as in tumors for human cyclophilins {Lee, 2010 #1167}, but also in organisms that thrive under extreme conditions, such as theromophilic bacteria. Moreover, the reversible nature of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerization reaction catalyzed by cyclophilins has allowed these enzymes to serve as model systems for probing the role of conformational changes during catalytic turnover {Eisenmesser, 2002 #20;Eisenmesser, 2005 #203}. Thus, we present here the resonance assignments of a thermophilic cyclophilin from Geobacillus kaustophilus derived from deep-sea sediment {Takami, 2004 #1384}. This thermophilic cyclophilin may now be studied at a variety of temperatures to provide insight into the comparative structure, dynamics, and catalytic mechanism of cyclophilins.

  19. RUBIDIUM, a program for computer-aided assignment of two-dimensional NMR spectra of polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, C; Hwang, J F; Chen, T B; Soo, V W

    1992-01-01

    Taking advantage of the rule-based expert system technology, a program named RUBIDIUM (Rule-Based Identification In 2D NMR Spectrum) was developed to accomplish the automatic 1H NMR resonance assignments of polypeptides. Besides noise elimination and peak selection capabilities, RUBIDIUM detects the cross-peak patterns of amino acid residues in the COSY spectrum, assigning these patterns to amino acid types, performing sequential assignments using combined COSY/NOESY spectra, and finally, achieving the total assignment of the 1H NMR spectrum.

  20. Structure and Membrane Interactions of the Antibiotic Peptide Dermadistinctin K by Multidimensional Solution and Oriented 15N and 31P Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Moraes, Cléria Mendonça de; Resende, Jarbas M.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fábio C.L.; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    DD K, a peptide first isolated from the skin secretion of the Phyllomedusa distincta frog, has been prepared by solid-phase chemical peptide synthesis and its conformation was studied in trifluoroethanol/water as well as in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecylphosphocholine micelles or small unilamellar vesicles. Multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy indicates an α-helical conformation in membrane environments starting at residue 7 and extending to the C-terminal carboxyamide. Furthermore, DD K has been labeled with 15N at a single alanine position that is located within the helical core region of the sequence. When reconstituted into oriented phosphatidylcholine membranes the resulting 15N solid-state NMR spectrum shows a well-defined helix alignment parallel to the membrane surface in excellent agreement with the amphipathic character of DD K. Proton-decoupled 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy indicates that the peptide creates a high level of disorder at the level of the phospholipid headgroup suggesting that DD K partitions into the bilayer where it severely disrupts membrane packing. PMID:19289046

  1. In vivo, large-scale preparation of uniformly (15)N- and site-specifically (13)C-labeled homogeneous, recombinant RNA for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Le, My T; Brown, Rachel E; Simon, Anne E; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of how ribonucleic acid (RNA) structures fold to form intricate, three-dimensional structures has provided fundamental insights into understanding the biological functions of RNA. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a particularly useful high-resolution technique to investigate the dynamic structure of RNA. Effective study of RNA by NMR requires enrichment with isotopes of (13)C or (15)N or both. Here, we present a method to produce milligram quantities of uniformly (15)N- and site-specifically (13)C-labeled RNAs using wild-type K12 and mutant tktA Escherichia coli in combination with a tRNA-scaffold approach. The method includes a double selection protocol to obtain an E. coli clone with consistently high expression of the recombinant tRNA-scaffold. We also present protocols for the purification of the tRNA-scaffold from a total cellular RNA extract and the excision of the RNA of interest from the tRNA-scaffold using DNAzymes. Finally, we showcase NMR applications to demonstrate the benefit of using in vivo site-specifically (13)C-labeled RNA. PMID:26577743

  2. Oligomeric complexes of some heteroaromatic ligands and aromatic diamines with rhodium and molybdenum tetracarboxylates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR and density functional theory studies.

    PubMed

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Kamieński, Bohdan; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-05-01

    Seven new oligomeric complexes of 4,4'-bipyridine; 3,3'-bipyridine; benzene-1,4-diamine; benzene-1,3-diamine; benzene-1,2-diamine; and benzidine with rhodium tetraacetate, as well as 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetraacetate, have been obtained and investigated by elemental analysis and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR. The known complexes of pyrazine with rhodium tetrabenzoate, benzoquinone with rhodium tetrapivalate, 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetrakistrifluoroacetate and the 1 : 1 complex of 2,2'-bipyridine with rhodium tetraacetate exhibiting axial-equatorial ligation mode have been obtained as well for comparison purposes. Elemental analysis revealed 1 : 1 complex stoichiometry of all complexes. The (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra of all new complexes consist of one narrow signal, indicating regular uniform structures. Benzidine forms a heterogeneous material, probably containing linear oligomers and products of further reactions. The complexes were characterized by the parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δcomplex  - δligand). This parameter ranged from around -40 to -90 ppm in the case of heteroaromatic ligands, from around -12 to -22 ppm for diamines and from -16 to -31 ppm for the complexes of molybdenum tetracarboxylates with 4,4'-bipyridine. The experimental results have been supported by a density functional theory computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts and complexation shifts at the non-relativistic Becke, three-parameter, Perdew-Wang 91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] and GGA-PBE/QZ4P levels of theory and at the relativistic scalar and spin-orbit zeroth order regular approximation/GGA-PBE/QZ4P level of theory. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts have been calculated for the selected compounds.

  3. The theoretical investigation of solvent effects on the relative stability and 15N NMR shielding of antidepressant heterocyclic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahan, Arezoo; Khojandi, Mahya; Salari, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) and Tomasi's polarized continuum model (PCM) were used for the investigation of solvent polarity and its dielectric constant effects on the relative stability and NMR shielding tensors of antidepressant mirtazapine (MIR). The obtained results indicated that the relative stability in the polar solvents is higher than that in non-polar solvents and the most stable structure was observed in the water at the B3LYP/6-311++G ( d, p) level of theory. Also, natural bond orbital (NBO) interpretation demonstrated that by increase of solvent dielectric constant, negative charge on nitrogen atoms of heterocycles and resonance energy for LP(N10) → σ* and π* delocalization of the structure's azepine ring increase and the highest values of them were observed in water. On the other hand, NMR calculations showed that with an increase in negative charge of nitrogen atoms, isotropic chemical shielding (σiso) around them increase and nitrogen of piperazine ring (N19) has the highest values of negative charge and σiso among nitrogen atoms. NMR calculations also represented that direct solvent effect on nitrogen of pyridine ring (N15) is more than other nitrogens, while its effect on N19 is less than other ones. Based on NMR data and NBO interpretation, it can be deduced that with a decrease in the negative charge on nitrogen atoms, the intramolecular effects on them decrease, while direct solvent effect increases.

  4. 1H, 13C, and 15N chemical shift assignments of cyanobacteriochrome NpR6012g4 in the green-absorbing photoproduct state.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sunghyuk; Yu, Qinhong; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Lagarias, J Clark; Ames, James B

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial photosensory proteins with a tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore that belong to the phytochrome superfamily. Like phytochromes, CBCRs photoconvert between two photostates with distinct spectral properties. NpR6012g4 from Nostoc punctiforme is a model system for widespread CBCRs with conserved red/green photocycles. Atomic-level structural information for the photoproduct state in this subfamily is not known. Here, we report NMR backbone chemical shift assignments of the light-activated state of NpR6012g4 (BMRB no. 26577) as a first step toward determining its atomic resolution structure. PMID:26537963

  5. On the problem of resonance assignments in solid state NMR of uniformly ¹⁵N,¹³C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Determination of accurate resonance assignments from multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra is one of the major problems in biomolecular solid state NMR, particularly for relative large proteins with less-than-ideal NMR linewidths. This article investigates the difficulty of resonance assignment, using a computational Monte Carlo/simulated annealing (MCSA) algorithm to search for assignments from artificial three-dimensional spectra that are constructed from the reported isotropic (15)N and (13)C chemical shifts of two proteins whose structures have been determined by solution NMR methods. The results demonstrate how assignment simulations can provide new insights into factors that affect the assignment process, which can then help guide the design of experimental strategies. Specifically, simulations are performed for the catalytic domain of SrtC (147 residues, primarily β-sheet secondary structure) and the N-terminal domain of MLKL (166 residues, primarily α-helical secondary structure). Assuming unambiguous residue-type assignments and four ideal three-dimensional data sets (NCACX, NCOCX, CONCA, and CANCA), uncertainties in chemical shifts must be less than 0.4 ppm for assignments for SrtC to be unique, and less than 0.2 ppm for MLKL. Eliminating CANCA data has no significant effect, but additionally eliminating CONCA data leads to more stringent requirements for chemical shift precision. Introducing moderate ambiguities in residue-type assignments does not have a significant effect. PMID:25797013

  6. Dependence of in vivo glutamine synthetase activity on ammonia concentration in rat brain studied by 1H - 15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence-transfer NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, K; Ross, B D; Kuo, E L

    1995-01-01

    The dependence of the in vivo rate of glutamine synthesis on the substrate ammonia concentration was studied in rat brain by 1H-15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence-transfer NMR in combination with biochemical techniques. In vivo rates were measured at various steady-state blood and brain ammonia concentrations within the ranges 0.4-0.55 mumol/g and 0.86-0.98 mumol/g respectively, after low-rate intravenous 15NH4+ infusion (isotope chase). The rate of glutamine synthesis at steady state was determined from the change in brain [5-15N]glutamine levels during isotope chase, observed selectively through the amide proton by NMR, and 15N enrichments of brain glutamine and of blood and brain ammonia measured byN gas chromatography-MS. The in vivo rate (v) was 3.3-4.5 mumol/h per g of brain at blood ammonia concentrations (s) of 0.40-0.55 mumol/g. A linear increase of 1/v with 1/s permitted estimation of the in vivo glutamine synthetase (GS) activity at a physiological blood ammonia concentration to be 0.4-2.1 mumol/h per g. The observed ammonia-dependence strongly suggests that, under physiological conditions, in vivo GS activity is kinetically limited by sub-optimal in situ concentrations of ammonia as well as glutamate and ATP. Comparison of the observed in vivo GS activity with the reported in vivo rates of glutaminase and of gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) synthesis suggests that, under mildly hyperammonaemic conditions, glutamine is synthesized at a sufficiently high rate to serve as a precursor of GABA, but glutaminase-catalysed hydrolysis of glutamine is too slow to be the sole provider of glutamate used for GABA synthesis. PMID:7487913

  7. Protein-ligand NOE matching: a high-throughput method for binding pose evaluation that does not require protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Constantine, Keith L; Davis, Malcolm E; Metzler, William J; Mueller, Luciano; Claus, Brian L

    2006-06-01

    Given the three-dimensional (3D) structure of a protein, the binding pose of a ligand can be determined using distance restraints derived from assigned intra-ligand and protein-ligand nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs). A primary limitation of this approach is the need for resonance assignments of the ligand-bound protein. We have developed an approach that utilizes data from 3D 13C-edited, 13C/15N-filtered HSQC-NOESY spectra for evaluating ligand binding poses without requiring protein NMR resonance assignments. Only the 1H NMR assignments of the bound ligand are essential. Trial ligand binding poses are generated by any suitable method (e.g., computational docking). For each trial binding pose, the 3D 13C-edited, 13C/15N-filtered HSQC-NOESY spectrum is predicted, and the predicted and observed patterns of protein-ligand NOEs are matched and scored using a fast, deterministic bipartite graph matching algorithm. The best scoring (lowest "cost") poses are identified. Our method can incorporate any explicit restraints or protein assignment data that are available, and many extensions of the basic procedure are feasible. Only a single sample is required, and the method can be applied to both slowly and rapidly exchanging ligands. The method was applied to three test cases: one complex involving muscle fatty acid-binding protein (mFABP) and two complexes involving the leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) I-domain. Without using experimental protein NMR assignments, the method identified the known binding poses with good accuracy. The addition of experimental protein NMR assignments improves the results. Our "NOE matching" approach is expected to be widely applicable; i.e., it does not appear to depend on a fortuitous distribution of binding pocket residues.

  8. 3D NMR spectroscopy for resonance assignment and structure elucidation of proteins under MAS: novel pulse schemes and sensitivity considerations.

    PubMed

    Heise, Henrike; Seidel, Karsten; Etzkorn, Manuel; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2005-03-01

    Two types of 3D MAS NMR experiments are introduced, which combine standard (NC,CC) transfer schemes with (1H,1H) mixing to simultaneously detect connectivities and structural constraints of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled proteins with high spectral resolution. The homonuclear CCHHC and CCC experiments are recorded with one double-quantum evolution dimension in order to avoid a cubic diagonal in the spectrum. Depending on the second transfer step, spin systems or proton-proton contacts can be determined with reduced spectral overlap. The heteronuclear NHHCC experiment encodes NH-HC proton-proton interactions, which are indicative for the backbone conformation of the protein. The third dimension facilitates the identification of the amino acid spin system. Experimental results on U-[15N,13C]valine and U-[15N,13C]ubiquitin demonstrate their usefulness for resonance assignments and for the determination of structural constraints. Furthermore, we give a detailed analysis of alternative multidimensional sampling schemes and their effect on sensitivity and resolution. PMID:15705514

  9. NMR assignments, secondary structure, and global fold of calerythrin, an EF-hand calcium-binding protein from Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed Central

    Aitio, H.; Annila, A.; Heikkinen, S.; Thulin, E.; Drakenberg, T.; Kilpeläinen, I.

    1999-01-01

    Calerythrin is a 20 kDa calcium-binding protein isolated from gram-positive bacterium Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Based on amino acid sequence homology, it has been suggested that calerythrin belongs to the family of invertebrate sarcoplasmic EF-hand calcium-binding proteins (SCPs), and therefore it is expected to function as a calcium buffer. NMR spectroscopy was used to obtain structural information on the protein in solution. Backbone and side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N assignments were obtained from triple resonance experiments HNCACB, HN(CO)CACB, HNCO, CC(CO)NH, and [15N]-edited TOCSY, and HCCH-TOCSY. Secondary structure was determined by using secondary chemical shifts and characteristic NOEs. In addition, backbone N-H residual dipolar couplings were measured from a spin-state selective [1H, 15N] correlation spectrum acquired from a sample dissolved in a dilute liquid crystal. Four EF-hand motifs with characteristic helix-loop-helix patterns were observed. Three of these are typical calcium-binding EF-hands, whereas site 2 is an atypical nonbinding site. The global fold of calerythrin was assessed by dipolar couplings. Measured dipolar couplings were compared with values calculated from four crystal structures of proteins with sequence homology to calerythrin. These data allowed us to recognize an overall similarity between the folds of calerythrin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins from the sandworm Nereis diversicolor and the amphioxus Branchiostoma lanceolatum. PMID:10631973

  10. Identifying the African Wintering Grounds of Hybrid Flycatchers Using a Multi–Isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Assignment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Wilgenburg, Steven L.; Hobson, Keith A.; Folmer, Eelke; Font, Laura; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival, which would be expected if their migration strategy had been a mix of the parent species' strategies potentially resulting in an intermediate route crossing the Sahara desert to different wintering grounds. Previously, we compared isotope ratios and found no significant difference in stable-nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) in winter-grown feathers between the parental species and hybrids, but stable-carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in hybrids significantly clustered only with those of pied flycatchers. We followed up on these findings and additionally analyzed the same feathers for stable-hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) and conducted spatially explicit multi-isotope assignment analyses. The assignment results overlapped with presumed wintering ranges of the two species, highlighting the efficacy of the method. In contrast to earlier findings, hybrids clustered with both parental species, though most strongly with pied flycatcher. PMID:24847717

  11. Identifying the African wintering grounds of hybrid flycatchers using a multi-isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) assignment approach.

    PubMed

    Veen, Thor; Hjernquist, Mårten B; Van Wilgenburg, Steven L; Hobson, Keith A; Folmer, Eelke; Font, Laura; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival, which would be expected if their migration strategy had been a mix of the parent species' strategies potentially resulting in an intermediate route crossing the Sahara desert to different wintering grounds. Previously, we compared isotope ratios and found no significant difference in stable-nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) in winter-grown feathers between the parental species and hybrids, but stable-carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in hybrids significantly clustered only with those of pied flycatchers. We followed up on these findings and additionally analyzed the same feathers for stable-hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) and conducted spatially explicit multi-isotope assignment analyses. The assignment results overlapped with presumed wintering ranges of the two species, highlighting the efficacy of the method. In contrast to earlier findings, hybrids clustered with both parental species, though most strongly with pied flycatcher.

  12. Complete Assignment of (1)H-NMR Resonances of the King Cobra Neurotoxin CM-11.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu-Xi; Liu, Wei-Dong; Liu, Ai-Zhuo; Pei, Feng-Kui

    1997-01-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus Hannah) neurotoxin CM-Il is long-chain peptide with 72 amino acid residues. Its complete assignment of (1)H-NMR resonances was obtained using various 2D-NMR technologies, including DQF-COSY, clean-TOCSY and NOESY.

  13. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for ten phenylpiperazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhihui; Yuan, Mu; Zhang, Si; Wu, Jun; Qi, Shuhua; Li, Qingxin

    2005-10-01

    Ten phenylpiperazine derivatives were designed and synthesized. The first complete assignments of (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts for these phenylpiperazine derivatives were achieved by means of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra.

  14. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for 10 phenylethanoid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Huang, Jianshe; Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Si; Xiao, Zhihui; Li, Qingxin; Long, Lijuan; Huang, Liangmin

    2004-07-01

    Ten phenylethanoid glycosides, including two new ones, isolated from the aerial parts of the mangrove plant Acanthus ilicifolius were identified. The first complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for these glycosides were achieved by means of 2D NMR techniques, including 1H-1H COSY, TOCSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra.

  15. 1H, 13C, and 15N backbone, side-chain, and heme chemical shift assignments for oxidized and reduced forms of the monoheme c-type cytochrome ApcA isolated from the acidophilic metal-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum.

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Swenson, Michael; Magnuson, Timothy S.

    2011-03-04

    We report the 1H, 13C, and 15N chemical shift assignments of both oxidized and reduced forms of an abundant periplasmic c-type cytochrome, designated ApcA, from the acidophilic gram-negative facultatively anaerobic metal-reducing alpha-proteobacterium Acidiphilium cryptum. These resonance assignments prove that ApcA is a monoheme cytochrome c2 and the product of the Acry_2099 gene. An absence of resonance peaks in the NMR spectra for the 21 N-terminal residues suggests that a predicted N-terminal signal sequence is cleaved. We also describe the preparation and purification of the protein in labeled form from laboratory cultures of A. cryptum growing on 13C- and 15N- labeled substrates.

  16. NMR studies on /sup 15/N-labeled creatine (CR), creatinine (CRN), phosphocreatine (PCR), and phosphocreatinine (PCRN), and on barriers to rotation in creatine kinase-bound creatine in the enzymatic reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, G.L.; Reddick, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    Recently, the authors have synthesized /sup 15/N-2-Cr, /sup 15/N-3-Crn, /sup 15/N-2-Crn, /sup 15/N-3-PCrn, /sup 15/N-3-PCr, and /sup 15/N-2-PCr. /sup 1/H, /sup 15/N, /sup 31/P NMR data show that Crn protonates exclusively at the non-methylated ring nitrogen, confirm that PCrn is phosphorylated at the exocyclic nitrogen, and demonstrate that the /sup 31/P-/sup 15/N one-bond coupling constant in /sup 15/N-3-PCr is 18 Hz, not 3 Hz as previously reported by Brindle, K.M., Porteous, R. and Radda, G.K.. The authors have found that creatine kinase is capable of catalyzing the /sup 14/N//sup 15/N positional isotope exchange of 3-/sup 15/N-PCr in the presence of MgADP, but not in its absence. Further, the exchange does not take place when labeled PCr is resynthesized exclusively from the ternary complex E X Cr X MgATP as opposed to either E X Cr or free Cr. This suggests that the enzyme both imparts an additional rotational barrier to creatine in the complex and catalyzes the transfer of phosphoryl group with essentially complete regiospecificity.

  17. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments and secondary structure information for Methylobacterium extorquens PqqD and the complex of PqqD with PqqA.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert L; Latham, John A; Klinman, Judith P; Wilmot, Carrie M; Xia, Youlin

    2016-10-01

    The ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide (RiPP), pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), is a dehydrogenase cofactor synthesized by, but not exclusively used by, certain prokaryotes. RiPPs represent a rapidly expanding and diverse class of natural products-many of which have therapeutic potential-and the biosynthetic pathways for these are gaining attention. Five gene products from the pqq operon (PqqA, PqqB, PqqC, PqqD, and PqqE) are essential for PQQ biosynthesis. The substrate is the peptide PqqA, which is presented to the radical SAM enzyme PqqE by the small protein PqqD. PqqA is unstructured in solution, and only binds to PqqE when in complex with PqqD. PqqD is a member of a growing family of RiPP chaperone proteins (or domains in most cases) that present their associated peptide substrates to the initial RiPP biosynthesis enzymes. An X-ray crystal structure exists for dimeric Xanthomonas campestris PqqD (PDB ID: 3G2B), but PqqD is now known to act as a monomer under physiological conditions. In this study, the PqqD truncation from naturally fused Methylobacterium extorquens (Mex) PqqCD was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and MexPqqA was chemically synthesized. Solution NMR (1)H-,(15)N-HSQC chemical shift studies have identified the PqqD residues involved in binding PqqA, and (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N peak assignments for PqqD alone and for PqqD bound to PqqA are reported herein. PMID:27638737

  18. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments and secondary structure information for Methylobacterium extorquens PqqD and the complex of PqqD with PqqA.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert L; Latham, John A; Klinman, Judith P; Wilmot, Carrie M; Xia, Youlin

    2016-10-01

    The ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide (RiPP), pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), is a dehydrogenase cofactor synthesized by, but not exclusively used by, certain prokaryotes. RiPPs represent a rapidly expanding and diverse class of natural products-many of which have therapeutic potential-and the biosynthetic pathways for these are gaining attention. Five gene products from the pqq operon (PqqA, PqqB, PqqC, PqqD, and PqqE) are essential for PQQ biosynthesis. The substrate is the peptide PqqA, which is presented to the radical SAM enzyme PqqE by the small protein PqqD. PqqA is unstructured in solution, and only binds to PqqE when in complex with PqqD. PqqD is a member of a growing family of RiPP chaperone proteins (or domains in most cases) that present their associated peptide substrates to the initial RiPP biosynthesis enzymes. An X-ray crystal structure exists for dimeric Xanthomonas campestris PqqD (PDB ID: 3G2B), but PqqD is now known to act as a monomer under physiological conditions. In this study, the PqqD truncation from naturally fused Methylobacterium extorquens (Mex) PqqCD was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and MexPqqA was chemically synthesized. Solution NMR (1)H-,(15)N-HSQC chemical shift studies have identified the PqqD residues involved in binding PqqA, and (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N peak assignments for PqqD alone and for PqqD bound to PqqA are reported herein.

  19. NMR Assignments for a Helical 40 kDa Membrane Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Oxenoid, Kirill; Kim, Hak J.; Jacob, Jaison; Soennichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2004-04-28

    Backbone nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments were achieved for diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) in detergent micelles. DAGK is a homotrimeric integral membrane protein comprised of 121 residue subunits, each having three transmembrane segments. Assignments were made using TROSY-based pulse sequences. DAGK was found to be an almost exclusively helical protein. This work points to the feasibility of both solving the structure of DAGK using solution NMR methods and using NMR as a primary tool in structural studies of other helical integral membrane proteins of similar size and complexity.

  20. Analysis of internal motions of interleukin-13 variant associated with severe bronchial asthma using {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Takeda, Chika; Kuroki, Ryota; Izuhara, Kenji; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi . E-mail: ueda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-22

    The single nucleotide polymorphism interleukin-13 (IL-13) R110Q is associated with severe bronchial asthma because its lower affinity leads to the augmentation of local IL-13 concentration, resulting in an increase in the signal transduction via IL-13R. Since the mutation site does not directly bind to IL-13R{alpha}2, we carried out NMR relaxation analyses of the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q in order to examine whether the R110Q mutation affects the internal motions in IL-13 molecules. The results showed that the internal motion in the micro- to millisecond time scale on helix D, which is suggested to be important for the interaction between IL-13 and IL-13R{alpha}2, is increased in IL-13-R110Q compared with that in the wild-type IL-13. It therefore appears that the difference in the internal motions on helix D between the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q may be involved in their affinity differences with IL-13R{alpha}2.

  1. The HSP90 binding mode of a radicicol-like E-oxime from docking, binding free energy estimations, and NMR 15N chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Spichty, Martin; Taly, Antoine; Hagn, Franz; Kessler, Horst; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We determine the binding mode of a macrocyclic radicicol-like oxime to yeast HSP90 by combining computer simulations and experimental measurements. We sample the macrocyclic scaffold of the unbound ligand by parallel tempering simulations and dock the most populated conformations to yeast HSP90. Docking poses are then evaluated by the use of binding free energy estimations with the linear interaction energy method. Comparison of QM/MM-calculated NMR chemical shifts with experimental shift data for a selective subset of back-bone 15N provides an additional evaluation criteria. As a last test we check the binding modes against available structure-activity-relationships. We find that the most likely binding mode of the oxime to yeast HSP90 is very similar to the known structure of the radicicol-HSP90 complex. PMID:19482409

  2. Detection of closed influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide structures in membranes by backbone (13)CO- (15)N rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ujjayini; Xie, Li; Weliky, David P

    2013-02-01

    The influenza virus fusion peptide is the N-terminal ~20 residues of the HA2 subunit of the hemagglutinin protein and this peptide plays a key role in the fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes during initial infection of a cell. The fusion peptide adopts N-helix/turn/C-helix structure in both detergent and membranes with reports of both open and closed interhelical topologies. In the present study, backbone (13)CO-(15)N REDOR solid-state NMR was applied to the membrane-associated fusion peptide to detect the distribution of interhelical distances. The data clearly showed a large fraction of closed and semi-closed topologies and were best-fitted to a mixture of two structures that do not exchange. One of the earlier open structural models may have incorrect G13 dihedral angles derived from TALOS analysis of experimentally correct (13)C shifts.

  3. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  4. Carbon-13, sup 15 N, and sup 31 P NMR studies on 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine oxidase from Arthrobacter oxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pust, S.; Vervoort, J.; Decker, K.; Bacher, A.; Mueller, F. )

    1989-01-24

    The interaction between the apoprotein of 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine oxidase from Arthrobacter oxidans and the prosthetic group FAD has been investigated by {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N and {sup 31}P NMR techniques. The FAD prosthetic group was selectively enriched in {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopes by adding isotopically labeled riboflavin derivatives to the growth medium of riboflavin-requiring mutant cells. In the oxidized state the chemical shift of the C(7) and C(8) atoms indicates that the xylene moiety of the isoalloxazine ring is embedded in a hydrophobic environment. The binding of the competitive inhibitor, 6-hydroxy-D-nicotine, influences the resonances of the C(4a) and the N(5) atom strongly. It is suggested that these shifts are due to a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between the N(5) atom and the inhibitor. On reduction all resonances, except those of the C(10a) and the N(1) atoms, shift upfield, indicating the increased electron density in the ring system. It can unambiguously be concluded from the chemical shift of the N(1) atom that the reduced flavin is anionic. The doublet character of the N(3) and N(5) resonances suggests that bulk water has no access to the active center. The strong downfield shift of the N(1) position indicates that this atom is embedded in a polar environment, but it does not indicate the presence of a positively charged residue. The {sup 31}P NMR spectra show that the resonances of the pyrophosphate group of the bound FAD differ slightly from those of free FAD. Besides the {sup 31}P resonances from FAD, four peaks around 0 ppm are observed that belongs to bound phosphorus residues. The residues are not located close to the isoalloxazine ring.

  5. (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of the conserved region in the middle domain of S. pombe Sin1 protein.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Saori; Furuita, Kyoko; Hattori, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2015-04-01

    SAPK-interacting protein 1 (Sin1) is an important component of the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 (TORC2). TOR is a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase and forms functionally distinct protein complexes referred to as TORC1 and TORC2. TORC2, conserved from yeast to humans, phosphorylates AGC-family protein kinases and has many cellular functions including the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. The Sin1 subunit of TORC2 is required for the binding of TORC2 to substrates, and the conserved region in the middle (CRIM) domain of Sin1 is important in the substrate recognition of TORC2. Here, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sin1 (amino acids 247-400) (Sin1CRIM), which possesses the CRIM domain. These data contribute toward the structure determination of Sin1CRIM and an understanding of the interactions of Sin1CRIM with substrates of TORC2.

  6. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure of the human PHF6-ePHD1 domain.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yun; Liu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Jiahai; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2016-04-01

    The plant homeodomain (PHD) finger 6 (PHF6) is a multidomain protein that comprises four nuclear localization signals and two extended PHD zinc finger domains (ePHD), suggesting that the PHD domains of PHF6 may have different functions compared with other PHD domains. And the PHF6 was first identified as the gene mutated associated with Börjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome, an X-linked mental retardation disorder. The mutant PHF6 is also associated with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. But the molecular mechanism between these diseases and PHF6 are still unclear. In addition, the first conserved ePHD (ePHD1) of PHF6 is involved in its nucleolus localization, directly interacts with upstream binding factor (UBF) and suppresses rRNA transcription. Here we show the backbone resonance and side chain assignments of the PHF6-ePHD1 domain from human by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy and its secondary structure as predicted by the TALOS+. These assignments of PHF6-ePHD1 domain throw a light on the further structure determination, dynamics and interaction with UBF.

  7. Automated assignment of NMR chemical shifts based on a known structure and 4D spectra.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Matthias; Fredriksson, Kai; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Apart from their central role during 3D structure determination of proteins the backbone chemical shift assignment is the basis for a number of applications, like chemical shift perturbation mapping and studies on the dynamics of proteins. This assignment is not a trivial task even if a 3D protein structure is known and needs almost as much effort as the assignment for structure prediction if performed manually. We present here a new algorithm based solely on 4D [(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC-NOESY-[(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC spectra which is able to assign a large percentage of chemical shifts (73-82 %) unambiguously, demonstrated with proteins up to a size of 250 residues. For the remaining residues, a small number of possible assignments is filtered out. This is done by comparing distances in the 3D structure to restraints obtained from the peak volumes in the 4D spectrum. Using dead-end elimination, assignments are removed in which at least one of the restraints is violated. Including additional information from chemical shift predictions, a complete unambiguous assignment was obtained for Ubiquitin and 95 % of the residues were correctly assigned in the 251 residue-long N-terminal domain of enzyme I. The program including source code is available at https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign . PMID:27484442

  8. On the accuracy of the GIAO-DFT calculation of 15N NMR chemical shifts of the nitrogen-containing heterocycles--a gateway to better agreement with experiment at lower computational cost.

    PubMed

    Samultsev, Dmitry O; Semenov, Valentin A; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2014-05-01

    The main factors affecting the accuracy and computational cost of the gauge-independent atomic orbital density functional theory (GIAO-DFT) calculation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts in the representative series of key nitrogen-containing heterocycles--azoles and azines--have been systematically analyzed. In the calculation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts, the best result has been achieved with the KT3 functional used in combination with Jensen's pcS-3 basis set (GIAO-DFT-KT3/pcS-3) resulting in the value of mean absolute error as small as 5 ppm for a range exceeding 270 ppm in a benchmark series of 23 compounds with an overall number of 41 different (15)N NMR chemical shifts. Another essential finding is that basically, the application of the locally dense basis set approach is justified in the calculation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts within the 3-4 ppm error that results in a dramatic decrease in computational cost. Based on the present data, we recommend GIAO-DFT-KT3/pcS-3//pc-2 as one of the most effective locally dense basis set schemes for the calculation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts.

  9. Review of Methods to Assign the NMR Peaks of Reductively Methylated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Kevin J.; Macnaughtan, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    Reductive methylation of lysyl side-chain amines has been a successful tool in the advancement of high resolution structural biology. The utility of this method has continuously gained ground as a protein chemical modification; first, as a tool to aid protein crystallization and later, as a probe in protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. As an isotope-labeling strategy for NMR studies, reductive methylation has contributed to the study of protein-protein interactions and global conformational changes. While more detailed structural studies using this labeling strategy are possible, the hurdle of assigning the NMR peaks to the corresponding reductively methylated amine hinders its use. In this review, we discuss and compare strategies used to assign the NMR peaks of reductively methylated protein-amines. PMID:25175010

  10. Site-specific protein backbone and side-chain NMR chemical shift and relaxation analysis of human vinexin SH3 domain using a genetically encoded {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-labeled unnatural amino acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Xi, Zhaoyong; Wang, Hu; Shi, Chaowei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine. {yields} Site-specific incorporation of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine to SH3. {yields} Site-specific backbone and side chain chemical shift and relaxation analysis. {yields} Different internal motions at different sites of SH3 domain upon ligand binding. -- Abstract: SH3 is a ubiquitous domain mediating protein-protein interactions. Recent solution NMR structural studies have shown that a proline-rich peptide is capable of binding to the human vinexin SH3 domain. Here, an orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair for {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine ({sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-tfmF) has been applied to achieve site-specific labeling of SH3 at three different sites. One-dimensional solution NMR spectra of backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F were obtained for SH3 with three different site-specific labels. Site-specific backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F chemical shift and relaxation analysis of SH3 in the absence or presence of a peptide ligand demonstrated different internal motions upon ligand binding at the three different sites. This site-specific NMR analysis might be very useful for studying large-sized proteins or protein complexes.

  11. Formation of a noncovalent serpin-proteinase complex involves no conformational change in the serpin. Use of 1H-15N HSQC NMR as a sensitive nonperturbing monitor of conformation.

    PubMed

    Peterson, F C; Gordon, N C; Gettins, P G

    2000-10-01

    A structural understanding of the nature and scope of serpin inhibition mechanisms has been limited by the inability so far to crystallize any serpin-proteinase complex. We describe here the application of [(1)H-(15)N]-HSQC NMR on uniformly and residue-selectively (15)N-labeled serpin alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor (Pittsburgh variant with stabilizing mutations) to provide a nonperturbing and exquisitely sensitive means of probing the conformation of the serpin alone and in a noncovalent complex with inactive, serine 195-modified, bovine trypsin. The latter should be a good model both for the few examples of reversible serpin-proteinase complexes and for the initial Michaelis-like complex formed en route to irreversible covalent inhibition. Cleavage of the reactive center loop, with subsequent insertion into beta-sheet A, caused dramatic perturbation of most of the NMR cross-peaks. This was true for both the uniformly labeled and alanine-specifically labeled samples. The spectra of uniformly or leucine- or alanine-specifically labeled alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor in noncovalent complex with unlabeled inactive trypsin gave almost no detectable chemical shift changes of cross-peaks, but some general increase in line width. Residue-specific assignments of the four alanines in the reactive center loop, at P12, P11, P9, and P4, allowed specific examination of the behavior of the reactive center loop. All four alanines showed higher mobility than the body of the serpin, consistent with a flexible reactive center loop, which remained flexible even in the noncovalent complex with proteinase. The three alanines near the hinge point for insertion showed almost no chemical shift perturbation upon noncovalent complex formation, while the alanine at P4 was perturbed, presumably by interaction with the active site of bound trypsin. Reporters from both the body of the serpin and the reactive center loop therefore indicate that noncovalent complex formation involves no

  12. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for the cyanine dyes SYBR Safe and thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Evenson, William E; Boden, Lauren M; Muzikar, Katy A; O'Leary, Daniel J

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of (1)H and (13)C NMR and mass spectral data for the fluorescent nucleic acid stain SYBR Safe indicates that it contains a cyanine-based cationic core structure identical to thiazole orange. The difference between these two compounds is the type of N-substitution on the quinolinium ring system (SYBR Safe, n-Pr; thiazole orange, Me). The (1)H and (13)C NMR resonances for both compounds were assigned on the basis of one- and two-dimensional (COSY, ROESY, HSQC, and HMBC) experiments. The preferred conformation of these compounds was computed by ab initio methods and found to be consistent with the NMR data.

  13. GASA: a graph-based automated NMR backbone resonance sequential assignment program.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Lin, Guohui

    2007-04-01

    The success in backbone resonance sequential assignment is fundamental to three dimensional protein structure determination via Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Such a sequential assignment can roughly be partitioned into three separate steps: grouping resonance peaks in multiple spectra into spin systems, chaining the resultant spin systems into strings, and assigning these strings to non-overlapping consecutive amino acid residues in the target protein. Separately dealing with these three steps has been adopted in many existing assignment programs, and it works well on protein NMR data with close-to-ideal quality, while only moderately or even poorly on most real protein datasets, where noises as well as data degeneracies occur frequently. We propose in this work to partition the sequential assignment not by physical steps, but only virtual steps, and use their outputs to cross validate each other. The novelty lies in the places, where the ambiguities at the grouping step will be resolved in finding the highly confident strings at the chaining step, and the ambiguities at the chaining step will be resolved by examining the mappings of strings at the assignment step. In this way, all ambiguities at the sequential assignment will be resolved globally and optimally. The resultant assignment program is called Graph-based Approach for Sequential Assignment (GASA), which has been compared to several recent similar developments including PACES, RANDOM, MARS, and RIBRA. The performance comparisons with these works demonstrated that GASA is more promising for practical use.

  14. Practical aspects of NMR signal assignment in larger and challenging proteins

    PubMed Central

    Frueh, Dominique P.

    2014-01-01

    NMR has matured into a technique routinely employed for studying proteins in near physiological conditions. However, applications to larger proteins are impeded by the complexity of the various correlation maps necessary to assign NMR signals. This article reviews the data analysis techniques traditionally employed for resonance assignment and describes alternative protocols necessary for overcoming challenges in large protein spectra. In particular, simultaneous analysis of multiple spectra may help overcome ambiguities or may reveal correlations in an indirect manner. Similarly, visualization of orthogonal planes in a multidimensional spectrum can provide alternative assignment procedures. We describe examples of such strategies for assignment of backbone, methyl, and nOe resonances. We describe experimental aspects of data acquisition for the related experiments and provide guidelines for preliminary studies. Focus is placed on large folded monomeric proteins and examples are provided for 37, 48, 53, and 81 kDa proteins. PMID:24534088

  15. Characterization of a buried neutral histidine residue in Bacillus circulans xylanase: NMR assignments, pH titration, and hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Plesniak, L. A.; Connelly, G. P.; Wakarchuk, W. W.; McIntosh, L. P.

    1996-01-01

    Bacillus circulans xylanase contains two histidines, one of which (His 156) is solvent exposed, whereas the other (His 149) is buried within its hydrophobic core. His 149 is involved in a network of hydrogen bonds with an internal water and Ser 130, as well as a potential weak aromatic-aromatic interaction with Tyr 105. These three residues, and their network of interactions with the bound water, are conserved in four homologous xylanases. To probe the structural role played by His 149, NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize the histidines in BCX. Complete assignments of the 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances and tautomeric forms of the imidazole rings were obtained from two-dimensional heteronuclear correlation experiments. An unusual spectroscopic feature of BCX is a peak near 12 ppm arising from the nitrogen bonded 1H epsilon 2 of His 149. Due to its solvent inaccessibility and hydrogen bonding to an internal water molecule, the exchange rate of this proton (4.0 x 10(-5) s-1 at pH*7.04 and 30 degrees C) is retarded by > 10(6)-fold relative to an exposed histidine. The pKa of His 156 is unperturbed at approximately 6.5, as measured from the pH dependence of the 15N- and 1H-NMR spectra of BCX. In contrast, His 149 has a pKa < 2.3, existing in the neutral N epsilon 2H tautomeric state under all conditions examined. BCX unfolds at low pH and 30 degrees C, and thus His 149 is never protonated significantly in the context of the native enzyme. The structural importance of this buried histidine is confirmed by the destablizing effect of substituting a phenylalanine or glutamine at position 149 in BCX. PMID:8931150

  16. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the (15)N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H(2)O/D(2)O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu(II) to enable rapid data acquisition. PMID:18462963

  17. Proton NMR assignments and regular backbone structure of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.D. ); Purisima, E.O. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); Eastman, M.A.; Scheraga, H.A. )

    1989-07-11

    Proton NMR assignments have been made for 121 of the 124 residues of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). During the first stage of assignment, COSY and relayed COSY data were used to identify 40 amino acid spin systems belonging to alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, and serine residues. Approximately 60 other NH-{alpha}CH-{beta}CH systems were also identified but not assigned to specific amino acid type. NOESY data then were used to connect sequentially neighboring spin systems; approximately 475 of the possible 700 resonances in RNase A were assigned in this way. The authors' assignments agree with those for 20 residues assigned previously. NOESY correlations were used to identify regular backbone structure elements in RNase A, which are very similar to those observed in X-ray crystallographic studies.

  18. Nitrogen-detected CAN and CON experiments as alternative experiments for main chain NMR resonance assignments

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koh; Heffron, Gregory; Sun, Zhen-Yu J.; Frueh, Dominique P.

    2010-01-01

    Heteronuclear direct-detection experiments, which utilize the slower relaxation properties of low γ nuclei, such as 13C have recently been proposed for sequence-specific assignment and structural analyses of large, unstructured, and/or paramagnetic proteins. Here we present two novel 15N direct-detection experiments. The CAN experiment sequentially connects amide 15N resonances using 13Cα chemical shift matching, and the CON experiment connects the preceding 13C′ nuclei. When starting from the same carbon polarization, the intensities of nitrogen signals detected in the CAN or CON experiments would be expected four times lower than those of carbon resonances observed in the corresponding 13C-detecting experiment, NCA-DIPAP or NCO-IPAP (Bermel et al. 2006b; Takeuchi et al. 2008). However, the disadvantage due to the lower γ is counteracted by the slower 15N transverse relaxation during detection, the possibility for more efficient decoupling in both dimensions, and relaxation optimized properties of the pulse sequences. As a result, the median S/N in the 15N observe CAN experiment is 16% higher than in the 13C observe NCA-DIPAP experiment. In addition, significantly higher sensitivity was observed for those residues that are hard to detect in the NCA-DIPAP experiment, such as Gly, Ser and residues with high-field Cα resonances. Both CAN and CON experiments are able to detect Pro resonances that would not be observed in conventional proton-detected experiments. In addition, those experiments are free from problems of incomplete deuterium-to-proton back exchange in amide positions of perdeuterated proteins expressed in D2O. Thus, these features and the superior resolution of 15N-detected experiments provide an attractive alternative for main chain assignments. The experiments are demonstrated with the small model protein GB1 at conditions simulating a 150 kDa protein, and the 52 kDa glutathione S-transferase dimer, GST. PMID:20556482

  19. Nitrogen-detected CAN and CON experiments as alternative experiments for main chain NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koh; Heffron, Gregory; Sun, Zhen-Yu J; Frueh, Dominique P; Wagner, Gerhard

    2010-08-01

    Heteronuclear direct-detection experiments, which utilize the slower relaxation properties of low gamma nuclei, such as (13)C have recently been proposed for sequence-specific assignment and structural analyses of large, unstructured, and/or paramagnetic proteins. Here we present two novel (15)N direct-detection experiments. The CAN experiment sequentially connects amide (15)N resonances using (13)C(alpha) chemical shift matching, and the CON experiment connects the preceding (13)C' nuclei. When starting from the same carbon polarization, the intensities of nitrogen signals detected in the CAN or CON experiments would be expected four times lower than those of carbon resonances observed in the corresponding (13)C-detecting experiment, NCA-DIPAP or NCO-IPAP (Bermel et al. 2006b; Takeuchi et al. 2008). However, the disadvantage due to the lower gamma is counteracted by the slower (15)N transverse relaxation during detection, the possibility for more efficient decoupling in both dimensions, and relaxation optimized properties of the pulse sequences. As a result, the median S/N in the (15)N observe CAN experiment is 16% higher than in the (13)C observe NCA-DIPAP experiment. In addition, significantly higher sensitivity was observed for those residues that are hard to detect in the NCA-DIPAP experiment, such as Gly, Ser and residues with high-field C(alpha) resonances. Both CAN and CON experiments are able to detect Pro resonances that would not be observed in conventional proton-detected experiments. In addition, those experiments are free from problems of incomplete deuterium-to-proton back exchange in amide positions of perdeuterated proteins expressed in D(2)O. Thus, these features and the superior resolution of (15)N-detected experiments provide an attractive alternative for main chain assignments. The experiments are demonstrated with the small model protein GB1 at conditions simulating a 150 kDa protein, and the 52 kDa glutathione S-transferase dimer, GST.

  20. Synthesis of stereospecifically deuterated desoxypodophyllotoxins and 1H-nmr assignment of desoxypodophyllotoxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pullockaran, A. J.; Kingston, D. G.; Lewis, N. G.

    1989-01-01

    [4 beta- 2H1]Desoxypodophyllotoxin [3], [4 alpha- 2H1]desoxypodophyllotoxin [4], and [4, 4- 2 H2]desoxypodophyllotoxin [9] were prepared from podophyllotoxin [1] via its chloride [5]. A complete assignment of the 1H-nmr spectrum of desoxypodophyllotoxin [2] was made on the basis of the spectra of the deuterated compounds [3] and [4].

  1. Solution NMR resonance assignment strategies for β-barrel membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel A; Columbus, Linda

    2013-08-01

    Membrane proteins in detergent micelles are large and dynamic complexes that present challenges for solution NMR investigations such as spectral overlap and line broadening. In this study, multiple methods are introduced to facilitate resonance assignment of β-barrel membrane proteins using Opa60 from Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a model system. Opa60 is an eight-stranded β-barrel with long extracellular loops (∼63% of the protein) that engage host receptors and induce engulfment of the bacterium. The NMR spectra of Opa60 in detergent micelles exhibits significant spectral overlap and resonances corresponding to the loop regions had variable line widths, which interfered with a complete assignment of the protein. To assign the β-barrel residues, trypsin cleavage was used to remove much of the extracellular loops while preserving the detergent solubilized β-barrel. The removal of the loop resonances significantly improved the assignment of the Opa60 β-barrel region (97% of the resonances corresponding to the β-barrel and periplasmic turns were assigned). For the loop resonance assignments, two strategies were implemented; modulating temperature and synthetic peptides. Lowering the temperature broadened many peaks beyond detection and simplified the spectra to only the most dynamic regions of the loops facilitating 27 loop resonances to be assigned. To further assign functionally important and unstructured regions of the extracellular loops, a synthetic 20 amino acid peptide was synthesized and had nearly complete spectral overlap with the full-length protein allowing 17 loop resonances to be assigned. Collectively, these strategies are effective tools that may accelerate solution NMR structure determination of β-barrel membrane proteins.

  2. Solution NMR resonance assignment strategies for β-barrel membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Daniel A; Columbus, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins in detergent micelles are large and dynamic complexes that present challenges for solution NMR investigations such as spectral overlap and line broadening. In this study, multiple methods are introduced to facilitate resonance assignment of β-barrel membrane proteins using Opa60 from Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a model system. Opa60 is an eight-stranded β-barrel with long extracellular loops (∼63% of the protein) that engage host receptors and induce engulfment of the bacterium. The NMR spectra of Opa60 in detergent micelles exhibits significant spectral overlap and resonances corresponding to the loop regions had variable line widths, which interfered with a complete assignment of the protein. To assign the β-barrel residues, trypsin cleavage was used to remove much of the extracellular loops while preserving the detergent solubilized β-barrel. The removal of the loop resonances significantly improved the assignment of the Opa60 β-barrel region (97% of the resonances corresponding to the β-barrel and periplasmic turns were assigned). For the loop resonance assignments, two strategies were implemented; modulating temperature and synthetic peptides. Lowering the temperature broadened many peaks beyond detection and simplified the spectra to only the most dynamic regions of the loops facilitating 27 loop resonances to be assigned. To further assign functionally important and unstructured regions of the extracellular loops, a synthetic 20 amino acid peptide was synthesized and had nearly complete spectral overlap with the full-length protein allowing 17 loop resonances to be assigned. Collectively, these strategies are effective tools that may accelerate solution NMR structure determination of β-barrel membrane proteins. PMID:23754333

  3. Rapid assignment of solution 31P NMR spectra of large proteins by solid-state spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iuga, Adriana; Spoerner, Michael; Ader, Christian; Brunner, Eike; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2006-07-21

    The application of the (31)P NMR spectroscopy to large proteins or protein complexes in solution is hampered by a relatively low intrinsic sensitivity coupled with large line widths. Therefore, the assignment of the phosphorus signals by two-dimensional NMR methods in solution is often extremely time consuming. In contrast, the quality of solid-state NMR spectra is not dependent on the molecular mass and the solubility of the protein. For the complex of Ras with the GTP-analogue GppCH(2)p we show solid-state (31)P NMR methods to be more sensitive by almost one order of magnitude than liquid-state NMR. Thus, solid-state NMR seems to be the method of choice for obtaining the resonance assignment of the phosphorus signals of protein complexes in solution. Experiments on Ras.GDP complexes show that the microcrystalline sample can be substituted by a precipitate of the sample and that unexpectedly the two structural states observed earlier in solution are present in crystals as well.

  4. sup 15 N and sup 13 C NMR studies of ligands bound to the 280,000-dalton protein porphobilinogen synthase elucidate the structures of enzyme-bound product and a Schiff base intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, E.K.; Rajagopalan, J.S. ); Markham, G.D. )

    1990-09-11

    Porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) catalyzes the asymmetric condensation of two molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). Despite the 280,000-dalton size of PBGS, much can be learned about the reaction mechanism through {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N NMR. The authors knowledge, these studies represent the largest protein complex for which individual nuclei have been characterized by {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N NMR. Here they extend their {sup 13}C NMR studies to PBGS complexes with (3,3-{sup 2}H{sub 2},3-{sup 13}C)ALA and report {sup 15}N NMR studies of ({sup 15}N)ALA bound to PBGS. As in their previous {sup 13}C NMR studies, observation of enzyme-bound {sup 15}N-labeled species was facilitated by deuteration at nitrogens that are attached to slowly exchanging hydrogens. For holo-PBGS at neutral pH, the NMR spectra reflect the structure of the enzyme-bound product porphobilinogen (PBG), whose chemical shifts are uniformly consistent with deprotonation of the amino group whose solution pK{sub a} is 11. Despite this local environment, the protons of the amino group are in rapid exchange with solvent. For methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) modified PBGS, the NMR spectra reflect the chemistry of an enzyme-bound Schiff base intermediate that is formed between C{sub 4} of ALA and an active-site lysine. The {sup 13}C chemical shift of (3,3-{sup 2}H{sub 2},3-{sup 13}C)ALA confirms that the Schiff base is an imine of E stereochemistry. By comparison to model imines formed between ({sup 15}N)ALA and hydrazine or hydroxylamine, the {sup 15}N chemical shift of the enzyme-bound Schiff base suggests that the free amino group is an environment resembling partial deprotonation. Deprotonation of the amino group would facilitate formation of a Schiff base between the amino group of the enzyme-bound Schiff base and C{sub 4} of the second ALA substrate. This is the first evidence supporting carbon-nitrogen bond formation as the initial site of interaction between the two substrate molecules.

  5. Assignment of Oriented Sample NMR Resonances from a Three Transmembrane Helix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. T.; Hung, I.; Cross, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Oriented sample solid state NMR techniques have been routinely employed to determine the structures of membrane proteins with one or two transmembrane helices. For larger proteins the technique has been limited by spectral resolution and lack of assignment strategies. Here, a strategy for resonance assignment is devised and applied to a three transmembrane helix protein. Sequence specific assignments for all labeled transmembrane amino acid sites are obtained, which provide a set of orientational restraints and helix orientation in the bilayer. Our experiments expand the utility of solid state NMR in membrane protein structure characterization to three transmembrane helix proteins and represent a straightforward strategy for routinely characterizing multiple transmembrane helix protein structures. PMID:24509383

  6. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Alexander; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Chitayat, Seth; Karra, Murthy; Farès, Christophe; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H

    2011-01-01

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution - especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  7. NMR assignments of the macro domain from Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Ping; Cho, Chao-Cheng; Chang, Chi-Fon; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2016-10-01

    The newly emerging human pathogen, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), contains a macro domain in the highly conserved N-terminal region of non-structural protein 3. Intense research has shown that macro domains bind ADP-ribose and other derivatives, but it still remains intangible about their exact function. In this study we report the preliminary structural analysis through solution NMR spectroscopy of the MERS-CoV macro domain. The near complete NMR assignments of MERS-CoV macro domain provide the basis for subsequent structural and biochemical investigation in the context of protein function.

  8. Complete (1)H and (13)C signal assignment of prenol-10 with 3D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Misiak, Maria; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Kwasiborska, Maria; Wójcik, Jacek; Ciepichal, Ewa; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2009-10-01

    The complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of natural abundance prenol-10 is reported for the first time. It was achieved using 3D NMR experiments, which were based on random sampling of the evolution time space followed by multidimensional Fourier transform. This approach makes it possible to acquire 3D NMR spectra in a reasonable time and preserves high resolution in indirectly detected dimensions. It is shown that the interpretation of 3D COSY-HMBC and 3D TOCSY-HSQC spectra is crucial in the structural analysis of prenol-10.

  9. Narrow carbonyl resonances in proton-diluted proteins facilitate NMR assignments in the solid-state.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    HNCO/HNCACO type correlation experiments are an alternative for assignment of backbone resonances in extensively deuterated proteins in the solid-state, given the fact that line widths on the order of 14-17 Hz are achieved in the carbonyl dimension without the need of high power decoupling. The achieved resolution demonstrates that MAS solid-state NMR on extensively deuterated proteins is able to compete with solution-state NMR spectroscopy if proteins are investigated with correlation times tau(c) that exceed 25 ns. PMID:20232230

  10. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  11. Total assignment and structure in solution of tetrandrine by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevand, André; Stanculescu, Ioana; Mandravel, Cristina; Woisel, Patrice; Surpateanu, Gheorghe

    2004-07-01

    High-resolution 1- and 2D NMR spectra of tetrandrine and molecular modelling were employed to characterise its structure in solution. Complete and unambiguous assignment of all proton and carbon resonance signals is reported. Scalar couplings were determined from dihedral angles with the Karplus equation. Inter-proton distances were evaluated from NOE correlation peaks. Comparison of simulated and X-ray conformations of tetrandrine reveals only small differences.

  12. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of two phytosterols from roots of Piper nigrum.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kun; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Pei, Yuping; Chen, Yingjie; Nikaido, Tamotsu

    2004-03-01

    Using modern NMR techniques, including DQF-COSY, NOESY, HETCOR and HMBC, the full assignments of all 1H and 13C chemical shifts were made for stigmastane-3,6-dione and stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione, isolated from the roots of Piper nigrum (Piperaceae). Their stereochemistry was resolved by a combination of 2D NOESY data and analysis of coupling constants. The two compounds were isolated from the genus Piper for the first time.

  13. Solid-state NMR resonance assignments of the filament-forming CARD domain of the innate immunity signaling protein MAVS.

    PubMed

    He, Lichun; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in the innate immune response against viral infections. Viral RNA present in the cytoplasm is detected by retinoic acid inducible gene I like receptors, which then activate MAVS via heterotypic interactions between their respective caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARD). This leads to the formation of active, high molecular weight MAVS complexes formed by homotypic interactions between the single N-terminal CARDs of MAVS. Filaments formed by the N-terminal MAVS(CARD) alone are sufficient to induce the autocatalytic conversion from a monomeric to an aggregated state in a prion-like manner. Here, we present the nearly complete spectroscopic (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of human MAVS(CARD) filaments obtained from a single sample by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The corresponding secondary chemical shifts suggest that the filamentous form of MAVS(CARD) retains an exclusively alpha-helical fold that is very similar to the X-ray structure determined previously from monomeric MAVS(CARD)-maltose binding protein fusion constructs.

  14. High-throughput backbone resonance assignment of small 13C, 15N-labeled proteins by a triple-resonance experiment with four sequential connectivity pathways using chemical shift-dependent, apparent 1J ( 1H, 13C): HNCACB codedHAHB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegan, Scott; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon; Riek, Roland

    2003-12-01

    The proposed three-dimensional triple-resonance experiment HNCACB codedHAHB correlates sequential 15N, 1H moieties via the chemical shifts of 13C α, 13C β, 1H α, and 1H β. The four sequential correlation pathways are achieved by the incorporation of the concept of chemical shift-coding [J. Biomol. NMR 25 (2003) 281] to the TROSY-HNCACB experiment. The monitored 1H α and 1H β chemical shifts are then coded in the line shape of the cross-peaks of 13C α, 13C β along the 13C dimension through an apparent residual scalar coupling, the size of which depends on the attached hydrogen chemical shift. The information of four sequential correlation pathways enables a rapid backbone assignment. The HNCACB codedHAHB experiment was applied to ˜85% labeled 13C, 15N-labeled amino-terminal fragment of Vaccinia virus DNA topoisomerase I comprising residues 1-77. After one day of measurement on a Bruker Avance 700 MHz spectrometer and 8 h of manual analysis of the spectrum 93% of the backbone assignment was achieved.

  15. Enhanced biosynthetically directed fractional carbon-13 enrichment of proteins for backbone NMR assignments.

    PubMed

    Wenrich, Broc R; Sonstrom, Reilly E; Gupta, Riju A; Rovnyak, David

    2015-11-01

    Routes to carbon-13 enrichment of bacterially expressed proteins include achieving uniform or positionally selective (e.g. ILV-Me, or (13)C', etc.) enrichment. We consider the potential for biosynthetically directed fractional enrichment (e.g. carbon-13 incorporation in the protein less than 100%) for performing routine n-(D)dimensional NMR spectroscopy of proteins. First, we demonstrate an approach to fractional isotope addition where the initial growth media containing natural abundance glucose is replenished at induction with a small amount (e.g. 10%(w/w)u-(13)C-glucose) of enriched nutrient. The approach considered here is to add 10% (e.g. 200mg for a 2g/L culture) u-(13)C-glucose at the induction time (OD600=0.8), resulting in a protein with enhanced (13)C incorporation that gives almost the same NMR signal levels as an exact 20% (13)C sample. Second, whereas fractional enrichment is used for obtaining stereospecific methyl assignments, we find that (13)C incorporation levels no greater than 20%(w/w) yield (13)C and (13)C-(13)C spin pair incorporation sufficient to conduct typical 3D-bioNMR backbone experiments on moderate instrumentation (600 MHz, RT probe). Typical 3D-bioNMR experiments of a fractionally enriched protein yield expected backbone connectivities, and did not show amino acid biases in this work, with one exception. When adding 10% u-(13)C glucose to expression media at induction, there is poor preservation of (13)Cα-(13)Cβ spin pairs in the amino acids ILV, leading to the absence of Cβ signals in HNCACB spectra for ILV, a potentially useful editing effect. Enhanced fractional carbon-13 enrichment provides lower-cost routes to high throughput protein NMR studies, and makes modern protein NMR more cost-accessible.

  16. Applying Thymine Isostere 2,4-Difluoro-5-Methylbenzene as a NMR Assignment Tool and Probe of Homopyrimidine/Homopurine Tract Structural Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brinson, Robert G; Miller, Jennifer T; Kahn, Jason D; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Marino, John P

    2016-01-01

    Proton assignment of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of homopyrimidine/homopurine tract oligonucleotides becomes extremely challenging with increasing helical length due to severe cross-peak overlap. As an alternative to the more standard practice of (15)N and (13)C labeling of oligonucleotides, here, we describe a method for assignment of highly redundant DNA sequences that uses single-site substitution of the thymine isostere 2,4-difluoro-5-methylbenzene (dF). The impact of this approach in facilitating the assignment of intractable spectra and analyzing oligonucleotide structure and dynamics is demonstrated using A-tract and TATA box DNA and two polypurine tract-containing RNA:DNA hybrids derived from HIV-1 and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae long-terminal repeat-containing retrotransposon Ty3. Only resonances proximal to the site of dF substitution exhibit sizable chemical shift changes, providing spectral dispersion while still allowing chemical shift mapping of resonances from unaffected residues distal to the site of modification directly back to the unmodified sequence. It is further illustrated that dF incorporation can subtly alter the conformation and dynamics of homopyrimidine/homopurine tract oligonucleotides, and how these NMR observations can be correlated, in the cases of the TATA box DNA, with modulation in the TATA box-binding protein interaction using an orthogonal gel assay.

  17. Spectral editing at ultra-fast magic-angle-spinning in solid-state NMR: facilitating protein sequential signal assignment by HIGHLIGHT approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songlin; Matsuda, Isamu; Long, Fei; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrates a novel spectral editing technique for protein solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to simplify the spectrum drastically and to reduce the ambiguity for protein main-chain signal assignments in fast magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions at a wide frequency range of 40-80 kHz. The approach termed HIGHLIGHT (Wang et al., in Chem Comm 51:15055-15058, 2015) combines the reverse (13)C, (15)N-isotope labeling strategy and selective signal quenching using the frequency-selective REDOR pulse sequence under fast MAS. The scheme allows one to selectively observe the signals of "highlighted" labeled amino-acid residues that precede or follow unlabeled residues through selectively quenching (13)CO or (15)N signals for a pair of consecutively labeled residues by recoupling (13)CO-(15)N dipolar couplings. Our numerical simulation results showed that the scheme yielded only ~15% loss of signals for the highlighted residues while quenching as much as ~90% of signals for non-highlighted residues. For lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein, the 2D (15)N/(13)Cα correlation and 2D (13)Cα/(13)CO correlation SSNMR spectra by the HIGHLIGHT approach yielded signals only for six residues following and preceding the unlabeled lysine residues, respectively. The experimental dephasing curves agreed reasonably well with the corresponding simulation results for highlighted and quenched residues at spinning speeds of 40 and 60 kHz. The compatibility of the HIGHLIGHT approach with fast MAS allows for sensitivity enhancement by paramagnetic assisted data collection (PACC) and (1)H detection. We also discuss how the HIGHLIGHT approach facilitates signal assignments using (13)C-detected 3D SSNMR by demonstrating full sequential assignments of lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein (~300 nmol), for which data collection required only 11 h. The HIGHLIGHT approach offers valuable means of signal assignments especially for larger proteins through reducing the

  18. Spectral editing at ultra-fast magic-angle-spinning in solid-state NMR: facilitating protein sequential signal assignment by HIGHLIGHT approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songlin; Matsuda, Isamu; Long, Fei; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrates a novel spectral editing technique for protein solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to simplify the spectrum drastically and to reduce the ambiguity for protein main-chain signal assignments in fast magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions at a wide frequency range of 40-80 kHz. The approach termed HIGHLIGHT (Wang et al., in Chem Comm 51:15055-15058, 2015) combines the reverse (13)C, (15)N-isotope labeling strategy and selective signal quenching using the frequency-selective REDOR pulse sequence under fast MAS. The scheme allows one to selectively observe the signals of "highlighted" labeled amino-acid residues that precede or follow unlabeled residues through selectively quenching (13)CO or (15)N signals for a pair of consecutively labeled residues by recoupling (13)CO-(15)N dipolar couplings. Our numerical simulation results showed that the scheme yielded only ~15% loss of signals for the highlighted residues while quenching as much as ~90% of signals for non-highlighted residues. For lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein, the 2D (15)N/(13)Cα correlation and 2D (13)Cα/(13)CO correlation SSNMR spectra by the HIGHLIGHT approach yielded signals only for six residues following and preceding the unlabeled lysine residues, respectively. The experimental dephasing curves agreed reasonably well with the corresponding simulation results for highlighted and quenched residues at spinning speeds of 40 and 60 kHz. The compatibility of the HIGHLIGHT approach with fast MAS allows for sensitivity enhancement by paramagnetic assisted data collection (PACC) and (1)H detection. We also discuss how the HIGHLIGHT approach facilitates signal assignments using (13)C-detected 3D SSNMR by demonstrating full sequential assignments of lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein (~300 nmol), for which data collection required only 11 h. The HIGHLIGHT approach offers valuable means of signal assignments especially for larger proteins through reducing the

  19. Total assignment of 1H and 13C NMR data for the sesquiterpene lactone 15-deoxygoyazensolide.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes; Crotti, Antônio Eduardo Miller; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Lopes, João Luis Callegari

    2004-03-01

    We describe a complete analysis of the 1H and 13C spectra of the anti-inflamatory, schistossomicidal and trypanosomicidal sesquiterpene lactone 15-deoxygoyazensolide. This lactone, with a structure similar to other important ones, was studied by NMR techniques such as COSY, HMQC, HMBC, Jres and NOE experiments. The comparison of the data with some computational results led to an unequivocal assignment of all hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts, even eliminating some previous ambiguities. We were able to determine all hydrogen coupling constants (J) and signal multiplicities and to confirm the stereochemistry. A new method for the determination of the relative position of the lactonization and the position of the ester group on a medium-sized ring by NMR was developed.

  20. Total (1)H NMR assignment of 3β-acetoxypregna-5,16-dien-20-one.

    PubMed

    Becerra-Martinez, Elvia; Ramírez-Gualito, Karla E; Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    This work describes the total and unambiguous assignment of the 750 MHz (1)H NMR spectrum of 3β-acetoxypregna-5,16-dien-20-one or 16-DPA (1), the well-known intermediate utilized in the synthesis of biological important commercial steroids. The task was accomplished by extracting the coupling constant values in the overlapped spectrum region by HSQC, and using these values in the (1)H iterative full spin analysis integrated in the PERCH NMR software. Comparison of the experimental vicinal coupling constants of 1 with the values calculated using Altona provides an excellent correlation. The same procedure, when applied to the published data of progesterone (2) and testosterone (3), afforded an acceptable correlation for 2 and a poor correlation for 3. In the last case, this suggested the reassignment of all four vicinal coupling constants for the methylene signals at the C-15 and C-16 positions, demonstrating the utility of this methodology. PMID:26476187

  1. 1H, 15N and 13C backbone assignments of GDP-bound human H-Ras mutant G12V.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nader; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Coyle, Joe; Nietlispach, Daniel; Williams, Glyn

    2016-04-01

    Harvey Ras (H-Ras) is a membrane-associated GTPase with critical functions in cell proliferation and differentiation. The G12V mutant of H-Ras is one of the most commonly encountered oncoproteins in human cancer. This mutation disrupts the GTPase activity of H-Ras, leading to constitutive activation and aberrant downstream signalling. Here we report the backbone resonance assignments of human H-Ras mutant G12V lacking the C-terminal membrane attachment domain.

  2. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1

    PubMed Central

    Parnham, Stuart; Gaines, William A.; Duggan, Brendan M.; Marcotte, William R.

    2011-01-01

    The building blocks of spider dragline silk are two fibrous proteins secreted from the major ampullate gland named spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1, MaSp2). These proteins consist of a large central domain composed of approximately 100 tandem copies of a 35–40 amino acid repeat sequence. Non-repetitive N and C-terminal domains, of which the C-terminal domain has been implicated to transition from soluble and insoluble states during spinning, flank the repetitive core. The N-terminal domain until recently has been largely unknown due to difficulties in cloning and expression. Here, we report nearly complete assignment for all 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in the 14 kDa N-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1-N) of the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes. PMID:21152998

  3. Contiguously substituted cyclooctane polyols. configurational assignments via (1)H NMR correlations and symmetry considerations.

    PubMed

    Moura-Letts, Gustavo; Paquette, Leo A

    2008-10-01

    More advanced oxidation of the cyclooctadienol shown, readily available in enantiomerically pure form from D-glucose, has given rise to a series of intermediates whose relative (and ultimately absolute) configuration was assigned on the basis of (1)H/(1)H coupling constant analysis. The selectivities that were deduced in this manner were drawn from the sequential application of CrO3 oxidation in tandem with Luche reduction, two-step NMO-promoted osmylations bracketed by acetonide formation, and wholesale deprotection. The stereoselectivities of these reactions were traced by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and the stereochemical assignments were confirmed by the presence or absence of symmetry in the final cyclooctane polyols (four shown) generated in this investigation.

  4. A general rule for the assignment of the carbon-13 NMR peaks in fatty acid chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengsch, E.; Perly, B.; Deleuze, C.; Valero, A.

    Complete assignments of the carbon-13 NMR signals in long fatty acid chains up to C 19 and C 22 were obtained from relaxation behavior studies, from specific isotope labeling, and from studies of analogies between homologous compounds. Results lead to a pyramidal representation which offers a very surprising systematic ordering. From high to low field, signals are ordered in triads with increasing number like C 3C 4C 5, C 6C 7C 8. The triads are interrupted by a signal from the chain end position in decreasing order like C n-3 , C n-4 , and so on. This rule allows complete line assignments for unknown aliphatic fatty acid chains. The rule should be important for studies of lipid compounds and for motional models in biological membrane material.

  5. Paramagnetic 13C and 15N NMR analyses of the push and pull effects in cytochrome c peroxidase and Coprinus cinereus peroxidase variants: functional roles of highly conserved amino acids around heme.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Daisuke; Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Welinder, Karen G; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2010-01-12

    Paramagnetic (13)C and (15)N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of heme-bound cyanide ((13)C(15)N) was applied to 11 cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) and Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) mutants to investigate contributions to the push and pull effects of conserved amino acids around heme. The (13)C and (15)N NMR data for the distal His and Arg mutants indicated that distal His is the key amino acid residue creating the strong pull effect and that distal Arg assists. The mutation of distal Trp of CcP to Phe, the amino acid at this position in CIP, changed the push and pull effects so they resembled those of CIP, whereas the mutation of distal Phe of CIP to Trp changed this mutant to become CcP-like. The (13)C NMR shifts for the proximal Asp mutants clearly showed that the proximal Asp-His hydrogen bonding strengthens the push effect. However, even in the absence of a hydrogen bond, the push effect of proximal His in peroxidase is significantly stronger than in globins. Comparison of these NMR data with the compound I formation rate constants and crystal structures of these mutants showed that (1) the base catalysis of the distal His is more critical for rapid compound I formation than its acid catalysis, (2) the primary function of the distal Arg is to maintain the distal heme pocket in favor of rapid compound I formation via hydrogen bonding, and (3) the push effect is the major contributor to the differential rates of compound I formation in wild-type peroxidases.

  6. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  7. Sequence-specific 1H, 13C and 15N assignments of the phosphoesterase (PE) domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA ligase D (LigD)

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Kaushik; Natarajan, Aswin; Nair, Pravin A.; Shuman, Stewart; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2014-01-01

    DNA ligase D (LigD), consisting of polymerase, ligase and phosphoesterase domains, is the essential catalyst of the bacterial non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. The phosphoesterase (PE) module performs manganese-dependent 3’-phosphomonoesterase and 3’-ribonucleoside resection reactions that heal broken ends in preparation for sealing. LigD PE exemplifies a structurally and mechanistically unique class of DNA end-processing enzymes. Here, we present the resonance assignments of the PE domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LigD comprising the N-terminal 177 residues. PMID:21213076

  8. Combined ligand-observe 19F and protein-observe 15N,1H-HSQC NMR suggests phenylalanine as the key Δ-somatostatin residue recognized by human protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kirsty L.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Hudson, Paul B.; Williamson, Richard A.; Howard, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Human protein disulphide isomerase (hPDI) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) based isomerase and folding chaperone. Molecular detail of ligand recognition and specificity of hPDI are poorly understood despite the importance of the hPDI for folding secreted proteins and its implication in diseases including cancer and lateral sclerosis. We report a detailed study of specificity, interaction and dissociation constants (Kd) of the peptide-ligand Δ-somatostatin (AGSKNFFWKTFTSS) binding to hPDI using 19F ligand-observe and 15N,1H-HSQC protein-observe NMR methods. Phe residues in Δ-somatostatin are hypothesised as important for recognition by hPDI therefore, step-wise peptide Phe-to-Ala changes were progressively introduced and shown to raise the Kd from 103 + 47 μM until the point where binding was abolished when all Phe residues were modified to Ala. The largest step-changes in Kd involved the F11A peptide modification which implies the C-terminus of Δ-somatostatin is a prime recognition region. Furthermore, this study also validated the combined use of 19F ligand-observe and complimentary 15N,1H-HSQC titrations to monitor interactions from the protein’s perspective. 19F ligand-observe NMR was ratified as mirroring 15N protein-observe but highlighted the advantage that 19F offers improved Kd precision due to higher spectrum resolution and greater chemical environment sensitivity. PMID:26786784

  9. Low resolution 1H NMR assignment of proton populations in pound cake and its polymeric ingredients.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Waterschoot, J; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Hills, B; Delcour, J A

    2013-08-15

    Based on a model system approach, five different proton populations were distinguished in pound cake crumb using one dimensional low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In free induction decay (FID) measurements, proton populations were assigned to (i) non-exchanging CH protons of crystalline starch, proteins and crystalline fat and (ii) non-exchanging CH protons of amorphous starch and gluten, which are in little contact with water. In Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements, three proton populations were distinguished. The CPMG population with the lowest mobility and the FID population with the highest mobility represent the same proton population. The two CPMG proton populations with the highest mobility were assigned to exchanging protons (i.e., protons of water, starch, gluten, egg proteins and sugar) and protons of lipids (i.e., protons of egg yolk lipids and amorphous lipid fraction of margarine) respectively. Based on their spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), two dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy further resolved the two proton populations with the highest mobility into three and two proton populations, respectively. PMID:23561087

  10. Low resolution 1H NMR assignment of proton populations in pound cake and its polymeric ingredients.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Waterschoot, J; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Hills, B; Delcour, J A

    2013-08-15

    Based on a model system approach, five different proton populations were distinguished in pound cake crumb using one dimensional low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In free induction decay (FID) measurements, proton populations were assigned to (i) non-exchanging CH protons of crystalline starch, proteins and crystalline fat and (ii) non-exchanging CH protons of amorphous starch and gluten, which are in little contact with water. In Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements, three proton populations were distinguished. The CPMG population with the lowest mobility and the FID population with the highest mobility represent the same proton population. The two CPMG proton populations with the highest mobility were assigned to exchanging protons (i.e., protons of water, starch, gluten, egg proteins and sugar) and protons of lipids (i.e., protons of egg yolk lipids and amorphous lipid fraction of margarine) respectively. Based on their spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), two dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy further resolved the two proton populations with the highest mobility into three and two proton populations, respectively.

  11. Beckmann rearrangement of 15N-cyclohexanone oxime on zeolites silicalite-1, H-ZSM-5, and H-[B]ZSM-5 studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marthala, V R Reddy; Jiang, Yijiao; Huang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Gläser, Roger; Hunger, Michael

    2006-11-22

    By means of solid-state 15N NMR spectroscopy, evidence for the formation of nitrilium ions as intermediates of the Beckmann rearrangement of 15N-cyclohexanone oxime to epsilon-caprolactam on silicalite-1, H-ZSM-5, and H-[B]ZSM-5 is reported. The zeolites under study are characterized by different acid strengths (silicalite-1 < H-[B]ZSM-5 < H-ZSM-5). Depending on the nature of catalytically active surface OH groups, reactant and product molecules exist in the nonprotonated or protonated state. In addition, formation of byproducts such as 5-cyano-1-pentene and epsilon-aminocapric acid as a result of dehydration and hydrolysis of the reactant and product molecules, respectively, were observed.

  12. NMR resonance assignments of the lantibiotic immunity protein NisI from Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Carolin; Christ, Nina Alexandra; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Korn, Sophie; Berninger, Lucija; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2015-10-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a small antimicrobial peptide which acts against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria. Nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis strains express four genes for self-protection against their own antimicrobial compound. This immunity system consists of the lipoprotein NisI and the ABC transporter NisFEG. NisI is attached to the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane via a covalently linked diacylglycerol anchor. Both the lipoprotein and the ABC transporter are needed for full immunity but the exact immunity mechanism is still unclear. To gain insights into the highly specific immunity mechanism of nisin producing strains on a structural level we present here the backbone resonance assignment of NisI (25.8 kDa) as well as the virtually complete (1)H,(15)N,(13)C chemical shift assignments for the isolated 12.7 kDa N-terminal and 14.6 kDa C-terminal domains of NisI.

  13. NMR resonance assignments of the lantibiotic immunity protein NisI from Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Carolin; Christ, Nina Alexandra; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Korn, Sophie; Berninger, Lucija; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2015-10-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a small antimicrobial peptide which acts against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria. Nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis strains express four genes for self-protection against their own antimicrobial compound. This immunity system consists of the lipoprotein NisI and the ABC transporter NisFEG. NisI is attached to the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane via a covalently linked diacylglycerol anchor. Both the lipoprotein and the ABC transporter are needed for full immunity but the exact immunity mechanism is still unclear. To gain insights into the highly specific immunity mechanism of nisin producing strains on a structural level we present here the backbone resonance assignment of NisI (25.8 kDa) as well as the virtually complete (1)H,(15)N,(13)C chemical shift assignments for the isolated 12.7 kDa N-terminal and 14.6 kDa C-terminal domains of NisI. PMID:25613223

  14. Automating unambiguous NOE data usage in NVR for NMR protein structure-based assignments.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is an important technique that allows determining protein structure in solution. An important problem in protein structure determination using NMR spectroscopy is the mapping of peaks to corresponding amino acids, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this problem using a template structure that is homologous to the target. Our previously developed approach Nuclear Vector Replacement-Binary Integer Programming (NVR-BIP) computed the optimal solution for small proteins, but was unable to solve the assignments of large proteins. NVR-Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) extended the applicability of the NVR approach for such proteins. One of the input data utilized in these approaches is the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. NOE is an interaction observed between two protons if the protons are located close in space. These protons could be amide protons, protons attached to the alpha-carbon atom in the backbone of the protein, or side chain protons. NVR only uses backbone protons. In this paper, we reformulate the NVR-BIP model to distinguish the type of proton in NOE data and use the corresponding proton coordinates in the extended formulation. In addition, the threshold value over interproton distances is set in a standard manner for all proteins by extracting the NOE upper bound distance information from the data. We also convert NOE intensities into distance thresholds. Our new approach thus handles the NOE data correctly and without manually determined parameters. We accordingly adapt NVR-ACO solution methodology to these changes. Computational results show that our approaches obtain optimal solutions for small proteins. For the large proteins our ant colony optimization-based approach obtains promising results.

  15. Automating unambiguous NOE data usage in NVR for NMR protein structure-based assignments.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is an important technique that allows determining protein structure in solution. An important problem in protein structure determination using NMR spectroscopy is the mapping of peaks to corresponding amino acids, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this problem using a template structure that is homologous to the target. Our previously developed approach Nuclear Vector Replacement-Binary Integer Programming (NVR-BIP) computed the optimal solution for small proteins, but was unable to solve the assignments of large proteins. NVR-Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) extended the applicability of the NVR approach for such proteins. One of the input data utilized in these approaches is the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. NOE is an interaction observed between two protons if the protons are located close in space. These protons could be amide protons, protons attached to the alpha-carbon atom in the backbone of the protein, or side chain protons. NVR only uses backbone protons. In this paper, we reformulate the NVR-BIP model to distinguish the type of proton in NOE data and use the corresponding proton coordinates in the extended formulation. In addition, the threshold value over interproton distances is set in a standard manner for all proteins by extracting the NOE upper bound distance information from the data. We also convert NOE intensities into distance thresholds. Our new approach thus handles the NOE data correctly and without manually determined parameters. We accordingly adapt NVR-ACO solution methodology to these changes. Computational results show that our approaches obtain optimal solutions for small proteins. For the large proteins our ant colony optimization-based approach obtains promising results. PMID:26260854

  16. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. )

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  17. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids. PMID:26203019

  18. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  19. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  20. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  1. Proton NMR assignment and secondary structural elements of human transforming growth factor. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.C.; Mueller, L.; Jeffs, P.W. )

    1989-01-24

    The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of human transforming growth factor {alpha} (hTGF-{alpha}) has been completely assigned, and secondary structural elements have been identified as a preliminary step in determining the structure of this protein by distance geometry methods. Many of these structural elements closely correspond to those previously found in a truncated human EGF and murine EGF. These include the presence of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet between residues G19 and C34 with a type I {beta}-turn at V25-D28, a type II {beta}-turn at H35-Y38, and another short {beta}-sheet between residues Y38-V39 and H45-A46.

  2. (15)N and (13)C group-selective techniques extend the scope of STD NMR detection of weak host-guest interactions and ligand screening.

    PubMed

    Kövér, Katalin E; Wéber, Edit; Martinek, Tamás A; Monostori, Eva; Batta, Gyula

    2010-10-18

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) is a valuable tool for studying the binding of small molecules to large biomolecules and for obtaining detailed information on the binding epitopes. Here, we demonstrate that the proposed (15)N/(13)C variants of group-selective, "GS-STD" experiments provide a powerful approach to mapping the binding epitope of a ligand even in the absence of efficient spin diffusion within the target protein. Therefore, these experimental variants broaden the scope of STD studies to smaller and/or more-dynamic targets. The STD spectra obtained in four different experimental setups (selective (1)H STD, (15)N GS-STD, (13)C(Ar) and (13)C(aliphatic) GS-STD approaches) revealed that the signal-intensity pattern of the difference spectra is affected by both the type and the spatial distribution of the excited "transmitter" atoms, as well as by the efficiency of the spin-diffusion-mediated magnetization transfer. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated on a system by using the lectin, galectin-1 and its carbohydrate ligand, lactose.

  3. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of four new steroidal glycosides from a gorgonian coral Junceella juncea.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shuhua; Zhang, Si; Huang, Jianshe; Xiao, Zhihui; Wu, Jun; Li, Qingxin

    2005-03-01

    Four new cholest-type steroidal glycosides, junceellosides A-D, isolated from the EtOH/CH(2)Cl(2) extracts of the South China Sea gorgonian coral Junceella juncea, were identified. Complete assignments of the (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts for these compounds were achieved by means of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectra.

  4. 1H, 13C, 195Pt and 15N NMR structural correlations in Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with various alkyl and aryl derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Tomasz; Pazderski, Leszek; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2011-02-01

    (1)H, (13)C, (195)Pt and (15)N NMR studies of platinide(II) (M = Pd, Pt) chloride complexes with such alkyl and aryl derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline as LL = 6,6'-dimethyl-bpy, 5,5'-dimethyl-bpy, 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-bpy, 2,9-dimethyl-phen, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-phen, 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-phen, having the general [M(LL)Cl(2)] formula were performed and the respective chemical shifts (δ(1H), δ(13C), δ(195Pt), δ(15N)) reported. (1)H high-frequency coordination shifts (Δ(coord)(1H) = δ(complex)(1H)-δ(ligand)(1H)) mostly pronounced for nitrogen-adjacent protons and methyl groups in the nearest adjacency of nitrogen, as well as (15)N low-frequency coordination shifts (Δ(coord)(15H) = δ(complex)(15H)-δ(ligand)(15H)) were discussed in relation to the molecular structures.

  5. Complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of standard neo-iota-carrabiose oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, Diane; Boulenguer, Patrick; Mazoyer, Jacques; Helbert, William

    2010-02-26

    Standard Eucheuma denticulatum iota-carrageenan was degraded with the Alteromonas fortis iota-carrageenase. The most abundant products, the neo-iota-carratetraose and neo-iota-carrahexaose were purified by permeation gel chromatography, and their corresponding (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were fully assigned. PMID:20038459

  6. 1H and 13C NMR assignments of new methoxylated furanoflavonoids from Lonchocarpus araripensis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Almi F; Mileo, Paulo Graziane M; Andrade-Neto, Manoel; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Silveira, Edilberto R; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia L

    2009-02-01

    Two new polymethoxylated flavonoids, 2',5',6'-trimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 3',4']furano dihydrochalcone and 2,4',4,5-tetramethoxy-[2'',3'' : 6,7]-furanodihydroaurone, were isolated from the root barks of Lonchocarpus araripensis, along with the known compounds 3,4,5,6-tetramethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavan, 3,6-dimethoxy-1'',1''-dimethylcromene-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-flavone, 3',4'-methylenodioxy-5,6-dimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavone, 3,5,6-trimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavanone, 3,5,6-trimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavone, and 6alpha-hydroxy-medicarpin. The complete (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments of the new furan flavonoids were performed using 1D and 2D pulse sequences, including COSY, HSQC, and HMBC experiments, and comparison with spectral data for analog compounds from the literature, particularly for the new furanodihydroaurone because of several inconsistencies on the carbonyl chemical shifts from the literature. PMID:18932264

  7. (15)N NMR Spectroscopy, X-ray and Neutron Diffraction, Quantum-Chemical Calculations, and UV/vis-Spectrophotometric Titrations as Complementary Techniques for the Analysis of Pyridine-Supported Bicyclic Guanidine Superbases.

    PubMed

    Schwamm, Ryan J; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; García, M Ángeles; Claramunt, Rosa M; Alkorta, Ibon; Saame, Jaan; Leito, Ivo; Fitchett, Christopher M; Edwards, Alison J; Coles, Martyn P

    2016-09-01

    Pyridine substituted with one and two bicyclic guanidine groups has been studied as a potential source of superbases. 2-{hpp}C5H4N (I) and 2,6-{hpp}2C5H3N (II) (hppH = 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidine) were protonated using [HNEt3][BPh4] to afford [I-H][BPh4] (1a), [II-H][BPh4] (2), and [II-H2][BPh4]2 (3). Solution-state (1)H and (15)N NMR spectroscopy shows a symmetrical cation in 2, indicating a facile proton-exchange process in solution. Solid-state (15)N NMR data differentiates between the two groups, indicating a mixed guanidine/guanidinium. X-ray diffraction data are consistent with protonation at the imine nitrogen, confirmed for 1a by single-crystal neutron diffraction. The crystal structure of 1a shows association of two [I-H](+) cations within a cage of [BPh4](-) anions. Computational analysis performed in the gas phase and in MeCN solution shows that the free energy barrier to transfer a proton between imino centers in [II-H](+) is 1 order of magnitude lower in MeCN than in the gas phase. The results provide evidence that linking hpp groups with the pyridyl group stabilizes the protonation center, thereby increasing the intrinsic basicity in the gas phase, while the bulk prevents efficient cation solvation, resulting in diminished pKa(MeCN) values. Spectrophotometrically measured pKa values are in excellent agreement with calculated values and confirm that I and II are superbases in solution.

  8. (15)N NMR Spectroscopy, X-ray and Neutron Diffraction, Quantum-Chemical Calculations, and UV/vis-Spectrophotometric Titrations as Complementary Techniques for the Analysis of Pyridine-Supported Bicyclic Guanidine Superbases.

    PubMed

    Schwamm, Ryan J; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; García, M Ángeles; Claramunt, Rosa M; Alkorta, Ibon; Saame, Jaan; Leito, Ivo; Fitchett, Christopher M; Edwards, Alison J; Coles, Martyn P

    2016-09-01

    Pyridine substituted with one and two bicyclic guanidine groups has been studied as a potential source of superbases. 2-{hpp}C5H4N (I) and 2,6-{hpp}2C5H3N (II) (hppH = 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidine) were protonated using [HNEt3][BPh4] to afford [I-H][BPh4] (1a), [II-H][BPh4] (2), and [II-H2][BPh4]2 (3). Solution-state (1)H and (15)N NMR spectroscopy shows a symmetrical cation in 2, indicating a facile proton-exchange process in solution. Solid-state (15)N NMR data differentiates between the two groups, indicating a mixed guanidine/guanidinium. X-ray diffraction data are consistent with protonation at the imine nitrogen, confirmed for 1a by single-crystal neutron diffraction. The crystal structure of 1a shows association of two [I-H](+) cations within a cage of [BPh4](-) anions. Computational analysis performed in the gas phase and in MeCN solution shows that the free energy barrier to transfer a proton between imino centers in [II-H](+) is 1 order of magnitude lower in MeCN than in the gas phase. The results provide evidence that linking hpp groups with the pyridyl group stabilizes the protonation center, thereby increasing the intrinsic basicity in the gas phase, while the bulk prevents efficient cation solvation, resulting in diminished pKa(MeCN) values. Spectrophotometrically measured pKa values are in excellent agreement with calculated values and confirm that I and II are superbases in solution. PMID:27494395

  9. Study of stereospecificity of 1H, 13C, 15N and 77Se shielding constants in the configurational isomers of the selenophene-2-carbaldehyde azine by NMR spectroscopy and MP2-GIAO calculations.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Albanov, Alexander I; Levanova, Ekaterina P; Levkovskaya, Galina G

    2011-11-01

    In the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of selenophene-2-carbaldehyde azine, the (1)H-5, (13)C-3 and (13)C-5 signals of the selenophene ring are shifted to higher frequencies, whereas those of the (1)H-1, (13)C-1, (13)C-2 and (13)C-4 are shifted to lower frequencies on going from the EE to ZZ isomer or from the E moiety to the Z moiety of EZ isomer. The (15)N chemical shift is significantly larger in the EE isomer relative to the ZZ isomer and in the E moiety relative to the Z moiety of EZ isomer. A very pronounced difference (60-65 mg/g) between the (77)Se resonance positions is revealed in the studied azine isomers, the (77)Se peak being shifted to higher frequencies in the ZZ isomer and in the Z moiety of EZ isomer. The trends in the changes of the measured chemical shifts are reasonably reproduced by the GIAO calculations at the MP2 level of the (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (77)Se shielding constants in the energy-favorable conformation with the syn orientation of both selenophene rings relative to the C = N groups. The NBO analysis suggests that such an arrangement of the selenophene rings may take place because of a higher energy of some intramolecular interactions. PMID:22002712

  10. Secondary structure and side-chain sup 1 H and sup 13 C resonance assignments of calmodulin in solution by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Spera, S.; Barbato, G.; Kay, L.E.; Bax, A. ); Krinks, M. )

    1991-09-24

    Heteronuclear 2D and 3D NMR experiments were carried out on recombinant Drosophila calmodulin (CaM), a protein of 148 residues and with molecular mass of 16.7 kDa, that is uniformly labeled with {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C to a level of > 95%. Nearly complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C side-chain assignments for all amino acid residues are obtained by using the 3D HCCH-COSY and HCCH-TOCSY experiments that rely on large heteronuclear one-bond scalar couplings to transfer magnetization and establish through-bond connectivities. The secondary structure of this protein in solution has been elucidated by a qualitative interpretation of nuclear Overhauser effects, hydrogen exchange data, and {sup 3}J{sub HNH{alpha}} coupling constants. A clear correlation between the {sup 13}C{alpha} chemical shift and secondary structure is found. The secondary structure in the two globular domains of Drosophila CaM in solution is essentially identical with that of the X-ray crystal structure of mammalian CaM which consists of two pairs of a helix-loop-helix motif in each globular domain. The existence of a short antiparallel {beta}-sheet between the two loops in each domain has been confirmed. The eight {alpha}-helix segments identified from the NMR data are located at Glu-6 to Phe-19, thr-29 to Ser-38, Glu-45 to Glu-54, Phe-65 to Lys-77, Glu-82 to Asp-93, Ala-102 to Asn-111, Asp-118 to Glu-127, and Tyr-138 to Thr-146. Although the crystal structure has a long central helix from Phe-65 to Phe-92 that connects the two globular domains, NMR data indicate that residues Asp-78 to Ser-81 of this central helix adopt a nonhelical conformation with considerable flexibility.

  11. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of the aciniform spidroin (AcSp1) repetitive domain of Argiope trifasciata wrapping silk.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingling; Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Meng, Qing; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2012-10-01

    Spider silk is one of nature's most remarkable biomaterials due to extraordinary strength and toughness not found in today's synthetic materials. Of the seven types of silk, wrapping silk (AcSp1) is the most extensible of the types of silks and has no sequence similarity to the other types. Here we report the chemical shifts for the AcSp1 199 amino acid protein repeat unit and its anticipated secondary structure based on secondary chemical shifts. PMID:21989955

  12. Structural elucidation and NMR assignments of four aromatic lactones from a mangrove endophytic fungus (No. GX4-1B).

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongbo; Li, Qing; Feng, Xiaojun; Chen, Bin; Wang, Jun; Liu, Lan; She, Zhigang; Lin, Yongcheng

    2010-06-01

    Two new aromatic lactones, 6-hydroxy-4-hydroxymethyl-8-methoxy-3- methylisocoumarin (1) and 1,10-dihydroxy-8-methyl-dibenz[b, e]oxepin-6,11-dione (2), together with two known compounds, 1,10-dihydroxy-dibenz[b, e]oxepin-6,11-dione (3) and 3-hydroxymethyl-6,8-dimethoxycoumarin (4), were isolated from a mangrove endophytic fungus (No. GX4-1B) collected from the South China Sea. Their structures were elucidated and the data of (1)H and (13)C NMR were assigned completely by HREIMS, 1D and 2D NMR experiments including HMQC, HMBC and NOESY.

  13. N,N-Di- n-octyl- N,N-dimethyl and N,N-di- n-nonyl- N,N-dimethyl ammonium cholates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR, powder X-ray diffraction and thermoanalytical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolehmainen, Erkki; Lahtinen, Manu; Valkonen, Arto; Behera, Babita; Kauppinen, Reijo

    2009-07-01

    N,N-Di- n-octyl- N,N-dimethyl cholate ( 1) and N,N-di- n-nonyl- N,N-dimethyl ammonium cholate ( 2) have been prepared by crystallization from equimolar mixtures of sodium cholate and quaternary N,N-di- n-alkyl- N,N-dimethyl ( n-octyl or n-nonyl) ammonium bromides. The formed crystalline materials have been structurally characterized by 13C and 15N cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and thermoanalytical (TGA/DTA and DSC) methods and compared with each other. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of 1 and 2 reveal clear similarities. Combined with the thermoanalytical data of these structures an existence of two hydrated polymorphs (most probably mono- and dihydrates) can be proposed. This presumption is further supported by 13C CPMAS NMR showing clearly double resonances for the carboxylic and majority of other carbons in these quaternary ammonium cholates. Owing to the endogenous character of cholate anion these ionic structures possess great potential in many pharmaceutical applications such as controlled drug delivery.

  14. Improving the efficiency of branch-and-bound complete-search NMR assignment using the symmetry of molecules and spectra.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Andrés; Castillo, Andrés M; González, Fabio; Patiny, Luc; Wist, Julien

    2015-02-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignment of small molecules is presented as a typical example of a combinatorial optimization problem in chemical physics. Three strategies that help improve the efficiency of solution search by the branch and bound method are presented: 1. reduction of the size of the solution space by resort to a condensed structure formula, wherein symmetric nuclei are grouped together; 2. partitioning of the solution space based on symmetry, that becomes the basis for an efficient branching procedure; and 3. a criterion of selection of input restrictions that leads to increased gaps between branches and thus faster pruning of non-viable solutions. Although the examples chosen to illustrate this work focus on small-molecule NMR assignment, the results are generic and might help solving other combinatorial optimization problems. PMID:25701998

  15. Improving the efficiency of branch-and-bound complete-search NMR assignment using the symmetry of molecules and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Andrés; Castillo, Andrés M.; González, Fabio; Patiny, Luc; Wist, Julien

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignment of small molecules is presented as a typical example of a combinatorial optimization problem in chemical physics. Three strategies that help improve the efficiency of solution search by the branch and bound method are presented: 1. reduction of the size of the solution space by resort to a condensed structure formula, wherein symmetric nuclei are grouped together; 2. partitioning of the solution space based on symmetry, that becomes the basis for an efficient branching procedure; and 3. a criterion of selection of input restrictions that leads to increased gaps between branches and thus faster pruning of non-viable solutions. Although the examples chosen to illustrate this work focus on small-molecule NMR assignment, the results are generic and might help solving other combinatorial optimization problems.

  16. Improving the efficiency of branch-and-bound complete-search NMR assignment using the symmetry of molecules and spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Andrés; Patiny, Luc; Castillo, Andrés M.; González, Fabio; Wist, Julien

    2015-02-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignment of small molecules is presented as a typical example of a combinatorial optimization problem in chemical physics. Three strategies that help improve the efficiency of solution search by the branch and bound method are presented: 1. reduction of the size of the solution space by resort to a condensed structure formula, wherein symmetric nuclei are grouped together; 2. partitioning of the solution space based on symmetry, that becomes the basis for an efficient branching procedure; and 3. a criterion of selection of input restrictions that leads to increased gaps between branches and thus faster pruning of non-viable solutions. Although the examples chosen to illustrate this work focus on small-molecule NMR assignment, the results are generic and might help solving other combinatorial optimization problems.

  17. 1H and 13C NMR assignments of three nitrogen containing compounds from the mangrove endophytic fungus (ZZF08).

    PubMed

    Tao, Yiwen; Zeng, Xianjian; Mou, Chengbo; Li, Jun; Cai, Xiaoling; She, Zhigang; Zhou, Shining; Lin, Yongcheng

    2008-05-01

    A new natural product, named phomopsin A, 1-(meta-hydroxyphenyl)-4-hydroxy-3-isoquinolone (1), together with two known compounds cytochalasin H (2) and glucosylceramide (3), was isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus Phomopsis sp. (ZZF08) obtained from the South China Sea coast. The structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR experiments including COSY, HMQC, and HMBC. According to NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, it was found that some assignments about (1)H and (13)C NMR data for cytochalasin H (2) were probably uncorrected in the previous reports. In our cytotoxicity assays, compound 1 showed moderate cytotoxicity toward KB cells with IC(50) at 28.0 microg ml(-1) and KBv200 cells with IC(50) at 16.8 microg ml(-1), and compound 2 exhibited strong cytotoxicity toward KB cells and KBv200 cells with IC(50) less than 1.25 microg ml(-1).

  18. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for two anthraquinones and two xanthones from the mangrove fungus (ZSUH-36).

    PubMed

    Shao, Changlun; She, Zhigang; Guo, Zhiyong; Peng, Hong; Cai, Xiaoling; Zhou, Shining; Gu, Yucheng; Lin, Yongcheng

    2007-05-01

    We report the unambiguous assignments of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of one new natural product, namely, 6,8-di-O-methyl versiconol (1) together with one known anthraquinone aversin (2) and two xanthones 5-methoxysterigmatocystin (3) and sterigmatocystin (4). These compounds were all isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus ZSUH-36 from the South China Sea. 1D and 2D NMR experiments including COSY, HMQC and HMBC were used to elucidate the structures. Variations in the (1)H NMR spectrum of 6,8-di-O-methyl versiconol (1) were also observed in the temperature range 25-75 degrees C. In addition, the plausible biogenetic path from 1 to 2 is discussed.

  19. NMR studies of active-site properties of human carbonic anhydrase II by using (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole as a local probe and histidine hydrogen-bond correlations.

    PubMed

    Shenderovich, Ilya G; Lesnichin, Stepan B; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    By using a combination of liquid and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole (4-MI) as a local probe of the environment has been studied: 1) in the polar, wet Freon CDF3 /CDF2 Cl down to 130 K, 2) in water at pH 12, and 3) in solid samples of the mutant H64A of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). In the latter, the active-site His64 residue is replaced by alanine; the catalytic activity is, however, rescued by the presence of 4-MI. For the Freon solution, it is demonstrated that addition of water molecules not only catalyzes proton tautomerism but also lifts its quasidegeneracy. The possible hydrogen-bond clusters formed and the mechanism of the tautomerism are discussed. Information about the imidazole hydrogen-bond geometries is obtained by establishing a correlation between published (1) H and (15) N chemical shifts of the imidazole rings of histidines in proteins. This correlation is useful to distinguish histidines embedded in the interior of proteins and those at the surface, embedded in water. Moreover, evidence is obtained that the hydrogen-bond geometries of His64 in the active site of HCA II and of 4-MI in H64A HCA II are similar. Finally, the degeneracy of the rapid tautomerism of the neutral imidazole ring His64 reported by Shimahara et al. (J. Biol. Chem.- 2007, 282, 9646) can be explained with a wet, polar, nonaqueous active-site conformation in the inward conformation, similar to the properties of 4-MI in the Freon solution. The biological implications for the enzyme mechanism are discussed. PMID:25521423

  20. NMR studies of active-site properties of human carbonic anhydrase II by using (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole as a local probe and histidine hydrogen-bond correlations.

    PubMed

    Shenderovich, Ilya G; Lesnichin, Stepan B; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    By using a combination of liquid and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole (4-MI) as a local probe of the environment has been studied: 1) in the polar, wet Freon CDF3 /CDF2 Cl down to 130 K, 2) in water at pH 12, and 3) in solid samples of the mutant H64A of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). In the latter, the active-site His64 residue is replaced by alanine; the catalytic activity is, however, rescued by the presence of 4-MI. For the Freon solution, it is demonstrated that addition of water molecules not only catalyzes proton tautomerism but also lifts its quasidegeneracy. The possible hydrogen-bond clusters formed and the mechanism of the tautomerism are discussed. Information about the imidazole hydrogen-bond geometries is obtained by establishing a correlation between published (1) H and (15) N chemical shifts of the imidazole rings of histidines in proteins. This correlation is useful to distinguish histidines embedded in the interior of proteins and those at the surface, embedded in water. Moreover, evidence is obtained that the hydrogen-bond geometries of His64 in the active site of HCA II and of 4-MI in H64A HCA II are similar. Finally, the degeneracy of the rapid tautomerism of the neutral imidazole ring His64 reported by Shimahara et al. (J. Biol. Chem.- 2007, 282, 9646) can be explained with a wet, polar, nonaqueous active-site conformation in the inward conformation, similar to the properties of 4-MI in the Freon solution. The biological implications for the enzyme mechanism are discussed.

  1. Post-translational heterocyclic backbone modifications in the 43-peptide antibiotic microcin B17. Structure elucidation and NMR study of a 13C,15N-labelled gyrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bayer, A; Freund, S; Jung, G

    1995-12-01

    Microcin B17 (McB17), the first known gyrase inhibitor of peptidic nature, is produced by ribosomal synthesis and post-translational modification of the 69-residue precursor protein by an Escherichia coli strain. To elucidate the chemical structure of the mature 43-residue peptide antibiotic, fermentation and purification protocols were established and optimized which allowed the isolation and purification of substantial amounts of highly pure McB17 (non-labelled, 15N-labelled and 13C/15N-labelled peptide. By ultraviolet-absorption spectroscopy. HPLC-electrospray mass spectrometry and GC-mass spectrometry, amino acid analysis, protein sequencing, and, in particular, multidimensional NMR, we could demonstrate and unequivocally prove that the enzymic modification of the precursor backbone at Gly-Cys and Gly-Ser segments leads to the formation of 2-aminomethylthiazole-4-carboxylic acid and 2-aminomethyloxazole-4-carboxylic acid, respectively. In addition, two bicyclic modifications 2-(2-aminomethyloxazolyl)thiazole-4-carboxylic acid and 2-(2-aminomethylthiazolyl)oxazole-4-carboxylic acid were found that consist of directly linked thiazole and oxazole rings derived from one Gly-Ser-Cys and one Gly-Cys-Ser segment. Analogous to the thiazole and oxazole rings found in antitumor peptides of microbial and marine origin, these heteroaromatic ring systems of McB17 presumably play an important role in its gyrase-inhibiting activity, e.g. interacting with the DNA to trap the covalent protein-DNA intermediate of the breakage-reunion reaction of the gyrase.

  2. Backbone and side chain NMR assignments of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ZapA allow identification of residues that mediate the interaction of ZapA with FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Maria Luiza C; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Chin, Yanni K-Y; Mobli, Mehdi; Handler, Aaron; Gorbatyuk, Vitaliy Y; Robson, Scott A; King, Glenn F; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial division begins with the formation of a contractile protein ring at midcell, which constricts the bacterial envelope to generate two daughter cells. The central component of the division ring is FtsZ, a tubulin-like protein capable of self-assembling into filaments which further associate into a higher order structure known as the Z ring. Proteins that bind to FtsZ play a crucial role in the formation and regulation of the Z ring. One such protein is ZapA, a widely conserved 21 kDa homodimeric protein that associates with FtsZ filaments and promotes their bundling. Although ZapA was discovered more than a decade ago, the structural details of its interaction with FtsZ remain unknown. In this work, backbone and side chain NMR assignments for the Geobacillus stearothermophilus ZapA homodimer are described. We titrated FtsZ into (15)N(2)H-ZapA and mapped ZapA residues whose resonances are perturbed upon FtsZ binding. This information provides a structural understanding of the interaction between FtsZ and ZapA.

  3. Backbone and side chain NMR assignments of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ZapA allow identification of residues that mediate the interaction of ZapA with FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Maria Luiza C; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Chin, Yanni K-Y; Mobli, Mehdi; Handler, Aaron; Gorbatyuk, Vitaliy Y; Robson, Scott A; King, Glenn F; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial division begins with the formation of a contractile protein ring at midcell, which constricts the bacterial envelope to generate two daughter cells. The central component of the division ring is FtsZ, a tubulin-like protein capable of self-assembling into filaments which further associate into a higher order structure known as the Z ring. Proteins that bind to FtsZ play a crucial role in the formation and regulation of the Z ring. One such protein is ZapA, a widely conserved 21 kDa homodimeric protein that associates with FtsZ filaments and promotes their bundling. Although ZapA was discovered more than a decade ago, the structural details of its interaction with FtsZ remain unknown. In this work, backbone and side chain NMR assignments for the Geobacillus stearothermophilus ZapA homodimer are described. We titrated FtsZ into (15)N(2)H-ZapA and mapped ZapA residues whose resonances are perturbed upon FtsZ binding. This information provides a structural understanding of the interaction between FtsZ and ZapA. PMID:25967379

  4. Concerted two-dimensional NMR approaches to hydrogen-1, carbon-13, and nitrogen-15 resonance assignments in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Reily, M.D.; Westler, W.M.; Ulrich, E.L.; Markley, J.L. )

    1989-01-10

    When used in concert, one-bond carbon-carbon correlations, one-bond and multiple-bond proton-carbon correlations, and multiple-bond proton-nitrogen correlations, derived from two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra of isotopically enriched proteins, provide a reliable method of assigning proton, carbon, and nitrogen resonances. In contrast to procedures that simply extend proton assignments to carbon or nitrogen resonances, this technique assigns proton, carbon, and nitrogen resonances coordinately on the basis of their integrated coupling networks. Redundant spin coupling pathways provide ways of resolving overlaps frequently encountered in homonuclear {sup 1}H 2D NMR spectra and facilitate the elucidation of complex proton spin systems. Carbon-carbon and proton-carbon couplings can be used to bridge the aromatic and aliphatic parts of proton spin systems; this avoids possible ambiguities that may result from the use of nuclear Overhauser effects to assign aromatic amino acid signals. The technique is illustrated for Anabaena 7120 flavodoxin and cytochrome c-553, both uniformly enriched with carbon-13 (26%) or nitrogen-15 (98%).

  5. MetaboID: a graphical user interface package for assignment of 1H NMR spectra of bodyfluids and tissues.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Neil; Somashekar, Bagganahalli S; Tripathi, Pratima; Ge, Wencheng; Rajendiran, Thekkelnaycke M; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance based measurements of small molecule mixtures continues to be confronted with the challenge of spectral assignment. While multi-dimensional experiments are capable of addressing this challenge, the imposed time constraint becomes prohibitive, particularly with the large sample sets commonly encountered in metabolomic studies. Thus, one-dimensional spectral assignment is routinely performed, guided by two-dimensional experiments on a selected sample subset; however, a publicly available graphical interface for aiding in this process is currently unavailable. We have collected spectral information for 360 unique compounds from publicly available databases including chemical shift lists and authentic full resolution spectra, supplemented with spectral information for 25 compounds collected in-house at a proton NMR frequency of 900 MHz. This library serves as the basis for MetaboID, a Matlab-based user interface designed to aid in the one-dimensional spectral assignment process. The tools of MetaboID were built to guide resonance assignment in order of increasing confidence, starting from cursory compound searches based on chemical shift positions to analysis of authentic spike experiments. Together, these tools streamline the often repetitive task of spectral assignment. The overarching goal of the integrated toolbox of MetaboID is to centralize the one dimensional spectral assignment process, from providing access to large chemical shift libraries to providing a straightforward, intuitive means of spectral comparison. Such a toolbox is expected to be attractive to both experienced and new metabolomic researchers as well as general complex mixture analysts.

  6. 1H and 13C NMR signal assignment of cucurbitacin derivatives from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader and Ecballium elaterium L. (Cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Seger, Christoph; Sturm, Sonja; Mair, Maria-Elisabeth; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Stuppner, Hermann

    2005-06-01

    2D NMR-derived 1H and 13C NMR signal assignments of six structurally closely related cucurbitacin derivatives are presented. The investigated 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylcucurbitacins I, J, K, and L were obtained from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader whereas the aglyca cucurbitacin E and I were isolated from Ecballium elaterium L.

  7. (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments for two new steroids from the coral Chromonephthea sp.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua-Wei; Liao, Xiao-Jian; Xu, Shi-Hai

    2009-04-01

    Two new steroids isolated from EtOH extracts of the South China Sea soft coral Chromonephthea sp. were identified. One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments including COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY were used for the determination of their structure.

  8. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  9. Computational Chemistry to the Rescue: Modern Toolboxes for the Assignment of Complex Molecules by GIAO NMR Calculations.

    PubMed

    Grimblat, Nicolas; Sarotti, Ariel M

    2016-08-22

    The calculations of NMR properties of molecules using quantum chemical methods have deeply impacted several branches of organic chemistry. They are particularly important in structural or stereochemical assignments of organic compounds, with implications in total synthesis, stereoselective reactions, and natural products chemistry. In studying the evolution of the strategies developed to support (or reject) a structural proposal, it becomes clear that the most effective and accurate ones involve sophisticated procedures to correlate experimental and computational data. Owing to their relatively high mathematical complexity, such calculations (CP3, DP4, ANN-PRA) are often carried out using additional computational resources provided by the authors (such as applets or Excel files). This Minireview will cover the state-of-the-art of these toolboxes in the assignment of organic molecules, including mathematical definitions, updates, and discussion of relevant examples. PMID:27405775

  10. Computational Chemistry to the Rescue: Modern Toolboxes for the Assignment of Complex Molecules by GIAO NMR Calculations.

    PubMed

    Grimblat, Nicolas; Sarotti, Ariel M

    2016-08-22

    The calculations of NMR properties of molecules using quantum chemical methods have deeply impacted several branches of organic chemistry. They are particularly important in structural or stereochemical assignments of organic compounds, with implications in total synthesis, stereoselective reactions, and natural products chemistry. In studying the evolution of the strategies developed to support (or reject) a structural proposal, it becomes clear that the most effective and accurate ones involve sophisticated procedures to correlate experimental and computational data. Owing to their relatively high mathematical complexity, such calculations (CP3, DP4, ANN-PRA) are often carried out using additional computational resources provided by the authors (such as applets or Excel files). This Minireview will cover the state-of-the-art of these toolboxes in the assignment of organic molecules, including mathematical definitions, updates, and discussion of relevant examples.

  11. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for two oxaphenalenones bacillosporin C and D from the mangrove endophytic fungus SBE-14.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; Shao, Changlun; She, Zhigang; Cai, Xiaoling; Liu, Fan; Vrijimoed, L L P; Lin, Yongcheng

    2007-05-01

    The complete (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments are reported for the novel natural product Bacillosporin D together with the known compound Bacillosporin C. These compounds containing seven rings were isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus SBE-14 from the South China Sea. 1D and 2D NMR experiments, including COSY, HMQC and HMBC were used to the determination of the structures and NMR assignments. It is proposed that 1 was biogenetically produced by transforming 2. Transforming a lactone to an anhydride is unusual in nature.

  12. Sequence-specific H NMR assignments and secondary structure in the sea anemone polypeptide Stichodactyla helianthus neurotoxin I

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, R.H.; Mabbutt, B.C.; Kem, W.R.; Norton, R.S. )

    1989-02-21

    Sequence-specific assignments are reported for the 500-MHz H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the 48-residue polypeptide neurotoxin I from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (Sh I). Spin systems were first identified by using two-dimensional relayed or multiple quantum filtered correlation spectroscopy, double quantum spectroscopy, and spin lock experiments. Specific resonance assignments were then obtained from nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) connectivities between protons from residues adjacent in the amino acid sequence. Of a total of 265 potentially observable resonances, 248 (i.e., 94%) were assigned, arising from 39 completely and 9 partially assigned amino acid spin systems. The secondary structure of Sh I was defined on the basis of the pattern of sequential NOE connectivities. NOEs between protons on separate strands of the polypeptide backbone, and backbone amide exchange rates. Sh I contains a four-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet encompassing residues 1-5, 16-24, 30-33, and 40-46, with a {beta}-bulge at residues 17 and 18 and a reverse turn, probably a type II {beta}-turn, involving residues 27-30. No evidence of {alpha}-helical structure was found.

  13. Study of conformations and hydrogen bonds in the configurational isomers of pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde oxime by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy combined with MP2 and DFT calculations and NBO analysis.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Ushakov, Igor A; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Ivanov, Andrei V; Mikhaleva, Al'bina I

    2010-09-01

    The (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies have shown that the E and Z isomers of pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde oxime adopt preferable conformation with the syn orientation of the oxime group with respect to the pyrrole ring. The syn conformation of E and Z isomers of pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde oxime is stabilized by the N-H...N and N-H...O intramolecular hydrogen bonds, respectively. The N-H...N hydrogen bond in the E isomer causes the high-frequency shift of the bridge proton signal by about 1 ppm and increase the (1)J(N, H) coupling by approximately 3 Hz. The bridge proton shows further deshielding and higher increase of the (1)J(N, H) coupling constant due to the strengthening of the N-H...O hydrogen bond in the Z isomer. The MP2 calculations indicate that the syn conformation of E and Z isomers is by approximately 3.5 kcal/mol energetically less favorable than the anti conformation. The calculations of (1)H shielding and (1)J(N, H) coupling in the syn and anti conformations allow the contribution to these constants from the N-H...N and N-H...O hydrogen bondings to be estimated. The NBO analysis suggests that the N-H...N hydrogen bond in the E isomer is a pure electrostatic interaction while the charge transfer from the oxygen lone pair to the antibonding orbital of the N-H bond through the N-H...O hydrogen bond occurs in the Z isomer. PMID:20623827

  14. NMR characterization of cellulose acetate: chemical shift assignments, substituent effects, and chemical shift additivity.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Hisaho; Shimizu, Yuuichi

    2015-03-15

    A series of cellulose acetates (CA) with degrees of substitution (DS) ranging from 2.92-0.92 dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-d6 and cellulose dissolved in tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF)/DMSO-d6 were investigated by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR spectroscopic analysis allowed the determination of the (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the eight anhydroglucose units (AGUs) that contain CA: 2,3,6-tri-, 2,3-di-, 2,6-di-, 3,6-di-, 2-mono-, 3-mono-, 6-mono-, and unacetylated AGUs. A comparative analysis of the chemical shift data revealed the substituent effect of acetyl groups at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions on the (1)H and (13)C nuclei in the same AGU. In addition, chemical shift additivity could be applied to the (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of CA because the chemical shifts of the diacetylated and triacetylated AGUs could be almost completely explained by the acetyl substituent effects at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions.

  15. (13)C-detected NMR experiments for automatic resonance assignment of IDPs and multiple-fixing SMFT processing.

    PubMed

    Dziekański, Paweł; Grudziąż, Katarzyna; Jarvoll, Patrik; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) have recently attracted much interest, due to their role in many biological processes, including signaling and regulation mechanisms. High-dimensional (13)C direct-detected NMR experiments have proven exceptionally useful in case of IDPs, providing spectra with superior peak dispersion. Here, two such novel experiments recorded with non-uniform sampling are introduced, these are 5D HabCabCO(CA)NCO and 5D HNCO(CA)NCO. Together with the 4D (HACA)CON(CA)NCO, an extension of the previously published 3D experiments (Pantoja-Uceda and Santoro in J Biomol NMR 59:43-50, 2014. doi: 10.1007/s10858-014-9827-1), they form a set allowing for complete and reliable resonance assignment of difficult IDPs. The processing is performed with sparse multidimensional Fourier transform based on the concept of restricting (fixing) some of spectral dimensions to a priori known resonance frequencies. In our study, a multiple-fixing method was developed, that allows easy access to spectral data. The experiments were tested on a resolution-demanding alpha-synuclein sample. Due to superior peak dispersion in high-dimensional spectrum and availability of the sequential connectivities between four consecutive residues, the overwhelming majority of resonances could be assigned automatically using the TSAR program. PMID:25902761

  16. Solution structural characterization of cyanometmyoglobin: Resonance assignment of heme cavity residues by two-dimensional NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, S.D.; La Mar, G.N. )

    1990-02-13

    Steady-state nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE), two-dimensional (2D) nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), and 2D spin correlation spectroscopy (COSY) have been applied to the fully paramagnetic low-spin, cyanide-ligated complex of sperm whale ferric myoglobin to assign the majority of the heme pocket side-chain proton signals and the remainder of the heme signals. It is shown that the 2D NOESY map reveals essentially all dipolar connectivities observed in ordinary 1D NOE experiments and expected on the basis of crystal coordinates, albeit often more weakly than in a diamagnetic analogue. For extremely broad ({approximately}600-Hz) and rapidly relaxing (T{sub 1} {approximately} 3 ms) signals which show no NOESY peaks, the authors demonstrate that conventional steady-state NOEs obtained under very rapid pulsing conditions still allow detection of the critical dipolar connectivities that allow unambiguous assignments. Numerous critical COSY cross peaks between strongly hyperfine-shifted peaks were resolved and assigned. In all, 95% (53 of 56 signals) of the total proton sets within {approximately}7.5 {angstrom} of the iron, the region experiencing the strongest hyperfine shifts and paramagnetic relaxation, are now unambiguously assigned. Hence it is clear that the 2D methods can be profitably applied to paramagnetic proteins. The scope and limitations of such application are discussed. The resulting hyperfine shift pattern for the heme confirmed expectations based on model compounds.

  17. NMR sequential assignment of Escherichia coli thioredoxin utilizing random fractional deuteriation

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.; Richards, F.M.

    1988-01-12

    All non-proline residues except for the N-terminal dipeptide have been assigned in the 108-residue protein Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Central to these experiments has been the use of protein samples in which all carbon-bound hydrogen positions are substituted to 75% with deuterium by bacterial growth on partially deuteriated carbon sources and media. The dilution of the local proton density gives rise to narrower line widths with little loss in sensitivity. In addition, passive or secondary coupling to protons not directly involved in the coherence transfer process of correlation experiments is largely suppressed, thus significantly improving the resolution for side-chain couplings. Simultaneous multiresidue-type assignments have been obtained by incorporation of several amino acids with differing selective ..cap alpha.. and/or ..beta..-deuteriation into a fractionally deuteriated background. Combined with several single residue type labeling experiments, these selective labelings have yielded direct residue type assignments for two-thirds of the protein. In addition to improved resolution, the amide to carbon-bound proton NOESY spectra offered equivalent sensitivity while the amide to amide NOESY spectra offered superior sensitivity to that observed for natural abundance samples. The resultant sequential assignment has an average number of nearest-neighbor NOE connectivities of 2.35 out of the possible 3 ..cap alpha..-amide, ..beta..-amide, and amide-amide connectivities.

  18. 13C and 1H NMR ester region resonance assignments and the composition of human infant and child meibum.

    PubMed

    Borchman, Douglas; Yappert, Marta C; Milliner, Sarah E; Duran, Diana; Cox, Gregory W; Smith, Ryan J; Bhola, Rahul

    2013-07-01

    Recent NMR studies suggest that unsaturation may contribute to tear film instability in adults and loss of cholesteryl esters and squalene could reduce tear film stability in adults with meibomian gland dysfunction. The proton resonances were tentatively assigned in those studies. In this current investigation, meibum from seven infants and children, one adult and a pool of adult meibum have been analyzed using an NMR spectrometer with greater sensitivity and spectral resolution. The goals of this work are to confirm/correct the previous assignments and to determine possible age-related changes in composition. The initial resonance assignments were confirmed using heteronuclear single quantum correlation spectroscopy. Because there were no significant interferences in the spectral region corresponding to the resonances for cholesteryl and wax esters, the areas of these resonances were used to calculate their molar ratios. We calculated a wax ester:cholesteryl ester molar ratio of 1:0.57 ± 0.05 for all our meibum samples and there were no age-related differences. At lower film thicknesses, the rate of evaporation measured in vitro was lower for wax esters mixed with a long chain cholesteryl ester compared to wax esters alone. However, the film thicknesses tested were non-physiological. Longer chain cholesteryl esters increase the interactions between hydrocarbon chains. Hydrocarbon chains were more saturated in meibum from infants and children compared to adults. Unsaturation may contribute to tear film instability in adults. Loss of cholesteryl ester and squalene could destabilize tear film in adults with meibomian gland dysfunction.

  19. Three-Dimensional Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Is Essential for Resolution of Resonances from In-Plane Residues in Uniformly 15N-Labeled Helical Membrane Proteins in Oriented Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marassi, Francesca M.; Ma, Che; Gesell, Jennifer J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2000-05-01

    Uniformly 15N-labeled samples of membrane proteins with helices aligned parallel to the membrane surface give two-dimensional PISEMA spectra that are highly overlapped due to limited dispersions of 1H-15N dipolar coupling and 15N chemical shift frequencies. However, resolution is greatly improved in three-dimensional 1H chemical shift/1H-15N dipolar coupling/15N chemical shift correlation spectra. The 23-residue antibiotic peptide magainin and a 54-residue polypeptide corresponding to the cytoplasmic domain of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu are used as examples. Both polypeptides consist almost entirely of α-helices, with their axes aligned parallel to the membrane surface. The measurement of three orientationally dependent frequencies for Val17 of magainin enabled the three-dimensional orientation of this helical peptide to be determined in the lipid bilayer.

  20. Sequence-specific sup 1 H NMR assignments and secondary structure of eglin c

    SciTech Connect

    Hyberts, S.G.; Wagner, G. )

    1990-02-13

    Sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments were obtained for eglin c, a polypeptide inhibitor of the granulocytic proteinases elastase and cathepsin G and some other proteinases. The protein consists of a single polypeptide chain of 70 residues. All proton resonances were assigned except for some labile protons of arginine side chains. The patterns of nuclear Overhauser enhancements and coupling constants and the observation of slow hydrogen exchange were used to characterize the secondary structure of the protein. The results indicate that the solution structure of the free inhibitor is very similar to the crystal structure reported for the same protein in the complex with subtilisin Carlsberg. However, a part of the binding loop seems to have a significantly different conformation in the free protein.

  1. Practical use of chemical shift databases for protein solid-state NMR: 2D chemical shift maps and amino-acid assignment with secondary-structure information.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, K J; Yang, Y; Schmidt-Rohr, K; Hong, Mei

    2013-06-01

    We introduce a Python-based program that utilizes the large database of (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank to rapidly predict the amino acid type and secondary structure from correlated chemical shifts. The program, called PACSYlite Unified Query (PLUQ), is designed to help assign peaks obtained from 2D (13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, or 3D (15)N-(13)C-(13)C magic-angle-spinning correlation spectra. We show secondary-structure specific 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation maps of all twenty amino acids, constructed from a chemical shift database of 262,209 residues. The maps reveal interesting conformation-dependent chemical shift distributions and facilitate searching of correlation peaks during amino-acid type assignment. Based on these correlations, PLUQ outputs the most likely amino acid types and the associated secondary structures from inputs of experimental chemical shifts. We test the assignment accuracy using four high-quality protein structures. Based on only the Cα and Cβ chemical shifts, the highest-ranked PLUQ assignments were 40-60 % correct in both the amino-acid type and the secondary structure. For three input chemical shifts (CO-Cα-Cβ or N-Cα-Cβ), the first-ranked assignments were correct for 60 % of the residues, while within the top three predictions, the correct assignments were found for 80 % of the residues. PLUQ and the chemical shift maps are expected to be useful at the first stage of sequential assignment, for combination with automated sequential assignment programs, and for highly disordered proteins for which secondary structure analysis is the main goal of structure determination.

  2. NMR sequential assignments and solution structure of chlorotoxin, a small scorpion toxin that blocks chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Lippens, G; Najib, J; Wodak, S J; Tartar, A

    1995-01-10

    The solution structure of chlorotoxin, a small toxin purified from the venom of the Leiurus quinquestriatus scorpion, has been determined using 2D 1H NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of the NMR data shows that the structure consists of a small three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet packed against an alpha-helix, thereby adopting the same fold as charybdotoxin and other members of the short scorpion toxin family [Arseniev et al. (1984) FEBS Lett. 165, 57-62; Martins et al. (1990) FEBS Lett. 260, 249-253; Bontems et al. (1991) Science 254, 1521-1523]. Three disulfide bonds of chlorotoxin (Cys5-Cys28, Cys16-Cys33, and Cys20-Cys35), cross-linking the alpha-helix to the beta-sheet, follow the common pattern found in the other short scorpion toxins. The fourth disulfide bridge (Cys2-Cys19) links the small N-terminal beta strand to the rest of the molecule, in contrast to charybdotoxin where this disulfide bridge is absent and the first strand interacts with the rest of the molecule by several contacts between hydrophobic residues. Another structural difference between chlorotoxin and charybdotoxin is observed at the level of the alpha-beta turn. This difference is accompanied by a change in the electrostatic potential surface, which is largely positive at the level of this turn in chlorotoxin, whereas no such positive potential surface can be found at the same position in charybdotoxin. In the latter protein, the positive surface is formed by different charged residues situated on the solvent-exposed site of the C-terminal beta-sheet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. NMR assignments and the acid-base characterization of the pomegranate ellagitannin punicalagin in the acidic pH-range.

    PubMed

    Kraszni, Márta; Marosi, Attila; Larive, Cynthia K

    2013-07-01

    In exploring the capability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for pomegranate juice analysis, the eight aromatic singlet resonances of α- and β-punicalagin were clearly identified in the (1)H NMR spectra of juice samples. The four downfield resonances were found to be sensitive to small pH changes around pH 3.50 where the NMR spectra of the juice samples were recorded. To understand this unusual behavior, the (1)H and (13)C resonance assignments of the punicalagin anomers were determined in aqueous solution and pH titrations with UV and (1)H NMR detection carried out to characterize the acid-base properties of punicalagin over the pH range 2-8. Simultaneous fitting of all of the pH-sensitive (1)H NMR signals produced similar but significantly different pKa values for the first two deprotonation equilibria of the gallagic acid moiety of the punicalagin α- (pKa1 = 4.57 ± 0.02, pKa2 = 5.63 ± 0.03) and β- (pKa1 = 4.36 ± 0.01, pKa2 = 5.47 ± 0.02) anomers. Equivalent pKa values, (α : 6.64 ± 0.01, β : 6.63± 0.01) were measured for the third deprotonation step involving the ellagic acid group, in good agreement with a prior literature report. The punicalagin anomer equilibrium readjusts in parallel with the proton dissociation steps as the pH is raised such that β-punicalagin becomes the most abundant anomer at neutral pH. The unusual upfield shifts observed for the glucose H3 and H5 resonances with increasing pH along with the shift in the α/β anomer equilibrium are likely the consequence of a conformational rearrangement.

  4. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  5. Proton NMR assignments and secondary structure of the snake venom protein echistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chen; Baum, J. ); Pitzenberger, S.M.; Garsky, V.M.; Lumma, P.K.; Sanyal, G. )

    1991-12-17

    The snake venom protein echistatin is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. The inhibitory properties of echistatin have been attributed to the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence at residues 24-26. In this paper, sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments are presented for the proton resonances of echistatin in water. The single-chain protein contains 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges. All of the backbone amide, C{sub alpha}H, and side-chain resonances, except for the {eta}-NH of the arginines, have been assigned. The secondary structure of the protein was characterized from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from the identification of slowly exchanging amide protons, from {sup 3}J{sub c{alpha}H-NH} coupling constants, and from circular dichroism studies. The data suggest that the secondary structure consists of a type I {beta}-turn, a short {beta}-hairpin, and a short-, irregular, antiparallel {beta}-sheet and that the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is in a flexible loop connecting two strands of the distorted antiparallel {beta}-sheet.

  6. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins.

    PubMed

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie; Hamelin, Olivier; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D2O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d10. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  7. Resonance Assignments and Secondary Structure Analysis of Dynein Light Chain 8 by Magic-angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shangjin; Butterworth, Andrew H.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Lightcap, Christine M.; Williams, John C.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2011-08-04

    Dynein light chain LC8 is the smallest subunit of the dynein motor complex and has been shown to play important roles in both dynein-dependent and dynein-independent physiological functions via its interaction with a number of its binding partners. It has also been linked to pathogenesis including roles in viral infections and tumorigenesis. Structural information for LC8-target proteins is critical to understanding the underlying function of LC8 in these complexes. However, some LC8-target interactions are not amenable to structural characterization by conventional structural biology techniques owing to their large size, low solubility, and crystallization difficulties. Here, we report magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of the homodimeric apo-LC8 protein as a first effort in addressing more complex, multi-partner, LC8-based protein assemblies. We have established site-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignments for the majority of the residues of LC8, and show TALOS+-predicted torsion angles ø and ψ in close agreement with most residues in the published LC8 crystal structure. Data obtained through these studies will provide the first step toward using MAS NMR to examine the LC8 structure, which will eventually be used to investigate protein–protein interactions in larger systems that cannot be determined by conventional structural studies.

  8. Sequential sup 1 H NMR assignments and secondary structure of an IgG-binding domain from protein G

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, L.Y.; Yang, J.C.; Derrick, J.P.; Sutcliffe, M.J.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Murphy, J.P.; Goward, C.R.; Atkinson, T. )

    1991-06-04

    Protein G is a member of a class of cell surface bacterial proteins from Streptococcus that bind IgG with high affinity. A fragment of molecular mass 6,988, which retains IgG-binding activity, has been generated by proteolytic digestion and analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR. Two-dimenstional DQF-COSY, TOCSY, and NOESY spectra have been employed to assign the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the peptide. Elements of regular secondary structure have been identified by using nuclear Overhauser enhancement, coupling constant, and amide proton exchange data. The secondary structure consists of a central {alpha}-helix (Ala28-Val44), flanked by two portions of {beta}-sheet (Val5-Val26 and Asp45-Lys62). This is a fundamentally different arrangement of secondary structure from that of protein A, which is made up of three consecutive {alpha}-helics in free solution. The authors conclude that the molecular mechanisms underlying the association of protein A and protein G with IgG are different.

  9. Resonance Assignments and Secondary Structure Analysis of Dynein Light Chain 8 by Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shangjin; Butterworth, Andrew H.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Lightcap, Christine M.; Williams, John C.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-01-01

    Dynein light chain LC8 is the smallest subunit of the dynein motor complex and has been shown to play important roles in both dynein dependent and dynein independent physiological functions via its interaction with a number of its binding partners. It has also been linked to pathogenesis including roles in viral infections and tumorigenesis. Structural information for LC8-target proteins is critical to understanding the underlying function of LC8 in these complexes. However, some LC8-target interactions are not amenable for structural characterization by conventional structural biology techniques due to their large size, low solubility and crystallization difficulties. Here, we report magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of the homodimeric apo-LC8 protein as a first effort in addressing more complex, multi-partner LC8-based protein assemblies. We have established site-specific backbone and side chain resonance assignments for the majority of the residues of LC8, and show TALOS+ predicted torsion angles ϕ and ψ in close agreement with most residues in the published LC8 crystal structure. Data obtained through these studies will provide the first step toward using MAS NMR to examine the LC8 structure, which will eventually be used to investigate protein-protein interactions in larger systems, which cannot be determined by conventional structural studies. PMID:23243318

  10. (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments for five anthraquinones from the mangrove endophytic fungus Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403).

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue-Kui; Huang, Hua-Rong; She, Zhi-Gang; Shao, Chang-Lun; Liu, Fan; Cai, Xiao-Ling; Vrijmoed, L L P; Lin, Yong-Cheng

    2007-11-01

    We report the unambiguous assignments of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of two new natural products, namely, 1,4,5,6,7,9-hexahydroxy-2-methoxy-7-methyl-5beta,9beta,8abeta, 6alpha,10aalpha-hexahydroanthracen-10 (10aH)-one (1) and 1,4,6-trihydroxy-2-methoxy-7-methylanthracene-9, 10-dione (2), together with three known anthraquinones. These compounds were all isolated from the marine endophytic fungus No. 1403 collected from the South China Sea. Compounds 3 and 4 were isolated from the marine fungus for the first time. The structures were elucidated by the spectroscopic methods 1D and 2D NMR including COSY, HMQC, HMBC and NOE, and HREIMS. In our cytotoxicity assays, compound 5 showed cytotoxicity toward KB and KBv-200 cells with IC(50) of 1.40 and 2.58 microg/ml, respectively. In addition, the plausible biogenic relationship of compounds 1, 2, 3 and 4 is discussed.

  11. Solid-state NMR sequential assignment of the β-endorphin peptide in its amyloid form.

    PubMed

    Seuring, Carolin; Gath, Julia; Verasdonck, Joeri; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Rivier, Jean; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H; Riek, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Insights into the three-dimensional structure of hormone fibrils are crucial for a detailed understanding of how an amyloid structure allows the storage of hormones in secretory vesicles prior to hormone secretion into the blood stream. As an example for various hormone amyloids, we have studied the endogenous opioid neuropeptide β-endorphin in one of its fibril forms. We have achieved the sequential assignment of the chemical shifts of the backbone and side-chain heavy atoms of the fibril. The secondary chemical shift analysis revealed that the β-endorphin peptide adopts three β-strands in its fibril state. This finding fosters the amyloid nature of a hormone at the atomic level.

  12. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations.

  13. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:26845204

  14. A novel approach to the rapid assignment of (13)C NMR spectra of major components of vegetable oils such as avocado, mango kernel and macadamia nut oils.

    PubMed

    Retief, Liezel; McKenzie, Jean M; Koch, Klaus R

    2009-09-01

    Assignment of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of major fatty acid components of South African produced vegetable oils was attempted using a method in which the vegetable oil was spiked with a standard triacylglycerol. This proved to be inadequate and therefore a new rapid and potentially generic graphical linear correlation method is proposed for assignment of the (13)C NMR spectra of major fatty acid components of apricot kernel, avocado pear, grapeseed, macadamia nut, mango kernel and marula vegetable oils. In this graphical correlation method, chemical shifts of fatty acids present in a known standard triacylglycerol is plotted against the corresponding chemical shifts of fatty acids present in the vegetable oils. This new approach (under carefully defined conditions and concentrations) was found especially useful for spectrally crowded regions where significant peak overlap occurs and was validated with the well-known (13)C NMR spectrum of olive oil which has been extensively reported in the literature. In this way, a full assignment of the (13)C{1H} NMR spectra of the vegetable oils, as well as tripalmitolein was readily achieved and the resonances belonging to the palmitoleic acid component of the triacylglycerols in the case of macadamia nut and avocado pear oil resonances were also assigned for the first time in the (13)C NMR spectra of these oils.

  15. A novel approach to the rapid assignment of (13)C NMR spectra of major components of vegetable oils such as avocado, mango kernel and macadamia nut oils.

    PubMed

    Retief, Liezel; McKenzie, Jean M; Koch, Klaus R

    2009-09-01

    Assignment of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of major fatty acid components of South African produced vegetable oils was attempted using a method in which the vegetable oil was spiked with a standard triacylglycerol. This proved to be inadequate and therefore a new rapid and potentially generic graphical linear correlation method is proposed for assignment of the (13)C NMR spectra of major fatty acid components of apricot kernel, avocado pear, grapeseed, macadamia nut, mango kernel and marula vegetable oils. In this graphical correlation method, chemical shifts of fatty acids present in a known standard triacylglycerol is plotted against the corresponding chemical shifts of fatty acids present in the vegetable oils. This new approach (under carefully defined conditions and concentrations) was found especially useful for spectrally crowded regions where significant peak overlap occurs and was validated with the well-known (13)C NMR spectrum of olive oil which has been extensively reported in the literature. In this way, a full assignment of the (13)C{1H} NMR spectra of the vegetable oils, as well as tripalmitolein was readily achieved and the resonances belonging to the palmitoleic acid component of the triacylglycerols in the case of macadamia nut and avocado pear oil resonances were also assigned for the first time in the (13)C NMR spectra of these oils. PMID:19544589

  16. Complete assignments of (1)H and (13)C NMR data for two 3beta,8beta-epoxymexicanolides from the fruit of a Chinese mangrove Xylocarpus granatum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Xiao, Zhihui; Song, Yang; Zhang, Si; Xiao, Qiang; Ma, Cha; Ding, Haixin; Li, Qingxin

    2006-01-01

    Three 3beta,8beta-epoxymexicanolides, including xyloccensin K, 6-acetoxycedrodorin and a new one named xyloccensin W, were isolated from the fruit of a Chinese mangrove Xylocarpus granatum. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analyses. The first complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR data for xyloccensin W was achieved by means of 2D NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectra. In addition, the confusion of (1)H and (13)C NMR data previously reported for xyloccensin K was clarified.

  17. Sequential sup 1 H NMR assignments of kistrin, a potent platelet aggregation inhibitor and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.; Wagner, G. )

    1992-02-04

    Sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonances assignments have been obtained for the protons of kistrin. Kistrin is a small naturally occurring snake venom protein that inhibits platelet aggregation by blocking the interaction of fibrinogen with the membrane-bound glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GP IIb-IIIa), a receptor from the integrin family. Kistrin has an Arg-Gly-Asp sequence which is believed to form an adhesion recognition sequence that is essential for activity. Therefore, the interaction between kistrin and GP IIb-IIIa may provide important information on the motif used by integrins to recognize their target proteins which bear RGD sequences. Kistrin consists of 68 residues and contains six intramolecular disulfide bonds. Although one-third of the amide protons are protected from exchange with the solvent, there appears to be little or no regular secondary structure. The large number of NOE's between residues separated by two and three positions in the sequence indicates that the protein contains a large number of tightly packed loops. Along with the sequential assignments, this paper also discusses the construction and use of computerized data bases for manipulating NMR results. A strategy for computer-assisted sequential resonance using these data bases is also presented.

  18. Complete (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift assignments of mono-, di-, and trisaccharides as basis for NMR chemical shift predictions of polysaccharides using the computer program casper.

    PubMed

    Roslund, Mattias U; Säwén, Elin; Landström, Jens; Rönnols, Jerk; Jonsson, K Hanna M; Lundborg, Magnus; Svensson, Mona V; Widmalm, Göran

    2011-08-16

    The computer program casper uses (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data of mono- to trisaccharides for the prediction of chemical shifts of oligo- and polysaccharides. In order to improve the quality of these predictions the (1)H and (13)C, as well as (31)P when applicable, NMR chemical shifts of 30 mono-, di-, and trisaccharides were assigned. The reducing sugars gave two distinct sets of NMR resonances due to the α- and β-anomeric forms. In total 35 (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data sets were obtained from the oligosaccharides. One- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were used for the chemical shift assignments and special techniques were employed in some cases such as 2D (1)H,(13)C-HSQC Hadamard Transform methodology which was acquired approximately 45 times faster than a regular t(1) incremented (1)H,(13)C-HSQC experiment and a 1D (1)H,(1)H-CSSF-TOCSY experiment which was able to distinguish spin-systems in which the target protons were only 3.3Hz apart. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts were subsequently refined using total line-shape analysis with the PERCH NMR software. The acquired NMR data were then utilized in the casper program (http://www.casper.organ.su.se/casper/) for NMR chemical shift predictions of the O-antigen polysaccharides from Klebsiella O5, Shigella flexneri serotype X, and Salmonella arizonae O62. The data were compared to experimental data of the polysaccharides from the two former strains and the lipopolysaccharide of the latter strain showing excellent agreement between predicted and experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

  19. Studies of nitrogen metabolism using /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy. 3. Synthesis of DL-(3-/sup 13/C,2-/sup 15/N)Lysine and its incorporation into streptothricin F/sup 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, S.J.; Thiruvengadam, T.K.

    1981-11-04

    A scheme for the synthesis of DL-(3-/sup 13/C, 2-/sup 15/N)Lysine, I, is presented. Data are also reported to show that the mutase reaction occurring in the biosynthesis of I occurs with an intramolecular migration of nitrogen from C-2 to C-3. (BLM)

  20. Fragment Assembly Approach Based on Graph/Network Theory with Quantum Chemistry Verifications for Assigning Multidimensional NMR Signals in Metabolite Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kengo; Tsutsumi, Yu; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-15

    The abundant observation of chemical fragment information for molecular complexities is a major advantage of biological NMR analysis. Thus, the development of a novel technique for NMR signal assignment and metabolite identification may offer new possibilities for exploring molecular complexities. We propose a new signal assignment approach for metabolite mixtures by assembling H-H, H-C, C-C, and Q-C fragmental information obtained by multidimensional NMR, followed by the application of graph and network theory. High-speed experiments and complete automatic signal assignments were achieved for 12 combined mixtures of (13)C-labeled standards. Application to a (13)C-labeled seaweed extract showed 66 H-C, 60 H-H, 326 C-C, and 28 Q-C correlations, which were successfully assembled to 18 metabolites by the automatic assignment. The validity of automatic assignment was supported by quantum chemical calculations. This new approach can predict entire metabolite structures from peak networks of biological extracts.

  1. The infrared, Raman, NMR and UV spectra, ab initio calculations and spectral assignments of 2-amino-4-chloro-6-methoxypyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinar, Z.; Karabacak, M.; Cinar, M.; Kurt, M.; Chinna babu, P.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2013-12-01

    The 2-amino-4-chloro-6-methoxypyrimidine abbreviated as ACMP have been investigated by both the experimental and theoretical methods; through this work we provide the essential fact about the structural and vibrational insights. The optimized molecular structure, atomic charges, vibrational frequencies and ultraviolet spectral interpretation of ACMP have been studied by performing DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(df,pd) level of theory. The FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. The UV absorption spectrum of the compound that dissolved in ethanol and water solution were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm. The scaled wavenumbers are compared with the experimental values. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. Based on the UV spectrum and TD-DFT calculations, the electronic structure and the assignments of the absorption bands were carried out. The 1H, 13C and DEPT 135 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using with the Gauge Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) analysis were investigated using theoretical calculations.

  2. Facilitating unambiguous NMR assignments and enabling higher probe density through selective labeling of all methyl containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Frank, Andreas O; Ruggiu, Fiorella; Mamo, Mulugeta; Lingel, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The deuteration of proteins and selective labeling of side chain methyl groups has greatly enhanced the molecular weight range of proteins and protein complexes which can be studied using solution NMR spectroscopy. Protocols for the selective labeling of all six methyl group containing amino acids individually are available, however to date, only a maximum of five amino acids have been labeled simultaneously. Here, we describe a new methodology for the simultaneous, selective labeling of all six methyl containing amino acids using the 115 kDa homohexameric enzyme CoaD from E. coli as a model system. The utility of the labeling protocol is demonstrated by efficiently and unambiguously assigning all methyl groups in the enzymatic active site using a single 4D (13)C-resolved HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment, in conjunction with a crystal structure. Furthermore, the six fold labeled protein was employed to characterize the interaction between the substrate analogue (R)-pantetheine and CoaD by chemical shift perturbations, demonstrating the benefit of the increased probe density. PMID:27130242

  3. 13C-13C and 15N-13C correlation spectroscopy of membrane-associated and uniformly labeled human immunodeficiency virus and influenza fusion peptides: Amino acid-type assignments and evidence for multiple conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, Michele L.; Gabrys, Charles M.; Struppe, Jochem O.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-02-01

    Many viruses which cause disease including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza are "enveloped" by a membrane and infection of a host cell begins with joining or "fusion" of the viral and target cell membranes. Fusion is catalyzed by viral proteins in the viral membrane. For HIV and for the influenza virus, these fusion proteins contain an ˜20-residue apolar "fusion peptide" that binds to target cell membranes and plays a critical role in fusion. For this study, the HIV fusion peptide (HFP) and influenza virus fusion peptide (IFP) were chemically synthesized with uniform C13, N15 labeling over large contiguous regions of amino acids. Two-dimensional C13-C13 and N15-C13 spectra were obtained for the membrane-bound fusion peptides and an amino acid-type C13 assignment was obtained for the labeled residues in HFP and IFP. The membrane used for the HFP sample had a lipid headgroup and cholesterol composition comparable to that of host cells of the virus, and the C13 chemical shifts were more consistent with β strand conformation than with helical conformation. The membrane used for the IFP sample did not contain cholesterol, and the chemical shifts of the dominant peaks were more consistent with helical conformation than with β strand conformation. There were additional peaks in the IFP spectrum whose shifts were not consistent with helical conformation. An unambiguous C13 and N15 assignment was obtained in an HFP sample with more selective labeling, and two shifts were identified for the Leu-9 CO, Gly-10 N, and Gly-10 Cα nuclei. These sets of two shifts may indicate two β strand registries such as parallel and antiparallel. Although most spectra were obtained on a 9.4T instrument, one C13-C13 correlation spectrum was obtained on a 16.4T instrument and was better resolved than the comparable 9.4T spectrum. More selective labeling and higher field may, therefore, be approaches to obtaining unambiguous assignments for membrane-associated fusion peptides.

  4. 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of pyrolyzed metal-polyaniline cathode catalysts for oxygen reduction in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Shigeki; Hosaka, Yo; Yamauchi, Chiharu; Nagata, Shinsuke; Sonoda, Mayu

    2015-09-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of pyrolyzed metal-free and metal (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu)-containing polyaniline (PANI) in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) was studied. The metal-free PANI800 shows quite poor ORR catalytic activity, whilst the metal-containing PANIMe800 display a better ORR activity. The 15N CP/MAS NMR spectra of PANINi800 and PANICu800 show one weak peak at 118 ppm and there is no peak observed in PANIFe800, against that of PANI800, PANIMn800, PANICo800 and PANINi800 show two peaks at 273 and 118 ppm assigned to the pyridinic and pyridinium nitrogens. It is because of the paramagnetic effect of metal ions. The 15N spin-echo NMR spectra of PANIMe800 with fast recycle delay show the peaks at 140 and 270 ppm assigned to the graphitic and pyridinic nitrogens, against that of PANI800 shows no peak. The spectra of PANIMn800, PANICo800, PANINi800 and PANICu600 also contain a very broaden peak at 430 ppm assigned to the nitrogen with Fermi-contact effect from metal ions. The spectra of PANIFe800 show some spinning side bands and the average Fe3+-15N distance can be calculated. The some amount of iron ion are relieved and average Fe3+-15N distance increase after acid washing and the ORR activity decreases.

  5. 13C-NMR of ribosyl A-A-A, A-A-G, and A-U-G. Synthesis and assignment.

    PubMed

    Stone, M P; Winkle, S A; McFarland, G D; Yoo, M C; Borer, P N

    1985-11-01

    The three RNA trinucleotides; ApApA, ApApG, and ApUpG, have been synthesized in sufficient quantity to obtain natural abundance 13C(1H)-NMR spectra at strand concentrations between 4 and 100 mM. Comparisons between 70 degrees C spectra of the three trimers and their consistuent dimers ApA, ApG, ApU, and UpG allow secure assignments to be made for most of the resonances. This paper describes the syntheses and 13C assignments of the oligomers.

  6. Assignment of the sup 1 H NMR spectrum and secondary structure elucidation of the single-stranded DNA binding protein encoded by the filamentous bacteriophage IKe

    SciTech Connect

    van Duynhoven, J.P.M.; Folkers, P.J.M.; Prinse, C.W.J.M.; Harmsen, B.J.M.; Konings, R.N.H.; Hilbers, C.W. )

    1992-02-04

    By means of 2D NMR techniques, all backbone resonances in the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the single-stranded DNA binding protein encoded by gene V of the filamentous phage IKe have been assigned sequence specifically. In addition, a major part of the side chain resonances could be assigned as well. Analysis of NOESY data permitted the elucidation of the secondary structure of IKe gene V protein. The major part of the secondary structure is present as an antiparallel {beta}-sheet, i.e., as two {beta}-loops which partly combine into a triple-stranded {beta}-sheet structure, one {beta}-loop and one triple-stranded {beta}-sheet structure. It is shown that a high degree of homology exists with the single-stranded DNA binding protein encoded by gene V of the distantly related filamentous phase M13.

  7. Proton NMR sequential resonance assignments, secondary structure, and global fold in solution of the major (trans-Pro43) form of bovine calbindin D sub 9k

    SciTech Connect

    Koerdel, J.; Forsen, S.; Chazin, W.J. )

    1989-08-22

    A wide range of two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR experiments have been used to completely assign the 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of recombinant Ca{sup 2+}-saturated bovine calbindin D{sub 9k}. In solution, calbindin D{sub 9k} exists as an equilibrium mixture of isoforms with trans (75%) and cis (25%) isomers of the peptide bond at Pro43 which results in two sets of {sup 1}H NMR signals from approximately half of the amino acids. The complete {sup 1}H NMR assignments for the major, trans-pro43 isoform are presented here. By use of an integrated strategy for spin system identification, 62 of the 76 spin systems could be assigned to the appropriate residue type. Sequence-specific assignments were then obtained by the standard method. Secondary structure elements were identified on the basis of networks of sequential and medium-range nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} spin coupling constants, and the location of slowly exchanging amide protons. Four helical segments and a short {beta}-sheet between the two calcium binding loops are found. These elements of secondary structure and a few additional long-range NOEs provide the global fold. Good agreement is found between the solution and crystal structures of the minor A form of bovine calbindin D{sub 9k} and between the solution structures of the minor A form of bovine calbindin D{sub 9k} and intact porcine calbindin D{sub 9k}.

  8. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for 6-demethylvermistatin and two penicillide derivatives from the mangrove fungus Guignardia sp. (No. 4382) from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue-Kui; Liu, Fan; She, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Li-Guo; Li, Meng-Feng; Vrijmoed, L L P; Lin, Yong-Cheng

    2008-07-01

    One new compound 6-demethylvermistatin (1), together with two known compounds, the penicillide derivatives (2) and (3) were isolated from the mangrove fungus Guignardia sp. No. 4382 obtained from the South China Sea. Their structures were assigned using high-resolution electron ionization mass spectrometry(HREIMS), (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, DEPT, and by 2D COSY, HMQC, and HMBC experiments. The absolute configuration of 1 was established by comparison of its CD with that of vermistatin.

  9. sup 1 H NMR studies of plastocyanin from Scenedesmus obliquus: Complete sequence-specific assignment, secondary structure analysis, and global fold

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.M.; Chazin, W.J.; Wright, P.E. ); Powls, R. )

    1988-10-04

    Two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR methods have been used to make sequence-specific resonance assignments for the 97 amino acid residues of the plastocyanin from the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. Assignments were obtained for all backbone protons and the majority of the side-chain protons. Spin system identification relied heavily on the observation of relayed connectivities to the backbone amide proton. Sequence-specific assignments were made by using the sequential assignment procedure. During this process, an extra valine residue was identified that had not been detected in the original amino acid sequence. Elements of regular secondary structure were identified from characteristic NOE connectivities between backbone protons, coupling constant values, and the observation of slowly exchanging amide protons. The protein in solution contains eight {beta}-strands, one short segment of helix, five reverse turns, and five loops. The {beta}-strands may be arranged into two {beta}sheets on the basis of extensive cross-strand NOE connectivities. The chain-folding topology determined from the NMR experiments is that of a Greek key {beta}-barrel and is similar to that observed for French bean plastocyanin in solution and poplar plastocyanin in the crystalline state. While the overall structures are similar, several differences in local structure between the S. obliquus and higher plant plastocyanins have been identified.

  10. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  11. A 3D Time-Shared NOESY Experiment Designed to Provide Optimal Resolution for Accurate Assignment of NMR Distance Restraints in Large Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Subrata H; Harden, Bradley J

    2014-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by solution NMR has become an established method, but challenges increase steeply with the size of proteins. Notably spectral crowding and signal overlap impair the analysis of cross-peaks in NOESY spectra that provide distance restraints for structural models. An optimal spectral resolution can alleviate overlap but requires prohibitively long experimental time with existing methods. Here we present a time-shared 3D experiment optimized for large proteins that provides 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra in a single measurement. NOESY correlations appear in the detected dimension and hence benefit from the highest resolution achievable of all dimensions without increase in experimental time. By design, this experiment is inherently optimal for non-uniform sampling acquisition when compared to current alternatives. Thus, 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra with ultra-high resolution in all dimensions were acquired in parallel within about 4 days instead of 80 days for a 52 kDa monomeric protein at a concentration of 350 μM. PMID:25381567

  12. Using MUSIC and CC(CO)NH for backbone assignment of two medium-sized proteins not fully accessible to standard 3D NMR.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Annette K; Frøystein, Nils Åge

    2014-01-01

    The backbone assignment of medium-sized proteins is rarely as straightforward as that of small proteins, and thus often requires creative solutions. Here, we describe the application of a combination of standard 3D heteronuclear methods with CC(CO)NH and a variety of MUltiplicity Selective In-phase Coherence transfer (MUSIC) experiments. Both CC(CO)NH and MUSIC are, in theory, very powerful methods for the backbone assignment of proteins. Due to low sensitivity, their use has usually been linked to small proteins only. However, we found that combining CC(CO)NH and MUSIC experiments simplified the assignment of two challenging medium-sized proteins of 13 and 19.5 kDa, respectively. These methods are to some extent complementary to each other: CC(CO)NH acquired with a long isotropic mixing time can identify amino acids with large aliphatic side chains. Whereas the most sensitive MUSIC experiments identify amino acid types that cannot be detected by CC(CO)NH, comprising the residues with acid and amide groups, and aromatic rings in their side chains. Together these methods provide a means of identifying the majority of peaks in the 2D 15N HSQC spectrum which simplifies the backbone assignment work even for proteins, e.g., small kinases, whose standard spectra resulted in little spectral resolution and low signal intensities.

  13. Structural peculiarities of configurational isomers of 1-styrylpyrroles according to 1Н, 13С and 15N NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations: electronic and steric hindrance for planar structure.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Ushakov, Igor A; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Schmidt, Elena Yu; Dvorko, Marina Yu

    2013-06-01

    Comparative analysis of the (1)Н and (13)С NMR data for a series of the E and Z-1-styrylpyrroles, E and Z-1-(1-propenyl)pyrroles, 1-vinylpyrroles and styrene suggests that the conjugation between the unsaturated fragments in the former compounds is reduced. This is the result of the mutual influence of the donor p-π and π-π conjugation having opposite directions. According to the NMR data combined with the density functional theory calculations, the Z isomer of 1-styrylpyrrole has essentially a nonplanar structure because of the steric hindrance. However, the E isomer of 1-styrylpyrrole is also an out-of-plane structure despite the absence of a sterical barrier for the planar one. Deviation of the E isomer from the planar structure seems to be caused by an electronic hindrance produced by a mutual influence of the p-π and π-π conjugation. The structure of the E isomer of the 2-substituted 1-styrylpyrroles is similar to that of the 2-substituted 1-vinylpyrroles. The steric effects in the Z isomer of the 2-substituted 1-styrylpyrroles result in the large increase of the dihedral angle between planes of the pyrrole ring and double bond. PMID:23558848

  14. Determination of methyl 13C-15N dipolar couplings in peptides and proteins by three-dimensional and four-dimensional magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmus, Jonathan J.; Nadaud, Philippe S.; Höfer, Nicole; Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2008-02-01

    We describe three- and four-dimensional semiconstant-time transferred echo double resonance (SCT-TEDOR) magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments for the simultaneous measurement of multiple long-range N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar couplings in uniformly C13, N15-enriched peptides and proteins with high resolution and sensitivity. The methods take advantage of C13 spin topologies characteristic of the side-chain methyl groups in amino acids alanine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, threonine, and valine to encode up to three distinct frequencies (N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar coupling, N15 chemical shift, and Cmethyl13 chemical shift) within a single SCT evolution period of initial duration ˜1/JCC1 (where JCC1≈35Hz, is the one-bond Cmethyl13-C13 J-coupling) while concurrently suppressing the modulation of NMR coherences due to C13-C13 and N15-C13 J-couplings and transverse relaxation. The SCT-TEDOR schemes offer several important advantages over previous methods of this type. First, significant (approximately twofold to threefold) gains in experimental sensitivity can be realized for weak N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar couplings (corresponding to structurally interesting, ˜3.5Å or longer, distances) and typical Cmethyl13 transverse relaxation rates. Second, the entire SCT evolution period can be used for Cmethyl13 and/or N15 frequency encoding, leading to increased spectral resolution with minimal additional coherence decay. Third, the experiments are inherently "methyl selective," which results in simplified NMR spectra and obviates the use of frequency-selective pulses or other spectral filtering techniques. Finally, the N15-C13 cross-peak buildup trajectories are purely dipolar in nature (i.e., not influenced by J-couplings or relaxation), which enables the straightforward extraction of N15-Cmethyl13 distances using an analytical model. The SCT-TEDOR experiments are demonstrated on a uniformly C13, N15-labeled peptide, N-acetyl-valine, and a 56

  15. Assignment of phycocyanobilin in HMPT using triple resonance experiments.

    PubMed

    Röben, Marco; Schmieder, Peter

    2011-09-01

    A complete assignment of all resonances of a small organic molecule is a prerequisite for a structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. This is conventionally obtained using a well-established strategy based on COSY, HMQC and HMBC spectra. In case of phycocyanobilin (PCB) in HMPT this strategy was unsuccessful due to the symmetry of the molecule and extreme signal overlap. Since (13)C and (15)N labeled material was available, an alternative strategy for resonance assignment was used. Triple resonance experiments derived from experiments conventionally performed for proteins are sensitive and easy to analyze. Their application led to a complete and unambiguous assignment using three types of experiments. PMID:21815209

  16. Facilitating quality control for spectra assignments of small organic molecules: nmrshiftdb2--a free in-house NMR database with integrated LIMS for academic service laboratories.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Stefan; Schlörer, Nils E

    2015-08-01

    nmrshiftdb2 supports with its laboratory information management system the integration of an electronic lab administration and management into academic NMR facilities. Also, it offers the setup of a local database, while full access to nmrshiftdb2's World Wide Web database is granted. This freely available system allows on the one hand the submission of orders for measurement, transfers recorded data automatically or manually, and enables download of spectra via web interface, as well as the integrated access to prediction, search, and assignment tools of the NMR database for lab users. On the other hand, for the staff and lab administration, flow of all orders can be supervised; administrative tools also include user and hardware management, a statistic functionality for accounting purposes, and a 'QuickCheck' function for assignment control, to facilitate quality control of assignments submitted to the (local) database. Laboratory information management system and database are based on a web interface as front end and are therefore independent of the operating system in use. PMID:25998807

  17. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of three new polyhydroxylated sterols from the South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shu-Hua; Zhang, Si; Wang, Yi-Fei; Li, Ming-Yi

    2007-12-01

    Three new polyhydroxylated sterols, 3beta,6alpha,11,20beta,24-pentahydroxy- 9,11-seco-5alpha-24-ethylcholest-7,28-diene-9-one (1), 3-(1',2'-ethandiol)-24- methylcholest-8(9),22E-diene-3beta,5alpha,6alpha,7alpha,11alpha-pentaol (2), 24-methylcholest-7,22 E-diene-3beta,5alpha,6beta,25-tetraol (3) together with five known sterols, were isolated from the EtOH/CH2Cl2 extract of the South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa. The complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for these new compounds were achieved by means of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, including HSQC, HMBC, 1H--1H COSY, and NOESY spectra.

  18. (1) H and (13) C NMR spectral assignment of N,N'-disubstituted thiourea and urea derivatives active against nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Chayah, Mariem; Camacho, M Encarnación; Carrión, M Dora; Gallo, Miguel A

    2016-10-01

    The (1) H and (13) C NMR resonances of seventeen N-alkyl and aryl-N'-[3-hydroxy-3-(2-nitro-5-substitutedphenyl)propyl]-thioureas and ureas (1-17), and seventeen N-alkyl or aryl-N'-[3-(2-amino-5-substitutedphenyl)-3-hydroxypropyl]-thioureas and ureas (18-34), designed as NOS inhibitors, were assigned completely using the concerted application of one- and two-dimensional experiments (DEPT, HSQC and HMBC). NOESY studies confirm the preferred conformation of these compounds. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shift Assignments and Conformational Analysis for the Two Diastereomers of the Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Inhibitor Brodifacoum

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Cho, Herman M.

    2009-10-01

    Proton and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments and 1H-1H scalar couplings for the two diastereomers of the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) inhibitor brodifacoum have been determined from acetone solutions containing both diastereomers. Data were obtained from homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra acquired at 1H frequencies of 750 and 900 MHz over a 268-303 K temperature range. Conformations inferred from scalar coupling and 1-D NOE measurements exhibit large differences between the diastereomers. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  20. Toward hyperpolarized molecular imaging of HIV: synthesis and longitudinal relaxation properties of 15N-Azidothymidine

    PubMed Central

    Shchepin, Roman V.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Previously unreported 15N labeled Azidothymidine (AZT) was prepared as an equimolar mixture of two isotopomers: 1-15N-AZT and 3-15N-AZT. Polarization decay of 15N NMR signal was studied in high (9.4 T) and low (~50 mT) magnetic fields. 15N T1 values were 45 ± 5 s (1-15N-AZT) and 37 ± 2 s (3-15N-AZT) at 9.4 T, and 140 ± 16 s (3-15N-AZT) at 50 mT. 15N-AZT can be potentially 15N hyperpolarized by several methods. These sufficiently long 15N-AZT T1 values potentially enable hyperpolarized in vivo imaging of 15N-AZT, because of the known favorable efficient (i.e., of the time scale shorter than the longest reported here 15N T1) kinetics of uptake of injected AZT. Therefore, 3-15N-AZT can be potentially used for HIV molecular imaging using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25156931

  1. AutoLink: Automated sequential resonance assignment of biopolymers from NMR data by relative-hypothesis-prioritization-based simulated logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, James E.; Keller, Rochus

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a new computer algorithm for determining the backbone resonance assignments for biopolymers. The approach we have taken, relative hypothesis prioritization, is implemented as a Lua program interfaced to the recently developed computer-aided resonance assignment (CARA) program. Our program can work with virtually any spectrum type, and is especially good with NOESY data. The results of the program are displayed in an easy-to-read, color-coded, graphic representation, allowing users to assess the quality of the results in minutes. Here we report the application of the program to two RNA recognition motifs of Apobec-1 Complementation Factor. The assignment of these domains demonstrates AutoLink's ability to deliver accurate resonance assignments from very minimal data and with minimal user intervention.

  2. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2015-08-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases (15)N-(1)H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  3. Two-dimensional NMR studies of squash family inhibitors. Sequence-specific proton assignments and secondary structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III

    SciTech Connect

    Krisnamoorthi, R.; Yuxi Gong; Chanlan Sun Lin ); VanderVelde, D. )

    1992-01-28

    The solution structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III*) was investigated by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. CMTI-III*, prepared by reacting CMTI-III with trypsin which cleaved the Arg5-Ile6 peptide bond, had the two fragments held together by a disulfide linkage. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H NMR resonance assignments were made for all the 29 amino acid residues of the protein. The secondary structure of CMTI-III*, as deduced from NOESY cross peaks and identification of slowly exchanging hydrogens, contains two turns, a 3{sub 10}-helix, and a triple-stranded {beta}-sheet. Sequential proton assignments were also made for the virgin inhibitor, CMTI-III, at pH 4.71, 30C. Comparison of backbone hydrogen chemical shifts of CMTI-III and CMTI-III* revealed significant changes for residues located far away from the reactive-site region as well as for those located near it, indicating tertiary structural changes that are transmitted through most of the 29 residues of the inhibitor protein. These chemical shift changes were relatively small compared to changes that occurred upon hydrolysis of the reactive-site peptide bond between Arg 5 and Ile6 in CMTI-III.

  4. DFT-GIAO(1)H NMR chemical shifts prediction for the spectral assignment and conformational analysis of the anticholinergic drugs (-)-scopolamine and (-)-hyoscyamine.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Marcelo A; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2010-06-01

    The relatively large chemical shift differences observed in the (1)H NMR spectra of the anticholinergic drugs (-)-scopolamine 1 and (-)-hyoscyamine 2 measured in CDCl(3) are explained using a combination of systematic/molecular mechanics force field (MMFF) conformational searches and gas-phase density functional theory (DFT) single point calculations, geometry optimizations and chemical shift calculations within the gauge including/invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) approximation. These calculations show that both molecules prefer a compact conformation in which the phenyl ring of the tropic ester is positioned under the tropane bicycle, clearly suggesting that the chemical shift differences are produced by the anisotropic effect of the aromatic ring. As the calculations fairly well predict these experimental differences, diastereotopic NMR signal assignments for the two studied molecules are proposed. In addition, a cursory inspection of the published (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of different forms of 1 and 2 in solution reveals that most of them show these diastereotopic chemical shift differences, strongly suggesting a preference for the compact conformation quite independent of the organic or aqueous nature of the solvent.

  5. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of site-specific isotopically labeled nucleotides for use in NMR resonance assignment, dynamics and structural characterizations

    PubMed Central

    Longhini, Andrew P.; LeBlanc, Regan M.; Becette, Owen; Salguero, Carolina; Wunderlich, Christoph H.; Johnson, Bruce A.; D'Souza, Victoria M.; Kreutz, Christoph; Dayie, T. Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is central to NMR studies of nucleic acids. Development of methods that incorporate labels at specific atomic positions within each nucleotide promises to expand the size range of RNAs that can be studied by NMR. Using recombinantly expressed enzymes and chemically synthesized ribose and nucleobase, we have developed an inexpensive, rapid chemo-enzymatic method to label ATP and GTP site specifically and in high yields of up to 90%. We incorporated these nucleotides into RNAs with sizes ranging from 27 to 59 nucleotides using in vitro transcription: A-Site (27 nt), the iron responsive elements (29 nt), a fluoride riboswitch from Bacillus anthracis (48 nt), and a frame-shifting element from a human corona virus (59 nt). Finally, we showcase the improvement in spectral quality arising from reduced crowding and narrowed linewidths, and accurate analysis of NMR relaxation dispersion (CPMG) and TROSY-based CEST experiments to measure μs-ms time scale motions, and an improved NOESY strategy for resonance assignment. Applications of this selective labeling technology promises to reduce difficulties associated with chemical shift overlap and rapid signal decay that have made it challenging to study the structure and dynamics of large RNAs beyond the 50 nt median size found in the PDB. PMID:26657632

  6. 13C NMR spectra of 1,3-dipyridyl- and pyridylphenylthioureas. Chemical shift assignments and conformational implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudha, L. V.; Sathyanarayana, D. N.; Manogaran, S.

    The 13C NMR spectra of a series of 1,3-dipyridyl- and pyridylphenylthioureas have been obtained. Complete analyses of the experimental spectra have provided the chemical shifts and coupling constants. The spectra of dipyridylthioureas over a temperature range showed important changes which could be attributed to an intramolecular conversion between the two equivalent E,Z and Z,E conformations. The coalescence temperature of the 13C signals leads to a Δ G* of ˜ 58.0 kJ mol -1 for the dynamic process involved. The results show that pyridylphenyl thioureas exist in a single conformation at ambient temperature.

  7. The “Speedy” Synthesis of Atom-Specific 15N Imino/Amido-Labeled RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Christoph; Micura, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous reports on the synthesis of atom-specific 15N-labeled nucleosides exist, fast and facile access to the corresponding phosphoramidites for RNA solid-phase synthesis is still lacking. This situation represents a severe bottleneck for NMR spectroscopic investigations on functional RNAs. Here, we present optimized procedures to speed up the synthesis of 15N(1) adenosine and 15N(1) guanosine amidites, which are the much needed counterparts of the more straightforward-to-achieve 15N(3) uridine and 15N(3) cytidine amidites in order to tap full potential of 1H/15N/15N-COSY experiments for directly monitoring individual Watson–Crick base pairs in RNA. Demonstrated for two preQ1 riboswitch systems, we exemplify a versatile concept for individual base-pair labeling in the analysis of conformationally flexible RNAs when competing structures and conformational dynamics are encountered. PMID:26237536

  8. 13C and 1H chemical shift assignments and conformation confirmation of trimedlure-Y via 2-D NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warthen, J. D.; Waters, R. M.; McGovern, T. P.

    The conformation of 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- cis-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-Y) was confirmed as 1,2,5 equatorial, axial, equatorial via 13C, 1H, APT, CSCM and COSY NMR analyses. The carbon and proton nuclei in trimedlure-Y and the previously unassigned eight cyclohexyl protons (1.50-2.60 ppm) in 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- trans-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-B 1; 1,2,5 equatorial, equatorial, equatorial) were also characterized by these methods. The effects of the 2-CH 3 in the axial or equatorial conformation upon the chemical shifts of the other nuclei in the molecule are discussed.

  9. 13C direct detected COCO-TOCSY: A tool for sequence specific assignment and structure determination in protonless NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Jiménez, Beatriz; Piccioli, Mario

    2006-10-01

    A novel experiment is proposed to provide inter-residue sequential correlations among carbonyl spins in 13C detected, protonless NMR experiments. The COCO-TOCSY experiment connects, in proteins, two carbonyls separated from each other by three, four or even five bonds. The quantitative analysis provides structural information on backbone dihedral angles ϕ as well as on the side chain dihedral angles of Asx and Glx residues. This is the first dihedral angle constraint that can be obtained via a protonless approach. About 75% of backbone carbonyls in Calbindin D 9K, a 75 aminoacid dicalcium protein, could be sequentially connected via a COCO-TOCSY spectrum. 49 3J values were measured and related to backbone ϕ angles. Structural information can be extended to the side chain orientation of aminoacids containing carbonyl groups. Additionally, long range homonuclear coupling constants, 4JCC and 5JCC, could be measured. This constitutes an unprecedented case for proteins of medium and small size.

  10. Delineation of conformational preferences in human salivary statherin by 1H, 31P NMR and CD studies: sequential assignment and structure-function correlations.

    PubMed

    Naganagowda, G A; Gururaja, T L; Levine, M J

    1998-08-01

    Membrane-induced solution structure of human salivary statherin, a 43 amino acid residue acidic phosphoprotein, has been investigated by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D 1H NMR) spectroscopy. NMR assignments and structural analysis of this phosphoprotein was accomplished by analyzing the pattern of sequential and medium range NOEs, alphaCH chemical shift perturbations and deuterium exchange measurements of the amide proton resonances. The NMR data revealed three distinct structural motifs in the molecule: (1) an alpha-helical structure at the N-terminal domain comprising Asp1-Tyr16, (2) a polyproline type II (PPII) conformation predominantly occurring at the middle proline-rich domain spanning Gly19-Gln35, and (3) a 3(10)-helical structure at the C-terminal Pro36-Phe43 sequence. Presence of a few weak dalphaN(i,i+2) NOEs suggests that N-terminus also possesses minor population of 3(10)-helical conformation. Of the three secondary structural elements, helical structure formed by the N-terminal residues, Asp1-Ile11 appears to be more rigid as observed by the relatively very slow exchange of amide hydrogens of Glu5-Ile11. 31P NMR experiments clearly indicated that N-terminal domain of statherin exists mainly in disordered state in water whereas, upon addition of structure stabilizing co-solvent, 2,2,2-trifluorethanol (TFE), it showed a strong propensity for helical conformation. Calcium ion interaction studies suggested that the disordered N-terminal region encompassing the two vicinal phosphoserines is essential for the binding of calcium ions in vivo. Results from the circular dichroism (CD) experiments were found to be consistent with and complimentary to the NMR data and provided an evidence that non-aqueous environment such as TFE, could induce the protein to fold into helical conformation. The findings that the statherin possesses blended solvent sensitive secondary structural elements and the requirement of non-structured N-terminal region

  11. NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}: Assignment of {sup 19}F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-15

    The {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shifts (δ{sub iso}) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding {sup 19}F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M{sub 4}F{sub 20}] units of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values and calculated {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shielding σ{sub iso} values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF{sub 5}. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M–F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5}, distorted multiplets, arising from {sup 1}J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the {sup 19}F and {sup 93}Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of {sup 93}Nb–{sup 19}F {sup 1}J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites. - Graphical abstract: The complete assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} allow establishing relationships between the {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values, the nature of the fluorine atoms

  12. High resolution 2D-NMR studies indicating complete assignments and conformational characteristics of the NF-kappa B binding enhancer element of HIV-LTR.

    PubMed

    Singh, M P; Fregeau, N L; Pon, R T; Lown, J W

    1995-10-01

    The asymmetrical DNA duplex [5'd(AAGGGACTTTCC)].[5'-d(GGAAAGTCCCTT)] has been studied by one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques. The sequence is comprised of the actual 10 base-pair long binding site for the transcription factor NF-kappa B in the enhancer sequence of the long term repeat (LTR) region of HIV and SIV types of retroviruses associated with the AIDS syndrome. Two additional A.T base-pairs are also included on one end for an added interest in the 12-bp duplex sequence with a pseudo dyad-symmetric disposition of the oligopurine and oligopyrimidine segments, as it appears in the HIV-1 genome. Phase-sensitive two-dimensional spectra (NOESY, ROESY, COSY and TOCSY) were obtained at three different temperatures (5, 15 and 25 degrees C) for a complete assignment of the non-exchangeable protons by tracing through sequence specific intra- and internucleotide connectivities. 2D-NOESY spectra were also acquired in aqueous (90% H2O-D2O) solutions, with two different methods of water signal suppression, to assign the exchangeable protons from specific NOE correlations. Adenine H2 protons were assigned by the use of NOE correlations and from T1 relaxation time measurements. The general spectral features and semi-quantitative interproton distance estimates indicate a B-DNA type conformation. However, some distinctly unusual features associated with the nucleotides at and immediately adjacent to both the 5'-and 3'-ends of AAA/TTT and GGG/CCC segments were noted. The complete assignments, and the observed characteristics, will be of significant value in studying the complexes of this transcriptionally active DNA domain with the protein and other rationally designed DNA binding agents.

  13. Comparative 2D NMR studies of human insulin and des-pentapeptide insulin: Sequential resonance assignment and implications for protein dynamics and receptor recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Qingxin ); Weiss, M.A. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1991-06-04

    The solution structure and dynamics of human insulin are ivestigated by 2D {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy in reference to a previously analyzed analogue, des-pentapeptide (B26-B30) insulin. This spectroscopic comparison is of interest since (i) the structure of the C-terminal region of the B-chain has not been determined in the monomeric state and (ii) the role of this region in binding to the insulin receptor has been the subject of long-standing speculation. The present NMR studies are conducted in the presence of an organic cosolvent (20% acetic acid), under which conditions both proteins are monomeric and stably folded. Complete sequential assignment of human insulin is obtained and leads to the following conclusions. (1) The secondary structure of the insulin monomer (three {alpha}-helices and B-chain {beta}-turn) is similar to that observed in the 2-Zn crustal state. (2) The folding of DPI is essentially the same as the corresponding portion of intact insulin, in accord with the similarities between their respective crystal structues. (3) residues B24-B28 adopt an extended configuration in the monomer and pack against the hydrophobic core as in crystallographic dimers; residues B29 and B30 are largely disordered. (4) The insulin fold is shown to provide a model for collective motions in a protein with implications for the mechanism of protein-protein recognition. To their knowledge, this paper describes the first detailed analysis of a protein NMR spectrum under conditions of extensive conformational broadening.

  14. Assignment of selected hyperfine proton NMR resonances in the met forms of Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and comparisons with sperm whale metmyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.; Pandey, R.K.; Leung, H.K.; Smith, K.M.

    1988-04-19

    This work indicates a high degree of purity for our preparations of all three of the primary Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and details assignments of the heme methyl and vinyl protons in the hyperfine shift region of the ferric (aquo.) protein forms. The assignments were carried out by reconstituting the apoproteins of each component with selectively deuteriated hemes. The results indicate that even though the individual component preparations consist of essentially a single protein, the proton NMR spectra indicate spectroscopic heterogeneity. Evidence is presented for identification and classification of major and minor protein forms that are present in solutions of each component. Finally, in contrast to previous results, a detailed analysis of the proton hyperfine shift patterns of the major and minor forms of each component, in comparison to the major and minor forms of metmyoglobin, leads to the conclusions that the corresponding forms of the proteins from each species have strikingly similar heme-globin contacts and display nearly identical heme electronic structures and coordination numbers.

  15. CH3-specific NMR assignment of alanine, isoleucine, leucine and valine methyl groups in high molecular weight proteins using a single sample.

    PubMed

    Kerfah, Rime; Hamelin, Olivier; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Marion, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    A new strategy for the NMR assignment of aliphatic side-chains in large perdeuterated proteins is proposed. It involves an alternative isotopic labeling protocol, the use of an out-and-back (13)C-(13)C TOCSY experiment ((H)C-TOCSY-C-TOCSY-(C)H) and an optimized non-uniform sampling protocol. It has long been known that the non-linearity of an aliphatic spin-system (for example Ile, Val, or Leu) substantially compromises the efficiency of the TOCSY transfers. To permit the use of this efficient pulse scheme, a series of optimized precursors were designed to yield linear (13)C perdeuterated side-chains with a single protonated CH3 group in these three residues. These precursors were added to the culture medium for incorporation into expressed proteins. For Val and Leu residues, the topologically different spin-systems introduced for the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups enable stereospecific assignment. All CH3 can be simultaneously assigned on a single sample using a TOCSY experiment. It only requires the tuning of a mixing delay and is thus more versatile than the relayed COSY experiment. Enhanced resolution and sensi-tivity can be achieved by non-uniform sampling combined with the removal of the large JCC coupling by deconvolution prior to the processing by iterative soft thresholding. This strategy has been used on malate synthase G where a large percentage of the CH3 groups could be correlated directly up to the backbone Ca. It is anticipated that this robust combined strategy can be routinely applied to large proteins.

  16. Computer assignment of the backbone resonances of labelled proteins using two-dimensional correlation experiments.

    PubMed

    Morelle, N; Brutscher, B; Simorre, J P; Marion, D

    1995-02-01

    We present ALPS (Assignment for Labelled Protein Spectra), a flexible computer program for the automatic assignment of backbone NMR resonances of (15)N/(13)C-labelled proteins. The program constructs pseudoresidues from peak-picking lists of a set of two-dimensional triple resonance experiments and uses either a systematic search or a simulated annealing-based optimization to perform the assignment. This method has been successfully tested on two-dimensional triple resonance spectra of Rhodobacter capsulatus ferrocytochrome c (2) (116 amino acids).

  17. Infrared, Raman and NMR spectral analysis, vibrational assignments, normal coordinate analysis, and quantum mechanical calculations of 2-Amino-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Ahmed E.; Abuelela, Ahmed M.; Zoghaieb, Wajdi M.; Mohamed, Tarek A.

    2016-01-01

    Raman (3500-55 cm-1) and infrared (4000-300 cm-1) spectra of 2-Amino-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole (AET; C4H7N3S) have been recorded in the solid phase. In addition, the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of AET were obtained in DMSO-d6. As a result of internal rotations of either methyl and/or ethyl groups around the C-C bonds with NH2 moiety being planar (sp2) and/or non-planar (sp3) eight structures are theoretically proposed (1-8). The conformational energies and vibrational frequencies have been calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the methods of B3LYP and B3PW91 utilizing 6-31G (d) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. And then S-4 (the only conformer with real frequencies) was optimized, to yield S-9, however the Thiadiazole ring slightly twisted (tilt angle is 0.9°). The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were also predicted using a GIAO approximation at 6-311++G(d,p) basis set utilizing B3LYP and B3PW91 methods with solvent effects using PCM method. The computational outcomes favor S-9; the methyl group being staggered to the lone pair of N4 and reside trans position to the S atom, whereas NH2 is non-planar in good agreement with the current study. Aided by the above mentioned DFT computations, a complete vibrational assignment of the observed infrared and Raman bands along with NMR chemical shifts has been proposed. The vibrational interpretations have been supported by normal coordinate analysis and potential energy distributions (PEDs). Finally, NH2, CH3 and C2H5 barriers to internal rotations were carried out using B3LYP/6-31G(d) optimized structural parameters (S-9). The results are reported herein and compared with X-ray structural parameters.

  18. Proton NMR studies of bovine and porcine phospholipase A sub 2 : Assignment of aromatic resonances and evidence for a conformational equilibrium in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.; Primrose, W.U.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Dekker, N.; Boelens, R.; Kaptein, R.; Slotboom, A.J. )

    1989-07-11

    Bovine and porcine pancreatic phospholipases A{sub 2}, and porcine isophospholipase A{sub 2}, have been investigated by one- and two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. Resonances have been assigned for 20-26 residues in each enzyme, including all the aromatic residues, by a strategy based on the semiquantitative comparison of proximity relationships deduced from NOE experiments with those seen in the crystal structure. NOE experiments indicate that the loop comprising residues 59-70, which has a different conformation in the crystal structures of the bovine and porcine enzymes, has the same conformation in these two enzymes in solution. Selective changes in the line width of a limited number of resonances as a function of pH, temperature, and calcium concentration provide evidence for a local conformational equilibrium. This equilibrium involves a limited region of the protein structure around residues 25, 41, 106, and 111; it has been identified in the bovine enzyme and porcine isoenzyme but is not apparent in the porcine enzyme.

  19. Solid-state NMR studies of theophylline co-crystals with dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Sokal, Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-11-01

    In this work, three polycrystalline materials containing co-crystals of theophylline with malonic, maleic, and glutaric acids were studied using (13)C, (15)N and (1)H solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The NMR assignments were supported by gauge including projector augmented waves (GIPAW) calculations of chemical shielding, performed using X-ray determined geometry. The experimental (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR results and the calculated isotropic chemical shifts were in excellent agreement. A rapid and convenient method for theophylline co-crystals crystal structure analysis has been proposed for co-crystals, which are potentially new APIs.

  20. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C and 15N chemical shifts of intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded enaminocarbonyl derivatives of Meldrum’s and Tetronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Saif; Zhang, Wei; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-07-01

    Secondary deuterium isotope effects on 13C and 15N nuclear shieldings in a series of cyclic enamino-diesters and enamino-esters and acyclic enaminones and enamino-esters have been examined and analysed using NMR and DFT (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)) methods. One-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra of enaminocarbonyl and their deuterated analogues were recorded in CDCl 3 and CD 2Cl 2 at variable temperatures and assigned. 1JNH coupling constants for the derivatives of Meldrum's and tetronic acids reveal that they exist at the NH-form. It was demonstrated that deuterium isotope effects, for the hydrogen bonded compounds, due to the deuterium substitution at the nitrogen nucleus lead to large one-bond isotope effects at nitrogen, 1Δ 15N(D), and two-bond isotope effects on carbon nuclei, 2ΔC(ND), respectively. A linear correlations exist between 2ΔC(ND) and 1Δ 15N(D) whereas the correlation with δNH is divided into two. A good agreement between the experimentally observed 2ΔC(ND) and calculated dσ 13C/dR NH was obtained. A very good correlation between calculated NH bond lengths and observed NH chemical shifts is found. The observed isotope effects are shown to depend strongly on Resonance Assisted Hydrogen bonding.

  1. Measurement of multiple psi torsion angles in uniformly 13C,15N-labeled alpha-spectrin SH3 domain using 3D 15N-13C-13C-15N MAS dipolar-chemical shift correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Jaroniec, Christopher P; Diehl, Annette; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Griffin, Robert G

    2003-06-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous measurement of several backbone torsion angles psi in the uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled alpha-Spectrin SH3 domain using two different 3D 15N-13C-13C-15N dipolar-chemical shift magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments. The first NCCN experiment utilizes double quantum (DQ) spectroscopy combined with the INADEQUATE type 13C-13C chemical shift correlation. The decay of the DQ coherences formed between 13C'(i) and 13C(alphai) spin pairs is determined by the "correlated" dipolar field due to 15N(i)-13C(alphai) and 13C'(i)-15N(i+1) dipolar couplings and is particularly sensitive to variations of the torsion angle in the regime |psi| > 140 degrees. However, the ability of this experiment to constrain multiple psi-torsion angles is limited by the resolution of the 13C(alpha)-(13)CO correlation spectrum. This problem is partially addressed in the second approach described here, which is an NCOCA NCCN experiment. In this case the resolution is enhanced by the superior spectral dispersion of the 15N resonances present in the 15N(i+1)-13C(alphai) part of the NCOCA chemical shift correlation spectrum. For the case of the 62-residue alpha-spectrin SH3 domain, we determined 13 psi angle constraints with the INADEQUATE NCCN experiment and 22 psi constraints were measured in the NCOCA NCCN experiment.

  2. Protein structure elucidation from minimal NMR data: the CLOUDS approach.

    PubMed

    Grishaev, Alexander; Llinás, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    In this chapter we review automated methods of protein NMR data analysis and expand on the assignment-independent CLOUDS approach. As presented, given a set of reliable NOEs it is feasible to derive a spatial H-atom distribution that provides a low-resolution image of the protein structure. In order to generate such a list of unambiguous NOEs, a probabilistic assessment of the NOE identities (in terms of frequency-labeled H-atom sources) was developed on the basis of Bayesian inference. The methodology, encompassing programs SPI and BACUS, provides a list of "clean" NOEs that does not hinge on prior knowledge of sequence-specific resonance assignments or a preliminary structural model. As such, the combined SPI/BACUS approach, intrinsically adaptable to include 13C- and/or 15N-edited experiments, affords a useful tool for the analysis of NMR data irrespective of whether the adopted structure calculation protocol is assignment-dependent.

  3. Multinuclear magnetic resonance studies of the 2Fe-2S sup * ferredoxin from Anabaena species strain PCC 7120. 2. Sequence-specific carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 resonance assignments of the oxidized form

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byung-Ha; Mooberry, E.S.; Markley, J.L. )

    1990-04-24

    Multinuclear two-dimensional NMR techniques were used to assign nearly all diamagnetic {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N resonances of the plant-type 2Fe{center dot}2S* ferredoxin from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Since a {sup 13}C spin system directed strategy had been used to identify the {sup 1}H spin systems, the sequence-specific {sup 1}H assignments also provided sequence-specific {sup 13}C assignments. Several resonances from {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C groups were assigned independently of the {sup 1}H assignments by considering the distances between these nuclei and the paramagnetic 2Fe{center dot}2S center. A {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N correlation data set was used to assign additional carbonyl carbons and to analyze overlapping regions of the {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation spectrum. Sequence-specific assignments of backbone and side-chain nitrogens were based on {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N correlations obtained from various two-dimensional NMR experiments.

  4. 6-Aminopenicillanic acid revisited: A combined solid state NMR and in silico refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Daniel Lima Marques de; San Gil, Rosane Aguiar da Silva; Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca de; Souza, Eugenio Furtado de; Borré, Leandro Bandeira; Vaiss, Viviane da Silva; Leitão, Alexandre Amaral

    2016-09-01

    13C/15N (experimental and ab initio) solid-state NMR was used to achieve an affordable way to improve hydrogen refinement of 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) structure. The lattice effect on the isotropic chemical shifts was probed by using two different magnetic shielding calculations: isolated molecules and periodic crystal structure. The electron density difference maps of optimized and non-optimized structures were calculated in order to investigate the interactions inside the 6-APA unit cell. The 13C and 15N chemical shifts assignments were unambiguously stablished. In addition, some of the literature 13C resonances ambiguities could be properly solved.

  5. An economical method for (15)N/(13)C isotopic labeling of proteins expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, E; Krishna, N R

    2001-07-01

    We report a new and cost-effective approach to prepare (15)N/(13)C labeled proteins for NMR using the Pichia pastoris expression system. Four protocols (P1 to P4) were defined and compared using recombinant Ovine interferon-tau (rOvIFN-tau). Our results demonstrate that in order to get full incorporation of (15)N and (13)C, the isotopes are not totally required during the initial growth phase of P. pastoris culture. The addition of small amounts of (15)N and (13)C compounds 6 h prior to the methanol induction phase is sufficient to obtain 99% incorporation of heavy isotopes into the protein. Our optimized protocol P4 is two-thirds less costly than the classical method using (15)N and (13)C isotopes during the entire growth phase.

  6. 1H and 13C NMR assignments of two new diaryl ethers phomopsides A and B from the mangrove endophytic fungus (ZZF08).

    PubMed

    Tao, Yiwen; Mou, Chengbo; Zeng, Xianjian; Xu, Fang; Cai, Jiwen; She, Zhigang; Zhou, Shining; Lin, Yongcheng

    2008-08-01

    Two new diaryl ethers, named phomopside A (1) and B (2), together with known excelsione (3) were isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus Phomopsis sp. (ZZF08) obtained from the South China Sea coast. The structure of 1 was elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Compounds 2 and 3 were identified by NMR spectroscopy and comparing the spectroscopic data with literature values. In addition, the plausible biogenetic path of 1, 2 and 3 is discussed.

  7. Backbone assignment and secondary structure of Rnd1, an unusual Rho family small GTPase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shufen; Mao, Xi'an; Liu, Deli; Buck, Matthias

    2013-10-01

    Rho GTPases have attracted considerable interest as signaling molecules due to their variety of functional roles in cells. Rnd1 is a relatively recently discovered Rho GTPase with no enzymatic activity against its bound GTP nucleotide, setting it apart from other family members. Research has revealed a critical role for Rnd1 not only in neurite outgrowth, dendrite development, axon guidance, but also in gastric cancer and in endothelial cells during inflammation. Structural information is crucial for understanding the mechanism that forms the basis for protein-protein interactions and functions, but until recently there were no reports of NMR studies directly on the Rnd1 protein. In this paper we report assignments for the majority of Rnd1 NMR resonances based on 2D and 3D NMR spectra. Rnd1 assignment was a challenging task, however, despite optimization strategies that have facilitated NMR studies of the protein (Cao and Buck in Small GTPase 2:295-304, 2012). Besides common triple-resonance experiments, 3D HNCA, 3D HN(CO)CA, 3D HNCO which are usually employed for sequence assignment, 3D NOESY experiments and specific labeling of 13 kinds of amino acids were also utilized to gain as many (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N resonances assignments as possible. For 170 cross peaks observed out of 183 possible mainchain N-H correlations in the (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectrum, backbone assignment was finally completed for 127 resonances. The secondary structure was then defined by chemical shifts and TALOS+ based on the assignments. The overall structure in solution compares well with that of Rnd1 in a crystal, except for two short segments, residues 77-83 and residues 127-131. Given that some features are shared among Rho GTPases, Rnd1 assignments are also compared with two other family members, Cdc42 and Rac1. The overall level of Rnd1 assignment is lower than for Cdc42 and Rac1, consistent with its lower stability and possibly increased internal dynamics. However, while the Rnd1

  8. Backbone assignment and secondary structure of Rnd1, an unusual Rho family small GTPase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shufen; Mao, Xi'an; Liu, Deli; Buck, Matthias

    2013-10-01

    Rho GTPases have attracted considerable interest as signaling molecules due to their variety of functional roles in cells. Rnd1 is a relatively recently discovered Rho GTPase with no enzymatic activity against its bound GTP nucleotide, setting it apart from other family members. Research has revealed a critical role for Rnd1 not only in neurite outgrowth, dendrite development, axon guidance, but also in gastric cancer and in endothelial cells during inflammation. Structural information is crucial for understanding the mechanism that forms the basis for protein-protein interactions and functions, but until recently there were no reports of NMR studies directly on the Rnd1 protein. In this paper we report assignments for the majority of Rnd1 NMR resonances based on 2D and 3D NMR spectra. Rnd1 assignment was a challenging task, however, despite optimization strategies that have facilitated NMR studies of the protein (Cao and Buck in Small GTPase 2:295-304, 2012). Besides common triple-resonance experiments, 3D HNCA, 3D HN(CO)CA, 3D HNCO which are usually employed for sequence assignment, 3D NOESY experiments and specific labeling of 13 kinds of amino acids were also utilized to gain as many (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N resonances assignments as possible. For 170 cross peaks observed out of 183 possible mainchain N-H correlations in the (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectrum, backbone assignment was finally completed for 127 resonances. The secondary structure was then defined by chemical shifts and TALOS+ based on the assignments. The overall structure in solution compares well with that of Rnd1 in a crystal, except for two short segments, residues 77-83 and residues 127-131. Given that some features are shared among Rho GTPases, Rnd1 assignments are also compared with two other family members, Cdc42 and Rac1. The overall level of Rnd1 assignment is lower than for Cdc42 and Rac1, consistent with its lower stability and possibly increased internal dynamics. However, while the Rnd1

  9. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N experiment to facilitate the assignment of backbone resonances in proteins exhibiting high backbone shift degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Raikwal, Nisha; Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish; Guleria, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three-dimensional NMR experiments involving amide 1H/15N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high-degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced-dimensionality (RD) experiment -(5, 3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate/validate the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide 15N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. HiNi and Hi-1Ni-1) for overlapping amide-NH peaks. The experiment -in combination with routine triple resonance 3D-NMR experiments involving backbone amide (1H/15N) and carbon (13Cα/13C‧) chemical shifts- will serve as a powerful complementary tool to achieve the nearly complete assignment of protein backbone resonances in a time efficient manner.

  10. A straightforward method for stereospecific assignment of val and leu prochiral methyl groups by solid-state NMR: Scrambling in the [2-13C]Glucose labeling scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Guohua; Faßhuber, Hannes Klaus; Loquet, Antoine; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Vijayan, Vinesh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2013-03-01

    The unambiguous stereospecific assignment of the prochiral methyl groups in Val and Leu plays an important role in the structural investigation of proteins by NMR. Here, we present a straightforward method for their stereospecific solid-state NMR assignment based on [2-13C]Glucose ([2-13C]Glc) as the sole carbon source during protein expression. The approach is fundamentally based on the stereo-selective biosynthetic pathway of Val and Leu, and the co-presence of [2-13C]pyruvate produced mainly by glycolysis and [3-13C]/[1,3-13C]pyruvate most probably formed through scrambling in the pentose phosphate pathway. As a consequence, the isotope spin pairs 13Cβ-13Cγ2 and 13Cα-13Cγ1 in Val, and 13Cγ-13Cδ2 and 13Cβ-13Cδ1 in Leu are obtained. The approach is successfully demonstrated with the stereospecific assignment of the methyl groups of Val and Leu of type 3 secretion system PrgI needles and microcrystalline ubiquitin.

  11. Site-specific φ- and ψ-torsion angle determination in a uniformly/extensively 13C- and 15N-labeled peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sungsool; Spano, Justin

    2011-10-01

    A solid-state rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR) NMR method was introduced to identify the ϕ- and ψ-torsion angle from a 1H- 15N or 1H- 13C' spin system of alanine-like residues in a selectively, uniformly, or extensively 15N-/ 13C-labeled peptide. When a C α( i) or a 15N peak is site-specifically obtainable in the NMR spectrum of a uniformly 15N/ 13C-labeled sample system, the ψ- or ϕ-torsion angle specified by the conformational structure of peptide geometry involving 15N( i)- 1H αi - 15N( i + 1) or 13C'( i - 1)- 1H Ni- 13C'( i) spin system can be identified based on 13C α- or 15N-detected 1H α- 15N or 1H N- 13C REDOR experiment. This method will conveniently be utilized to identify major secondary motifs, such as α-helix, β-sheet, and β-turn, from a uniformly 15N-/ 13C-labled peptide sample system. When tested on a 13C-/ 15N-labeled model system of a three amino acid peptide Gly-[U- 13C, 15N]Ala-[U- 13C, 15N]Leu, the ψ-angle of alanine obtained experimentally, ψ = -40 ± 30°, agreed reasonably well with the X-ray determined angle, ψ = -39°.

  12. Strategy for the study of paramagnetic proteins with slow electronic relaxation rates by nmr spectroscopy: application to oxidized human [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Machonkin, Timothy E; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2004-05-01

    NMR studies of paramagnetic proteins are hampered by the rapid relaxation of nuclei near the paramagnetic center, which prevents the application of conventional methods to investigations of the most interesting regions of such molecules. This problem is particularly acute in systems with slow electronic relaxation rates. We present a strategy that can be used with a protein with slow electronic relaxation to identify and assign resonances from nuclei near the paramagnetic center. Oxidized human [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (adrenodoxin) was used to test the approach. The strategy involves six steps: (1) NMR signals from (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei unaffected or minimally affected by paramagnetic effects are assigned by standard multinuclear two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) spectroscopic methods with protein samples labeled uniformly with (13)C and (15)N. (2) The very broad, hyperfine-shifted signals from carbons in the residues that ligate the metal center are classified by amino acid and atom type by selective (13)C labeling and one-dimensional (1D) (13)C NMR spectroscopy. (3) Spin systems involving carbons near the paramagnetic center that are broadened but not hyperfine-shifted are elucidated by (13)C[(13)C] constant time correlation spectroscopy (CT-COSY). (4) Signals from amide nitrogens affected by the paramagnetic center are assigned to amino acid type by selective (15)N labeling and 1D (15)N NMR spectroscopy. (5) Sequence-specific assignments of these carbon and nitrogen signals are determined by 1D (13)C[(15)N] difference decoupling experiments. (6) Signals from (1)H nuclei in these spin systems are assigned by paramagnetic-optimized 2D and 3D (1)H[(13)C] experiments. For oxidized human ferredoxin, this strategy led to assignments (to amino acid and atom type) for 88% of the carbons in the [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding loops (residues 43-58 and 89-94). These included complete carbon spin-system assignments for eight of the 22 residues and partial assignments for

  13. Partial sup 1 H NMR assignments of the Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase complex with folate: Evidence for a unique conformation of bound folate

    SciTech Connect

    Falzone, C.J.; Benkovic, S.J. ); Wright, P.E. )

    1990-10-01

    Sequence-specific {sup 1}H assignments have been made for over 25% of the amino acid side chains of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase complexed with folate by using a variety of two-dimensional techniques. Proton resonances were assigned by using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and a knowledge of the X-ray crystal structure. Unique sets of NOE connectivities present in hydrophobic pockets were matched with the X-ray structure and used to assign many of the residues. Other residues, particularly those near or in the active site, were assigned by site-directed mutagenesis. The ability to assign unambiguosly the proton resonances of these catalytically important residues allowed for extensive networks of NOE connectivities to follow from these assignments. As a consequence of these assignments, the orientation of the pterin ring of folate could be determined, and its conformation is similar to that of the productive dihydrofolate complex. Under these experimental conditions, only one bound form of the pterin ring could be detected.

  14. Backbone and side chain NMR assignment, along with the secondary structure prediction of RRM2 domain of La protein from a lower eukaryote exhibiting identical structural organization with its human homolog.

    PubMed

    Argyriou, Aikaterini I; Chasapis, Christos T; Apostolidi, Maria; Konstantinidou, Parthena; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-04-01

    The La protein (Lupus antigen), a key mediator during biogenesis of RNA polymerase III transcripts, contains a characteristic La motif and one or two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains, depending on the organism of origin. The RRM1 domain is conserved in higher eukaryotes and located in the N-terminal region, whereas the C-terminal RRM2 domain is absent in most lower eukaryotes and its specific role remains, so far, uncharacterized. Here, we present the backbone and side-chain assignment of the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances of RRM2 of La protein from Dictyostelium discoideum. Interestingly, the La protein in this lower eukaryote, exhibits high homology to its human counterpart. Moreover, it contains two RRM domains, instead of one, raising questions on its evolutionary origin and the putative role of RRM2 in vivo. We also provide its secondary structure as predicted by the TALOS+ online tool.

  15. Hydrogen doppler spectroscopy using 15N ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, L.; Becker, H. W.; Gorris, F.; Kubsky, S.; Schulte, W. H.; Rolfs, C.

    The energy spread of atomic and molecular ion beams from the 4 MV Dynamitron tandem accelerator at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum has been studied and in part minimized. Using the ER= 6.40 MeV narrow resonance in 1H(15N,αγ)12C with an 15N energy spread of 4.55 keV, the Doppler broadening for several hydrogen-bearing gases was found to be in good agreement with expectation: e.g. for NH3 gas a rotational-vibrational Doppler width of 10.41 +/- 0.25 keV was observed (theory = 10.4 keV). Studies of the vibrational Doppler widths of H-bonds on a Si <100> surface were performed using a 4πγ-ray detection system together with UHV-chambers for sample preparation, transport, and analysis. The results showed that further improvements in the experimental set-ups are needed for such investigations.

  16. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  17. ¹H, ¹³C, ¹⁵N backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for the N-terminal RNA recognition motif of the HvGR-RBP1 protein involved in the regulation of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) senescence.

    PubMed

    Mason, Katelyn E; Tripet, Brian P; Parrott, David; Fischer, Andreas M; Copié, Valérie

    2014-04-01

    Leaf senescence is an important process in the developmental life of all plant species. Senescence efficiency influences important agricultural traits such as grain protein content and plant growth, which are often limited by nitrogen use. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating this highly orchestrated process. To enhance our understanding of leaf senescence and its regulation, we have undertaken the structural and functional characterization of previously unknown proteins that are involved in the control of senescence in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Previous microarray analysis highlighted several barley genes whose transcripts are differentially expressed during senescence, including a specific gene which is greater than 40-fold up-regulated in the flag leaves of early- as compared to late-senescing near-isogenic barley lines at 14 and 21 days past flowering (anthesis). From inspection of its amino acid sequence, this gene is predicted to encode a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein herein referred to as HvGR-RBP1. HvGR-RBP1 has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli, and preliminary NMR data analysis has revealed that its glycine-rich C-terminal region [residues: 93-162] is structurally disordered whereas its N-terminal region [residues: 1-92] forms a well-folded domain. Herein, we report the complete (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of backbone and sidechain atoms, and the secondary structural topology of the N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain of HvGR-RBP1, as a first step to unraveling its structural and functional role in the regulation of barley leaf senescence.

  18. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure, vibrational and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN ∼ 0°) structures being about 2-6 kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN ∼ 180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26 ppm, respectively.

  19. Further exploration of the conformational space of α-synuclein fibrils: solid-state NMR assignment of a high-pH polymorph.

    PubMed

    Verasdonck, Joeri; Bousset, Luc; Gath, Julia; Melki, Ronald; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism is a common and important phenomenon for protein fibrils which has been linked to the appearance of strains in prion and other neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson disease is a frequently occurring neurodegenerative pathology, tightly associated with the formation of Lewy bodies. These deposits mainly consist of α-synuclein in fibrillar, β-sheet-rich form. α-synuclein is known to form numerous different polymorphs, which show distinct structural features. Here, we describe the chemical shift assignments, and derive the secondary structure, of a polymorph that was fibrillized at higher-than-physiological pH conditions. The fibrillar core contains residues 40-95, with both the C- and N-terminus not showing any ordered, rigid parts. The chemical shifts are similar to those recorded previously for an assigned polymorph that was fibrillized at neutral pH.

  20. J-GFT NMR for precise measurement of mutually correlated nuclear spin-spin couplings.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Hanudatta S; Garcia, Erwin; Shen, Yang; Szyperski, Thomas

    2007-01-24

    G-matrix Fourier transform (GFT) NMR spectroscopy is presented for accurate and precise measurement of chemical shifts and nuclear spin-spin couplings correlated according to spin system. The new approach, named "J-GFT NMR", is based on a largely extended GFT NMR formalism and promises to have a broad impact on projection NMR spectroscopy. Specifically, constant-time J-GFT (6,2)D (HA-CA-CO)-N-HN was implemented for simultaneous measurement of five mutually correlated NMR parameters, that is, 15N backbone chemical shifts and the four one-bond spin-spin couplings 13Calpha-1Halpha, 13Calpha-13C', 15N-13C', and 15N-1HNu. The experiment was applied for measuring residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in an 8 kDa protein Z-domain aligned with Pf1 phages. Comparison with RDC values extracted from conventional NMR experiments reveals that RDCs are measured with high precision and accuracy, which is attributable to the facts that (i) the use of constant time evolution ensures that signals do not broaden whenever multiple RDCs are jointly measured in a single dimension and (ii) RDCs are multiply encoded in the multiplets arising from the joint sampling. This corresponds to measuring the couplings multiple times in a statistically independent manner. A key feature of J-GFT NMR, i.e., the correlation of couplings according to spin systems without reference to sequential resonance assignments, promises to be particularly valuable for rapid identification of backbone conformation and classification of protein fold families on the basis of statistical analysis of dipolar couplings.

  1. Molecular structure, vibrational spectral assignments (FT-IR and FT-RAMAN), NMR, NBO, HOMO-LUMO and NLO properties of O-methoxybenzaldehyde based on DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennila, P.; Govindaraju, M.; Venkatesh, G.; Kamal, C.

    2016-05-01

    Fourier transform - Infra red (FT-IR) and Fourier transform - Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopic techniques have been carried out to analyze O-methoxy benzaldehyde (OMB) molecule. The fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of vibrational bands were evaluated using density functional theory (DFT). The vibrational analysis of stable isomer of OMB has been carried out by FT-IR and FT-Raman in combination with theoretical method simultaneously. The first-order hyperpolarizability and the anisotropy polarizability invariant were computed by DFT method. The atomic charges, hardness, softness, ionization potential, electronegativity, HOMO-LUMO energies, and electrophilicity index have been calculated. The 13C and 1H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have also been obtained by GIAO method. Molecular electronic potential (MEP) has been calculated by the DFT calculation method. Electronic excitation energies, oscillator strength and excited states characteristics were computed by the closed-shell singlet calculation method.

  2. (1)H and (13)C NMR signal assignments of paecilin A and B, two new chromone derivatives from mangrove endophytic fungus Paecilomyces sp. (tree 1-7).

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; She, Zhigang; Shao, Changlun; Wen, Lu; Liu, Fan; Zheng, Zhonghui; Lin, Yongcheng

    2007-09-01

    Two new natural products, named paecilin A (1) and B (2), together with two known compounds secalonic acid D (3) and (11)-cytochalasa-6(12),13-diene-1,21-dione-16,18-dimethyl-7-hydroxy-10-phenyl-(7S*,13E,16S*,18S*) (4), were isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus, Paecilomyces sp. (tree 1-7) from the South China Sea. 1D and 2D NMR experiments including COSY, HMQC, and HMBC were used for the determination of their structures. In our cytotoxicity assays, secalonic D (3) showed cytotoxicity toward KB cells with IC(50) < 1 microg ml(-1) and inhibiting human topoisomerase I with IC(50) at 0.16 micromol ml(-1). 1, 2, and 4 showed no activity to KB cells.

  3. Carbon-fluorine bond cleavage in the preparation of Osmium(III) and Osmium(IV) fluorothiolate complexes. Fluorine by fluorine NMR-assignment and fluxional processes.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Maribel; Bernès, Sylvain; Cerón, Margarita; Cortina, Verónica; Mendoza, Consuelo; Torrens, Hugo

    2007-06-11

    Reactions of OsO4 with HSR (R=C6F5, C6F4H-4,) in refluxing ethanol afford [Os(SC6F5)3(SC6F4(SC6F5)-2)] (1) and [Os(SC6F4H-4)3(SC6F3H-4-(SC6F4H-4)-2)] (2), which involve the rupture of C-F bonds. At room temperature, the compound [Os(SC6F5)3(PMe2Ph)2] or [Os(SC6F5)4(PMe2Ph)] reacts with KOH(aq) in acetone, giving rise to [ Os(SC6F5)(SC6F4(SC6F4O-2)-2)(PMe2Ph)2] (3), through a process involving the rupture of two C-F bonds, while the compound [Os(SC6F4H)4(PPh3)] reacts with KOH(aq) in acetone to afford [Os(SC6F4H-4)2(SC6F3H-4-O-2)(PPh3)] (4), which also implies a C-F bond cleavage. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies of 1, 2, and 4 indicate that these compounds include five-coordinated metal ions in essentially trigonal-bipyramidal geometries, whereas these studies on the paramagnetic compound 3 show a six-coordinated osmium center in a distorted octahedral geometry. 19F, 1H, 31P{1H}, and COSY 19F-19F NMR studies for the diamagnetic 1, 2, and 4 compounds, including variable-temperature 19F NMR experiments, showed that these molecules are fluxional. Some of the activation parameters for these dynamic processes have been determined.

  4. High-field n.m.r. studies of keratan sulphates. 1H and 13C assignments of keratan sulphate from shark cartilage.

    PubMed

    Cockin, G H; Huckerby, T N; Nieduszynski, I A

    1986-06-15

    Keratan sulphate was extracted from a shark/whale cartilage preparation and examined by 400 MHz 1H- and 100 MHz 13C-n.m.r. spectroscopy. Assignment of the majority of the resonances was facilitated by two-dimensional 13C-1H correlation by using a modified COLOC procedure and a COSY-45 experiment. The spectra are consistent with an N-acetyl-lactosamine repeating unit that is predominantly sulphated at C-6 of both galactose and N-acetylglucosamine. Gel chromatography of a keratanase digest of the shark keratan sulphate confirmed the high degree of galactose sulphation.

  5. Sequential backbone assignment of uniformly 13C-labeled RNAs by a two-dimensional P(CC)H-TOCSY triple resonance NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Wijmenga, S S; Heus, H A; Leeuw, H A; Hoppe, H; van der Graaf, M; Hilbers, C W

    1995-01-01

    A new 1H-13C-31P triple resonance experiment is described which allows unambiguous sequential backbone assignment in 13C-labeled oligonucleotides via through-bond coherence transfer from 31P via 13C to 1H. The approach employs INEPT to transfer coherence from 31P to 13C and homonuclear TOCSY to transfer the 13C coherence through the ribose ring, followed by 13C to 1H J-cross-polarisation. The efficiencies of the various possible transfer pathways are discussed. The most efficient route involves transfer of 31Pi coherence via C4'i and C4'i-1, because of the relatively large JPC4' couplings involved. Via the homonuclear and heteronuclear mixing periods, the C4'i and C4'i-1 coherences are subsequently transferred to, amongst others, H1'i and H1'i-1, respectively, leading to a 2D 1H-31P spectrum which allows a sequential assignment in the 31P-1H1' region of the spectrum, i.e. in the region where the proton resonances overlap least. The experiment is demonstrated on a 13C-labeled RNA hairpin with the sequence 5'(GGGC-CAAA-GCCU)3'.

  6. sup 1 H NMR assignment and secondary structure of the Ca sup 2+ -free form of the amino-terminal epidermal growth factor like domain in coagulation factor X

    SciTech Connect

    Selander, M.; Persson, E.; Stenflo, J.; Drakenberg, T. )

    1990-09-04

    Blood coagulation factor X is composed of discrete domains, two of which are homologous to the epidermal growth factor (EGF). The N-terminal EGF like domain in factor X (fX-EGF{sub N}), residues 45-86 of the intact protein contains a {beta}-hydroxylated asparatic acid and has one Ca{sup 2+}-binding site. Using 2D NMR techniques, the authors have made a full assignment of the 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of Ca{sup 2+}-free fX-EGF{sub N}. On the basis of this assignment and complementary NOESY experiments, they have also determined the secondary structure of Ca{sup 2+}-free fX-EGF{sub N} in water solution. Residues 45-49 are comparatively mobile, whereas residues 5-56 are constrained by two disulfide bonds to one side of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet involving residues 59-64 and 67-72. Another antiparallel {beta}-sheet involves residues 76-77 and 83-84. A small, parallel {beta}-sheet connects residues 80-81 and 55-56 and thereby orients the two antiparallel {beta}-sheets relative to each other. Four {beta}-turns are identified, involving residues 50-53, 56-59, 64-67, 73-76. Residues 78-82 adopt an extended bend structure. On the basis of secondary structure and the location of the three disulfide bonds, they find that Asp 46, Asp 48, and Hya 63 are sufficiently close to each other to form a Ca{sup 2+}-binding site. However, the amino terminus of the Ca{sup 2+}-free form of fX-EGF{sub N} is not part of a triple-stranded {beta}-sheet as in other EGF like peptides. Differences and similarities between fX-EGF{sub N} and murine EGF with respect to secondary structure and conformational shifts are discussed.

  7. Assignment of the ferriheme resonances of high- and low-spin forms of the symmetrical hemin-reconstituted nitrophorins 1-4 by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy: the dynamics of heme ruffling deformations.

    PubMed

    Shokhireva, Tatiana K; Shokhirev, Nikolai V; Berry, Robert E; Zhang, Hongjun; Walker, F Ann

    2008-08-01

    The four major nitrophorins (NPs) of the adult blood-sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus have been reconstituted with the "symmetrical hemin" 2,4-dimethyldeuterohemin, and their NMR spectra have been investigated as the high-spin (S=5/2) aqua and low-spin (S=1/2) N-methylimidazole (NMeIm) and cyanide complexes. The NMeIm complexes allow assignment of the high-spin hemin resonances by saturation transfer difference spectroscopy. The cyanide complexes were investigated as paramagnetic analogues of the NO complexes. It is shown that the hemin ring is highly distorted from planarity, much more so for NP2 than for NP1 and NP4 (with ruffling being the major distortion mode), for both high- and low-spin forms. For the cyanide complexes, the conformation of the distorted ring changes on the NMR timescale to yield chemical exchange (exchange spectroscopy, EXSY) cross peaks for NP1sym(CN), NP3sym(CN) and NP4sym(CN) but not for NP2sym(CN). These changes in nonplanar conformation are visualized as a "rolling" of the ruffled macrocycle ridges through some number of degrees, the lowest-energy ruffling mode. This probably occurs in response to slow protein dynamics that cause the I120 and L132 side chains in the distal heme pocket to move in opposite directions (up and away vs. down and toward the hemin ring). This in turn changes the out-of-plane displacements of the 2M and 3M of the symmetrical hemin on the NMR timescale. Two other types of dynamics, i.e., changes in heme seating and NMeIm rotation, are also observed. The highly distorted heme and the dynamics it causes are unique to the NPs and a few other heme proteins with highly distorted macrocycles. PMID:18458965

  8. Sequence-specific sup 1 H NMR assignments, secondary structure, and location of the calcium binding site in the first epidermal growth factor like domain of blood coagulation factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.H.; Cheng, H.; Sweeney, W.V. ); Pardi, A. ); Tam, J.P. )

    1991-07-30

    Factor IX is a blood clotting protein that contains three regions, including a {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain, two tandemly connected epidermal growth factor like (EGF-like) domains, and a serine protease region. The protein exhibits a high-affinity calcium binding site in the first EGF0like domain, in addition to calcium binding in the Gla domain. The first EGF-like domain, factor IX (45-87), has been synthesized. Sequence-specific resonance assignment of the peptide has been made by using 2D NMR techniques, and its secondary structure has been determined. The protein is found to have two antiparallel {beta}-sheets, and preliminary distance geometry calculations indicate that the protein has two domains, separated by Trp{sup 28}, with the overall structure being similar to that of EGF. An NMR investigation of the calcium-bound first EGF-like domain indicates the presence and location of a calcium binding site involving residues on both strands of one of the {beta}-sheets as well as the N-terminal region of the peptide. These results suggest that calcium binding in the first EGF-like domain could induce long-range (possibly interdomain) conformational changes in factor IX, rather than causing structural alterations in the EGF-like domain itself.

  9. Lineshape-based polarimetry of dynamically-polarized 15N2O in solid-state mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, N.N.; Håkansson, P.; Pourfathi, M.; Ghosh, R.K.; Kara, H.; Kadlecek, S.J.; Pileio, G.; Levitt, M.H.; Rizi, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of 15N2O, known for its long-lived singlet-state order at low magnetic field, is demonstrated in organic solvent/trityl mixtures at ~1.5 K and 5 T. Both 15N polarization and intermolecular dipolar broadening are strongly affected by the sample's thermal history, indicating spontaneous formation of N2O clusters. In situ 15N NMR reveals four distinct powder-pattern spectra, attributed to the chemical-shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors of the two 15N nuclei, further split by the intramolecular dipolar coupling between their magnetic moments. 15N polarization is estimated by fitting the free-induction decay (FID) signals to the analytical model of four single-quantum transitions. This analysis implies (10:2 ± 2:2)% polarization after 37 h of DNP, and provides a direct, instantaneous probe of the absolute 15N polarization, without a need for time-consuming referencing to a thermal-equilibrium NMR signal. PMID:23851025

  10. In vivo uniform (15)N-isotope labelling of plants: using the greenhouse for structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ippel, Johannes H; Pouvreau, Laurice; Kroef, Toos; Gruppen, Harry; Versteeg, Geurt; van den Putten, Peter; Struik, Paul C; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2004-01-01

    Isotope labelling of proteins is important for progress in the field of structural proteomics. It enables the utilisation of the power of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) for the characterisation of the three-dimensional structures and corresponding dynamical features of proteins. The usual approach to obtain isotopically labelled protein molecules is by expressing the corresponding gene in bacterial or yeast host organisms, which grow on isotope-enriched media. This method has several drawbacks. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to fully label a plant with (15)N-isotopes. The advantage of in vivo labelling of higher organisms is that all constituting proteins are labelled and become available as functional, post-translationally modified, correctly folded proteins. A hydroponics set-up was used to create the first example of a uniformly (15)N-labelled (> 98%) plant species, the potato plant (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Elkana). Two plants were grown at low costs using potassium-[(15)N]-nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. At harvest time, a total of 3.6 kg of potato tubers and 1.6 kg of foliage, stolons and roots were collected, all of which were fully (15)N-labelled. Gram quantities of soluble (15)N-labelled proteins (composed mainly of the glycoprotein patatin and Kunitz-type protease inhibitors) were isolated from the tubers. NMR results on the complete proteome of potato sap and on an isolated protease inhibitor illustrate the success of the labelling procedure. The presented method of isotope labelling is easily modified to label other plants. Its envisioned impact in the field of structural proteomics of plants is discussed.

  11. Potential probe for examining opiate-receptor interactions: model compound study of dynamic effects on /sup 15/N INEPT enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, K.H.; Mikita, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    Model systems were chosen in an attempt to mimic the proton exchange environment of an agonist nitrogen in an opiate-receptor interaction. The two model systems studied were an ammonium: 18-crown-6 ether complex and a quinuclidine-trifluoroacetic acid ion pair. Each system was examined for their effects on /sup 15/N NMR INEPT enhancements. Both models were found to retard proton exchange dynamics, as observed by increased enhancements relative to free ions in neutral aqueous solutions. These results suggest that the confinement of a protonated nitrogen, such as that expected in receptor binding, may alter exchange dynamics to favor INEPT enhancements, while unbound agonists would remain unenhanced. As a result, /sup 15/N NMR INEPT enhancements from a solution of receptor subtypes with an appropriate /sup 15/N-labeled agonist may present a means of exploring the dynamics of direct opiate-receptor interactions.

  12. Cosine Modulated HSQC: A Rapid Determination of 3JHNHα Scalar Couplings in 15N-labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Audrey; Vincent, Sébastien J. F.; Zwahlen, Catherine

    2002-06-01

    A two-dimensional HSQC-based NMR method, 15N-COSMO-HSQC, is presented for the rapid determination of homonuclear 3JHNHα couplings in 15N-labeled proteins in solution. Scalar couplings are extracted by comparing the intensity of two separate datasets recorded with and without decoupling of the 3JHNHα during a preparation period. The scalar couplings are introduced through a cosine modulation of the peak intensities. The experiment relies on a BIRD sandwich to selectively invert all amide protons H N and is very simple to implement. 3JHNHα couplings were determined using both the 15N-COSMO-HSQC and quantitative- J on 15N-labeled chemokine RANTES. The two experiments show well-correlated values.

  13. Utilizing the charge field effect on amide (15)N chemical shifts for protein structure validation.

    PubMed

    Bader, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Of all the nuclei in proteins, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of nitrogen are the theoretically least well understood. In this study, quantum chemical methods are used in combination with polarizable-continuum models in order to show that consideration of the effective electric field, including charge screening due to solvation, improves considerably the consistencies of statistical relationships between experimental and computed amide (15)N shifts between various sets of charged and uncharged oligopeptides and small organic molecules. A single conversion scheme between shielding parameters from first principles using density functional theory (DFT) and experimental shifts is derived that holds for all classes of compounds examined here. This relationship is then used to test the accuracy of such (15)N chemical shift predictions in the cyclic decapeptide antibiotic gramicidin S (GS). GS has previously been studied in great detail, both by NMR and X-ray crystallography. It adopts a well-defined backbone conformation, and hence, only a few discrete side chain conformational states need to be considered. Moreover, a charge-relay effect of the two cationic ornithine side chains to the protein backbone has been described earlier by NMR spectroscopy. Here, DFT-derived backbone amide nitrogen chemical shifts were calculated for multiple conformations of GS. Overall, the structural dynamics of GS is revisited in view of chemical shift behavior along with energetic considerations. Together, the study demonstrates proof of concept that (15)N chemical shift information is particularly useful in the analysis and validation of protein conformational states in a charged environment.

  14. Limiting Values of the 15N Chemical Shift of the Imidazole Ring of Histidine at High-pH§

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    Tautomeric identification by direct observation of 15N chemical shifts of the imidazole ring of histidine (His) has become a common practice in NMR spectroscopy. However, such applications require knowledge of the “canonical” limiting values of the 15N chemical shift of the imidazole ring of His in which each form of His, namely the protonated (H+) and the tautomeric Nε2-H and Nδ1-H forms, respectively, is present to the extent of 100%. So far, the adopted canonical limiting values of the 15N chemical shift have been those available from model compounds. As to whether these canonical values reflect those of the individual pure forms of His is investigated here by carrying out an analysis of the second-order shielding differences, ΔΔ = |Δε − Δδ, with Δξ(ξ = ε or δ) being the DFT-computed average shielding differences between the two nitrogens of the imidazole ring of His in each pure tautomeric form. In the high-pH limit the results indicate that the (i) ΔΔ values from the DFT-computed shielding, but not from the commonly-used canonical limiting values, are in closer agreement with those obtained with experimental chemical shift data from model compounds in solution and solid-state NMR; and (ii) commonly-used canonical limiting values of the 15N chemical shifts lead to an average tautomeric equilibrium constant that differs by a factor of ~2.6 from the one computed by using DFT-based 15N limiting values, raising concern about the practice of using canonical limiting 15N values; this can be avoided by reporting tautomeric equilibrium constants computed by using only limiting 15N values for the Nε2-H tautomer. PMID:22376024

  15. Multinuclear NMR studies of the flavodoxin from Anabaena 7120:. beta. -sheet structure and the flavin mononucleotide binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    A concerted approach to primary {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance assignments in proteins was developed. The method requires enrichment of the protein with {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N. The technique relies on the comparison of data sets from NMR experiments that correlate various nuclei: {sup 13}C({sup 13}C) double quantum correlations, {sup 1}H({sup 13}C) and {sup 1}H({sup 15}N) single bond correlations, and {sup 1}H({sup 13}C) and {sup 1}H({sup 15}N) multiple bond correlations. Comparison of data sets increases the number of resonances that can be assigned and improves assignment confidence. By combined use of these and conventional NMR techniques, sequential assignments were made for the {beta}-sheet and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) binding site residues in flavodoxin from Anabaena 7120. The {beta}-sheet structure was found to be similar to that seen in the crystal structure of Anacystis nidulans flavodoxin. In the FMN binding site, a total of 69 NOEs were identified: eight between protons of FMN, 36 between protons of binding site residues, and 25 between protons of FMN and protein. These constraints were used to determine the localized solution structure of the flavin binding site. The electronic environment and conformation of the protein-bound isoalloxazine ring were investigated by determining chemical shifts and coupling constants for the ring atoms. The carbonyl edge of the flavin ring was found to be slightly polarized by hydrogen bonding to the protein. The xylene ring was found to be nonplanar. The C{sup 6}-N{sup 5} region of the flavin appears to be solvent accessible.

  16. Hydrogen-1, carbon-13, and nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy of Anabaena 7120 flavodoxin: Assignment of. beta. -sheet and flavin binding site resonances and analysis of protein-flavin interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Krezel, A.M.; Markley, J.L. ); Leonhardt, K.G.; Straus, N.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Sequence-specific {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR assignments have been made for residues that form the five-stranded parallel {beta}-sheet and the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) binding site of oxidized Anabaena 7120 flavodoxin. Interstrand nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) indicate that the {beta}-sheet arrangement is similar to that observed in the crystal structure of the 70% homologous long-chain flavodoxin from Anacystis nidulans. A total of 62 NOEs were identified: 8 between protons of bound FMN, 29 between protons of the protein in the flavin binding site, and 25 between protons of bound FMN and protons of the protein. These constraints were used to determine the localized solution structure of the FMN binding site. The electronic environment and conformation of the protein-bound flavin isoalloxazine ring were investigated by determining {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H coupling constants. The carbonyl edge of the flavin ring was found to be slightly polarized. The xylene ring was found to be nonplanar. Tyrosine 94, located adjacent to the flavin isoalloxazine ring, was shown to have a hindered aromatic ring flip rate.

  17. NMR conformational properties of an Anthrax Lethal Factor domain studied by multiple amino acid-selective labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vourtsis, Dionysios J.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Pairas, George; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A polypeptide, N-ALF{sub 233}, was overexpressed in E. coli and successfully isolated. • We produced {sup 2}H/{sup 15}N/{sup 13}C labeled protein samples. • Amino acid selective approaches were applied. • We acquired several heteronuclear NMR spectra, to complete the backbone assignment. • Prediction of the secondary structure was performed. - Abstract: NMR-based structural biology urgently needs cost- and time-effective methods to assist both in the process of acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra and their subsequent analysis. Especially for bigger proteins (>20 kDa) selective labeling is a frequently used means of sequence-specific assignment. In this work we present the successful overexpression of a polypeptide of 233 residues, corresponding to the structured part of the N-terminal domain of Anthrax Lethal Factor, using Escherichia coli expression system. The polypeptide was subsequently isolated in pure, soluble form and analyzed structurally by solution NMR spectroscopy. Due to the non-satisfying quality and resolution of the spectra of this 27 kDa protein, an almost complete backbone assignment became feasible only by the combination of uniform and novel amino acid-selective labeling schemes. Moreover, amino acid-type selective triple-resonance NMR experiments proved to be very helpful.

  18. Reduced dimensionality tailored HN(C)N experiments for facile backbone resonance assignment of proteins through unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) tailored HN(C)N [S.C. Panchal, N.S. Bhavesh, R.V. Hosur, Improved 3D triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, for HN and 15N sequential correlations in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins: application to unfolded proteins, J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] experiments are proposed to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. These experiments - referred here as (4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH - exploit the linear combination of backbone 15N and 13C‧/13Cα chemical shifts simultaneously to achieve higher peak dispersion and randomness along their respective F1 dimensions. Simply, this has been achieved by modulating the backbone 15N(i) chemical shifts with that of 13C‧ (i - 1)/13Cα (i - 1) spins following the established reduced dimensionality NMR approach [T. Szyperski, D.C. Yeh, D.K. Sukumaran, H.N. Moseley, G.T. Montelione, Reduced-dimensionality NMR spectroscopy for high-throughput protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 8009-8014]. Though the modification is simple it has resulted an ingenious improvement of HN(C)N both in terms of peak dispersion and easiness of establishing the sequential connectivities. The increased dispersion along F1 dimension solves two purposes here: (i) resolves the ambiguities arising because of degenerate 15N chemical shifts and (ii) reduces the signal overlap in F2(15N)-F3(1H) planes (an important requisite in HN(C)N based assignment protocol for facile and unambiguous identification of sequentially connected HSQC peaks). The performance of both these experiments and the assignment protocol has been demonstrated using bovine apo Calbindin-d9k (75 aa) and urea denatured UNC60B (a 152 amino acid ADF/cofilin family protein of Caenorhabditis elegans), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively.

  19. Bridge over troubled proline: assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins using (HCA)CON(CAN)H and (HCA)N(CA)CO(N)H experiments concomitantly with HNCO and i(HCA)CO(CA)NH.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Maarit; Piirainen, Henni; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Permi, Perttu

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is by far the most versatile and information rich technique to study intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). While NMR is able to offer residue level information on structure and dynamics, assignment of chemical shift resonances in IDPs is not a straightforward process. Consequently, numerous pulse sequences and assignment protocols have been developed during past several years, targeted especially for the assignment of IDPs, including experiments that employ H(N), H(α) or (13)C detection combined with two to six indirectly detected dimensions. Here we propose two new HN-detection based pulse sequences, (HCA)CON(CAN)H and (HCA)N(CA)CO(N)H, that provide correlations with (1)H(N)(i - 1), (13)C'(i - 1) and (15)N(i), and (1)H(N)(i + 1), (13)C'(i) and (15)N(i) frequencies, respectively. Most importantly, they offer sequential links across the proline bridges and enable filling the single proline gaps during the assignment. We show that the novel experiments can efficiently complement the information available from existing HNCO and intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH pulse sequences and their concomitant usage enabled >95 % assignment of backbone resonances in cytoplasmic tail of adenosine receptor A2A in comparison to 73 % complete assignment using the HNCO/i(HCA)CO(CA)NH data alone. PMID:24346685

  20. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    +)-tagged GB1 mutants to rapidly determine the global protein fold in a de novo fashion. Remarkably, these studies required quantitative measurements of only approximately four or five backbone amide (15)N longitudinal paramagnetic relaxation enhancements per residue, in the complete absence of the usual internuclear distance restraints. Importantly, this paramagnetic solid-state NMR methodology is general and can be directly applied to larger proteins and protein complexes for which a significant fraction of the signals can be assigned in standard 2D and 3D MAS NMR chemical shift correlation spectra.

  1. (15)N Heteronuclear Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MRI.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Haifeng; Xu, Jiadi; Yadav, Nirbhay N; McMahon, Michael T; Harden, Bradley; Frueh, Dominique; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2016-09-01

    A two-step heteronuclear enhancement approach was combined with chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) to magnify (15)N MRI signal of molecules through indirect detection via water protons. Previous CEST studies have been limited to radiofrequency (rf) saturation transfer or excitation transfer employing protons. Here, the signal of (15)N is detected indirectly through the water signal by first inverting selectively protons that are scalar-coupled to (15)N in the urea molecule, followed by chemical exchange of the amide proton to bulk water. In addition to providing a small sensitivity enhancement, this approach can be used to monitor the exchange rates and thus the pH sensitivity of the participating (15)N-bound protons. PMID:27548755

  2. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with (2)H, (13)C and (15)N in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-06-01

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80% can be achieved for (15)N and (13)C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For (2)H,(15)N and (2)H,(13)C,(15)N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73%, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins. PMID:25929326

  3. Conformation of alamethicin in oriented phospholipid bilayers determined by (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Bak, M; Bywater, R P; Hohwy, M; Thomsen, J K; Adelhorst, K; Jakobsen, H J; Sørensen, O W; Nielsen, N C

    2001-01-01

    The conformation of the 20-residue antibiotic ionophore alamethicin in macroscopically oriented phospholipid bilayers has been studied using (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Differently (15)N-labeled variants of alamethicin and an analog with three of the alpha-amino-isobutyric acid residues replaced by alanines have been investigated to establish experimental structural constraints and determine the orientation of alamethicin in hydrated phospholipid (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) bilayers and to investigate the potential for a major kink in the region of the central Pro(14) residue. From the anisotropic (15)N chemical shifts and (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings determined for alamethicin with (15)N-labeling on the Ala(6), Val(9), and Val(15) residues and incorporated into phospholipid bilayer with a peptide:lipid molar ratio of 1:8, we deduce that alamethicin has a largely linear alpha-helical structure spanning the membrane with the molecular axis tilted by 10-20 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In particular, we find compatibility with a straight alpha-helix tilted by 17 degrees and a slightly kinked molecular dynamics structure tilted by 11 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In contrast, the structural constraints derived by solid-state NMR appear not to be compatible with any of several model structures crossing the membrane with vanishing tilt angle or the earlier reported x-ray diffraction structure (Fox and Richards, Nature. 300:325-330, 1982). The solid-state NMR-compatible structures may support the formation of a left-handed and parallel multimeric ion channel. PMID:11509381

  4. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  5. Phenylalanine δ15N in Paleo Archives as a New Proxy for δ15N of Exported Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M.; Batista, F. C.; Vokhshoori, N. L.; Brown, J. T.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ravelo, A. C.; Sherwood, O.

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of individual amino acids (CSI-AA) is emerging as a powerful new tool for studying the paleo nitrogen cycle. Because most detrital organic nitrogen is composed of amino acids, CSI-AA can reveal the mechanistic basis for organic nitrogen diagenesis, preserve a record of past food web structure, and potentially reconstruct the δ15N values of past nitrate and primary production. Within the commonly measured amino acids, the δ15N value of phenylalanine (Phe) appears uniquely promising as a new proxy that reflects the nitrogen isotopic value of the original source. Phe δ15N values remain almost unchanged with trophic transfer through food webs, and also during at least the initial stages of organic matter degradation. Here we synthesize results from both bio-archives and recent sediments, which together suggest that at least in Holocene archives the Phe δ15N value does in fact record the average inorganic nitrogen δ15N value at the base of planktonic food webs. However, several important unknowns also remain. These include the extent of variation in amino acid isotopic fractionation patterns in phylogenetically distinct algal groups. The stability of Phe δ15N values in older sediments where organic matter has undergone extensive diagenesis is also an important research area, which may ultimately establish the temporal limit for application of this approach to study past geological epochs. Together, however, results to date suggest that of Phe δ15N values in paleo archives represent a novel molecular-level proxy which is not tied to any specific organism or group, but rather can provide an integrated estimate of δ15N value of exported primary production.

  6. Full differentiation and assignment of boron species in the electrolytes Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuniger, Thomas; Pilz, Thomas; Chandran, C. Vinod; Jansen, Martin

    2012-10-15

    The syntheses of two new fluorooxoborates, Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2}, which possess considerable ion conductivity at higher temperatures, have been reported recently. Here, we describe the characterisation of these compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. The complex central-transition MAS spectra, resulting from overlap of sub-spectra contributed by the individual boron species in the crystal structures, could be clearly separated by acquisition and analysis of 3QMAS spectra. By numerical fit of these sub-spectra, the isotropic chemical shift {delta}{sub iso}, the quadrupolar coupling constant {chi}, and the asymmetry {eta} were determined. Using known relations between boron coordination and chemical shift as well as quadrupolar coupling, the individual {sup 11}B NMR resonances have been ascribed to boron species in tetrahedral or trigonal environment. To remove remaining assignment ambiguities, the response of the {sup 11}B resonances to {sup 19}F decoupling was qualitatively analysed. Thus, by using the combined information conveyed by chemical shift, quadrupolar and dipolar interaction, a complete assignment of the complex {sup 11}B line shapes exhibited by the fluorooxoborates has been achieved. - Graphical abstract: Structure and solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectrum of Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterisation of title compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-spectra of boron species separated by evaluation of 3QMAS spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotropic chemical shift and quadrupolar interaction parameters determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full boron assignment based on NMR parameters and response to {sup 19}F decoupling.

  7. Complete assignment of the methionyl carbonyl carbon resonance in switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies labeled with (1- sup 13 C)methionine

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, C.; Igarashi, Takako; Kim, Hahyung; Odaka, Asano; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji )

    1991-01-01

    A {sup 13}C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies developed by Dangl et al. who had used the fluorescence-activated cell sorter to select and clone these variants. These switch variant antibodies possess the identical V{sub H}, V{sub L}, and C{sub L} domains in conjunction with different heavy chain constant regions. In the present study, switch variant antibodies of IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b subclasses were used along with a short-chain IgG2a antibody, in which the entire C{sub H}1 domain is deleted. The switch variant antibodies were specifically labeled with (1-{sup 13}C)methionine by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Assignments of all the methionyl carbonyl carbon resonances have been completed by using the intact antibodies along with their fragments and recombined proteins in which either heavy or light chain is labeled. A double labeling method has played a crucial role in the process of the spectral assignments. The strategy used for the assignments has been described in detail. In incorporating {sup 15}N-labeled amino acids into the antibodies for the double labeling, isotope dilution caused a serious problem except in the cases of ({alpha}-{sup 15}N)lysine and ({sup 15}N)threonine, both of which cannot become the substrate of transaminases. It was found that {beta}-chloro-L-alanine is most effective in suppressing the isotope scrambling. So far, spectral assignments by the double labeling method have been possible with {sup 15}N-labeled Ala, His, Ile, Lys, Met, Ser, Thr, Tyr, and Val. On the basis of the results of the present {sup 13}C study, possible use of the assigned carbonyl carbon resonances for the elucidation of the structure-function relationship in the antibody system has been briefly discussed.

  8. ABACUS, a direct method for protein NMR structure computation via assembly of fragments.

    PubMed

    Grishaev, A; Steren, C A; Wu, B; Pineda-Lucena, A; Arrowsmith, C; Llinás, M

    2005-10-01

    The ABACUS algorithm obtains the protein NMR structure from unassigned NOESY distance restraints. ABACUS works as an integrated approach that uses the complete set of available NMR experimental information in parallel and yields spin system typing, NOE spin pair identities, sequence specific resonance assignments, and protein structure, all at once. The protocol starts from unassigned molecular fragments (including single amino acid spin systems) derived from triple-resonance (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR experiments. Identifications of connected spin systems and NOEs precede the full sequence specific resonance assignments. The latter are obtained iteratively via Monte Carlo-Metropolis and/or probabilistic sequence selections, molecular dynamics structure computation and BACUS filtering (A. Grishaev and M. Llinás, J Biomol NMR 2004;28:1-10). ABACUS starts from scratch, without the requirement of an initial approximate structure, and improves iteratively the NOE identities in a self-consistent fashion. The procedure was run as a blind test on data recorded on mth1743, a 70-amino acid genomic protein from M. thermoautotrophicum. It converges to a structure in ca. 15 cycles of computation on a 3-GHz processor PC. The calculated structures are very similar to the ones obtained via conventional methods (1.22 A backbone RMSD). The success of ABACUS on mth1743 further validates BACUS as a NOESY identification protocol.

  9. A practical implementation of cross-spectrum in protein backbone resonance assignment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Delaglio, Frank; Tjandra, Nico

    2010-04-01

    The concept of cross-spectrum is applied in protein NMR spectroscopy to assist in the backbone sequential resonance assignment. Cross-spectrum analysis is used routinely to reveal correlations in frequency domains as a means to reveal common features contained in multiple time series. Here the cross-spectrum between related NMR spectra, for example HNCO and HN(CA)CO, can be calculated with point-by-point multiplications along their common C' carbon axis. In the resulting higher order cross-spectrum, an enhanced correlation signal occurs at every common i-1 carbon frequency allowing the amide proton H(N) (and nitrogen N) resonances from residues i and i-1 to be identified. The cross-spectrum approach is demonstrated using 2D spectra H(N)CO, H(NCA)CO, H(NCO)CACB, and H(N)CACB measured on a 15N/13C double-labeled Ubiquitin sample. These 2D spectra are used to calculate two pseudo-3D cross-spectra, H(i)-H(i)(-1)-C'(i)(-1) and H(i)-H(i)(-1)-CA(i)(-1)CB(i)(-1). We show using this approach, backbone resonances of H, C', CA, and CB can be fully assigned without ambiguity. The cross-spectrum principle is expected to offer an easy, practical, and more quantitative approach for heteronuclear backbone resonance assignment. PMID:20053573

  10. **1**5N-NMR INVESTIGATION OF HYDROXYLAMINE DERIVATIZED HUMIC SUBSTANCES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.; Mikita, Michael A.

    1986-01-01

    Humic substances are the most abundant naturally occurring refactory organic compounds in soils and water. They have a broad range of physical, chemical and physiological properties. In soils, humic substances contribute to the cation exchange capacity, help maintain the physical structure, and play a role in plant growth and nutrition. In aquatic systems, humic substances serve to regulate the levels of inorganic constituents, yield trihalomethanes upon chlorination, and transport or concentrate organic and inorganic pollutants. The oxygen containing functional groups of humic and fulvic acids are believed to play a key role in the chemical properties of humic substances. This study was undertaken to gain additional information on the specific types of oxygen functionalities in humic substances. Since the analysis of hydroxyl moieties had been earlier established, we focused our attention on the analysis of ketone and aldehyde functional groups in humic substances.

  11. Catalytic roles of βLys87 in tryptophan synthase: (15)N solid state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Caulkins, Bethany G; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F; Mueller, Leonard J

    2015-09-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4' for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-¹⁵N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using ¹⁵N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. Guest Editors: Andrea Mozzarelli and Loredano Pollegioni.

  12. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence. PMID:27586953

  13. Modeling 15N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence.

  14. Fischer indolisation of N-(α-ketoacyl)anthranilic acids into 2-(indol-2-carboxamido)benzoic acids and 2-indolyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-ones and their NMR study.

    PubMed

    Proisl, Karel; Kafka, Stanislav; Urankar, Damijana; Gazvoda, Martin; Kimmel, Roman; Košmrlj, Janez

    2014-12-21

    N-(α-ketoacyl)anthranilic acids reacted with phenylhydrazinium chloride in boiling acetic acid to afford 2-(indol-2-carboxamido)benzoic acids in good to excellent yields and 2-indolyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-ones as by-products. The formation of the latter products could easily be suppressed by a hydrolytic workup. Alternatively, by increasing the reaction temperature and/or time, 2-indolyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-ones can be obtained exclusively. Optimisations of the reaction conditions as well as the scope and the course of the transformations were investigated. The products were characterized by (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR spectroscopy. The corresponding resonances were assigned on the basis of the standard 1D and gradient selected 2D NMR experiments ((1)H-(1)H gs-COSY, (1)H-(13)C gs-HSQC, (1)H-(13)C gs-HMBC) with (1)H-(15)N gs-HMBC as a practical tool to determine (15)N NMR chemical shifts at the natural abundance level of (15)N isotope.

  15. Refining cotton-wick method for 15N plant labelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fustec, Joëlle; Mahieu, Stéphanie

    2010-05-01

    The symbiosis Fabaceae/Rhizobiaceae plays a critical role in the nitrogen cycle. It gives the plant the ability to fix high amounts of atmospheric N. A part of this N can be transferred to the soil via rhizodeposition. The contribution of Fabaceae to the soil N pool is difficult to measure, since it is necessary for assessing N benefits for other crops, for soil biological activity, and for reducing water pollution in sustainable agriculture (Fustec, 2009). The aim of this study was to test and improve the reliability of the 15N cotton-wick method for measuring the soil N derived from plant rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2007). The effects of the concentration of the 15N-urea labelling solution and of the feeding frequency (continuous or pulses) on the assessment of nitrogen rhizodeposition were studied in two greenhouse experiments using the field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and the non-nodulating isoline P2. The plant parts and the soil were prepared for 15N:14N measurements for assessing N rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2009). The fraction of plants' belowground nitrogen allocated to rhizodeposition in both Frisson pea and P2 was 20 to more than 50% higher when plants were labelled continuously than when they were labelled using fortnightly pulses. Our results suggested that when 15N root enrichment was high, nitrogen rhizodeposition was underestimated only for plants that were 15N-fed by fortnightly pulses, and not in plants 15N-fed continuously. This phenomenon was especially observed for plants relying on symbiotic N fixation for N acquisition; it may be linked to the concentration of the labelling solution. In conclusion, N rhizodeposition assessment was strongly influenced by the 15N-feeding frequency and the concentration of the labelling solution. The estimation of N rhizodeposition was more reliable when plants were labelled continuously with a dilute solution of 15N urea. Fustec et al. 2009. Agron. Sustain. Dev., DOI 10.1051/agro/2009003, in press. Mahieu

  16. Combined experimental and computational NMR study of crystalline and amorphous zeolitic imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Emma F; Bennett, Thomas D; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline; Gervais, Christel; Blanc, Frédéric; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2015-10-14

    Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) have attracted great interest in recent years due to their high chemical and thermal stability with promising applications in gas storage and separations. We investigate the structures of three different crystalline ZIFs - ZIF-4, ZIF-8, ZIF-zni - and their amorphous counterparts using high field (13)C and (15)N CP MAS NMR. The high field (20 T) allows for the observation of all crystallographically independent carbon and nitrogen atoms in the crystalline ZIFs. Combining our experimental results with density functional theory calculations enabled the assignment of all chemical shifts. The crystalline spectra reveal the potential of high field NMR to distinguish between two ZIF polymorphs, ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni, with identical [Zn(C3H3N2)2] chemical compositions. (13)C and (15)N CP MAS NMR data obtained for the amorphous ZIFs clearly showed signal broadening upon amorphization, confirming the retention of chemical composition and the structural similarity of amorphous ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni. In the case of amorphous ZIF-8, we present evidence for the partial de-coordination of the 2-methyl imidazole linker.

  17. Environmentally friendly flame retardants. A detailed solid-state NMR study of melamine orthophosphate.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Andreas; Litvinov, Victor M; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2007-12-01

    We used solid-state NMR spectroscopy to gain detailed information about the proton positions, proximities and the hydrogen-bonding network in the environmentally friendly flame retardant melamine orthophosphate (MP). High-resolution proton one- and two-dimensional solid-state NMR spectra were obtained at high external magnetic field in combination with fast magic angle spinning of the sample. Furthermore, we recorded homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of types (15)N–(15)N, (1)H–(13)C, (1)H–(15)N and (1)H–(31)P. In addition, we determined the geometry of the NH and NH(2) groups in MP by (15)N–(1)H heteronuclear recoupling experiments.We were able to completely assign the different isotropic chemical shifts in MP. Furthermore, we could identify the protonation of the melamine and orthophosphate moieties. The experimental results are discussed in connection with the structural model obtained by powder X-ray diffraction together with a combined molecular modeling-Rietveld refinement approach (De Ridder et al. Helv. Chim. Acta 2004; 87: 1894). We show that the geometry of the NH2 groups can only be successfully estimated by solid-state NMR. PMID:18157843

  18. Combined experimental and computational NMR study of crystalline and amorphous zeolitic imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Emma F; Bennett, Thomas D; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline; Gervais, Christel; Blanc, Frédéric; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2015-10-14

    Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) have attracted great interest in recent years due to their high chemical and thermal stability with promising applications in gas storage and separations. We investigate the structures of three different crystalline ZIFs - ZIF-4, ZIF-8, ZIF-zni - and their amorphous counterparts using high field (13)C and (15)N CP MAS NMR. The high field (20 T) allows for the observation of all crystallographically independent carbon and nitrogen atoms in the crystalline ZIFs. Combining our experimental results with density functional theory calculations enabled the assignment of all chemical shifts. The crystalline spectra reveal the potential of high field NMR to distinguish between two ZIF polymorphs, ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni, with identical [Zn(C3H3N2)2] chemical compositions. (13)C and (15)N CP MAS NMR data obtained for the amorphous ZIFs clearly showed signal broadening upon amorphization, confirming the retention of chemical composition and the structural similarity of amorphous ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni. In the case of amorphous ZIF-8, we present evidence for the partial de-coordination of the 2-methyl imidazole linker. PMID:26351979

  19. A concise methodology for the stereoselective synthesis of O-glycosylated amino acid building blocks: complete 1H NMR assignments and their application in solid-phase glycopeptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, J; Gururaja, T L; Naganagowda, G A; Ramasubbu, N; Levine, M J

    1998-09-01

    A facile strategy for the stereoselective synthesis of suitably protected O-glycosylated amino acid building blocks, namely, Nalpha-Fmoc-Ser-[Ac4-beta-D-Gal-(1-3)-Ac2-alpha or beta-D-GalN3]-OPfp and Nalpha-Fmoc-Thr-[Ac4-beta-D-Gal-(1-3)-Ac2-alpha or beta-D-GalN3]-OPfp is described. What is new and novel in this report is that Koenigs-Knorr type glycosylation of an aglycon serine/threonine derivative (i.e. Nalpha-Fmoc-Ser-OPfp or Nalpha-Fmoc-Thr-OPfp) with protected beta-D-Gal(1-3)-D-GalN3 synthon mediated by silver salts resulted in only alpha- and/or beta-isomers in excellent yields under two different reaction conditions. The subtle differences in stereoselectivity were demonstrated clearly when glycosylation was carried out using only AgClO4 at -40 degrees C which afforded a-isomer in a quantitative yield (alpha:beta = 5:1). On the other hand, the beta-isomer was formed exclusively when the reaction was performed in the presence of Ag2CO3/AgClO4 at room temperature. A complete assignment of 1H resonances to individual sugar ring protons and the characteristic anomeric alpha-1 H and beta-1 H in Ac4Galbeta(1-3)Ac2GalN3 alpha and/or beta linked to Ser/Thr building blocks was accomplished unequivocally by two-dimensional double-quantum filtered correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser enhancement and exchange spectroscopy NMR experiments. An unambiguous structural characterization and documentation of chemical shifts, including the coupling constants for all the protons of the aforementioned alpha- and beta-isomers of the O-glycosylated amino acid building blocks carrying protected beta-D-Gal(1-3)-D-GalN3, could serve as a template in elucidating the three-dimensional structure of glycoproteins. The synthetic utility of the building blocks and versatility of the strategy was exemplified in the construction of human salivary mucin (MUC7)-derived, O-linked glycopeptides with varied degrees of glycosylation by solid-phase Fmoc chemistry. Fmoc

  20. MUSIC in triple-resonance experiments: amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations

    PubMed

    Schubert; Smalla; Schmieder; Oschkinat

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH(2) or XH(3) (X can be (15)N or (13)C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10527741

  1. MUSIC in Triple-Resonance Experiments: Amino Acid Type-Selective 1H- 15N Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Mario; Smalla, Maika; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective 1H-15N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH2 or XH3 (X can be 15N or 13C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains.

  2. MUSIC in triple-resonance experiments: amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations

    PubMed

    Schubert; Smalla; Schmieder; Oschkinat

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH(2) or XH(3) (X can be (15)N or (13)C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Paramagnetic Inversion of the Sign of the Interference Contribution to the Transverse Relaxation of the Imido Protons of the Coordinated Imidazoles in the Uniformly 15N-Labeled Cytochrome c3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Tomoaki; Harada, Erisa; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kawai, Gota; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Akutsu, Hideo

    1998-04-01

    In the spectrum of uniformly15N-labeled cytochromec3, the relative linewidths of the doublet peaks of the15N-coupled imido proton of the coordinated imidazole group were reversed on oxidation. This inversion was explained by the interference relaxation process between the electron-proton dipolar and15N-1H dipolar interactions. The inversion can be used to assign the imido protons of the coordinated imidazole groups in heme proteins.

  4. Stepwise enrichment of 15N along food chains: Further evidence and the relation between δ 15N and animal age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masao; Wada, Eitaro

    1984-05-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrogen was measured in marine and fresh-water animals from the East China Sea, The Bering Sea, Lake Ashinoko and Usujiri intertidal zone. Primary producers, showed average δ15Nversus atmospheric nitrogen of +5.0%. (+3.4 to +7.5) in the Bering Sea and Lake Ashinoko, and +6.8%. (+6.0 to +7.6) in Usujiri intertidal zone. Blue green algae from the East China Sea show an average -0.55%. (-0.8 to +1.2). All consumers, Zooplankton, fish and bird exhibited Stepwise enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level. The 15N enrichment at a single feeding process ranged from +1.3 to +5.3 averaging +3.4 ± 1.1%.. This isotopic fractionation seems to be independent of habitat. The effect of age in animals was obtained by analyzing two marine mussels. The soft tissue nitrogen showed +2.0%. enrichment relative to that of primary producers, and the magnitude was almost constant with shell ages ranging from 0 to 8 years. A similar 15N enrichment occurs in all Molluscs, Crustaceans, Insecta, Amphibia, Fish, Ave and Mammal species regardless of the difference in the form of excreted nitrogen and in laboratory cultured fish, brine shrimp and mice (+2.9 to +4.9%.). The excreted ammonia from guppy was sufficiently light to balance the concentration of 15N to animal body.

  5. Synthesis of 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogen 15-N-acetylglucosaminides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, E; Namba, S; Kurihara, H; Goto, J; Matsuki, Y; Nambara, T

    1995-03-01

    The synthesis of 15-N-acetylglucosaminides of 15 alpha-hydroxyesterone, 15 alpha-hydroxyestradiol, and 15 alpha-hydroxyestriol (estetrol) is described. The latter two were prepared by condensation of 2-acetamido-1 alpha-chloro-1,2-dideoxy-3,4,6-trio-O-acetyl-D-glucopyranose with appropriately protected 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogens by the Koenigs-Knorr reaction employing cadmium carbonate as a catalyst. Subsequent removal of protecting groups with methanolic potassium hydroxide provided the desired conjugates. 15 alpha-Hydroxyestrone 15-N-acetylglucosaminide was synthesized from the corresponding 15 alpha-hydroxyestradiol derivative by Jones oxidation followed by brief alkaline hydrolysis. These conjugates underwent enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Jack beans to produce 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogens. PMID:7792832

  6. (¹⁵N ± ¹³C') edited (4, 3)D-H(CC)CONH TOCSY and (4, 3)D-NOESY HNCO experiments for unambiguous side chain and NOE assignments of proteins with high shift degeneracy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Arora, Ashish

    2011-11-01

    Well-resolved and unambiguous through-bond correlations and NOE data are crucial for high-quality protein structure determination by NMR. In this context, we present here (4, 3)D reduced dimensionality (RD) experiments: H(CC)CONH TOCSY and NOESY HNCO--which instead of (15)N shifts exploit the linear combination of (15)N(i) and (13)C'(i-1) shifts (where i is a residue number) to resolve the through-bond (1)H-(1)H correlations and through-space (1)H-(1)H NOEs. The strategy makes use of the fact that (15)N and (13)C' chemical shifts when combined linearly provide a dispersion which is better compared to those of the individual chemical shifts. The extended dispersion thus available in these experiments will help to obtain the unambiguous side chain and accurate NOE assignments especially for medium-sized alpha-helical or partially unstructured proteins [molecular weight (MW) between 12-15 kDa] as well as higher MW (between 15-25 kDa) folded proteins where spectral overlap renders inaccurate and ambiguous NOEs. Further, these reduced dimensionality experiments in combination with routinely used (15)N and (13)C' edited TOCSY and NOESY experiments will provide an alternative way for high-quality NMR structure determination of large unstable proteins (with very high shift degeneracy), which are not at all amenable to 4D NMR. The utility of these experiments has been demonstrated here using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin (76 aa) protein.

  7. (¹⁵N ± ¹³C') edited (4, 3)D-H(CC)CONH TOCSY and (4, 3)D-NOESY HNCO experiments for unambiguous side chain and NOE assignments of proteins with high shift degeneracy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Arora, Ashish

    2011-11-01

    Well-resolved and unambiguous through-bond correlations and NOE data are crucial for high-quality protein structure determination by NMR. In this context, we present here (4, 3)D reduced dimensionality (RD) experiments: H(CC)CONH TOCSY and NOESY HNCO--which instead of (15)N shifts exploit the linear combination of (15)N(i) and (13)C'(i-1) shifts (where i is a residue number) to resolve the through-bond (1)H-(1)H correlations and through-space (1)H-(1)H NOEs. The strategy makes use of the fact that (15)N and (13)C' chemical shifts when combined linearly provide a dispersion which is better compared to those of the individual chemical shifts. The extended dispersion thus available in these experiments will help to obtain the unambiguous side chain and accurate NOE assignments especially for medium-sized alpha-helical or partially unstructured proteins [molecular weight (MW) between 12-15 kDa] as well as higher MW (between 15-25 kDa) folded proteins where spectral overlap renders inaccurate and ambiguous NOEs. Further, these reduced dimensionality experiments in combination with routinely used (15)N and (13)C' edited TOCSY and NOESY experiments will provide an alternative way for high-quality NMR structure determination of large unstable proteins (with very high shift degeneracy), which are not at all amenable to 4D NMR. The utility of these experiments has been demonstrated here using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin (76 aa) protein. PMID:22002239

  8. Marking Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) With Rubidium or 15N.

    PubMed

    Klick, J; Yang, W Q; Bruck, D J

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) has caused significant economic damage to berry and stone fruit production regions. Markers that are systemic in plants and easily transferred to target organisms are needed to track D. suzukii exploitation of host resources and trophic interactions. High and low concentrations of the trace element, rubidium (Rb), and the stable isotope, 15N, were tested to mark D. suzukii larvae feeding on fruits of enriched strawberry plants grown in containers under greenhouse conditions. Fly marker content and proportion of flies marked 1, 7, and 14 d after emergence from enriched fruits and fly dry mass were analyzed. Nearly 100% of the flies analyzed 14 d after emerging from 15N-enriched plants were marked, whereas only 30-75% and 0-3% were marked 14 d after emerging from high and low Rb concentration plants, respectively. Rapid Rb decay, strong 15N persistence, and the economics of using these markers in the field to elucidate D. suzukii pest ecology are discussed. PMID:26470275

  9. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  10. In Vivo Fluxes in the Ammonium-Assimilatory Pathways in Corynebacterium glutamicum Studied by 15N Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, M.; de Graaf, A. A.; Sahm, H.

    1999-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS)–glutamine 2-oxoglutarate-aminotransferase (GOGAT) represent the two main pathways of ammonium assimilation in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In this study, the ammonium assimilating fluxes in vivo in the wild-type ATCC 13032 strain and its GDH mutant were quantitated in continuous cultures. To do this, the incorporation of 15N label from [15N]ammonium in glutamate and glutamine was monitored with a time resolution of about 10 min with in vivo 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) used in combination with a recently developed high-cell-density membrane-cyclone NMR bioreactor system. The data were used to tune a standard differential equation model of ammonium assimilation that comprised ammonia transmembrane diffusion, GDH, GS, GOGAT, and glutamine amidotransferases, as well as the anabolic incorporation of glutamate and glutamine into biomass. The results provided a detailed picture of the fluxes involved in ammonium assimilation in the two different C. glutamicum strains in vivo. In both strains, transmembrane equilibration of 100 mM [15N]ammonium took less than 2 min. In the wild type, an unexpectedly high fraction of 28% of the NH4+ was assimilated via the GS reaction in glutamine, while 72% were assimilated by the reversible GDH reaction via glutamate. GOGAT was inactive. The analysis identified glutamine as an important nitrogen donor in amidotransferase reactions. The experimentally determined amount of 28% of nitrogen assimilated via glutamine is close to a theoretical 21% calculated from the high peptidoglycan content of C. glutamicum. In the GDH mutant, glutamate was exclusively synthesized over the GS/GOGAT pathway. Its level was threefold reduced compared to the wild type. PMID:10049869

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  12. Tautomeric states of the active-site histidines of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated IIIGlc, a signal-transducing protein from Escherichia coli, using two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J. G.; Torchia, D. A.; Meadow, N. D.; Roseman, S.

    1993-01-01

    IIIGlc is an 18.1-kDa signal-transducing phosphocarrier protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase system from Escherichia coli. The 1H, 15N, and 13C histidine ring NMR signals of both the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of IIIGlc have been assigned using two-dimensional 1H-15N and 1H-13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) experiments and a two-dimensional 13C-13C-1H correlation spectroscopy via JCC coupling experiment. The data were acquired on uniformly 15N-labeled and uniformly 15N/13C-labeled protein samples. The experiments rely on one-bond and two-bond J couplings that allowed for assignment of the signals without the need for the analysis of through-space (nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) correlations. The 15N and 13C chemical shifts were used to determine that His-75 exists predominantly in the N epsilon 2-H tautomeric state in both the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of IIIGlc, and that His-90 exists primarily in the N delta 1-H state in the unphosphorylated protein. Upon phosphorylation of the N epsilon 2 nitrogen of His-90, the N delta 1 nitrogen remains protonated, resulting in the formation of a charged phospho-His-90 moiety. The 1H, 15N, and 13C signals of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated proteins showed only minor shifts in the pH range from 6.0 to 9.0. These data indicate that the pK alpha values for both His-75 and His-90 in IIIGlc and His-75 in phospho-IIIGlc are less than 5.0, and that the pK alpha value for phospho-His-90 is greater than 10. The results are presented in relation to previously obtained structural data on IIIGlc, and implications for proposed mechanisms of phosphoryl transfer are discussed. PMID:8518729

  13. Synthesis and x-ray structural characterization of binuclear iridium(I) and rhodium(I) hydroxypyridinate complexes. 1. Complete assignment of the /sup 1/H NMR spectra by two-dimensional and NOE techniques. The nature of inside and outside /sup 1/H chemical shift differences

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, G.S.; Mann, K.R.

    1988-09-21

    Six new d/sup 8/-d/sup 8/ complexes, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-chp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-2hq))/sub 2/, (Rh(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/, and (Rh(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/ (hp = 2-hydroxyphridinate, mhp = 6-methyl-2-hydroxypyridinate, chp = 6-chloro-2-hydroxypyridinate, 2hq = 2-hydroxyquinolate, COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene), were synthesized and characterized by /sup 1/H NMR, /sup 13/C NMR, and IR spectroscopy and FAB mass spectrometry. X-ray crystallographic analyses of the isostructural (M(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/ (M = Ir and Rh) complexes confirmed the binuclear nature of the complexes. The complete assignment of the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of (Ir(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/ (and by analogy, the spectra of the other five complexes) was carried out with selective decoupling, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE), and two-dimensional NMR techniques. The NOE observed between hp proton H5 and COD proton H15 allowed the precise assignment of all 12 COD resonances. Olefinic proton H12 (trans to N and outside) resonates downfield of olefinic proton H11 (trans to N and inside). Olefininc proton H15 (trans to O and outside) resonates upfield of olefinic proton H16 (trans to O and inside). The endo methylene protons resonate upfield of the exo methylene protons. The inside/outside chemical shift differences observed for these compounds are ascribed to steric and magnetic anisotropy effects. The crystallographic data are presented. The molecular structure of the complexes is discussed in detail. 39 references, 5 figures, 9 tables.

  14. Membrane orientation of the Na,K-ATPase regulatory membrane protein CHIF determined by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Franzin, Carla M.; Teriete, Peter; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroid hormone-induced factor (CHIF) is a major regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, and a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of membrane proteins that regulate the function of the enzyme complex in a tissue-specific and physiological-state-specific manner. Here we present the structure of CHIF oriented in the membrane, determined by solid-state NMR orientation-dependent restraints. Because CHIF adopts a similar structure in lipid micelles and bilayers, it is possible to assign the solid-state NMR spectrum measured for 15N-labeled CHIF in oriented bilayers from the structure determined in micelles, to obtain the global orientation of the protein in the membrane. PMID:18098352

  15. Backbone chemical shift assignments for Xanthomonas campestris peroxiredoxin Q in the reduced and oxidized states: a dramatic change in backbone dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Perkins, Arden; Parsonage, Derek; Poole, Leslie B; Karplus, P Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are ubiquitous enzymes that reduce peroxides as part of antioxidant defenses and redox signaling. While Prx catalytic activity and sensitivity to hyperoxidative inactivation depend on their dynamic properties, there are few examples where their dynamics has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Here, we provide a foundation for studies of the solution properties of peroxiredoxin Q from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (XcPrxQ) by assigning the observable (1)H(N), (15)N, (13)C(α), (13)C(β), and (13)C' chemical shifts for both the reduced (dithiol) and oxidized (disulfide) states. In the reduced state, most of the backbone amide resonances (149/152, 98 %) can be assigned in the XcPrxQ (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum. In contrast, a remarkable 51 % (77) of these amide resonances are not visible in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum of the disulfide state of the enzyme, indicating a substantial change in backbone dynamics associated with the formation of an intramolecular C48-C84 disulfide bond. PMID:26438558

  16. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  17. The 15N(α,γ)19F reaction and nucleosynthesis of 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmes, S.; Wilmes, V.; Staudt, G.; Mohr, P.; Hammer, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    Several resonances in the 15N(α,γ)19F reaction have been investigated in the energy range between 0.6 MeV and 2.7 MeV. Resonance strengths and branching ratios have been determined. High sensitivity could be obtained by the combination of the Dynamitron high current accelerator, the windowless gas target system Rhinoceros, and actively shielded germanium detectors. Two levels of 19F could be observed for the first time in the (α,γ) channel, and several weak branchings below the detection limits of previous experiments were measured. Two observed resonances correspond to α-cluster states in 19F, which have been assigned unambiguously. The astrophysical reaction rate is derived from this set of resonance strengths.

  18. Chemical shifts assignments of the archaeal MC1 protein and a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA duplex in complex.

    PubMed

    Loth, Karine; Landon, Céline; Paquet, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55 in laboratory growth conditions and is structurally unrelated to other DNA-binding proteins. MC1 functions are to shape and to protect DNA against thermal denaturation by binding to it. Therefore, MC1 has a strong affinity for any double-stranded DNA. However, it recognizes and preferentially binds to bent DNA, such as four-way junctions and negatively supercoiled DNA minicircles. Combining NMR data, electron microscopy data, biochemistry, molecular modelisation and docking approaches, we proposed recently a new type of DNA/protein complex, in which the monomeric protein MC1 binds on the concave side of a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA. We present here the NMR chemical shifts assignments of each partner in the complex, (1)H (15)N MC1 protein and (1)H (13)C (15)N bent duplex DNA, as first step towards the first experimental 3D structure of this new type of DNA/protein complex.

  19. Proton-decoupled CPMG: a better experiment for measuring (15)N R2 relaxation in disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2014-04-01

    (15)N R2 relaxation is one of the most informative experiments for characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Small changes in nitrogen R2 rates are often used to determine how IDPs respond to various biologically relevant perturbations such as point mutations, posttranslational modifications and weak ligand interactions. However collecting high-quality (15)N relaxation data can be difficult. Of necessity, the samples of IDPs are often prepared with low protein concentration and the measurement time can be limited because of rapid sample degradation. Furthermore, due to hardware limitations standard experiments such as (15)N spin-lock and CPMG can sample the relaxation decay only to ca. 150ms. This is much shorter than (15)N T2 times in disordered proteins at or near physiological temperature. As a result, the sampling of relaxation decay profiles in these experiments is suboptimal, which further lowers the precision of the measurements. Here we report a new implementation of the proton-decoupled (PD) CPMG experiment which allows one to sample (15)N R2 relaxation decay up to ca. 0.5-1s. The new experiment has been validated through comparison with the well-established spin-lock measurement. Using dilute samples of denatured ubiquitin, we have demonstrated that PD-CPMG produces up to 3-fold improvement in the precision of the data. It is expected that for intrinsically disordered proteins the gains may be even more substantial. We have also shown that this sequence has a number of favorable properties: (i) the spectra are recorded with narrow linewidth in nitrogen dimension; (ii) (15)N offset correction is small and easy to calculate; (iii) the experiment is immune to various spurious effects arising from solvent exchange; (iv) the results are stable with respect to pulse miscalibration and rf field inhomogeneity; (v) with minimal change, the pulse sequence can also be used to measure R2 relaxation of (15)N(ε) spins in arginine side chains. We

  20. Magic-angle-spinning NMR of the drug resistant S31N M2 proton transporter from influenza A.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Eddy, Matthew T; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G

    2012-05-01

    We report chemical shift assignments of the drug-resistant S31N mutant of M2(18-60) determined using 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR spectra acquired with a (15)N-(13)C ZF-TEDOR transfer followed by (13)C-(13)C mixing by RFDR. The MAS spectra reveal two sets of resonances, indicating that the tetramer assembles as a dimer of dimers, similar to the wild-type channel. Helicies from the two sets of chemical shifts are shown to be in close proximity at residue H37, and the assignments reveal a difference in the helix torsion angles, as predicted by TALOS+, for the key resistance residue N31. In contrast to wild-type M2(18-60), chemical shift changes are minimal upon addition of the inhibitor rimantadine, suggesting that the drug does not bind to S31N M2.

  1. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  2. Theoretical gas to liquid shift of (15)N isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding in nitromethane using ab initio molecular dynamics and GIAO/GIPAW calculations.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Iann C; Jolibois, Franck

    2015-05-14

    Chemical shift requires the knowledge of both the sample and a reference magnetic shielding. In few cases as nitrogen (15N), the standard experimental reference corresponds to its liquid phase. Theoretical estimate of NMR magnetic shielding parameters of compounds in their liquid phase is then mandatory but usually replaced by an easily-get gas phase value, forbidding direct comparisons with experiments. We propose here to combine ab initio molecular dynamic simulations with the calculations of magnetic shielding using GIAO approach on extracted cluster's structures from MD. Using several computational strategies, we manage to accurately calculate 15N magnetic shielding of nitromethane in its liquid phase. Theoretical comparison between liquid and gas phase allows us to extrapolate an experimental value for the 15N magnetic shielding of nitromethane in gas phase between -121.8 and -120.8 ppm.

  3. Pseudo-4D triple resonance experiments to resolve HN overlap in the backbone assignment of unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Bagai, Ireena; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Zuiderweg, Erik R P

    2011-02-01

    The solution NMR resonance assignment of the protein backbone is most commonly carried out using triple resonance experiments that involve (15)N and (1)HN resonances. The assignment becomes problematic when there is resonance overlap of (15)N-(1)HN cross peaks. For such residues, one cannot unambiguously link the "left" side of the NH root to the "right" side, and the residues associated with such overlapping HN resonances remain often unassigned. Here we present a solution to this problem: a hybrid (4d,3d) reduced-dimensionality HN(CO)CA(CON)CA sequence. In this experiment, the Ca(i) resonance is modulated with the frequency of the Ca(i-1) resonance, which helps in resolving the ambiguity involved in connecting the Ca(i) and Ca(i-1) resonances for overlapping NH roots. The experiment has limited sensitivity, and is only suited for small or unfolded proteins. In a companion experiment, (4d,3d) reduced-dimensionality HNCO(N)CA, the Ca(i) resonance is modulated with the frequency of the CO(i-1) resonance, hence resolving the ambiguity existent in pairing up the Ca(i) and CO(i-1) resonances for overlapping NH roots. PMID:21190062

  4. Stable isotope tracking of endangered sea turtles: validation with satellite telemetry and δ15N analysis of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Benson, Scott R; Arthur, Karen E; Eguchi, Tomoharu; Dutton, Peter H; Tapilatu, Ricardo F; Popp, Brian N

    2012-01-01

    Effective conservation strategies for highly migratory species must incorporate information about long-distance movements and locations of high-use foraging areas. However, the inherent challenges of directly monitoring these factors call for creative research approaches and innovative application of existing tools. Highly migratory marine species, such as marine turtles, regularly travel hundreds or thousands of kilometers between breeding and feeding areas, but identification of migratory routes and habitat use patterns remains elusive. Here we use satellite telemetry in combination with compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids to confirm that insights from bulk tissue stable isotope analysis can reveal divergent migratory strategies and within-population segregation of foraging groups of critically endangered leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) across the Pacific Ocean. Among the 78 turtles studied, we found a distinct dichotomy in δ(15)N values of bulk skin, with distinct "low δ(15)N" and "high δ(15)N" groups. δ(15)N analysis of amino acids confirmed that this disparity resulted from isotopic differences at the base of the food chain and not from differences in trophic position between the two groups. Satellite tracking of 13 individuals indicated that their bulk skin δ(15)N value was linked to the particular foraging region of each turtle. These findings confirm that prevailing marine isoscapes of foraging areas can be reflected in the isotopic compositions of marine turtle body tissues sampled at nesting beaches. We use a Bayesian mixture model to show that between 82 and 100% of the 78 skin-sampled turtles could be assigned with confidence to either the eastern Pacific or western Pacific, with 33 to 66% of all turtles foraging in the eastern Pacific. Our forensic approach validates the use of stable isotopes to depict leatherback turtle movements over broad spatial ranges and is timely for establishing wise conservation efforts in

  5. Stable isotope tracking of endangered sea turtles: validation with satellite telemetry and δ15N analysis of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Benson, Scott R; Arthur, Karen E; Eguchi, Tomoharu; Dutton, Peter H; Tapilatu, Ricardo F; Popp, Brian N

    2012-01-01

    Effective conservation strategies for highly migratory species must incorporate information about long-distance movements and locations of high-use foraging areas. However, the inherent challenges of directly monitoring these factors call for creative research approaches and innovative application of existing tools. Highly migratory marine species, such as marine turtles, regularly travel hundreds or thousands of kilometers between breeding and feeding areas, but identification of migratory routes and habitat use patterns remains elusive. Here we use satellite telemetry in combination with compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids to confirm that insights from bulk tissue stable isotope analysis can reveal divergent migratory strategies and within-population segregation of foraging groups of critically endangered leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) across the Pacific Ocean. Among the 78 turtles studied, we found a distinct dichotomy in δ(15)N values of bulk skin, with distinct "low δ(15)N" and "high δ(15)N" groups. δ(15)N analysis of amino acids confirmed that this disparity resulted from isotopic differences at the base of the food chain and not from differences in trophic position between the two groups. Satellite tracking of 13 individuals indicated that their bulk skin δ(15)N value was linked to the particular foraging region of each turtle. These findings confirm that prevailing marine isoscapes of foraging areas can be reflected in the isotopic compositions of marine turtle body tissues sampled at nesting beaches. We use a Bayesian mixture model to show that between 82 and 100% of the 78 skin-sampled turtles could be assigned with confidence to either the eastern Pacific or western Pacific, with 33 to 66% of all turtles foraging in the eastern Pacific. Our forensic approach validates the use of stable isotopes to depict leatherback turtle movements over broad spatial ranges and is timely for establishing wise conservation efforts in

  6. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-11-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of (13)C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against (13)C' or (13)C(α) spins coupled to (15)N. As a result, (1)H-(15)N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns.

  7. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J.; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M.; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of 13C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against 13C’ or 13Cα spins coupled to 15N. As a result, 1H-15N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns. PMID:25442777

  8. Side-chain H and C resonance assignment in protonated/partially deuterated proteins using an improved 3D 13C-detected HCC-TOCSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kaifeng; Vögeli, Beat; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2005-06-01

    We propose the use of 13C-detected 3D HCC-TOCSY experiments for assignment of 1H and 13C resonances in protonated and partially deuterated proteins. The experiments extend 2D C-13-start and C-13-observe TOCSY type experiments proposed earlier [J. Biomol. NMR 26 (2) (2003) 167]. Introduction of the third 1H dimension to 2D TOCSY: (i) reduces the peak overlap and (ii) increases the sensitivity per unit time, even for highly deuterated (>85%) protein samples, which makes this improved method an attractive tool for the side-chain H and C assignment of average sized proteins with natural isotope abundance as well as large partially deuterated proteins. The experiments are demonstrated with a 16 kDa 15N, 13C-labeled non-deuterated apo-CcmE and a 48 kDa uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled and fractionally (˜90%) deuterated dimeric sFkpA. It is predicted that this method should be suitable for the assignment of methyl 13C and 1H chemical shifts of methyl protonated, highly deuterated and 13C-labeled proteins with even higher molecular weight.

  9. The effect of noncollinearity of 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA tensors and rotational anisotropy on 15N relaxation, CSA/dipolar cross correlation, and TROSY.

    PubMed

    Fushman, D; Cowburn, D

    1999-02-01

    Current approaches to 15N relaxation in proteins assume that the 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA tensors are collinear. We show theoretically that, when there is significant anisotropy of molecular rotation, different orientations of the two tensors, experimentally observed in proteins, nucleic acids, and small peptides, will result in differences in site-specific correlation functions and spectral densities. The standard treatments of the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation of amide 15N nuclei, of the 15N CSA/15N-1H dipolar cross correlation, and of the TROSY experiment are extended to account for the effect of noncollinearity of the 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA (chemical shift anisotropy) tensors. This effect, proportional to the degree of anisotropy of the overall motion, (D parallel/D perpendicular - 1), is sensitive to the relative orientation of the two tensors and to the orientation of the peptide plane with respect to the diffusion coordinate frame. The effect is negligible at small degrees of anisotropy, but is predicted to become significant for D parallel/D perpendicular > or = 1.5, and at high magnetic fields. The effect of noncollinearity of 15N CSA and 15N-1H dipolar interaction is sensitive to both gross (hydrodynamic) properties and atomic-level details of protein structure. Incorporation of this effect into relaxation data analysis is likely to improve both precision and accuracy of the derived characteristics of protein dynamics, especially at high magnetic fields and for molecules with a high degree of anisotropy of the overall motion. The effect will also make TROSY efficiency dependent on local orientation in moderately anisotropic systems.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the Schiff base in bacteriorhodopsin: Counterion effects on the sup 15 N shift anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    de Groot, H.J.M.; Harbison, G.S.; Herzfeld, J.; Griffin, R.G. )

    1989-04-18

    High-resolution, solid-state {sup 15}N NMR has been used to study the chemical shift anisotropies of the Schiff bases in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and in an extensive series of model compounds. Using slow-spinning techniques, the authors are able to obtain sufficient rotational sideband intensity to determine the full {sup 15}N chemical shift anisotropy for the Schiff base nitrogen in bR{sub 548} and bR{sub 568}. Comparisons are made between all-trans-bR{sub 568} and N-all-trans-retinylidene butylimine salts with halide, phenolate, and carboxylate counterions. It is argues that for the model compounds the variation in {sup 15}N chemical shift reflects the variation in (hydrogen) bond strength with the various counterions. The results suggest that carboxylates and tyrosinates may form hydrogen bonds of comparable strength in a hydrophobic environment. Thus, the hydrogen bonding strength of a counterion depends on factors that are not completely reflected in the solution pK{sub a} of its conujugate acid. For the model compounds, the two most downfield principal values of the {sup 15}N chemical shift tensor, {sigma}{sub 22} and {sigma}{sub 33}, vary dramatically with different counterions, whereas {sigma}{sub 11} remains essentially unaffected. In addition, there exists a linear correlation between {sigma}{sub 22} and {sigma}{sub 33}, which suggests that a single mechanism is responsible for the variation in chemical shifts present in all three classes of model compounds. The data for bR{sub 568} follow this trend, but the isotropic shift is 11 ppm further upfield than any of the model compounds. This extreme value suggests an unusually weak hydrogen bond in the protein.

  11. Tracking the incorporation of 15N from labeled beech litter into mineral-organic associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, M.; Hatton, P.; Derrien, D.; Lajtha, K.; Zeller, B.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen containing organic compounds are thought to have a role in the complex web of processes that control the turnover time of soil organic matter. The sequential density fractionation technique is increasingly used for the purpose of investigating the association of organic materials with the mineral matrix. Organic materials in the denser fractions (>2.0 kg L-1) typically show 13C NMR signals indicative of carbohydrate and aliphatic structures, an absence of lignin and tannin structures and a narrow C:N ratio, suggesting a microbial origin of organic matter in these fractions. Here we take advantage of a labeling experiment conducted at two different sites in Germany and in France to investigate the incorporation of organic nitrogen into physical fractions of increasing density, representing a proximity gradient to mineral surfaces. 15N labeled beech litter was applied to two acidic forest topsoils 8 and 12 years ago. Although there are differences in the distribution patterns between the two soils, and the majority of the organic nitrogen was recovered in fractions representing organic matter of plant origin and not bound to the mineral matrix, our data clearly show that after a decade, significant amounts of the nitrogen had been incorporated in mineral-organic fractions of supposedly slow turnover. It remains to be shown to which extent the N in the densest fractions was incorporated by soil microbiota and associated with mineral surfaces in organic form or adsorbed to mineral surfaces in inorganic form (NH4+).

  12. Combining Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography (HILIC) and Isotope Tagging for Off-Line LC-NMR Applications in Metabolite Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Appiah-Amponsah, Emmanuel; Owusu-Sarfo, Kwadwo; Gowda, G.A. Nagana; Ye, Tao; Raftery, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The complementary use of liquid chromatography (LC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has shown high utility in a variety of fields. While the significant benefit of spectral simplification can be achieved for the analysis of complex samples, other limitations remain. For example, 1H LC-NMR suffers from pH dependent chemical shift variations, especially during urine analysis, owing to the high physiological variation of urine pH. Additionally, large solvent signals from the mobile phase in LC can obscure lower intensity signals and severely limit the number of metabolites detected. These limitations, along with sample dilution, hinder the ability to make reliable chemical shift assignments. Recently, stable isotopic labeling has been used to detect quantitatively specific classes of metabolites of interest in biofluids. Here we present a strategy that explores the combined use of two-dimensional hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and isotope tagged NMR for the unambiguous identification of carboxyl containing metabolites present in human urine. The ability to separate structurally related compounds chromatographically, in off-line mode, followed by detection using 1H-15N 2D HSQC (two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence) spectroscopy, resulted in the assignment of low concentration carboxyl-containing metabolites from a library of isotope labeled compounds. The quantitative nature of this strategy is also demonstrated. PMID:24860727

  13. Disentangling crystallographic inequivalence and crystallographic forms of L-arginine by one- and two-dimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Herbert-Pucheta, Jose-Enrique; Colaux, Henri; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Tekely, Piotr

    2011-12-29

    Overlapping (13)C or (15)N solid-state NMR spectra from crystallographically different forms of L-arginine hydrochloride can be separated by exploiting differential proton T(1) relaxation in conjunction with cross-polarization. Dipolar (13)C-(13)C and (15)N-(15)N two-dimensional correlation experiments reveal resonances belonging to crystallographically and magnetically inequivalent molecules.

  14. Quantification of ammonia binding sites in Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant : a solid-state Nitrogen-15 MAS NMR spectroscopy investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian Ray

    2004-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of ammonia binding sites in the Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant using solid-state {sup 15}N MAS NMR spectroscopy is reported. By utilizing 15N enriched ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) gas, the different adsorption/binding sites within the zeolite were investigated as a function of NH{sub 3} loading. Using {sup 15}N MAS NMR multiple sites were resolved that have distinct cross-polarization dynamics and chemical shift behavior. These differences in the {sup 15}N NMR were used to characterize the adsorption environments in both the pure 3A zeolite and the silicone-molded forms of the desiccant.

  15. Enhancing NMR of insensitive nuclei by transfer of SABRE spin hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Zimmermann, Herbert; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the performance of methods for enhancing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signals of "insensitive", but important NMR nuclei, which are based on the SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) technique, i.e., on spin order transfer from parahydrogen (H2 molecule in its nuclear singlet spin state) to a substrate in a transient organometallic complex. Here such transfer is performed at high magnetic fields by INEPT-type NMR pulse sequences, modified for SABRE. Signal enhancements up to three orders of magnitude are obtained for 15N nuclei; the possibility of sensitive detection of 2D-NMR 1H-15N spectra of SABRE complexes and substrates is demonstrated.

  16. 15N2 formation and fast oxygen isotope exchange during pulsed 15N18O exposure of MnOx/CeO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-12-23

    Pulsing 15N18O onto an annealed 1% Mn16Ox/Ce16O2 catalyst resulted in very fast oxygen isotope exchange and 15N2 formation at 295 K. In the 1st 15N18O pulse, due to the presence of large number of surface oxygen defects, extensive 15N218O and 15N2 formations were observed. In subsequent pulses oxygen isotope exchange dominated as a result of highly labile oxygen in the oxide. We gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Vehicle Technologies Program for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  17. Assessing the fate and transformation of plant residues in the terrestrial environment using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Brian P.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Simpson, Andre J.

    2006-08-01

    Plant litter decomposition plays a fundamental role in carbon and nitrogen cycles, provides key nutrients to the soil environment and represents a potentially large positive feedback to atmospheric CO 2. However, the full details of decomposition pathways and products are unknown. Here we present the first application of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy on 13C and 15N labeled plant materials, and apply this approach in a preliminary study to monitor the environmental degradation of the pine and wheatgrass residues over time. In HR-MAS, is it possible to acquire very high resolution NMR data of plant biomass, and apply the vast array of multidimensional experiments available in conventional solution-state NMR. High levels of isotopic enrichment combined with HR-MAS significantly enhance the detection limits, and provide a wealth of information that is unattainable by any other method. Diffusion edited HR-MAS NMR data reveal the rapid loss of carbohydrate structures, while two-dimensional (2-D) HR-MAS NMR spectra demonstrate the relatively fast loss of both hydrolysable and condensed tannin structures from all plant tissues studied. Aromatic (partially lignin) and aliphatic components (waxes, cuticles) tend to persist, along with a small fraction of carbohydrate, and become highly functionalized over time. While one-dimensional (1-D) 13C HR-MAS NMR spectra of fresh plant tissue reflect compositional differences between pine and grass, these differences become negligible after decomposition suggesting that recalcitrant carbon may be similar despite the plant source. Two-dimensional 1H- 15N HR-MAS NMR analysis of the pine residue suggests that nitrogen from specific peptides is either selectively preserved or used for the synthesis of what appears to be novel structures. The amount of relevant data generated from plant components in situ using HR-MAS NMR is highly encouraging, and demonstrates that complete assignment will yield unprecedented structural knowledge of plant cell

  18. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: NMR-based mapping of the active site.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luis; Kuti, Miklos; Bishop, David F; Mezei, Mihaly; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Desnick, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) catalyzes the cyclization and D-ring isomerization of hydroxymethylbilane (HMB) to uroporphyrinogen (URO'gen) III, the cyclic tetrapyrrole and physiologic precursor of heme, chlorophyl, and corrin. The deficient activity of human URO-synthase results in the autosomal recessive cutaneous disorder, congenital erythropoietic porphyria. Mapping of the structural determinants that specify catalysis and, potentially, protein-protein interactions is lacking. To map the active site and assess the enzyme's possible interaction in a complex with hydroxymethylbilane-synthase (HMB-synthase) and/or uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (URO-decarboxylase) by NMR, an efficient expression and purification procedure was developed for these cytosolic enzymes of heme biosynthesis that enabled preparation of special isotopically-labeled protein samples for NMR characterization. Using an 800 MHz instrument, assignment of the URO-synthase backbone (13)C(alpha) (100%), (1)H(alpha) (99.6%), and nonproline (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances (94%) was achieved as well as 85% of the side-chain (13)C and (1)H resonances. NMR analyses of URO-synthase titrated with competitive inhibitors N(D)-methyl-1-formylbilane (NMF-bilane) or URO'gen III, revealed resonance perturbations of specific residues lining the cleft between the two major domains of URO synthase that mapped the enzyme's active site. In silico docking of the URO-synthase crystal structure with NMF-bilane and URO'gen III was consistent with the perturbation results and provided a 3D model of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The absence of chemical shift changes in the (15)N spectrum of URO-synthase mixed with the homogeneous HMB-synthase holoenzyme or URO-decarboxylase precluded occurrence of a stable cytosolic enzyme complex. PMID:18004775

  19. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yun; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Yang, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    In mature HIV-1 virions, a 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this report, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assemblies that are stable and are not affected by magic angle spinning of the samples at frequencies between 10 and 25 kHz. Multidimensional homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of CA assemblies of uniformly 13C,15N-labelled CA exhibit narrow lines, indicative of conformational homogeneity of the protein in these assemblies. For the conical assemblies, partial residue-specific resonance assignments were obtained. Analysis of the NMR spectra recorded for the conical and spherical assemblies indicates that the CA protein structure is not significantly different in the different morphologies. The present results demonstrate that the assemblies of CA protein are amenable to detailed structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:20092249

  20. Synthesis of 13C and 15N labeled 2,4-dinitroanisole.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Field, Jim A; Chorover, Jon; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Abrell, Leif; Mash, Eugene A

    2014-05-30

    Syntheses of [(13)C6]-2,4-dinitroanisole (ring-(13)C6) from [(13)C6]-anisole (ring-(13)C6) and [(15)N2]-2,4-dinitroanisole from anisole using in situ generated acetyl nitrate and [(15)N]-acetyl nitrate, respectively, are described. Treatment of [(13)C6]-anisole (ring-(13)C6) with acetyl nitrate generated in 100% HNO3 gave [(13)C6]-2,4-dinitroanisole (ring-(13)C6) in 83% yield. Treatment of anisole with [(15)N]-acetyl nitrate generated in 10 N [(15)N]-HNO3 gave [(15)N2 ]-2,4-dinitroanisole in 44% yield after two cycles of nitration. Byproducts in the latter reaction included [(15)N]-2-nitroanisole and [(15)N]-4-nitroanisole.

  1. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly 13C/15N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive 13C/15N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of 13C/15N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% 13C-glycerol and 0.5% 15N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of 13C/15N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  2. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-06-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive (13)C/(15)N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of (13)C/(15)N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% (13)C-glycerol and 0.5% (15)N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of (13)C/(15)N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state.

  3. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations. PMID:27482868

  4. Protonation States of the Tryptophan Synthase Internal Aldimine Active Site from Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Direct Observation of the Protonated Schiff Base Linkage to Pyridoxal-5′-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acid–base chemistry that drives catalysis in pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes has been the subject of intense interest and investigation since the initial identification of PLP’s role as a coenzyme in this extensive class of enzymes. It was first proposed over 50 years ago that the initial step in the catalytic cycle is facilitated by a protonated Schiff base form of the holoenzyme in which the linking lysine ε-imine nitrogen, which covalently binds the coenzyme, is protonated. Here we provide the first 15N NMR chemical shift measurements of such a Schiff base linkage in the resting holoenzyme form, the internal aldimine state of tryptophan synthase. Double-resonance experiments confirm the assignment of the Schiff base nitrogen, and additional 13C, 15N, and 31P chemical shift measurements of sites on the PLP coenzyme allow a detailed model of coenzyme protonation states to be established. PMID:25148001

  5. Numerical evaluation of subsoil diffusion of (15) N labelled denitrification products during employment of the (15) N gas flux method in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Ruoss, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Common methods for measuring soil denitrification in situ include monitoring the accumulation of 15N labelled N2 and N2O evolved from 15N labelled soil nitrate pool in soil surface chambers. Gas diffusion is considered to be the main accumulation process. Because accumulation of the gases decreases concentration gradients between soil and chamber over time, gas production rates are underestimated if calculated from chamber concentrations. Moreover, concentration gradients to the non-labelled subsoil exist, inevitably causing downward diffusion of 15N labelled denitrification products. A numerical model for simulating gas diffusion in soil was used in order to determine the significance of this source of error. Results show that subsoil diffusion of 15N labelled N2 and N2O - and thus potential underestimation of denitrification derived from chamber fluxes - increases with cover closure time as well as with increasing diffusivity. Simulations based on the range of typical gas diffusivities of unsaturated soils show that the fraction of subsoil diffusion after chamber closure for 1 hour is always significant with values up to >30 % of total production of 15N labelled N2 and N2O. Field experiments for measuring denitrification with the 15N gas flux method were conducted. The ability of the model to predict the time pattern of gas accumulation was evaluated by comparing measured 15N2 concentrations and simulated values.

  6. Ultrahigh resolution protein structures using NMR chemical shift tensors

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Franks, W. Trent; Oldfield, Eric; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs) in proteins, as well as their orientations, represent an important new restraint class for protein structure refinement and determination. Here, we present the first determination of both CST magnitudes and orientations for 13Cα and 15N (peptide backbone) groups in a protein, the β1 IgG binding domain of protein G from Streptococcus spp., GB1. Site-specific 13Cα and 15N CSTs were measured using synchronously evolved recoupling experiments in which 13C and 15N tensors were projected onto the 1H-13C and 1H-15N vectors, respectively, and onto the 15N-13C vector in the case of 13Cα. The orientations of the 13Cα CSTs to the 1H-13C and 13C-15N vectors agreed well with the results of ab initio calculations, with an rmsd of approximately 8°. In addition, the measured 15N tensors exhibited larger reduced anisotropies in α-helical versus β-sheet regions, with very limited variation (18 ± 4°) in the orientation of the z-axis of the 15N CST with respect to the 1H-15N vector. Incorporation of the 13Cα CST restraints into structure calculations, in combination with isotropic chemical shifts, transferred echo double resonance 13C-15N distances and vector angle restraints, improved the backbone rmsd to 0.16 Å (PDB ID code 2LGI) and is consistent with existing X-ray structures (0.51 Å agreement with PDB ID code 2QMT). These results demonstrate that chemical shift tensors have considerable utility in protein structure refinement, with the best structures comparable to 1.0-Å crystal structures, based upon empirical metrics such as Ramachandran geometries and χ1/χ2 distributions, providing solid-state NMR with a powerful tool for de novo structure determination. PMID:21969532

  7. Resonance assignment of disordered protein with repetitive and overlapping sequence using combinatorial approach reveals initial structural propensities and local restrictions in the denatured state.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nikita; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-09-01

    NMR resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins poses a challenge because of the limited dispersion of amide proton chemical shifts. This becomes even more complex with the increase in the size of the system. Residue specific selective labeling/unlabeling experiments have been used to resolve the overlap, but require multiple sample preparations. Here, we demonstrate an assignment strategy requiring only a single sample of uniformly labeled (13)C,(15)N-protein. We have used a combinatorial approach, involving 3D-HNN, CC(CO)NH and 2D-MUSIC, which allowed us to assign a denatured centromeric protein Cse4 of 229 residues. Further, we show that even the less sensitive experiments, when used in an efficient manner can lead to the complete assignment of a complex system without the use of specialized probes in a relatively short time frame. The assignment of the amino acids discloses the presence of local structural propensities even in the denatured state accompanied by restricted motion in certain regions that provides insights into the early folding events of the protein. PMID:27586017

  8. Regulation of [15N]urea synthesis from [5-15N]glutamine. Role of pH, hormones, and pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Nissim, I; Yudkoff, M; Brosnan, J T

    1996-12-01

    We have utilized both [5-15N]glutamine and [3-13C] pyruvate as metabolic tracers in order to: (i) examine the effect of pH, glucagon (GLU), or insulin on the precursor-product relationship between 15NH3, [15N]citrulline, and, thereby, [15N]urea synthesis and (ii) elucidate the mechanism(s) by which pyruvate stimulates [15N] urea synthesis. Hepatocytes isolated from rat were incubated at pH 6.8, 7.4, or 7.6 with 1 mM [5-15N]glutamine and 0.1 mM 14NH4Cl in the presence or the absence of [3-13C] pyruvate (2 mM). A separate series of experiments was performed at pH 7.4 in the presence of insulin or GLU. 15NH3 enrichment exceeded or was equal to that of [15N]citrulline under all conditions except for pH 7.6, when the 15N enrichment in citrulline exceeded that in ammonia. The formation of [15N]citrulline (atom % excess) was increased with higher pH. Flux through phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and [15N]urea synthesis were stimulated (p < 0.05) at pH 7.6 or with GLU and decreased (p < 0.05) at pH 6.8. Insulin had no significant effect on flux through PDG or on [15N]urea synthesis. Decreased [15N]urea production at pH 6.8 was associated with depleted aspartate and glutamate levels. Pyruvate attenuated this decrease in the aspartate and glutamate pools and stimulated [15N]urea synthesis. Production of Asp from pyruvate was increased with increasing medium pH. Approximately 80% of Asp was derived from [3-13C]pyruvate regardless of incubation pH or addition of hormone. Furthermore, approximately 20, 40, and 50% of the mitochondrial N-acetylglutamate (NAG) pool was derived from [3-13C]pyruvate at pH 6.8, 7.4, and 7.6, respectively. Both the concentration and formation of [13C]NAG from [3-13C]pyruvate were increased (p < 0.05) with glucagon and decreased (p < 0.05) with insulin or at pH 6.8. The data suggest a correlation between changes in [15N]urea synthesis and alterations in the level and synthesis of [13C]NAG from pyruvate. The current observations suggest that the

  9. Resonance assignment of PsbP: an extrinsic protein from photosystem II of Spinacia oleracea.

    PubMed

    Rathner, Adriana; Chandra, Kousik; Rathner, Petr; Horničáková, Michaela; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Müller, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    PsbP (23 kDa) is an extrinsic eukaryotic protein of photosystem II found in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants and green algae. It has been proven to be indispensable for proper functioning of the oxygen evolving complex. By interaction with other extrinsic proteins (PsbQ, PsbO and PsbR), it modulates the concentration of two cofactors of the water splitting reaction, Ca(2+) and Cl(-). The crystallographic structure of PsbP from Spinacia oleracea lacks the N-terminal part as well as two inner regions which were modelled as loops. Those unresolved parts are believed to be functionally crucial for the binding of PsbP to the thylakoid membrane. In this NMR study we report (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of the backbone and side chain atoms of the PsbP protein. Based on these data, an estimate of the secondary structure has been made. The structural motifs found fit the resolved parts of the crystallographic structure very well. In addition, the complete assignment set provides preliminary insight into the dynamic regions.

  10. sup 13 C and sup 15 N nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of the ionization state of substrates bound to bovine dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Selinsky, B.S.; Perlman, M.E.; London, R.E. ); Unkefer, C.J. ); Mitchell, J. ); Blakley, R.L. Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis )

    1990-02-06

    The state of protonation of substrates bound to mammalian dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) has significance for the mechanism of catalysis. To investigate this, dihydrofolate and dihydropteroylpentaglutamate have been synthesized with {sup 15}N enrichment at N-5. {sup 15}N NMR studies have been performed on the binary complexes formed by bovine DHFR with these compounds and with (5-{sup 15}N)dihydrobiopterin. The results indicate that there is no protonation at N-5 in the binary complexes, and this was confirmed by {sup 13}C NMR studies with folate and dihydrofolate synthesized with {sup 13}C enrichment at C-6. The chemical shift displacements produced by complex formation are in the same direction as those which result from deprotonation of the N-3/C-4-O amide group and are consistent with at least partial loss of the proton from N-3. This would be possible if, as crystallographic data indicate, there is interaction of N-3 and the 2-amino group of the bound ligands with the carboxylate of the active site glutamate residue (Glu{sup 30}).

  11. Sensitivity-Enhanced MQ-HCN-CCH-TOCSY and MQ-HCN-CCH-COSY Pulse Schemes for 13C/ 15N Labeled RNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weidong; Jiang, Licong; Gosser, Yuying Q.

    2000-07-01

    Sensitivity enhanced multiple-quantum 3D HCN-CCH-TOCSY and HCN-CCH-COSY experiments are presented for the ribose resonance assignment of 13C/15N-labeled RNA sample. The experiments make use of the chemical shift dispersion of N1/N9 of pyrimidine/purine to distinguish the ribose spin systems. They provide a complementary approach for the assignment of ribose resonance to the currently used HCCH-COSY and HCCH-TOCSY type experiments in which either 13C or 1H is utilized to separate the different ribose spin systems. The pulse schemes have been demonstrated on a 23-mer 13C/15N-labeled RNA aptamer complexed with neomycin and tested on a 32-mer RNA complexed with a 23-residue peptide.

  12. Benchmark fragment-based (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua D; Kudla, Ryan A; Day, Graeme M; Mueller, Leonard J; Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-08-21

    The performance of fragment-based ab initio(1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions is assessed against experimental NMR chemical shift data in four benchmark sets of molecular crystals. Employing a variety of commonly used density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP, TPSSh, OPBE, PBE, TPSS), we explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, and combined cluster/fragment models. The hybrid density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP and TPSSh) generally out-perform their generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based counterparts. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O isotropic chemical shifts can be predicted with root-mean-square errors of 0.3, 1.5, 4.2, and 9.8 ppm, respectively, using a computationally inexpensive electrostatically embedded two-body PBE0 fragment model. Oxygen chemical shieldings prove particularly sensitive to local many-body effects, and using a combined cluster/fragment model instead of the simple two-body fragment model decreases the root-mean-square errors to 7.6 ppm. These fragment-based model errors compare favorably with GIPAW PBE ones of 0.4, 2.2, 5.4, and 7.2 ppm for the same (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O test sets. Using these benchmark calculations, a set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided and their robustness assessed using statistical cross-validation. We demonstrate the utility of these approaches and the reported scaling parameters on applications to 9-tert-butyl anthracene, several histidine co-crystals, benzoic acid and the C-nitrosoarene SnCl2(CH3)2(NODMA)2. PMID:27431490

  13. Variability of the 15N Chemical Shielding Tensors in the B3 Domain of Protein G from 15N Relaxation Measurements at Several Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jennifer B.; Fushman, David

    2008-01-01

    We applied a combination of 15N relaxation and CSA/dipolar cross-correlation measurements at five magnetic fields (9.4, 11.7, 14.1, 16.4, and 18.8 Tesla) to determine the 15N chemical shielding tensors for backbone amides in protein G in solution. The data were analyzed using various model-independent approaches and those based on Lipari-Szabo approximation, all of them yielding similar results. The results indicate a range of site-specific values of the anisotropy (CSA) and orientation of the 15N chemical shielding tensor, similar to those in ubiquitin. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of the 15N CSA values, the mean anisotropy is -173.9 to -177.2 ppm (for 1.02-Å NH-bond length) and the site-so-site CSA variability is ±17.6 to ±21.4 ppm, depending on the method used. This CSA variability is significantly larger than derived previously for ribonuclease H or recently, using “meta-analysis” for ubiquitin. Standard interpretation of 15N relaxation studies of backbone dynamics in proteins involves an a priori assumption of a uniform 15N CSA. We show that this assumption leads to a significant discrepancy between the order parameters obtained at different fields. Using the site-specific CSAs obtained from our study removes this discrepancy and allows simultaneous fit of relaxation data at all five fields to Lipari-Szabo spectral densities. These findings emphasize the necessity of taking into account the variability of 15N CSA for accurate analysis of protein dynamics from 15N relaxation measurements. PMID:16771499

  14. Soil processes drive seasonal variation in retention of 15N tracers in a deciduous forest catchment.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Christine L; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Weiss, Marissa S; McCalley, K; Sparks, Jed P; Thomas, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal patterns of stream nitrate concentration have long been interpreted as demonstrating the central role of plant uptake in regulating stream nitrogen loss from forested catchments. Soil processes are rarely considered as important drivers of these patterns. We examined seasonal variation in N retention in a deciduous forest using three whole-ecosystem 15N tracer additions: in late April (post-snowmelt, pre-leaf-out), late July (mid-growing- season), and late October (end of leaf-fall). We expected that plant 15N uptake would peak in late spring and midsummer, that immobilization in surface litter and soil would peak the following autumn leaf-fall, and that leaching losses would vary inversely with 15N retention. Similar to most other 15N tracer studies, we found that litter and soils dominated ecosystem retention of added 15N. However, 15N recovery in detrital pools varied tremendously by season, with > 90% retention in spring and autumn and sharply reduced 15N retention in late summer. During spring, over half of the 15N retained in soil occurred within one day in the heavy (mineral-associated) soil fraction. During summer, a large decrease in 15N retention one week after addition coincided with increased losses of 15NO3- to soil leachate and seasonal increases in soil and stream NO3- concentrations, although leaching accounted for only a small fraction of the lost 15N (< 0.2%). Uptake of 15N into roots did not vary by season and accounted for < 4% of each tracer addition. Denitrification or other processes that lead to N gas loss may have consumed the rest. These measurements of 15N movement provide strong evidence for the dominant role of soil processes in regulating seasonal N retention and losses in this catchment and perhaps others with similar soils.

  15. High-resolution molecular structure of a peptide in an amyloid fibril determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Macphee, Cait E.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; McMahon, Michael T.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are self-assembled filamentous structures associated with protein deposition conditions including Alzheimer's disease and the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Despite the immense medical importance of amyloid fibrils, no atomic-resolution structures are available for these materials, because the intact fibrils are insoluble and do not form diffraction-quality 3D crystals. Here we report the high-resolution structure of a peptide fragment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin, TTR(105-115), in its fibrillar form, determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. The structure resolves not only the backbone fold but also the precise conformation of the side chains. Nearly complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for TTR(105-115) formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance and dihedral angle restraints. A total of 76 self-consistent experimental measurements, including 41 restraints on 19 backbone dihedral angles and 35 13C-15N distances between 3 and 6 Å were obtained from 2D and 3D NMR spectra recorded on three fibril samples uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled in consecutive stretches of four amino acids and used to calculate an ensemble of peptide structures. Our results indicate that TTR(105-115) adopts an extended -strand conformation in the amyloid fibrils such that both the main- and side-chain torsion angles are close to their optimal values. Moreover, the structure of this peptide in the fibrillar form has a degree of long-range order that is generally associated only with crystalline materials. These findings provide an explanation of the unusual stability and characteristic properties of this form of polypeptide assembly.

  16. NMR and mass spectrometric characterization of vinblastine, vincristine and some new related impurities - part I.

    PubMed

    Dubrovay, Zsófia; Háda, Viktor; Béni, Zoltán; Szántay, Csaba

    2013-10-01

    In the course of exploring the possibilities of developing a new, improved process at Gedeon Richter for the production of the "bisindole" alkaloids vinblastine (VLB) and vincristine (VCR), some novel VLB/VCR-related trace impurities were detected by analytical HPLC. Following isolation by preparative HPLC, a combination of 1D and 2D ultra high-field NMR and high-resolution (HR) (LC-)MS/MS studies allowed the structural identification and complete spectral characterization of several hitherto unpublished VLB/VCR-analogue impurities. Since the impurities could not be isolated in entirely pure forms and were available only in minute, mass-limited quantities, accessing the spectral information needed for their ab initio structure determination was met with various practical difficulties. Successful structure determination therefore relied heavily on the availability and use of detailed and definitive spectral data for both VLB and VCR. In particular, the utilization of detailed (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR assignments as well as (1)H-(1)H, (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N spin-spin connectivities pertaining to different solvents for VLB/VCR base and sulphate salt was required. Although NMR studies on VLB base and other bisindoles were reported earlier in the literature, an NMR characterization of VLB and VCR under the above-mentioned circumstances and using ultra-high field instrumentation is either scarcely available or entirely lacking, therefore the necessary data had to be obtained in-house. Likewise, a modern tandem HR-ESI-MS/MS(n) fragmentation study of VLB and VCR has not been published yet. In the present paper we therefore give a thorough NMR and MS characterization of VLB and VCR specifically with a view to filling this void and to provide sufficiently extensive and solid reference data for the structural investigation of the aforementioned VLB/VCR impurities. Besides being scientifically relevant in its own right, the disclosed data should be useful for anyone

  17. REDOR NMR of stable-isotope-labeled protein binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, J.

    1994-12-01

    Rotational-echo, double resonance (REDOR) NMR, a new analytical spectroscopic technique for solids spinning at the magic angle, has been developed over the last 5 years. REDOR provides a direct measure of heteronuclear dipolar coupling between isolated pairs of labeled nuclei. In a solid with a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N labeled pair, for example, the {sup 13}C rotational echoes that form each rotor period following a{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization transfer can be prevented from reaching full intensity by insertion of a {sup 15}N {pi} pulse each half rotor period. The REDOR difference (the difference between a {sup 13}C NMR spectrum obtained under these conditions and one obtained with no {sup 15}N {pi} pulses) has a strong dependence on the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar coupling, and hence, the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N internuclear distance. REDOR is described as double-resonance even though three radio frequencies (typically {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N) are used because the protons are removed from the important evolution part of the experiment by resonant decoupling. The dephasing of magnetization in REDOR arises from a local dipolar {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N field gradient and involves no polarization transfer. REDOR has no dependence on {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N chemical-shift tensors and does not require resolution of a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N coupling in the chemical-shift dimension.

  18. Solution structure of pleckstrin homology domain of dynamin by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Fushman, D; Cahill, S; Lemmon, M A; Schlessinger, J; Cowburn, D

    1995-01-01

    The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain is a recognition motif thought to be involved in signal-transduction pathways controlled by a variety of cytoplasmic proteins. Assignments of nearly all 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances of the PH domain from dynamin have been obtained from homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR experiments. The secondary structure has been elucidated from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from 13C chemical shift deviations, and from observation of slowly exchanging amide hydrogens. The secondary structure contains one alpha-helix and eight beta-strands, seven of which are arranged in two contiguous, antiparallel beta-sheets. The structure is monomeric, in contrast to the well-defined intimate dimerization of the crystal structure of this molecule. Residues possibly involved in ligand binding are in apparently flexible loops. Steady-state 15N(1H) nuclear Overhauser effect measurements indicate unequivocally the boundaries of this PH domain, and the structured portion of the domain appears to be more extended to the C terminus than previously suggested for other PH domains. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7846058

  19. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  20. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms.

  1. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  2. Solid-state NMR spectroscopic study of chromophore-protein interactions in the Pr ground state of plant phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2012-05-01

    Despite extensive study, the molecular structure of the chromophore-binding pocket of phytochrome A (phyA), the principal photoreceptor controlling photomorphogenesis in plants, has not yet been successfully resolved. Here, we report a series of two-dimensional (2-D) magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments on the recombinant N-terminal, 65-kDa PAS-GAF-PHY light-sensing module of phytochrome A3 from oat (Avena sativa), assembled with uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (u-[13C,15N]-PCB-As.phyA3). The Pr state of this protein was studied regarding the electronic structure of the chromophore and its interactions with the proximal amino acids. Using 2-D 13C-13C and 1H-15N experiments, a complete set of 13C and 15N assignments for the chromophore were obtained. Also, a large number of 1H-13C distance restraints between the chromophore and its binding pocket were revealed by interfacial heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. 13C doublings of the chromophore A-ring region and the C-ring carboxylate moiety, together with the observation of two Pr isoforms, Pr-I and Pr-II, demonstrate the local mobility of the chromophore and the plasticity of its protein environment. It appears that the interactions and dynamics in the binding pocket of phyA in the Pr state are remarkably similar to those of cyanobacterial phytochrome (Cph1). The N-terminus of the region modeled (residues 56-66 of phyA) is highly mobile. Differences in the regulatory processes involved in plant and Cph1 phytochromes are discussed. PMID:22419823

  3. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  4. δ 15 N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural abundance δ15N of ecosystems integrates nitrogen (N) inputs and losses, and thus reflects factors that control the long-term development of ecosystem N balances. We here report N and carbon (C) content of forest vegetation and soils, and associated δ15N, across nine Doug...

  5. Human dietary δ(15)N intake: representative data for principle food items.

    PubMed

    Huelsemann, F; Koehler, K; Braun, H; Schaenzer, W; Flenker, U

    2013-09-01

    Dietary analysis using δ(15)N values of human remains such as bone and hair is usually based on general principles and limited data sets. Even for modern humans, the direct ascertainment of dietary δ(15)N is difficult and laborious, due to the complexity of metabolism and nitrogen fractionation, differing dietary habits and variation of δ(15)N values of food items. The objective of this study was to summarize contemporary regional experimental and global literature data to ascertain mean representative δ(15)N values for distinct food categories. A comprehensive data set of more than 12,000 analyzed food samples was summarized from the literature. Data originated from studies dealing with (1) authenticity tracing or origin control of food items, and (2) effects of fertilization or nutrition on δ(15)N values of plants or animals. Regional German food δ(15)N values revealed no major differences compared with the mean global values derived from the literature. We found that, in contrast to other food categories, historical faunal remains of pig and poultry are significantly enriched in (15)N compared to modern samples. This difference may be due to modern industrialized breeding practices. In some food categories variations in agricultural and feeding regimens cause significant differences in δ(15)N values that may lead to misinterpretations when only limited information is available.

  6. δ(15) N from soil to wine in bulk samples and proline.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Mauro; Ziller, Luca; Bertoldi, Daniela; Bontempo, Luana; Larcher, Roberto; Nicolini, Giorgio; Camin, Federica

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of using δ(15) N as an additional isotopic marker able to link wine to its area of origin was investigated. The whole production chain (soil-leaves-grape-wine) was considered. Moreover, the research included evaluation of the effect of the fermentation process, the use of different types of yeast and white and red vinification, the addition of nitrogen adjuvants and ultrasound lysis simulating wine ageing. The δ(15) N of grapes and wine was measured in bulk samples and compounds, specifically in proline, for the first time. Despite isotopic fractionation from soil to wine, the δ(15) N values of leaves, grapes, wine and particularly must and wine proline conserved the variability of δ(15) N in the growing soil. Fermentation and ultrasound treatment did not affect the δ(15) N values of grape must, which was therefore conserved in wine. The addition of inorganic or organic adjuvants was able to influence the δ(15) N of bulk wine, depending on the amount and the difference between the δ(15) N of must and that of the adjuvant. The δ(15) N of wine proline was not influenced by adjuvant addition and is therefore the best marker for tracing the geographical origin of wine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. δ(15) N from soil to wine in bulk samples and proline.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Mauro; Ziller, Luca; Bertoldi, Daniela; Bontempo, Luana; Larcher, Roberto; Nicolini, Giorgio; Camin, Federica

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of using δ(15) N as an additional isotopic marker able to link wine to its area of origin was investigated. The whole production chain (soil-leaves-grape-wine) was considered. Moreover, the research included evaluation of the effect of the fermentation process, the use of different types of yeast and white and red vinification, the addition of nitrogen adjuvants and ultrasound lysis simulating wine ageing. The δ(15) N of grapes and wine was measured in bulk samples and compounds, specifically in proline, for the first time. Despite isotopic fractionation from soil to wine, the δ(15) N values of leaves, grapes, wine and particularly must and wine proline conserved the variability of δ(15) N in the growing soil. Fermentation and ultrasound treatment did not affect the δ(15) N values of grape must, which was therefore conserved in wine. The addition of inorganic or organic adjuvants was able to influence the δ(15) N of bulk wine, depending on the amount and the difference between the δ(15) N of must and that of the adjuvant. The δ(15) N of wine proline was not influenced by adjuvant addition and is therefore the best marker for tracing the geographical origin of wine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27479606

  8. Chemical shift assignments and secondary structure prediction for Q4DY78, a conserved kinetoplastid-specific protein from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    D'Andréa, Éverton Dias; Diehl, Anne; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosma brucei and Leishmania spp. are kinetoplastid protozoa causative agents of Chagas disease, sleeping sickness and leishmaniasis, respectively, neglected tropical diseases estimated to infect millions of people worldwide. Their genome sequencing has revealed approximately 50 % of genes encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function, opening possibilities for novel target identification and drug discovery. Q4DY78 is a putative essential protein from T. cruzi conserved in the related kinetoplastids and divergent from mammalian host proteins. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C chemical shift assignments and secondary structure analysis of the Q4DY78 protein as basis for NMR structure determination, functional analysis and drug screening.

  9. Assignments That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashimoto, I.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests, on a humorous note, a game-plan for assignment justification and elaboration that utilizes, in a constructive and professional manner, the best of what is known about assignment-making. (EL)

  10. Stable Isotope Tracking of Endangered Sea Turtles: Validation with Satellite Telemetry and δ15N Analysis of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Seminoff, Jeffrey A.; Benson, Scott R.; Arthur, Karen E.; Eguchi, Tomoharu; Dutton, Peter H.; Tapilatu, Ricardo F.; Popp, Brian N.

    2012-01-01

    Effective conservation strategies for highly migratory species must incorporate information about long-distance movements and locations of high-use foraging areas. However, the inherent challenges of directly monitoring these factors call for creative research approaches and innovative application of existing tools. Highly migratory marine species, such as marine turtles, regularly travel hundreds or thousands of kilometers between breeding and feeding areas, but identification of migratory routes and habitat use patterns remains elusive. Here we use satellite telemetry in combination with compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids to confirm that insights from bulk tissue stable isotope analysis can reveal divergent migratory strategies and within-population segregation of foraging groups of critically endangered leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) across the Pacific Ocean. Among the 78 turtles studied, we found a distinct dichotomy in δ15N values of bulk skin, with distinct “low δ15N” and “high δ15N” groups. δ15N analysis of amino acids confirmed that this disparity resulted from isotopic differences at the base of the food chain and not from differences in trophic position between the two groups. Satellite tracking of 13 individuals indicated that their bulk skin δ15N value was linked to the particular foraging region of each turtle. These findings confirm that prevailing marine isoscapes of foraging areas can be reflected in the isotopic compositions of marine turtle body tissues sampled at nesting beaches. We use a Bayesian mixture model to show that between 82 and 100% of the 78 skin-sampled turtles could be assigned with confidence to either the eastern Pacific or western Pacific, with 33 to 66% of all turtles foraging in the eastern Pacific. Our forensic approach validates the use of stable isotopes to depict leatherback turtle movements over broad spatial ranges and is timely for establishing wise conservation efforts in

  11. Preparation and characterization of 15N-enriched, size-defined heparan sulfate precursor oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sigulinsky, Crystal; Babu, Ponnusamy; Victor, Xylophone V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    We report the preparation of size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides from Escherichia coli-derived 15N-enriched N-acetylheparosan. Optimized growth conditions of E. coli in minimal media containing 15NH4Cl yielded [15N]N-acetylheparosan on a preparative scale. Depolymerization of [15N]N-acetylheparosan by heparitinase I yielded resolvable, even-numbered oligosaccharides ranging from disaccharide to icosaccharide. Anion-exchange chromatography-assisted fractionation afforded size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides identifiable by ESI-TOFMS. These isotopically labeled oligosaccharides will prove to be valuable research tools for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of heparin and heparan sulfate oligosaccharides and for the study of their structural biology. PMID:19945695

  12. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in an arid ecosystem measured by sup 15 N natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Plants dependent on nitrogen fixation have an {sup 15}N abundance similar to the atmosphere, while non-nitrogen fixing plants usually are enriched in {sup 15}N and are similar to soil nitrogen values. The natural abundance of {sup 15}N in leaf tissues and soils was determined to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation by several legumes and actinorhizal species in the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research area in central New Mexico. Comparison of {delta}{sup 15}N values for the legume Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) to adjacent Atriplex canascens (fourwing saltbush) indicated that P. glandulosa obtained 66% of its nitrogen by fixation. The legume Hoffmanseggia jamesii was found to be utilizing soil nitrogen. The {delta}{sup 15}N values for the actinorhizal plants, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Cercocarpus montanus, while below values for soil nitrogen, did not differ from associated non-fixing plants.

  13. Direct measurements of protein backbone 15N spin relaxation rates from peak line-width using a fully-relaxed Accordion 3D HNCO experiment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2009-03-01

    Protein backbone (15)N spin relaxation rates measured by solution NMR provide useful dynamic information with a site-specific resolution. The conventional method is to record a series of 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra with varied relaxation delays, and derive relaxation rate from the following curve fitting on the resonance intensities. Proteins with poorly resolved spectra often require several 3D HNCO spectra to be collected on a (15)N/(13)C double labeled protein sample. In order to reduce the relaxation dimension Carr et al. (P.A. Carr, D.A. Fearing, A.G. Palmer, 3D accordion spectroscopy for measuring N-15 and (CO)-Carbon-13 relaxation rates in poorly resolved NMR spectra, J. Magn. Reson. 132 (1998) 25-33) employed an Accordion type HNCO pulse sequence to obtain (15)N or (13)C T(1) relaxation rates by numerical fitting of the relaxation interfered free induction decay (FID) data. To avoid intensive analysis of the time domain data, we propose a modified protocol to measure (15)N T(1) and T(2) relaxation rates from easily obtained line-widths in an Accordion HNCO spectrum. Both T(1) and T(2) relaxation could be simultaneously convoluted into the constant-time evolution periods of (13)C' and (15)N, respectively. The relaxation delay was allowed to reach at least 3 x T(1) or 3 x T(2) so that the signal was substantially decayed by the end of the FID, and the resulting peak full-width at half height (FWHH) could be directly used to calculate relaxation rate. When applied to the 76-residue Ubiquitin and the 226-residue glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP), this method yielded T(1) and T(2) values deviating on average by 4-6% and 5-7%, respectively, from the measurements based on the conventional 2D method. In comparison, the conventional methods possessed intrinsic error ranges of 2-4% for T(1) and 3-6% for T(2). In addition to comparable accuracy, the fully-relaxed Accordion HNCO method presented here allowed measurements of relaxation rates for resonances unresolved in

  14. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  15. Proton NMR investigation of the heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase that mimics manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-07-13

    The heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase [MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 4, 215-221] that closely mimics manganese peroxidase (MnP) has been characterized by both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. All hyperfine-shifted resonances from the heme pocket as well as resonances from catalytically relevant amino acid residues in the congested diamagnetic envelope have been assigned. From the NMR spectral assignment and the line broadening pattern of specific protons in NOESY spectra of MnCcP, the location of the engineered Mn(II) center is firmly identified. Furthermore, we found that the creation of the Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in no detectable structural changes on the distal heme pocket of the protein. However, notable structural changes are observed at the proximal side of the heme cavity. Both CepsilonH shift of the proximal histidine and (15)N shift of the bound C(15)N(-) suggest a weaker heme Fe(III)-N(His) bond in MnCcP compared to WtCcP. Our results indicate that the engineered Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in not only a similar Mn(II)-binding affinity and improved MnP activity, but also weakened the Fe(III)-N(His) bond strength of the template protein CcP so that its bond strength is similar to that of the target protein MnP. The results presented here help elucidate the impact of designing a metal-binding site on both the local and global structure of the enzyme, and provide a structural basis for engineering the next generation of MnCcP that mimics MnP more closely. PMID:10413489

  16. The effect of manuring on cereal and pulse amino acid δ(15)N values.

    PubMed

    Styring, Amy K; Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-06-01

    Amino acid δ(15)N values of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) grains and rachis and broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, grown in manured and unmanured soil at the experimental farm stations of Rothamsted, UK and Bad Lauchstädt, Germany, were determined by GC-C-IRMS. Manuring was found to result in a consistent (15)N-enrichment of cereal grain amino acid δ(15)N values, indicating that manuring did not affect the metabolic routing of nitrogen (N) into cereal grain amino acids. The increase in cereal grain δ(15)N values with manuring is therefore due to a (15)N-enrichment in the δ(15)N value of assimilated inorganic-N. Greater variation was observed in the (15)N-enrichment of rachis amino acids with manuring, possibly due to enhanced sensitivity to changes in growing conditions and higher turnover of N in rachis cells compared to cereal grains. Total amino acid δ(15)N values of manured and unmanured broad beans and peas were very similar, indicating that the legumes assimilated N2 from the atmosphere rather than N from the soil, since there was no evidence for routing of (15)N-enriched manure N into any of the pulse amino acids. Crop amino acid δ(15)N values thus provide insights into the sources of N assimilated by non N2-fixing and N2-fixing crops grown on manured and unmanured soils, and reveal an effect of manure on N metabolism in different crop species and plant parts.

  17. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15 N over long-term forest succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven; Tepley, Alan J.; Compton, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession towards old-growth are thought to increase nitrogen (N) availability and N loss, which should increase soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across 800 years of forest succession in a topographically complex montane landscape influenced by human logging and wildfire. In contrast to expectations, we found that disturbance caused declines in surface mineral soil δ15N values, both in logged forests measured 40–50 years after disturbance, and in unlogged forests disturbed by severe wildfire within the last 200 years. Both symbiotic N fixation and N transfers from disturbed vegetation and detritus could lower soil δ15N values after disturbance. A more important role for symbiotic N fixation is suggested by lower soil δ15N values in slow-successional sites with slow canopy closure, which favors early-successional N fixers. Soil δ15N values increased only marginally throughout 800 years of succession, reflecting soil N uptake by vegetation and strong overall N retention. Although post-disturbance N inputs lowered surface soil δ15N values, steady-state mass balance calculations suggest that wildfire combustion of vegetation and detritus can dominate long-term N loss and increase whole-ecosystem δ15N. On steeper topography, declining soil δ15N values highlight erosion and accelerated soil turnover as an additional abiotic control on N balances. We conclude for N-limited montane forests that soil δ15N and N availability are less influenced by nitrate leaching and denitrification loss than by interactions between disturbance, N fixation, and erosion.

  18. Compound-specific 15N analysis of amino acids in 15N tracer experiments provide an estimate of newly synthesised soil protein from inorganic and organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, Alice; Michaelides, Katerina; Evershed, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Organic N concentrations far exceed those of inorganic N in most soils and despite much investigation, the composition and cycling of this complex pool of SOM remains poorly understood. A particular problem has been separating more recalcitrant soil organic N from that actively cycling through the soil system; an important consideration in N cycling studies and for the soil's nutrient supplying capacity. The use of 15N-labelled substrates as stable isotope tracers has contributed much to our understanding of the soil system, but the complexity and heterogeneity of soil organic N prevents thorough compound-specific 15N analyses of organic N compounds and makes it difficult to examine any 15N-labelled organic products in any detail. As a result, a significant proportion of previous work has either simply assumed that since the majority of soil N is organic, all of the 15N retained in the soil is organic N (e.g. Sebilo et al., 2013) or subtracted 15N-labelled inorganic compounds from bulk values (e.g. Pilbeam et al., 1997). While the latter approach is more accurate, these methods only provide an estimate of the bulk 15N value of an extremely complex and non-uniformly labelled organic pool. A more detailed approach has been to use microbial biomass extraction (Brookes et al., 1985) and subsequent N isotopic analysis to determine the 15N value of biomass-N, representing the fraction of 15N assimilated by microbes or the 15N cycling through the 'living' or 'active' portion of soil organic N. However, this extraction method can only generate estimates and some lack of confidence in its validity and reliability remains. Here, we present an alternative technique to obtain a measure of the assimilation of an applied 15N substrate by the soil microbial biomass and an estimate of the newly synthesized soil protein, which is representative of the magnitude of the active soil microbial biomass. The technique uses a stable isotope tracer and compound-specific 15N analysis, but

  19. NMR study of the structures of repeated sequences, GAGXGA (X = S, Y, V), in Bombyx mori liquid silk.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yu; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Aoki, Akihiro; Shindo, Heisaburo; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2014-01-13

    The silk fibroin stored in the silk gland of the Bombyx mori silkworm, called "liquid silk", is spun out and converted into the silk fiber with extremely high strength and high toughness. Therefore it is important to determine the silk structure before spinning called Silk I at an atomic level to clarify the fiber formation mechanism. We proposed the repeated type II β-turn structure as Silk I in the solid state with the model peptide (AG)15 and several solid state NMR techniques previously. In this paper, the solution structure of native "liquid silk" was determined with solution NMR, especially for tandem repeated sequences with (GAGXGA)n (X = S, Y, V) and GAASGA motifs in the B. mori silk fibroin. The assignment of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solution NMR spectra for the repetitive sequence motifs was achieved, and the chemical shifts were obtained. The program, TALOS-N, to predict the backbone torsion angles from the chemical shifts of proteins was applied to these motifs with (13)Cα, (13)Cβ, (13)CO, (1)Hα, (1)HN, and (15)N chemical shifts. The twenty-five best matches of torsion angles (ϕ, φ) were well populated and mainly fell into the regions for typical type II β-turn structures in the (ϕ, φ) map for the GAGXGA (X = S, Y, V) motifs. In contrast, (ϕ, φ) plots for motif GAASGA were scattered, indicating that the motif is in a disordered structure. Furthermore, inter-residue HN-Hα NOE cross peaks between i-th and (i+2)th residues in GAGXGA (X = S, Y, V) motifs were observed, supporting the repeated type II β-turn structure. Thus, we could show the presence of the repeated type II β-turn structure in "liquid silk".

  20. High-resolution NMR characterization of a spider-silk mimetic composed of 15 tandem repeats and a CRGD motif.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Glendon D; Slocik, Joseph; Mantz, Robert; Kaplan, David; Cahill, Sean; Girvin, Mark; Greenbaum, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopic techniques have been used to obtain atomic level information about a recombinant spider silk construct in hexafluoro-isopropanol (HFIP). The synthetic 49 kDa silk-like protein mimics authentic silk from Nephila clavipes, with the inclusion of an extracellular matrix recognition motif. 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR spectroscopy reveals 33 cross peaks, which were assigned to amino acid residues in the semicrystalline repeat units. Signals from the amorphous segments in the primary sequence were weak and broad, suggesting that this region is highly dynamic and undergoing conformational exchange. An analysis of the deviations of the (13)C(alpha), (13)C(beta), and (13)CO chemical shifts relative to the expected random coil values reveals two highly alpha-helical regions from amino acid 12-19 and 26-32, which comprise the polyalanine track and a GGLGSQ sequence. This finding is further supported by phi-value analysis and sequential and medium-range NOE interactions. Pulsed field gradient NMR measurements indicate that the topology of the silk mimetic in HFIP is nonglobular. Moreover, the 3D (15)N-NOESY HSQC spectrum exhibits few long-range NOEs. Similar spectral features have been observed for repeat modules in other polypeptides and are characteristic of an elongated conformation. The results provide a residue-specific description of a silk sequence in nonaqueous solution and may be insightful for understanding the fold and topology of highly concentrated, stable silk before spinning. Additionally, the insights obtained may find application in future design and large-scale production and storage of synthetic silks in organic solvents. PMID:19177364

  1. Solid-State NMR, Crystallographic, and Computational Investigation of Bisphosphonates and Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase-Bisphosphonate Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mao,J.; Mukherjee, S.; Zhang, Y.; Cao, R.; Sanders, J.; Song, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Meints, G.; Gao, Y.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are a class of molecules in widespread use in treating bone resorption diseases and are also of interest as immunomodulators and anti-infectives. They function by inhibiting the enzyme farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), but the details of how these molecules bind are not fully understood. Here, we report the results of a solid-state {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 31}P magic-angle sample spinning (MAS) NMR and quantum chemical investigation of several bisphosphonates, both as pure compounds and when bound to FPPS, to provide information about side-chain and phosphonate backbone protonation states when bound to the enzyme. We then used computational docking methods (with the charges assigned by NMR) to predict how several bisphosphonates bind to FPPS. Finally, we used X-ray crystallography to determine the structures of two potent bisphosphonate inhibitors, finding good agreement with the computational results, opening up the possibility of using the combination of NMR, quantum chemistry and molecular docking to facilitate the design of other, novel prenytransferase inhibitors.

  2. An NMR study and ab initio molecular orbital calculation of substituted benzofuroxans and the salt of 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmoch, P.; Wiench, J. W.; Stefaniak, L.; Webb, G. A.

    1999-09-01

    13C, 15N and 17O NMR data are reported for a series of substituted benzofuroxans in aprotic and acidic solutions and for a potassium salt of a substituted benzofuroxan. Some of the title compounds can exhibit fast furoxan valence equilibrium at room temperature regardless of a solvent used, whereas for the others no evidence of above-mentioned process exists. The NMR parameters most sensitive to salt formation are the chemical shifts of the C7, N1, N3 and all of the oxygen nuclei. Hence these are reported as the most satisfactory chemical shifts to be used in distinguishing between the salt and non-ionic forms of the substituted benzofuroxans studied. Calculated energies at the self-consistent field (SCF) level of theory for both tautomeric forms (N1- and N3-oxide) of some compounds studied are used for predicting the tautomeric equilibrium constants. Absolute 17O shieldings are employed in the reversal of the assignments of 17O NMR signals existing in the literature.

  3. In-cell NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serber, Zach; Corsini, Lorenzo; Durst, Florian; Dötsch, Volker

    2005-01-01

    The role of a protein inside a cell is determined by both its location and its conformational state. Although fluorescence techniques are widely used to determine the cellular localization of proteins in vivo, these approaches cannot provide detailed information about a protein's three-dimensional state. This gap, however, can be filled by NMR spectroscopy, which can be used to investigate both the conformation as well as the dynamics of proteins inside living cells. In this chapter we describe technical aspects of these "in-cell NMR" experiments. In particular, we show that in the case of (15)N-labeling schemes the background caused by labeling all cellular components is negligible, while (13)C-based experiments suffer from high background levels and require selective labeling schemes. A correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio of in-cell NMR experiments with the overexpression level of the protein shows that the current detection limit is 150-200 muM (intracellular concentration). We also discuss experiments that demonstrate that the intracellular viscosity is not a limiting factor since the intracellular rotational correlation time is only approximately two times longer than the correlation time in water. Furthermore, we describe applications of the technique and discuss its limitations. PMID:15808216

  4. HNCA-TOCSY-CANH experiments with alternate 13C-12C labeling: a set of 3D experiment with unique supra-sequential information for mainchain resonance assignment

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koh; Gal, Maayan; Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio

    2011-01-01

    Described here is a set of three-dimensional (3D) NMR experiments that rely on CACA-TOCSY magnetization transfer via the weak 3JCαCα coupling. These pulse sequences, which resemble recently described 13C detected CACA-TOCSY (Takeuchi et al. 2010) experiments, are recorded in 1H2O, and use 1H excitation and detection. These experiments require alternate 13C-12C labeling together with perdeuteration, which allows utilizing the small 3JCαCα scalar coupling that is otherwise masked by the stronger 1JCC couplings in uniformly 13C labeled samples. These new experiments provide a unique assignment ladder-mark that yields bidirectional supra-sequential information and can readily straddle proline residues. Unlike the conventional HNCA experiment, which contains only sequential information to the 13Cα of the preceding residue, the 3D hnCA-TOCSY-caNH experiment can yield sequential correlations to alpha carbons in positions i−1, i + 1 and i−2. Furthermore, the 3D hNca-TOCSY-caNH and Hnca-TOC-SY-caNH experiments, which share the same magnetization pathway but use a different chemical shift encoding, directly couple the 15N-1H spin pair of residue i to adjacent amide protons and nitrogens at positions i−2, i−1, i + 1 and i + 2, respectively. These new experimental features make protein backbone assignments more robust by reducing the degeneracy problem associated with the conventional 3D NMR experiments. PMID:21110064

  5. NMR-Based Mapping of Disulfide Bridges in Cysteine-Rich Peptides: Application to the μ-Conotoxin SxIIIA*

    PubMed Central

    Walewska, Aleksandra; Skalicky, Jack J.; Davis, Darrell R.; Zhang, Min-Min; Lopez-Vera, Estuardo; Watkins, Maren; Han, Tiffany S.; Yoshikami, Doju; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    Disulfide-rich peptides represent a megadiverse group of natural products with very promising therapeutic potential. To accelerate their functional characterization, high-throughput chemical synthesis and folding methods are required, including efficient mapping of multiple disulfide bridges. Here, we describe a novel approach for such mapping and apply it to a three-disulfide bridged conotoxin, μ-SxIIIA (from the venom of Conus striolatus) whose discovery is also reported here for the first time. μ-SxIIIA was chemically synthesized with three cysteine residues labeled 100% with 15N/13C, while the remaining three cysteine residues were incorporated using a mixture of 70%:30% unlabeled:labeled Fmoc-protected residues. After oxidative folding, the major product was analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. Sequence-specific resonance assignments for the isotope-enriched Cys residues were determined with 2D versions of standard triple resonance (1H,13C,15N) NMR experiments and 2D [13C,1H] HSQC. Disulfide patterns were directly determined with cross-disulfide NOEs confirming that the oxidation product had the disulfide connectivities characteristic of μ-conotoxins. μ-SxIIIA was found to be a potent blocker of the sodium channel subtype NaV1.4 (IC50 = 7 nM). These results suggest that differential incorporation of isotope-labeled cysteine residues is an efficient strategy to map disulfides and should facilitate the discovery and structure-function studies of many bioactive peptides. PMID:18831583

  6. Steroselective synthesis and application of L-( sup 15 N) amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J. ); Lodwig, S.N. . Div. of Science)

    1991-01-01

    We have developed two general approaches to the stereoselective synthesis of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-labeled amino acids. First, labeled serine, biosynthesized using the methylotrophic bacterium M. extorquens AM1, serves as a chiral precursor for the synthesis of other amino acids. For example, pyridoxal phosphate enzymes can be used for the conversion of L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)serine to L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tyrosine, L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tryptophan, and L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)cysteine. In the second approach, developed by Oppolzer and Tamura, an electrophilic amination'' reagent, 1-chloro-1-nitrosocyclohexane, was used to convert chiral enolates into L-{alpha}-amino acids. We prepared 1-chloro-1-({sup 15}N) nitrosocyclohexane and used it to aminate chiral enolates to produce L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)amino acids. The stereoselectivity of this scheme using the Oppolzer sultam chiral auxiliary is remarkable, producing enantiomer ratios of 200 to 1. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles. PMID:25621737

  8. Production of 15N-depleted biomass during cyanobacterial N2-fixation at high Fe concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Junium, Christopher K.; Canfield, Donald E.; House, Christopher H.

    2008-09-01

    In this study we examine the effects of varying Fe, Mo, and P concentrations on δ15N fractionation during N2 fixation in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis. We show that when grown in Fe-enriched media ([Fe] ≥ 50 nM), this organism produces biomass up to 3‰ lower in δ15N than when grown in Fe-limited media ([Fe] < 50 nM). A compilation of our data with previous measurements of δ15N in N2-fixing cyanobacteria reveals a general trend toward the production of more 15N-depleted biomass at higher Fe concentrations. We discuss our results in the context of negative δ15N values preserved in Archean and some Phanerozoic sediments, generally attributed to the production of marine organic matter with low δ15N by N2 fixation (and potentially NH4+ regeneration) during periods of fluctuating nutrient dynamics. We suggest that enhanced Fe availability during periods of widespread ocean anoxia can further stimulate the production of 15N-depleted biomass by N2-fixing organisms, contributing to the isotopic record.

  9. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles.

  10. Light-mediated 15N fractionation in Caribbean gorgonian octocorals: implications for pollution monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. M.; Kim, K.; Andras, J. P.; Sparks, J. P.

    2011-09-01

    The stable nitrogen isotope ratio ( δ 15N) of coral tissue is a useful recorder of anthropogenic pollution in tropical marine ecosystems. However, little is known of the natural environmentally induced fractionations that affect our interpretation of coral δ 15N values. In symbiotic scleractinians, light affects metabolic fractionation of N during photosynthesis, which may confound the identification of N pollution between sites of varied depth or turbidity. Given the superiority of octocorals for δ 15N studies, our goal was to quantify the effect of light on gorgonian δ 15N in the context of monitoring N pollution sources. Using field collections, we show that δ 15N declined by 1.4‰ over 20 m depth in two species of gorgonians, the common sea fan, Gorgonia ventalina, and the slimy sea plume, Pseudopterogorgia americana. An 8-week laboratory experiment with P. americana showed that light, not temperature causes this variation, whereby the lowest fractionation of the N source was observed in the highest light treatment. Finally, we used a yearlong reciprocal depth transplant experiment to quantify the time frame over which δ 15N changes in G. ventalina as a function of light regime . Over the year, δ 15N was unchanged and increased slightly in the deep control colonies and shallow colonies transplanted to the deep site, respectively. Within 6 months, colonies transplanted from deep to shallow became enriched by 0.8‰, mirroring the enrichment observed in the shallow controls, which was likely due to the combined effect of an increase in the source δ 15N and reduced fractionation. We conclude that light affects gorgonian δ 15N fractionation and should be considered in sampling designs for N pollution monitoring. However, these fractionations are small relative to differences observed between natural and anthropogenic N sources.

  11. Fate and metabolism of [15N]2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in soil.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Martin; Geyer, Roland; Russow, Rolf; Richnow, Hans H; Kästner, Matthias

    2004-08-01

    The fates of the labels from [14C] and [15N] trinitrotoluene were analyzed in bioreactors under aerobic conditions in soil treated by a fungal bioremediation process with Stropharia rugosoannulata and in control soil. Up to 17.5% of the 15N label had a different fate than the 14C label. Three N-mineralization processes were identified in detailed experiments with [15N]TNT. About 2% of the 15N label was found as NO3- and NH4+, showing simultaneous processes of direct TNT denitration (I) and reduction with cleavage of the amino groups (II). The enrichment of NO2-/NO3- (up to 7.5 atom% 15N abundance) indicates the formation of Meisenheimer complexes with a denitration of [15N]TNT. A 1.4% of the label was found distributed between N2O and N2. However, the 15N enrichment of the N2O (up to 38 atom%) demonstrated that both N atoms were generated from the labeled TNT and clearly indicates a novel formation process (III). We propose, as an explanation, the generation of N2O by cleavage from condensed azoxy metabolites. In addition, 1.7% of the 15N label was detected as biogenic amino acids in the wheat straw containing the fungus. Overall, 60 to 85% of the applied [15N]TNT was degraded and 52 to 64% was found as nonextractable residues in the soil matrix. Three percent was detected as 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene.

  12. Effects of structural differences on the NMR chemical shifts in isostructural dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Altheimer, Benjamin D; Mehta, Manish A

    2014-04-10

    Porous crystalline dipeptides have gained recent attention for their potential as gas-storage materials. Within this large class is a group of dipeptides containing alanine, valine, and isoleucine with very similar crystal structures. We report the (13)C (carbonyl and Cα) and (15)N (amine and amide) solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shifts in a series of seven such isostructural porous dipeptides as well as shift tensor data for the carbonyl and amide sites. Using their known crystal structures and aided by ab initio quantum chemical calculations for the resonance assignments, we elucidate trends relating local structure, hydrogen-bonding patterns, and chemical shift. We find good correlation between the backbone dihedral angles and the Cα1 and Cα2 shifts. For the C1 shift tensor, the δ11 value shifts downfield as the hydrogen-bond distance increases, δ22 shifts upfield, and δ33 shows little variation. The C2 shift tensor shows no appreciable correlation with structural parameters. For the N2 tensor, δ11 shows little dependence on the hydrogen-bond length, whereas δ22 and δ33 both show a decrease in shielding as the hydrogen bond shortens. Our analysis teases apart some, but not all, structural contributors to the observed differences the solid-state NMR chemical shifts.

  13. Radiative p 15N Capture in the Region of Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-06-01

    Within the framework of the modified potential cluster model with classification of orbital states according to the Young schemes, the possibility of describing experimental data for the astrophysical S-factor of p 15N radiative capture at energies from 50 to 1500 keV is considered. It is shown that on the basis of M1 and E1 transitions from various p 15N scattering states to the ground state of the 16O nucleus in the p 15N channel it is entirely possible to successfully explain the overall behavior of the S-factor in the considered energy region in the presence of two resonances.

  14. Dynamic NMR study of the mechanisms of double, triple, and quadruple proton and deuteron transfer in cyclic hydrogen bonded solids of pyrazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Klein, Oliver; Aguilar-Parrilla, Francisco; Lopez, Juan Miguel; Jagerovic, Nadine; Elguero, José; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2004-09-22

    Using dynamic solid state (15)N CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization, MAS = magic angle spinning), the kinetics of the degenerate intermolecular double and quadruple proton and deuteron transfers in the cyclic dimer of (15)N labeled polycrystalline 3,5-diphenyl-4-bromopyrazole (DPBrP) and in the cyclic tetramer of (15)N labeled polycrystalline 3,5-diphenylpyrazole (DPP) have been studied in a wide temperature range at different deuterium fractions in the mobile proton sites. Rate constants were measured on a millisecond time scale by line shape analysis of the doubly (15)N labeled compounds, and by magnetization transfer experiments on a second timescale of the singly (15)N labeled compounds in order to minimize the effects of proton-driven (15)N spin diffusion. For DPBrP the multiple kinetic HH/HD/DD isotope effects could be directly obtained. By contrast, four rate constants k(1) to k(4) were obtained for DPP at different deuterium fractions. Whereas k(1) corresponds to the rate constant k(HHHH) of the HHHH isotopolog, an appropriate kinetic reaction model was needed for the kinetic assignment of the other rate constants. Using the model described by Limbach, H. H.; Klein, O.; Lopez Del Amo, J. M.; Elguero, J. Z. Phys. Chem. 2004,218, 17, a concerted quadruple proton-transfer mechanism as well as a stepwise consecutive single transfer mechanism could be excluded. By contrast, using the kinetic assignment k(2) approximately k(3) approximately k(HHHD) approximately k(HDHD) and k(3) approximately k(HDDD) approximately k(DDDD), the results could be explained in terms of a two-step process involving a zwitterionic intermediate. In this mechanism, each reaction step involves the concerted transfer of two hydrons, giving rise to primary kinetic HH/HD/DD isotope effects, whereas the nontransferred hydrons only contribute small secondary effects, which are not resolved experimentally. By contrast, the multiple kinetic isotope effects of the double proton

  15. Continuous field measurement of N2O isotopologues using FTIR spectroscopy following 15N addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. L.; Griffith, D. W.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Lugg, G.; Lawrie, R.; Macdonald, B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic additions of fertilizer nitrogen (N) have significantly increased the mole fraction of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the troposphere. Tracking the fate of fertilizer N and its transformation to N2O is important to advance knowledge of greenhouse gas emissions from soils. Transport and transformations are frequently studied using 15N labeling experiments, but instruments capable of continuous measurements of 15N-N2O at the surface of soil have only recently come to the fore. Our primary aim was to quantify emissions of N2O and the fraction of 15N emitted as N2O from an agricultural soil following 15N addition using a mobile Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. We set up a short-term field experiment on a coastal floodplain site near Nowra, New South Wales. We deployed an automated chamber system connected to a multi-pass cell (optical pathlength 24 m) and low resolution FTIR spectrometer to measure fluxes of all N2O isotopologues collected from five 0.25 m2 chambers every three hours. We measured N2O fluxes pre and post-application of 15N-labeled substrate as potassium nitrate (KNO3) or urea [CO(NH2)2] to the soil surface. Root mean square uncertainties for all isotopologue measurements were less than 0.3 nmol mol-1 for 1 minute average concentration measurements, and minimum detectable fluxes for each isotopologue were <0.1 ng N m-2 s-1. Emissions of all N2O isotopologues were evident immediately following 15N addition. Emissions of 14N15NO, 15N14NO and 15N15NO isotopologues subsided within 10 d, but 14N14NO fluxes were evident over the entire experiment. The figure provides an overview of the emissions. Cumulative 15N-N2O fluxes (sum of the three 15N isotopologues) per chamber for the 14 days following 15N addition ranged from 1.5 to 10.3 mg 15N-N2O m-2. The chambers were destructively sampled after 2 weeks and 15N analyzed in soil and plant material using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Approximately 1% (range 0.7 - 1.9%) of the total amount of

  16. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12 C/ 13 C and 14 N/ 15 N ratios and the mystery of 15 N

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-07-30

    We compared carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. Furthermore, we present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. All of the explosion energies and H concentrations aremore » considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.« less

  17. Carbon-rich Presolar Grains from Massive Stars: Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N Ratios and the Mystery of 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.

  18. Increase of Natural 15N Enrichment of Soybean Nodules with Mean Nodule Mass 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Bryan, Barbara A.; Kohl, Daniel H.

    1984-01-01

    The 15N abundance of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill var Harosoy) nodules is usually greater than it is for other tissues or for atmospheric N2. Results of experiments in which nodules were separated by size show that the magnitude of the 15N enrichment is correlated with nodule mass. The results support the hypothesis that 15N enrichment of nodules results from differential N isotopic fractionation for synthesis of nodule tissue versus synthesis of compounds for export from the nodule. The physiological significance of this hypothesis is that it requires that a substantial fraction of the N for nodule tissue synthesis in 15N-enriched nodules be N recently fixed within the same nodule. PMID:16663917

  19. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  20. Fungal Functioning In A Pine Forest: Evidence From A 15N-Labeled Global Change Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Hofmockel, K.; van Diepen, L.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we used tracer 15N labeling and a concurrent six-year nitrogen fertilization experiment in a Pinus taeda Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment to investigate the functioning of saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal fungi in nitrogen cycling. Ectomycorrhizal fungi with hydrophobic ectomycorrhizae acquired nitrogen from deeper in the soil profile than taxa with hydrophilic ectomycorrhizae, whereas saprotrophic fungi acquired nitrogen primarily from relatively recent surface litter. By combining natural abundance and tracer measurements, we estimated the 15N enrichment of fungi relative to source nitrogen at between 4‰ and 9‰, depending on genus, with some genera sampling pools more 15N-enriched in the labeling experiment than could be measured by bulk analyses. Thus, biologically relevant nitrogen fractions may correspond poorly to what can be extracted chemically. The multiple 15N labels in this FACE experiment proved useful for tracking nitrogen into different fungal taxa from potential nitrogen sources.