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Sample records for 15n nmr studies

  1. Benchmark Theoretical and Experimental Study on (15)N NMR Shifts of Oxidatively Damaged Guanine.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Šála, Michal; Klepetářová, Blanka; Šebera, Jakub; Fukal, Jiří; Holečková, Veronika; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Nencka, Radim; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2016-02-11

    The (15)N NMR shifts of 9-ethyl-8-oxoguanine (OG) were calculated and measured in liquid DMSO and in crystal. The OG molecule is a model for oxidatively damaged 2'-deoxyguanosine that occurs owing to oxidative stress in cell. The DNA lesion is repaired with human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) base-excision repair enzyme, however, the exact mechanism of excision of damaged nucleobase with hOGG1 is currently unknown. This benchmark study on (15)N NMR shifts of OG aims their accurate structural interpretation and calibration of the calculation protocol utilizable in future studies on mechanism of hOGG1 enzyme. The effects of NMR reference, DFT functional, basis set, solvent, structure, and dynamics on calculated (15)N NMR shifts were first evaluated for OG in crystal to calibrate the best performing calculation method. The effect of large-amplitude motions on (15)N NMR shifts of OG in liquid was calculated employing molecular dynamics. The B3LYP method with Iglo-III basis used for B3LYP optimized geometry with 6-311++G(d,p) basis and including effects of solvent and molecular dynamic was the calculation protocol used for calculation of (15)N NMR shifts of OG. The NMR shift of N9 nitrogen of OG was particularly studied because the atom is involved in an N-glycosidic bond that is cleaved with hOGG1. The change of N9 NMR shift owing to oxidation of 9-ethylguanine (G) measured in liquid was -27.1 ppm. The calculated N9 NMR shift of OG deviated from experiment in crystal and in liquid by 0.45 and 0.65 ppm, respectively. The calculated change of N9 NMR shift owing to notable N9-pyramidalization of OG in one previously found polymorph was 20.53 ppm. We therefore assume that the pyramidal geometry of N9 nitrogen that could occur for damaged DNA within hOGG1 catalytic site might be detectable with (15)N NMR spectroscopy. The calculation protocol can be used for accurate structural interpretation of (15)N NMR shifts of oxidatively damaged guanine DNA residue.

  2. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  3. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  4. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported.

  5. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  6. Natural-abundance 15N NMR studies of Turkey ovomucoid third domain. Assignment of peptide 15N resonances to the residues at the reactive site region via proton-detected multiple-quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Polo, Gilberto; Krishnamoorthi, R.; Markley, John L.; Live, David H.; Davis, Donald G.; Cowburn, David

    Heteronuclear two-dimensional 1H{ 15N} multiple-quantum (MQ) spectroscopy has been applied to a protein sample at natural abundance: ovomucoid third domain from turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo), a serine proteinase inhibitor of 56 amino acid residues. Peptide amide 1H NMR assignments obtained by two-dimensional 1H{ 1H} NMR methods (R. Krishnamoorthi and J. L. Markley, unpublished data) led to identification of the corresponding 1H{ 15N} MQ coherence cross peaks. From these, 15N NMR chemical shifts were determined for several specific backbone amide groups of amino acid residues located around the reactive site region of the inhibitor. The results suggest that amide 15N chemical shifts, which are readily obtained in this way, may serve as sensitive probes for conformational studies of proteins.

  7. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  8. 15N NMR study of nitrate ion structure and dynamics in hydrotalcite-like compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hou, X.; James, Kirkpatrick R.; Yu, P.; Moore, D.; Kim, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report here the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic study of the dynamical and structural behavior of nitrate on the surface and in the interlayer of hydrotalcite-like compounds (15NO3--HT). Spectroscopically resolvable surface-absorbed and interlayer NO3- have dramatically different dynamical characteristics. The interlayer nitrate shows a well defined, temperature independent uniaxial chemical shift anisotropy (CS A) powder pattern. It is rigidly held or perhaps undergoes rotation about its threefold axis at all temperatures between -100 ??C and +80 ??C and relative humidities (R.H.) from 0 to 100% at room temperature. For surface nitrate, however, the dynamical behavior depends substantially on temperature and relative humidity. Analysis of the temperature and R.H. dependences of the peak width yields reorieritational frequencies which increase from essentially 0 at -100 ??C to 2.6 ?? 105 Hz at 60 ??C and an activation energy of 12.6 kJ/mol. For example, for samples at R.H. = 33%, the surface nitrate is isotropically mobile at frequencies greater than 105 Hz at room temperature, but it becomes rigid or only rotates on its threefold axis at -100 ??C. For dry samples and samples heated at 200 ??C (R.H. near 0%), the surface nitrate is not isotropically averaged at room temperature. In contrast to our previous results for 35Cl--containing hydrotalcite (35Cl--HT), no NMR detectable structural phase transition is observed for 15NO3--HT. The mobility of interlayer nitrate in HT is intermediate between that of carbonate and chloride.

  9. Heteronuclear NMR studies of cobalamins. 11. sup 15 N NMR studies of the axial nucleotide and amide side chains of cyanocobalamin and dicyanocobamides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.; Brooks, H.B.; Xiang, Zou ); Victor, M.; Ray, A. ); Timkovich, R. )

    1990-11-28

    Spectroscopic and thermodynamic evidence for the structure of cobalamines and dicyanocobalamin (CN){sub 2}Cbl have been previously reported. The structure indicated the occurrence of the so-called tuck-in species. Further observations and characterization of the tuck-in species of (CN){sub 2}Cbl by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy are presented herein. These results represent the first observation of the {sup 15}N NMR spectrum of benzimidazole nucleotide of cobalamins. The first NMR observation of the amide protons of cobalamins and their connectivity to the amide nitrogens are also reported. 50 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Solvent effects on 15N NMR coordination shifts.

    PubMed

    Kleinmaier, Roland; Arenz, Sven; Karim, Alavi; Carlsson, Anna-Carin C; Erdélyi, Máté

    2013-01-01

    (15)N NMR chemical shift became a broadly utilized tool for characterization of complex structures and comparison of their properties. Despite the lack of systematic studies, the influence of solvent on the nitrogen coordination shift, Δ(15)N(coord), was hitherto claimed to be negligible. Herein, we report the dramatic impact of the local environment and in particular that of the interplay between solvent and substituents on Δ(15)N(coord). The comparative study of CDCl(3) and CD(3)CN solutions of silver(I)-bis(pyridine) and silver(I)-bis(pyridylethynyl)benzene complexes revealed the strong solvent dependence of their (15)N NMR chemical shift, with a solvent dependent variation of up to 40 ppm for one and the same complex. The primary influence of the effect of substituent and counter ion on the (15)N NMR chemical shifts is rationalized by corroborating Density-Functional Theory (nor discrete Fourier transform) calculations on the B3LYP/6-311 + G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. Cooperative effects have to be taken into account for a comprehensive description of the coordination shift and thus the structure of silver complexes in solution. Our results demonstrate that interpretation of Δ(15)N(coord) in terms of coordination strength must always consider the solvent and counter ion. The comparable magnitude of Δ(15)N(coord) for reported transition metal complexes makes the principal findings most likely general for a broad scale of complexes of nitrogen donor ligands, which are in frequent use in modern organometallic chemistry.

  11. A 1H, 13C and 15N NMR study in solution and in the solid state of six N-substituted pyrazoles and indazoles.

    PubMed

    Claramunt, Rosa M; Santa María, M Dolores; Sanz, Dionisia; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2006-05-01

    Three N-substituted pyrazoles and three N-substituted indazoles [1-(4-nitrophenyl)-3,5-dimethylpyrazole (1), 1-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-3,5-dimethylpyrazole (2), 1-tosyl-pyrazole (3), 1-p-chlorobenzoylindazole (4), 1-tosylinda-zole (5) and 2-(2-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl)-indazole (6)] have been studied by NMR spectroscopy in solution (1H, 13C, 15N) and in the solid state (13C, 15N). The chemical shifts have been compared with GIAO/DFT calculated absolute shieldings. Some discrepancies have been analyzed.

  12. 15N NMR of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Goba, Inguna; Liepinsh, Edvards

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we describe the characteristic (15)N and (1)HN NMR chemical shifts and (1)J((15)N-(1)H) coupling constants of various symmetrically and unsymmetrically substituted 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives. The NMR chemical shifts and coupling constants are discussed in terms of their relationship to structural features such as character and position of the substituent in heterocycle, N-alkyl substitution, nitrogen lone pair delocalization within the conjugated system, and steric effects.

  13. Mechanism of Solid-State Thermolysis of Ammonia Boraine: 15N NMR Study Using Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Gupta, Shalabh; Caporini, Marc A; Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Pruski, Marek

    2014-08-28

    The solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) was explored using state-of-the-art 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including 2D indirectly detected 1H{15N} heteronuclear correlation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 15N{1H} cross-polarization experiments as well as 11B NMR. The complementary use of 15N and 11B NMR experiments, supported by density functional theory calculations of the chemical shift tensors, provided insights into the dehydrogenation mechanism of AB—insights that have not been available by 11B NMR alone. Specifically, highly branched polyaminoborane derivatives were shown to form from AB via oligomerization in the “head-to-tail” manner, which then transform directly into hexagonal boron nitride analog through the dehydrocyclization reaction, bypassing the formation of polyiminoborane.

  14. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported.

  15. sup 13 C and sup 15 N NMR studies on the interaction between 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine and lumazine protein

    SciTech Connect

    Vervoort, J.; Mueller, F. ); O'Kane, D.J.; Lee, J. ); Bacher, A.; Strobl, G. )

    1990-02-20

    The interaction between the prosthetic group 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1{prime}-D-ribityl)lumazine and the lumazine apoproteins from two marine bioluminescent bacteria, one from a relatively thermophilic species, Photobacterium leiognathi, and the other from a psychrophilic species, Photobacterium phosphoreum, was studied by {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N NMR using various selectively enriched derivatives. It is shown that the electron distribution in the protein-bound 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine differs from that of free 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine in buffer. The {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N chemical shifts indicate that the protein-bound 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine is embedded in a polar environment and that the ring system is strongly polarized. It is concluded that the two carbonyl groups play an important role in the polarization of the molecule. The N(3)-H group is not accessible to bulk solvent. The N(8) atom is sp{sup 2} hybridized and has {delta}+ character. Nuclear Overhauser effect studies indicate that the 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine ring is rigidly bound with no internal mobility. The NMR results indicate that the interaction between the ring system and the two apoproteins is almost the same.

  16. Proton-coupled 15N NMR spectra of neutral and protonated ethenoadenosine and ethenocytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Sierzputowska-Gracz, H; Wiewiórowski, M; Kozerski, L; von Philipsborn, W

    1984-01-01

    The 15N chemical shifts and 15N, 1H spin coupling constants were determined in the title compounds using the INEPT pulse sequence and assigned with the aid of selective proton decoupling. The delta/15N/ and J/N, H/ values are discussed in terms of involvement of the imidazole ring created by ethenobridging in the electronic structure of the whole molecule. Both spectral parameters indicate that the diligant nitrogen in this ring is the primary site of protonation in these modified nucleosides. It is concluded that 15N NMR of nucleoside bases can be largely a complementary method to 1H and 13C NMR studies and, in addition, can serve as a direct probe for studies of nitrogen environment in oligomeric fragments of nucleic acids even at moderately strong magnetic fields due to the higher spectral dispersion compared with 1H and 13C NMR spectra. PMID:6473107

  17. Investigation of Uña De Gato I. 7-Deoxyloganic acid and 15N NMR spectroscopic studies on pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids from Uncaria tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, I; Dunbar, D C; Khan, R A; Ganzera, M; Khan, I A

    2001-07-01

    The C-8-(S) isomer of deoxyloganic acid (7-deoxyloganic acid), together with beta-sitosteryl glucoside, five known stereoisomeric pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids and the tetracyclic oxindole isorhyncophylline, were isolated from the inner bark of Uncaria tomentosa. Structures of the isolated compounds were based on 1H and 13C NMR data, mainly 2D NMR experiments, including 1H-13C HMBC and 1H-1H NOESY correlation. Furthermore, the hitherto unreported 15N chemical shifts of the isomeric oxindole alkaloids, using 1H-15N HMBC experiments, were utilized to facilitate their characterization. Uncarine D showed weak cytotoxic activity against SK-MEL, KB, BT-549 and SK-OV-3 cell lines with IC(50) values between 30 and 40 microg/ml, while uncarine C exhibited weak cytotoxicity only against ovarian carcinoma (IC(50) at 37 microg/ml).

  18. Oligomeric complexes of some heteroaromatic ligands and aromatic diamines with rhodium and molybdenum tetracarboxylates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR and density functional theory studies.

    PubMed

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Kamieński, Bohdan; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-05-01

    Seven new oligomeric complexes of 4,4'-bipyridine; 3,3'-bipyridine; benzene-1,4-diamine; benzene-1,3-diamine; benzene-1,2-diamine; and benzidine with rhodium tetraacetate, as well as 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetraacetate, have been obtained and investigated by elemental analysis and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR. The known complexes of pyrazine with rhodium tetrabenzoate, benzoquinone with rhodium tetrapivalate, 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetrakistrifluoroacetate and the 1 : 1 complex of 2,2'-bipyridine with rhodium tetraacetate exhibiting axial-equatorial ligation mode have been obtained as well for comparison purposes. Elemental analysis revealed 1 : 1 complex stoichiometry of all complexes. The (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra of all new complexes consist of one narrow signal, indicating regular uniform structures. Benzidine forms a heterogeneous material, probably containing linear oligomers and products of further reactions. The complexes were characterized by the parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δcomplex  - δligand). This parameter ranged from around -40 to -90 ppm in the case of heteroaromatic ligands, from around -12 to -22 ppm for diamines and from -16 to -31 ppm for the complexes of molybdenum tetracarboxylates with 4,4'-bipyridine. The experimental results have been supported by a density functional theory computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts and complexation shifts at the non-relativistic Becke, three-parameter, Perdew-Wang 91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] and GGA-PBE/QZ4P levels of theory and at the relativistic scalar and spin-orbit zeroth order regular approximation/GGA-PBE/QZ4P level of theory. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts have been calculated for the selected compounds.

  19. Derivatives of pyrazinecarboxylic acid: 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Wolfgang; Eller, Gernot A; Datterl, Barbara; Habicht, Daniela

    2009-07-01

    NMR spectroscopic studies are undertaken with derivatives of 2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid. Complete and unambiguous assignment of chemical shifts ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N) and coupling constants ((1)H,(1)H; (13)C,(1)H; (15)N,(1)H) is achieved by combined application of various 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques. Unequivocal mapping of (13)C,(1)H spin coupling constants is accomplished by 2D (delta,J) long-range INEPT spectra with selective excitation. Phenomena such as the tautomerism of 3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid are discussed.

  20. Determination of 15N chemical shift anisotropy from a membrane-bound protein by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Ahuja, Shivani; Pichumani, Kumar; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-06-21

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors are essential in the structural and dynamic studies of proteins using NMR spectroscopy. Results from relaxation studies in biomolecular solution and solid-state NMR experiments on aligned samples are routinely interpreted using well-characterized CSA tensors determined from model compounds. Since CSA tensors, particularly the (15)N CSA, highly depend on a number of parameters including secondary structure, electrostatic interaction, and the amino acid sequence, there is a need for accurately determined CSA tensors from proteins. In this study, we report the backbone amide-(15)N CSA tensors for a 16.7-kDa membrane-bound and paramagnetic-heme containing protein, rabbit Cytochrome b(5) (cytb(5)), determined using the (15)N CSA/(15)N-(1)H dipolar transverse cross-correlation rates. The mean values of (15)N CSA determined for residues in helical, sheet, and turn regions are -187.9, -166.0, and -161.1 ppm, respectively, with an overall average value of -171.7 ppm. While the average CSA value determined from this study is in good agreement with previous solution NMR experiments on small globular proteins, the CSA value determined for residues in helical conformation is slightly larger, which may be attributed to the paramagnetic effect from Fe(III) of the heme unit in cytb(5). However, like in previous solution NMR studies, the CSA values reported in this study are larger than the values measured from solid-state NMR experiments. We believe that the CSA parameters reported in this study will be useful in determining the structure, dynamics, and orientation of proteins, including membrane proteins, using NMR spectroscopy.

  1. Efficient Synthesis of Nicotinamide-1-15N for Ultrafast NMR Hyperpolarization Using Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide (a vitamin B3 amide) is one of the key vitamins as well as a drug for treatment of M. tuberculosis, HIV, cancer, and other diseases. Here, an improved Zincke reaction methodology is presented allowing for straightforward and scalable synthesis of nicotinamide-1-15N with an excellent isotopic purity (98%) and good yield (55%). 15N nuclear spin label in nicotinamide-1-15N can be NMR hyperpolarized in seconds using parahydrogen gas. NMR hyperpolarization using the process of temporary conjugation between parahydrogen and to-be-hyperpolarized biomolecule on hexacoordinate iridium complex via the Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) method significantly increases detection sensitivity (e.g., >20 000-fold for nicotinamide-1-15N at 9.4 T) as has been shown by Theis T. et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404), and hyperpolarized in this fashion, nicotinamide-1-15N can be potentially used to probe metabolic processes in vivo in future studies. Moreover, the presented synthetic methodology utilizes mild reaction conditions, and therefore can also be potentially applied to synthesis of a wide range of 15N-enriched N-heterocycles that can be used as hyperpolarized contrast agents for future in vivo molecular imaging studies. PMID:26999571

  2. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  3. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by 15N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons.

    PubMed

    Live, D H; Cowburn, D; Breslow, E

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, 15N labeling being used to identify specific backbone 15N and 1H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence of hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neurophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of 15N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. 15N, 17O NMR and X-ray diffraction study of mesoionic 1,2,3,4-thiatriazolium-5-olate and its ethylated derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaźiwińsk, J.; Staszewska, O.; Staszewski, P.; Stefaniak, L.; Wiench, J. W.; Webb, G. A.

    1999-02-01

    Two mesoionic compounds with oxygenous exocyclic groups: 3-phenyl-1,2,3,4-thiatriazolium-5-olate 1 and its ethylated derivative 2 were investigated by means of 15N, 17O NMR and X-ray diffraction techniques. The exocyclic C5-O6 bond of thiatriazole 1 [1.224(3) Å] has a strong double bond character. Bond lengths in the thiatriazole ring are intermediate between single and double bond values except for S1-C5 [1.800(2) Å] which is close to a single Csp 3-S bond. The C5-O6 bond is significantly longer for the ethylated derivative 2 [1.314(4) Å]. The ethyl group attached to O6 is located in the trans position in relation to the ring S1 atom. The experimental data are compared with the results of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The calculated absolute nuclear shieldings, chemical shifts and charge densities, in spite of some limitations, can be useful as an aid to signal assignments and for an understanding of the NMR parameters.

  5. Structure and reactivity of lithium amides. /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies and colligative measurements of lithium diphenylamide and lithium diphenylamide-lithium bromide complex solvated by tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    DePue, J.S.; Collum, D.B.

    1988-08-03

    /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of lithium diphenylamide in THF/hydrocarbon solutions (THF = tetrahydrofuran) detected two different species. /sup 6/Li and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of (/sup 6/Li, /sup 15/N)lithium diphenylamide showed the species observed at low THF concentrations to be a cyclic oligomer. Structural analogies provided strong support for a dimer while colligative measurements at 0/degrees/C indicated the dimer to be di- or trisolvated. On the basis of the observed mass action effects, the species appearing at intermediate THF concentrations is assigned as a contact or solvent-separated ion-paired monomer. Lithium diphenylamide forms a 1:1 adduct with lithium bromide at low THF concentrations. A combination of /sup 6/Li-/sup 15/N double labeling studies and colligative measurements supports a trisolvated cyclic mixed dimer structure. Although detailed spectroscopic studies at elevated THF concentrations were precluded by high fluctionality, the similarity of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts of lithium diphenylamide in the presence and absence of lithium bromide provide indirect evidence that the mixed dimer undergoes a THF concentration dependent dissociation to the monomeric amide and free lithium bromide. 24 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  6. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  7. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of phenazopyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Mora-Pérez, Yolanda; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    Phenazopyridine hydrochloride (1), a drug in clinical use for many decades, and some derivatives were studied by one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR methodology. The assignments, combined with DFT calculations, reveal that the preferred protonation site of the drug is the pyridine ring nitrogen atom. The chemoselective acetylation of phenazopyridine (2) and its influence on the polarization of the azo nitrogen atoms were evidenced by the (15)N NMR spectra. Molecular calculations of the phenazopyridines 2-4 show that the pyridine and phenyl groups are oriented in an antiperiplanar conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-b atom and the C-2 amino group preserving the E-azo stereochemistry.

  8. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  9. The acyl nitroso Diels-Alder (ANDA) reaction of sorbate derivatives: an X-ray and 15N NMR study with an application to amino-acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bollans, Lee; Bacsa, John; Iggo, Jonathan A; Morris, Gareth A; Stachulski, Andrew V

    2009-11-07

    We present a study of the acyl nitroso Diels-Alder (ANDA) reaction of sorbate esters and sorbic alcohol derivatives, using alkoxycarbonyl nitroso dienophiles. An optimisation of the reaction conditions for ethyl sorbate is first presented, and the product is used in an efficient synthesis of 5-methylornithine. Structure-reactivity trends in sorbic alcohol (E,E-2,4-hexadien-1-ol) and its acylated analogues are then discussed. We present single-crystal X-ray structural proof for key adducts in both series and present in detail a novel HMBC/HSQC ((1)H-(15)N) criterion for ready distinction of regioisomers arising from such ANDA reactions.

  10. NMR studies on /sup 15/N-labeled creatine (CR), creatinine (CRN), phosphocreatine (PCR), and phosphocreatinine (PCRN), and on barriers to rotation in creatine kinase-bound creatine in the enzymatic reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, G.L.; Reddick, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    Recently, the authors have synthesized /sup 15/N-2-Cr, /sup 15/N-3-Crn, /sup 15/N-2-Crn, /sup 15/N-3-PCrn, /sup 15/N-3-PCr, and /sup 15/N-2-PCr. /sup 1/H, /sup 15/N, /sup 31/P NMR data show that Crn protonates exclusively at the non-methylated ring nitrogen, confirm that PCrn is phosphorylated at the exocyclic nitrogen, and demonstrate that the /sup 31/P-/sup 15/N one-bond coupling constant in /sup 15/N-3-PCr is 18 Hz, not 3 Hz as previously reported by Brindle, K.M., Porteous, R. and Radda, G.K.. The authors have found that creatine kinase is capable of catalyzing the /sup 14/N//sup 15/N positional isotope exchange of 3-/sup 15/N-PCr in the presence of MgADP, but not in its absence. Further, the exchange does not take place when labeled PCr is resynthesized exclusively from the ternary complex E X Cr X MgATP as opposed to either E X Cr or free Cr. This suggests that the enzyme both imparts an additional rotational barrier to creatine in the complex and catalyzes the transfer of phosphoryl group with essentially complete regiospecificity.

  11. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGES

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; ...

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  12. Solution-state (15)N NMR spectroscopic study of alpha-C-phycocyanin: implications for the structure of the chromophore-binding pocket of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Janina; Kühne, Ronald; Schmieder, Peter

    2007-12-17

    The detailed structure of the chromophore-binding pocket in phytochrome proteins and the structural changes associated with its photocycle are still matters of debate. Insight into the structure and dynamics of the binding pocket has been gained through the comparison of a (15)N NMR spectrum of alpha-C-phycocyanin, which is often used as a model system for the study of phytochromes, with the previously described (15)N NMR spectrum of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. The former spectrum supports the hypothesis that all four nitrogen atoms of the alpha-C-phycocyanin chromophore are protonated, in analogy with the proposed protonation state for the P(r) and P(fr) forms of Cph1. The spectra show that the chromophores in both proteins exhibit a distinct dynamic behavior, as also indicated by a NOESY spectrum of Cph1. Finally, stereochemical arguments and a Cph1 homology model support the hypothesis that the chromophore in Cph1 is most likely in the ZZZssa conformation in the P(r) form of the protein.

  13. Quantitative and qualitative 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopic investigation of the urea-formaldehyde resin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Steinhof, Oliver; Kibrik, Éléonore J; Scherr, Günter; Hasse, Hans

    2014-04-01

    Urea-formaldehyde resins are bulk products of the chemical industry. Their synthesis involves a complex reaction network. The present work contributes to its elucidation by presenting results from detailed NMR spectroscopic studies with different methods. Besides (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR, (15)N NMR spectroscopy is also applied. (15)N-enriched urea was used for the investigations. A detailed NMR signal assignment and a model of the reaction network of the hydroxymethylation step of the synthesis are presented. Because of its higher spectral dispersion and the fact that all key reactions directly involve the nitrogen centers, (15)N NMR provides a much larger amount of detail than do (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Symmetric and asymmetric dimethylol urea can be clearly distinguished and separated from monomethylol urea, trimethylol urea, and methylene-bridged urea. The existence of hemiformals of methylol urea is confirmed. 1,3,5-Oxadiazinan-4-on (uron) and its derivatives were not found in the reaction mixtures investigated here but were prepared via alternative routes. The molar ratios of formaldehyde to urea were 1, 2, and 4, the pH values 7.5 and 8.5, and the reaction temperature 60 °C.

  14. The structural plasticity of heparan sulfate NA-domains and hence their role in mediating multivalent interactions is confirmed by high-accuracy 15N-NMR relaxation studies

    PubMed Central

    Mobli, Mehdi; Nilsson, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Considering the biological importance of heparan sulfate (HS) and the significant activity of its highly-sulfated regions (S-domains), the paucity of known functions for the non-sulfated NA-domains is somewhat puzzling. It has been suggested that chain dynamics within the NA-domains are the key to their functional role in HS. In this study, we investigate this hypothesis using state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at multiple frequencies. To resolve the problem of severe overlap in 1H-NMR spectra of repetitive polysaccharides from proteoglycans, we have prepared oligosaccharides with the chemical structure of HS NA-domains containing the 15N nucleus, which has enough chemical shift dispersion to probe the central residues of octasaccharides at atomic resolution using 600 MHz NMR. By performing NMR relaxation experiments at three magnetic-field strengths, high quality data on internal dynamics and rotational diffusion was obtained. Furthermore, translational diffusion could also be measured by NMR using pulse field gradients. These experimental data were used, in concert with molecular dynamics simulations, to provide information on local molecular shape, greatly aiding our relaxation analyses. Our results, which are more accurate than those presented previously, confirm the higher flexibility of the NA-domains as compared with reported data on S-domains. It is proposed that this flexibility has two functional roles. First, it confers a greater area of interaction from the anchoring point on the core protein for the bioactive S-domains. Secondly, it allows multiple interactions along the same HS chain that are dynamically independent of each other. Electronic Supplementary Material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10719-007-9081-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18080183

  15. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part II: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV).

    PubMed

    Makrynitsa, Garyfallia I; Ntonti, Dioni; Marousis, Konstantinos D; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-10-01

    Macro domains consist of 130-190 amino acid residues and appear to be highly conserved in all kingdoms of life. Intense research on this field has shown that macro domains bind ADP-ribose and other similar molecules, but their exact function still remains intangible. Macro domains are highly conserved in the Alphavirus genus and the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a member of this genus that causes fatal encephalitis to equines and humans. In this study we report the high yield recombinant expression and preliminary solution NMR study of the macro domain of VEEV. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure predicted by TALOS+. The protein shows a unique mixed α/β-fold.

  16. Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15N, 13C, and 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Hoatson, G. L.; Holloway, B. C.; Vold, R. L.; Reilly, A. C.

    2003-11-01

    The nitrogen bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is examined with 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests revealed an elastic recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. The NMR results show that nitrogen bonding in this material is consistent with sp2 hybridized nitrogen incorporated in an aromatic carbon environment. The data also indicate that the a-CNx prepared for this study has very low hydrogen content and is hydrophilic. Specifically, analysis of 15N and 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning and 1H NMR experiments suggests that water preferentially protonates nitrogen sites.

  17. (13)C and (15)N NMR characterization of amine reactivity and solvent effects in CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Perinu, Cristina; Arstad, Bjørnar; Bouzga, Aud M; Jens, Klaus-J

    2014-08-28

    Factors influencing the reactivity of selected amine absorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, in terms of the tendency to form amine carbamate, have been studied. Four linear primary alkanolamines at varying chain lengths (MEA, 3A1P, 4A1B , and 5A1P ), two primary amines with different substituents in the β-position to the nitrogen (1A2P and ISOB), a secondary alkanolamine (DEA), and a sterically hindered primary amine (AMP) were investigated. The relationship between the (15)N NMR data of aqueous amines and their ability to form carbamate, as determined at equilibrium by quantitative (13)C NMR experiments, was analyzed, taking into account structural-chemical properties. For all the amines, the (15)N chemical shifts fairly reflected the observed reactivity for carbamate formation. In addition to being a useful tool for the investigation of amine reactivity, (15)N NMR data clearly provided evidence of the importance of solvent effects for the understanding of chemical dynamics in CO2 capture by aqueous amine absorbents.

  18. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  19. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part I: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Mayaro virus (MAYV).

    PubMed

    Melekis, Efstathios; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Chasapis, Christos T; Margiolaki, Irene; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-04-01

    Macro domains are ADP-ribose-binding modules present in all eukaryotic organisms, bacteria and archaea. They are also found in non-structural proteins of several positive strand RNA viruses such as alphaviruses. Here, we report the high yield expression and preliminary structural analysis through solution NMR spectroscopy of the macro domain from New World Mayaro Alphavirus. The recombinant protein was well-folded and in a monomeric state. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure determined by TALOS+.

  20. Experimental and calculated 1H, 13C, 15N NMR spectra of famotidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barańska, M.; Czarniecki, K.; Proniewicz, L. M.

    2001-05-01

    Famotidine, 3-[[[2-[(aminoiminomethyl)amino]-4-thiazolyl]methyl]thio]- N-(aminosulfonyl), is a histamine H 2-receptor blocker that has been used mainly for the treatment of peptic ulcers and the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Its NMR spectra in different solvents were reported earlier; however, detailed interpretation has not been done thus far. In this work, experimental 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectra of famotidine dissolved in DMSO-d 6 are shown. The assignment of observed chemical shifts is based on quantum chemical calculation at the Hartree-Fock/6-31G ∗ level. The geometry optimization of the famotidine molecule with two internal hydrogen bonds, i.e. [N(3)-H(23)⋯N(9) and N(3)⋯H(34)-N(20)], is done by using the B3LYP method with the 6-31G ∗ basis set.

  1. (15)N CSA tensors and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static (15)N NMR techniques for the determination of the (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and (15)N-(1)H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone (15)N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the (15)N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the (15)N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the "magic sandwich" SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the (15)N-(1)H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples.

  2. 15N Solid-State NMR as a Probe of Flavin H-bonding

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dongtao; Koder, Ronald L.; Dutton, P. Leslie; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2011-01-01

    Flavins mediate a wide variety of different chemical reactions in biology. To learn how one cofactor can be made to execute different reactions in different enzymes, we are developing solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to probe the flavin electronic structure, via the 15N chemical shift tensor principal values (δii). We find that SSNMR has superior responsiveness to H-bonds, compared to solution NMR. H-bonding to a model of the flavodoxin active site produced an increase of 10 ppm in the δ11 of N5 although none of the H-bonds directly engage N5, and solution NMR detected only a 4 ppm increase in the isotropic chemical shift (δiso). Moreover SSNMR responded differently to different H-bonding environments as H-bonding with water caused δ11 to decrease by 6 ppm whereas δiso increased by less than 1 ppm. Our density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations reproduce the observations, validating the use of computed electronic structures to understand how H-bonds modulate the flavin’s reactivity. PMID:21619002

  3. 15N solid-state NMR provides a sensitive probe of oxidized flavin reactive sites.

    PubMed

    Koder, Ronald L; Walsh, Joseph D; Pometun, Maxim S; Dutton, P Leslie; Wittebort, Richard J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2006-11-29

    Flavins are central to the reactivity of a wide variety of enzymes and electron transport proteins. There is great interest in understanding the basis for the different reactivities displayed by flavins in different protein contexts. We propose solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) as a tool for directly observing reactive positions of the flavin ring and thereby obtaining information on their frontier orbitals. We now report the SS-NMR signals of the redox-active nitrogens N1 and N5, as well as that of N3. The chemical shift tensor of N5 is over 720 ppm wide, in accordance with the predictions of theory and our calculations. The signal of N3 can be distinguished on the basis of coupling to 1H absent for N1 and N5, as well as the shift tensor span of only 170 ppm, consistent with N3's lower aromaticity and lack of a nonbonding lone pair. The isotropic shifts and spans of N5 and N1 reflect two opposite extremes of the chemical shift range for "pyridine-type" N's, consistent with their electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical reactivities, respectively. Upon flavin reduction, N5's chemical shift tensor contracts dramatically to a span of less than 110 ppm, and the isotropic chemical shift changes by approximately 300 ppm. Both are consistent with loss of N5's nonbonding lone pair and decreased aromaticity, and illustrate the responsiveness of the 15N chemical shift principal values to electronic structure. Thus. 15N chemical shift principal values promise to be valuable tools for understanding electronic differences that underlie variations in flavin reactivity, as well as the reactivities of other heterocyclic cofactors.

  4. A closer look at the nitrogen next door: 1H-15N NMR methods for glycosaminoglycan structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beni, Szabolcs; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, experimental conditions were presented for the detection of the N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) NHSO3- or sulfamate 1H and 15N NMR resonances of the pharmaceutically and biologically important glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin in aqueous solution. In the present work, we explore further the applicability of nitrogen-bound proton detection to provide structural information for GAGs. Compared to the detection of 15N chemical shifts of aminosugars through long-range couplings using the IMPACT-HNMBC pulse sequence, the more sensitive two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiments provided additional structural data. The IMPACT-HNMBC experiment remains a powerful tool as demonstrated by the spectrum measured for the unsubstituted amine of 3-O-sulfoglucosamine (GlcN(3S)), which cannot be observed with the 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiment due to the fast exchange of the amino group protons with solvent. The 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectrum reported for the mixture of model compounds GlcNS and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrate the broad utility of this approach. Measurements for the synthetic pentasaccharide drug Arixtra® (Fondaparinux sodium) in aqueous solution illustrate the power of this NMR pulse sequence for structural characterization of highly similar N-sulfoglucosamine residues in GAG-derived oligosaccharides.

  5. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Verma, Deepshikha; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2016-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a 150-residue long calmodulin-like calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6), as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization.

  6. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  7. 15N NMR investigation of the reduction and binding of TNT in an aerobic bench scale reactor simulating windrow composting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Hayes, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    T15NT was added to a soil of low organic carbon content and composted for 20 days in an aerobic bench scale reactor. The finished whole compost and fulvic acid, humic acid, humin, and lignocellulose fractions extracted from the compost were analyzed by solid-state CP/MAS and DP/MAS 15N NMR. 15N NMR spectra provided direct spectroscopic evidence for reduction of TNT followed by covalent binding of the reduced metabolites to organic matter of the composted soil, with the majority of metabolite found in the lignocellulose fraction, by mass also the major fraction of the compost. In general, the types of bonds formed between soil organic matter and reduced TNT amines in controlled laboratory reactions were observed in the spectra of the whole compost and fractions, confirming that during composting TNT is reduced to amines that form covalent bonds with organic matter through aminohydroquinone, aminoquinone, heterocyclic, and imine linkages, among others. Concentrations of imine nitrogens in the compost spectra suggestthat covalent binding bythe diamines 2,4DANT and 2,6DANT is a significant process in the transformation of TNT into bound residues. Liquid-phase 15N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid and humin fractions provided possible evidence for involvement of phenoloxidase enzymes in covalent bond formation.

  8. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  9. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Kennedy, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined.

  10. A facile method for expression and purification of 15N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis

    PubMed Central

    Armand, Tara; Ball, K. Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with 15N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the 15N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼6 mg/L culture for 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and 1H–15N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with 15N and 13C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants. PMID:26231074

  11. Target-specific NMR detection of protein-ligand interactions with antibody-relayed (15)N-group selective STD.

    PubMed

    Hetényi, Anasztázia; Hegedűs, Zsófia; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Monostori, Éva; Kövér, Katalin E; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-12-01

    Fragment-based drug design has been successfully applied to challenging targets where the detection of the weak protein-ligand interactions is a key element. (1)H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for this work but it requires pure homogeneous proteins as targets. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-relayed (15)N-GS STD spectroscopy has been developed to resolve the problem of protein mixtures and impure proteins. A (15)N-labelled target-specific mAb is selectively irradiated and the saturation is relayed through the target to the ligand. Tests on the anti-Gal-1 mAb/Gal-1/lactose system showed that the approach is experimentally feasible in a reasonable time frame. This method allows detection and identification of binding molecules directly from a protein mixture in a multicomponent system.

  12. 15N and 13C NMR Determination of Allantoin Metabolism in Developing Soybean Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Coker, George T.; Schaefer, Jacob

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of allantoin by immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max L. cv Elf) grown in culture was investigated using solid state 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance. All of the nitrogens of allantoin were incorporated into protein in a manner similar to that of each other and to the amide nitrogen of glutamine. The C-2 of allantoin was not incorporated into cellular material; presumably it was lost as CO2. About 50% of the C-5 of allantoin was incorporated into cellular material as a methylene carbon; the other 50% was presumably also lost as CO2. The 13C-15N bonds of [5-13C;1-15N] and [2-13C;1,3-15N]allantoin were broken prior to the incorporation of the nitrogens into protein. These data are consistent with allantoin's degradation to two molecules of urea and one two-carbon fragment. Cotyledons grown on allantoin as a source of nitrogen accumulated 21% of the nitrogen of cotyledons grown on glutamine. Only 50% of the nitrogen of the degraded allantoin was incorporated into the cotyledon as organic nitrogen; the other 50% was recovered as NH4+ in the media in which the cotyledons had been grown. The latter results suggests that the lower accumulation of nitrogen by cotyledons grown on allantoin was in part due to failure to assimilate NH4+ produced from allantoin. The seed coats had a higher activity of glutamine synthetase and a higher rate of allantoin degradation than cotyledons indicating that seed coats play an important role in the assimilation and degradation of allantoin. PMID:16663995

  13. Triosephosphate isomerase: 15N and 13C chemical shift assignments and conformational change upon ligand binding by magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yimin; Lorieau, Justin; McDermott, Ann E

    2010-03-19

    Microcrystalline uniformly (13)C,(15)N-enriched yeast triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is sequentially assigned by high-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Assignments are based on intraresidue and interresidue correlations, using dipolar polarization transfer methods, and guided by solution NMR assignments of the same protein. We obtained information on most of the active-site residues involved in chemistry, including some that were not reported in a previous solution NMR study, such as the side-chain carbons of His95. Chemical shift differences comparing the microcrystalline environment to the aqueous environment appear to be mainly due to crystal packing interactions. Site-specific perturbations of the enzyme's chemical shifts upon ligand binding are studied by SSNMR for the first time. These changes monitor proteinwide conformational adjustment upon ligand binding, including many of the sites probed by solution NMR and X-ray studies. Changes in Gln119, Ala163, and Gly210 were observed in our SSNMR studies, but were not reported in solution NMR studies (chicken or yeast). These studies identify a number of new sites with particularly clear markers for ligand binding, paving the way for future studies of triosephosphate isomerase dynamics and mechanism.

  14. The Styrene Probe Applied to 15N and 77Se NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Se, in chemical energetics and organic synthesis increase the value of learning more of their bonding properties through NMR. In the last 10-15 years...change of the substituent chemical shift of the cyanide carbon and the adjacent ring carbon to be reversed from each other: as X became more e withdrawing...the ring carbon became more deshielded (+ slope) and the cyanide carbon became more shielded (- slope), shown in XXVIII(A): [32] NOTE: Within this

  15. 13C and 15N spectral editing inside histidine imidazole ring through solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenhui; Zhou, Lei; Su, Yongchao; Han, Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Histidine usually exists in three different forms (including biprotonated species, neutral τ and π tautomers) at physiological pH in biological systems. The different protonation and tautomerization states of histidine can be characteristically determined by (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts of imidazole ring. In this work, solid-state NMR techniques were developed for spectral editing of (13)C and (15)N sites in histidine imidazole ring, which provides a benchmark to distinguish the existing forms of histidine. The selections of (13)Cγ, (13)Cδ2, (15)Nδ1, and (15)Nε2 sites were successfully achieved based on one-bond homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole interactions. Moreover, it was demonstrated that (1)H, (13)C, and (15) chemical shifts were roughly linearly correlated with the corresponding atomic charge in histidine imidazole ring by theoretical calculations. Accordingly, the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts variation in different protonation and tautomerization states could be ascribed to the atomic charge change due to proton transfer in biological process.

  16. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  17. High Resolution NMR ^15N and ^31P NMR Of Antiferroelectric Phase Transition in Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate and Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaydin-Sen, Ozge

    2005-03-01

    Natural abundance ^15N CPMAS NMR has been used to investigate the paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition of NH4H2AsO4 (ADA) (TN˜216K) and of NH4H2PO4 (ADP) (148K), with a focus on the role of the NH4^+ ion. Isotropic chemical shift of ^15N for ADA exhibits an almost linear temperature dependence to within TN±1K, and then changes discontinuously, followed by another almost linear dependence. The spectra of the paraelectric and antiferroelectric phases coexist around the TN. The sharp anomaly around TN implies that the NH4^+ ions undergo a displacive transition, whereas the protons in the O-HO bonds undergo an order-disorder transition. The ^15N data thus support a mixed order-disorder-displacive mechanism for this transition. The ^15N data on ADP exhibit somewhat different behavior. ^31P CPMAS measurements will also be presented and discussed in terms of the above model.

  18. Robust and low cost uniform (15)N-labeling of proteins expressed in Drosophila S2 cells and Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells for NMR applications.

    PubMed

    Meola, Annalisa; Deville, Célia; Jeffers, Scott A; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Vasiliauskaite, Ieva; Sizun, Christina; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Malosse, Christian; van Heijenoort, Carine; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Krey, Thomas; Guittet, Eric; Pêtres, Stéphane; Rey, Félix A; Bontems, François

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool to study structural and functional properties of proteins, provided that they can be enriched in stable isotopes such as (15)N, (13)C and (2)H. This is usually easy and inexpensive when the proteins are expressed in Escherichiacoli, but many eukaryotic (human in particular) proteins cannot be produced this way. An alternative is to express them in insect cells. Labeled insect cell growth media are commercially available but at prohibitive prices, limiting the NMR studies to only a subset of biologically important proteins. Non-commercial solutions from academic institutions have been proposed, but none of them is really satisfying. We have developed a (15)N-labeling procedure based on the use of a commercial medium depleted of all amino acids and supplemented with a (15)N-labeled yeast autolysate for a total cost about five times lower than that of the currently available solutions. We have applied our procedure to the production of a non-polymerizable mutant of actin in Sf9 cells and of fragments of eukaryotic and viral membrane fusion proteins in S2 cells, which typically cannot be produced in E. coli, with production yields comparable to those obtained with standard commercial media. Our results support, in particular, the putative limits of a self-folding domain within a viral glycoprotein of unknown structure.

  19. COVALENT BINDING OF REDUCED METABOLITES OF [15N3] TNT TO SOIL ORGANIC MATTER DURING A BIOREMEDIATION PROCESS ANALYZED BY 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY. (R826646)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of
    biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-15N3-trinitrotoluene
    (TNT) to different soil fractions (humic acids, fulvic
    acids, and humin) using liquid 15N NMR spectroscopy. A
    silylation p...

  20. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  1. Screening enoxaparin tetrasaccharide SEC fractions for 3-O-sulfo-N-sulfoglucosamine residues using [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC NMR.

    PubMed

    Beecher, Consuelo N; Manighalam, Matthew S; Nwachuku, Adanma F; Larive, Cynthia K

    2016-02-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) are important in mediating a variety of biological processes through binding to myriad different proteins. Specific structural elements along the polysaccharide chains are essential for high affinity protein binding, such as the 3-O-sulfated N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS3S) residue, a relatively rare modification essential for heparin's anticoagulant activity. The isolation of 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides from complex mixtures is challenging because of their low abundance. Although methods such as affinity chromatography are useful in isolating oligosaccharides that bind specific proteins with high affinity, other important 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides may easily be overlooked. Screening preparative-scale size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) fractions of heparin or HS digests using [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC NMR allows the identification of fractions containing 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides through the unique (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts of the GlcNS3S residue. Those SEC fractions containing 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides can then be isolated using strong anion-exchange (SAX)-HPLC. Compared with the results obtained by pooling the fractions comprising a given SEC peak, SAX-HPLC analysis of individual SEC fractions produces a less complicated chromatogram in which the 3-O-sulfated oligosaccharides are enriched relative to more abundant components. The utility of this approach is demonstrated for tetrasaccharide SEC fractions of the low molecular weight heparin drug enoxaparin facilitating the isolation and characterization of an unsaturated 3-O-sulfated tetrasaccharide containing a portion of the antithrombin-III binding sequence.

  2. **1**5N-NMR INVESTIGATION OF HYDROXYLAMINE DERIVATIZED HUMIC SUBSTANCES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.; Mikita, Michael A.

    1986-01-01

    Humic substances are the most abundant naturally occurring refactory organic compounds in soils and water. They have a broad range of physical, chemical and physiological properties. In soils, humic substances contribute to the cation exchange capacity, help maintain the physical structure, and play a role in plant growth and nutrition. In aquatic systems, humic substances serve to regulate the levels of inorganic constituents, yield trihalomethanes upon chlorination, and transport or concentrate organic and inorganic pollutants. The oxygen containing functional groups of humic and fulvic acids are believed to play a key role in the chemical properties of humic substances. This study was undertaken to gain additional information on the specific types of oxygen functionalities in humic substances. Since the analysis of hydroxyl moieties had been earlier established, we focused our attention on the analysis of ketone and aldehyde functional groups in humic substances.

  3. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule's introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening. Results We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better. Conclusions Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. PMID:22536902

  4. 3D NMR Experiments for Measuring 15N Relaxation Data of Large Proteins: Application to the 44 kDa Ectodomain of SIV gp41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, Michael; Kaufman, Joshua; Stahl, Stephen J.; Wingfield, Paul T.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Clore, G. Marius

    1998-12-01

    A suite of 3D NMR experiments for measuring15N-{1H} NOE,15NT1, and15NT1ρvalues in large proteins, uniformly labeled with15N and13C, is presented. These experiments are designed for proteins that exhibit extensive spectral overlap in the 2D1H-15N HSQC spectrum. The pulse sequences are readily applicable to perdeuterated samples, which increases the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, thereby permitting the characterization of protein dynamics to be extended to larger protein systems. Application of the pulse sequences is demonstrated on a perdeuterated13C/15N-labeled sample of the 44 kDa ectodomain of SIV gp41.

  5. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene:  Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Thorne, Philip G.; Cox, Larry G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  6. Computational identification of a phospholipidosis toxicophore using (13)C and (15)N NMR-distance based fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Svetoslav H; Wilkes, Jon G; Buzatu, Dan A; Kruhlak, Naomi L; Willard, James M; Hanig, Joseph P; Beger, Richard D

    2014-12-01

    Modified 3D-SDAR fingerprints combining (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts augmented with inter-atomic distances were used to model the potential of chemicals to induce phospholipidosis (PLD). A curated dataset of 328 compounds (some of which were cationic amphiphilic drugs) was used to generate 3D-QSDAR models based on tessellations of the 3D-SDAR space with grids of different density. Composite PLS models averaging the aggregated predictions from 100 fully randomized individual models were generated. On each of the 100 runs, the activities of an external blind test set comprised of 294 proprietary chemicals were predicted and averaged to provide composite estimates of their PLD-inducing potentials (PLD+ if PLD is observed, otherwise PLD-). The best performing 3D-QSDAR model utilized a grid with a density of 8ppm×8ppm in the C-C region, 8ppm×20ppm in the C-N region and 20ppm×20ppm in the N-N region. The classification predictive performance parameters of this model evaluated on the basis of the external test set were as follows: accuracy=0.70, sensitivity=0.73 and specificity=0.66. A projection of the most frequently occurring bins on the standard coordinate space suggested a toxicophore composed of an aromatic ring with a centroid 3.5-7.5Å distant from an amino-group. The presence of a second aromatic ring separated by a 4-5Å spacer from the first ring and at a distance of between 5.5Å and 7Å from the amino-group was also associated with a PLD+ effect. These models provide comparable predictive performance to previously reported models for PLD with the added benefit of being based entirely on non-confidential, publicly available training data and with good predictive performance when tested in a rigorous, external validation exercise.

  7. 1H and 15N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially 1H-15N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate 15N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS 15N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via 1H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D 1H and 2D 1H-15N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  8. In Vivo Fluxes in the Ammonium-Assimilatory Pathways in Corynebacterium glutamicum Studied by 15N Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, M.; de Graaf, A. A.; Sahm, H.

    1999-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS)–glutamine 2-oxoglutarate-aminotransferase (GOGAT) represent the two main pathways of ammonium assimilation in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In this study, the ammonium assimilating fluxes in vivo in the wild-type ATCC 13032 strain and its GDH mutant were quantitated in continuous cultures. To do this, the incorporation of 15N label from [15N]ammonium in glutamate and glutamine was monitored with a time resolution of about 10 min with in vivo 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) used in combination with a recently developed high-cell-density membrane-cyclone NMR bioreactor system. The data were used to tune a standard differential equation model of ammonium assimilation that comprised ammonia transmembrane diffusion, GDH, GS, GOGAT, and glutamine amidotransferases, as well as the anabolic incorporation of glutamate and glutamine into biomass. The results provided a detailed picture of the fluxes involved in ammonium assimilation in the two different C. glutamicum strains in vivo. In both strains, transmembrane equilibration of 100 mM [15N]ammonium took less than 2 min. In the wild type, an unexpectedly high fraction of 28% of the NH4+ was assimilated via the GS reaction in glutamine, while 72% were assimilated by the reversible GDH reaction via glutamate. GOGAT was inactive. The analysis identified glutamine as an important nitrogen donor in amidotransferase reactions. The experimentally determined amount of 28% of nitrogen assimilated via glutamine is close to a theoretical 21% calculated from the high peptidoglycan content of C. glutamicum. In the GDH mutant, glutamate was exclusively synthesized over the GS/GOGAT pathway. Its level was threefold reduced compared to the wild type. PMID:10049869

  9. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  10. Natural abundance 15N NMR assignments delineate structural differences between intact and reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthi, R; Nemmers, S; Tobias, B

    1992-06-15

    15N NMR assignments were made to the backbone amide nitrogen atoms at natural isotopic abundance of intact and reactive-site (Arg5-Ile6) hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III and CMTI-III*, respectively) by means of 2D proton-detected heteronuclear single bond chemical shift correlation (HSBC) spectroscopy, utilizing the previously made sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments (Krishnamoorthi et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 898-904). Comparison of the 15N chemical shifts of the two forms of the inhibitor molecule revealed significant changes not only for residues located near the reactive-site region, but also for those distantly located. Residues Cys3, Arg5, Leu7, Met8, Cys10, Cys16, Glu19, His25, Tyr27, Cys28 and Gly29 showed significant chemical shift changes ranging from 0.3 to 6.1 ppm, thus indicating structural perturbations that were transmitted throughout the molecule. These findings confirm the earlier conclusions based on 1H NMR investigations.

  11. Backbone (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR resonance assignments of the Krüppel-like factor 4 activation domain.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Brigid S; Weiss, Emma R; Smith, Steven P; Langelaan, David N

    2017-04-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a transcription factor involved in diverse biological processes, including development, cellular differentiation and proliferation, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. KLF4 has also been associated with disease states, such as cardiovascular disease and several cancers. KLF4 contains an activation domain, repression domain, and a structurally characterized C-terminal zinc finger domain that mediates its binding to DNA. The structurally uncharacterized KLF4 activation domain is critical for transactivation by KLF4 and mediates its binding to the transcriptional coactivator CBP/p300. Here, we report the (1)H, (15)N, (13)CO, (13)Cα and (13)Cβ NMR chemical shift assignments of KLF41-130, which contains the KLF4 activation domain. Narrow chemical shift dispersion in the (1)H dimension of the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum suggests that the KLF41-130 fragment is intrinsically disordered.

  12. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei.

  13. Comparative analysis of the orientation of transmembrane peptides using solid-state (2)H- and (15)N-NMR: mobility matters.

    PubMed

    Grage, Stephan L; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Esteban-Martín, Santiago; Salgado, Jesús; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-05-01

    Many solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approaches for membrane proteins rely on orientation-dependent parameters, from which the alignment of peptide segments in the lipid bilayer can be calculated. Molecules embedded in liquid-crystalline membranes, such as monomeric helices, are highly mobile, leading to partial averaging of the measured NMR parameters. These dynamic effects need to be taken into account to avoid misinterpretation of NMR data. Here, we compare two common NMR approaches: (2)H-NMR quadrupolar waves, and separated local field (15)N-(1)H polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle (PISEMA) spectra, in order to identify their strengths and drawbacks for correctly determining the orientation and mobility of α-helical transmembrane peptides. We first analyzed the model peptide WLP23 in oriented dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes and then contrasted it with published data on GWALP23 in dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). We only obtained consistent tilt angles from the two methods when taking dynamics into account. Interestingly, the two related peptides differ fundamentally in their mobility. Although both helices adopt the same tilt in their respective bilayers (~20°), WLP23 undergoes extensive fluctuations in its azimuthal rotation angle, whereas GWALP23 is much less dynamic. Both alternative NMR methods are suitable for characterizing orientation and dynamics, yet they can be optimally used to address different aspects. PISEMA spectra immediately reveal the presence of large-amplitude rotational fluctuations, which are not directly seen by (2)H-NMR. On the other hand, PISEMA was unable to define the azimuthal rotation angle in the case of the highly dynamic WLP23, though the helix tilt could still be determined, irrespective of any dynamics parameters.

  14. The theoretical investigation of solvent effects on the relative stability and 15N NMR shielding of antidepressant heterocyclic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahan, Arezoo; Khojandi, Mahya; Salari, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) and Tomasi's polarized continuum model (PCM) were used for the investigation of solvent polarity and its dielectric constant effects on the relative stability and NMR shielding tensors of antidepressant mirtazapine (MIR). The obtained results indicated that the relative stability in the polar solvents is higher than that in non-polar solvents and the most stable structure was observed in the water at the B3LYP/6-311++G ( d, p) level of theory. Also, natural bond orbital (NBO) interpretation demonstrated that by increase of solvent dielectric constant, negative charge on nitrogen atoms of heterocycles and resonance energy for LP(N10) → σ* and π* delocalization of the structure's azepine ring increase and the highest values of them were observed in water. On the other hand, NMR calculations showed that with an increase in negative charge of nitrogen atoms, isotropic chemical shielding (σiso) around them increase and nitrogen of piperazine ring (N19) has the highest values of negative charge and σiso among nitrogen atoms. NMR calculations also represented that direct solvent effect on nitrogen of pyridine ring (N15) is more than other nitrogens, while its effect on N19 is less than other ones. Based on NMR data and NBO interpretation, it can be deduced that with a decrease in the negative charge on nitrogen atoms, the intramolecular effects on them decrease, while direct solvent effect increases.

  15. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  16. Identification of allosteric PIF-pocket ligands for PDK1 using NMR-based fragment screening and 1H-15N TROSY experiments.

    PubMed

    Stockman, Brian J; Kothe, Michael; Kohls, Darcy; Weibley, Laura; Connolly, Brendan J; Sheils, Alissa L; Cao, Qing; Cheng, Alan C; Yang, Lily; Kamath, Ajith V; Ding, Yuan-Hua; Charlton, Maura E

    2009-02-01

    Aberrant activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway because of genetic mutations of essential signalling proteins has been associated with human diseases including cancer and diabetes. The pivotal role of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 in the PI3K signalling cascade has made it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. The N-terminal lobe of the 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 catalytic domain contains a docking site which recognizes the non-catalytic C-terminal hydrophobic motifs of certain substrate kinases. The binding of substrate in this so-called PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket allows interaction with 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 and enhanced phosphorylation of downstream kinases. NMR spectroscopy was used to a screen 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 domain construct against a library of chemically diverse fragments in order to identify small, ligand-efficient fragments that might interact at either the ATP site or the allosteric PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket. While majority of the fragment hits were determined to be ATP-site binders, several fragments appeared to interact with the PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket. Ligand-induced changes in 1H-15N TROSY spectra acquired using uniformly 15N-enriched PDK1 provided evidence to distinguish ATP-site from PDK1 Interacting Fragment-site binding. Caliper assay data and 19F NMR assay data on the PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket fragments and structurally related compounds identified them as potential allosteric activators of PDK1 function.

  17. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  18. Analysis of internal motions of interleukin-13 variant associated with severe bronchial asthma using {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Takeda, Chika; Kuroki, Ryota; Izuhara, Kenji; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi . E-mail: ueda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-22

    The single nucleotide polymorphism interleukin-13 (IL-13) R110Q is associated with severe bronchial asthma because its lower affinity leads to the augmentation of local IL-13 concentration, resulting in an increase in the signal transduction via IL-13R. Since the mutation site does not directly bind to IL-13R{alpha}2, we carried out NMR relaxation analyses of the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q in order to examine whether the R110Q mutation affects the internal motions in IL-13 molecules. The results showed that the internal motion in the micro- to millisecond time scale on helix D, which is suggested to be important for the interaction between IL-13 and IL-13R{alpha}2, is increased in IL-13-R110Q compared with that in the wild-type IL-13. It therefore appears that the difference in the internal motions on helix D between the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q may be involved in their affinity differences with IL-13R{alpha}2.

  19. The HSP90 binding mode of a radicicol-like E-oxime from docking, binding free energy estimations, and NMR 15N chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Spichty, Martin; Taly, Antoine; Hagn, Franz; Kessler, Horst; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We determine the binding mode of a macrocyclic radicicol-like oxime to yeast HSP90 by combining computer simulations and experimental measurements. We sample the macrocyclic scaffold of the unbound ligand by parallel tempering simulations and dock the most populated conformations to yeast HSP90. Docking poses are then evaluated by the use of binding free energy estimations with the linear interaction energy method. Comparison of QM/MM-calculated NMR chemical shifts with experimental shift data for a selective subset of back-bone 15N provides an additional evaluation criteria. As a last test we check the binding modes against available structure-activity-relationships. We find that the most likely binding mode of the oxime to yeast HSP90 is very similar to the known structure of the radicicol-HSP90 complex. PMID:19482409

  20. 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of pyrolyzed metal-polyaniline cathode catalysts for oxygen reduction in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Shigeki; Hosaka, Yo; Yamauchi, Chiharu; Nagata, Shinsuke; Sonoda, Mayu

    2015-09-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of pyrolyzed metal-free and metal (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu)-containing polyaniline (PANI) in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) was studied. The metal-free PANI800 shows quite poor ORR catalytic activity, whilst the metal-containing PANIMe800 display a better ORR activity. The 15N CP/MAS NMR spectra of PANINi800 and PANICu800 show one weak peak at 118 ppm and there is no peak observed in PANIFe800, against that of PANI800, PANIMn800, PANICo800 and PANINi800 show two peaks at 273 and 118 ppm assigned to the pyridinic and pyridinium nitrogens. It is because of the paramagnetic effect of metal ions. The 15N spin-echo NMR spectra of PANIMe800 with fast recycle delay show the peaks at 140 and 270 ppm assigned to the graphitic and pyridinic nitrogens, against that of PANI800 shows no peak. The spectra of PANIMn800, PANICo800, PANINi800 and PANICu600 also contain a very broaden peak at 430 ppm assigned to the nitrogen with Fermi-contact effect from metal ions. The spectra of PANIFe800 show some spinning side bands and the average Fe3+-15N distance can be calculated. The some amount of iron ion are relieved and average Fe3+-15N distance increase after acid washing and the ORR activity decreases.

  1. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  2. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templer, P.H.; Mack, M.C.; Chapin, F. S.; Christenson, L.M.; Compton, J.E.; Crook, H.D.; Currie, W.S.; Curtis, C.J.; Dail, D.B.; D'Antonio, C. M.; Emmett, B.A.; Epstein, H.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Gundersen, P.; Hobbie, S.E.; Holland, K.; Hooper, D.U.; Hungate, B.A.; Lamontagne, S.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Osenberg, C.W.; Perakis, S.S.; Schleppi, P.; Schimel, J.; Schmidt, I.K.; Sommerkorn, M.; Spoelstra, J.; Tietema, A.; Wessel, W.W.; Zak, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3–18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C: N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N·ha-1·yr-1 above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer addition.

  3. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies.

    PubMed

    Templer, P H; Mack, M C; Chapin, F S; Christenson, L M; Compton, J E; Crook, H D; Currie, W S; Curtis, C J; Dail, D B; D'Antonio, C M; Emmett, B A; Epstein, H E; Goodale, C L; Gundersen, P; Hobbie, S E; Holland, K; Hooper, D U; Hungate, B A; Lamontagne, S; Nadelhoffer, K J; Osenberg, C W; Perakis, S S; Schleppi, P; Schimel, J; Schmidt, I K; Sommerkorn, M; Spoelstra, J; Tietema, A; Wessel, W W; Zak, D R

    2012-08-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (< 1 week after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3-18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C:N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1) above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer

  4. NMR Structural Studies of Antimicrobial Peptides: LPcin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji-Ho; Kim, Ji-Sun; Choi, Sung-Sub; Kim, Yongae

    2016-01-01

    Lactophoricin (LPcin), a component of proteose peptone (113–135) isolated from bovine milk, is a cationic amphipathic antimicrobial peptide consisting of 23 amino acids. We designed a series of N- or C-terminal truncated variants, mutated analogs, and truncated mutated analogs using peptide-engineering techniques. Then, we selected three LPcin analogs of LPcin-C8 (LPcin-YK1), LPcin-T2WT6W (LPcin-YK2), and LPcin-T2WT6W-C8 (LPcin-YK3), which may have better antimicrobial activities than LPcin, and successfully expressed them in E. coli with high yield. We elucidated the 3D structures and topologies of the three LPcin analogs in membrane environments by conducting NMR structural studies. We investigated the purity of the LPcin analogs and the α-helical secondary structures by performing 1H-15N 2D HSQC and HMQC-NOESY liquid-state NMR spectroscopy using protein-containing micelle samples. We measured the 3D structures and tilt angles in membranes by conducting 15N 1D and 2D 1H-15N SAMMY type solid-state NMR spectroscopy with an 800 MHz in-house-built 1H-15N double-resonance solid-state NMR probe with a strip-shield coil, using protein-containing large bicelle samples aligned and confirmed by molecular-dynamics simulations. The three LPcin analogs were found to be curved α-helical structures, with tilt angles of 55–75° for normal membrane bilayers, and their enhanced activities may be correlated with these topologies. PMID:26789765

  5. Design of a hyperpolarized (15)N NMR probe that induces a large chemical-shift change upon binding of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Hata, Ryunosuke; Nonaka, Hiroshi; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2015-08-07

    Ca(2+) is a fundamental metal ion for physiological functioning. Therefore, molecular probes for Ca(2+) analysis are required. Recently, a hyperpolarized NMR probe has emerged as a promising tool. Here, we report a new design of a hyperpolarized NMR probe for Ca(2+), which showed a large chemical shift change upon binding to Ca(2+) and was applied for Ca(2+) sensing in a hyperpolarized state.

  6. Compound specific amino acid δ15N in marine sediments: A new approach for studies of the marine nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Fabian C.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Crusius, John; Casso, Michael A.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-10-01

    The nitrogen (N) isotopic composition (δ15N) of bulk sedimentary N (δ15Nbulk) is a common tool for studying past biogeochemical cycling in the paleoceanographic record. Empirical evidence suggests that natural fluctuations in the δ15N of surface nutrient N are reflected in the δ15N of exported planktonic biomass and in sedimentary δ15Nbulk. However, δ15Nbulk is an analysis of total combustible sedimentary N, and therefore also includes mixtures of N sources and/or selective removal or preservation of N-containing compounds. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analyses of individual amino acids (δ15NAA) are novel measurements with the potential to decouple δ15N changes in nutrient N from trophic effects, two main processes that can influence δ15Nbulk records. As a proof of concept study to examine how δ15NAA can be applied in marine sedimentary systems, we compare the δ15NAA signatures of surface and sinking POM sources with shallow surface sediments from the Santa Barbara Basin, a sub-oxic depositional environmental that exhibits excellent preservation of sedimentary organic matter. Our results demonstrate that δ15NAA signatures of both planktonic biomass and sinking POM are well preserved in such surface sediments. However, we also observed an unexpected inverse correlation between δ15N value of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe; the best AA proxy for N isotopic value at the base of the food web) and calculated trophic position. We used a simple N isotope mass balance model to confirm that over long time scales, δ15NPhe values should in fact be directly dependent on shifts in ecosystem trophic position. While this result may appear incongruent with current applications of δ15NAA in food webs, it is consistent with expectations that paleoarchives will integrate N dynamics over much longer timescales. We therefore propose that for paleoceanographic applications, key δ15NAA parameters are ecosystem trophic position, which determines relative partitioning of 15N

  7. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. )

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  8. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the past reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have been reinvestigating the prospects of using zero field NMR types of techniques for two dimensional NMR structural analysis of complex organic solids such as coals. Currently MAS spin rates are not sufficiently high to permit zero field in high field NMR for protons in typical organic solids, however they are compatible with {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C dipolar couplings. In collaboration with Dr. Robert Tycko of AT T Bell Laboratories, inventor of the zero field in high field NMR method, the authors have performed the first zero field in high field {sup 13}C NMR experiments. These results are described. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Production of 15N-Labelled Liquid Organic Fertilisers Based on Manure and Crop Residue for Use in Fertigation Studies.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Fernández, Carlos; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of crop residue and animal manure from agricultural and livestock activities are annually produced worldwide. With proper management, these residues are potentially valuable sources of plant nutrients, mainly N. Recycling such subproducts in sustainably-based agricultural systems can minimise the use of mineral fertilisers, and hence reduce the potential risk of surface and groundwater pollution. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to obtain (small scale) two liquid labelled-organic fertilisers, an animal- and a vegetal-based organic (AO and VO, respectively) fertiliser, to be used as organic N sources in subsequent fertigation studies. Forage maize (Zea mays L.) grown under 15N-labelled fertiliser supply was used as raw material for VO fertiliser production, and also as 15N-labelled sheep feed to obtain 15N-labelled manure. The labelled faeces fraction was used as raw material for the AO fertiliser. The VO fertiliser was obtained after an acidic and an enzyme-driven hydrolysis. The AO fertiliser was obtained after acidic hydrolysis. The VO liquid fertiliser presented an N concentration of 330 mg·L-1, 85% of total N was organic, while ammonium and nitrate N accounted for 55% and 45% of the mineral nitrogen fraction, respectively. This fertiliser also exhibited high K, Ca and S concentrations and notable values for the remaining macro- and micronutrients. The AO liquid fertiliser had a similar total N concentration (496 mg·L-1, 82% of total N in an organic form) to that of VO, but its mineral N fraction significantly differed, which came in a predominantly (95%) ammonia form. It also had a high content of N, P, K and other macronutrients, and sufficient Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu and B levels, which suggests its suitability as a potential fertiliser. The percentage of 15N enrichment in both VO and AO liquid fertilisers exceeded 2% 15N atom excess, which enabled their use in subsequent assays run to assess nitrogen uptake efficiency.

  10. Using natural 15N abundances to trace the fate of waste-derived nitrogen in forest ecosystems: New Zealand case studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Magesan, G N; Clinton, P W; Lavery, J M

    2005-03-01

    Treatment of wastewater generally results in elevated natural 15N abundance (delta15N) in the effluent and sludges. For example, high delta15N values are found in treated sewage effluent, biosolids, and other wastes that are commonly applied to land. In contrast, N deficient coniferous forest soils usually have a low delta15N. When wastes with high delta15N values are applied to land, their distinctive delta15N signature can potentially be used to trace the fate of waste-derived N in the ecosystem. In this paper, we provide an overview of the use of delta15N in land application of wastes, including New Zealand case studies on tracing nitrogen in forest ecosystems.

  11. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  12. Quantitative study on the fate of residual soil nitrate in winter wheat based on a 15N-labeling method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Ting; Wang, Zhi-Min; Liang, Shuang-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Hua; Lu, Lai-Qing; Wang, Run-Zheng

    2017-01-01

    A considerable amount of surplus nitrogen (N), which primarily takes the form of nitrate, accumulates in the soil profile after harvesting crops from an intensive production system in the North China Plain. The residual soil nitrate (RSN) is a key factor that is included in the N recommendation algorithm. Quantifying the utilization and losses of RSN is a fundamental necessity for optimizing crop N management, improving N use efficiency, and reducing the impact derived from farmland N losses on the environment. In this study, a 15N-labeling method was introduced to study the fate of the RSN quantitatively during the winter wheat growing season by 15N tracer technique combined with a soil column study. A soil column with a 2 m height was vertically divided into 10 20-cm layers, and the RSN in each layer was individually labeled with a 15N tracer before the wheat was sown. The results indicated that approximately 17.68% of the crop N derived from RSN was located in the 0–2 m soil profile prior to wheat sowing. The wheat recovery proportions of RSN at various layers ranged from 0.21% to 33.46%. The percentages that still remained in the soil profile after the wheat harvest ranged from 47.08% to 75.44%, and 19.46–32.64% of the RSN was unaccounted for. Upward and downward movements in the RSN were observed, and the maximum upward and downward distances were 40 cm and 100 cm, respectively. In general, the 15N-labeling method contributes to a deeper understanding of the fates of the RSN. Considering the low crop recovery of the RSN from deep soil layers, water and N saving practices should be adopted during crop production. PMID:28170440

  13. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focused on variable temperature spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 5 figs.

  14. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focussed on spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Backbone dynamics of a biologically active human FGF-1 monomer, complexed to a hexasaccharide heparin-analogue, by 15N NMR relaxation methods.

    PubMed

    Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Fayos, Rosa; Angulo, Jesús; Ojeda, Rafael; Martín-Pastor, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Lozano, Rosa; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2006-08-01

    The binding site and backbone dynamics of a bioactive complex formed by the acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and a specifically designed heparin hexasaccharide has been investigated by HSQC and relaxation NMR methods. The comparison of the relaxation data for the free and bound states has allowed showing that the complex is monomeric, and still induces mutagenesis, and that the protein backbone presents reduced motion in different timescale in its bound state, except in certain points that are involved in the interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR).

  16. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  17. Elucidating the guest-host interactions and complex formation of praziquantel and cyclodextrin derivatives by (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arrúa, Eva C; Ferreira, M João G; Salomon, Claudio J; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-12-30

    Praziquantel is the drug of choice to treat several parasitic infections including the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis. Due to its low aqueous solubility, cyclodextrins have been tested as potential host candidates to prepare praziquantel inclusion complexes with improved solubility. For the first time, the interactions of praziquantel with β-cyclodextrin and β-cyclodextrin derivatives (methyl-β-cyclodextrin and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin) were investigated using high resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The results of this work confirmed that solid-state NMR experiments provided structural characterization, demonstrating the formation of inclusion complexes most probably with PZQ adopting an anti conformation, also the most likely in amorphous raw PZQ. Further information on the interaction of praziquantel with methyl-β-cyclodextrin was obtained from proton rotating-frame relaxation time measurements, sensitive to kilohertz-regime motions but modulated by spin-diffusion. Evidences were presented in all cases for praziquantel complexation through the aromatic ring. In addition, 1:2 drug:carrier molar ratio appears to be the most probable and therefore suitable stoichiometry to improve pharmaceutical formulations of this antischistosomal drug.

  18. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  19. Production of 15N-Labelled Liquid Organic Fertilisers Based on Manure and Crop Residue for Use in Fertigation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Fernández, Carlos; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of crop residue and animal manure from agricultural and livestock activities are annually produced worldwide. With proper management, these residues are potentially valuable sources of plant nutrients, mainly N. Recycling such subproducts in sustainably-based agricultural systems can minimise the use of mineral fertilisers, and hence reduce the potential risk of surface and groundwater pollution. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to obtain (small scale) two liquid labelled-organic fertilisers, an animal- and a vegetal-based organic (AO and VO, respectively) fertiliser, to be used as organic N sources in subsequent fertigation studies. Forage maize (Zea mays L.) grown under 15N-labelled fertiliser supply was used as raw material for VO fertiliser production, and also as 15N-labelled sheep feed to obtain 15N-labelled manure. The labelled faeces fraction was used as raw material for the AO fertiliser. The VO fertiliser was obtained after an acidic and an enzyme-driven hydrolysis. The AO fertiliser was obtained after acidic hydrolysis. The VO liquid fertiliser presented an N concentration of 330 mg·L-1, 85% of total N was organic, while ammonium and nitrate N accounted for 55% and 45% of the mineral nitrogen fraction, respectively. This fertiliser also exhibited high K, Ca and S concentrations and notable values for the remaining macro- and micronutrients. The AO liquid fertiliser had a similar total N concentration (496 mg·L-1, 82% of total N in an organic form) to that of VO, but its mineral N fraction significantly differed, which came in a predominantly (95%) ammonia form. It also had a high content of N, P, K and other macronutrients, and sufficient Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu and B levels, which suggests its suitability as a potential fertiliser. The percentage of 15N enrichment in both VO and AO liquid fertilisers exceeded 2% 15N atom excess, which enabled their use in subsequent assays run to assess nitrogen uptake efficiency. PMID:26982183

  20. Non-homogeneity of isotopic labelling in 15N gas flux studies: theory, some observations and possible lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Deppe, Marianna; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Gattinger, Andreas; Giesemann, Anette; Krause, Hans-Martin; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika

    2015-04-01

    addressing cases iii. and iv.. Furthermore we present some experimental data illustrating this. These include two data sets from denitrification experiments exhibiting substantial deviations in 15N enrichment between the N pools producing N2 and N2O. Moreover, results from a lab incubation study to quantify NH4+-derived N2O with increasing NH4+ amendment under conditions favouring nitrification are shown, were non-labelled NH4+ was added together with 15N labelled NO3-. Here we found large deviations between the 15N enrichment of NO3- in extracted soil water and the 15N enrichment of the labelled N pool as calculated from N2O isotopologues (Bergsma et al., 2001). We think that this reflects type iv. bias, probably because enrichment of NO3- in anoxic micro-sites was less diluted by non-labelled NO3- from nitrification compared to NO3- in oxic zones. Our data analysis provides a means to overcome bias iv. and thus to obtain correct source apportionment. References: Arah, J.R.M. (1992): Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 56, 795 - 800, 1992. Bergsma, T. et al. (2001): Env. Sci. & Technol. 35(21): 4307-4312. Hauck, R.D., et al.(1958): Soil Science 86, 287 - 291, 1958. Lewicka-Szczebak, D. et al.(2013): Rapid Comm. Mass Spectrom., 27 1548-1558. Müller, C. et al. (2004): Soil Biol. Biochem. 36(4): 619-632. Mulvaney, R.L.(1984):. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 48:690 - 692. Spott, O, et al.. (2006): Rapid Comm. Mass Spectrom., 20: 3267-3274. Spott, O. and C. F. Stange (2007): Rapid Comm. Mass Spectrom., 21: 2398-2406.

  1. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have concentrated on a theoretical treatment of pairs of tightly coupled spin {1/2} nuclei under magic angle spinning conditions. The average Hamiltonian theory developed here is required for a quantitative understanding of two dimensional NMR experiments of such spin pairs in solids. These experiments in turn provide a means of determining connectivities between resonances in solid state NMR spectra. Development of these techniques will allow us to establish connectivities between functional components in coals. The complete description of these spin dynamics has turned out to be complex, and is necessary to provide a foundation upon which such experiments may be quantitatively interpreted in complex mixtures such as coals. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concern how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors have concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the magic angle spinning (MAS) rate. In order to be able to use fields the order of 7.0 T or higher, CP efficiency must be maintained at MAS rates of over 10 kHz. The standard sequences have severe limitations at these rates which lead to intensity distortions in {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra. Thus in order to be able to take advantage of the increases in sensitivity and resolution that accompany high field operation, improvements in the NMR methods are required. The new sequences the authors are developing will be especially important for quantitative analysis of coal structure by {sup 13}C solid state NMR at high field strengths. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. 15N Isotopic Crop Exchange Residue Studies Suggest that IPCC N Input Methodologies to Assess N2O-N Emissions Should be Reevaluated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is difficult to quantify nitrogen (N) losses from agricultural systems to the environment, however we can use 15N isotopic techniques to conduct site specific studies to increase our knowledge about N management and fate. This manuscript synthesizes the review of two selected 15N isotopic studies...

  4. Selectively labeling the heterologous protein in Escherichia coli for NMR studies: a strategy to speed up NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almeida, F C; Amorim, G C; Moreau, V H; Sousa, V O; Creazola, A T; Américo, T A; Pais, A P; Leite, A; Netto, L E; Giordano, R J; Valente, A P

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The (1)H/(15)N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective (15)N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good (1)H/(15)N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The (15)N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the (1)H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  5. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  6. Sequential assignment of 1H, 15N, 13C resonances and secondary structure of human calmodulin-like protein determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, H.; Rogers, M. S.; Schleucher, J.; Edlund, U.; Strehler, E. E.; Sethson, I.

    1998-01-01

    Human calmodulin-like protein (CLP) is closely related to vertebrate calmodulin, yet its unique cell specific expression pattern, overlapping but divergent biochemical properties, and specific target proteins suggest that it is not an isoform of calmodulin. To gain insight into the structural differences that may underlie the difference target specificities and biochemical properties of CLP when compared to calmodulin, we determined the sequential backbone assignment and associated secondary structure of 144 out of the 148 residues of Ca2+-CLP by using multinuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Despite a very high overall degree of structural similarity between CLP and calmodulin, a number of significant differences were found mainly in the length of alpha-helices and in the central nonhelical flexible region. Interestingly, the regions of greatest primary sequence divergence between CLP and calmodulin in helices III and VIII displayed only minor secondary structure differences. The data suggest that the distinct differences in target specificity and biochemical properties of CLP and calmodulin result from the sum of several minor structural and side-chain changes spread over multiple domains in these proteins. PMID:9828009

  7. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Probing Hydronium Ion Histidine NH Exchange Rate Constants in the M2 Channel via Indirect Observation of Dipolar-Dephased (15)N Signals in Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Miao, Yimin; Qin, Huajun; Cross, Timothy A

    2016-12-14

    Water-protein chemical exchange in membrane-bound proteins is an important parameter for understanding how proteins interact with their aqueous environment, but has been difficult to observe in membrane-bound biological systems. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of probing specific water-protein chemical exchange in membrane-bound proteins in solid-state MAS NMR. By spin-locking the (1)H magnetization along the magic angle, the (1)H spin diffusion is suppressed such that a water-protein chemical exchange process can be monitored indirectly by dipolar-dephased (15)N signals through polarization transfer from (1)H. In the example of the Influenza A full length M2 protein, the buildup of dipolar-dephased (15)N signals from the tetrad of His37 side chains have been observed as a function of spin-lock time. This confirms that hydronium ions are in exchange with protons in the His37 NH bonds at the heart of the M2 proton conduction mechanism, with an exchange rate constant of ∼1750 s(-1) for pH 6.2 at -10 °C.

  9. Nitrogen assimilation and dissimilation by bacteria and benthic microalgae in tidal mudflat sediment in a 15N labeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dähnke, K.; Moneta, A.; Veuger, B.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    In a short-term 15N-labeling experiment, we investigated the changes in relative utilization of reactive nitrogen in tidal flat sediment, focusing on the relative importance of assimilatory versus dissimilatory processes and the role of benthic microalgae therein. 15N-labeled ammonium and nitrate were added separately to homogenized tidal flat sediment, and 15N was subsequently traced into bulk sediment and inorganic nutrients in pore water. Integration of results in an N cycle model allowed us to quantify rates for the major assimilatory and dissimilatory processes in the sediment. Overall, the results indicate that the equilibrium between assimilation and dissimilation in this tidal mudflat is mainly dependent on the nitrogen source: Nitrate is utilized almost exclusively dissimilatory via denitrification, whereas ammonium is rapidly assimilated, with about a quarter of this assimilation due to BMA activity. The major influence of benthic microalgae is on assimilation of ammonium, ceasing BMA activity turns the sediments from a net ammonium sink to a net source. There is little evidence of dissimilative processes like nitrification in undisturbed sediments, but high initial nitrification rates suggest that in a dynamic environment like tidal flats, intense and fast nitrification/denitrification of ammonium is abundant. The driving mechanisms for assimilation or dissimilation accordingly appear to be ruled to a large extent by external physical forcing, with the entire system being capable of rapid shifts following environmental changes. Our combined experimental and model approach reveals that selective removal of labeled compounds takes place for both ammonium and nitrate. Mechanisms remain unclear, but this finding clearly challenges the traditional labeling approach and underscores the need to consider selective uptake in future labeling studies. Ignoring such selective uptake mechanisms will lead to misinterpretation of process rates when these are estimated

  10. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coal models. Along the same lines the author are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors has concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the Hartmann-Hahn mismatch. It has been found that the usual theories of CP are incorrect, and that the CP process is very heterogeneous in nature. This has significant implications on methods typically used in quantifying {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra of coals. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Coupling Cover Crops with Alternative Swine Manure Application Strategies: Manure-15N Tracer Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of rye cover crops with alternative liquid swine (Sus scrofa L.) manure application strategies may enhance retention of manure N in corn (Zea mays L.) - soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] cropping systems. The objective of this study was to quantify uptake of manure derived-N by a rye (Seca...

  12. Salt marsh ecosystem biogeochemical responses to nutrient enrichment: a paired 15N tracer study.

    PubMed

    Drake, D C; Peterson, Bruce J; Galván, Kari A; Deegan, Linda A; Hopkinson, Charles; Johnson, J Michael; Koop-Jakobsen, K; Lemay, Lynsey E; Picard, Christian

    2009-09-01

    We compared processing and fate of dissolved NO3- in two New England salt marsh ecosystems, one receiving natural flood tide concentrations of approximately 1-4 micromol NO3-/ L and the other receiving experimentally fertilized flood tides containing approximately 70-100 micromol NO3-/ L. We conducted simultaneous 15NO3- (isotope) tracer additions from 23 to 28 July 2005 in the reference (8.4 ha) and fertilized (12.4 ha) systems to compare N dynamics and fate. Two full tidal cycles were intensively studied during the paired tracer additions. Resulting mass balances showed that essentially 100% (0.48-0.61 mol NO3-N.ha(-1).h(-1)) of incoming NO3- was assimilated, dissimilated, sorbed, or sedimented (processed) within a few hours in the reference system when NO3- concentrations were 1.3-1.8 micromol/L. In contrast, only 50-60% of incoming NO3- was processed in the fertilized system when NO3- concentrations were 84-96 micromol/L; the remainder was exported in ebb tidewater. Gross NO3- processing was approximately 40 times higher in the fertilized system at 19.34-24.67 mol NO3-N.ha(-1).h(-1). Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was evident in both systems during the first 48 h of the tracer additions but <1% of incoming 15NO3- was exported as 15NH4+. Nitrification rates calculated by 15NO3- dilution were 6.05 and 4.46 mol.ha(-1).h(-1) in the fertilized system but could not be accurately calculated in the reference system due to rapid (<4 h) NO3- turnover. Over the five-day paired tracer addition, sediments sequestered a small fraction of incoming NO3-, although the efficiency of sequestration was 3.8% in the reference system and 0.7% in the fertilized system. Gross sediment N sequestration rates were similar at 13.5 and 12.6 mol.ha(-1).d(-1), respectively. Macrophyte NO3- uptake efficiency, based on tracer incorporation in aboveground tissues, was considerably higher in the reference system (16.8%) than the fertilized system (2.6%), although bulk uptake of NO3

  13. Dynamics of Reassembled Thioredoxin Studied by Magic Angle Spinning NMR: Snapshots from Different Timescales

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Tasayco, Maria Luisa; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to probe internal protein dynamics in the absence of the overall molecular tumbling. In this study, we report 15N backbone dynamics in differentially enriched 1-73(U-13C, 15N)/74-108(U-15N) reassembled thioredoxin on multiple timescales using a series of 2D and 3D MAS NMR experiments probing the backbone amide 15N longitudinal relaxation, 1H-15N dipolar order parameters, 15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), and signal intensities in the temperature-dependent and 1H T2′ -filtered NCA experiments. The spin-lattice relaxation rates R1(R1 = 1/T1) were observed in the range from 0.012 to 0.64 s-1 indicating large site-to-site variations in dynamics on pico- to nanosecond time scales. The 1H-15N dipolar order parameters, , and 15N CSA anisotropies, δσ reveal the backbone mobilities in reassembled thioredoxin, as reflected in the average = 0.89 ± 0.06 and δσ = 92.3 ± 5.2 ppm, respectively. From the aggregate of experimental data from different dynamics methods, some degree of correlation between the motions on the different time scales has been suggested. Analysis of the dynamics parameters derived from these solid-state NMR experiments indicates higher mobilities for the residues constituting irregular secondary structure elements than for those located in the α-helices and β-sheets, with no apparent systematic differences in dynamics between the α-helical and β-sheet residues. Remarkably, the dipolar order parameters derived from the solid-state NMR measurements and the corresponding solution NMR generalized order parameters display similar qualitative trends as a function of the residue number. The comparison of the solid-state dynamics parameters to the crystallographic B-factors has identified the contribution of static disorder to the B-factors. The combination of longitudinal relaxation, dipolar order parameter, and CSA line shape analyses employed in this study provides snapshots of dynamics and a new

  14. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  15. NMR Studies on the Aqueous Phase Photochemical Degradation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2008-04-06

    Aqueous phase photochemical degradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is an important pathway in several environments, including washout lagoon soils, impact craters from partially detonated munitions that fill with rain or groundwater, and shallow marine environments containing unexploded munitions that have corroded. Knowledge of the degradation products is necessary for compliance issues on military firing ranges and formerly used defense sites. Previous laboratory studies have indicated that UV irradiation of aqueous TNT solutions results in a multicomponent product mixture, including polymerization compounds, that has been only partially resolved by mass spectrometric analyses. This study illustrates how a combination of solid and liquid state 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopy, including two dimensional analyses, provides complementary information on the total product mixture from aqueous photolysis of TNT, and the effect of reaction conditions. Among the degradation products detected were amine, amide, azoxy, azo, and carboxylic acid compounds.

  16. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  17. Are vascular epiphytes nitrogen or phosphorus limited? A study of plant (15) N fractionation and foliar N : P stoichiometry with the tank bromeliad Vriesea sanguinolenta.

    PubMed

    Wanek, Wolfgang; Zotz, Gerhard

    2011-10-01

    Although there is unambiguous evidence for vascular epiphytic plants to be limited by insufficient water and nutrient supply under natural conditions, it is an open debate whether they are primarily phosphorus (P) or nitrogen (N) limited. Plant (15) N fractionation and foliar N : P stoichiometry of a tank epiphyte (Vriesea sanguinolenta), and its response to combined N-P fertilization, were studied under semi-natural conditions over 334 d to clarify the type of nutrient limitation. Plants collected in the field and experimental plants with limited nutrient supply showed significant plant (15) N fractionation (mean 5‰) and plant N : P ratios of c. 13.5. Higher relative growth rates and declines in plant (15) N fractionation (0.5‰) and in foliar N : P ratios to 8.5 in the high N-P treatment indicated that these epiphytes were P limited in situ. The critical foliar N : P ratio was 10.4, as derived from the breakpoint in the relationship between plant (15) N fractionation and foliar N : P. We interpret the widespread (15) N depletion of vascular epiphytes relative to their host trees as deriving from (15) N fractionation of epiphytes as a result of P limitation. High foliar N : P ratios (> 12) corroborate widespread P limitation (or co-limitation by N and P) of epiphytic bromeliads and, possibly, other epiphyte species.

  18. δ 15N Studies of Nitrogen Use by the Red Mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L. in South Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, B.; Bern, A. L.; Ross, M. S.; Meeder, J. F.

    2000-02-01

    To help define nitrogen (N) sources and patterns of N processing in mangrove ecosystems, mangrove leaf nitrogen contents and δ 15N values were assayed in three marshes along the south Florida coast. In each marsh, leaf samples were collected from dwarf mangroves at interior locations and taller mangroves at the ocean fringe. Leaf % N and δ 15N values did not differ consistently between dwarf and tall mangroves, even though there were large variations in δ 15N (18‰ range, -5 to +13‰) and % N (1·2% range, 0·9-2·1%). Highest % N and δ 15N values occurred along the western margin of Biscayne Bay where canals draining agricultural lands deliver high-nitrate waters to fringing mangrove marshes. High mangrove δ 15N values may be good biomonitors of anthropogenic N loading to south Florida estuaries. Lower values likely reflect less anthropogenic N entering the mangrove marshes, as well as differences in plant physiology that occur along the fringe-dwarf gradient.

  19. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  20. N-15 NMR study of the immobilization of 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene in aerobic compost.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Kevin A; Pennington, Judith C; Kennedy, Kay R; Cox, Larry G; Hayes, Charolett A; Porter, Beth E

    2008-04-01

    Large-scale aerobic windrow composting has been used to bioremediate washout lagoon soils contaminated with the explosives TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) and RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) at several sites within the United States. We previously used 15N NMR to investigate the reduction and binding of T15NT in aerobic bench-scale reactors simulating the conditions of windrow composting. These studies have been extended to 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4DNT) and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6DNT), which, as impurities in TNT, are usually presentwherever soils have been contaminated with TNT. Liquid-state 15N NMR analyses of laboratory reactions between 4-methyl-3-nitroaniline-15N, the major monoamine reduction product of 2,4DNT, and the Elliot soil humic acid, both in the presence and absence of horseradish peroxidase, indicated that the amine underwent covalent binding with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and non-heterocyclic condensation products. Liquid-state 15N NMR analyses of the methanol extracts of 20 day aerobic bench-scale composts of 2,4-di-15N-nitrotoluene and 2,6-di-15N-nitrotoluene revealed the presence of nitrite and monoamine, but not diamine, reduction products, indicating the occurrence of both dioxygenase enzyme and reductive degradation pathways. Solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR analyses of the whole composts, however, suggested that reduction to monoamines followed by covalent binding of the amines to organic matter was the predominant pathway.

  1. N-15 NMR study of the immobilization of 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene in aerobic compost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Kennedy, K.R.; Cox, L.G.; Hayes, C.A.; Porter, B.E.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale aerobic windrow composting has been used to bioremediate washout lagoon soils contaminated with the explosives TNT (2,4,6- trinitrotoluene) and RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) at several sites within the United States. We previously used 15N NMR to investigate the reduction and binding of T15NT in aerobic bench -scale reactors simulating the conditions of windrow composting. These studies have been extended to 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4DNT) and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6DNT), which, as impurities in TNT, are usually present wherever soils have been contaminated with TNT. Liquid-state 15N NMR analyses of laboratory reactions between 4-methyl-3-nitroaniline-15N, the major monoamine reduction product of 2,4DNT, and the Elliot soil humic acid, both in the presence and absence of horseradish peroxidase, indicated that the amine underwent covalent binding with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and non-heterocyclic condensation products. Liquid-state 15N NMR analyses of the methanol extracts of 20 day aerobic bench-scale composts of 2,4-di-15N-nitrotoluene and 2,6-di-15N-nitrotoluene revealed the presence of nitrite and monoamine, but not diamine, reduction products, indicating the occurrence of both dioxygenase enzyme and reductive degradation pathways. Solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR analyses of the whole composts, however, suggested that reduction to monoamines followed by covalent binding of the amines to organic matter was the predominant pathway. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  2. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  3. The NMR study of biologically active metallated alkanol ammoinium ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, I. A.; Voronov, V. K.; Adamovich, S. N.; Mirskov, R. G.; Mirskova, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The 1H, 13C, 15N, and 111Cd NMR spectra of a series of metallated alkanol ammonium ionic liquids (MAIL) series [n N(CH2CH2OH;)3M]+ · mX-, where M = Cd, Mg, Zn, Fe, Rh; X = Cl, OOCCH3, obtained in a wide range of temperatures of the studied samples, have been analyzed. It is found that, under biomimetic conditions (H2O, 25 °C), the compounds studied exist as mono- bi- and the tricyclic structures, which are in equilibrium. Shift of the equilibrium depends upon nature of a metal and effects all the parameters of the NMR spectra. Peculiarities of ligand exchange, typical for the studied compounds, have been studied in a wide range of temperatures. It is found that the NMR data can be used to control structure of the compounds formed in the course of synthesis.

  4. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  5. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  6. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for E73 from Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus ragged hills, a hyperthermophilic crenarchaeal virus from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Casey; Menon, Smita; Lawrence, C Martin; Copié, Valérie

    2009-12-01

    Crenarchaeal viruses are commonly found in hyperthermal acidic environments such as those of Yellowstone National Park. These remarkable viruses not only exhibit unusual morphologies, but also display extreme genetic diversity. However, little is known about crenarchaeal viral life cycles, virus-host interactions, and their adaptation to hyperthermophilic environments. In an effort to better understand the functions of crenarchaeal viruses and the proteins encoded by their genomes, we have undertaken detailed structural and functional studies of gene products encoded in the open reading frames of Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus ragged hills. Herein, we report ((15)N, (13)C, (1)H) resonance assignments of backbone and side chain atoms of a 19.1 kDa homodimeric E73 protein of SSVRH.

  7. Solid-state NMR studies of form I of atorvastatin calcium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei David; Gao, Xudong; Strohmeier, Mark; Wang, Wei; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2012-03-22

    Solid-state (13)C, (19)F, and (15)N magic angle spinning NMR studies of Form I of atorvastatin calcium are reported, including chemical shift tensors of all resolvable carbon sites and fluorine sites. The complete (13)C and (19)F chemical shift assignments are given based on an extensive analysis of (13)C-(1)H HETCOR and (13)C-(19)F HETCOR results. The solid-state NMR data indicate that the asymmetric unit of this material contains two atorvastatin molecules. A possible structure of Form I of atorvastatin calcium (ATC-I), derived from solid-state NMR data and density functional theory calculations of various structures, is proposed for this important active pharmaceutical ingredient (API).

  8. NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Lewis E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in solution NMR spectroscopy have significantly extended the spectrum of problems that can now be addressed with this technology. In particular, studies of proteins with molecular weights on the order of 100 kDa are now possible at a level of detail that was previously reserved for much smaller systems. An example of the sort of information that is now accessible is provided in a study of malate synthase G, a 723 residue enzyme that has been a focal point of research efforts in my laboratory. Details of the labeling schemes that have been employed and optimal experiments for extraction of structural and dynamics information on this protein are described. NMR studies of protein dynamics, in principle, give insight into the relation between motion and function. A description of deuterium-based spin relaxation methods for the investigation of side chain dynamics is provided. Examples where millisecond (ms) time scale dynamics play an important role and where relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy has been particularly informative, including applications involving the membrane enzyme PagP and mutants of the Fyn SH3 domain that fold on a ms time scale, are presented.

  9. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  10. A study on the influence of fast amide exchange on the accuracy of (15)N relaxation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Jurt, Simon; Zerbe, Oliver

    2012-12-01

    (15)N relaxation rates of amide moieties provide insight both into global as well as local backbone dynamics of peptides and proteins. As the differences in the relaxation rates in general are small, their accurate determination is of prime importance. One potential source of error is fast amide exchange. It is well known that in its presence the effects of saturation transfer and H/D exchange may result in erroneous apparent relaxation rates R (1) and R (2). Here, the extent of these errors is rigorously examined. Theoretical considerations reveal that even when saturation effects are absent, H/D exchange will easily result in significant deviations from the true values. In particular overestimations of up to 10 % in R (1) and up to 5 % in R (2) are observed. An alternative scheme for fitting the relaxation data to the corresponding exponentials is presented that in the best cases not only delivers more accurate relaxation rates but also allows extracting estimates for the exchange rates. The theoretical computations were tested and verified for the case of ubiquitin.

  11. Influence of N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds on the (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensors in crystalline acetaminophen: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi; Hadipour, Nasser L

    2007-06-01

    A computational investigation was carried out to characterize the (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensors in crystalline acetaminophen. We found that N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds around the acetaminophen molecule in the crystal lattice have different influences on the calculated (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding eigenvalues and their orientations in the molecular frame of axes. The calculations were performed with the B3LYP method and 6-311++G(d, p) and 6-311+G(d) standard basis sets using the Gaussian 98 suite of programs. Calculated chemical shielding tensors were used to evaluate the (17)O, (15)N, and (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors in crystalline acetaminophen, which are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The difference between the calculated NMR parameters of the monomer and molecular clusters shows how much hydrogen-bonding interactions affect the chemical shielding tensors of each nucleus. The computed (17)O chemical shielding tensor on O(1), which is involved in two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, shows remarkable sensitivity toward the choice of the cluster model, whereas the (17)O chemical shielding tensor on O(2) involved in one N-H...O hydrogen bond, shows smaller improvement toward the hydrogen-bonding interactions. Also, a reasonably good agreement between the experimentally obtained solid-state (15)N and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculations is achievable only in molecular cluster model where a complete hydrogen-bonding network is considered. Moreover, at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) level of theory, the calculated (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensor orientations are able to reproduce the experimental values to a reasonably good degree of accuracy.

  12. Reactions, characterization and uptake of ammoxidized kraft lignin labeled with 15N.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, F; Varela, G; Delgado, E; López-Dellamary, F; Zúñiga, V; González, V; Faix, O; Meier, D

    2007-05-01

    Ammoxidation of kraft lignin was carried out in a Parr reactor using (15)NH(3) as the main nitrogen source. Reaction parameters were set up until a total nitrogen content of approximately 13 wt.% in lignin was achieved, in accordance with conditions of previous studies. Analytical tools such as FTIR, Py-GC/MS, and solid state NMR were used in this research. The nature of nitrogen bondings is discussed. The incorporation of the (15)N from ammoxidized lignin was followed in pumpkins (Zucchini cucurbita pepo L.) by means of (15)N emission spectroscopy.

  13. Microslot NMR probe for metabolomics studies.

    PubMed

    Krojanski, Hans Georg; Lambert, Jörg; Gerikalan, Yilmaz; Suter, Dieter; Hergenröder, Roland

    2008-11-15

    A NMR microprobe based on microstrip technology suitable for investigations of volume-limited samples in the low nanoliter range was designed. NMR spectra of sample quantities in the 100 pmol range can be obtained with this probe in a few seconds. The planar geometry of the probe is easily adaptable to the size and geometry requirements of the samples.

  14. Nitrate turnover in a peat soil under drained and rewetted conditions: results from a [(15)N]nitrate-bromide double-tracer study.

    PubMed

    Russow, Rolf; Tauchnitz, Nadine; Spott, Oliver; Mothes, Sibylle; Bernsdorf, Sabine; Meissner, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Under natural conditions, peatlands are generally nitrate-limited. However, recent concerns about an additional N input into peatlands by atmospheric N deposition have highlighted the risk of an increased denitrification activity and hence the likelihood of a rise of emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the turnover of added nitrate in a drained and a rewetted peatland using a [(15)N]nitrate-bromide double-tracer method. The double-tracer method allows a separation between physical effects (dilution, dispersion and dislocation) and microbial and chemical nitrate transformation by comparing with the conservative Br(-) tracer. In the drained peat site, low NO3(-) consumption rates have been observed. In contrast, NO3(-) consumption at the rewetted peat site rises rapidly to about 100% within 4 days after tracer application. Concomitantly, the (15)N abundances of nitrite and ammonium in soil water increased and lead to the conclusion that, besides commonly known NO3(-) reduction to nitrite (i.e. denitrification), a dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium has simultaneously taken place. The present study reveals that increasing NO3(-) inputs into rewetted peatlands via atmospheric deposition results in a rapid NO3(-) consumption, which could lead to an increase in N2O emissions into the atmosphere.

  15. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  16. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  17. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  18. A multinuclear static NMR study of geopolymerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Aurélie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-09-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic binders obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicates. While the structure of geopolymers is now well understood, the details of the geopolymerisation reaction and their impact on the rheology of the paste remain uncertain. In this work, we follow the elastic properties of a paste made with metakaolin and sodium silicate solution. After the first sharp increase of elastic modulus occurring a few hundred of seconds after mixing and related to the heterogeneous formation of an alumina–silicate gel with a molar ratio Si/Al < 4 located at the grains boundaries, we focus on the progressive increase in elastic modulus on a period of few hours during the setting of the geopolymer. In this study, we combine the study of rheological properties of the paste with {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si static NMR measurement in order to better understand the origin of this second increase in elastic modulus. Our results show that, after a few hours, Al and Na evolution in the liquid phase are concomitant. This suggests the precipitation of an aluminosilicate phase where Al is in tetrahedral position and Na compensates the charge. Furthermore, Si speciation confirms this result and allows us to identify the precipitation of a product, which has a chemical composition close to the final composition of geopolymer. This study provides strong evidence for a heterogeneous formation of an aluminosilicate glass directly from the first gel and the silicate solution without the need for a reorganisation of Gel 1 into Gel 2.

  19. Optimization of amino acid type-specific 13C and 15N labeling for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins by solution- and solid-state NMR with the UPLABEL algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hefke, Frederik; Bagaria, Anurag; Reckel, Sina; Ullrich, Sandra Johanna; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens; Güntert, Peter

    2011-02-01

    We present a computational method for finding optimal labeling patterns for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins and other large proteins that cannot be assigned by conventional strategies. Following the approach of Kainosho and Tsuji (Biochemistry 21:6273-6279 (1982)), types of amino acids are labeled with (13)C or/and (15)N such that cross peaks between (13)CO(i - 1) and (15)NH(i) result only for pairs of sequentially adjacent amino acids of which the first is labeled with (13)C and the second with (15)N. In this way, unambiguous sequence-specific assignments can be obtained for unique pairs of amino acids that occur exactly once in the sequence of the protein. To be practical, it is crucial to limit the number of differently labeled protein samples that have to be prepared while obtaining an optimal extent of labeled unique amino acid pairs. Our computer algorithm UPLABEL for optimal unique pair labeling, implemented in the program CYANA and in a standalone program, and also available through a web portal, uses combinatorial optimization to find for a given amino acid sequence labeling patterns that maximize the number of unique pair assignments with a minimal number of differently labeled protein samples. Various auxiliary conditions, including labeled amino acid availability and price, previously known partial assignments, and sequence regions of particular interest can be taken into account when determining optimal amino acid type-specific labeling patterns. The method is illustrated for the assignment of the human G-protein coupled receptor bradykinin B2 (B(2)R) and applied as a starting point for the backbone assignment of the membrane protein proteorhodopsin.

  20. Biogeochemical Indicators in High- and Low-Arctic Marine and Terrestrial Avian Community Changes: Comparative Isotopic (13C, 15N, and 34S) Studies in Alaska and Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causey, D.; Bargmann, N. A.; Burnham, K. K.; Burnham, J. L.; Padula, V. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Welker, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the complex dynamics of environmental change in northern latitudes is of paramount importance today, given documented rapid shifts in sea ice, plant phenology, temperatures, deglaciation, and habitat fidelity. This knowledge is particularly critical for Arctic avian communities, which are integral components by which biological teleconnections are maintained between the mid and northern latitudes. Furthermore, Arctic birds are fundamental to Native subsistence lifestyles and a focus for conservation activities. Avian communities of marine and terrestrial Arctic environments represent a broad spectrum of trophic levels, from herbivores (eg., geese Chen spp.), planktivores (eg., auklets Aethia spp.), and insectivores (eg., passerines: Wheatears Oenanthe spp., Longspurs Calcarius spp.), to predators of marine invertebrates (eg., eiders Somateria spp.), nearshore and offshore fish (eg., cormorants Phalacrocorax spp, puffins Fratercula spp.), even other bird species (eg., gulls Larus spp., falcons Peregrinus spp.). This diversity of trophic interconnections is an integral factor in the dynamics of Arctic ecosystem ecology, and they are key indicators for the strength and trajectories of change. We are especially interested in their feeding ecology, using stable isotope-diet relations to examine historical diets and to predict future feeding ecology by this range of species. Since 2009, we have been studying the foodweb ecology using stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S) of contemporaneous coastal and marine bird communities in High Arctic (Northwest Greenland) and Low Arctic (western Aleutian Islands, AK). We are quantifying the isotopic values of blood, organ tissues, and feathers, and have carried out comparisons between native and lipid-extracted samples. Although geographically distant, these communities comprise similar taxonomic and ecological congeners, including several species common to both (eg., Common Eider, Black-legged Kittiwake, Northern

  1. The NMR and X-ray study of L-arginine derived Schiff bases and its cadmium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, B.; Grech, E.; Schilf, W.; Kamieński, B.; Pazio, A.; Woźniak, K.

    2014-04-01

    The structure study of five Schiff bases derived from L-arginine (L-Arg) and 2-hydroxy carbonyl compounds were performed in both solution and solid state using NMR and X-ray methods. Both analytical methods applied to the solid state sample of two Schiff bases showed a significant difference in molecular structures of unsubstituted and 7-CH3 substituted compounds. This effect was explained as a steric interaction of methyl group. Additionally the structure of two Cd2+ complexes with some Schiff bases were determined by NMR methods in DMSO solution and in the solid state. On the base of heteronuclear NMR measurement (13C, 15N and 113Cd) it was possible to define the complexation site on nitrogen atom. The large set of spectral parameters: chemical shifts, homo- and heteronuclear coupling constants, were used in structure study.

  2. A study of pyridyl nitrosyl iron(II) tetraphenyl 15N4-porphyrin. NO geometry and spin coupling to the pyrrole nitrogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, D. C.; Dikanov, S. A.; Doetschman, D. C.; Smeija, J. A.

    1999-12-01

    Spin coupling with pyrrole nitrogens and NO geometry in pyridyl-NO-Fe(II) tetraphenyl- 15N4-porphyrin, examined with hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy (HYSCORE), was studied because of renewed interest in diatomic molecule bound ferrous hemes, e.g. the physiologically important NO synthase. Dipolar coupling locates the effective electron spin position (0.109±0.008 nm from the ring center, 0.106±0.006 nm above the ring plane and projecting 37±2° from the nearest pyrrole nitrogen). The NO projection in an X-ray study of the 4-methyl piperidine complex is 38.6°. The negative pyrrole nitrogen spin densities induced by the NO obey a sinusoidal angular relationship.

  3. Study of the 15N(p,n)15O reaction as a monoenergetic neutron source for the measurement of differential scattering cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenitz, E.; Nolte, R.; Schmidt, D.; Chen, G.

    2017-03-01

    The 15N(p,n) reaction is a promising candidate for the production of monoenergetic neutrons with energies of up to 5.7 MeV at the facilities where the T(p,n)3He reaction cannot be used. The characteristic properties of this reaction were studied focusing on its suitability as a source of monoenergetic neutrons for the measurement of differential scattering cross sections in the neutron energy range of 2 MeV to 5 MeV . For this purpose differential and integral cross sections were measured and the choice of optimum target conditions was investigated. The reaction has already been used successfully to measure of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for natPb in the energy range from 2 MeV to 4 MeV and for 209Bi and 181Ta at 4 MeV .

  4. High-resolution, high-pressure NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, J; Ballard, L; Nash, D

    1998-01-01

    Advanced high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NMR techniques, combined with high pressure capability, represents a powerful new tool in the study of proteins. This contribution is organized in the following way. First, the specialized instrumentation needed for high-pressure NMR experiments is discussed, with specific emphasis on the design features and performance characteristics of a high-sensitivity, high-resolution, variable-temperature NMR probe operating at 500 MHz and at pressures of up to 500 MPa. An overview of several recent studies using 1D and 2D high-resolution, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy to investigate the pressure-induced reversible unfolding and pressure-assisted cold denaturation of lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and ubiquitin is presented. Specifically, the relationship between the residual secondary structure of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured states and the structure of early folding intermediates is discussed. PMID:9649405

  5. Dynamics of Antibody Domains Studied by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Bang K.; Walsh, Joseph D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ishima, Rieko

    2012-01-01

    Information on local dynamics of antibodies is important to evaluate stability, to rationally design variants, and to clarify conformational disorders at the epitope binding sites. Such information may also be useful for improved understanding of antigen recognition. NMR can be used for characterization of local protein dynamics at the atomic level through relaxation measurements. Due to the complexity of the NMR spectra, an extensive use of this method is limited to small protein molecules, for example, antibody domains and some scFv. Here, we describe a protocol that was used to study the dynamics of an antibody domain in solution using NMR. We describe protein preparation for NMR studies, NMR sample optimization, signal assignments, and dynamics experiments. PMID:19252840

  6. Functional binding surface of a β-hairpin VEGF receptor targeting peptide determined by NMR spectroscopy in living cells.

    PubMed

    Diana, Donatella; Russomanno, Anna; De Rosa, Lucia; Di Stasi, Rossella; Capasso, Domenica; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Romanelli, Alessandra; Russo, Luigi; D'Andrea, Luca D; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2015-01-02

    In this study, the functional interaction of HPLW peptide with VEGFR2 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2) was determined by using fast (15)N-edited NMR spectroscopic experiments. To this aim, (15)N uniformly labelled HPLW has been added to Porcine Aortic Endothelial Cells. The acquisition of isotope-edited NMR spectroscopic experiments, including (15)N relaxation measurements, allowed a precise characterization of the in-cell HPLW epitope recognized by VEGFR2.

  7. NMR study of a membrane protein in detergent-free aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zoonens, Manuela; Catoire, Laurent J; Giusti, Fabrice; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2005-06-21

    One of the major obstacles to membrane protein (MP) structural studies is the destabilizing effect of detergents. Amphipols (APols) are short amphipathic polymers that can substitute for detergents to keep MPs water-soluble under mild conditions. In the present work, we have explored the feasibility of studying the structure of APol-complexed MPs by NMR. As a test MP, we chose the 171-residue transmembrane domain of outer MP A from Escherichia coli (tOmpA), whose x-ray and NMR structures in detergent are known. 2H,15N-labeled tOmpA was produced as inclusion bodies, refolded in detergent solution, trapped with APol A8-35, and the detergent removed by adsorption onto polystyrene beads. The resolution of transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy-heteronuclear single-quantum correlation spectra of tOmpA/A8-35 complexes was found to be close to that of the best spectra obtained in detergent solutions. The dispersion of chemical shifts indicated that the protein had regained its native fold and retained it during the exchange of surfactants. MP-APol interactions were mapped by substituting hydrogenated for deuterated A8-35. The resulting dipolar broadening of amide proton linewidths was found to be limited to the beta-barrel region of tOmpA, indicating that A8-35 binds specifically to the hydrophobic transmembrane surface of the protein. The potential of this approach to MP studies by solution NMR is discussed.

  8. A comprehensive NMR structural study of Titan aerosol analogs: Implications for Titan's atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-11-01

    Titan has a thick atmosphere composed primarily of nitrogen and methane. Complex organic chemistry induced by solar ultraviolet radiation and energetic particles, takes place in Titan's upper atmosphere, producing an optically thick reddish brown carbon based haze encircling this moon. The chemistry in Titan's atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood in spite of a great many efforts being made. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of the 13C and 15N labeled, simulated Titan haze aerosols (tholin) by NMR and identified several dominant small molecules in the tholin. Here we report our expanded structural investigation of the bulk of the tholin by more comprehensive NMR study. The NMR results show that the tholin materials are dominated by heavily nitrogenated compounds, in which the macromolecular structures are highly branched polymeric or oligomeric compounds terminated in methyl, amine, and nitrile groups. The structural characteristic suggest that the tholin materials are formed via different copolymerization or incorporation mechanisms of small precursors, such as HCN, CH2dbnd NH, NH3 and C2H2. This study helps to understand the formation process of nitrogenated organic aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and their prebiotic implications.

  9. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  10. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  11. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  12. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  13. Soil N transformations and its controlling factors in temperate grasslands in China: A study from 15N tracing experiment to literature synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Liang; Feng, Xiaojuan; Hu, Huifeng; Cai, Zucong; Müller, Christoph; Zhang, Jinbo

    2016-12-01

    Temperate grasslands in arid and semiarid regions cover about 40% of the total land area in China. So far, only a few studies have studied the N transformations in these important ecosystems. In the present study, soil gross N transformation rates in Inner Mongolia temperate grasslands in China were determined using a 15N tracing experiment and combined with a literature synthesis to identify the soil N transformation characteristics and their controlling factors in a global perspective. Our results showed that the rates of gross N mineralization and immobilization NH4+ were significantly lower, while autotrophic nitrification rates were significantly higher in Chinese temperate grassland soils compared to other regions in the world. In particular, the primary mineral N consumption processes, i.e., immobilization of NO3- and NH4+, and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, were on average much lower in temperate grassland soils in China, compared to other temperate grassland regions. The reduced heterotrophic activity and microbial growth associated with lower soil organic carbon and arid climate (e.g., mean annual precipitation) were identified as the main factors regulating soil N cycling in the studied regions in China. To restrict NO3- accumulation and associated high risks of N losses in these arid and semiarid ecosystems in China, it is important to develop the regimes of soil organic C and water management that promote the retention of N in these grassland ecosystems.

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) as a tool for the study of the metabolism of Rickettsia slovaca.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, Lara; Busto, Jesús H; Peregrina, Jesús M; Santibáñez, Sonia; Portillo, Aránzazu; Avenoza, Alberto; Oteo, José A

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsial infections are caused by intracellular bacteria. They do not grow in standard culture media so there are limitations in routine practice to study their metabolism. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used for identification of metabolites in biological samples. Vero cells infected with Rickettsia slovaca as well as uninfected cells were monitored by (1)H NMR showing the presence of ethanol and lactic acid. As no differences were observed, labeled compounds were added into cultures. When D-[1-13C]glucose was monitored by (13)C NMR no differences among infected and uninfected cells were observed in metabolic profiles. Glucose was transformed into ethanol in all cultures. Monitored experiments carried out with [2-13C]glycine showed differences between infected and uninfected cell cultures spectra. Glycine was partially transformed into serine, but the amount of the serine formed was larger in those infected. Moreover, L-[2-13C]leucine, L-[1-13C]isoleucine and L-[15N]tyrosine were evaluated. No differences among infected and uninfected cells were observed in the metabolic profiles when tyrosine and leucine were monitored. The amino acid L-[1-13C]isoleucine exhibited different metabolism in presence of the R. slovaca, showing a promising behavior as biomarker. In this work we focused on finding one or more compounds that could be metabolized specifically by R. slovaca and could be used as an indicator of its activity.

  15. NMR studies on polyphosphide Ce6Ni6P17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Yamada, H.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report the result of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on Ce6Ni6P17. The observed NMR spectra show a Lorentzian-type and an asymmetric shapes, reflecting the local symmetry around each P site in the cubic unit cell. We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to three inequivalent P sites and deduced the temperature dependence of the Knight shift for each site. The Knight shifts increase with decreasing temperature down to 1.5 K, indicating a localized spin system of Ce6Ni6P17. Antiferromagnetic correlation between 4f spins is suggested from the negative sign of the Weiss-temperature.

  16. Contemporary NMR Studies of Protein Electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Hass, Mathias A S; Mulder, Frans A A

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatics play an important role in many aspects of protein chemistry. However, the accurate determination of side chain proton affinity in proteins by experiment and theory remains challenging. In recent years the field of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has advanced the way that protonation states are measured, allowing researchers to examine electrostatic interactions at an unprecedented level of detail and accuracy. Experiments are now in place that follow pH-dependent (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts as spatially close as possible to the sites of protonation, allowing all titratable amino acid side chains to be probed sequence specifically. The strong and telling response of carefully selected reporter nuclei allows individual titration events to be monitored. At the same time, improved frameworks allow researchers to model multiple coupled protonation equilibria and to identify the underlying pH-dependent contributions to the chemical shifts.

  17. Nitrogen-15 NMR studies of tetrazole complexes of pentamminecobalt(III). Implications concerning the transition state for linkage isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hubinger, S.; Hall, J.H.; Purcell, W.L. Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1993-05-26

    Synthesis of the N1-bonded (5-methyltetrazolato)pentaamminecobalt(III) complex utilizing sodium azide enriched in [sup 1]N at the terminal nitrogen has produced a complex enriched specifically at the N2 and N4 ring positions. This has permitted the assignment of all four nitrogen signals in the natural-abundance NMR spectrum for a novel chelated amidine complex which is also N1 bonded is reported along with its synthesis and purification. Following the [sup 15]N NMR of the linkage isomerization of the enriched complex in solution to the N2-bonded form has also permitted an [eta][sup 5] and certain [eta][sup 3] transition-state structures to be eliminated from consideration for the isomerization process. The data suggest an [eta][sup 2] transition state is utilized. A subsequent N2-to-N3 isomerization of the N2-bonded complex has also been discovered from the [sup 15]N NMR study. The enrichment study also indicates that previous assignments of ring nitrogen signals N1 and N4 is similar N2-bonded tetrazolato complexes of cobalt(III) may be in error.

  18. Diamond Deposition and Defect Chemistry Studied via Solid State NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    same integrated NMR signal, regardless of its chemical environment, provided complete spin-lattice relaxation occurs between averages 3 . Gem -quality...occurs between averages, and broadening from years, a large research effort has been devoted to the study paramagnetic centers is insignificant. Gem ...information on the distribution and motion mond’s durability very attractive. However, while gem - of hydrogen can be obtained from the solid-state NMR

  19. NMR studies of osmoregulation in methanogenic archaebacteria. [NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Methanogens are strict anaerobic archaebacteria whose metabolism centers around the reduction of CO[sub 2] to CH[sub 4]. Their environments are often extreme (high temperatures, high salt, few nutrients, etc.) and they may have evolved unique ways to handle these stresses. It is proposed that methanogenic archaebacteria respond to osmotic stress by accumulating a series of organic solutes. In two strains of marine methanogens, Methanogenium cariaci and Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, four key organic solutes are observed: L-[alpha]-glutamate, [beta]-glutamate, N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine, and glycine betaine. The first three of these are synthesized de novo; glycine betaine is transported into the Mg. cariaci cells from the medium. In the absence of betaine, Mg. cariaci synthesizes N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine as the dominant osmolyte. Mc. thermolithotrophicus also synthesizes N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine but only at salt concentrations greater than 1 M. In Mc. thermolithotrophicus intracellular potassium ion concentrations, determined by [sup 39]K NMR spectroscopy, are balanced by the total concentration of anionic amino acid species, [alpha]-glutamate and [beta]-glutamate. Turnover of the organic solutes has been monitored using [sup 13]C-pulse/[sup 12]C-chase, and [sup 15]N-pulse/[sup 14]N-chase experiments. The [beta]-amino acids exhibit slower turnover rates compared to L-[alpha]-glutamate or aspartate, consistent with their role as compatible solutes. Biosynthetic information for the [beta]-amino acids was provided by [sup 13]C-label incorporation and steady state labeling experiments. [beta]-glutamate shows a lag in [sup 13]C uptake from [sup 13]CO[sub 2], indicative of its biosynthesis from a precursor not in equilibrium with the soluble L-[alpha]-glutamate pool, probably a macromolecule. A novel biosynthetic pathway is proposed for N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine from the diaminopimelate pathway.

  20. Protein NMR Studies of substrate binding to human blood group A and B glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas; Grimm, Lena Lisbeth; Weissbach, Sophie; Flügge, Friedemann; Begemann, Nora; Palcic, Monica

    2017-03-03

    Donor and acceptor substrate binding to human blood group A and B glycosyltransferases (GTA, GTB) has been studied by a variety of protein NMR experiments. Prior crystallographic studies have shown these enzymes to adopt an open conformation in the absence of substrates. Binding of either the donor substrate UDP-Gal, or of UDP induces a semi-closed conformation. In the presence of both, donor- and acceptor substrates, the enzymes shift towards a closed conformation with ordering of an internal loop and the C-terminal residues, which then completely cover the donor-binding pocket. Chemical shift titrations of uniformly 2H,15N labeled GTA or GTB with UDP affected about 20% of all cross peaks in 1H,15N-TROSY-HSQC spectra reflecting substantial plasticity of the enzymes. On the other hand, it is this conformational flexibility that impedes NH backbone assignments. Chemical shift perturbation experiments using 1-13C-methyl Ile labeled samples revealed two Ile residues, Ile123 at the bottom of the UDP binding pocket, and Ile192 as part of the internal loop that were significantly disturbed upon stepwise addition of UDP and H-disaccharide, also revealing long-range perturbations. Finally, methyl TROSY based relaxation dispersion experiments do not reveal s to ms time scale motions. Although this study reveals substantial conformational plasticity of GTA and GTB it remains enigmatic how binding of substrates shifts the enzymes into catalytically competent states.

  1. High-Resolution NMR Studies of Human Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzio, Kristin M.; Watt, Eric D.; Boettcher, John M.; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M.; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    In normal hemostasis, the blood clotting cascade is initiated when factor VIIa (fVIIa, other clotting factors are named similarly) binds to the integral membrane protein, human tissue factor (TF). The TF/fVIIa complex in turn activates fX and fIX, eventually concluding with clot formation. Several X-ray crystal structures of the soluble extracellular domain of TF (sTF) exist; however, these structures are missing electron density in functionally relevant regions of the protein. In this context, NMR can provide complementary structural information as well as dynamic insights into enzyme activity. The resolution and sensitivity for NMR studies are greatly enhanced by the ability to prepare multiple milligrams of protein with various isotopic labeling patterns. Here, we demonstrate high-yield production of several isotopically labeled forms of recombinant sTF, allowing for high-resolution NMR studies both in the solid and solution state. We also report solution NMR spectra at sub-mM concentrations of sTF, ensuring the presence of dispersed monomer, as well as the first solid-state NMR spectra of sTF. Our improved sample preparation and precipitation conditions have enabled the acquisition of multidimensional NMR data sets for TF chemical shift assignment and provide a benchmark for TF structure elucidation. PMID:27657719

  2. Solid-State 15N NMR of 15N-Labeled Nylon 6 and Nylon 11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-22

    S. Veeman, E. M. Menger, W. Ritchey, and E. de Boer, Macromolecules, 1979, 12, 924. 2. A. N. Garroway , W. M. Ritchey and W. B. Moniz, Macromolecules...S. Veeman and E. M. Menger, Bull. Magn. Reson., 1980, 2, 77. 26. D. L. VanderHart and A. N. Garroway , J. Chem. Phys., 1979, 71, 2773. 27. M. D

  3. Pathways of nitrogen assimilation in cowpea nodules studied using /sup 15/N/sub 2/ and allopurinol. [Vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, C.A.; Storer, P.J.; Pate, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the presence of 0.5 millimolar allopurinol (4-hydroxypyrazolo (3,4-d)pyrimidine), an inhibitor of NAD:xanthine oxidoreductase (EC 1.2.3.2), intact attached nodules of cowpea (vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita 3) formed (/sup 15/N)xanthine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ at rates equivalent to those of ureide synthesis, confirming the direct assimilation of fixed nitrogen into purines. Xanthine accumulated in nodules and was exported in increasing amounts in xylem of allopurinol-treated plants. Other intermediates of purine oxidation, de novo purine synthesis, and ammonia assimilation did not increase and, over the time course of experiments (4 hours), allopurinol had no effect on nitrogenase (EC 1.87.99.2) activity. Negligible /sup 15/N -labeling of asparagine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ was observed, suggesting that the significant pool (up to 14 micromoles per gram of nodule fresh weight) of this amide in cowpea nodules was not formed directly from fixation but may have accumulated as a consequence of phloem delivery.

  4. Protein-energy status and 15N-glycine kinetic study of child a cirrhotic patients fed low- to high-protein energy diets.

    PubMed

    Dichi, I; Dichi, J B; Papini-Berto, S J; Angeleli, A Y; Bicudo, M H; Rezende, T A; Burini, R C

    1996-01-01

    In five male cirrhotic patients (Child A) and in four age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects, whole-body protein turnover was measured using a single oral dose of 15N-glycine as a tracer and urinary ammonia as end product. Subjects were studied in the fasting and feeding state, with different levels of protein and energy intake. The patients were underweight and presented lower plasma transthyretin and retinol-binding protein levels. When compared with controls, the kinetic studies showed patients to be hypometabolic in the fasting (D0) state and with the control diet [D1 = (0.85 g of protein/ 154 kJ) x kg-1.day-1]. However, when corrected by body weight, the kinetic differences between groups disappeared, whereas the N-retention in the feeding state showed better results for the patients due mainly to their efficient breakdown decrease. When fed high-level protein or energy diets [D1 = (0.9 g protein/195 kJ) and D3 = (1.56 g protein/158 kJ) x kg-1.day-1], the patients showed D0 = D1 = D2 < D3 for N-flux and (D0 = D1) < D3 (D2 is intermediary) for protein synthesis. Thus, the present data suggest that the remaining mass of the undernourished mild cirrhotic patients has fairly good protein synthesis activity and also that protein, rather than energy intake, would be the limiting factor for increasing their whole-body protein synthesis.

  5. Use of specifically {sup 15}N-labeled histidine to study structures and mechanisms within the active sites of serine proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.

    1994-12-01

    The current emphasis in biological NMR work is on determining structures of biological macromolecules in solution. This emphasis is appropriate because NMR is the only technique capable of providing high-resolution structures that are comparable to those of x-ray crystallography for molecules in solution. This structural knowledge is immensely valuable and is needed in many areas of investigation. However, as valuable as such structural knowledge is, it never provides all the answers; a structure often reveals more questions than answers.

  6. Chlorophyll a-specific Δ14C, δ13C and δ15N values in stream periphyton: implications for aquatic food web studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, N. F.; Yamane, M.; Suga, H.; Ogawa, N. O.; Yokoyama, Y.; Ohkouchi, N.

    2015-11-01

    Periphytic algae attached to a streambed substrate (periphyton) are an important primary producer in stream ecosystems. We determined the isotopic composition of chlorophyll a in periphyton collected from a stream flowing on limestone bedrock in the Seri River, central Japan. Stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) and natural radiocarbon abundances (Δ14C) were measured in chlorophyll a (δ13Cchl, δ15Nchl and Δ14Cchl) and bulk (δ13Cbulk, δ15Nbulk and Δ14Cbulk) for periphyton, a pure aquatic primary producer (Cladophora sp.) and a terrestrial primary producer (Quercus glauca). Periphyton δ13Cbulk and δ13Cchl values did not necessarily correspond to δ13Cbulk for an algal-grazing specialist (Epeorus latifolium). Periphyton Δ14Cchl values (-258 ‰ in April and -190 ‰ in October) were slightly lower than Δ14Cbulk values (-228 ‰ in April and -179 ‰ in October) but were close to the Δ14C value for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; -217 ± 31 ‰), which is a mixture of weathered carbonates (Δ14C = -1000 ‰), CO2 derived from aquatic and terrestrial organic matters (variable Δ14C) and dissolved atmospheric CO2 (Δ14C approximately +30 ‰ in 2013). Δ14Cchl values were also close to Δ14Cbulk for E. latifolium (-215 ‰ in April and -199 ‰ in October) and Cladophora sp. (-210 ‰), whereas the Δ14Cbulk value for Q. glauca (+27 ‰) was closer to Δ14C for atmospheric CO2. Although the bulk isotopic composition of periphyton is recognised as a surrogate for the photosynthetic algal community, natural periphyton is a mixture of aquatic and terrestrial organic materials. Our results indicate that the bulk periphyton matrix at the study site consists of 89 to 95 % algal carbon (derived from 14C-depleted DIC) and 5 to 11 % terrestrial organic carbon (derived from 14C-enriched atmospheric CO2).

  7. Chlorophyll a specific Δ14C, δ13C and δ15N values in stream periphyton: implications for aquatic food web studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, N. F.; Yamane, M.; Suga, H.; Ogawa, N. O.; Yokoyama, Y.; Ohkouchi, N.

    2015-07-01

    We determined the isotopic composition of chlorophyll a in periphytic algae attached to a streambed substrate (periphyton). The samples were collected from a stream flowing on limestone bedrock in the Seri River, central Japan. Stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) and natural radiocarbon abundances (Δ14C) were measured in chlorophyll a (δ13Cchl, δ15Nchl and Δ14Cchl) and bulk (δ13Cbulk, δ15Nbulk and Δ14Cbulk) for periphyton, pure aquatic primary producer (Cladophora sp.) and terrestrial primary producer (Quercus glauca). Periphyton δ13Cbulk and δ13Cchl values did not necessarily correspond to δ13Cbulk for an algal-grazing specialist (Mayfly larva, Epeorus latifolium), suggesting that periphyton δ13C values do not faithfully trace carbon transfer between primary producers and primary consumers. Periphyton Δ14Cchl values (-258 ‰ in April and -190 ‰ in October) were slightly lower than Δ14Cbulk values (-228 ‰ in April and -179 ‰ in October), but were close to the Δ14C value for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (-217 ± 31 ‰), which is a mixture of weathered carbonates (Δ14C = -1000 ‰) and dissolved atmospheric CO2 (Δ14C approximately +30 ‰ in 2013). Δ14Cchl values were also close to Δ14Cbulk for E. latifolium (-215 ‰ in April and -199 ‰ in October) and Cladophora sp. (-210 ‰), whereas the Δ14Cbulk value for Q. glauca (+27 ‰) was closer to Δ14C for atmospheric CO2. Although the bulk isotopic composition of periphyton is recognised as a surrogate for the photosynthetic algal community, natural periphyton is a mixture of aquatic and terrestrial organic materials. Our results indicate that the bulk periphyton matrix at the study site consists of 89 to 95 % algal carbon (derived from 14C-depleted DIC) and 5 to 11 % terrestrial organic carbon (derived from 14C-enriched atmospheric CO2).

  8. Occurrence of non-hydrolysable amides in the macromolecular constituent of Scenedesmus quadricauda cell wall as revealed by [sup 15]N NMR: Origin of n-alkylnitriles in pyrolysates of ultralaminai-containing kerogens

    SciTech Connect

    Derenne, S.; Largeau, C. ); Taulelle, F. )

    1993-02-01

    New structures, termed ultralaminae, were recently shown to occur in kerogens from numerous oil shales and source rocks. Morphological and chemical studies revealed that ultralaminae originate from the selective preservation of the non-hydrolysable biomacromolecules (algaenans) building up the thin outer walls of several Chlorophyceae (green microalgae) including the cosmopolitan general Scenedesmus and Chlorella. The chemical correlation between such algaenans and fossil ultralaminae was mainly based on the production, on pyrolysis, of nitrogen compounds, n-alkylnitriles, with specific distributions depending on the lacustrine of marine origin of the considered samples. In addition, these bio-and geopolymers were characterized by quite high N levels.

  9. Study of cultured fibroblasts in vivo using NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Karczmar, G.S.

    1984-08-01

    The goal was to study the compartmentation of phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates in intact Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts (CEFs) using /sup 31/P NMR at 109 MHz. A technique for maintaining functional cells at high densities in an NMR magnet is described. Signals were detected from cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), ATP, NAD, NADH, phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine. The effect of external glucose on cytoplasmic pools of phosphates was studied. When cells were perfused with glucose-free medium the rate of glycolysis decreased, the amplitudes of the ATP resonances decreased, and the P/sub i/ intensity increased. The quantity of NMR-detectable P/sub i/ produced was significantly greater than the quantity of NMR-detectable ATP which was lost. Experiments with /sup 32/P labeled P/sub i/ showed that as the concentration of glucose in the medium was increase, the amount of phosphate sequestered in the cells increased. We conclude that there is a pool of P/sub i/ which is not detected by high resolution NMR and that the size of this pool increases as the rate of glycolysis increase. Longtitudinal relaxation times of intracellular phosphates in normal, transformed, and primary CEFs were measured. The results demonstrate that relaxation times of phosphates are sensitive to structural and metabolic changes which occur when cells are grown in culture. 59 references. 31 figures.

  10. Production of 15N-labeled α-amanitin in Galerina marginata

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Brandon; Sgambelluri, R. Michael; Angelos, Evan R.; Li, Xuan; Holmes, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    α-Amanitin is the major causal constituent of deadly Amanita mushrooms that account for the majority of fatal mushroom poisonings worldwide. It is also an important biochemical tool for the study of its target, RNA polymerase II. The commercial supply of this bicyclic peptide comes directly from A. phalloides, the death cap mushroom, which is collected from its natural habitat. Isotopically labeled amanitin could be useful for clinical and forensic applications, but α-amanitin has not been chemically synthesized and A. phalloides cannot be cultured on artificial medium. Using Galerina marginata, an unrelated saprobic mushroom that grows and produces α-amanitin in culture, we describe a method for producing 15N-labeled α-amanitin using growth media containing 15N as sole nitrogen source. A key to success was preparing 15N-enriched yeast extract via a novel method designated “glass bead-assisted maturation.” In the presence of the labeled yeast extract and 15N-NH4Cl, α-amanitin was produced with >97% isotope enrichment. The labeled product was confirmed by HPLC, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and NMR. PMID:26100667

  11. Production of (15)N-labeled α-amanitin in Galerina marginata.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; DuBois, Brandon; Sgambelluri, R Michael; Angelos, Evan R; Li, Xuan; Holmes, Daniel; Walton, Jonathan D

    2015-09-01

    α-Amanitin is the major causal constituent of deadly Amanita mushrooms that account for the majority of fatal mushroom poisonings worldwide. It is also an important biochemical tool for the study of its target, RNA polymerase II. The commercial supply of this bicyclic peptide comes from Amanita phalloides, the death cap mushroom, which is collected from the wild. Isotopically labeled amanitin could be useful for clinical and forensic applications, but α-amanitin has not been chemically synthesized and A. phalloides cannot be cultured on artificial medium. Using Galerina marginata, an unrelated saprotrophic mushroom that grows and produces α-amanitin in culture, we describe a method for producing (15)N-labeled α-amanitin using growth media containing (15)N as sole nitrogen source. A key to success was preparing (15)N-enriched yeast extract via a novel method designated "glass bead-assisted maturation." In the presence of the labeled yeast extract and (15)N-NH4Cl, α-amanitin was produced with >97% isotope enrichment. The labeled product was confirmed by HPLC, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and NMR.

  12. Molecular docking and NMR binding studies to identify novel inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Boonsri, Pornthip; Neumann, Terrence S.; Olson, Andrew L.; Cai, Sheng; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Hannongbua, Supa; Sem, Daniel S.

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Natural and synthetic inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Virtual screening yielded a hit rate of 15%, with inhibitor K{sub d}'s of 10-60 {mu}M. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR studies indicate significant protein conformational changes upon binding. -- Abstract: Phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK) phosphorylates mevalonate-5-phosphate (M5P) in the mevalonate pathway, which is the sole source of isoprenoids and steroids in humans. We have identified new PMK inhibitors with virtual screening, using autodock. Promising hits were verified and their affinity measured using NMR-based {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) chemical shift perturbation and fluorescence titrations. Chemical shift changes were monitored, plotted, and fitted to obtain dissociation constants (K{sub d}). Tight binding compounds with K{sub d}'s ranging from 6-60 {mu}M were identified. These compounds tended to have significant polarity and negative charge, similar to the natural substrates (M5P and ATP). HSQC cross peak changes suggest that binding induces a global conformational change, such as domain closure. Compounds identified in this study serve as chemical genetic probes of human PMK, to explore pharmacology of the mevalonate pathway, as well as starting points for further drug development.

  13. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    PubMed Central

    Sobolev, Anatoly P.; Capitani, Donatella; Giannino, Donato; Nicolodi, Chiara; Testone, Giulio; Santoro, Flavio; Frugis, Giovanna; Iannelli, Maria A.; Mattoo, Autar K.; Brosio, Elvino; Gianferri, Raffaella; D’Amico, Irene; Mannina, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    The 1H-NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foods is discussed. Transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the ArabidopsisKNAT1 gene is presented as a case study. Twenty-two water-soluble metabolites (amino acids, organic acids, sugars) present in leaves of conventional and GM lettuce were monitored by NMR and quantified at two developmental stages. The NMR spectra did not reveal any difference in metabolite composition between the GM lettuce and the wild type counterpart. Statistical analyses of metabolite variables highlighted metabolism variation as a function of leaf development as well as the transgene. A main effect of the transgene was in altering sugar metabolism. PMID:22253988

  14. Epitope Mapping of Antigenic MUC1 Peptides to Breast Cancer Antibody Fragment B27.29: A Heteronuclear NMR Study

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstead, Jeffrey S.; Schuman, Jason T.; Campbell, Ann P.

    2003-11-13

    MUC1 mucin is a breast cancer-associated transmembrane glycoprotein, of which the extracellular domain is formed by the repeating 20-amino acid sequence GVTSAPDTRPAPGSTAPPAH. In neoplastic breast tissue, the highly immunogenic sequence PDTRPAP (in bold above) is exposed. Antibodies raised directly against MUC1-expressing tumors offer unique access to this neoplastic state, as they represent immunologically relevant ''reverse templates'' of the tumor-associated mucin. In a previous study [Grinstead, J. S., et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 9946-9961], 1H NMR methods were used to correlate the effects of cryptic glycosylation outside of the PDTRPAP core epitope sequence on the recognition and binding of Mab B27.29, a monoclonal antibody raised against breast tumor cells. In the study presented here, isotope-edited NMR methods, including 15N and 13C relaxation measurements, were used to probe the recognition and binding of the PDTRPAP epitope sequence to Fab B27.29. Two peptides were studied: a one-repeat MUC1 16mer peptide of the sequence GVTSAPDTRPAPGSTA and a two-repeat MUC1 40mer peptide of the sequence (VTSAPDTRPAPGSTAPPAHG)2. 15N and 13C NMR relaxation parameters were measured for both peptides free in solution and bound to Fab B27.29. The 13CR T1 values best represent changes in the local correlation time of the peptide epitope upon binding antibody, and demonstrate that the PDTRPAP sequence is immobilized in the antibody-combining site. This result is also reflected in the appearance of the 15N- and 13C-edited HSQC spectra, where line broadening of the same peptide epitope resonances is observed. The PDTRPAP peptide epitope expands upon the peptide epitope identified previously in our group as PDTRP by homonuclear NMR experiments [Grinstead, J. S., et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 9946-9961], and illustrates the usefulness of the heteronuclear NMR experiments. The implications of these results are discussed within the context of MUC1 breast cancer vaccine design.

  15. The “Speedy” Synthesis of Atom-Specific 15N Imino/Amido-Labeled RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Christoph; Micura, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous reports on the synthesis of atom-specific 15N-labeled nucleosides exist, fast and facile access to the corresponding phosphoramidites for RNA solid-phase synthesis is still lacking. This situation represents a severe bottleneck for NMR spectroscopic investigations on functional RNAs. Here, we present optimized procedures to speed up the synthesis of 15N(1) adenosine and 15N(1) guanosine amidites, which are the much needed counterparts of the more straightforward-to-achieve 15N(3) uridine and 15N(3) cytidine amidites in order to tap full potential of 1H/15N/15N-COSY experiments for directly monitoring individual Watson–Crick base pairs in RNA. Demonstrated for two preQ1 riboswitch systems, we exemplify a versatile concept for individual base-pair labeling in the analysis of conformationally flexible RNAs when competing structures and conformational dynamics are encountered. PMID:26237536

  16. Characterization of Nylon 6 by 15N Solid State NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-31

    M.; Ritchey, W.; de Boer, E. Macromolecules, 1979, 12, 924. 2. Garroway , A. N.; Ritchey, W. M.; Moniz, W. B.; Macromolecules, 1982, It, 1051. 3...E. Macromolecules, 1982, 15, 1406. 23. Veeman, W. S.; Menger, E. M. Bull. Magn. Reson., 1980,2,77. 24. VanderHart, D. L.; Garroway , A. N. J. Chem

  17. NMR study of a membrane protein in detergent-free aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Zoonens, Manuela; Catoire, Laurent J.; Giusti, Fabrice; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2005-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to membrane protein (MP) structural studies is the destabilizing effect of detergents. Amphipols (APols) are short amphipathic polymers that can substitute for detergents to keep MPs water-soluble under mild conditions. In the present work, we have explored the feasibility of studying the structure of APol-complexed MPs by NMR. As a test MP, we chose the 171-residue transmembrane domain of outer MP A from Escherichia coli (tOmpA), whose x-ray and NMR structures in detergent are known. 2H,15N-labeled tOmpA was produced as inclusion bodies, refolded in detergent solution, trapped with APol A8-35, and the detergent removed by adsorption onto polystyrene beads. The resolution of transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy–heteronuclear single-quantum correlation spectra of tOmpA/A8-35 complexes was found to be close to that of the best spectra obtained in detergent solutions. The dispersion of chemical shifts indicated that the protein had regained its native fold and retained it during the exchange of surfactants. MP–APol interactions were mapped by substituting hydrogenated for deuterated A8-35. The resulting dipolar broadening of amide proton linewidths was found to be limited to the β-barrel region of tOmpA, indicating that A8-35 binds specifically to the hydrophobic transmembrane surface of the protein. The potential of this approach to MP studies by solution NMR is discussed. PMID:15956183

  18. Conformation of alamethicin in oriented phospholipid bilayers determined by (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Bak, M; Bywater, R P; Hohwy, M; Thomsen, J K; Adelhorst, K; Jakobsen, H J; Sørensen, O W; Nielsen, N C

    2001-01-01

    The conformation of the 20-residue antibiotic ionophore alamethicin in macroscopically oriented phospholipid bilayers has been studied using (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Differently (15)N-labeled variants of alamethicin and an analog with three of the alpha-amino-isobutyric acid residues replaced by alanines have been investigated to establish experimental structural constraints and determine the orientation of alamethicin in hydrated phospholipid (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) bilayers and to investigate the potential for a major kink in the region of the central Pro(14) residue. From the anisotropic (15)N chemical shifts and (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings determined for alamethicin with (15)N-labeling on the Ala(6), Val(9), and Val(15) residues and incorporated into phospholipid bilayer with a peptide:lipid molar ratio of 1:8, we deduce that alamethicin has a largely linear alpha-helical structure spanning the membrane with the molecular axis tilted by 10-20 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In particular, we find compatibility with a straight alpha-helix tilted by 17 degrees and a slightly kinked molecular dynamics structure tilted by 11 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In contrast, the structural constraints derived by solid-state NMR appear not to be compatible with any of several model structures crossing the membrane with vanishing tilt angle or the earlier reported x-ray diffraction structure (Fox and Richards, Nature. 300:325-330, 1982). The solid-state NMR-compatible structures may support the formation of a left-handed and parallel multimeric ion channel. PMID:11509381

  19. Novel Dodecaarylporphyrins: Synthesis and Variable Temperature NMR Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cancilla, Mark; Lebrilla, Carlito; Ma, Jian-Guo; Medforth, Craig J.; Muzzi, Cinzia M.; Shelnutt, John A.; Smith, Kevin M.; Voss, Lisa

    1999-05-05

    An investigation of the synthesis of novel dodecaarylporphyrins using the Suzuki coupling reaction of arylboronic acids with octabromotetraarylporphyrins is reported. Studies of the dynamic properties of these new porphyrins using variable temperature (VT) 1H NMR spectroscopy and molecular mechanics provide interesting insights into their dynamic properties, including the first determination of {beta} aryl rotation in a porphyrin system.

  20. Studies of Transition Metal Complexes Using Dynamic NMR Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coston, Timothy Peter John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This Thesis is primarily concerned with the quantitative study of fluxional processes in, predominantly platinum(IV) complexes, with the ligands 1,1,2,2-tetrakis(methylthio)ethane (MeS)_2CHCH(SMe)_2 , and 1,1,2,2-tetrakis(methylthio)ethene (MeS) _2C=C(SMe)_2. Quantitative information relating to the energetics of these processes has been obtained by a combination of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques. Chapter One provides an introduction to the background of fluxional processes in transition metal complexes together with data concerning the energetics of the processes that have already been studied by NMR techniques. Chapter Two provides a thorough grounding in NMR techniques, in particular those concerned with the quantitative measurement of rates involved in chemical exchange processes. A description of the use of 2D EXSY NMR spectroscopy in obtaining rate data is given. The properties of the magnetic isotope of platinum are given in Chapter Three. A general survey is also given of some additional compounds that have already been studied by platinum-195 spectroscopy. Chapter Four is concerned with the quantitative study of low temperature (<293 K) fluxionality (sulphur inversion) in the complexes (PtXMe_3 (MeS)_2CHCH(SMe) _2) (X = Cl, Br, I). These complexes were studied by dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance and the information regarding the rates of sulphur inversion was obtained by complete band-shape analysis. Chapter Five is concerned with high temperature (>333 K) fluxionality, of the previous complexes, as studied by a combination of one- and two -dimensional NMR techniques. Aside from obtaining thermodynamic parameters for all the processes, a new novel mechanism is proposed. Chapter Six is primarily concerned with the NMR investigation of the new dinuclear complexes ((PtXMe _3)_2(MeS) _2CHCH(SMe)_2) (X = Cl, Br, I). The solution properties have been established and thermo-dynamic parameters

  1. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  2. NMR-Profiles of Protein Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Serrano, Pedro; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    NMR-Profiles are quantitative one-dimensional presentations of two-dimensional [15N,1H]-correlation spectra used to monitor the quality of protein solutions prior to and during NMR structure determinations and functional studies. In our current use in structural genomics projects, a NMR-Profile is recorded at the outset of a structure determination, using a uniformly 15N-labeled micro-scale sample of the protein. We thus assess the extent to which polypeptide backbone resonance assignments can be achieved with given NMR techniques, for example, conventional triple resonance experiments or APSY-NMR. With the availability of sequence-specific polypeptide backbone resonance assignments in the course of the structure determination, an “Assigned NMR-Profile” is generated, which visualizes the variation of the 15N–1H correlation cross peak intensities along the sequence and thus maps the sequence locations of polypeptide segments for which the NMR line shapes are affected by conformational exchange or other processes. The Assigned NMR-Profile provides a guiding reference during later stages of the structure determination, and is of special interest for monitoring the protein during functional studies, where dynamic features may be modulated during physiological functions. PMID:23839514

  3. Study of cultured fibroblasts in vivo using NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Karczmar, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to study the compartmentation of phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates in intact Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts (CEFs) using /sup 31/P NMR at 109 MHz. Because glycolysis is regulated differently in normal and virally transformed CEFs, NMR experiments were performed on both types of cells. A technique for maintaining functional cells at high densities in an NMR magnet is described. Signals were detected from cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), ATP, NAD, NADH, phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine. The effect of external glucose on cytoplasmic pools of phosphates was studied. However, experiments with /sup 32/P labelled P/sub i/ showed that as the concentration of glucose in the medium was increased, the amount of phosphate sequestered in the cells increased. They conclude that there is a pool of P/sub i/ which is not detected by high resolution of NMR and that the size of this pool increases as the rate of glycolysis increases. These effects were found only in cultured cells; the data for transformed and normal cells were similar. Longitudinal relaxation times of intracellular phosphates in normal, transformed, and primary CEFs were measured.

  4. Solid State NMR Studies of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuru Hennadige, Sohan Roshel De Silva

    NMR (Nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy is utilized to study energy conversion and storage materials. Different types of NMR techniques including Magic Angle Spinning, Cross-polarization and relaxation measurement experiments were employed. Four different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, three types of CFx battery materials were investigated. Electrochemical studies have demonstrated different electrochemical performances by one type, delivering superior performance over the other two. 13C and 19F MAS NMR techniques are employed to identify the atomic/molecular structural factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among different types. Next as the second project, layered polymer dielectrics were investigated by NMR. Previous studies have shown that thin film capacitors are improved by using alternate layers of two polymers with complementary properties: one with a high breakdown strength and one with high dielectric constant as opposed to monolithic layers. 13C to 1H cross-polarization techniques were used to investigate any inter-layer properties that may cause the increase in the dielectric strength. The third project was to study two types of thermoelectric materials. These samples were made of heavily doped phosphorous and boron in silicon by two different methods: ball-milled and annealed. These samples were investigated by NMR to determine the degree of disorder and obtain insight into the doping efficiency. The last ongoing project is on a lithium-ion battery system. The nature of passivating layers or the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on the electrodes surface is important because of the direct correlation between the SEI and the battery life time/durability. Multinuclear (7Li, 19F, 31P) techniques are employed to identify the composition of the SEI formation of both positive and negative electrodes.

  5. Study of correlations in molecular motion by multiple quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.H.

    1981-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a very useful tool for characterizing molecular configurations through the measurement of transition frequencies and dipolar couplings. The measurement of spectral lineshapes, spin-lattice relaxation times, and transverse relaxation times also provide us with valuable information about correlations in molecular motion. The new technique of multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance has numerous advantages over the conventional single quantum NMR techniques in obtaining information about static and dynamic interactions of coupled spin systems. In the first two chapters, the theoretical background of spin Hamiltonians and the density matrix formalism of multiple quantum NMR is discussed. The creation and detection of multiple quantum coherence by multiple pulse sequence are discussed. Prototype multiple quantum spectra of oriented benzene are presented. Redfield relaxation theory and the application of multiple quantum NMR to the study of correlations in fluctuations are presented. A specific example of an oriented methyl group relaxed by paramagnetic impurities is studied in detail. The study of possible correlated motion between two coupled methyl groups by multiple quantum NMR is presented. For a six spin system it is shown that the four-quantum spectrum is sensitive to two-body correlations, and serves a ready test of correlated motion. The study of the spin-lattice dynamics of orienting or tunneling methyl groups (CH/sub 3/ and CD/sub 3/) at low temperatures is presented. The anisotropic spin-lattice relaxation of deuterated hexamethylbenzene, caused by the sixfold reorientation of the molecules, is investigated, and the NMR spectrometers and other experimental details are discussed.

  6. The PAW/GIPAW approach for computing NMR parameters: a new dimension added to NMR study of solids.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Thibault

    2011-07-01

    In 2001, Mauri and Pickard introduced the gauge including projected augmented wave (GIPAW) method that enabled for the first time the calculation of all-electron NMR parameters in solids, i.e. accounting for periodic boundary conditions. The GIPAW method roots in the plane wave pseudopotential formalism of the density functional theory (DFT), and avoids the use of the cluster approximation. This method has undoubtedly revitalized the interest in quantum chemical calculations in the solid-state NMR community. It has quickly evolved and improved so that the calculation of the key components of NMR interactions, namely the shielding and electric field gradient tensors, has now become a routine for most of the common nuclei studied in NMR. Availability of reliable implementations in several software packages (CASTEP, Quantum Espresso, PARATEC) make its usage more and more increasingly popular, maybe indispensable in near future for all material NMR studies. The majority of nuclei of the periodic table have already been investigated by GIPAW, and because of its high accuracy it is quickly becoming an essential tool for interpreting and understanding experimental NMR spectra, providing reliable assignments of the observed resonances to crystallographic sites or enabling a priori prediction of NMR data. The continuous increase of computing power makes ever larger (and thus more realistic) systems amenable to first-principles analysis. In the near future perspectives, as the incorporation of dynamical effects and/or disorder are still at their early developments, these areas will certainly be the prime target.

  7. Multinuclear NMR studies of gaseous and liquid sevoflurane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macięga, E.; Makulski, W.; Jackowski, K.; Blicharska, B.

    2006-03-01

    For the first time, a small amount of sevoflurane ((CF 3) 2CHOCH 2F) in carbon dioxide and xenon as the gaseous solvents has been studied using 19F and 1H NMR spectra. Density-dependent 19F and 1H nuclear magnetic shielding was observed when the pressure of each solvent was increased. After extrapolation of the results to the zero-density limit it was possible to determine the appropriate shielding constants free from intermolecular interactions, σ0(F) and σ0(H). Similar procedure has also been applied for the investigation of fluorine-proton spin-spin couplings and the 2J 0(FH) and 3J 0(FH) constants of an isolated (CF 3) 2CHOCH 2F molecule were also obtained. Additionally, high-resolution 1H, 13C, 17O and 19F NMR spectra of pure liquid sevoflurane were also recorded and all the 1H- 13C, 1H- 19F and 19F- 13C spin-spin coupling constants and NMR chemical shifts were measured. It is shown that the experimental NMR parameters are suitable for comparison with the results of recent quantum-chemical calculations.

  8. The Cyanide Ligands of [FeFe] Hydrogenase: Pulse EPR Studies of 13C and 15N-Labeled H-Cluster

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The two cyanide ligands in the assembled cluster of [FeFe] hydrogenase originate from exogenous l-tyrosine. Using selectively labeled tyrosine substrates, the cyanides were isotopically labeled via a recently developed in vitro maturation procedure allowing advanced electron paramagnetic resonance techniques to probe the electronic structure of the catalytic core of the enzyme. The ratio of the isotropic 13C hyperfine interactions for the two CN– ligands—a reporter of spin density on their respective coordinating iron ions—collapses from ≈5.8 for the Hox form of hydrogenase to <2 for the CO-inhibited form. Additionally, when the maturation was carried out using [15N]-tyrosine, no features previously ascribed to the nitrogen of the bridging dithiolate ligand were observed suggesting that this bridge is not sourced from tyrosine. PMID:25133957

  9. An NMR Study of Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Keith E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as a model for studying enzyme activity with a basic spectrometer is presented. Included are background information, experimental procedures, and a discussion of probable results. Stressed is the value of the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in biochemistry. (CW)

  10. NMR studies and applications of perfluorocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yulin

    Hyperpolarized 3He has been very successful in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs. It provides ways to study the physiological properties of the lungs and lung function. However, the high costs of the polarizing apparatus and the complicated polarizing procedure are preventing this technique from being clinically used routinely. Recent developments have shown that several fluorinated gases have the potential to replace 3He in some of its applications. This thesis presents some preliminary results of human excised lung imaging using C2F6 and C3F8. These two fluorinated gases were able to yield images with good signal-to-noise ratio and reasonable resolutions in a 1.5 T magnet. Using diffusion MRI of these two gases can distinguish emphysematous lungs from healthy ones. An important application of these gases would be to determine local lung surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio in vivo, which requires the unrestricted (free) diffusivity in each pixel to be known. We present data in this thesis which allow free diffusivities to be calculated from the relaxation time T1. Samples of pure C 2F6 and C3F8 at different pressures and in mixtures with oxygen at different concentrations were made. Measurements were done at two different magnetic fields and temperature was regulated to study the temperature dependence over a small range. These two gases were also used in studies of carbon-block filters, where the strong adsorption of the gases to the high surface-area carbon is beneficial. A brief review of our work on mouse lung imaging using hyperpolarized 3He is presented in Appendix A; Appendix B is a study of the longitudinal spin magnetization in the presence of a strong magnetic field gradient; the construction of the pulsed field gradient waveform measurement coils and some experimental results using these coils are contained in Appendix C.

  11. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  12. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    Nanoscience is an emerging field that can provide potential routes towards addressing critical issues such as clean and sustainable energy, environmental remediation and human health. Specifically, porous nanomaterials, such as zeolites and mesoporous silica, are found in a wide range of applications including catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, environmental protection, and sensing. The characterization of the physical and chemical properties of nanocrystalline materials is essential to the realization of these innovative applications. The great advantage of porous nanocrystals is their increased external surface area that can control their biological, chemical and catalytic activities. Specific functional groups synthesized on the surface of nanoparticles are able to absorb heavy metals from the solution or target disease cells, such as cancer cells. In these studies, three main issues related to functionalized nanomaterials will be addressed through the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques including: 1) surface composition and structure of functionalized nanocrystalline particles; 2) chemical properties of the guest molecules on the surface of nanomaterials, and 3) adsorption and reactivity of surface bound functional groups. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the major spectroscopic techniques available for the characterization of molecular structure and conformational dynamics with atomic level detail. This thesis deals with the application of 1H solution state NMR to porous nanomaterial in an aqueous environment. Understanding the aqueous phase behavior of functionalized nanomaterials is a key factor in the design and development of safe nanomaterials because their interactions with living systems are always mediated through the aqueous phase. This is often due to a lack of fundamental knowledge in interfacial chemical and physical phenomena that occur on the surface of nanoparticles. The use of solution NMR spectroscopy results

  13. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methane groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples. In this report period we have focused our work on 1 segment of the program. Our last report outlined progress in using our NMR editing methods with higher field operation where higher magic angle spinning rates are required. Significant difficulties were identified, and these have been the main subject of study during the most recent granting period.

  14. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  15. Double rotation NMR studies of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, Raz

    1993-07-01

    Goal is to study the organization and structures of guest atoms and molecules and their reactions on internal surfaces within pores of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves. 27Al and 23Na double rotation NMR (DOR) is used since it removes the anisotropic broadening in NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, thus increasing resolution. This work concentrates on probing aluminum framework atoms in aluminophosphate molecular sieves and sodium extra framework cations in porous aluminosilicates. In aluminophosphates, ordering and electronic environments of the framework 27Al nuclei are modified upon adsorption of water molecules within the channels; a relation is sought between the sieve channel topology and the organization of adsorbed water, as well as the interaction between the Al nuclei and the water molecules. Extra framework Na+ cations are directly involved in adsorption processes and reactions in zeolite cavities.

  16. Solid state NMR studies of materials for energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambukara Kodiweera Arachchilage, Chandana K.

    Presented in this dissertation are NMR investigations of the dynamical and structural properties of materials for energy conversion and storage devices. 1H and 2H NMR was used to study water and methanol transportation in sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) based membranes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). These results are presented in chapter 3. The amount of liquid in the membrane and ion exchange capacity (IEC) are two main factors that govern the dynamics in these membranes. Water and methanol diffusion coefficients also are comparable. Chapters 4 and 5 are concerned with 31P and 1H NMR in phosphoric acid doped PBI membranes (para-PBI and 2OH-PBI) as well as PBI membranes containing ionic liquids (H3PO4/PMIH2PO4/PBI). These membranes are designed for higher-temperature fuel cell operation. In general, stronger short and long range interactions were observed in the 2OH-PBI matrix, yielding reduced proton transport compared to that of para-PBI. In the case of H3PO4/PMIH2PO 4/PBI, both conductivity and diffusion are higher for the sample with molar ratio 2/4/1. Finally, chapter 6 is devoted to the 31P NMR MAS study of phosphorus-containing structural groups on the surfaces of micro/mesoporous activated carbons. Two spectral features were observed and the narrow feature identifies surface phosphates while the broad component identifies heterogeneous subsurface phosphorus environments including phosphate and more complex structure multiple P-C, P-N and P=N bonds.

  17. An NMR study and ab initio molecular orbital calculation of substituted benzofuroxans and the salt of 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmoch, P.; Wiench, J. W.; Stefaniak, L.; Webb, G. A.

    1999-09-01

    13C, 15N and 17O NMR data are reported for a series of substituted benzofuroxans in aprotic and acidic solutions and for a potassium salt of a substituted benzofuroxan. Some of the title compounds can exhibit fast furoxan valence equilibrium at room temperature regardless of a solvent used, whereas for the others no evidence of above-mentioned process exists. The NMR parameters most sensitive to salt formation are the chemical shifts of the C7, N1, N3 and all of the oxygen nuclei. Hence these are reported as the most satisfactory chemical shifts to be used in distinguishing between the salt and non-ionic forms of the substituted benzofuroxans studied. Calculated energies at the self-consistent field (SCF) level of theory for both tautomeric forms (N1- and N3-oxide) of some compounds studied are used for predicting the tautomeric equilibrium constants. Absolute 17O shieldings are employed in the reversal of the assignments of 17O NMR signals existing in the literature.

  18. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with (2)H, (13)C and (15)N in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-06-01

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80% can be achieved for (15)N and (13)C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For (2)H,(15)N and (2)H,(13)C,(15)N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73%, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins.

  19. NMR Studies of Molecular Orientation and Dynamics in Spider silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michal, Carl; Eles, Philip

    2004-05-01

    Spider dragline silk has a unique combination of strength and extensibility that has been difficult to achieve in synthetic polymer fibres and has inspired industrial efforts to produce genetically engineered analogues. In light of these efforts elsewhere, we describe solid-state NMR experiments that elucidate the molecular structure and dynamics of this remarkable material. These experiments include the use of a 2-D exchange NMR experiment known as DECODER in which the sample is reoriented through a discrete angle during the mixing time. This experiment allows a reconstruction of the orientation distribution of the protein backbone. Our data is well described by a two-component distribution where the protein backbones of both components are preferentially aligned along the silk fibre. This experiment is also sensitive to molecular motion on a wide range of time-scales, and is employed to study changes in the silk as a function of fibre extension and hydration. Hydrated silk undergoes a remarkable phenomena known as supercontraction where fibres shrink by up to 50% in length while swelling in diameter. DECODER NMR of fully and partially supercontracted silk reveals that supercontraction occurs through a process of local phase transitions where water disrupts inter- and intra-chain hydrogen bonds.

  20. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  1. NMR structural study of the prototropic equilibrium in solution of Schiff bases as model compounds.

    PubMed

    Ortegón-Reyna, David; Garcías-Morales, Cesar; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia; García-Báez, Efren; Aríza-Castolo, Armando; Peraza-Campos, Ana; Martínez-Martínez, Francisco

    2013-12-31

    An NMR titration method has been used to simultaneously measure the acid dissociation constant (pKa) and the intramolecular NHO prototropic constant ΔKNHO on a set of Schiff bases. The model compounds were synthesized from benzylamine and substituted ortho-hydroxyaldehydes, appropriately substituted with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups to modulate the acidity of the intramolecular NHO hydrogen bond. The structure in solution was established by 1H-, 13C- and 15N-NMR spectroscopy. The physicochemical parameters of the intramolecular NHO hydrogen bond (pKa, ΔKNHO and ΔΔG°) were obtained from 1H-NMR titration data and pH measurements. The Henderson-Hasselbalch data analysis indicated that the systems are weakly acidic, and the predominant NHO equilibrium was established using Polster-Lachmann δ-diagram analysis and Perrin model data linearization.

  2. Quantitative role of splanchnic region in leucine metabolism: L-(1-13C,15N)leucine and substrate balance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.M.; Wagner, D.A.; Tredget, E.E.; Walaszewski, J.A.; Burke, J.F.; Young, V.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The role of the splanchnic region (Sp) in whole body leucine metabolism was assessed in six chronically catheterized fasting mongrel dogs and in eight dogs during constant enteral feeding of a complete amino acid solution (0.24 g.kg-1.h-1). We used primed continuous intravenous infusions of L-(1-13C,15N)leucine and L-(1-14C)leucine and measurements of arteriovenous isotope and leucine balance across the gut, liver, and Sp. In the fasted condition, 3.5% of arterial leucine supply was oxidized in the Sp, accounting for 13% of total body leucine oxidation, with 10% by liver. With amino acid feeding (1) leucine carbon and nitrogen fluxes and oxidation were increased (P less than 0.01) at the whole body level; (2) the percent of whole body leucine oxidation occurring in the Sp and liver increased (P less than 0.01) to 41 and 27%, respectively; (3) fractional metabolic utilization of leucine delivered to the Sp was reduced (P less than 0.01) from 47 to 35%; (4) the deamination rate of leucine in the gut was increased (P less than 0.05), along with an increased reamination rate of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid in the Sp (P less than 0.05). These findings reveal that the Sp accounts for a small fraction of whole body leucine oxidation during the fasting condition, but it plays a quantitatively important role in total body leucine oxidation during amino acid feeding; the gut and liver play cooperative roles in controlling leucine supply to peripheral tissues.

  3. Freezing point depression of water in phospholipid membranes: a solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Kwon, Byung Soo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2008-12-02

    Lipid-water interaction plays an important role in the properties of lipid bilayers, cryoprotectants, and membrane-associated peptides and proteins. The temperature at which water bound to lipid bilayers freezes is lower than that of free water. Here, we report a solid-state NMR investigation on the freezing point depression of water in phospholipid bilayers in the presence and absence of cholesterol. Deuterium NMR spectra at different temperatures ranging from -75 to + 10 degrees C were obtained from fully (2)H2O-hydrated POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), prepared with and without cholesterol, to determine the freezing temperature of water and the effect of cholesterol on the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. Our 2H NMR experiments reveal the motional behavior of unfrozen water molecules in POPC bilayers even at temperatures significantly below 0 degrees C and show that the presence of cholesterol further lowered the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. These results suggest that in the presence of cholesterol the fluidity and dynamics of lipid bilayers can be retained even at very low temperatures as exist in the liquid crystalline phase of the lipid. Therefore, bilayer samples prepared with a cryoprotectant like cholesterol should enable the performance of multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments to investigate the structure, dynamics, and topology of membrane proteins at a very low temperature with enhanced sample stability and possibly a better sensitivity. Phosphorus-31 NMR data suggest that lipid bilayers can be aligned at low temperatures, while 15N NMR experiments demonstrate that such aligned samples can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of is 15N chemical shift spectra of a 37-residue human antimicrobial peptide, LL-37.

  4. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  5. MRI and unilateral NMR study of reindeer skin tanning processes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizheng; Del Federico, Eleonora; Ilott, Andrew J; Klokkernes, Torunn; Kehlet, Cindie; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-04-07

    The study of arctic or subarctic indigenous skin clothing material, known for its design and ability to keep the body warm, provides information about the tanning materials and techniques. The study also provides clues about the culture that created it, since tanning processes are often specific to certain indigenous groups. Untreated skin samples and samples treated with willow (Salix sp) bark extract and cod liver oil are compared in this study using both MRI and unilateral NMR techniques. The two types of samples show different proton spatial distributions and different relaxation times, which may also provide information about the tanning technique and aging behavior.

  6. Revisiting the use of δ15N in meso-scale studies of marine food webs by considering spatio-temporal variations in stable isotopic signatures - The case of an open ecosystem: The Bay of Biscay (North-East Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouvelon, T.; Spitz, J.; Caurant, F.; Mèndez-Fernandez, P.; Chappuis, A.; Laugier, F.; Le Goff, E.; Bustamante, P.

    2012-08-01

    Most of the recent framework directives and environmental policies argue for the development and the use of indicators - notably trophodynamic indicators - that should be able to follow ecosystems' evolution in space and time, particularly under anthropogenic perturbations. In the last decades, the use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes ratios has increased exponentially, particularly in studies of marine ecosystems' trophic structure and functioning. This method is principally based on the assumption that the isotopic composition of a consumer directly reflects that of its food. Nevertheless, few studies have attempted to define the limits of this tool, before using it and drawing ecological conclusions from isotopic analysis. This study aimed to assess the importance of considering spatio-temporal variations in isotopic signatures of consumers when using δ13C and especially δ15N values in open ecosystems with complex food webs, using the Bay of Biscay (North-East Atlantic) as a case study. To this end, more than 140 species from this marine ecosystem were analysed for the isotopic signatures in their muscle tissue. They were sampled from coastal to oceanic and deep-sea areas and at different latitudes, to evaluate spatial variations of isotopic signatures. Selected species were also sampled over several years and in two seasons to account for inter-annual and seasonal variations. In the Bay of Biscay temperate ecosystem, which is subject to both coastal and oceanic influences - two main river inputs and upwelling areas - , δ13C and δ15N values significantly decreased from inshore to offshore species, and to a lesser extent from benthic to pelagic organisms. River discharges appeared to be the first factor influencing δ13C and δ15N values in consumers. From the important spatial variations detected in δ15N values in particular, we suggest that in such contrasted ecosystem, nitrogen isotopic ratios may also be revisited as an indicator of the feeding

  7. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Organic phosphorus incorporated in calcite during laboratory precipitation experiments and in natural cave deposits was investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For calcite precipitated in the presence of organic phosphoesters of varying size and functionality, solid-state 31P{1H} CP/MAS NMR shows that the phosphoesters were incorporated intact into the solid. Systematic changes in the 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphate group were observed between the solid phosphoester and that incorporated in the solid precipitate, yielding 31P NMR chemical shifts of the coprecipitates in the range of +1.8 to -2.2 ppm. These chemical shifts are distinct from that of similarly prepared calcite coprecipitated with inorganic phosphate, 3.5 ppm. Only minor changes were noted in the phosphoester 31P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) which suggests no significant change in the local structure of the phosphate group, which is dominated by C-O-P bonding. Close spatial proximity of the organic phosphate group to calcite structural components was revealed by 31P/13C rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments for coprecipitates prepared with 13C-labeled carbonate. All coprecipitates showed significant 31P dephasing effects upon 13C-irradiation, signaling atomic-scale proximity to carbonate carbon. The dephasing rate for smaller organophosphate molecules is similar to that observed for inorganic phosphate, whereas much slower dephasing was observed for larger molecules having long and/or bulky side-chains. This result suggests that small organic molecules can be tightly enclosed within the calcite structure, whereas significant structural disruption required to accommodate the larger organic molecules leads to longer phosphate-carbonate distances. Comparison of 31P NMR spectroscopic data from the synthetic coprecipitates with those from calcite moonmilk speleothems indicates that phosphorus occurs mainly as inorganic orthophosphate in the natural deposits, although small

  8. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the interaction of melatonin with calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Adrián G.; Estrin, Darío A.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.; McCormick, John E.; Martin, Stephen R.; Pastore, Annalisa; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Martorana, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Pineal hormone melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is thought to modulate the calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway either by changing intracellular Ca2+ concentration via activation of its G-protein–coupled membrane receptors, or through a direct interaction with calmodulin (CaM). The present work studies the direct interaction of melatonin with intact calcium-saturated CaM both experimentally, by fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and theoretically, by molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the interaction is calcium-dependent. The affinity, as obtained from monitoring 15N and 1H chemical shift changes for a melatonin titration, is weak (in the millimolar range) and comparable for the N- and C-terminal domains. Partial replacement of diamagnetic Ca2+ by paramagnetic Tb3+ allowed the measurement of interdomain NMR pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings, indicating that each domain movement in the complex is not correlated with the other one. Molecular dynamics simulations allow us to follow the dynamics of melatonin in the binding pocket of CaM. Overall, this study provides an example of how a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches can shed light on a weakly interacting system of biological and pharmacological significance. PMID:15498938

  9. Phenylalanine δ15N in Paleo Archives as a New Proxy for δ15N of Exported Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M.; Batista, F. C.; Vokhshoori, N. L.; Brown, J. T.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ravelo, A. C.; Sherwood, O.

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of individual amino acids (CSI-AA) is emerging as a powerful new tool for studying the paleo nitrogen cycle. Because most detrital organic nitrogen is composed of amino acids, CSI-AA can reveal the mechanistic basis for organic nitrogen diagenesis, preserve a record of past food web structure, and potentially reconstruct the δ15N values of past nitrate and primary production. Within the commonly measured amino acids, the δ15N value of phenylalanine (Phe) appears uniquely promising as a new proxy that reflects the nitrogen isotopic value of the original source. Phe δ15N values remain almost unchanged with trophic transfer through food webs, and also during at least the initial stages of organic matter degradation. Here we synthesize results from both bio-archives and recent sediments, which together suggest that at least in Holocene archives the Phe δ15N value does in fact record the average inorganic nitrogen δ15N value at the base of planktonic food webs. However, several important unknowns also remain. These include the extent of variation in amino acid isotopic fractionation patterns in phylogenetically distinct algal groups. The stability of Phe δ15N values in older sediments where organic matter has undergone extensive diagenesis is also an important research area, which may ultimately establish the temporal limit for application of this approach to study past geological epochs. Together, however, results to date suggest that of Phe δ15N values in paleo archives represent a novel molecular-level proxy which is not tied to any specific organism or group, but rather can provide an integrated estimate of δ15N value of exported primary production.

  10. Plan of study to determine if the isotopic ratios [delta]15 N and [delta]18 O can reveal the sources of nitrate discharged by the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Kendall, Carol; Goolsby, Donald A.; Boyer, Laurie L.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate and other nutrients discharged from the Mississippi River basin are suspected of causing a zone of depleted dissolved oxygen (hypoxic zone) in the Gulf of Mexico each summer. The hypoxic zone may have an adverse effect on aquatic life and commercial fisheries. Commercial fertilizers are the dominant source of nitrogen input to the Mississippi basin. Other nitrogen sources include animal waste, fixation of atmospheric nitrogen by legumes, precipitation, domestic and industrial effluent, and the soil. The inputs of nitrogen from most of these sources to the Mississippi basin can be estimated and the outputs in surface water can be measured. However, nitrogen from each source is affected differently by physical, chemical, and biological processes that control nitrogen cycling in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Hence, the relative contributions from the various sources of nitrogen to nitrate load in the Mississippi River are unknown because the different sources may not contribute proportionally to their inputs in the basin. It may be possible to determine the relative contributions of the major sources of nitrate in river water using the stable isotopic ratios d15N and d18O of the nitrate ion. A few researchers have used the d15N and/or d18O isotope ratios to determine sources of nitrate in ground water, headwater catchments, and small rivers, but little is known about the isotopic composition of nitrate in larger rivers. The objective of this study is to measure the isotopic composition of nitrate and suspended organic matter in the Mississippi River and its major tributaries, in discharge to the Gulf of Mexico, and in streamflow from smaller watersheds that have distinct sources of nitrogen (row crops, animal wastes, and urban effluents) or are minimally impacted by man (undeveloped). Samples from seven sites on the Mississippi River and its tributaries and from 17 sites in smaller watersheds within the Mississippi River basin will be analyzed for d15N and

  11. NMR assignment method for amide signals with cell-free protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods are widely used to determine the three-dimensional structures of proteins, to estimate protein folding, and to discover high-affinity ligands for proteins. However, one of the problems to apply such NMR methods to proteins is that we should obtain mg quantities of (15)N and/or (13)C labeled pure proteins of interest. Here, we describe the method to produce dual amino acid-selective (13)C-(15)N labeled proteins for NMR study using the improved wheat germ cell-free system, which enables sequence-specific assignments of amide signals simply even for very large protein.

  12. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

  13. Molecular interactions between Geobacter sulfurreducens triheme cytochromes and the electron acceptor Fe(iii) citrate studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marisa R; Dantas, Joana M; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2017-02-14

    Proteomic and genetic studies have identified a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E) that are essential in the iron respiratory pathways of Geobacter sulfurreducens. These include the reduction of Fe(iii) soluble chelated forms or Fe(iii) oxides, which can be used as terminal acceptors by G. sulfurreducens. The relevance of these cytochromes in the respiratory pathways of soluble or insoluble forms of iron is quite distinct. In fact, while PpcD had a higher abundance in the Fe(iii) oxides supplanted G. sulfurreducens cultures, PpcA, PpcB and PpcE were important in Fe(iii) citrate supplanted cultures. Based on these observations we probed the molecular interactions between these cytochromes and Fe(iii) citrate by NMR spectroscopy. NMR spectra were recorded for natural abundance and (15)N-enriched PpcA, PpcB or PpcE samples at increasing amounts of Fe(iii) citrate. The addition of this molecule caused pronounced perturbations on the line width of the protein's NMR signals, which were used to map the interaction region between each cytochrome and the Fe(iii) citrate molecule. The perturbations on the NMR signals corresponding to the backbone NH and heme methyl substituents showed that complex interfaces consist of a well-defined patch, which surrounds the more solvent-exposed heme IV methyl groups in each cytochrome. Overall, this study provides for the first time a clear illustration of the formation of an electron transfer complex between Fe(iii) citrate and G. sulfurreducens triheme cytochromes, shown to be crucial in this respiratory pathway.

  14. NMR studies of coupled low- and high-barrier hydrogen bonds in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate model systems in polar solution.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Shasad; Denisov, Gleb S; Toney, Michael D; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2007-05-16

    The 1H and 15N NMR spectra of several 15N-labeled pyridoxal-5'-phosphate model systems have been measured at low temperature in various aprotic and protic solvents of different polarity, i.e., dichloromethane-d2, acetonitrile-d3, tetrahydrofuran-d8, freon mixture CDF3/CDClF2, and methanol. In particular, the 15N-labeled 5'-triisopropyl-silyl ether of N-(pyridoxylidene)-tolylamine (1a), N-(pyridoxylidene)-methylamine (2a), and the Schiff base with 15N-2-methylaspartic acid (3a) and their complexes with proton donors such as triphenylmethanol, phenol, and carboxylic acids of increasing strength were studied. With the use of hydrogen bond correlation techniques, the 1H/15N chemical shift and scalar coupling data could be associated with the geometries of the intermolecular O1H1N1 (pyridine nitrogen) and the intramolecular O2H2N2 (Schiff base) hydrogen bonds. Whereas O1H1N1 is characterized by a series of asymmetric low-barrier hydrogen bonds, the proton in O2H2N2 faces a barrier for proton transfer of medium height. When the substituent on the Schiff base nitrogen is an aromatic ring, the shift of the proton in O1H1N1 from oxygen to nitrogen has little effect on the position of the proton in the O2H2N2 hydrogen bond. By contrast, when the substituent on the Schiff base nitrogen is a methyl group, a proton shift from O to N in O1H1N1 drives the tautomeric equilibrium in O2H2N2 from the neutral O2-H2...N2 to the zwitterionic O2-...H2-N(2+) form. This coupling is lost in aqueous solution where the intramolecular O2H2N2 hydrogen bond is broken by solute-solvent interactions. However, in methanol, which mimics hydrogen bonds to the Schiff base in the enzyme active site, the coupling is preserved. Therefore, the reactivity of Schiff base intermediates in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate enzymes can likely be tuned to the requirements of the reaction being catalyzed by differential protonation of the pyridine nitrogen.

  15. Tricritical point in ferroelastic ammonium titanyl fluoride: NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kavun, V.Ya.; Kozlova, S.G.; Laptash, N.M; Tkachenko, I.A.; Gabuda, S.P

    2010-09-15

    Ionic mobility and phase transitions in ammonium titanyl pentafluoride (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} were studied using the {sup 19}F and {sup 1}H NMR data. The high-temperature phase (I) is characterized by spherically symmetric (isotropic) reorientation of [TiOF{sub 5}]{sup 3-} anions and by uniaxial reorientation of these anions in the ferroelastic phase II. A previously unknown second-order phase transition to the low-temperature modification (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}(III) was found at 205 K. The transition is accompanied by hindering of uniaxial rotations of [TiOF{sub 5}]{sup 3-} anions and by noticeable change of {sup 19}F magnetic shielding tensor associated with the influence of pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect. A pressure-induced tricritical point with coordinates p{sub TCR{approx}}2 kbar and T{sub TCR{approx}}170 K is estimated on the base of {sup 19}F NMR chemical shift data, and previously studied p-T diagram of (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}. - Graphical abstract: p-T phase diagram of (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}.

  16. NMR Study of Organic Counterion Binding to Perfluorinated Micellar Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossev, Dobrin; Matsumoto, Mustuo; Nakahara, Masaru

    2008-03-01

    In this study we have applied our previously developed NMR method to study the adsorption of tetramethylammonium (TMA^+) and tetraethylammonium (TEA^+) counterions to micelles formed by perfluorooctylsulfonate (FOS^-) surfactant in water at 30 C. These two counterions induce formation of threadlike surfactant structures that result in well pronounced viscoelastic properties of the solution. To selectively probe the degree of counterion binding we have used ^1H and ^19F NMR chemical shifts and self-diffusion coefficients that are sensitive to the Stern and diffuse double layers, respectively. The competitive adsorption of TMA^+ and TEA^+ was examined as a function of the TMA^+/TEA^+ ratio at a constant FOS^- concentration of 100 mM. The two counterions were found to form Stern layer around the FOS^- micelles with comparable packing; about one counterion per two micellized FOS molecules. When mixed at intermediate proportions, however, the TEA^+ counterion shows preferential binding; the concentration of TEA^+ in the Stern layer is found to be twice higher than that of TMA^+ at equal total respective concentrations in the solution. These results are discussed in terms of counterion size and hydrophobicity and presented in parallel with those that involved the smaller and more hydrophilic lithium counterion.

  17. Entangled Polymer Melt Dynamics Studied By Low-Field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaca Chavez, Fabian; Huebsch, Patrick; Zirbs, Ronald; Binder, Wolfgang; Saalwaechter, Kay

    2009-03-01

    Proton Multiple-Quantum (MQ) NMR is a powerful technique to investigate polymer dynamics due to its sensitivity to molecular motions on very different timescales. Entangled melts exhibit dynamic processes that cover a wide range of timescales, starting from fast ps-scale segmental reorientation up to diffusive and cooperative motions on the ms-s-scale. In this work, we apply MQ NMR to linear poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) and poly(isobutylene) of different molecular weight above the glass transition over suitable ranges of temperature, in order to establish the dynamic regimes predicted by the tube model, and, for the first time, to extract actual time scale information. This directly complements many neutron scattering studies, which are restricted to the sub-μs-timescale. Measurements on PIB-grafted silica particles with different molecular weights and different chain densities on the surface of the particle are also shown. The data is analyzed by establishing scaling laws which can be directly associated with different dynamic regimes predicted by the tube/reptation model. Full analytical analyses based on a correlation function which explicitly includes segmental, Rouse, and reptation dynamics are discussed.

  18. Effects of nucleotide binding to LmrA: A combined MAS-NMR and solution NMR study.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Ute A; Mönkemeyer, Leonie; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    ABC transporters are fascinating examples of fine-tuned molecular machines that use the energy from ATP hydrolysis to translocate a multitude of substrates across biological membranes. While structural details have emerged on many members of this large protein superfamily, a number of functional details are still under debate. High resolution structures yield valuable insights into protein function, but it is the combination of structural, functional and dynamic insights that facilitates a complete understanding of the workings of their complex molecular mechanisms. NMR is a technique well-suited to investigate proteins in atomic resolution while taking their dynamic properties into account. It thus nicely complements other structural techniques, such as X-ray crystallography, that have contributed high-resolution data to the architectural understanding of ABC transporters. Here, we describe the heterologous expression of LmrA, an ABC exporter from Lactococcus lactis, in Escherichia coli. This allows for more flexible isotope labeling for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and the easy study of LmrA's multidrug resistance phenotype. We use a combination of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) on the reconstituted transporter and solution NMR on its isolated nucleotide binding domain to investigate consequences of nucleotide binding to LmrA. We find that nucleotide binding affects the protein globally, but that NMR is also able to pinpoint local dynamic effects to specific residues, such as the Walker A motif's conserved lysine residue.

  19. NMR structural studies of PECVD amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Thomas Sidley, Jr.

    The properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) amorphous semiconductor films vary depending upon preparation conditions and doping. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films (a-Si:H) have some properties that make these films desirable for use in solar cells and photoreceptor devices. Maximizing electronic and structural properties of such films is key to their success. Nuclear magnetic resonance, and in particular deuterium magnetic resonance (DMR) for a-Si:H,D films, is a useful means to study the morphology of such samples. The location and motions of hydrogen and the chemically equivalent deuterium within an amorphous semiconductor film can be observed with NMR. The information from the NMR studies can be correlated with electronic properties studies to determine whether a given sample would make a successful photovoltaic device. This thesis focuses on three aspects of study: comparison of two samples that differ in the bias applied to the substrate upon which the amorphous films were grown; derivation of relaxation parameters for covalently bonded deuterium; development of a new pulse sequence "incremental spin echo double resonance (SEDOR)" to study the number of unlike spins that contribute to the local field of a given nuclei. Four significant conclusions can be drawn. First, the electronic quality as measured by the photoresponse product etamutau correlates with the broad Gaussian DMR spectral feature which arises from molecular hydrogen in sites that restrict motion. Second, the relaxation of nuclear magnetization under extreme inhomogeneous broadening can be modeled very well as the relaxation without spin diffusion to faster relaxing species within a sample. Third, incremental SEDOR has either a quantum mechanical or classical behavior depending upon the length of the pulse spacing in comparison to the spin-spin relaxation time. Fourth, the local field at the hydrogen of an HD pair within an a-Si:H,D sample is determined on average by

  20. Unilateral NMR study of a XVI century wall painted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proietti, N.; Capitani, D.; Rossi, E.; Cozzolino, S.; Segre, A. L.

    2007-06-01

    Wall paintings in the XVI century Serra Chapel in the "Chiesa di Nostra Signora del Sacro Cuore" Rome, have been studied using unilateral NMR. In order to map the distribution of moisture content in the wall painted, a large number of Hahn echo measurements, covering large areas of the wall painting were performed. Because the intensity of the Hahn echo is proportional to the amount of moisture in the area under study, the experimental data were transformed into 2D gradient colour maps which allowed an easy visualization of the moisture content of the wall. The state of conservation of the wall painting was monitored using T2 measurements specially with regards to outcropping salt.

  1. Ion transport in porous media studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Pel, L; Huinink, H P; Kopinga, K; Rijniers, L A; Kaasschieter, E F

    2001-01-01

    Moisture and salt transport in masonry can give rise to damages. Therefore a detailed knowledge of the moisture and salt transport is essential for understanding the durability of masonry. A special NMR apparatus has been made allowing quasi-simultaneous measurements of both moisture and Na profiles in porous building materials. Using this apparatus both the absorption of a 4 M NaCl solution in a calcium silicate brick and the drying of a 3 M NaCl capillary saturated fired-clay brick have been studied. It was found that during the absorption process the Na ions clearly stay behind, which this is caused by adsorption of these ions to the pore surface. For the drying it was found that at the beginning of the drying process the ions accumulate near the surface. As the drying rate decreases, diffusion becomes dominant and the ion profile levels off again.

  2. NMR Studies of Ligand Binding to P450eryF Provides Insight into the Mechanism of Cooperativity

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Arthur G.; Diaz, Maria D.; Lampe, Jed N.; Shireman, Laura; Grinstead, Jeffrey S.; Dabrowski, Michael J.; Pearson, Josh T.; Bowman, Michael K.; Atkins, William M.; Campbell, Ann P.

    2006-02-14

    Cytochrome P450’s (P450’s) catalyze the oxidative metabolism of most drugs and toxins. Although extensive studies have proven that some P450’s demonstrate both homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity toward a number of substrates, the mechanistic and molecular details of P450 allostery are still not well-established. Here, we use UV/vis and heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques to study the mechanism and thermodynamics of the binding of two 9-aminophenanthrene (9-AP) and testosterone (TST) molecules to the erythromycin-metabolizing bacterial P450eryF. UV/vis absorbance spectra of P450eryF demonstrated that binding occurs with apparent negative homotropic cooperativity for TST and positive homotropic cooperativity for 9-AP with Hill-equation-derived dissociation constants of KS ) 4 and 200 íM, respectively. The broadening and shifting observed in the 2D-{1H,15N}-HSQC-monitored titrations of 15N-Phe-labeled P450eryF with 9-AP and TST indicated binding on intermediate and fast chemical exhange time scales, respectively, which was consistent with the Hillequation- derived KS values for these two ligands. Regardless of the type of spectral perturbation observed (broadening for 9-AP and shifting for TST), the 15N-Phe NMR resonances most affected were the same in each titration, suggesting that the two ligands “contact” the same phenylalanines within the active site of P450eryF. This finding is in agreement with X-ray crystal structures of bound P450eryF showing different ligands occupying similar active-site niches. Complex spectral behavior was additionally observed for a small collection of resonances in the TST titration, interpreted as multiple binding modes for the lowaffinity TST molecule or multiple TST-bound P450eryF conformational substates. A structural and energetic model is presented that combines the energetics and structural aspects of 9-AP and TST binding derived from these observations.

  3. ¹H NMR and hyperpolarized ¹³C NMR assays of pyruvate-lactate: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hill, Deborah K; Jamin, Yann; Orton, Matthew R; Tardif, Nicolas; Parkes, Harold G; Robinson, Simon P; Leach, Martin O; Chung, Yuen-Li; Eykyn, Thomas R

    2013-10-01

    Pyruvate-lactate exchange is mediated by the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and is central to the altered energy metabolism in cancer cells. The measurement of exchange kinetics using hyperpolarized (13) C NMR has provided a biomarker of response to novel therapeutics. However, the observable signal is restricted to the exchanging hyperpolarized (13) C pools and the endogenous pools of (12) C-labelled metabolites are invisible in these measurements. In this study, we investigated an alternative in vitro (1) H NMR assay, using [3-(13) C]pyruvate, and compared the measured kinetics with a hyperpolarized (13) C NMR assay, using [1-(13) C]pyruvate, under the same conditions in human colorectal carcinoma SW1222 cells. The apparent forward reaction rate constants (kPL ) derived from the two assays showed no significant difference, and both assays had similar reproducibility (kPL  = 0.506 ± 0.054 and kPL  = 0.441 ± 0.090 nmol/s/10(6) cells; mean ± standard deviation; n = 3); (1) H, (13) C assays, respectively). The apparent backward reaction rate constant (kLP ) could only be measured with good reproducibility using the (1) H NMR assay (kLP  = 0.376 ± 0.091 nmol/s/10(6) cells; mean ± standard deviation; n = 3). The (1) H NMR assay has adequate sensitivity to measure real-time pyruvate-lactate exchange kinetics in vitro, offering a complementary and accessible assay of apparent LDH activity.

  4. Ultra-broadband NMR probe: numerical and experimental study of transmission line NMR probe.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Shinji

    2003-06-01

    We have reinvestigated a transmission line NMR probe first published by Lowe and co-workers in 1970s [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 45 (1974) 631; 48 (1977) 268] numerically and experimentally. The probe is expected to be ultra-broadband, thus might enable new types of solid-state NMR experiments. The NMR probe consists of a coil and capacitors which are connected to the coil at regular intervals. The circuit is the same as a cascaded LC low-pass filter, except there are nonzero mutual inductances between different coil sections. We evaluated the mutual inductances by Neumann's formula and calculated the electrical characteristics of the probe as a function of a carrier frequency. We found that they were almost the same as those of a cascaded LC low-pass filter, when the inductance L of a section was estimated from the inductance of the whole coil divided by the number of the sections, and if C was set to the capacitance in a section. For example, the characteristic impedance of a transmission line coil is given by Z=(L/C)(1/2). We also calculated the magnitude and the distribution of RF magnetic field inside the probe. The magnitude of RF field decreases when the carrier frequency is increased because the phase delay between neighboring sections is proportional to the carrier frequency. For cylindrical coils, the RF field is proportional to (pinu/2nu(d))(1/2)exp(-nu/nu(d)), where the decay frequency nu(d) is determined by the dimensions of the coil. The observed carrier frequency thus must be much smaller than the decay frequency. This condition restricts the size of transmission line coils. We made a cylindrical coil for a 1H NMR probe operating below 400 MHz. It had a diameter 2.3mm and a pitch 1.2mm. Five capacitors of 6pF were connected at every three turns. The RF field strength was 40 and 60 kHz at the input RF power 100 W by a calculation and by experiments, respectively. The calculations showed that the RF field inhomogeneity along the coil axis was caused by a

  5. An in-cell NMR study of monitoring stress-induced increase of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hembram, Dambarudhar Shiba Sankar; Haremaki, Takahiro; Hamatsu, Jumpei; Inoue, Jin; Kamoshida, Hajime; Ikeya, Teppei; Mishima, Masaki; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Ito, Yutaka

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •We performed time-resolved NMR observations of calbindin D{sub 9k} in HeLa cells. •Stress-induced increase of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration was observed by in-cell NMR. •Calbindin D{sub 9k} showed the state-transition from Mg{sup 2+}- to Ca{sup 2+}-bound state in cells. •We provide a useful tool for in situ monitoring of the healthiness of the cells. -- Abstract: Recent developments in in-cell NMR techniques have allowed us to study proteins in detail inside living eukaryotic cells. The lifetime of in-cell NMR samples is however much shorter than that in culture media, presumably because of various stresses as well as the nutrient depletion in the anaerobic environment within the NMR tube. It is well known that Ca{sup 2+}-bursts occur in HeLa cells under various stresses, hence the cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration can be regarded as a good indicator of the healthiness of cells in NMR tubes. In this study, aiming at monitoring the states of proteins resulting from the change of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration during experiments, human calbindin D{sub 9k} (P47M + C80) was used as the model protein and cultured HeLa cells as host cells. Time-resolved measurements of 2D {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N SOFAST–HMQC experiments of calbindin D{sub 9k} (P47M + C80) in HeLa cells showed time-dependent changes in the cross-peak patterns in the spectra. Comparison with in vitro assignments revealed that calbindin D{sub 9k} (P47M + C80) is initially in the Mg{sup 2+}-bound state, and then gradually converted to the Ca{sup 2+}-bound state. This conversion process initiates after NMR sample preparation. These results showed, for the first time, that cells inside the NMR tube were stressed, presumably because of cell precipitation, the lack of oxygen and nutrients, etc., thereby releasing Ca{sup 2+} into cytosol during the measurements. The results demonstrated that in-cell NMR can monitor the state transitions of stimulated cells through the observation of

  6. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin–lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C). PMID:28067292

  7. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin–lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C).

  8. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  9. Efficient cross-polarization using a composite 0 degrees pulse for NMR studies on static solids.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Masashi; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Takegoshi, K

    2009-02-01

    In most solid-state NMR experiments, cross-polarization is an essential step to detect low-gamma nuclei such as (13)C and (15)N. In this study, we present a new cross-polarization scheme using spin-locks composed of composite 0 degrees pulses in the RF channels of high-gamma and low-gamma nuclei to establish the Hartmann-Hahn match. The composite 0 degrees pulses with no net nutation-angle{(2pi)(X)-(2pi)(-X)-(2pi)(Y)-(2pi)(-Y) -}(n) applied simultaneously to both high-gamma (I) and low-gamma (S) nuclei create an effective heteronuclear dipolar Hamiltonian H(d)((0))=d/2(2I(Z)S(Z)+I(X)S(X)+I(Y)S(Y)), which is capable of transferring the Z-component of the I spin magnetization to the Z-component of the S spin magnetization. It also retains a homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian that enables the flip-flop transfer among abundant spins. While our experimental results indicate that the new pulse sequence, called composite zero cross-polarization (COMPOZER-CP) performs well on adamantane, it is expected to be more valuable to study semi-solids like liquid crystalline materials and model lipid membranes. Theoretical analysis of COMPOZER-CP is presented along with experimental results. Our experimental results demonstrate that COMPOZER-CP overcomes the RF field inhomogeneity and Hartmann-Hahn mismatch for static solids. Experimental results comparing the performance of COMPOZER-CP with that of the traditional constant-amplitude CP and rampCP sequences are also presented in this paper.

  10. Complete backbone and DENQ side chain NMR assignments in proteins from a single experiment: implications to structure-function studies.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jithender G; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2014-03-01

    Resonance assignment is the first and the most crucial step in all nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on structure-function relationships in biological macromolecules. Often, the assignment exercise has to be repeated several times when specific interactions with ligands, substrates etc., have to be elucidated for understanding the functional mechanisms. While the protein backbone serves to provide a scaffold, the side chains interact directly with the ligands. Such investigations will be greatly facilitated, if there are rapid methods for obtaining exhaustive information with minimum of NMR experimentation. In this context, we present here a pulse sequence which exploits the recently introduced technique of parallel detection of multiple nuclei, e.g. (1)H and (13)C, and results in two 3D-data sets simultaneously. These yield complete backbone resonance assignment ((1)H(N), (15)N, (13)CO, (1)Hα/(13)Cα, and (1)Hβ/(13)Cβ chemical shifts) and side chain assignment of D, E, N and Q residues. Such an exhaustive assignment has the potential of yielding accurate 3D structures using one or more of several algorithms which calculate structures of the molecules very reliably on the basis of NMR chemical shifts alone. The side chain assignments of D, E, N, and Q will be extremely valuable for interaction studies with different ligands; D and E side chains are known to be involved in majority of catalytic activities. Utility of this experiment has been demonstrated with Ca(2+) bound M-crystallin, which contains largely D, E, N and Q residues at the metal binding sites.

  11. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    PubMed Central

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies. PMID:28281640

  12. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  13. Electron-microscopic study of the structure of the surface layer in high-nitrogen 05Kh22AG15N8M2F steel after face turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the surface layer in high-nitrogen 05Kh22AG15N8M2F steel workpieces subjected to face turning is studied by electron microscopy. It is found that improved machinability by VK8 alloy cutting tools is achieved at a cutting depth of 0.25 mm and that the cutting-tool life decreases sharply when the cutting depth increases to 1 mm. A nanocrystalline structure with nanocrystal sizes from several to several tens of nanometers forms in the surface layer upon face turning in the as-cast, hot-rolled, and thermally deformed states. The structure of the surface layer is characterized by a high dislocation density and large austenite fragments with broad subgrains and deformation twins.

  14. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Wang, R.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. c2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. In-Cell Solid-State NMR: An Emerging Technique for the Study of Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Warnet, Xavier L.; Arnold, Alexandre A.; Marcotte, Isabelle; Warschawski, Dror E.

    2015-01-01

    Biological molecular processes are often studied in model systems, which simplifies their inherent complexity but may cause investigators to lose sight of the effects of the molecular environment. Information obtained in this way must therefore be validated by experiments in the cell. NMR has been used to study biological cells since the early days of its development. The first NMR structural studies of a protein inside a cell (by solution-state NMR) and of a membrane protein (by solid-state NMR) were published in 2001 and 2011, respectively. More recently, dynamic nuclear polarization, which has been used to enhance the signal in solid-state NMR, has also been applied to the study of frozen cells. Much progress has been made in the past 5 years, and in this review we take stock of this new technique, which is particularly appropriate for the study of biological membranes. PMID:26682804

  16. Fundamental studies of supported bimetallic catalysts by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Savargaonkar, Nilesh

    1996-10-17

    Various hydrogenation reactions on transition metals are important commercially whereas certain hydrogenolysis reactions are useful from fundamental point of view. Understanding the hydrogen mobility and kinetics of adsorption-desorption of hydrogen is important in understanding the mechanisms of such reactions involving hydrogen. The kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption was studied by means of selective excitation NMR on silica supported Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption was found to be lower on silica supported Pt catalysts as compared to Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. It was found that the rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Pt-Rh catalyst were similar to those on Rh catalyst and much higher as compared to Pt catalyst. The Ru-Ag bimetallic system is much simpler to study than the Pt-Rh system and serves as a model system to characterize more complicated systems such as the K/Ru system. Ag was found to decrease the amounts of adsorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen-to-ruthenium stoichiometry. Ag reduced the populations of states with low and intermediate binding energies of hydrogen on silica supported Ru catalyst. The rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption were also lower on silica supported Ru-Ag catalyst as compared to Ru catalyst. This report contains introductory information, the literature review, general conclusions, and four appendices. An additional four chapters and one appendix have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  17. NMR study of strontium binding by a micaceous mineral.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Geoffrey M; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, Sridhar; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na(4)Mg(6)Al(4)Si(4)O(20)F(4). Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 degrees C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a (1)H-(87)Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by (87)Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct (87)Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  18. NMR Study of Strontium Binding by a Micaceous Mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a 1H-87Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by 87Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct 87Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  19. Studies of Molecular Dynamics by Solid State Deuterium NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baiyi

    The rotational dynamics of molecules in a number of solid systems were followed by variable temperature deuterium (^2H), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy via changes in the spectral lineshapes and spin-lattice relaxation times (T _1). First the pure solid trimethylamine-borane adduct, (CH_3)_3NBH_3, was studied. For a methyl deuterated sample, T _1 measurements yielded two T_1 minima, 6.9 ms and 4.3 ms corresponding to the slowing of methyl and trimethyl rotation, respectively, with decreasing temperature. Activation energies for methyl and trimethyl rotation, obtained from fitting the T _1 curve as a function of temperature, were 32.8 and 15.0 kJ/mol, respectively; simulations of the spectral lineshapes gave 26.6 and 18.9 kT/mol, respectively. Fitting of the ^2H T_1 curve for the borane deuterated sample gave a BH _3 rotation activation energy of 14.1 kT/mol and a ^2H quadrupolar coupling constant, chi, of 101 kHz. The activation energy for BH_3 rotation obtained from the spectral lineshape simulations gave 12.6 kT/mol. A series of deuterated organic chalcogen cations: (CH_3)_3S^+, (CH_3)_3Se^+ and (CH_3)_3Te^+, were ion exchanged into the cavities of sodium Mordenite LZ-M5 and the dynamics of these guests within the hydrated zeolite were followed by ^2H NMR. All three undergo isotropic motion above about -80 to -90^circC. Below this temperature two superimposed ^2H powder spectra appear; the broad lineshape is consistent with only methyl rotation in a hindered, coordinated site, and the other narrow lineshape is due to both methyl and trimethyl rotation in a less hindered, uncoordinated site. As the temperature is lowered the population of the lower energy coordinated site increases. Relative peak areas yield adsorption enthalpies of 6.7, 7.8 and 10.0 kJ/mol for (CH_3)_3S^+, (CH_3)_3Se^+ and (CH_3)_3Te^+, respectively. The series of methyl deuterated ammonium and phosphonium cations: (CH_3)NH_3^+ , (CH_3)_2NH^+ , (CH_3)_3NH^+ and (CH_3)_4P^+ , were

  20. Organic matter stabilization in Cryosols of Northern Alaska - a combined NMR and NanoSIMS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, C. W.; Loeppmann, S.; Hoeschen, C.; Kao-Kniffin, J.; Bockheim, J.

    2012-04-01

    Various studies predict altered organic matter (OM) dynamics in arctic soils due to climatic change. While bulk soils react slowly to changing climate, the study of soil organic matter (SOM) fractions may offer a more detailed picture of the dynamics of differently preserved SOM pools in climate sensitive arctic regions. Due to cryoturbation, especially permafrost affected soils exhibit a structurally very heterogeneous matrix across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. However, processes controlling the stabilization and utilization of SOM happen at submicron scales. In order to combine chemical information of isolated SOM fractions and their possible role in the micro-scale architecture of Cryosols, we combined NMR spectroscopy with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Approximately 50-75% of Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain is covered with thaw lakes and drained thaw lakes that follow a 5,000 yr cycle of development (between creation and final drainage), thus forming a natural soil chronosequence. The drained thaw lakes offer the possibility to study SOM dynamics affected by permafrost processes over millennial timescales. In April 2010 we sampled 16 soil cores (including the active and permanent layer) reaching from young drained lakes (0-50 years since drainage) to ancient drained lakes (3000-5500 years since drainage). Air dried soil samples from soil horizons of the active and permanent layer were subjected to density fractionation in order to differentiate particulate OM and mineral associated OM. The chemical composition of the SOM fractions was analyzed by 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. From some soil cores, subsamples were taken and embedded in epoxy resin for further in-situ microscopic and spectrometric analyses. The NanoSIMS technology allows the simultaneous analysis of e.g. 12C-, 13C-, 12C14N-, 12C15N- and 28Si- with high sensitivity and lateral resolution. This enables the analysis of

  1. Elucidating the Structures of the Low- and High-pH Mo(V) Species in Respiratory Nitrate Reductase: A Combined EPR, (14,15)N HYSCORE, and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Julia; Biaso, Frédéric; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Toci, René; Seduk, Farida; Magalon, Axel; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Grimaldi, Stéphane

    2017-03-31

    Respiratory nitrate reductases (Nars), members of the prokaryotic Mo/W-bis Pyranopterin Guanosine dinucleotide (Mo/W-bisPGD) enzyme superfamily, are key players in nitrate respiration, a major bioenergetic pathway widely used by microorganisms to cope with the absence of dioxygen. The two-electron reduction of nitrate to nitrite takes place at their active site, where the molybdenum ion cycles between Mo(VI) and Mo(IV) states via a Mo(V) intermediate. The active site shows two distinct pH-dependent Mo(V) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals whose structure and catalytic relevance have long been debated. In this study, we use EPR and HYSCORE techniques to probe their nuclear environment in Escherichia coli Nar (EcNar). By using samples prepared at different pH and through different enrichment strategies in (98)Mo and (15)N nuclei, we demonstrate that each of the two Mo(V) species is coupled to a single nitrogen nucleus with similar quadrupole characteristics. Structure-based density functional theory calculations allow us to propose a molecular model of the low-pH Mo(V) species consistent with EPR spectroscopic data. Our results show that the metal ion is coordinated by a monodentate aspartate ligand and permit the assignment of the coupled nitrogen nuclei to the Nδ of Asn52, a residue located ∼3.9 Å to the Mo atom in the crystal structures. This is confirmed by measurements on selectively (15)N-Asn labeled EcNar. Further, we propose a Mo-O(H)···HN structure to account for the transfer of spin density onto the interacting nitrogen nucleus deduced from HYSCORE analysis. This work provides a foundation for monitoring the structure of the molybdenum active site in the presence of various substrates or inhibitors in Nars and other molybdenum enzymes.

  2. Proton-decoupled CPMG: a better experiment for measuring (15)N R2 relaxation in disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2014-04-01

    (15)N R2 relaxation is one of the most informative experiments for characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Small changes in nitrogen R2 rates are often used to determine how IDPs respond to various biologically relevant perturbations such as point mutations, posttranslational modifications and weak ligand interactions. However collecting high-quality (15)N relaxation data can be difficult. Of necessity, the samples of IDPs are often prepared with low protein concentration and the measurement time can be limited because of rapid sample degradation. Furthermore, due to hardware limitations standard experiments such as (15)N spin-lock and CPMG can sample the relaxation decay only to ca. 150ms. This is much shorter than (15)N T2 times in disordered proteins at or near physiological temperature. As a result, the sampling of relaxation decay profiles in these experiments is suboptimal, which further lowers the precision of the measurements. Here we report a new implementation of the proton-decoupled (PD) CPMG experiment which allows one to sample (15)N R2 relaxation decay up to ca. 0.5-1s. The new experiment has been validated through comparison with the well-established spin-lock measurement. Using dilute samples of denatured ubiquitin, we have demonstrated that PD-CPMG produces up to 3-fold improvement in the precision of the data. It is expected that for intrinsically disordered proteins the gains may be even more substantial. We have also shown that this sequence has a number of favorable properties: (i) the spectra are recorded with narrow linewidth in nitrogen dimension; (ii) (15)N offset correction is small and easy to calculate; (iii) the experiment is immune to various spurious effects arising from solvent exchange; (iv) the results are stable with respect to pulse miscalibration and rf field inhomogeneity; (v) with minimal change, the pulse sequence can also be used to measure R2 relaxation of (15)N(ε) spins in arginine side chains. We

  3. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  4. NMR study of small molecule adsorption in MOF-74-Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, M. G.; Canepa, Pieremanuele; Thonhauser, T.

    2013-04-01

    We calculate the carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding for CO2 and the hydrogen shieldings for both H2 and H2O inside the metal organic framework MOF-74-Mg. Our ab initio calculations are at the density functional theory level using the van der Waals including density functional vdW-DF. The shieldings are obtained while placing the small molecules throughout the structure, including the calculated adsorption site for various loading scenarios. We then explore relationships between loading, rotational and positional characteristics, and the NMR shieldings for each adsorbate. Our NMR calculations show a change in the shielding depending on adsorbate, position, and loading in a range that is experimentally observable. We further provide a simple model for the energy and the NMR shieldings throughout the cavity of the MOF. By providing this mapping of shielding to position and loading for these adsorbates, we argue that NMR probes could be used to provide additional information about the position at which these small molecules bind within the MOF, as well as the loading of the adsorbed molecule.

  5. A Deuterium NMR Study of Bent-Core Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingemans, Theo J.; Madsen, Louis A.; Samulski, Edward T.

    2002-10-01

    We have synthesized two deuterated boomerang-shaped liquid crystals based on 2,5-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (ODBP). Deuterium was introduced in the rigid 2,5-diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole core and in the aromatic ring of the terminal 4-dodecyloxyphenyl moiety using standard acid catalyzed deuterium exchange conditions. Both compounds, (4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl-d4) di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate: ODBP-d4-Ph-O-C12) and (4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl) di-4-dodecyloxy-benzoate-d4; ODBP-Ph-d4-O-C12) were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance, optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The optical textures and thermal behavior of both compounds were found to be identical to the non-deuterated analog 4,4(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl) di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate (ODBP-Ph-O-C12) which we reported earlier. These compounds exhibit behavior indicative of a biaxial nematic liquid crystal phase, which we hope to confirm using deuterium NMR spectroscopy in the next phase of this study.

  6. Vibrational and NMR probe studies of S Az-1 montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.T.; Erickson, C.; Earl, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports a study of the interactions of exchangeable metal cations with mineral surfaces using a combined spectroscopic/macroscopic approach. Objectives were to examine the use of water molecules and metal cations as molecular probes of smectite water interactions. The {nu}{sub 2} mode of water is used as a diagnostic vibrational band. An FTIR-gravimetric cell is used to examine the FTIR spectra of water on homoionic smectites. The {sup 23}Na NMR resonance is used to probe metal-water interactions on the surface. Results show that there are strong changes in both position and absorption coefficient of the H-O-H bending mode of water sorbed on SAz-1 montmorillonite as a function of water content. These changes are attributed to strong electrostatic forces and mobility changes that occur when the water in the interlammelar space is associated with the metal ion. The clay surface is viewed as having at least two distinct sites to which a hydrated Na{sup +} can bind. 32 refs, 5 figs. (DLC)

  7. Vibrational and NMR probe studies of S Az-1 montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.T.; Erickson, C. . Dept. of Soil Science); Earl, W.L. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a study of the interactions of exchangeable metal cations with mineral surfaces using a combined spectroscopic/macroscopic approach. Objectives were to examine the use of water molecules and metal cations as molecular probes of smectite water interactions. The {nu}{sub 2} mode of water is used as a diagnostic vibrational band. An FTIR-gravimetric cell is used to examine the FTIR spectra of water on homoionic smectites. The {sup 23}Na NMR resonance is used to probe metal-water interactions on the surface. Results show that there are strong changes in both position and absorption coefficient of the H-O-H bending mode of water sorbed on SAz-1 montmorillonite as a function of water content. These changes are attributed to strong electrostatic forces and mobility changes that occur when the water in the interlammelar space is associated with the metal ion. The clay surface is viewed as having at least two distinct sites to which a hydrated Na{sup +} can bind. 32 refs, 5 figs. (DLC)

  8. NMR studies of the conformational interconversion of butaclamol in solution.

    PubMed

    Casarotto, M G; Craik, D J; Lloyd, E J

    1991-07-01

    1H NMR experiments at 300 MHz have been carried out to determine the identity and study the interconversion of two conformations of butaclamol in solution. The hydrochloride salt in DMSO exists as an equilibrium mixture of two conformations, which differ in their stereochemistry about the ring junction that contains the single nitrogen atom in butaclamol. The trans form has a relative population of 80% and the cis I form 20%. In CDCl3 only the trans form is observed, while in CDCl3-DMSO mixtures, both forms are detected in a ratio (trans:cis I) that decreases as the percentage of CDCl3 decreases. For the free base in either CD2Cl2 or DMSO, only a single set of resonances is observed at room temperature, but as temperature is lowered, peaks from methine protons H4a and H13b near the ring junction broaden and (for samples in CD2Cl2) eventually split into two resonances corresponding to the cis and trans forms. It is suggested that nitrogen inversion is the dynamic process responsible for the interconversion of the two forms. Line shape analysis as a function of temperature yielded an energy barrier of 9.6 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol for the interconversion, in good agreement with values obtained from saturation transfer experiments. In the hydrochloride salt, the barrier in DMSO was somewhat higher, i.e., 17.3 +/- 0.9 kcal/mol, as determined by saturation transfer and variable-temperature measurements.

  9. Chemical Ligation of Folded Recombinant Proteins: Segmental Isotopic Labeling of Domains for NMR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Ayers, Brenda; Cowburn, David; Muir, Tom W.

    1999-01-01

    A convenient in vitro chemical ligation strategy has been developed that allows folded recombinant proteins to be joined together. This strategy permits segmental, selective isotopic labeling of the product. The src homology type 3 and 2 domains (SH3 and SH2) of Abelson protein tyrosine kinase, which constitute the regulatory apparatus of the protein, were individually prepared in reactive forms that can be ligated together under normal protein-folding conditions to form a normal peptide bond at the ligation junction. This strategy was used to prepare NMR sample quantities of the Abelson protein tyrosine kinase-SH(32) domain pair, in which only one of the domains was labeled with 15N Mass spectrometry and NMR analyses were used to confirm the structure of the ligated protein, which was also shown to have appropriate ligand-binding properties. The ability to prepare recombinant proteins with selectively labeled segments having a single-site mutation, by using a combination of expression of fusion proteins and chemical ligation in vitro, will increase the size limits for protein structural determination in solution with NMR methods. In vitro chemical ligation of expressed protein domains will also provide a combinatorial approach to the synthesis of linked protein domains.

  10. NMR study of black-phase in SmS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Yamada, H.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Haga, Y.

    2015-03-01

    We report the result of the 33S nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement on the nonmagnetic semiconductor SmS at ambient pressure. For this measurement, the 33S isotope enriched powder sample of SmS was prepared to increase the 33S NMR intensity. We have attempted 33S NMR measurement on SmS and successfully observed the signal of it. With decreasing temperature, the spectrum measured at the constant magnetic field shifted to lower frequency and became weakly temperature dependent below 50 K. The presence of the energy gap was microscopically established by the rapid decrease in the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1. The activation energy was deduced to be 625 K from an Arrhenius plot of T1.

  11. Al NMR study of molten aluminum oxide compounds and mixtures, measured at ultra high temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwowarczyk, J.; Marzke, R. F.; Wolf, G. H.; Petuskey, W. T.; Takulapalli, B.

    2002-10-01

    The technique of ultra high-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has provided insight into the chemical structure and properties of molten aluminum-bearing refractory ceramics, at temperatures in excess of 2000 ^oC. Through application of standard NMR measurements we have studied molten aluminum-bearing ceramics via ^27Al NMR. We have measured spin-lattice (T_1) and spin-spin (T_2) relaxation times, have studied Al-O-P chemical bonding within molten aluminua-monazite (Al_2O3 + LaPO_4) samples and have begun to measure Al diffusivity as a function of temperature and composition. To overcome the limitations of standard NMR heating systems a specially designed NMR probe was developed. Application of levitation technology and a laser heating system permit controlled, containerless heating of samples over a wide range of temperatures. Supported by NSF DMR 0116361, DMR 9818133 and by Research Corp. RA 0276

  12. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples.

  13. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators

    PubMed Central

    Kolehmainen, E.

    2016-01-01

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples. PMID:27374054

  14. NMR-based simulation studies of Pf1 coat protein in explicit membranes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Jo, Sunhwan; Marassi, Francesca M; Im, Wonpil

    2013-08-06

    As time- and ensemble-averaged measures, NMR observables contain information about both protein structure and dynamics. This work represents a computational study to extract such information for membrane proteins from orientation-dependent NMR observables: solid-state NMR chemical shift anisotropy and dipolar coupling, and solution NMR residual dipolar coupling. We have performed NMR-restrained molecular dynamics simulations to refine the structure of the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in explicit lipid bilayers using the recently measured chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar coupling, and residual dipolar coupling data. From the simulations, we have characterized detailed protein-lipid interactions and explored the dynamics. All simulations are stable and the NMR restraints are well satisfied. The C-terminal transmembrane (TM) domain of Pf1 finds its optimal position in the membrane quickly (within 6 ns), illustrating efficient solvation of TM domains in explicit bilayer environments. Such rapid convergence also leads to well-converged interaction patterns between the TM helix and the membrane, which clearly show the interactions of interfacial membrane-anchoring residues with the lipids. For the N-terminal periplasmic helix of Pf1, we identify a stable, albeit dynamic, helix orientation parallel to the membrane surface that satisfies the amphiphatic nature of the helix in an explicit lipid bilayer. Such detailed information cannot be obtained solely from NMR observables. Therefore, the present simulations illustrate the usefulness of NMR-restrained MD refinement of membrane protein structure in explicit membranes.

  15. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  16. 129Xe NMR studies of biochar made from biobased materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar is created by pyrolysis of biobased materials under controlled oxidative environments. The product is charcoal-like and can be used as filtration medium, sequestrant for metallic ions, soil conditioner, and other applications. In our work we have found 129Xe NMR to be an excellent technique...

  17. Ultraviolet radiation induces stress in etiolated Landoltia punctata, as evidenced by the presence of alanine, a universal stress signal: a ¹⁵N NMR study.

    PubMed

    Monselise, E B-I; Levkovitz, A; Kost, D

    2015-01-01

    Analysis with (15) N NMR revealed that alanine, a universal cellular stress signal, accumulates in etiolated duckweed plants exposed to 15-min pulsed UV light, but not in the absence of UV irradiation. The addition of 10 mm vitamin C, a radical scavenger, reduced alanine levels to zero, indicating the involvement of free radicals. Free D-alanine was detected in (15) N NMR analysis of the chiral amino acid content, using D-tartaric acid as solvent. The accumulation of D-alanine under stress conditions presents a new perspective on the biochemical processes taking place in prokaryote and eukaryote cells.

  18. Phosphopeptide binding to the N-terminal SH2 domain of the p85 alpha subunit of PI 3'-kinase: a heteronuclear NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Hensmann, M.; Booker, G. W.; Panayotou, G.; Boyd, J.; Linacre, J.; Waterfield, M.; Campbell, I. D.

    1994-01-01

    The N-terminal src-homology 2 domain of the p85 alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase (SH2-N) binds specifically to phosphotyrosine-containing sequences. Notably, it recognizes phosphorylated Tyr 751 within the kinase insert of the cytoplasmic domain of the activated beta PDGF receptor. A titration of a synthetic 12-residue phosphopeptide (ESVDY*VPMLDMK) into a solution of the SH2-N domain was monitored using heteronuclear 2D and 3D NMR spectroscopy. 2D-(15N-1H) heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) experiments were performed at each point of the titration to follow changes in both 15N and 1H chemical shifts in NH groups. When mapped onto the solution structure of the SH2-N domain, these changes indicate a peptide-binding surface on the protein. Line shape analysis of 1D profiles of individual (15N-1H)-HSQC peaks at each point of the titration suggests a kinetic exchange model involving at least 2 steps. To characterize changes in the internal dynamics of the domain, the magnitude of the (15N-1H) heteronuclear NOE for the backbone amide of each residue was determined for the SH2-N domain with and without bound peptide. These data indicate that, on a nanosecond timescale, there is no significant change in the mobility of either loops or regions of secondary structure. A mode of peptide binding that involves little conformational change except in the residues directly involved in the 2 binding pockets of the p85 alpha SH2-N domain is suggested by this study. PMID:7522724

  19. Multidimensional HRMAS NMR: a platform for in vivo studies using intact bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei

    2006-07-01

    In vivo analysis in whole cell bacteria, especially the native tertiary structures of the bacterial cell wall, remains an unconquered frontier. The current understanding of bacterial cell wall structures has been based on destructive analysis of individual components. These in vitro results may not faithfully reflect the native structural and conformational information. Multidimensional High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR (HRMAS NMR) has evolved to be a powerful technique in a variety of in vivo studies, including live bacterial cells. Existing studies of HRMAS NMR in bacteria, technical consideration of its successful application, and current limitations in studying true human pathogens are briefly reviewed in this report.

  20. sup 13 C and sup 15 N nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of the ionization state of substrates bound to bovine dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Selinsky, B.S.; Perlman, M.E.; London, R.E. ); Unkefer, C.J. ); Mitchell, J. ); Blakley, R.L. Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis )

    1990-02-06

    The state of protonation of substrates bound to mammalian dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) has significance for the mechanism of catalysis. To investigate this, dihydrofolate and dihydropteroylpentaglutamate have been synthesized with {sup 15}N enrichment at N-5. {sup 15}N NMR studies have been performed on the binary complexes formed by bovine DHFR with these compounds and with (5-{sup 15}N)dihydrobiopterin. The results indicate that there is no protonation at N-5 in the binary complexes, and this was confirmed by {sup 13}C NMR studies with folate and dihydrofolate synthesized with {sup 13}C enrichment at C-6. The chemical shift displacements produced by complex formation are in the same direction as those which result from deprotonation of the N-3/C-4-O amide group and are consistent with at least partial loss of the proton from N-3. This would be possible if, as crystallographic data indicate, there is interaction of N-3 and the 2-amino group of the bound ligands with the carboxylate of the active site glutamate residue (Glu{sup 30}).

  1. Release of nitrous oxide and dinitrogen from a transition bog under drained and rewetted conditions due to denitrification: results from a [15N]nitrate-bromide double-tracer study.

    PubMed

    Tauchnitz, Nadine; Spott, Oliver; Russow, Rolf; Bernsdorf, Sabine; Glaser, Bruno; Meissner, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification is well known being the most important nitrate-consuming process in water-logged peat soils, whereby the intermediate compound nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and the end product dinitrogen (N(2)) are ultimately released. The present study was aimed at evaluating the release of these gases (due to denitrification) from a nutrient-poor transition bog ecosystem under drained and three differently rewetted conditions at the field scale using a (15)N-tracer approach ([(15)N]nitrate application, 30 kg N ha(-1)) and a common closed-chamber technique. The drained site is characterized by a constant water table (WT) of -30 cm (here referred to as D30), while rewetted sites represent a constant WT of -15 cm, a constant WT of 0 cm (i.e. waterlogged), and an initial WT of 0 cm (which decreased slightly during the experiment), respectively, (here referred to as R15, R0, and R0(d), respectively). The highest N(2)O emissions were observed at D30 (291 µg N(2)O-N m(-2) h(-1)) as well as at R0d (665 µg N(2)O-N m(-2) h(-1)). At the rewetted peat sites with a constant WT (i.e. R15 and R0), considerably lower N2O emissions were observed (maximal 37 µg N(2)O-N m(-2) h(-1)). Concerning N(2) only at the initially water-logged peat site R0d considerable release rates (up to 3110 µg N(2)-N m(-2) h(-1)) were observed, while under drained conditions (D30) no N(2) emission and under rewetted conditions with a constant WT (R15 and R0) significantly lower N(2) release rates (maximal 668 µg N(2)-N m(-2) h(-1)) could be detected. In addition, it has been found that natural WT fluctuations at rewetted peat sites, in particular a rapid drop down of the WT, can induce high emission rates for both N(2)O and N(2).

  2. Dynamics of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N nitroxide-propylene glycol system studied by ESR and ESE in liquid and glassy state in temperature range 10-295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goslar, Janina; Hoffmann, Stanislaw K.; Lijewski, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    ESR spectra and electron spin relaxation of nitroxide radical in 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N in propylene glycol were studied at X-band in the temperature range 10-295 K. The spin-lattice relaxation in the liquid viscous state determined from the resonance line shape is governed by three mechanisms occurring during isotropic molecular reorientations. In the glassy state below 200 K the spin-lattice relaxation, phase relaxation and electron spin echo envelope modulations (ESEEM) were studied by pulse spin echo technique using 2-pulse and 3-pulse induced signals. Electron spin-lattice relaxation is governed by a single non-phonon relaxation process produced by localized oscillators of energy 76 cm-1. Electron spin dephasing is dominated by a molecular motion producing a resonance-type peak in the temperature dependence of the dephasing rate around 120 K. The origin of the peak is discussed and a simple method for the peak shape analysis is proposed, which gives the activation energy of a thermally activated motion Ea = 7.8 kJ/mol and correlation time τ0 = 10-8 s. The spin echo amplitude is strongly modulated and FT spectrum contains a doublet of lines centered around the 2D nuclei Zeeman frequency. The splitting into the doublet is discussed as due to a weak hyperfine coupling of nitroxide unpaired electron with deuterium of reorienting CD3 groups.

  3. 125Te NMR study of IrTe 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Kiyoshi; Magishi, Ko-ichi; Shinonome, Yasuaki; Saito, Takahito; Koyama, Kuniyuki; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nagata, Shoichi

    2002-03-01

    We have measured 125Te NMR of IrTe2 in order to elucidate the origin of the anomalous behaviors in electrical and magnetic properties around 270 K. In high-temperature region, the NMR spectrum exhibits a sharp line. On the other hand, in low-temperature region, the spectrum shifts to higher magnetic field and splits into three lines. Also, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, is proportional to the temperature in both temperature sides; Korringa-like behavior which is characteristic of a metallic state. From the T dependences of the spectrum and 1/T1 around 270 K, it is suggested that these anomalous behaviors may not be due to the charge density wave formation but be caused by a kind of lattice distortion at low temperature.

  4. NMR study of n-dodecane adsorbed on graphite.

    PubMed

    Alba, M D; Castro, M A; Clarke, S M; Perdigón, A C

    2003-05-01

    In this brief contribution we demonstrate that 1H and 2H NMR spectroscopy can be an effective method of investigating adsorption from liquids at the solid-liquid interface. The method is illustrated here with the adsorption of a simple alkane adsorbed on graphite, in particular the system n-dodecane and graphite at coverages of 1 and 5 monolayers. Static single-pulse proton nuclear magnetic resonance and static quadrupolar echo deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were recorded for both coverages. The experimental NMR results presented here show features clearly consistent with earlier calorimetric and neutron scattering work and demonstrate the formation of solid adsorbed layers that coexist with the bulk adsorbate with both isotopes. This ability to probe both deuterated and protonated materials simultaneously illustrates that this experimental approach can be readily extended to investigate the adsorption behaviour of multicomponent mixtures.

  5. NMR study of mesomorphic solutions of cellulose derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dayan, S.; Fried, F.; Gilli, J.M.; Sixou, P.

    1983-01-01

    Highly concentrated solutions of hydroxypropylcellulose and cellulose acetate give mesomorphic phases in a precise range of temperatures and concentrations. The existence of an orientational anisotropy in such solutions induces typical parameters of the high-resolution NMR spectra (chemical shift, splitting) that are similar to those of liquid crystal spectra. In the present work, the high-resolution NMR spectra of nuclei belonging to the solute molecules (D/sub 2/O and trifluoroacetic acid) were recorded as a function of various physical parameters such as temperature, concentration, and temporal change of the solutions. The specific variation of the orientational degree of order for each mesophase is described. In the case of the cellulose acetate/trifluoroacetic acid solution, an order parameter is calculated and a model for the orientational organization of the solution is described. 34 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  6. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    HPr and Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser{sup 46} occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser{sup 46}. HPr-Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of {sup 15}N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system.

  7. NMR studies of selective population inversion and spin clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.S.

    1986-02-01

    This work describes the development and application of selective excitation techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Composite pulses and multiple-quantum methods are used to accomplish various goals, such as broadband and narrowband excitation in liquids, and collective excitation of groups of spins in solids. These methods are applied to a variety of problems, including non-invasive spatial localization, spin cluster size characterization in disordered solids and solid state NMR imaging.

  8. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  9. Soil processes drive seasonal variation in retention of 15N tracers in a deciduous forest catchment.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Christine L; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Weiss, Marissa S; McCalley, K; Sparks, Jed P; Thomas, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal patterns of stream nitrate concentration have long been interpreted as demonstrating the central role of plant uptake in regulating stream nitrogen loss from forested catchments. Soil processes are rarely considered as important drivers of these patterns. We examined seasonal variation in N retention in a deciduous forest using three whole-ecosystem 15N tracer additions: in late April (post-snowmelt, pre-leaf-out), late July (mid-growing- season), and late October (end of leaf-fall). We expected that plant 15N uptake would peak in late spring and midsummer, that immobilization in surface litter and soil would peak the following autumn leaf-fall, and that leaching losses would vary inversely with 15N retention. Similar to most other 15N tracer studies, we found that litter and soils dominated ecosystem retention of added 15N. However, 15N recovery in detrital pools varied tremendously by season, with > 90% retention in spring and autumn and sharply reduced 15N retention in late summer. During spring, over half of the 15N retained in soil occurred within one day in the heavy (mineral-associated) soil fraction. During summer, a large decrease in 15N retention one week after addition coincided with increased losses of 15NO3- to soil leachate and seasonal increases in soil and stream NO3- concentrations, although leaching accounted for only a small fraction of the lost 15N (< 0.2%). Uptake of 15N into roots did not vary by season and accounted for < 4% of each tracer addition. Denitrification or other processes that lead to N gas loss may have consumed the rest. These measurements of 15N movement provide strong evidence for the dominant role of soil processes in regulating seasonal N retention and losses in this catchment and perhaps others with similar soils.

  10. Proton-decoupled CPMG: A better experiment for measuring 15N R2 relaxation in disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuwen, Tairan; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R.

    2014-04-01

    15N R2 relaxation is one of the most informative experiments for characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Small changes in nitrogen R2 rates are often used to determine how IDPs respond to various biologically relevant perturbations such as point mutations, posttranslational modifications and weak ligand interactions. However collecting high-quality 15N relaxation data can be difficult. Of necessity, the samples of IDPs are often prepared with low protein concentration and the measurement time can be limited because of rapid sample degradation. Furthermore, due to hardware limitations standard experiments such as 15N spin-lock and CPMG can sample the relaxation decay only to ca. 150 ms. This is much shorter than 15N T2 times in disordered proteins at or near physiological temperature. As a result, the sampling of relaxation decay profiles in these experiments is suboptimal, which further lowers the precision of the measurements. Here we report a new implementation of the proton-decoupled (PD) CPMG experiment which allows one to sample 15N R2 relaxation decay up to ca. 0.5-1 s. The new experiment has been validated through comparison with the well-established spin-lock measurement. Using dilute samples of denatured ubiquitin, we have demonstrated that PD-CPMG produces up to 3-fold improvement in the precision of the data. It is expected that for intrinsically disordered proteins the gains may be even more substantial. We have also shown that this sequence has a number of favorable properties: (i) the spectra are recorded with narrow linewidth in nitrogen dimension; (ii) 15N offset correction is small and easy to calculate; (iii) the experiment is immune to various spurious effects arising from solvent exchange; (iv) the results are stable with respect to pulse miscalibration and rf field inhomogeneity; (v) with minimal change, the pulse sequence can also be used to measure R2 relaxation of 15Nε spins in arginine side chains. We anticipate that

  11. NMR methods for in-situ biofilm metabolism studies: spatial and temporal resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Wind, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    We are developing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy, spectroscopy and combined NMR/optical techniques to the study of biofilms. Objectives include: time and depth-resolved metabolite concentrations with isotropic spatial resolution on the order of 10 microns, metabolic pathways and flux rates, mass transport and ultimately their correlation with gene expression by optical microscopy in biofilms. These methods are being developed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model system, but are equally applicable to other biofilm systems of interest. Thus, spatially resolved NMR of biofilms is expected to contribute significantly to the understanding of adherent cell metabolism.

  12. Conformational studies by 1H and 13C NMR of lisinopril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Ishi, Tomoko

    1993-10-01

    Lisinopril, N-N-[( s-1-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]- L-lysyl- L-proline) (MK-521), is an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme and a new drug for the treatment of hypertension. 1H and 13C NMR studies have shown that the s-cis equilibrium about the amide bond is strongly dependent on the configuration of the chiral centres. Vicinal coupling constants of stereochemical significance were obtained in deuterated solvent using NMR techniques. Comparison with values calculated for lisinopril using potential energy calculations and NMR show that lisinopril exists in preferred optimum conformation in solution.

  13. From precursors to non-oxide ceramics: Pyrolytic mechanisms studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmund, W.M.; Aldinger, F.; Feike, M.; Spiess, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    The pyrolysis of a poly ethylsilazane was studied using a CO{sub 2}-laser beam heated solid state MAS-NMR probe head. Chemical structures of the intermediate stages could be identified. The analogy of the pyrolysis evolution for the following two different methods could be shown: (A) in an inert gas furnace conventionally prepared and (B) laser irradiated in the NMR probe head under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions. Samples prepared by method A were studied by {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR and samples prepared by method B were studied with an appropriate cross polarization time by {sup 29}Si CP-MAS-NMR. Both experiments showed the same mechanisms for the pyrolysis as the polymer is transformed into a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/C ceramic.

  14. Isotope-Labeled Amyloids via Synthesis, Expression, and Chemical Ligation for Use in FTIR, 2D IR, and NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqi O; Grechko, Maksim; Moran, Sean D; Zanni, Martin T

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides protocols for isotope-labeling the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) involved in type II diabetes and γD-crystallin involved in cataract formation. Because isotope labeling improves the structural resolution, these protocols are useful for experiments using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), two-dimensional infrared (2D IR), and NMR spectroscopies. Our research group specializes in using 2D IR spectroscopy and isotope labeling. 2D IR spectroscopy provides structural information by measuring solvation from 2D diagonal lineshapes and vibrational couplings from cross peaks. Infrared spectroscopy can be used to study kinetics, membrane proteins, and aggregated proteins. Isotope labeling provides greater certainty in the spectral assignment, which enables new structural insights that are difficult to obtain with other methods. For amylin, we provide a protocol for (13)C/(18)O labeling backbone carbonyls at one or more desired amino acids in order to obtain residue-specific structural resolution. We also provide a protocol for expressing and purifying amylin from E. coli, which enables uniform (13)C or (13)C/(15)N labeling. Uniform labeling is useful for measuring the monomer infrared spectrum in an amyloid oligomer or fiber as well as amyloid protein bound to another polypeptide or protein, such as a chaperone or an inhibitor. In addition, our expression protocol results in 2-2.5 mg of amylin peptide per 1 L cell culture, which is a high enough yield to straightforwardly obtain the 2-10 mg needed for high resolution and solid-state NMR experiments. Finally, we provide a protocol to isotope-label either of the two domains of γD-crystallin using expressed protein ligation. Domain labeling makes it possible to resolve the structures of the two halves of the protein in FTIR and 2D IR spectra. With modifications, these strategies and protocols for isotope labeling can be applied to other amyloid polypeptides and proteins.

  15. Recent progress in solid-state NMR studies of drugs confined within drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Skorupska, Ewa; Jeziorna, Agata; Kazmierski, Slawomir; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR (SS NMR) spectroscopy in structural studies of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) embedded in different drug carriers is detailed. This article is divided into sections. The first part reports short characterization of the nanoparticles and microparticles that can be used as drug delivery systems (DDSs). The second part shows the applicability of SS NMR to study non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In this section, problems related to API-DDS interactions, morphology, local molecular dynamics, nature of inter- or intramolecular connections, and pore filling are reviewed for different drug carriers (e.g. mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), cyclodextrins, polymeric matrices and others). The third and fourth sections detail the recent applications of SS NMR for searching for antibiotics and anticancer drugs confined in zeolites, MSNs, amorphous calcium phosphate and other carriers.

  16. NMR studies on the flexibility of nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Lecroisey, A; Veron, M; Delepierre, M; Janin, J

    1997-06-01

    Human NDP kinase B, product of the nm23-H2 gene, binds DNA. It has been suggested that a helix hairpin on the protein surface, part of the nucleotide substrate binding site, could accommodate DNA binding by swinging away. The presence of flexible regions was therefore investigated by 1H NMR dynamic filtering. Although TOCSY peaks could be assigned to five residues at the N terminus of Dictyostelium NDP kinase, no flexible region was detected in the human enzyme. These data favor the idea that the protein offers different binding sites to mono- and polynucleotides.

  17. NMR Studies of Spin Decoherence in Phosphorus-doped Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Dementyev, A. E.; Liu, M.; Barrett, S. E.

    2002-03-01

    Understanding nuclear spin dynamics in Si:P is an important step(B.E. Kane, quant-ph/0003031.) towards the realization of semiconductor spin-based qubits(B.E. Kane, Nature 393, 133 (1998).). We present measurements of NMR spectra and relaxation times for both ^29Si and ^31P, in fields up to 15.3 Tesla. Our progress towards Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance(A.E. Dementyev, P.Khandelwal, N.N. Kuzma, S.E. Barrett, L.N. Pfeiffer, K.W.West, Solid State Commun. 119, 217 (2001).) (OPNMR) of Si:P will be described.

  18. NMR study of seven coumarins from mammea siamensis.

    PubMed

    Prachyawarakorn, V; Mahidol, C; Ruchirawat, S

    2000-01-01

    Seven known mammea coumarins, mammea A/AA cyclo D ( 1 ), mammea A/AD cyclo D ( 2 ), mammea A/AB cyclo D ( 3 ), mammea A/AC cyclo F ( 4 ), mam-mea A/AB cyclo F ( 5 ), mammea A/AA cyclo F ( 6 ), mammea B/AC cyclo F ( 7 ), were isolated for the first time from the hexane extract of Mammea siamensis . A detailed analysis of both 1D and 2D NMR spectral data of these compounds was made.

  19. An NMR probe for the study of aerobic suspensions of cells and organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Balaban, R.S.; Gadian, D.G.; Radda, G.K.; Wong, G.G.

    1981-09-15

    The construction of an NMR probe and cell chamber with good mixing, pH buffering, and oxygenation characteristics, which can be used for relatively dilute cell and organelle suspension is described. The /sup 31/P NMR spectra of acceptable signal-to-noise ratios are obtained from approximately 200 mg (protein) of tissues, and kinetic studies of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are demonstrated. Representative spectra from rabbit kidney cortical tubules and rabbit kidney cortical mitochondria are presented.

  20. 119 Sn NMR studies on the heavy fermion compound CeSn3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, John; Kim, Andrew; Klavins, Peter; Curro, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    CeSn3 does not exhibit long-range order at low temperatures, thus it provides an interesting baseline for NMR studies of the Knight shift. We report the synthesis and characterization of single crystals of CeSn3, as well as 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements from 4.5K to room temperature. Our data reveal a broad peak in the knight shift (K) at Tmax ~ 135K, and a knight shift anomaly at T* ~ 85K.

  1. Multiple-quantum NMR studies of spin clusters in liquid crystals and zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1991-07-01

    This work will describe the use of MQ NMR to study spin clusters in anisotropic materials. A technique known as multiple-quantum spin counting was used to determine average spin cluster sizes liquid crystalline materials and in faujacitic zeolites containing aromatic hydrocarbons. The first half of the thesis will describe MQ NMR and the MQ spin counting technique, and the second half of the thesis will describe the actual experiments and their results.

  2. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite - Gelatine Mesocrystals.

    PubMed

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-10-30

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite-gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO4(3-) groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals.

  3. Positional isotope exchange studies on enzyme using NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    The isotopically enriched compounds, /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and /sup 18/O bridge-labeled pyrophosphate, synthesized previously in this laboratory, were used to investigate and measure the exchange vs. turnover of substrates and products from their central complexes in four selected enzyme systems. Using hi-field /sup 31/P NMR, we were able to differentiate between /sup 18/O labeled in the bridge vs. the non-bridge positions by virtue of the isotope shift upon the phosphorus nuclei. The bridge to non-bridge scrambling of the label was quantitated and the exchange vs. turnover ratios under a variety of conditions was determined. Using the substrate inhibitor carboxycreatinine, PIX experiments with /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and creatine kinase were conducted. It was shown that carboxycreatinine and creatine kinase promoted exchange of the /sup 18/O label as determined by NMR. We have concluded that carboxycreatinine is either a substrate that catalyzes very slow turnover or it catalyzes exchange by a dissociative (SN/sub 1//sub P/) type of mechanism

  4. NMR study of CeTe at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderer, J.; Weyeneth, S. M.; Weller, M.; Gavilano, J. L.; Felder, E.; Hulliger, F.; Ott, H. R.

    2006-05-01

    We present 125Te NMR measurements on CeTe powder at temperatures between 1 and 150 K and in magnetic fields between 5 and 8 T. CeTe is a rocksalt-type intermetallic compound. It orders antiferromagnetically at TN≈2.2 K with a much reduced ordered moment [H.R. Ott, J.K. Kjems, F. Hulliger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42 20 (1979) 1378]. From our low-temperature NMR spectra we infer the presence of at least three inequivalent Te sites at low temperatures. Considering the crystal structure this result is completely unexpected. The linewidths and the Knight shifts of the individual lines are significantly different and increase substantially with decreasing temperature. They follow the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility above 20 K. Above TN, hyperfine fields of 1.6, 0.8 and 0.0 T at the three Te sites per Bohr magneton of Ce moment are deduced from Knight shift vs. magnetic susceptibility data. These values are typical for transferred hyperfine fields via conduction electrons.

  5. Dynamical properties of confined supercooled water: an NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Faraone, Antonio; Liu, Li; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2006-09-01

    We report a set of dynamical data of confined water measured in a very deeply supercooled regime (290-190 K). Water is contained in silica matrices (MCM-41-S) which consist of 1D cylindrical pores with diameters d = 14,18 and 24 Å. When confined in these tubular pores, water does not crystallize, and can be supercooled well below 200 K. We use the NMR technique to obtain the characteristic proton relaxation time-constants (the spin-lattice relaxation time-constant T1 and the spin-spin relaxation time-constant T2) and a direct measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient in the whole temperature range. We give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) at TL = 225 K from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient. A combination of the NMR self-diffusion coefficient with the average translational relaxation time, as measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, shows a well defined decoupling of transport coefficients, i.e. the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, on approaching the crossover temperature TL.

  6. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite - Gelatine Mesocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-10-01

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite—gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO43- groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals.

  7. Cell-free protein production for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2012-01-01

    The cell-free expression system using an Escherichia coli extract is a practical method for producing isotope-labeled proteins. The advantage of the cell-free system over cellular expression is that any isotope-labeled amino acid can be incorporated into the target protein with minimal scrambling, thus providing opportunities for advanced isotope labeling of proteins. We have modified the standard protocol for E. coli cell-free expression to cope with two problems specific to NMR sample preparation. First, endogenous amino acids present in the E. coli S30 extract lead to dilution of the added isotope. To minimize the content of the remaining amino acids, a gel filtration step is included in the preparation of the E. coli extract. Second, proteins produced by the cell-free system are not necessarily homogeneous due to incomplete processing of the N-terminal formyl-methionine residue, which complicates NMR spectra. Therefore, the protein of interest is engineered to contain a cleavable N-terminal histidine-tag, which generates a homogeneous protein after the digestion of the tag. Here, we describe the protocol for modified E. coli cell-free expression.

  8. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite – Gelatine Mesocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite—gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO43− groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals. PMID:26515127

  9. Compound-specific δ15N amino acid measurements in littoral mussels in the California upwelling ecosystem: a new approach to generating baseline δ15N Isoscapes for coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ(15)N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ(15)N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ(15)N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ(15)N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼ 7‰ to ∼ 12‰, R(2) = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ(15)N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ(15)N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ(15)N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with (15)N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ(15)N values of phenylalanine (δ(15)NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ(15)N values. We hypothesize δ(15)N(Phe) values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ(15)N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ(15)N(Phe) values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ(15)N values. We propose that δ(15)N(Phe) isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ(15)N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives.

  10. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of 1H and 13C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs.

  11. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P

    2016-01-15

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs.

  12. NMR relaxometry as a versatile tool to study Li ion dynamics in potential battery materials.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; Kunze, M; Sreeraj, P; Wiemhöfer, H D; Thangadurai, V; Wilkening, M; Heitjans, P

    2012-04-01

    NMR spin relaxometry is known to be a powerful tool for the investigation of Li(+) dynamics in (non-paramagnetic) crystalline and amorphous solids. As long as significant structural changes are absent in a relatively wide temperature range, with NMR spin-lattice (as well as spin-spin) relaxation measurements information on Li self-diffusion parameters such as jump rates and activation energies are accessible. Diffusion-induced NMR relaxation rates are governed by a motional correlation function describing the ion dynamics present. Besides the mean correlation rate of the dynamic process, the motional correlation function (i) reflects deviations from random motion (so-called correlation effects) and (ii) gives insights into the dimensionality of the hopping process. In favorable cases, i.e., when temperature- and frequency-dependent NMR relaxation rates are available over a large dynamic range, NMR spin relaxometry is able to provide a comprehensive picture of the relevant Li dynamic processes. In the present contribution, we exemplarily present two recent variable-temperature (7)Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation studies focussing on Li(+) dynamics in crystalline ion conductors which are of relevance for battery applications, viz. Li(7) La(3)Zr(2)O(12) and Li(12)Si(7).

  13. Protein folding and unfolding studied at atomic resolution by fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schanda, Paul; Forge, Vincent; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2007-07-03

    Atom-resolved real-time studies of kinetic processes in proteins have been hampered in the past by the lack of experimental techniques that yield sufficient temporal and atomic resolution. Here we present band-selective optimized flip-angle short transient (SOFAST) real-time 2D NMR spectroscopy, a method that allows simultaneous observation of reaction kinetics for a large number of nuclear sites along the polypeptide chain of a protein with an unprecedented time resolution of a few seconds. SOFAST real-time 2D NMR spectroscopy combines fast NMR data acquisition techniques with rapid sample mixing inside the NMR magnet to initiate the kinetic event. We demonstrate the use of SOFAST real-time 2D NMR to monitor the conformational transition of alpha-lactalbumin from a molten globular to the native state for a large number of amide sites along the polypeptide chain. The kinetic behavior observed for the disappearance of the molten globule and the appearance of the native state is monoexponential and uniform along the polypeptide chain. This observation confirms previous findings that a single transition state ensemble controls folding of alpha-lactalbumin from the molten globule to the native state. In a second application, the spontaneous unfolding of native ubiquitin under nondenaturing conditions is characterized by amide hydrogen exchange rate constants measured at high pH by using SOFAST real-time 2D NMR. Our data reveal that ubiquitin unfolds in a gradual manner with distinct unfolding regimes.

  14. Molecular dynamics of solid cortisol studied by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, E. R.

    Polycrystalline cortisol (hydrocortisone; 11β,17α,21-trihydroxy-4-preg- nene-3,20-dione; C21H30O5) has been investigated by continuous and pulse proton NMR methods between 78 and 400 K at Larmor frequencies of 7, 25 and 60 MHz. A reduced value of second moment was found above 90 K and is ascribed to reorientation of two methyl groups. A single asymmetric minimum was found in the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation times and this also is attributed to reorientation of two methyl groups. The asymmetry suggests an asymmetric distribution of correlation times of the motion. Using the Cole-Davidson distribution, the best computer fit yields the following parameters characterizing the motion: Ea = 11ṡ8 ± 0ṡ1 kJ mol-1, τ0 = 4ṡ6 ± 0ṡ4) x 10-13s, distribution parameter δ = 0ṡ62.

  15. NMR conformational properties of an Anthrax Lethal Factor domain studied by multiple amino acid-selective labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vourtsis, Dionysios J.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Pairas, George; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A polypeptide, N-ALF{sub 233}, was overexpressed in E. coli and successfully isolated. • We produced {sup 2}H/{sup 15}N/{sup 13}C labeled protein samples. • Amino acid selective approaches were applied. • We acquired several heteronuclear NMR spectra, to complete the backbone assignment. • Prediction of the secondary structure was performed. - Abstract: NMR-based structural biology urgently needs cost- and time-effective methods to assist both in the process of acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra and their subsequent analysis. Especially for bigger proteins (>20 kDa) selective labeling is a frequently used means of sequence-specific assignment. In this work we present the successful overexpression of a polypeptide of 233 residues, corresponding to the structured part of the N-terminal domain of Anthrax Lethal Factor, using Escherichia coli expression system. The polypeptide was subsequently isolated in pure, soluble form and analyzed structurally by solution NMR spectroscopy. Due to the non-satisfying quality and resolution of the spectra of this 27 kDa protein, an almost complete backbone assignment became feasible only by the combination of uniform and novel amino acid-selective labeling schemes. Moreover, amino acid-type selective triple-resonance NMR experiments proved to be very helpful.

  16. Pulsed NMR study of the curing process of epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Hiroki; Tanaka, Chikako; Yaginuma, Michiko; Shinohara, Emi; Asano, Atsushi; Kurotsu, Takuzo

    2008-07-01

    To analyze a curing process of epoxy resin in terms of molecular motion, we adapted a pulsed NMR method. Three kinds of (1)H spin-spin relaxation times (T(2L) (long), T(2S) (short) and T(2M) (intermediate)) were estimated from observed solid echo train signals as the curing process proceeded. A short T(2S) value below 20 micros suggests the existence of a motion-restricted chain, that is, cured elements of resin, and its fraction, P(S), sigmoidally increased with the curing time. On the other hand, the fraction of T(2L), P(L), decreased with the reaction time reciprocally against P(S), suggesting the disappearance of highly mobile molecules raised from pre-cured resin. The spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), was also measured to check another aspect of molecular motion in the process. T(1) of the mixed epoxy resin and curing agent gradually increased just after mixing both of them. This corresponds to an increment of a less-mobile fraction, of which the correction time is more than 10(-6) s, and also means that the occurrence of a network structure whose mobility is strongly restricted by chemically bonded bridges between the epoxy resin and curing agent. The time courses of these parameters coincided with those of IR peaks pertinent to the curing reaction. Therefore, pulsed NMR is a useful tool to monitor the hardening process of epoxy resin in real time non-distractively in terms of the molecular motion of protons.

  17. Nitrate reductase 15N discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Aspergillus niger, Pichea angusta, and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Eli; Yarnes, Chris; Toney, Michael D.; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Stable 15N isotopes have been used to examine movement of nitrogen (N) through various pools of the global N cycle. A central reaction in the cycle involves the reduction of nitrate (NO−3) to nitrite (NO−2) catalyzed by nitrate reductase (NR). Discrimination against 15N by NR is a major determinant of isotopic differences among N pools. Here, we measured in vitro 15N discrimination by several NRs purified from plants, fungi, and a bacterium to determine the intrinsic 15N discrimination by the enzyme and to evaluate the validity of measurements made using 15N-enriched NO−3. Observed NR isotope discrimination ranged from 22 to 32‰ (kinetic isotope effects of 1.022–1.032) among the different isozymes at natural abundance 15N (0.37%). As the fractional 15N content of substrate NO−3 increased from natural abundance, the product 15N fraction deviated significantly from that expected based on substrate enrichment and 15N discrimination measured at natural abundance. Additionally, isotopic discrimination by denitrifying bacteria used to reduce NO−3 and NO−2 in some protocols became a greater source of error as 15N enrichment increased. We briefly discuss potential causes of the experimental artifacts with enriched 15N and recommend against the use of highly enriched 15N tracers to study N discrimination in plants or soils. PMID:25071800

  18. Preparation and characterization of 15N-enriched, size-defined heparan sulfate precursor oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sigulinsky, Crystal; Babu, Ponnusamy; Victor, Xylophone V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    We report the preparation of size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides from Escherichia coli-derived 15N-enriched N-acetylheparosan. Optimized growth conditions of E. coli in minimal media containing 15NH4Cl yielded [15N]N-acetylheparosan on a preparative scale. Depolymerization of [15N]N-acetylheparosan by heparitinase I yielded resolvable, even-numbered oligosaccharides ranging from disaccharide to icosaccharide. Anion-exchange chromatography-assisted fractionation afforded size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides identifiable by ESI-TOFMS. These isotopically labeled oligosaccharides will prove to be valuable research tools for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of heparin and heparan sulfate oligosaccharides and for the study of their structural biology. PMID:19945695

  19. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of selectively ¹³C/¹⁵N-labeled RNA for NMR structural and dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Luigi J; Longhini, Andrew P; LeBlanc, Regan M; Chen, Bin; Kreutz, Christoph; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2014-01-01

    RNAs are an important class of cellular regulatory elements, and they are well characterized by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in their folded or bound states. However, the apo or unfolded states are more difficult to characterize by either method. Particularly, effective NMR spectroscopy studies of RNAs in the past were hampered by chemical shift overlap of resonances and associated rapid signal loss due to line broadening for RNAs larger than the median size found in the PDB (~25 nt); most functional riboswitches are bigger than this median size. Incorporation of selective site-specific (13)C/(15)N-labeled nucleotides into RNAs promises to overcome this NMR size limitation. Unlike previous isotopic enrichment methods such as phosphoramidite, de novo, uniform-labeling, and selective-biomass approaches, this newer chemical-enzymatic selective method presents a number of advantages for producing labeled nucleotides over these other methods. For example, total chemical synthesis of nucleotides, followed by solid-phase synthesis of RNA using phosphoramidite chemistry, while versatile in incorporating isotope labels into RNA at any desired position, faces problems of low yields (<10%) that drop precipitously for oligonucleotides larger than 50 nt. The alternative method of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis of NTPs is also a robust technique, with modest yields of up to 45%, but it comes at the cost of using 16 enzymes, expensive substrates, and difficulty in making some needed labeling patterns such as selective labeling of the ribose C1' and C5' and the pyrimidine nucleobase C2, C4, C5, or C6. Biomass-produced, uniformly or selectively labeled NTPs offer a third method, but suffer from low overall yield per labeled input metabolite and isotopic scrambling with only modest suppression of (13)C-(13)C couplings. In contrast to these four methods, our current chemo-enzymatic approach overcomes most of these shortcomings and allows

  20. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  1. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu; Morishita, Ryo; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially {sup 15}N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [{sup 1}H, {sup 15}N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has

  2. NMR study of the reversible trapping of SF6 by cucurbit[6]uril in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Locci, Emanuela; Lai, Adolfo; Luhmer, Michel

    2008-11-27

    The complexation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), a highly potent greenhouse gas, by cucurbit[6]uril (CB) was studied at various temperatures in Na(2)SO(4) aqueous solutions by (19)F and (1)H NMR. CB shows a remarkable affinity for SF(6), suggesting that it is a suitable molecular container for the design of materials tailored for SF(6) trapping. At 298 K, the equilibrium constant characterizing the inclusion of SF(6) by CB is 3.1 x 10(4) M(-1) and the residence time of SF(6) within the CB cavity is estimated to be of the order of a few seconds. The enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy of encapsulation were determined and are discussed. This work also reports on the interest of SF(6) in the framework of the spin-spy methodology. The advantages and drawbacks of solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) with respect to (129)Xe NMR are discussed. SF(6) comes forward as a versatile and informative spin-spy molecule for probing systems in solution because its detection limit by (19)F NMR reaches the micromolar range with standard equipment and because quantitative integral measurements, relaxation time measurements, and demanding experiments, such as translational diffusion coefficient measurements, are easily carried out in addition to chemical shift measurements. Solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) emerges as a promising alternative to (129)Xe NMR for probing cavities and for other applications relying on the encapsulation of an NMR active gaseous probe.

  3. NMR studies in chemistry. I. Organometallic tin and geramanium compounds. II. The sorbitol pathway in intact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized in the study of two very different chemical problems. The bonding and structure of various cyclopropyl derivatives of tin and germanium has been investigated by means of Sn-119, Ge-73, C-13, and H-1 NMR spectroscopy. Intact rabbit lenses have also been studied using NMR spectroscopy with regard to diabetic cataract formation. C-13 and P-31 NMR spectroscopies have been utilized in the study of the sorbitol pathway and aldose reductase inhibition.

  4. Three centered hydrogen bonds of the type C=O···H(N)···X-C in diphenyloxamide derivatives involving halogens and a rotating CF3 group: NMR, QTAIM, NCI and NBO studies.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipriya, A; Rama Chaudhari, Sachin; Shahi, Abhishek; Arunan, E; Suryaprakash, N

    2015-03-21

    The existence of three centered C=O···H(N)···X-C hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving organic fluorine and other halogens in diphenyloxamide derivatives has been explored by NMR spectroscopy and quantum theoretical studies. The three centered H-bond with the participation of a rotating CF3 group and the F···H-N intramolecular hydrogen bonds, a rare observation of its kind in organofluorine compounds, has been detected. It is also unambiguously established by a number of one and two dimensional NMR experiments, such as temperature perturbation, solvent titration, (15)N-(1)H HSQC, and (19)F-(1)H HOESY, and is also confirmed by theoretical calculations, such as quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), natural bond orbital (NBO) and non-covalent interaction (NCI).

  5. 15N Content Reflects Development of Mycorrhizae and Nitrogen Dynamics During Primary Succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Jumpponen, A.

    2004-05-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous symbionts on terrestrial plants that are particularly important for plant nitrogen nutrition. 15N content appears to be a useful marker of the mycorrhizal role in plant nitrogen supply because of an apparent fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from mycorrhizal fungi to host plants. Because plants developing during primary succession are gradually colonized by mycorrhizal fungi, such situations provide good opportunities to study interactions between mycorrhizal colonization and plant 15N content. Here, we present results of a study of nitrogen isotope patterns in ecosystem components during the first 100 years of ecosystem development after glacial retreat, and compare those patterns with those on adjacent mature terrain. Soils in primary succession were depleted in 15N relative to nitrogen-fixing plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants generally colonized by ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, or arbuscular fungi showed similar 15N content very early in succession (-4 to -6‰ ), corresponding to low colonization levels of all plant species. Subsequent colonization of evergreen plants by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid fungi led to a 5-6‰ decline in 15N content, indicating transfer of 15N-depleted N from fungi to plants. The values recorded (-10 to -14‰ ) are among the lowest yet observed in vascular plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi did not decline in 15N content. Most ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi were similar in 15N content in early succession (-1 to -3‰ ), with the notable exception of ectomycorrhizal fungi suspected of proteolytic capabilities, which were 15N enriched relative to all other fungi. 15N contents in both plants and soil from the mature site were 5‰ greater than in recently exposed sites. We conclude that 1) the primary nitrogen source to this ecosystem must be atmospheric deposition, 2) low plant 15N content generally corresponds with greater

  6. The degree of urbanization across the globe is not reflected in the δ(15)N of seagrass leaves.

    PubMed

    Christiaen, Bart; Bernard, Rebecca J; Mortazavi, Behzad; Cebrian, Just; Ortmann, Alice C

    2014-06-30

    Many studies show that seagrass δ(15)N ratios increase with the amount of urbanization in coastal watersheds. However, there is little information on the relationship between urbanization and seagrass δ(15)N ratios on a global scale. We performed a meta-analysis on seagrass samples from 79 independent locations to test if seagrass δ(15)N ratios correlate with patterns of population density and fertilizer use within a radius of 10-200 km around the sample locations. Our results show that seagrass δ(15)N ratios are more influenced by intergeneric and latitudinal differences than the degree of urbanization or the amount of fertilizer used in nearby watersheds. The positive correlation between seagrass δ(15)N ratios and latitude hints at an underlying pattern in discrimination or a latitudinal gradient in the (15)N isotopic signature of nitrogen assimilated by the plants. The actual mechanisms responsible for the correlation between δ(15)N and latitude remain unknown.

  7. Calcium binding by phosphatidylserine headgroups. Deuterium NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, M; Bloom, M

    1991-01-01

    The binding of calcium to headgroup deuterated 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine (POPS) was investigated by using deuterium magnetic resonance in pure POPS membranes and in mixed 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/POPS 5:1 (m:m) bilayers. Addition of CaCl2 to pure POPS bilayers led to two component spectra attributed, respectively, to liquid-crystallin POPS (less than 15 kHz) and POPS molecules in the calcium-induced dehydrated phase (cochleate) (approximately 120 kHz). The liquid-crystalline component has nearly disappeared at a Ca2+ to POPS ratio of 0.5, indicating that, under such conditions, most of the POPS molecules are in the precipitated cochleate phase. After dilution of the POPS molecules in zwitterionic POPC membranes (POPC/POPS 5:1 m:m), single component spectra characteristic of POPS in the liquid-crystalline state were observed in the presence of Molar concentrations of calcium ions (Ca2+ to POPS ratio greater than 50), showing that the amount of dehydrated cochleate PS-Ca2+ phase, if any, was low (less than 5%) under such conditions. Deuterium NMR data obtained in the 15-50 degrees C temperature range with the mixed PC/PS membranes, either in the absence or the presence of Ca2+ ions, indicate that the serine headgroup undergoes a temperature-induced conformational change, independent of the presence of Ca2+. This is discussed in relation to other headgroup perturbations such as that observed upon change of the membrane surface charge density. PMID:1883944

  8. 2H NMR studies of glycerol dynamics in protein matrices.

    PubMed

    Herbers, C R; Sauer, D; Vogel, M

    2012-03-28

    We use (2)H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the rotational motion of glycerol molecules in matrices provided by the connective tissue proteins elastin and collagen. Analyzing spin-lattice relaxation, line-shape properties, and stimulated-echo decays, we determine the rates and geometries of the motion as a function of temperature and composition. It is found that embedding glycerol in an elastin matrix leads to a mild slowdown of glycerol reorientation at low temperatures and glycerol concentrations, while the effect vanishes at ambient temperatures or high solvent content. Furthermore, it is observed that the nonexponential character of the rotational correlation functions is much more prominent in the elastin matrix than in the bulk liquid. Results from spin-lattice relaxation and line shape measurements indicate that, in the mixed systems, the strong nonexponentiality is in large part due to the existence of distributions of correlation times, which are broader on the long-time flank and, hence, more symmetric than in the neat system. Stimulated-echo analysis of slow glycerol dynamics reveals that, when elastin is added, the mechanism for the reorientation crosses over from small-angle jump dynamics to large-angle jump dynamics and the geometry of the motion changes from isotropic to anisotropic. The results are discussed against the background of present and previous findings for glycerol and water dynamics in various protein matrices and compared with observations for other dynamically highly asymmetric mixtures so as to ascertain in which way the viscous freezing of a fast component in the matrix of a slow component differs from the glassy slowdown in neat supercooled liquids.

  9. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  10. 2H NMR studies of glycerol dynamics in protein matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbers, C. R.; Sauer, D.; Vogel, M.

    2012-03-01

    We use 2H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the rotational motion of glycerol molecules in matrices provided by the connective tissue proteins elastin and collagen. Analyzing spin-lattice relaxation, line-shape properties, and stimulated-echo decays, we determine the rates and geometries of the motion as a function of temperature and composition. It is found that embedding glycerol in an elastin matrix leads to a mild slowdown of glycerol reorientation at low temperatures and glycerol concentrations, while the effect vanishes at ambient temperatures or high solvent content. Furthermore, it is observed that the nonexponential character of the rotational correlation functions is much more prominent in the elastin matrix than in the bulk liquid. Results from spin-lattice relaxation and line shape measurements indicate that, in the mixed systems, the strong nonexponentiality is in large part due to the existence of distributions of correlation times, which are broader on the long-time flank and, hence, more symmetric than in the neat system. Stimulated-echo analysis of slow glycerol dynamics reveals that, when elastin is added, the mechanism for the reorientation crosses over from small-angle jump dynamics to large-angle jump dynamics and the geometry of the motion changes from isotropic to anisotropic. The results are discussed against the background of present and previous findings for glycerol and water dynamics in various protein matrices and compared with observations for other dynamically highly asymmetric mixtures so as to ascertain in which way the viscous freezing of a fast component in the matrix of a slow component differs from the glassy slowdown in neat supercooled liquids.

  11. Combining DNP NMR with segmental and specific labeling to study a yeast prion protein strain that is not parallel in-register.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Kendra K; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Caporini, Marc A; Andreas, Loren B; Debelouchina, Galia T; Griffin, Robert G; Lindquist, Susan

    2017-04-04

    The yeast prion protein Sup35NM is a self-propagating amyloid. Despite intense study, there is no consensus on the organization of monomers within Sup35NM fibrils. Some studies point to a β-helical arrangement, whereas others suggest a parallel in-register organization. Intermolecular contacts are often determined by experiments that probe long-range heteronuclear contacts for fibrils templated from a 1:1 mixture of (13)C- and (15)N-labeled monomers. However, for Sup35NM, like many large proteins, chemical shift degeneracy limits the usefulness of this approach. Segmental and specific isotopic labeling reduce degeneracy, but experiments to measure long-range interactions are often too insensitive. To limit degeneracy and increase experimental sensitivity, we combined specific and segmental isotopic labeling schemes with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR. Using this combination, we examined an amyloid form of Sup35NM that does not have a parallel in-register structure. The combination of a small number of specific labels with DNP NMR enables determination of architectural information about polymeric protein systems.

  12. N-H...F hydrogen bonds in fluorinated benzanilides: NMR and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha Reddy, G N; Vasantha Kumar, M V; Guru Row, T N; Suryaprakash, N

    2010-10-28

    Using (19)F and (1)H-NMR (with (14)N decoupling) spectroscopic techniques together with density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, we have investigated weak molecular interactions in isomeric fluorinated benzanilides. Simultaneous presence of through space nuclear spin-spin couplings ((1h)J(N-HF)) of diverse strengths and feeble structural fluctuations are detected as a function of site specific substitution of fluorine atoms within the basic identical molecular framework. The transfer of hydrogen bonding interaction energies through space is established by perturbing their strengths and monitoring the effect on NMR parameters. Multiple quantum (MQ) excitation, up to the highest possible MQ orders of coupled protons, is utilized as a tool for accurate (1)H assignments. Results of NMR studies and DFT calculations are compared with the relevant structural parameters taken from single crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  13. Practical applications of hydrostatic pressure to refold proteins from inclusion bodies for NMR structural studies.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Kenji; Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Saio, Tomohide; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Torikai, Shinnosuke; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the hydrostatic pressure refolding method was reported as a practical tool for solubilizing and refolding proteins from inclusion bodies; however, there have been only a few applications for protein structural studies. Here, we report the successful applications of the hydrostatic pressure refolding method to refold proteins, including the MOE-2 tandem zinc-finger, the p62 PB1 domain, the GCN2 RWD domain, and the mTOR FRB domain. Moreover, the absence of aggregation and the correct folding of solubilized protein samples were evaluated with size exclusion chromatography and NMR experiments. The analyses of NMR spectra for MOE-2 tandem zinc-finger and GCN2 RWD further led to the determination of tertiary structures, which are consistent with those from soluble fractions. Overall, our results indicate that the hydrostatic pressure method is effective for preparing samples for NMR structural studies.

  14. Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Haruhiro; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin (OXT) in phosphate buffer was elucidated by one-dimensional (1D)- and two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques, which involve the assignment of peptide amide NH protons and carbamoyl NH(2) protons. The (1)H-(15)N correlation of seven amide NH protons and three carbamoyl NH(2) protons were also shown by HSQC NMR of OXT without (15)N enrichment.

  15. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles.

  16. Mechanical Behavior of Polymer Gels for RDCs and RCSAs Collection: NMR Imaging Study of Buckling Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Hellemann, Erich; Teles, Rubens R; Hallwass, Fernando; Barros, W; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Gil, Roberto R

    2016-11-07

    Anisotropic NMR parameters, such as residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), residual chemical shift anisotropies (RCSAs) and residual quadrupolar couplings (RQCs or ΔνQ ), appear in solution-state NMR when the molecules under study are subjected to a degree of order. The tunable alignment by reversible compression/relaxation of gels (PMMA and p-HEMA) is an easy, user-friendly, and very affordable method to measure them. When using this method, a fraction of isotropic NMR signals is observed in the NMR spectra, even at a maximum degree of compression. To explain the origin of these isotropic signals we decided to investigate their physical location inside the NMR tube using deuterium 1D imaging and MRI micro-imaging experiments. It was observed that after a certain degree of compression the gels start to buckle and they generate pockets of isotropic solvent, which are never eliminated. The amount of buckling depends on the amount of cross-linker and the length of the gel.

  17. 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectral studies of some Schiff bases derived from 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole.

    PubMed

    Issa, Y M; Hassib, H B; Abdelaal, H E

    2009-11-01

    Heterocyclic Schiff bases derived from 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole and different substituted aromatic aldehydes are prepared and subjected to (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and mass spectral analyses. (1)H NMR spectra in DMSO exhibit a sharp singlet within the 9.35-8.90ppm region which corresponds to the azomethine proton. The position of this signal is largely dependent on the nature of the substituents on the benzal moiety. It is observed that the shape, position and the integration value of the signal of the aromatic proton of the triazole ring ((5)C) are clearly affected by the rate of exchange, relaxation time, concentration of solution as well as the solvent used. (13)C NMR is taken as substantial support for the results reached from (1)H NMR studies. The mass spectral results are taken as a tool to confirm the structure of the investigated compounds. The base peak (100%), mostly the M-1 peak, indicates the facile loss of hydrogen radical. The fragmentation pattern of the unsubstituted Schiff base is taken as the general scheme. Differences in the other schemes result from the effect of the electronegativity of the substituents attached to the aromatic ring.

  18. NMR-BASED METABOLOMIC STUDIES OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION IN SMALL FISH MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics is now being widely used to obtain complementary information to genomic and proteomic studies. Among the various approaches used in metabolomics, NMR spectroscopy is particularly powerful, in part because it is relatively non-selective, and is amenable to the study o...

  19. NMR observation of Tau in Xenopus oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodart, Jean-François; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Amniai, Laziza; Leroy, Arnaud; Landrieu, Isabelle; Rousseau-Lescuyer, Arlette; Vilain, Jean-Pierre; Lippens, Guy

    2008-06-01

    The observation by NMR spectroscopy of microinjected 15N-labelled proteins into Xenopus laevis oocytes might open the way to link structural and cellular biology. We show here that embedding the oocytes into a 20% Ficoll solution maintains their structural integrity over extended periods of time, allowing for the detection of nearly physiological protein concentrations. We use these novel conditions to study the neuronal Tau protein inside the oocytes. Spectral reproducibility and careful comparison of the spectra of Tau before and after cell homogenization is presented. When injecting Tau protein into immature oocytes, we show that both its microtubule association and different phosphorylation events can be detected.

  20. 125Te and 139La NMR Studies of Single Crystal LaTe3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Michioka, Chishiro; Itoh, Yutaka; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi

    2007-12-01

    We report 125Te and 139La NMR studies for single crystals of LaTe3 between 10 and 160 K under an applied field of H = 7.4841 T. We observed the broad 125Te(1) NMR signals of metallic Te(1) sheets with a superlattice modulation and the sharp 125Te(2) and 139La NMR signals of LaTe(2) bi-layers. Temperature dependence of 125Te(1) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times of the modulated Te(1) sheets obeys a modified Korringa relation. The results indicate that the electronic state on the Te(1) sheets is a Landau-Fermi liquid on a misfit superlattice or a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid in a two-dimensional charge-density wave ordering state.

  1. Molecular motion of micellar solutes: a /sup 13/C NMR relaxation study

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, R.E.; Kasakevich, M.L.; Granger, J.W.

    1982-02-04

    A series of simple NMR relaxation experiments have been performed on nitrobenzene and aniline dissolved in the ionic detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Using /sup 13/C relaxation rates at various molecular sites, and comparing data obtained in organic media with those for micellar solutions, the viscosity at the solubilization site was estimated and a detailed picture of motional restrictions imposed by the micellar enviroment was derived. Viscosities of 8 to 17 cp indicate a rather fluid environment for solubilized nitrobenzene; both additives exhibit altered motional preferences in CTAB solutions only. As an aid in interpretation of the NMR data, quasi-elastic light scattering and other physical techniques have been used to evaluate the influence of organic solutes on micellar size and shape. The NMR methods are examined critically in terms of their general usefulness for studies of solubilization in detergent mice

  2. Multivalent ligand mimetics of LecA from P. aeruginosa: synthesis and NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Bini, Davide; Marchetti, Roberta; Russo, Laura; Molinaro, Antonio; Silipo, Alba; Cipolla, Laura

    2016-06-24

    Molecular recognition of glycans plays an important role in glycomic and glycobiology studies. For example, pathogens have a number of different types of lectin for targeting host sugars. In bacteria, lectins exist sometimes as domains of bacterial toxins and exploit adhesion to glycoconjugates as a means of entering host cells. Herein, we describe the synthesis of three glycodendrons with the aim to dissect the fine structural details involved in the multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions. LecA, from the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been used to characterize galactose dendrons interaction using one of the most widespread NMR technique for the elucidation of receptor-ligand binding in solution, the saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR. Furthermore, the effective hydrodynamic radius of each dendrimer recognized by LecA was estimated from the diffusion coefficients determined by pulsed-field-gradient stimulated echo (PFG-STE) NMR experiments.

  3. Cell-free expression of the APP transmembrane fragments with Alzheimer's disease mutations using algal amino acid mixture for structural NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Bocharova, Olga V; Urban, Anatoly S; Nadezhdin, Kirill D; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2016-07-01

    Structural investigations need ready supply of the isotope labeled proteins with inserted mutations n the quantities sufficient for the heteronuclear NMR. Though cell-free expression system has been widely used in the past years, high startup cost and complex compound composition prevent many researches from the developing this technique, especially for membrane protein production. Here we demonstrate the utility of a robust, cost-optimized cell-free expression technique for production of the physiologically important transmembrane fragment of amyloid precursor protein, APP686-726, containing Alzheimer's disease mutations in the juxtamembrane (E693G, Arctic form) and the transmembrane parts (V717G, London form, or L723P, Australian form). The protein cost was optimized by varying the FM/RM ratio as well as the amino acid concentration. We obtained the wild-type and mutant transmembrane fragments in the pellet mode of continuous exchange cell-free system consuming only commercial algal mixture of the (13)C,(15)N-labeled amino acids. Scaling up analytical tests, we achieved milligram quantity yields of isotope labeled wild-type and mutant APP686-726 for structural studies by high resolution NMR spectroscopy in membrane mimicking environment. The described approach has from 5 to 23-fold cost advantage over the bacterial expression methods described earlier and 1.5 times exceeds our previous result obtained with the longer APP671-726WT fragment.

  4. Altered nitrogen metabolism associated with de-differentiated suspension cultures derived from root cultures of Datura stramonium studied by heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fliniaux, Ophélie; Mesnard, François; Raynaud-Le Grandic, Sophie; Baltora-Rosset, Sylvie; Bienaimé, Christophe; Robins, Richard J; Fliniaux, Marc-André

    2004-05-01

    De-differentiation of transformed root cultures of Datura stramonium has previously been shown to cause a loss of tropane alkaloid synthetic capacity. This indicates a marked shift in physiological status, notably in the flux of primary metabolites into tropane alkaloids. Nitrogen metabolism in transformed root cultures of D. stramonium (an alkaloid-producing system) and de-differentiated suspension cultures derived therefrom (a non-producing system) has been compared using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. (15)N-Labelled precursors [((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) and K(15)NO(3)] were fed and their incorporation into nitrogenous metabolites studied using Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Coherence (HMBC) NMR spectroscopy. In both cultures, the same amino acids were resolved in the HMBC spectra. However, marked differences were found in the intensity of labelling of a range of nitrogenous compounds. In differentiated root cultures, cross-peaks corresponding to secondary metabolites, such as tropine, were observed, whereas these were absent in the de-differentiated cultures. By contrast, N- acetylputrescine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulated in the de-differentiated cultures to a much larger extent than in the root cultures. It can therefore be suggested that the loss of alkaloid biosynthesis was compensated by the diversion of putrescine metabolism away from the tropane pathway and toward the synthesis of GABA via N-acetylputrescine.

  5. Proton-NMR study on chemisorption of ethylene on platinum powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashi Shibanuma; Toshiji Matsui

    1985-05-01

    The high-temperature phase of ethylene on surfaces of Pt powder has been studied by proton-NMR in order to decide whether the surface species is the ethylidyne species (CH 3C) proposed by Kesmodel et al. or the multiple-bonded species (CH 2CH) proposed by Demuth. The observed NMR spectrum is not attributable to CH 3-groups on the surfaes, but can be interpreted as the superposition of two signals, one originating from CH 2-groups and the other from CH-groups. In other words, the results suggest that the surface species is the multiple-bonded species.

  6. Proton-NMR study on chemisorption of ethylene on platinum powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibanuma, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiji

    The high-temperature phase of ethylene on surfaces of Pt powder has been studied by proton-NMR in order to decide whether the surface species is the ethylidyne species (CH 3-C≡) proposed by Kesmodel et al. or the multiple-bonded species (-CH 2-CH=) proposed by Demuth. The observed NMR spectrum is not attributable to CH 3-groups on the surfaces, but can be interpreted as the superposition of two signals, one originating from CH 2-groups and the other from CH-groups. In other words, the results suggest that the surface species is the multiple-bonded species.

  7. NMR studies on a new method for selective degradation of lignins

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, F.; Ralph, J.

    1996-10-01

    The selectivity and cleanliness of reactions which form the basis of a proposed new alternative to the analytical thioacidolysis method have been examined by NMR using model compounds and isolated lignins The results from the model study show that all steps involved in the new selective method are almost quantitative. When applied to isolated lignins, the NMR spectra show that the main substructures of lignin a selectively and cleanly converted to desired derivatives which are further degraded by specific ether cleavage reactions resulting in high yields of analyzable monomers. The beautiful selectivity and cleanliness demonstrated here, combined with its mildness, should make this method very attractive to lignin researchers.

  8. Solid-state NMR and ESR studies of activated carbons produced from pecan shells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbon from pecan shells has shown promise as an adsorbent in water treatment and sugar refining. However, the chemistry of the material is complex and not fully understood. We report here the application of solid state NMR and ESR to study the chemical structure, mobility, and pore volu...

  9. Genetic analysis of 16 NMR-lipoprotein fractions in humans, the GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy lipoprotein measurements of more than 1,000 subjects of GOLDN study, at fasting and at 3.5 and 6 h after a postprandial fat (PPL) challenge at visits 2 and 4, before and after a 3 weeks Fenofibrate (FF) treatment, were included in 6 time-independ...

  10. Silver metallation of hen egg white lysozyme: X-ray crystal structure and NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Panzner, Matthew J; Bilinovich, Stephanie M; Youngs, Wiley J; Leeper, Thomas C

    2011-12-14

    The X-ray crystal structure, NMR binding studies, and enzyme activity of silver(I) metallated hen egg white lysozyme are presented. Primary bonding of silver is observed through His15 with secondary bonding interactions coming from nearby Arg14 and Asp87. A covalently bound nitrate completes a four coordinate binding pocket.

  11. Solid-state 207Pb NMR studies of mixed lead halides, PbFX (X=Cl, Br, or I).

    PubMed

    Glatfelter, Alicia; Dybowski, Cecil; Kragten, David D; Bai, Shi; Perry, Dale L; Lockard, Jenny

    2007-04-01

    Solid-state 207Pb NMR studies have been conducted on mixed lead(II) halides of the type PbFX, where X=Cl, Br, or I. NMR data for the mixed halides are compared to the solid-state NMR data for the divalent, binary lead halides, PbX2 (X=F, Cl, Br, I). The NMR data are evaluated in the context of the structures of the compounds and the effects of the mixed halides on the electronic structure of the divalent lead. Data sets for the mixed halides are discussed and compared to those for the regular lead(II) halides.

  12. Ultra-high field NMR studies of antibody binding and site-specific phosphorylation of {alpha}-synuclein

    SciTech Connect

    Sasakawa, Hiroaki |; Sakata, Eri; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Masuda, Masami |; Mori, Tetsuya; Kurimoto, Eiji; Iguchi, Takeshi; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kato, Koichi |

    2007-11-23

    Although biological importance of intrinsically disordered proteins is becoming recognized, NMR analyses of this class of proteins remain as tasks with more challenge because of poor chemical shift dispersion. It is expected that ultra-high field NMR spectroscopy offers improved resolution to cope with this difficulty. Here, we report an ultra-high field NMR study of {alpha}-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein identified as the major component of the Lewy bodies. Based on NMR spectral data collected at a 920 MHz proton frequency, we performed epitope mapping of an anti-{alpha}-synuclein monoclonal antibody, and furthermore, characterized conformational effects of phosphorylation at Ser129 of {alpha}-synuclein.

  13. Solid-state and unilateral NMR study of deterioration of a Dead Sea Scroll fragment.

    PubMed

    Masic, A; Chierotti, M R; Gobetto, R; Martra, G; Rabin, I; Coluccia, S

    2012-02-01

    Unilateral and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses were performed on a parchment fragment of the Dead Sea Scroll (DSS). The analyzed sample belongs to the collection of non-inscribed and nontreated fragments of known archaeological provenance from the John Rylands University Library in Manchester. Therefore, it can be considered as original DSS material free from any contamination related to the post-discovery period. Considering the paramount significance of the DSS, noninvasive approaches and portable in situ nondestructive methods are of fundamental importance for the determination of composition, structure, and chemical-physical properties of the materials under study. NMR studies reveal low amounts of water content associated with very short proton relaxation times, T(1), indicating a high level of deterioration of collagen molecules within scroll fragments. In addition, (13)C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy shows characteristic peaks of lipids whose presence we attribute to the production technology that did not involve liming. Extraction with chloroform led to the reduction of both lipid and protein signals in the (13)C CPMAS spectrum indicating probable involvement of lipids in parchment degradation processes. NMR absorption and relaxation measurements provide nondestructive, discriminative, and sensitive tools for studying the deterioration effects on the organization and properties of water and collagen within ancient manuscripts.

  14. 19F NMR study on the biodegradation of fluorophenols by various Rhodococcus species.

    PubMed

    Bondar, V S; Boersma, M G; Golovlev, E L; Vervoort, J; Van Berkel, W J; Finkelstein, Z I; Solyanikova, I P; Golovleva, L A; Rietjens, I M

    1998-01-01

    Of all NMR observable isotopes 19F is the one perhaps most convenient for studies on biodegradation of environmental pollutants. The reasons underlying this potential of 19F NMR are discussed and illustrated on the basis of a study on the biodegradation of fluorophenols by four Rhodococcus strains. The results indicate marked differences between the biodegradation pathways of fluorophenols among the various Rhodococcus species. This holds not only for the level and nature of the fluorinated biodegradation pathway intermediates that accumulate, but also for the regioselectivity of the initial hydroxylation step. Several of the Rhodococcus species contain a phenol hydroxylase that catalyses the oxidative defluorination of ortho-fluorinated di- and trifluorophenols. Furthermore, it is illustrated how the 19F NMR technique can be used as a tool in the process of identification of an accumulated unknown metabolite, in this case most likely 5-fluoromaleylacetate. Altogether, the 19F NMR technique proved valid to obtain detailed information on the microbial biodegradation pathways of fluorinated organics, but also to provide information on the specificity of enzymes generally considered unstable and, for this reason, not much studied so far.

  15. Compound-Specific δ15N Amino Acid Measurements in Littoral Mussels in the California Upwelling Ecosystem: A New Approach to Generating Baseline δ15N Isoscapes for Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ15N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ15N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ15N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ15N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼7‰ to ∼12‰, R2 = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ15N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ15N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ15N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with15N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ15N values of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ15N values. We hypothesize δ15NPhe values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ15N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ15NPhe values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ15N values. We propose that δ15NPhe isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ15N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives. PMID:24887109

  16. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of translation initiation factor 1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Alejandra; Hu, Yanmei; Palmer, Stephanie O; Silva, Aaron; Bullard, James; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen and a primary cause of infection in humans. P. aeruginosa can acquire resistance against multiple groups of antimicrobial agents, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones, and multidrug resistance is increasing in this organism which makes treatment of the infections difficult and expensive. This has led to the unmet need for discovery of new compounds distinctly different from present antimicrobials. Protein synthesis is an essential metabolic process and a validated target for the development of new antibiotics. Translation initiation factor 1 from P. aeruginosa (Pa-IF1) is the smallest of the three initiation factors that acts to establish the 30S initiation complex to initiate translation during protein biosynthesis, and its structure is unknown. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments of Pa-IF1 as the basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified five β-strands with an unusually extended β-strand at the C-terminal end of the protein and one short α-helix arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-β3-α1-β4-β5. This is further supported by (15)N-{(1)H} hetero NOEs. These secondary structure elements suggest the Pa-IF1 adopts the typical β-barrel structure and is composed of an oligomer-binding motif.

  17. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R.; Rigo, Vagner A.; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  18. Water exchange in plant tissue studied by proton NMR in the presence of paramagnetic centers.

    PubMed

    Bacić, G; Ratković, S

    1984-04-01

    The proton NMR relaxation of water in maize roots in the presence of paramagnetic centers, Mn2+, Mn- EDTA2 -, and dextran-magnetite was measured. It was shown that the NMR method of Conlon and Outhred (1972, Biochem. Biophys. Acta. 288:354-361) can be applied to a heterogenous multicellular system, and the water exchange time between cortical cells and the extracellular space can be calculated. The water exchange is presumably controlled by the intracellular unstirred layers. The Mn- EDTA2 - complex is a suitable paramagnetic compound for complex tissue, while the application of dextran-magnetite is probably restricted to studies of water exchange in cell suspensions. The water free space of the root and viscosity of the cells cytoplasm was estimated with the use of Mn- EDTA2 -. The convenience of proton NMR for studying the multiphase uptake of paramagnetic ions by plant root as well as their transport to leaves is demonstrated. A simple and rapid NMR technique (spin-echo recovery) for continuous measurement of the uptake process is presented.

  19. 17O NMR study of diamagnetic and paramagnetic lanthanide(III)-DOTA complexes in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Luhmer, Michel

    2014-08-18

    The complexes between the polyaminocarboxylate DOTA ligand and the whole series of stable lanthanide(III) metal ions, except Gd(3+), were studied in aqueous solution by (17)O NMR. For all of the paramagnetic systems, the (17)O NMR signals of both the nonchelating (O1) and chelating (O2) oxygen atoms could be detected, and for some of them, the signals of both the SAP and TSAP (TSAP') conformational isomers were also observed. Line width data analysis reveals that signal broadening is not dominated by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, as it was believed to be. The data indicate that quadrupole relaxation and, for some complexes, chemical exchange between the SAP and TSAP isomers are the major contributions to the (17)O NMR line width at 25 °C. Besides, the Fermi contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed lanthanide-induced shifts could be extracted. The (17)O hyperfine coupling constants determined for O2 in the SAP and TSAP isomers are similar to each other and to the values reported for several Gd(III) complexes comprising fast-exchanging ligands. Interestingly, the results suggest that (17)O NMR should prove to be useful for the study of highly paramagnetic Gd(III) complexes of nonlabile ligands.

  20. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, September 13, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  1. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  2. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  3. Influence of open ocean nitrogen supply on the skeletal δ15N of modern shallow-water scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen T.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Cohen, Anne L.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Cobb, Kim M.; Erler, Dirk V.; Stolarski, Jarosław; Kitahara, Marcelo V.; Ren, Haojia

    2016-05-01

    The isotopic composition of skeleton-bound organic nitrogen in shallow-water scleractinian corals (hereafter, CS-δ15N) is an emerging tool for studying the marine nitrogen cycle in the past. The CS-δ15N has been shown to reflect the δ15N of nitrogen (N) sources to corals, with most applications to date focusing on the anthropogenic/terrestrial N inputs to reef environments. However, many coral reefs receive their primary N sources from the open ocean, and the CS-δ15N of these corals may provide information on past changes in the open ocean regional and global N cycle. Using a recently developed persulfate/denitrifier-based method, we measured CS-δ15N in modern shallow-water scleractinian corals from 8 sites proximal to the open ocean. At sites with low open ocean surface nitrate concentrations typical of the subtropics and tropics, measured CS-δ15N variation on seasonal and annual timescales is most often less than 2‰. In contrast, a broad range in CS-δ15N (of ∼10‰) is measured across these sites, with a strong correlation between CS-δ15N and the δ15N of the deep nitrate supply to the surface waters near the reefs. While CS-δ15N can be affected by other N sources as well and can vary in response to local reef conditions as well as coral/symbiont physiological changes, this survey indicates that, when considering corals proximal to the open ocean, the δ15N of the subsurface nitrate supply to surface waters drives most of the CS-δ15N variation across the global ocean. Thus, CS-δ15N is a promising proxy for reconstructing the open ocean N cycle in the past.

  4. A 2H and 14N NMR study of molecular motion in polycrystalline choline salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratum, T. K.; Klein, M. P.

    2H and 14N solid-state NMR spectra of polycrystalline choline chloride, bromide, and iodide indicate that 180° cation flipping motion occurs in all three salts. From the temperature dependence of these spectra, the activation energy for this motion is determined to be 5.8 ± I kcal/mol in the iodide salt and 11 ± 1.5 kcal/mol in the chloride salt. In the bromide salt the reorientation rate is too rapid to be determined from the NMR lineshape, but the temperature dependence of the 2H quadrupole coupling parameters is indicative of a second-order phase transition at approximately 273 K. The spectral distortions in the 14N NMR spectra of the chloride and iodide salts are adequately explained using the motional model derived from the 2H NMR results, while the 14N spectra of the bromide salt show no motional effects. The axis of reorientation which is inferred from these data appears to be consistent with that indicated in a previous X-ray crystallographic study.

  5. Li NMR study of heavy-fermion LiV2O4 containing magnetic defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zong, X.; Das, S.; Borsa, F.; Vannette, M.; Prozorov, R.; Schmalian, J.; Johnston, D.

    2008-04-21

    We present a systematic study of the variations of the {sup 7}Li NMR properties versus magnetic defect concentration up to 0.83 mol% within the spinel structure of polycrystalline powder samples and a collection of small single crystals of LiV2O4 in the temperature range from 0.5 to 4.2 K. We also report static magnetization measurements and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements at 14 MHz on the samples at low temperatures. Both the NMR spectrum and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate are inhomogeneous in the presence of the magnetic defects. The NMR data for the powders are well explained by assuming that (i) there is a random distribution of magnetic point defects, (ii) the same heavy Fermi liquid is present in the samples containing the magnetic defects as in magnetically pure LiV2O4, and (iii) the influences of the magnetic defects and of the Fermi liquid on the magnetization and NMR properties are separable. In the single crystals, somewhat different behaviors are observed. Remarkably, the magnetic defects in the powder samples show evidence of spin freezing below T {approx} 1.0 K, whereas in the single crystals with similar magnetic defect concentration no spin freezing was found down to 0.5 K. Thus different types of magnetic defects and/or interactions between them appear to arise in the powders versus the crystals, possibly due to the substantially different synthesis conditions of the powders and crystals.

  6. Comparative study of inversion methods of three-dimensional NMR and sensitivity to fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Wang, Peng; Mao, Keyu

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (3D NMR) logging can simultaneously measure transverse relaxation time (T2), longitudinal relaxation time (T1), and diffusion coefficient (D). These parameters can be used to distinguish fluids in the porous reservoirs. For 3D NMR logging, the relaxation mechanism and mathematical model, Fredholm equation, are introduced, and the inversion methods including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD), and Global Inversion (GI) methods are studied in detail, respectively. During one simulation test, multi-echo CPMG sequence activation is designed firstly, echo trains of the ideal fluid models are synthesized, then an inversion algorithm is carried on these synthetic echo trains, and finally T2-T1-D map is built. Futhermore, SVD, BRD, and GI methods are respectively applied into a same fluid model, and the computing speed and inversion accuracy are compared and analyzed. When the optimal inversion method and matrix dimention are applied, the inversion results are in good aggreement with the supposed fluid model, which indicates that the inversion method of 3D NMR is applieable for fluid typing of oil and gas reservoirs. Additionally, the forward modeling and inversion tests are made in oil-water and gas-water models, respectively, the sensitivity to the fluids in different magnetic field gradients is also examined in detail. The effect of magnetic gradient on fluid typing in 3D NMR logging is stuied and the optimal manetic gradient is choosen.

  7. Layered structure of room-temperature ionic liquids in microemulsions by multinuclear NMR spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Falcone, R Dario; Baruah, Bharat; Gaidamauskas, Ernestas; Rithner, Christopher D; Correa, N Mariano; Silber, Juana J; Crans, Debbie C; Levinger, Nancy E

    2011-06-06

    Microemulsions form in mixtures of polar, nonpolar, and amphiphilic molecules. Typical microemulsions employ water as the polar phase. However, microemulsions can form with a polar phase other than water, which hold promise to diversify the range of properties, and hence utility, of microemulsions. Here microemulsions formed by using a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as the polar phase were created and characterized by using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. (1)H, (11)B, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy was applied to explore differences between microemulsions formed by using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF(4)]) as the polar phase with a cationic surfactant, benzylhexadecyldimethylammonium chloride (BHDC), and a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100 (TX-100). NMR spectroscopy showed distinct differences in the behavior of the RTIL as the charge of the surfactant head group varies in the different microemulsion environments. Minor changes in the chemical shifts were observed for [bmim](+) and [BF(4)](-) in the presence of TX-100 suggesting that the surfactant and the ionic liquid are separated in the microemulsion. The large changes in spectroscopic parameters observed are consistent with microstructure formation with layering of [bmim](+) and [BF(4)](-) and migration of Cl(-) within the BHDC microemulsions. Comparisons with NMR results for related ionic compounds in organic and aqueous environments as well as literature studies assisted the development of a simple organizational model for these microstructures.

  8. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies establish that heparanase is a retaining glycosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jennifer C.; Laloo, Andrew Elohim; Singh, Sanjesh; Ferro, Vito

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of fondaparinux were fully assigned by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. •Hydrolysis of fondaparinux by heparanase was monitored by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. •Heparanase is established to be a retaining glycosidase. -- Abstract: Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans in basement membranes and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Heparanase is implicated in several diverse pathological processes associated with ECM degradation such as metastasis, inflammation and angiogenesis and is thus an important target for anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drug discovery. Heparanase has been classed as belonging to the clan A glycoside hydrolase family 79 based on sequence analysis, secondary structure predictions and mutagenic analysis, and thus it has been inferred that it is a retaining glycosidase. However, there has been no direct experimental evidence to support this conclusion. Herein we describe {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies of the hydrolysis of the pentasaccharide substrate fondaparinux by heparanase, and provide conclusive evidence that heparanase hydrolyses its substrate with retention of configuration and is thus established as a retaining glycosidase. Knowledge of the mechanism of hydrolysis may have implications for future design of inhibitors for this important drug target.

  9. NMR and IR spectroscopic study of proton exchange between o-nitrophenol and methanol in CCl/sub 4/

    SciTech Connect

    Bureiko, S.F.; Golubev, N.S.; Lange, I.Y.

    1982-08-01

    The kinetics of proton exchange in solution between o-nitrophenol and methanol have been studied by dynamic NMR and IR spectroscopy, and a method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the rate constants for H-H, H-D, and D-H exchange from /sup 1/H NMR spectra.

  10. Solid state NMR study of SEI formation in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dachun

    Recently, rechargeable lithium ion batteries, which offer high energy density and long cycle life, are in great demand as power sources for our mobile electronic society. The formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the surface of electrodes in lithium ion batteries plays an essential role in their performance. This thesis presents solid state NMR and MAS NMR results on the SEI, which contribute to our understanding of SEI formation on both cathodes and anodes. This thesis is organized as following: Chapter 1 surveys the history of batteries and the challenges to further development of the lithium ion battery. Fundamental aspects and SEI formation mechanisms are also included in Chapter l. Chapter 2 deals with the principles and experimental techniques of solid state NMR. Chapter 3 presents studies of SEI formation on anode and cathode in lithium ion batteries using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and NMR. The results provide EIS and NMR evidence that cells containing electrolytes with high EC content display less irreversible capacity after high temperature storage. The irreversible capacity is attributed to SEI growth on electrode surfaces. NMR results on cathodes, on the other hand, imply that the presence of Ni in the cathode may reduce cell performance due to the oxidation of Ni 3+ to Ni4+. Our simulations show that a lower EC/DMC ratio is associated with a smaller SEI intensity for the cathode and higher intensity for the anode. Chapter 4 discusses the effect of temperature on SEI formation on anodes and cathodes. NMR measurements show that MCMB graphite based anodes exhibit high stability no chemical shift is evident over a wide temperature range. On cathodes, however, NMR does reveal changes in SEI intensity as a function of temperature. These changes are believed to be the result of decomposition of the SEI. Evidently, then, changes in the performance of the cell as a factor of temperature are, at least in part, due to changes in

  11. Polyoxomolybdate promoted hydrolysis of a DNA-model phosphoester studied by NMR and EXAFS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Absillis, Gregory; Van Deun, Rik; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2011-11-21

    Hydrolysis of (p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (NPP), a commonly used phosphatase model substrate, was examined in molybdate solutions by means of (1)H, (31)P, and (95)Mo NMR spectroscopy and Mo K-edge Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At 50 °C and pD 5.1 the cleavage of the phosphoester bond in NPP proceeds with a rate constant of 2.73 × 10(-5) s(-1) representing an acceleration of nearly 3 orders of magnitude as compared to the hydrolysis measured in the absence of molybdate. The pD dependence of k(obs) exhibits a bell-shaped profile, with the fastest cleavage observed in solutions where [Mo(7)O(24)](6-) is the major species in solution. Mixing of NPP and [Mo(7)O(24)](6-) resulted in formation of these two intermediate complexes that were detected by (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Complex A was characterized by a (31)P NMR resonance at -4.27 ppm and complex B was characterized by a (31)P NMR resonance at -7.42 ppm. On the basis of the previous results from diffusion ordered NMR spectroscopy, performed with the hydrolytically inactive substrate phenylphosphonate (PhP), the structure of these two complexes was deduced to be (NPP)(2)Mo(5)O(21)(4-) (complex A) and (NPP)(2)Mo(12)O(36)(H(2)O)(6)(4-) (complex B). The pH studies point out that both complexes are hydrolytically active and lead to the hydrolysis of phosphoester bond in NPP. The NMR spectra did not show evidence of any paramagnetic species, excluding the possibility of Mo(VI) reduction to Mo(V), and indicating that the cleavage of the phosphomonoester bond is purely hydrolytic. The Mo K-edge XANES region also did not show any sign of Mo(VI) to Mo(V) reduction during the hydrolytic reaction. (95)Mo NMR and Mo K-edge EXAFS spectra measured during different stages of the hydrolytic reaction showed a gradual disappearance of [Mo(7)O(24)](6-) during the hydrolytic reaction and appearance of [P(2)Mo(5)O(23)](6-), which was the final complex observed at the end of hydrolytic reaction.

  12. Ecosystem N distribution and δ15N during a century of forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compton, J.E.; Hooker, T.D.; Perakis, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of terrestrial ecosystem nitrogen (N) pools reflect internal processes and input–output balances. Disturbance generally increases N cycling and loss, yet few studies have examined ecosystem δ15N over a disturbance-recovery sequence. We used a chronosequence approach to examine N distribution and δ15N during forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment. Site ages ranged from 10 to 115 years, with similar soils, climate, land-use history, and overstory vegetation (white pine Pinus strobus). Foliar N and δ15N decreased as stands aged, consistent with a progressive tightening of the N cycle during forest regrowth on agricultural lands. Over time, foliar δ15N became more negative, indicating increased fractionation along the mineralization–mycorrhizal–plant uptake pathway. Total ecosystem N was constant across the chronosequence, but substantial internal N redistribution occurred from the mineral soil to plants and litter over 115 years (>25% of ecosystem N or 1,610 kg ha−1). Temporal trends in soil δ15N generally reflected a redistribution of depleted N from the mineral soil to the developing O horizon. Although plants and soil δ15N are coupled over millennial time scales of ecosystem development, our observed divergence between plants and soil suggests that they can be uncoupled during the disturbance-regrowth sequence. The approximate 2‰ decrease in ecosystem δ15N over the century scale suggests significant incorporation of atmospheric N, which was not detected by traditional ecosystem N accounting. Consideration of temporal trends and disturbance legacies can improve our understanding of the influence of broader factors such as climate or N deposition on ecosystem N balances and δ15N.

  13. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  14. 13C NMR study of halogen bonding of haloarenes: measurements of solvent effects and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Rainer; Chen, Naijun; Wu, Hong; Knotts, Nathan; Kaupp, Martin

    2004-04-07

    Solvent effects on the NMR spectra of symmetrical (X = F (1), X = Cl (2), X = Br (3), X = I (4), X = NO2 (5), X = CN (6)) and unsymmetrical (X = I, Y = MeO (7), Y = PhO (8)) para-disubstituted acetophenone azines X-C6H4-CMe=N-N=CMe-C6H4-Y and of models X-C6H4-CMe=N-Z (X = I, Z = H (9), Z = NH2 (10)), 4-iodoacetophenone (11), and iodobenzene (12) were measured in CDCl(3), DMSO, THF, pyridine, and benzene to address one intramolecular and one intermolecular issue. Solvent effects on the (13)C NMR spectra are generally small, and this finding firmly establishes that the azine bridge indeed functions as a "conjugation stopper," an important design concept in our polar materials research. Since intermolecular halogen bonding of haloarenes do occur in polar organic crystalline materials, the NMR solution data pose the question as to whether the absence of solvent shifts indicates the absence of strong halogen bonding in solution. This question was studied by the theoretical analysis of the DMSO complexes of iodoarenes 4, 9-12, and of iodoacetylene. DFT and MP2 computations show iodine bonding, and characteristic structural and electronic features are described. The nonrelativistic complexation shifts and the change in the spin-orbit induced heavy atom effect of iodine compensate each other, and iodine bonding thus has no apparent effect on Ci in the iodoarenes. For iodides, complexation by DMSO occurs and may or may not manifest itself in the NMR spectra. The absence of complexation shifts in the NMR spectra of halides does not exclude the occurrence of halogen bonding in solution.

  15. Metamorphic origin of ore-forming fluids for orogenic gold-bearing quartz vein systems in the North American Cordillera: constraints from a reconnaissance study of δ15N, δD, and δ18O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jia, Y.; Kerrich, R.; Goldfarb, R.

    2003-01-01

    The western North American Cordillera hosts a large number of gold-bearing quartz vein systems from the Mother Lode of southern California, through counterparts in British Columbia and southeastern Alaska, to the Klondike district in central Yukon. These vein systems are structurally controlled by major fault zones, which are often reactivated terrane-bounding sutures that formed in orogens built during accretion and subduction of terranes along the continental margin of North America. Mineralization ages span mid-Jurassic to early Tertiary and encompass much of the evolution ofthe Cordilleran orogen. Nitrogen contents and δ15N values of hydrothermal micas from veins are between 130 and 3,500 ppm and 1.7 to 5.5 per mil, respectively. These values are consistent with fluids derived from metamorphic dehydration reactions within the Phanerozoic accretion-subduction complexes, which have δ15N values of 1 to 6 per mil. The δ18O values of gold-bearing vein quartz from different locations in the Cordillera are between 14.6 and 22.2 per mil but are uniform for individual vein systems. The δD values of hydrothermal micas are between -110 and -60 per mil. Ore fluids have calculated δ18O values of 8 to 16 per mil and δD values of -65 to -10 per mil at an estimated temperature of 300δC; δD values of ore fluids do not show any latitudinal control. These results indicate a deep crustal source for the ore-forming fluids, most likely of metamorphic origin. Low δDH2O values of -120 to -130 per mil for a hydrous muscovite from the Sheba vein in the Klondike district reflect secondary exchange between recrystallizing mica and meteoric waters. Collectively, the N, H, and O isotope compositions of ore-related hydrothermal minerals indicate that the formation of these gold-bearing veins involved dilute, aqueous carbonic, and nitrogen-bearing fluids that were generated from metamorphic dehydration reactions at deep crustal levels. These data are not consistent with either mantle

  16. Compound-specific 15N analysis of amino acids in 15N tracer experiments provide an estimate of newly synthesised soil protein from inorganic and organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, Alice; Michaelides, Katerina; Evershed, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Organic N concentrations far exceed those of inorganic N in most soils and despite much investigation, the composition and cycling of this complex pool of SOM remains poorly understood. A particular problem has been separating more recalcitrant soil organic N from that actively cycling through the soil system; an important consideration in N cycling studies and for the soil's nutrient supplying capacity. The use of 15N-labelled substrates as stable isotope tracers has contributed much to our understanding of the soil system, but the complexity and heterogeneity of soil organic N prevents thorough compound-specific 15N analyses of organic N compounds and makes it difficult to examine any 15N-labelled organic products in any detail. As a result, a significant proportion of previous work has either simply assumed that since the majority of soil N is organic, all of the 15N retained in the soil is organic N (e.g. Sebilo et al., 2013) or subtracted 15N-labelled inorganic compounds from bulk values (e.g. Pilbeam et al., 1997). While the latter approach is more accurate, these methods only provide an estimate of the bulk 15N value of an extremely complex and non-uniformly labelled organic pool. A more detailed approach has been to use microbial biomass extraction (Brookes et al., 1985) and subsequent N isotopic analysis to determine the 15N value of biomass-N, representing the fraction of 15N assimilated by microbes or the 15N cycling through the 'living' or 'active' portion of soil organic N. However, this extraction method can only generate estimates and some lack of confidence in its validity and reliability remains. Here, we present an alternative technique to obtain a measure of the assimilation of an applied 15N substrate by the soil microbial biomass and an estimate of the newly synthesized soil protein, which is representative of the magnitude of the active soil microbial biomass. The technique uses a stable isotope tracer and compound-specific 15N analysis, but

  17. Preliminary 1H NMR study on archaeological waterlogged wood.

    PubMed

    Maccotta, Antonella; Fantazzini, Paola; Garavaglia, Carla; Donato, Ines D; Perzia, Patrizia; Brai, Maria; Morreale, Filippa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Relaxation (MRR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are powerful tools to obtain detailed information on the pore space structure that one is unlikely to obtain in other ways. These techniques are particularly suitable for Cultural Heritage materials, because they use water 1H nuclei as a probe. Interaction with water is one of the main causes of deterioration of materials. Porous structure in wood, for example, favours the penetration of water, which can carry polluting substances and promote mould growth. A particular case is waterlogged wood from underwater discoveries and moist sites; in fact, these finds are very fragile because of chemical, physical and biological decay from the long contact with the water. When wood artefacts are brought to the surface and directly dried in air, there is the collapse of the cellular structures, and wood loses its original form and dimensions and cannot be used for study and museum exhibits. In this work we have undertaken the study of some wood finds coming from Ercolano's harbour by MRR and MRI under different conditions, and we have obtained a characterization of pore space in wood and images of the spatial distribution of the confined water in the wood.

  18. A combined 15N tracing/proteomics study in Brassica napus reveals the chronology of proteomics events associated with N remobilisation during leaf senescence induced by nitrate limitation or starvation.

    PubMed

    Desclos, Marie; Etienne, Philippe; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Bonnefoy, Josette; Segura, Raphaël; Reze, Sandrine; Ourry, Alain; Avice, Jean-Christophe

    2009-07-01

    Our goal was to identify the leaf proteomic changes which appeared during N remobilisation that were associated or not associated with senescence of oilseed rape in response to contrasting nitrate availability. Remobilisation of N and leaf senescence status were followed using (15)N tracing, patterns of chlorophyll level, total protein content and a molecular indicator based on expression of senescence-associated gene 12/Cab genes. Three phases associated with N remobilisation were distinguished. Proteomics revealed that 55 proteins involved in metabolism, energy, detoxification, stress response, proteolysis and protein folding, were significantly induced during N remobilisation. Four proteases were specifically identified. FtsH, a chloroplastic protease, was induced transiently during the early stages of N remobilisation. Considering the dynamics of N remobilisation, chlorophyll and protein content, the pattern of FtsH expression indicated that this protease could be involved in the degradation of chloroplastic proteins. Aspartic protease increased at the beginning of senescence and was maintained at a high level, implicating this protease in proteolysis during the course of leaf senescence. Two proteases, proteasome beta subunit A1 and senescence-associated gene 12, were induced and continued to increase during the later phase of senescence, suggesting that these proteases are more specifically involved in the proteolysis processes occurring at the final stages of leaf senescence.

  19. NMR spectroscopy study of local correlations in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-12-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance we study the dynamics of the hydrogen bond (HB) sub-domains in bulk and emulsified water across a wide temperature range that includes the supercooled regime. We measure the proton spin-lattice T1 and spin-spin T2 relaxation times to understand the hydrophilic interactions that determine the properties of water. We use (i) the Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound approach that focuses on a single characteristic correlation time τc, and (ii) the Powles and Hubbard approach that measures the proton rotational time τθ. We find that when the temperature is low both relaxation times are strongly correlated when the HB lifetime is long, and that when the temperature is high a decrease in the HB lifetime destroys the water clusters and decouples the dynamic modes of the system.

  20. Stereospecific assignments of glycine in proteins by stereospecific deuteration and {sup 15}N labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Curley, R.W. Jr.; Panigot, M.J.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Stereospecific assignments are important for accurately determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins through the use of multidimensional NMR techniques. It is especially important to stereospecifically assign the glycine {alpha}-protons in proteins because of the potential for different backbone conformations of this residue. These stereospecific assignments are critical for interpreting the {sup 3}J{sub NH,{alpha}H} coupling constants and NOEs involving the glycine {alpha}-protons that determine the conformation of this part of the protein. However, it is often difficult to unambiguously obtain the stereospecific assignments for glycine residues by using only NOE data. In this poster, we present a method for unambiguous, stereospecific assignment of the {alpha}-protons of glycine residues. This method involves synthesis of stereo-specifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gly using a slightly modified procedure originally described by Woodard and coworkers for the stereoselective deuteration of glycine. The stereospecifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gy has been incorporated into recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial systems (FKBP) and mammalian cells (u-PA). Two- and three-dimensional isotope-filtered and isotope-edited NMR experiments were used to obtain the stereospecific assignments of the glycine {alpha}-protons for these proteins.

  1. NMR studies of electrostatic potential distribution around biologically important molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Likhtenshtein, G I; Adin, I; Novoselsky, A; Shames, A; Vaisbuch, I; Glaser, R

    1999-01-01

    A new experimental approach has been developed to study the distribution of local electrostatic potential around specific protons in biologically important molecules. The approach is the development of a method denoted as "spin label/spin probe," which was proposed by one of us (. Mol. Biol. 6:498-507). The proposed method is based upon the quantitative measurement of the contribution of differently charged nitroxide probes to the spin lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) of protons in the molecule of interest, followed by calculation of local electrostatic potential using the classical Debye equation. In parallel, the theoretical calculation of potential distribution with the use of the MacSpartan Plus 1.0 program has been performed. Application of the method to solutions of simple organic molecules (aliphatic and aromatic alcohols, aliphatic carboxylates (propionate anion), and protonated ethyl amine and imidazole) allowed us to estimate the effective potential around the molecules under investigation. These were found to be in good agreement with theoretically expected values. This technique was then applied to zwitterionic amino acids bearing neutral and charged side chains (glycine, lysine, histidine, and aspartic acid). The reliability of the general approach is proved by the data presented in this paper. Application of this new methodology can afford insight into the biochemical significance of electrostatic effects in biological systems. PMID:10388770

  2. NMR study of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Korn, C.; Goren, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance method was used to study the diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium hydride by measuring the temperature dependence of T/sub 1/ in a temperature range where the major relaxation mechanism was due to hydrogen diffusion. The samples investigated were ZrH/sub 1.588/, ZrH/sub 1.629/, ZrH/sub 1.684/, ZrH/sub 1.736/, ZrH/sub 1.815/, ZrH/sub 1.910/, and ZrH/sub 1.960/. These spanned both the cubic and tetragonal phases. The activation energy was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration in the cubic phase with E/sub a/ = 13.4 +- 0.4 kcal/mol and a preexponential factor given by A = (1/2)(2-x)(45 +- 10) x 10/sup 12/ Hz. In the tetragonal phase the activation energy of the bulk of the hydrogen increased modestly with concentration. In addition, it was discovered that a new very fast hydrogen channel was created by the tetragonality for approx.3% of the hydrogen. They jump with a preexponential factor that is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the rest of the hydrogen. A comparison was also made between the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound, the Barton-Sholl, and the Bustard theories for nuclear magnetic relaxation due to diffusion.

  3. NMR study of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, C.; Goren, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance method was used to study the diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium hydride by measuring the temperature dependence of T1 in a temperature range where the major relaxation mechanism was due to hydrogen diffusion. The samples investigated were ZrH1.588, ZrH1.629, ZrH1.684, ZrH1.736, ZrH1.815, ZrH1.910, and ZrH1.960. These spanned both the cubic and tetragonal phases. The activation energy was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration in the cubic phase with Ea=13.4+/-0.4 kcal/mol and a preexponential factor given by A=(1/2)(2-x)(45+/-10)×1012 Hz. In the tetragonal phase the activation energy of the bulk of the hydrogen increased modestly with concentration. In addition, it was discovered that a new very fast hydrogen channel was created by the tetragonality for ~3% of the hydrogen. They jump with a preexponential factor that is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the rest of the hydrogen. A comparison was also made between the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound, the Barton-Sholl, and the Bustard theories for nuclear magnetic relaxation due to diffusion.

  4. Interaction of ferulic acid derivatives with human erythrocytes monitored by pulse field gradient NMR diffusion and NMR relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Bernardi, Francesca; Centini, Marisanna; Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Valensin, Daniela; Valensin, Gianni

    2005-04-01

    Ferulic acid (Fer), a natural anti-oxidant and chemo-protector, is able to suppress experimental carcinogenesis in the forestomach, lungs, skin, tongue and colon. Several Fer derivatives have been suggested as promising candidates for cancer prevention, being the biological activity related also to the capacity of partitioning between aqueous and lipid phases. In the present work, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurement and NMR relaxation rates have been adopted for investigating the interaction of three Fer derivatives (Fer-C11, Fer-C12 and Fer-C13) with human erythrocytes. Binding to the erythrocyte membrane has been shown for all derivatives, which displayed a similar interaction mode such that the aromatic moiety and the terminal part of the alkyl chain were the most affected. Quantitative analysis of the diffusion coefficients was used to show that Fer-C12 and Fer-C13 display higher affinity for the cell membrane when compared with Fer-C11. These findings agree with the higher anti-oxidant activity of the two derivatives.

  5. EPIC- and CHANCE-HSQC: Two 15N Photo-CIDNP-Enhanced Pulse Sequences for the Sensitive Detection of Solvent-Exposed Tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, Ashok; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) of nuclei other than 1H offers a tremendous potential for sensitivity enhancement in liquid state NMR under mild, physiologically relevant conditions. Photo-CIDNP enhancements of 15N magnetization are much larger than those typically observed for 1H. However, the low gyromagnetic ratio of 15N prevents a full fruition of the potential signal-to-noise gains attainable via 15N photo-CIDNP. Here, we propose two novel pulse sequences, EPIC- and CHANCE-HSQC, tailored to overcome the above limitation. EPIC-HSQC exploits the strong 1H polarization and its subsequent transfer to non-equilibrium Nz magnetization prior to 15N photo-CIDNP laser irradiation. CHANCE-HSQC synergistically combines 1H and 15N photo-CIDNP. The above pulse sequences, tested on tryptophan (Trp) and the Trp-containing protein apoHmpH, were found to display up to two-fold higher sensitivity than the reference NPE-SE-HSQC pulse train (based on simple 15N photo-CIDNP followed by N-H polarization transfer), and up to a ca. 3-fold increase in sensitivity over the corresponding dark pulse schemes (lacking laser irradiation). The observed effects are consistent with the predictions from a theoretical model of photo-CIDNP and prove the potential of 15N and 1H photo-CIDNP in liquid state heteronuclear correlation NMR. PMID:19643649

  6. δ15N Value Does Not Reflect Fasting in Mysticetes

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Alex; Giménez, Joan; Gómez–Campos, Encarna; Cardona, Luís; Borrell, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    The finding that tissue δ15N values increase with protein catabolism has led researchers to apply this value to gauge nutritive condition in vertebrates. However, its application to marine mammals has in most occasions failed. We investigated the relationship between δ15N values and the fattening/fasting cycle in a model species, the fin whale, a migratory capital breeder that experiences severe seasonal variation in body condition. We analyzed two tissues providing complementary insights: one with isotopic turnover (muscle) and one that keeps a permanent record of variations in isotopic values (baleen plates). In both tissues δ15N values increased with intensive feeding but decreased with fasting, thus contradicting the pattern previously anticipated. The apparent inconsistency during fasting is explained by the fact that a) individuals migrate between different isotopic isoscapes, b) starvation may not trigger significant negative nitrogen balance, and c) excretion drops and elimination of 15N-depleted urine is minimized. Conversely, when intensive feeding is resumed in the northern grounds, protein anabolism and excretion start again, triggering 15N enrichment. It can be concluded that in whales and other mammals that accrue massive depots of lipids as energetic reserves and which have limited access to drinking water, the δ15N value is not affected by fasting and therefore cannot be used as an indicatior of nutritive condition. PMID:24651388

  7. Proton NMR study of the state of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots

    SciTech Connect

    Blinc, A.; Lahajnar, G.; Blinc, R.; Zidansek, A.; Sepe, A. )

    1990-04-01

    A proton NMR relaxation and pulsed field gradient self-diffusion study of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots has been performed with special emphasis on the effect of the sol-gel and shrinkage transitions. Deuteron NMR in fibrin gels was also studied to supplement the proton data. It is shown that a measurement of the water proton or deuteron T1/T2 ratio allows for a determination of the bound water fraction in all these systems. The change in the T1/T2 ratio at the shrinkage transition further allows for a determination of the surface fractal dimension of the gel if the change in the volume of the gel is known. The self-diffusion coefficient of water in these systems, which determines the transport properties of the gel, is found to be proportional to the free water fraction in both the nonshrunken and shrunken state.

  8. Conformational equilibrium of phenylacetic acid and its halogenated analogues through theoretical studies, NMR and IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levandowski, Mariana N.; Rozada, Thiago C.; Melo, Ulisses Z.; Basso, Ernani A.; Fiorin, Barbara C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a study on the conformational preferences of phenylacetic acid (PA) and its halogenated analogues (FPA, CPA, BPA). To clarify the effects that rule these molecules' behaviour, theoretical calculations were used, for both the isolated phase and solution, combined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Most conformations of phenylacetic acid and its halogenated derivatives are stabilized through the hyperconjugative effect, which rules the conformational preference. NMR analyses showed that even with the variation in medium polarity, there was no significant change in the conformation population. Infrared spectroscopy showed similar results for all compounds under study. In most spectra, two bands were found through the carbonyl deconvolution, which is in accordance with the theoretical data. It was possible to prove that variation in the nature of the substituent in the ortho position had no significant influence on the conformational equilibrium.

  9. Theoretical and experimental IR, Raman and NMR spectra in studying the electronic structure of 2-nitrobenzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, R.; Samsonowicz, M.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2007-05-01

    The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium on the electronic system of the 2-nitrobenzoic acid (2-NBA) was studied. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by HF, B3PW91, B3LYP methods using 6-311++G ∗∗ basis set. The theoretical IR and NMR spectra were obtained. The vibrational (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and NMR ( 1H and 13C) spectra for 2-nitrobenzoic acid salts of alkali metals were also recorded. The assignment of vibrational spectra was done. Characteristic shifts of band wavenumbers and changes in band intensities along the metal series were observed. Good correlation between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR and Raman spectra for 2-nitrobenzoates (2-NB) and ionic potential, electronegativity, atomic mass and affinity of metals were found. The chemical shifts of protons and carbons ( 1H, 13C NMR) in the series of studied alkali metal 2-nitrobenzoates were observed too. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of studied compounds.

  10. Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions Studied by NMR: From Molecular Recognition to Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alonso, María del Carmen; Díaz, Dolores; Berbis, Manuel Álvaro; Marcelo, Filipa; Cañada, Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Diseases that result from infection are, in general, a consequence of specific interactions between a pathogenic organism and the cells. The study of host-pathogen interactions has provided insights for the design of drugs with therapeutic properties. One area that has proved to be promising for such studies is the constituted by carbohydrates which participate in biological processes of paramount importance. On the one hand, carbohydrates have shown to be information carriers with similar, if not higher, importance than traditionally considered carriers as amino acids and nucleic acids. On the other hand, the knowledge on molecular recognition of sugars by lectins and other carbohydrate-binding proteins has been employed for the development of new biomedical strategies. Biophysical techniques such as X-Ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy lead currently the investigation on this field. In this review, a description of traditional and novel NMR methodologies employed in the study of sugar-protein interactions is briefly presented in combination with a palette of NMR-based studies related to biologically and/or pharmaceutically relevant applications. PMID:23305367

  11. Low-temperature NMR studies of Zn tautomerism and hindered rotations in solid zincocene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lopez del Amo, Juan Miguel; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Resa, Irene; Fernandez, Rafael; Carmona, Ernesto

    2008-04-24

    Using a combination of NMR methods we have detected and studied fluxional motions in the slip-sandwich structure of solid decamethylzincocene (I, [(eta5-C5Me5)Zn(eta1-C5Me5)]). For comparison, we have also studied the solid iminoacyl derivative [(eta5-C5Me5)Zn(eta1-C(NXyl)C5Me5)] (II). The variable temperature 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of I indicate fast rotations of both Cp* rings in the molecule down to 156 K as well as the presence of an order-disorder phase transition around 210 K. The disorder is shown to be dynamic arising from a fast combined Zn tautomerism and eta1/eta5 reorganization of the Cp* rings between two degenerate states A and B related by a molecular inversion. In the ordered phase, the degeneracy of A and B is lifted; that is, the two rings X and Y are inequivalent, where X exhibits a larger fraction of time in the eta5 state than Y. However, the interconversion is still fast and characterized by a reaction enthalpy of DeltaH = 2.4 kJ mol-1 and a reaction entropy of DeltaS = 4.9 J K-1 mol-1. In order to obtain quantitative kinetic information, variable temperature 2H NMR experiments were performed on static samples of I-d6 and II-d6 between 300 and 100 K, where in each ring one CH3 is replaced by one CD3 group. For II-d6, the 2H NMR line shapes indicate fast CD3 group rotations and a fast "eta5 rotation", corresponding to 72 degrees rotational jumps of the eta5 coordinated Cp* ring. The latter motion becomes slow around 130 K. By line shape analysis, an activation energy of the eta5 rotation of about 21 kJ mol-1 was obtained. 2H NMR line shapes analysis of I-d6 indicates fast CD3 group rotations at all temperatures. Moreover, between 100 and 150 K, a transition from the slow to the fast exchange regime is observed for the 5-fold rotational jumps of both Cp* rings, exhibiting an activation energy of 18 kJ mol-1. This value was corroborated by 2H NMR relaxometry from which additionally the activation energies 6.3 kJ mol-1 and 11.2 kJ mol-1 for the CD3

  12. 13C and 15N CP/MAS, 1H-15N SCT CP/MAS and FTIR spectroscopy as tools for qualitative detection of the presence of zwitterionic and non-ionic forms of ansa-macrolide 3-formylrifamycin SV and its derivatives in solid state.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pyta, Krystian; Klich, Katarzyna; Schilf, Wojciech; Kamieński, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    (13)C, (15)N CP/MAS, including (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N short contact time CP/MAS experiments, and FTIR methods were applied for detailed structural characterization of ansa-macrolides as 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its derivatives (2-6) in crystal and in powder forms. Although HPLC chromatograms for 2/CH3 OH and 2/CH3 CCl3 were the same for rifampicin crystals dissolved in respective solvents, the UV-vis data recorded for them were different in 300-375 nm region. Detailed solid state (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR and FTIR studies revealed that rifampicin (2), in contrast to 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its amino derivatives (3-6), can occur in pure non-ionic or zwitterionic forms in crystal and in pure these forms or a mixture of them in a powder. Multinuclear CP/MAS and FTIR studies demonstrated also that 3-6 derivatives were present exclusively in pure zwitterionic forms, both in powder and in crystal. On the basis of the solid state NMR and FTIR studies, two conformers of 3-formylrifamycin SV were detected in powder form due to the different orientations of carbonyl group of amide moiety. The PM6 molecular modeling at the semi-empirical level of theory, allowed visualization the most energetically favorable non-ionic and zwitterionic forms of 1-6 antibiotics, strongly stabilized via intramolecular H-bonds. FTIR studies indicated that the originally adopted forms of these type antibiotics in crystal or in powder are stable in standard laboratory conditions in time. The results presented point to the fact that because of a possible presence of two forms of rifampicin (compound 2), quantification of the content of this antibiotic in relevant pharmaceuticals needs caution.

  13. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: NMR potentials for studying physical processes in fossil coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Anatolii D.; Ul'yanova, Ekaterina V.; Vasilenko, Tat'yana A.

    2005-11-01

    High-resolution, pulsed, and wide-line NMR studies of fossil coals are reviewed. Coal substance conversion due to outbursts is discussed. Results on water and methane interactions with coal substance, which provide insight into the dynamic characteristics of boundary water, the location of methane in coal structure, and water and methane's hazard implications for coal beds (gas- or geodynamic phenomena) are presented; these are shown to have potential for predicting and preventing life threatening situations.

  14. Acid-Base Interactions of Polystyrene Sulfonic Acid in Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using a Combined UV/FTIR/XPS/ssNMR Study.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Chen, Xin; Nie, Haichen; Su, Ziyang; Fang, Ke; Yang, Xinghao; Smith, Daniel; Byrn, Stephen; Lubach, Joseph W

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the potential drug-excipient interactions of polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) and two weakly basic anticancer drugs, lapatinib (LB) and gefitinib (GB), in amorphous solid dispersions. Based on the strong acidity of the sulfonic acid functional group, PSSA was hypothesized to exhibit specific intermolecular acid-base interactions with both model basic drugs. Ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy identified red shifts, which correlated well with the color change observed in lapatinib-PSSA solutions. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra suggest the protonation of the quinazoline nitrogen atom in both model compounds, which agrees well with data from the crystalline ditosylate salt of lapatinib. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) detected increases in binding energy of the basic nitrogen atoms in both lapatinib and gefitinib, strongly indicating protonation of these nitrogen atoms. (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy provided direct spectroscopic evidence for protonation of the quinazoline nitrogen atoms in both LB and GB, as well as the secondary amine nitrogen atom in LB and the tertiary amine nitrogen atom in GB. The observed chemical shifts in the LB-PSSA (15)N spectrum also agree very well with the lapatinib ditosylate salt where proton transfer is known. Additionally, the dissolution and physical stability behaviors of both amorphous solid dispersions were examined. PSSA was found to significantly improve the dissolution of LB and GB and effectively inhibit the crystallization of LB and GB under accelerated storage conditions due to the beneficial strong intermolecular acid-base interaction between the sulfonic acid groups and basic nitrogen centers.

  15. Review of NMR studies of nanoscale molecular magnets composed of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic triangles

    DOE PAGES

    Furukawa, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies performed on three nanoscale molecular magnets with different novel configurations of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic (AFM) triangles: (1) the isolated single AFM triangle K6[V15As6O42(H2O)]·8H2O (in short V15), (2) the spin ball [Mo72Fe30O252(Mo2O7(H2O))2(Mo2O8H2(H2O)) (CH3COO)12(H2O)91]·150H2O (in short Fe30 spin ball), and (3) the twisted triangular spin tube [(CuCl2tachH)3Cl]Cl2 (in short Cu3 spin tube). In V15t, from 51V NMR spectra, the local spin configurations were directly determined in both the nonfrustrated total spin ST = 3/2 state at higher magnetic fields (H ge; 2.7 T) and the two nearly degenerate ST =more » 1/2 ground states at lower magnetic fields (H ≤ 2.7 T). The dynamical magnetic properties of V15 were investigated by proton spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) measurements. In the ST = 3/2 state, 1/T1 shows thermally activated behaviour as a function of temperature. On the other hand, the temperature independent behaviour of 1/T1 at very low temperatures is observed in the frustrated ST = 1/2 ground state. Possible origins for the peculiar behaviour of 1/T1 will be discussed in terms of magnetic fluctuations due to spin frustrations. In Fe30, static and dynamical properties of Fe3+ (s = 5/2) have been investigated by proton NMR spectra and 1/T1 measurements. From the temperature dependence of 1/T1, the fluctuation frequency of the Fe3+ spins is found to decrease with decreasing temperature, indicating spin freezing at low temperatures. The spin freezing is also evidenced by the observation of a sudden broadening of 1H NMR spectra below 0.6 K. Finally, 1H NMR data in Cu3 will be described. An observation of magnetic broadening of 1H NMR spectra at low temperatures below 1 K directly revealed a gapless ground state. The 1/T1 measurements revealed a usual slow spin dynamics in the Cu3 spin tube.« less

  16. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  17. NMR and Mössbauer Study of Al2O3-Eu2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, N.; Salas, P.; Llanos, M. E.; Pérez-Pastenes, H.; Viveros, T.

    2005-02-01

    Alumina-europia mixed oxides with 5 and 10 wt.% Eu2O3 were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, 27Al MAS-NMR and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The samples were prepared by the sol-gel technique. The XRD patterns for the calcined samples show a broad peak around 2 θ = 30° which is assigned to the Eu2O3; after treatment with hydrogen at 1073 K no reduction to Eu+2 or Eu0 was observed. The NMR spectra show three peaks, which are assigned to the octahedral, pentahedral and tetrahedral aluminum sites; the intensity of each peak depends on the concentration of europium ions. The Mössbauer spectra of the calcined samples show a single peak near zero velocity which is attributed to the Eu+3; after H2 treatment at 1073 K similar spectra were obtained, suggesting Eu+3 is not reducibly at this temperature.

  18. Chiral Magnetism in an Itinerant Helical Magnet, MnSi - An Extended 29Si NMR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Motoya, Kiyoichiro; Majumder, Mayukh; Witt, Sebastian; Krellner, Cornelius; Baenitz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The microscopic magnetism in the helical, conical and ferromagnetically polarized phases in an itinerant helical magnet, MnSi, has been studied by an extended 29Si NMR at zero field and under external magnetic fields. The temperature dependence of the staggered moment, MQ(T), determined by the 29Si NMR frequency, ν(T), and the nuclear relaxation rate, 1/T1(T), at zero field is in general accord with the SCR theory for weak itinerant ferromagnetic metals and its extension to helical magnets. The external field dependence of resonance frequency, ν(H), follows a vector sum of the contributions from the atomic hyperfine and macroscopic fields with a field induced moment characteristic to itinerant magnets. A discontinuous jump of the resonance frequency at the critical field, Hc, between the conical and the polarized phases has also been found, which suggests a first order like change of the electronic states at Hc.

  19. Decomposition of adsorbed VX on activated carbons studied by 31P MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Ishay; Waysbort, Daniel; Shmueli, Liora; Nir, Ido; Kaplan, Doron

    2006-06-15

    The fate of the persistent OP nerve agent O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) on granular activated carbons that are used for gas filtration was studied by means of 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. VX as vapor or liquid was adsorbed on carbon granules, and MAS NMR spectra were recorded periodically. The results show that at least 90% of the adsorbed VX decomposes within 20 days or less to the nontoxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and bis(S-2-diisopropylaminoethane) {(DES)2}. Decomposition occurred irrespective of the phase from which VX was loaded, the presence of metal impregnation on the carbon surface, and the water content of the carbon. Theoretical and practical aspects of the degradation are discussed.

  20. Cu(II)-Based Paramagnetic Probe to Study RNA-Protein Interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Seebald, Leah M; DeMott, Christopher M; Ranganathan, Srivathsan; Asare Okai, Papa Nii; Glazunova, Anastasia; Chen, Alan; Shekhtman, Alexander; Royzen, Maksim

    2017-04-03

    Paramagnetic NMR techniques allow for studying three-dimensional structures of RNA-protein complexes. In particular, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) data can provide valuable information about long-range distances between different structural components. For PRE NMR experiments, oligonucleotides are typically spin-labeled using nitroxide reagents. The current work describes an alternative approach involving a Cu(II) cyclen-based probe that can be covalently attached to an RNA strand in the vicinity of the protein's binding site using "click" chemistry. The approach has been applied to study binding of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein 7 (NCp7) to a model RNA pentanucleotide, 5'-ACGCU-3'. Coordination of the paramagnetic metal to glutamic acid residue of NCp7 reduced flexibility of the probe, thus simplifying interpretation of the PRE data. NMR experiments showed attenuation of signal intensities from protein residues localized in proximity to the paramagnetic probe as the result of RNA-protein interactions. The extent of the attenuation was related to the probe's proximity allowing us to construct the protein's contact surface map.

  1. NMR study on small proteins from Helicobacter pylori for antibiotic target discovery: a review.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Kim, Do-Hee; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2013-10-30

    Due to the widespread and increasing appearance of antibiotic resistance, a new strategy is needed for developing novel antibiotics. Especially, there are no specific antibiotics for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). H. pylori are bacteria that live in the stomach and are related to many serious gastric problems such as peptic ulcers, chronic gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Because of its importance as a human pathogen, it's worth studying the structure and function of the proteins from H. pylori. After the sequencing of the H. pylori strain 26695 in 1997, more than 1,600 genes were identified from H. pylori. Until now, the structures of 334 proteins from H. pylori have been determined. Among them, 309 structures were determined by X-ray crystallography and 25 structures by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), respectively. Overall, the structures of large proteins were determined by X-ray crystallography and those of small proteins by NMR. In our lab, we have studied the structural and functional characteristics of small proteins from H. pylori. In this review, 25 NMR structures of H. pylori proteins will be introduced and their structure-function relationships will be discussed.

  2. 39K, 23Na, and 31P NMR Studies of Ion Transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, T.; den Hollander, J. A.; Shulman, R. G.

    1983-09-01

    The relationship between efflux and influx of K+, Na+, and intracellular pH (pHin) in yeast cells upon energizing by oxygenation was studied by using the noninvasive technique of 39K, 23Na, and 31P NMR spectroscopy. By introducing an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent, Dy3+(P3O105-)2, into the medium, NMR signals of intra- and extracellular K+ and Na+ could be resolved, enabling us to study ion transport processes by NMR. Measurements showed that 40% of the intracellular K+ and Na+ in yeast cells contributed to the NMR intensities. By applying this correction factor, the intracellular ion concentrations were determined to be 130-170 mM K+ and 2.5 mM Na+ for fresh yeast cells. With the aid of a home-built solenoidal coil probe for 39K and a double-tuned probe for 23Na and 31P, we could follow time courses of K+ and Na+ transport and of pHin with a time resolution of 1 min. It was shown that H+ extrusion is correlated with K+ uptake and not with Na+ uptake upon energizing yeast cells by oxygenation. When the cells were deenergized after the aerobic period, K+ efflux, H+ influx, and Na+ influx were calculated to be 1.6, 1.5, and 0.15 μ mol/min per ml of cell water, respectively. Therefore, under the present conditions, K+ efflux is balanced by exchange for H+ with an approximate stoichiometry of 1:1.

  3. The production of soluble and correctly folded recombinant bovine beta-lactoglobulin variants A and B in Escherichia coli for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Komala; Loo, Trevor S; Edwards, Patrick J B; Pascal, Steven M; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Norris, Gillian E

    2010-04-01

    The production of soluble and correctly folded eukaryotic proteins in prokaryotic systems has always been hampered by the difference in or lack of cell machinery responsible for folding, post-translation modification and secretion of the proteins involved. In the case of bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a major cow's milk allergen and a protein widely used for protein folding studies, a eukaryotic yeast expression system has been the preferred choice of many researchers, particularly for the production of isotopically labeled protein required for NMR studies. Although this system yields high amounts of recombinant protein, the BLG produced is usually associated with extracellular polysaccharides, which is problematic for NMR analysis. In our study we show that when co-expressed with the signal-sequence-less disulfide bond isomerase (Delta ssDsbC) in the dual expression vector, pETDUET-1, both BLG A and BLG B can be reproducibly produced in a soluble form. Expression was carried out in Escherichia coli Origami(DE3), a trxB/gor mutant for thioredoxin- and glutathione reductase, which allows for proper formation of disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm. The protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography followed by salting-out at low pH and size exclusion chromatography. Our expression system is able to consistently produce milligram quantities of correctly folded BLG A and B with no additional amino acid residues at the N-terminus, except for a methionine. (15)N-labeled BLG A and B, prepared and purified using this method, produced HSQC spectra typical of native bovine BLG.

  4. Modeling 15N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence.

  5. Protein dynamics from chemical shift and dipolar rotational spin-echo sup 15 N NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Garbow, J.R.; Jacob, G.S.; Stejskal, E.O.; Schaefer, J. )

    1989-02-07

    The partial collapse of dipolar and chemical shift tensors for peptide NH and for the amide NH at cross-link sites in cell wall peptidoglycan, of intact lyophilized cells of Aerococcus viridans, indicates NH vector root-mean-square fluctuations of 23{degree}. This result is consistent with the local mobility calculated in typical picosecond regime computer simulations of protein dynamics in the solid state. The experimental root-mean-square angular fluctuations for both types of NH vectors increase to 37{degree} for viable wet cells at 10{degree}C. The similarity in mobilities for both general protein and cell wall peptidoglycan suggests that one additional motion in wet cells involves cooperative fluctuations of segments of cell walls, attached proteins, and associated cytoplasmic proteins.

  6. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence.

  7. A 29Si MAS-NMR study of transition metal site occupancy in forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccarty, R. J.; Palke, A.; Stebbins, J. F.; Hartman, S.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we address the problem of transition metal site occupancy in Mg-rich olivine using solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy. Transition metal substitution in olivine can occur in either of the two crystallographically unique octahedral sites: the smaller, more symmetric M1 site or the larger, more distorted M2 site. Site occupancy of the transition metal is expected to correlate with ionic radius and d-orbital structure. In NMR spectroscopy the presence of paramagnetic ions, such as transition metal ions, can produce accessory peaks referred to as "contact shifts," due to the interaction between unpaired electrons on the paramagnetic ion locally associated with the resonating nucleus. The position and intensity of the contact shifts are dependent on the geometrical association such as bond distances and bond angles between the paramagnetic ion and the resonating nucleus. 29Si MAS-NMR spectra collected on synthetic forsterite (Mg2SiO4) doped with minor amounts (0.2-5%) of individual, divalent, paramagnetic, transition metal cations (Mn, Co, Ni, or Cu) substituting for Mg in the octahedral sites, reveals multiple contact shifts. An interpretation of the number of such contact shifts and their relative intensities correlated with structural information of possible 29Si-M1 and 29Si-M2 configurations, potentially allows for the assignment of specific transition metals to individual M1 or M2 sites. An analysis of the MAS-NMR data will potentially bring a new level of confidence to transition metal site occupancy in forsterite.

  8. NMR Studies of Thermo-responsive Behavior of an Amphiphilic Poly(asparagine) Derivative in Water.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiji; Boutis, Gregory S; Sato, Hiroko; Sekine, Sokei; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2014-01-14

    The thermo-responsive behavior of a unique biocompatible polymer, poly(N-substituted α/β-asparagine) derivative (PAD), has been studied with several NMR methods. The (1)H and (13)C solution NMR measurements of the PAD in DMSO-d6 were used to investigate the isolated polymer and perform spectral assignments. By systematic addition of D2O we have tracked structural changes due to aggregation and observed contraction of hydrophilic side chains. Solution and cross polarization / magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) (13)C NMR approaches were implemented to investigate the aggregates of the PAD aqueous solution during the liquid to gel transition as the temperature was increased. At temperatures near 20 °C, all of the peaks from the PAD were observed in the (13)C CP/MAS and (13)C solution NMR spectra, indicating the presence of polymer chain nodes. Increasing the temperature to 40 °C resulted in a partial disentanglement of the nodes due to thermal agitation and further heating resulted in little to no additional structural changes. Deuterium T1-T2 and T2-T2 two-dimensional relaxation spectroscopies using an inverse Laplace transform, were also implemented to monitor the water-PAD interaction during the phase transition. At temperatures near 20 °C the dynamical characteristics of water were manifested into one peak in the deuterium T1-T2 map. Increasing the temperature to 40 °C resulted in several distinguishable reservoirs of water with different dynamical characteristics. The observation of several reservoirs of water at the temperature of gel formation at 40 °C is consistent with a physical picture of a gel involving a network of interconnected polymer chains trapping a fluid. Further increase in temperature to 70 °C resulted in two non-exchanging water reservoirs probed by deuterium T2-T2 measurements.

  9. Temperature and pressure based NMR studies of detergent micelle phase equilibria.

    PubMed

    Alvares, Rohan; Gupta, Shaan; Macdonald, Peter M; Prosser, R Scott

    2014-05-29

    Bulk thermodynamic and volumetric parameters (ΔGmic°, ΔHmic°, ΔSmic°, ΔCp,mic°, ΔVmic°, and Δκmic°) associated with the monomer–micelle equilibrium, were directly determined for a variety of common detergents [sodium n-dodecyl sulfate (SDS), n-dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC), n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM), and 7-cyclohexyl-1-heptyl phosphocholine (CyF)] via 1H NMR spectroscopy. For each temperature and pressure point, the critical micelle concentration (cmc) was obtained from a single 1H NMR spectrum at a single intermediate concentration by referencing the observed chemical shift to those of pure monomer and pure micellar phases. This permitted rapid measurements of the cmc over a range of temperatures and pressures. In all cases, micelle formation was strongly entropically favored, while enthalpy changes were all positive, with the exception of SDS, which exhibited a modestly negative enthalpy of micellization. Heat capacity changes were also characteristically negative, while partial molar volume changes were uniformly positive, as expected for an aggregation process dictated by hydrophobic effects. Isothermal compressibility changes were found to be consistent with previous measurements using other techniques. Thermodynamic measurements were also related to spectroscopic studies of topology and micelle structure. For example, paramagnetic effects resulting from the addition of dioxygen provided microscopic topological details concerning the hydrophobicity gradient along the detergent chains within their respective micelles as detected by 1H NMR. In a second example, combined 13C and 1H NMR chemical shift changes arising from application of high pressure, or upon micellization, of CyF provided site-specific details regarding micelle topology. In this fashion, bulk thermodynamics could be related to microscopic topological details within the detergent micelle.

  10. Delta15N values of tropical savanna and monsoon forest species reflect root specialisations and soil nitrogen status.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S; Stewart, G R

    2003-03-01

    A large number of herbaceous and woody plants from tropical woodland, savanna, and monsoon forest were analysed to determine the impact of environmental factors (nutrient and water availability, fire) and biological factors (microbial associations, systematics) on plant delta(15)N values. Foliar delta(15)N values of herbaceous and woody species were not related to growth form or phenology, but a strong relationship existed between mycorrhizal status and plant delta(15)N. In woodland and savanna, woody species with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) associations and putative N(2)-fixing species with ECM/arbuscular (AM) associations had lowest foliar delta(15)N values (1.0-0.6 per thousand ), AM species had mostly intermediate delta(15)N values (average +0.6 per thousand ), while non-mycorrhizal Proteaceae had highest delta(15)N values (+2.9 to +4.1 per thousand ). Similar differences in foliar delta(15)N were observed between AM (average 0.1 and 0.2 per thousand ) and non-mycorrhizal (average +0.8 and +0.3 per thousand ) herbaceous species in woodland and savanna. Leguminous savanna species had significantly higher leaf N contents (1.8-2.5% N) than non-fixing species (0.9-1.2% N) indicating substantial N acquisition via N(2) fixation. Monsoon forest species had similar leaf N contents (average 2.4% N) and positive delta(15)N values (+0.9 to +2.4 per thousand ). Soil nitrification and plant NO(3)(-) use was substantially higher in monsoon forest than in woodland or savanna. In the studied communities, higher soil N content and nitrification rates were associated with more positive soil delta(15)N and plant delta(15)N. In support of this notion, Ficus, a high NO(3)(-) using taxa associated with NO(3)(-) rich sites in the savanna, had the highest delta(15)N values of all AM species in the savanna. delta(15)N of xylem sap was examined as a tool for studying plant delta(15)N relations. delta(15)N of xylem sap varied seasonally and between differently aged Acacia and other savanna

  11. Mn(II) binding to human serum albumin: a ¹H-NMR relaxometric study.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Gabriella; Cao, Yu; Ascenzi, Paolo; Fasano, Mauro

    2012-12-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) displays several metal binding sites, participating to essential and toxic metal ions disposal and transport. The major Zn(II) binding site, called Site A, is located at the I/II domain interface, with residues His67, Asn99, His247, and Asp249 contributing with five donor atoms to the metal ion coordination. Additionally, one water molecule takes part of the octahedral coordination geometry. The occurrence of the metal-coordinated water molecule allows the investigation of the metal complex geometry by water (1)H-NMR relaxation, provided that the diamagnetic Zn(II) is replaced by the paramagnetic Mn(II). Here, the (1)H-NMR relaxometric study of Mn(II) binding to HSA is reported. Mn(II) binding to HSA is modulated by Zn(II), pH, and myristate through competitive inhibition and allosteric mechanisms. The body of results indicates that the primary binding site of Zn(II) corresponds to the secondary binding site of Mn(II), i.e. the multimetal binding site A. Excess Zn(II) completely displaces Mn(II) from its primary site suggesting that the primary Mn(II) site corresponds to the secondary Zn(II) site. This uncharacterized site is functionally-linked to FA1; moreover, metal ion binding is modulated by myristate and pH. Noteworthy, water (1)H-NMR relaxometry allowed a detailed analysis of thermodynamic properties of HSA-metal ion complexes.

  12. Structural Studies of Ethylene-1-Octene and Ethylene-Norbornene Random Copolymers by NMR and WAXD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowery, Daniel; Carrilero, Isabel; Alamo, Rufina

    2003-03-01

    The properties of two series of melt-quenched, random ethylene copolymers (comonomer content < 15 moldiscussed. Changes in the crystallite properties with increasing comonomer content, including crystallite thickness reduction from ^13C T1 NMR relaxation times and chain packing from the line widths of crystal NMR spectra, were found to be independent of comonomer type. Analyses of the non-crystalline regions revealed differences. Copolymers with norbornene showed a larger reduction in the peak position of the WAXD amorphous halo relative to copolymers with the same content of 1-octene. The NMR resonance of the amorphous CH2 backbone units was broader in the copolymers with norbornene. Both observations are due to significant conformational differences in the non-crystalline chains with different comonomer type. Interestingly, the overall decrease in ^13C T1 times of the amorphous CH2 backbone units with increasing comonomer content was the same for both copolymer systems. Hence, in the range of comonomer content studied, the rates of fast motions for ethylene segments in the backbone are independent of comonomer type.

  13. Molecular ordering of mixed surfactants in mesoporous silicas: A solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mao, Kanmi; Wang, Shy-Guey; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2011-02-17

    The use of mixed surfactants in the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) is of importance in the context of adjusting pore structures, sizes and morphologies. In the present study, the arrangement of molecules in micelles produced from a mixture of two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was detailed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Proximities of methyl protons in the trimethylammonium headgroup of CTAB and protons in the pyridinium headgroup of CPB were observed under fast magic angle spinning (MAS) by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and NOESY. This result suggested that CTAB and CPB co-exist in the pores without forming significant monocomponent domain structures. {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR showed that protons in the headgroups of CTAB are in closer proximity to the silica surface than those in the CPB headgroups. The structural information obtained in this investigation leads to better understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and their role in determining the structure and morphology of mesoporous materials.

  14. A 140 GHz pulsed EPR/212 MHz NMR spectrometer for DNP studies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Albert A; Corzilius, Björn; Bryant, Jeffrey A; DeRocher, Ronald; Woskov, Paul P; Temkin, Richard J; Griffin, Robert G

    2012-10-01

    We described a versatile spectrometer designed for the study of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at low temperatures and high fields. The instrument functions both as an NMR spectrometer operating at 212 MHz ((1)H frequency) with DNP capabilities, and as a pulsed-EPR operating at 140 GHz. A coiled TE(011) resonator acts as both an NMR coil and microwave resonator, and a double balanced ((1)H, (13)C) radio frequency circuit greatly stabilizes the NMR performance. A new 140 GHz microwave bridge has also been developed, which utilizes a four-phase network and ELDOR channel at 8.75 GHz, that is then multiplied and mixed to obtain 140 GHz microwave pulses with an output power of 120 mW. Nutation frequencies obtained are as follows: 6 MHz on S=1/2 electron spins, 100 kHz on (1)H, and 50 kHz on (13)C. We demonstrate basic EPR, ELDOR, ENDOR, and DNP experiments here. Our solid effect DNP results demonstrate an enhancement of 144 and sensitivity gain of 310 using OX063 trityl at 80 K and an enhancement of 157 and maximum sensitivity gain of 234 using Gd-DOTA at 20 K, which is significantly better performance than previously reported at high fields (≥3 T).

  15. Intrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    We studied the short proton free induction decay signals and the broad 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 77-355 K and 42 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. Using a Gaussian-type back extrapolation procedure for the obscured data of the proton free induction decay signals, we obtained more precise values of the second moments of the Fourier-transformed broad NMR spectra than those in a previous report [Y. Itoh and M. Isobe, http://doi.org/10.7566/JPSJ.84.113601, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84, 113601 (2015)] and compared with the theoretical second moments. The decrease in the second moment could not account for the large decrease in the magnitude of the intrinsic proton spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 from Mg(OH)2 to Ca(OH)2. The analysis of 1/T1 ∝ exp(-Eg/kBT) with Eg ˜ 0.01 eV points to a local hopping mechanism, and that of 1/T1 ∝ Tn with n ˜ 0.5 points to an anharmonic rattling mechanism.

  16. A 140 GHz pulsed EPR/212 MHz NMR spectrometer for DNP studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Bryant, Jeffrey A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-10-01

    We described a versatile spectrometer designed for the study of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at low temperatures and high fields. The instrument functions both as an NMR spectrometer operating at 212 MHz (1H frequency) with DNP capabilities, and as a pulsed-EPR operating at 140 GHz. A coiled TE011 resonator acts as both an NMR coil and microwave resonator, and a double balanced (1H, 13C) radio frequency circuit greatly stabilizes the NMR performance. A new 140 GHz microwave bridge has also been developed, which utilizes a four-phase network and ELDOR channel at 8.75 GHz, that is then multiplied and mixed to obtain 140 GHz microwave pulses with an output power of 120 mW. Nutation frequencies obtained are as follows: 6 MHz on S = 1/2 electron spins, 100 kHz on 1H, and 50 kHz on 13C. We demonstrate basic EPR, ELDOR, ENDOR, and DNP experiments here. Our solid effect DNP results demonstrate an enhancement of 144 and sensitivity gain of 310 using OX063 trityl at 80 K and an enhancement of 157 and maximum sensitivity gain of 234 using Gd-DOTA at 20 K, which is significantly better performance than previously reported at high fields (⩾3 T).

  17. Novel electrolytes for use in new and improved batteries: An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marc B.

    This thesis focuses on the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in order to study materials for use as electrolytes in batteries. The details of four projects are described in this thesis as well as a brief theoretical background of NMR. Structural and dynamics properties were determined using several NMR techniques such as static, MAS, PFG diffusion, and relaxation to understand microscopic and macroscopic properties of the materials described within. Nuclei investigate were 1H, 2H, 7Li, 13C, 19F, 23Na, and 27Al. The first project focuses on an exciting new material to be used as a solid electrolyte membrane. T. The second project focuses on the dynamics of ionic liquid-solvent mixtures and their comparison to molecular dynamics computer simulations. The third project involves a solvent-free film containing NaTFSI salt mixed in to PEO for use in sodium-ion batteries. This final project focuses on a composite electrolyte consisting of a ceramic and solid: LiI:PEO:LiAlO2.

  18. Density functional theory study of (13)C NMR chemical shift of chlorinated compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Songqing; Zhou, Wenfeng; Gao, Haixiang; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-02-01

    The use of the standard density functional theory (DFT) leads to an overestimation of the paramagnetic contribution and underestimation of the shielding constants, especially for chlorinated carbon nuclei. For that reason, the predictions of chlorinated compounds often yield too high chemical shift values. In this study, the WC04 functional is shown to be capable of reducing the overestimation of the chemical shift of Cl-bonded carbons in standard DFT functionals and to show a good performance in the prediction of (13)C NMR chemical shifts of chlorinated organic compounds. The capability is attributed to the minimization of the contributions that intensively increase the chemical shift in the WC04. Extensive computations and analyses were performed to search for the optimal procedure for WC04. The B3LYP and mPW1PW91 standard functionals were also used to evaluate the performance. Through detailed comparisons between the basis set effects and the solvent effects on the results, the gas-phase GIAO/WC04/6-311+G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) was found to be specifically suitable for the prediction of (13)C NMR chemical shifts of chlorides in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated carbons. Further tests with eight molecules in the probe set sufficiently confirmed that WC04 was undoubtedly effective for accurately predicting (13) C NMR chemical shifts of chlorinated organic compounds.

  19. Unilateral NMR, 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy and micro-analytical techniques for studying the materials and state of conservation of an ancient Egyptian wooden sarcophagus.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Noemi; Presciutti, Federica; Di Tullio, Valeria; Doherty, Brenda; Marinelli, Anna Maria; Provinciali, Barbara; Macchioni, Nicola; Capitani, Donatella; Miliani, Costanza

    2011-03-01

    A multi-technique approach was employed to study a decorated Egyptian wooden sarcophagus (XXV-XXVI dynasty, Third Intermediate Period), belonging to the Museo del Vicino Oriente of the Sapienza University of Rome. Portable non-invasive unilateral NMR was applied to evaluate the conservation state of the sarcophagus. Moreover, using unilateral NMR, a non-invasive analytical protocol was established to detect the presence of organic substances on the surface and/or embedded in the wooden matrix. This protocol allowed for an educated sampling campaign aimed at further investigating the state of degradation of the wood and the presence of organic substances by (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy. The composition of the painted layer was analysed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Raman and surface enhanced (resonance) Raman spectroscopy (SERS/SERRS), infrared and GC-MS techniques, evidencing original components such as clay minerals, Egyptian green, indigo, natural gums, and also highlighting restoration pigments and alteration compounds. The identification of the wood, of great value for the reconstruction of the history of the artwork, was achieved by means of optical microscopy.

  20. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant.

    PubMed

    Fenilli, Tatiele A B; Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O S; Trivelin, Paulo C O; Dourado-Neto, Durval

    2007-12-01

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry.

  1. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ15N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Nelson, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the ‘rivermouth effect’). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  2. Plant and Soil Natural Abundance delta-15N: Indicators of Nitrogen Cycling in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.; Lovett, G. M.; Weathers, K.; Arthur, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    We examined the potential use of natural abundance 15N of plants and soils as an indicator of forest nitrogen (N) cycling rates within the Catskill Mountains, NY. These watersheds receive among the highest rates of N deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Many studies have shown a link between increased N cycling rates and 15N enrichment of soil and plant pools. Faster rates of N cycling processes, especially nitrification, lead to fractionation of 14/15N, creating N products that are relatively depleted in 15N. This can lead to enrichment of soil pools, as lighter 14N is lost from the system via leaching or denitrification. Plant N pools can become increasingly enriched as they take up 15N-enriched soil N. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across the Catskill Mountains, forests dominated by different tree species appear to vary in the amount of N retained or lost to nearby streams. To determine if plant and soil 15N could be used as indicators of N cycling rates, we collected foliage, wood, litterfall, organic and mineral soil, and fine roots from single species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine roots and soil 15N were highest within sugar maple stands (p<0.05). Sugar maple soils also had the highest rates of net nitrification and N leaching. Therefore, soil 15N appears to correlate with forest N retention and loss. However, 15N enrichment was highest within foliage, litterfall and wood of beech trees (p<0.05). The decoupling between foliage 15N and N cycling, as well as between 15N of foliage and fine roots, illustrates that it may not be possible to use a single plant pool as an indicator of N cycling rates.

  3. Long-term 15N tracking from biological N fixation across different plant and humus components of the boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroniz-Crespo, Maria; Jones, David L.; Zackrisson, Olle; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2014-05-01

    Biological N2 fixation by cyanobacteria associated with feather mosses is an important cog in the nitrogen (N) cycle of boreal forests; still, our understanding of the turnover and fate of N fixed by this association remains greatly incomplete. The 15N signature of plants and soil serves as a powerful tool to explore N dynamics in forest ecosystems. In particular, in the present study we aimed to investigate the contribution of N2 fixation to δ15N signatures of plants and humus component of the boreal forest. Here we present results from a long-term (7 years) tacking of labelled 15N2 across the humus layer, seedlings of the tree species Pinus sylvestris, two common dwarf shrub species (Empetrum hermaphroditum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and the feather moss Pleurozium schreibery. The enriched experiment was conducted in 2005 in a natural boreal forest in northern Sweden. Two different treatments (10% 15N2 headspace enrichment and control) were setup in nine different plots (0.5 x 0.5 m) within the forest. We observed a significant reduction of δ15N signature of the 15N-enriched moss that could be explained by a growth dilution effect. Nevertheless, after 5 years since 15N2 enrichment some of the label 15N was still detected on the moss and in particular in the dead tissue. We could not detect a clear transfer of the labelled 15N2 from the moss-cyanobacteria system to other components of the ecosystem. However, we found consistence relationship through time between increments of δ15N signature of some of the forest components in plots which exhibited higher N fixation rates in the moss. In particular, changes in natural abundance δ15N that could be associated with N fixation were more apparent in the humus layer, the dwarf shrub Vaccinium vitis-idaea and the pine seedlings when comparing across plots and years.

  4. Phenol-formaldehyde resins: A quantitative NMR study of molecular structure and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottenbourgs, Benjamin Tony

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins have been the subject of this work. 13C liquid-state and solid-state NMR has been used to investigate the molecular structure of mainly novolak and partially of resole resins. 1H wideline in combination with 13C solid-state NMR relaxometry has been applied to study the curing and the molecular dynamics of phenolic resins. It was the intention to provide an insight in the relationship between resin composition, resin structure and subsequent resin properties (by means of the molecular dynamics). An improved 13C liquid-state NMR quantification technique of novolaks in THF-CDCl3 solutions is demonstrated. Full quantitative 13C liquid-state spectra of phenol-formaldehyde resins with high signal- to-noise ratio were obtained by using chromium acetylacetonate under optimized spectral conditions within a few hours spectrometer time. Attached proton test (APT) spectra enabled proper peak assignments in the region with significant overlap. For several novolaks, prepared under different catalytic conditions, the degree of polymerization, degree of branching, number average molecular weight, isomeric distribution, and the number of unreacted ortho and para phenol ring positions was determined with a reduced margin of error, by analyzing and integrating the 13C spectra. The power of 13C solid-state NMR in the analysis of cured PF resins is shown. Particular importance was ascribed to the question of the quantifiability of the experiments when it was desired to measure the degree of conversion by means of a 13C CP/MAS contact time study. The network structure present, and thus also the mechanical properties, is critically dependent upon the final degree of conversion obtained after curing. The degree of conversion, which depended on the cure conditions (cure temperature, cure pressure and cure time), was limited by vitrification as was demonstrated by DSC experiments. Changes in the spin-lattice relaxation time T 1H were observed, providing

  5. a Study of Molecular Dynamics in Water-Cellulose Systems Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waana, Charles Musannyana

    This thesis presents the application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to the study of the water dynamics in water-cellulose systems. Both H_2O and D_2O were used in polycrystalline Sigmacell 50 cellulose and in cellulose acetate films. Both the spectral lineshapes and various spin relaxation times were studied as functions of temperature and moisture content of the samples. ^1H and ^2 H NMR spectra of rm H_2O and rm D_2O absorbed in cellulose acetate films were observed while changing the angle between the plane of the film and the static magnetic field. ^1H-NMR spectra show dipolar splittings that vary depending on the angle. The splitting has a maximum when the surface of the film is perpendicular to the magnetic field. From the angular dependence of the dipolar splittings, it is deduced that the motionally averaged axis of the dipole moments is perpendicular to the film surface. ^2H NMR spectra show quadrupolar splittings which indicate that the motionally averaged axis of the electric quadrupole interaction is oriented perpendicular to the film. A number of NMR parameters were determined as a function of moisture content at 20^circ C for water adsorbed on Sigmacell 50 cellulose. The NMR parameters indicate that the cellulose swells as the water is added. Ninety-two percent of the cellulose is in crystalline domains and undergoes very little swelling indicating that it is largely inaccessible to water, whereas the remaining 8% is in paracrystalline or amorphous domains which are accessible to water and undergo considerable swelling. A three state model is applied for the protons in these samples, consisting of cellulose protons, water in intimate contact with these cellulose portons, and water which is not in intimate contact. Exchange and/or cross relaxation occurs between the three different proton groups. All the data are consistent with this model. An NMR relaxation study of water dynamics in hydrated Sigmacell 50 cellulose and cellulose acetate films has

  6. Binding mechanism of an SH3 domain studied by NMR and ITC.

    PubMed

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2009-04-01

    Complexes between Src-homology 3 domains and proline-rich target peptides can have lifetimes on the order of milliseconds, making them too short-lived for kinetic characterization by conventional methods. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) dynamics experiments are ideally suited to study such rapid binding equilibria, and additionally provide information on partly bound intermediate states. We used NMR together with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to characterize the interaction of the SH3 domain from the Fyn tyrosine kinase with a 12-residue peptide at temperatures between 10 and 50 degrees C. NMR data at all temperatures are consistent with an effectively two-state binding reaction, such that any intermediates are either very weakly populated or exchange extremely rapidly with the free or bound forms. Dissociation rate constants, determined by CPMG and ZZ-exchange NMR experiments, range from k(off)(10 degrees C) = 4.5 s(-1) to k(off)(50 degrees C) = 331 s(-1). ITC data at all temperatures follow a simple two-state interaction model. Binding is favored enthalpically, with a dissociation enthalpy, DeltaH(D)(30 degrees C) = 15.4 kcal mol(-1), and disfavored entropically, with a dissociation entropy, DeltaS(D)(30 degrees C) = 20.0 cal mol(-1) K(-1). The free protein and peptide have significantly higher heat capacity than the bound complex, DeltaC(p) = 352 cal mol(-1) K(-1), which is consistent with the largely hydrophobic character of the binding interface. An Eyring plot of k(off) values gives an activation enthalpy of dissociation, DeltaH(D)(double dagger)(30 degrees C) = 19.3 kcal mol(-1) and exhibits slight curvature consistent with the ITC-derived value of DeltaC(p). The curvature suggests that nonpolar residues of the hydrophobic interface are solvated in the transition state for dissociation. Association rate constants were calculated as k(on) = k(off)/K(D), and range from k(on)(10 degrees C) = 1.03 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) to k(on)(50 degrees C) = 2.0 x 10

  7. A new method to track seed dispersal and recruitment using 15N isotope enrichment.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Tomás A; Tewksbury, Joshua J; Martínez Del Río, Carlos

    2009-12-01

    Seed dispersal has a powerful influence on population dynamics, genetic structuring, evolutionary rates, and community ecology. Yet, patterns of seed dispersal are difficult to measure due to methodological shortcomings in tracking dispersed seeds from sources of interest. Here we introduce a new method to track seed dispersal: stable isotope enrichment. It consists of leaf-feeding plants with sprays of 15N-urea during the flowering stage such that seeds developed after applications are isotopically enriched. We conducted a greenhouse experiment with Solanum americanum and two field experiments with wild Capsicum annuum in southern Arizona, USA, to field-validate the method. First, we show that plants sprayed with 15N-urea reliably produce isotopically enriched progeny, and that delta 15N (i.e., the isotopic ratio) of seeds and seedlings is a linear function of the 15N-urea concentration sprayed on mothers. We demonstrate that three urea dosages can be used to distinctly enrich plants and unambiguously differentiate their offspring after seeds are dispersed by birds. We found that, with high urea dosages, the resulting delta 15N values in seedlings are 10(3) - 10(4) times higher than the delta 15N values of normal plants. This feature allows tracking not only where seeds arrive, but in locations where seeds germinate and recruit, because delta 15N enrichment is detectable in seedlings that have increased in mass by at least two orders of magnitude before fading to normal delta 15N values. Last, we tested a mixing model to analyze seed samples in bulk. We used the delta 15N values of batches (i.e., combined seedlings or seeds captured in seed traps) to estimate the number of enriched seeds coming from isotopically enriched plants in the field. We confirm that isotope enrichment, combined with batch-sampling, is a cheap, reliable, and user-friendly method for bulk-processing seeds and is thus excellent for the detection of rare dispersal events. This method could

  8. NMR Studies in Dodecylphosphocholine of a Fragment Containing the Seventh Transmembrane Helix of a G-Protein-Coupled Receptor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Neumoin, Alexey; Arshava, Boris; Becker, Jeff; Zerbe, Oliver; Naider, Fred

    2007-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of a large segment of Ste2p, the G-protein-coupled α-factor receptor from yeast, were studied in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles using solution NMR spectroscopy. We investigated the 73-residue peptide EL3-TM7-CT40 consisting of the third extracellular loop 3 (EL3), the seventh transmembrane helix (TM7), and 40 residues from the cytosolic C-terminal domain (CT40). The structure reveals the presence of an α-helix in the segment encompassing residues 10–30, which is perturbed around the internal Pro-24 residue. Root mean-square deviation values of individually superimposed helical segments 10–20 and 25–30 were 0.91 ± 0.33 Å and 0.76 ± 0.37 Å, respectively. 15N-relaxation and residual dipolar coupling data support a rather stable fold for the TM7 part of EL3-TM7-CT40, whereas the EL3 and CT40 segments are more flexible. Spin-label data indicate that the TM7 helix integrates into DPC micelles but is flexible around the internal Pro-24 site, exposing residues 22–26 to solution and reveal a second site of interaction with the micelle within a region comprising residues 43–58, which forms part of a less well-defined nascent helix. These findings are discussed in light of previous studies in organic-aqueous solvent systems. PMID:17449670

  9. High-resolution /sup 1/H NMR study of the solution structure of alamethicin

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, G.; Carver, J.A.; Boyd, J.; Campbell, I.D.

    1987-02-24

    A /sup 1/H NMR study of the peptide alamethicin, which forms voltage-gated ion channels in membranes, is described. The molecule was studied in methanol as a function of temperature and pH. A complete assignment of the spectra is given, including several stereospecific assignments. Alamethicin was found to have a structure substantially similar to the crystal although, in solution, the C-terminal dipeptide adopts a somewhat extended conformation. The overall conformation was insensitive to the ionization of the side chain of the ionizable group, Glu-18.

  10. A comparative study between para-aminophenyl and ortho-aminophenyl benzothiazoles using NMR and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Pierens, G K; Venkatachalam, T K; Reutens, D

    2014-08-01

    Ortho-substituted and para-substituted aminophenyl benzothiazoles were synthesised and characterised using NMR spectroscopy. A comparison of the proton chemical shift values reveals significant differences in the observed chemical shift values for the NH protons indicating the presence of a hydrogen bond in all ortho-substituted compounds as compared to the para compounds. The presence of intramolecular hydrogen bond in the ortho amino substituted aminophenyl benzothiazole forces the molecule to be planar which may be an additional advantage in developing these compounds as Alzheimer's imaging agent because the binding to amyloid fibrils prefers planar compounds. The splitting pattern of the methylene proton next to the amino group also showed significant coupling to the amino proton consistent with the notion of the existence of slow exchange and hydrogen bond in the ortho-substituted compounds. This is further verified by density functional theory calculations which yielded a near planar low energy conformer for all the o-aminophenyl benzothiazoles and displayed a hydrogen bond from the amine proton to the nitrogen of the thiazole ring. A detailed analysis of the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts and density functional theory calculated structures of the compounds are described.

  11. Solution NMR studies provide structural basis for endotoxin pattern recognition by the innate immune receptor CD14

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Seth; Chen Bin; Holbrook, Kristen; Jain, Nitin U.

    2008-04-04

    CD14 functions as a key pattern recognition receptor for a diverse array of Gram-negative and Gram-positive cell-wall components in the host innate immune response by binding to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) at partially overlapping binding site(s). To determine the potential contribution of CD14 residues in this pattern recognition, we have examined using solution NMR spectroscopy, the binding of three different endotoxin ligands, lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, and a PGN-derived compound, muramyl dipeptide to a {sup 15}N isotopically labeled 152-residue N-terminal fragment of sCD14 expressed in Pichia pastoris. Mapping of NMR spectral changes upon addition of ligands revealed that the pattern of residues affected by binding of each ligand is partially similar and partially different. This first direct structural observation of the ability of specific residue combinations of CD14 to differentially affect endotoxin binding may help explain the broad specificity of CD14 in ligand recognition and provide a structural basis for pattern recognition. Another interesting finding from the observed spectral changes is that the mode of binding may be dynamically modulated and could provide a mechanism for binding endotoxins with structural diversity through a common binding site.

  12. Macroalgae δ15N values in well-mixed estuaries: Indicator of anthropogenic nitrogen input or macroalgae metabolism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Guillou, Gaël; Mornet, Françoise; Richard, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Although nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in macroalgae is widely used as a bioindicator of anthropogenic nitrogen inputs to the coastal zone, recent studies suggest the possible role of macroalgae metabolism in δ15N variability. Simultaneous determinations of δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) along the land-sea continuum, inter-species variability of δ15N and its sensitivity to environmental factors are necessary to confirm the efficiency of macroalgae δ15N in monitoring nitrogen origin in mixed-use watersheds. In this study, δ15N of annual and perennial macroalgae (Ulva sp., Enteromorpha sp., Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus) are compared to δ15N-DIN along the Charente Estuary, after characterizing δ15N of the three main DIN sources (i.e. cultivated area, pasture, sewage treatment plant outlet). During late winter and spring, when human activities produce high DIN inputs, DIN sources exhibit distinct δ15N signals in nitrate (NO) and ammonium (NH): cultivated area (+6.5 ± 0.6‰ and +9.0 ± 11.0‰), pasture (+9.2 ± 1.8‰ and +12.4‰) and sewage treatment plant discharge (+16.9 ± 8.7‰ and +25.4 ± 5.9‰). While sources show distinct δN- in this multiple source catchment, the overall mixture of NO sources - generally >95% DIN - leads to low variations of δN-NO at the mouth of the estuary (+7.7 to +8.4‰). Even if estuarine δN-NO values are not significantly different from pristine continental and oceanic site (+7.3‰ and +7.4‰), macroalgae δ15N values are generally higher at the mouth of the estuary. This highlights high anthropogenic DIN inputs in the estuary, and enhanced contribution of 15N-depleted NH in oceanic waters. Although seasonal variations in δN-NO are low, the same temporal trends in macroalgae δ15N values at estuarine and oceanic sites, and inter-species differences in δ15N values, suggest that macroalgae δ15N values might be modified by the metabolic response of macroalgae to environmental parameters (e

  13. Characterization of filter extractables by proton NMR spectroscopy: studies on intact filters with process buffers.

    PubMed

    Kao, Y H; Bender, J; Hagewiesche, A; Wong, P; Huang, Y; Vanderlaan, M

    2001-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize potential extractables from sterilizing grade filters. The focus of this report is the 0.22 micron Durapore (hydrophilic modified PVDF) filter which is used throughout our recovery processes. The objectives of this study are (1) to identify potential filter extractables from the hydrophilic PVDF filters; (2) to show that NMR spectroscopy may be used to detect filter extractables in the presence of product and excipients; and (3) to establish levels of filter extractables obtained by extraction with a variety of buffers. The data show that the primary source of filter extractables is the hydrophilic modification of the PVDF membrane surface. Extractables from the modified hydrophilic PVDF filter include propylene glycol (PG) and soluble oligomers of the hydroxypropyl acrylate and cross-linker. Propylene glycol, arising from the hydrolysis of the hydroxypropyl acrylate, appears to be the primary extractable in buffers above pH 11. Since the 1H-NMR method can easily detect the methyl proton signals of PG, an NMR assay was developed to detect PG in the presence of buffer excipients and final product. Propylene glycol can be used as a marker for the extractables from Durapore hydrophilic PVDF filters. Although numerous buffers were used to generate extractables from the PVDF filter, significant extractables (PG and soluble oligomers) were found only in high pH extraction buffers. As a result of this finding, only a limited number of new buffers or new PVDF filters will require testing for future validation studies. Process validation studies have shown that neither PG nor soluble oligomers are at levels that impact the quality or safety of the product.

  14. Advanced solids NMR studies of coal structure and chemistry. Progress report, March 1 - September 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1996-12-31

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utili- zation of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NNM methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methine groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. We will also develop NMR methods for probing coal macropore structure using hyperpolarized {sup 29}Xe as a probe, and study the molecular dynamics of what appear to be mobile, CH{sub 2} rich, long chain hydrocarbons. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples.

  15. Enrichment of natural (15)N abundance during soil N losses under 20years of continuous cereal cropping.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew R; Dalal, Ram C

    2017-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the enrichment of natural (15)N abundance in soil over time is reflective of historic N cycling and loss, but this process in cropping soils is not yet clear. In this study, we identified an enrichment gradient of natural (15)N abundance during 20-year chronosequence of cereal cropping on Alfisols in southwest Queensland, Australia, that have no history of fertilisation. We demonstrate that the increase in soil (15)N abundance is explained by isotopic fractionation of (15)N during organic N mineralisation and nitrification, which lead to isotopically heavier ammonium retained in the soil and isotopically lighter soil nitrate taken up and removed by seasonal crops during harvest. Here we present a framework for natural (15)N isotopic fractionation co-occurring with N losses during long-term cultivation.

  16. Detection of platinum dihydride bisphosphine complexes and studies of their reactivity through para-hydrogen-enhanced NMR methods.

    PubMed

    Godard, Cyril; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Gálvez-López, María-Dolores; Roselló-Merino, Marta; Duckett, Simon B; Khazal, Iman; Lledós, Agustí; Whitwood, Adrian C

    2008-01-01

    In-situ NMR studies on the reactions of Pt{CH2 = CHSi(Me)2}2O)(PCy3) with phosphines, HSiEt3 and--hydrogen or Pt(L)(L')(Me)(2) alone enable the detection of cis-Pt(L)(L')(H)2 [L = PCy3 and L' = PCy2H, PPh3 or PCy3] which then undergo hydride site interchange and H2 reductive elimination on the NMR timescale.

  17. A NMR reverse diffusion filter for the simplification of spectra of complex mixtures and the study of drug receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Vega-Vázquez, M; Cobas, J C; Oliveira de Sousa, F F; Martin-Pastor, M

    2011-08-01

    A reverse diffusion filter NMR experiment (Drev) is proposed for the study of small molecules in binding with macromolecules. The filtering efficiency of Drev to eliminate the signals of the macromolecule is shown to be superior to conventional transverse relaxation filters at least for macromolecules containing a significant fraction of flexible residues. The Drev filter was also a useful complement for ligand-based NMR screening in combination with saturation transfer difference experiments.

  18. NMR STUDIES OF LIQUID CRYSTALS AND MOLECULES DISSOLVED IN LIQUID CRYSTAL SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Drobny, G.P.

    1982-11-01

    This thesis describes several studies in which nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure, orientation and dynamics of liquid crystal mesogens and molecules dissolved in liquid crystalline phases. In addition, a modern high field nmr spectrometer is described which has been used to perform such nmr studies. Chapter 1 introduces the quantum mechanical formalisms used throughout this thesis and briefly reviews the fundamentals of nuclear spin physics and pulsed nmr spectroscopy. First the density operator is described and a specific form for the canonical ensemble is derived. Then Clebsch-Gordon coefficients, Wigner rotation matrices, and irreducible tensor operators are reviewed. An expression for the equilibrium (Curie) magnetization is obtained and the linear response of a spin system to a strong pulsed r.f. irradiation is described. Finally, the spin interaction Hamiltonians relevant to this work are reviewed together with their truncated forms. Chapter 2 is a deuterium magnetic resonance study of two 'nom' liquid crystals which possess several low temperature mesomorphic phases. Specifically, deuterium quadrupolar echo spectroscopy is used to determine the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules in smectic phases, the changes in molecular orientation and motion that occur at smectic-smectic phase transitions, and the order of the phase transitions. For both compounds, the phase sequence is determined to be isotropic, nematic, smectic A, smectic C, smectic B{sub A}, smectic B{sub C}, and crystalline. The structure of the smectic A phase is found to be consistent with the well-known model of a two dimensional liquid in which molecules are rapidly rotating about their long axes and oriented at right angles to the plane of the layers. Molecules in the smectic C phase are found to have their long axes tilted with respect to the layer normal, and the tilt angle is temperature dependent, increasing from zero at the smectic A

  19. (1)H chemical shift differences of Prelog-Djerassi lactone derivatives: DFT and NMR conformational studies.

    PubMed

    Aímola, Túlio J; Lima, Dimas J P; Dias, Luiz C; Tormena, Cláudio F; Ferreira, Marco A B

    2015-02-21

    This work reports an experimental and theoretical study of the conformational preferences of several Prelog-Djerassi lactone derivatives, to elucidate the (1)H NMR chemical shift differences in the lactonic core that are associated with the relative stereochemistry of these derivatives. The boat-like conformation of explains the anomalous (1)H chemical shift between H-5a and H-5b, in which the two methyl groups (C-8 and C-9) face H-5b, leading to its higher shielding effect.

  20. [1H-NMR studies of the ACTH-like immunoregulatory peptides].

    PubMed

    Khristoforov, V S; Kutyshenko, V P; Abramov, V M; Zav'ialov, V P

    1997-01-01

    A comparative study of the conformational and dynamics properties of the ACTH-like linear peptides, sequences of which correspond to amino acid residues 11-20 of the heavy chain of human immunoglobulin G1 Eu, residues 78-85 of human pro-interleukin-1 alpha and site 10-18 of human ACTH, was performed in aqueous solution and dimethylsulfoxide by 1H-NMR spectroscopy at 400 MHz. The peptides were shown to possess an unordered unfolded flexible conformation in aqueous solution. The revealed structural and dynamic features of the peptides are discussed together with biological activity of this class of compounds.

  1. Methanol carbonylation over copper-modified mordenite zeolite: A solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Qi, Guodong; Su, Yongchao; Li, Jing; Zheng, Anmin; Yi, Xianfeng; Wang, Qiang; Deng, Feng

    2016-11-01

    The carbonylation of methanol with carbon monoxide to generate methyl acetate over Cu-H-MOR and H-MOR zeolites is studied using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. It is found that the catalytic activity of Cu-H-MOR zeolite is much higher than that of H-MOR zeolite. The presence of Cu(+) species enables the stabilization of dimethyl ether, which efficiently suppresses the hydrocarbon formation during carbonylation process over Cu-H-MOR zeolite. In addition, the carbon monoxide adsorbed on Cu(+) site is not an active species to produce either methyl acetate or acetic acid.

  2. NMR study on iridium(III) complexes for identifying disulfonate substituted bathophenanthroline regio-isomers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenchen; Yu, Linpo; Liu, Yang; Li, Fang; Zhou, Ming

    2011-12-01

    A series of novel biscyclometalated iridium (III) complexes with an ancillary disulfonated bathophenanthroline (DSBP(2-)) ligand, Ir(L)(2)DSBPNa, L = 2-phenylpyridine (ppy), 2,4-difluorophenylpyridine (fppy), and 1-phenylisoquinoline (piq) were found to have two isomeric forms. The chemical structures of the isomers were determined by the one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C NMR studies. The isomeric state was proved to have originated from the disulfonate-related regio-isomer of the DSBP(2-) ligand.

  3. Solid state NMR study of dietary fiber powders from aronia, bilberry, black currant and apple.

    PubMed

    Wawer, I; Wolniak, M; Paradowska, K

    2006-09-01

    13C CPMAS NMR spectra of dietary fiber powders from aronia (chokeberry), bilberry, black currant and apple were recorded. The spectra are complex owing to superposition of resonances from different polysaccharides and polyphenolic compounds. Standard, dipolar dephased and the TH(1rho) partially relaxed spectra enabled the identification of several constituents: microcrystalline cellulose, pectins, lignins, cutin-like polymers and condensed tannins. The fiber powders obtained from berries contain significant amounts of anthocyanins, as indicated by their dark violet color, but not verified by chemical shifts. The anthocyanin-rich extract from aronia berries and its major components, cyanidin-3-O-galactoside and (-)epicatechin were also studied.

  4. Thermal degradation in a trimodal poly(dimethylsiloxane) network studied by (1)H multiple quantum NMR.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jason R; Gjersing, Erica L; Chinn, Sarah C; Jones, Ticora V; Wilson, Thomas S; Alviso, Cynthia T; Herberg, Julie L; Pearson, Mark A; Maxwell, Robert S

    2007-11-15

    Thermal degradation of a filled, cross-linked siloxane material synthesized from poly(dimethylsiloxane) chains of three different average molecular weights and with two different cross-linking species has been studied by (1)H multiple quantum (MQ) NMR methods. Multiple domains of polymer chains were detected by MQ NMR exhibiting residual dipolar coupling () values of 200 and 600 Hz, corresponding to chains with high average molecular weight between cross-links and chains with low average molecular weight between cross-links or near the multifunctional cross-linking sites. Characterization of the values and changes in distributions present in the material were studied as a function of time at 250 degrees C and indicate significant time-dependent degradation. For the domains with low , a broadening in the distribution was observed with aging time. For the domain with high , increases in both the mean and the width in were observed with increasing aging time. Isothermal thermal gravimetric analysis reveals a 3% decrease in weight over 20 h of aging at 250 degrees C. Degraded samples also were analyzed by traditional solid-state (1)H NMR techniques, and off-gassing products were identified by solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results, which will be discussed here, suggest that thermal degradation proceeds by complex competition between oxidative chain scissioning and postcuring cross-linking that both contribute to embrittlement.

  5. A stable amorphous statin: solid-state NMR and dielectric studies on dynamic heterogeneity of simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Teresa G; Viciosa, M Teresa; Correia, Natália T; Danède, F; Nunes, Rita G; Diogo, Hermínio P

    2014-03-03

    Statins have been widely used as cholesterol-lowering agents. However, low aqueous solubility of crystalline statins and, consequently, reduced biovailability require seeking for alternative forms and formulations to ensure an accurate therapeutic window. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the stability of amorphous simvastatin by probing molecular dynamics using two nondestructive techniques: solid-state NMR and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Glassy simvastatin was obtained by the melt quench technique. (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectra and (1)H MAS NMR spectra were obtained from 293 K up to 333 K (Tg ≈ 302 K). The (13)C spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame, T1ρ, were measured as a function of temperature, and the correlation time and activation energy data obtained for local motions in different frequency scales revealed strong dynamic heterogeneity, which appears to be essential for the stability of the amorphous form of simvastatin. In addition, the (1)H MAS measurements presented evidence for mobility of the hydrogen atoms in hydroxyl groups which was assigned to noncooperative secondary relaxations. The complex dielectric permittivity of simvastatin was monitored in isochronal mode at five frequencies (from 0.1 to 1000 kHz), by carrying out a heating/cooling cycle allowing to obtain simvastatin in the supercooled and glassy states. The results showed that no dipolar moment was lost due to immobilization, thus confirming that no crystallization had taken place. Complementarily, the present study focused on the thermal stability of simvastatin using thermogravimetric analysis while the thermal events were followed up by differential scanning calorimetry and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Overall, the results confirm that the simvastatin in the glass form reveals a potential use in the solid phase formulation on the pharmaceutical industry.

  6. Direct observation of millisecond to second motions in proteins by dipolar CODEX NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; deAzevedo, Eduardo; Linser, Rasmus; Reif, Bernd; Saalwächter, Kay; Reichert, Detlef

    2009-09-02

    We present a site-resolved study of slow (ms to s) motions in a protein in the solid (microcrystalline) state performed with the use of a modified version of the centerband-only detection of exchange (CODEX) NMR experiment. CODEX was originally based on measuring changes in molecular orientation by means of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor, and in our modification, angular reorientations of internuclear vectors are observed. The experiment was applied to the study of slow (15)N-(1)H motions of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin. The protein was perdeuterated with partial back-exchange of protons at labile sites. This allowed indirect (proton) detection of (15)N nuclei and thus a significant enhancement of sensitivity. The diluted proton system also made negligible proton-driven spin diffusion between (15)N nuclei, which interferes with the molecular exchange (motion) and hampers the acquisition of dynamic parameters. The experiment has shown that approximately half of the peaks in the 2D (15)N-(1)H correlation spectrum exhibit exchange in a different extent. The correlation time of the slow motion for most peaks is 1 to 3 s. This is the first NMR study of the internal dynamics of proteins in the solid state on the millisecond to second time scale with site-specific spectral resolution that provides both time-scale and geometry information about molecular motions.

  7. 14N15N detectability in Pluto’s atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, Kandis Lea; Gladstone, G. R.; Heays, A. N.; Gibson, S. T.; Lewis, B. R.; Stark, G.

    2013-11-01

    Based on the vapor pressure behavior of Pluto’s surface ices, Pluto’s atmosphere is expected to be predominantly composed of N2 gas. Measurement of the N2 isotopologue 15N/14N ratio within Pluto’s atmosphere would provide important clues to the evolution of Pluto’s atmosphere from the time of formation to its present state. The most straightforward way of determining the N2 isotopologue 15N/14N ratio in Pluto’s atmosphere is via spectroscopic observation of the 14N15N gas species. Recent calculations of the 80-100 nm absorption behavior of the 14N2 and 14N15N isotopologues by Heays et al. (Heays, A.N. et al. [2011]. J. Chem. Phys. 135, 244301), Lewis et al. (Lewis, B.R., Heays, A.N., Gibson, S.T., Lefebvre-Brion, H., Lefebvre, R. [2008]. J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164306); Lewis et al. (Lewis, B.R., Gibson, S.T., Zhang, W., Lefebvre-Brion, H., Robbe, J.-M. [2005]. J. Chem. Phys. 122, 144302), and Haverd et al. (Haverd, V.E., Lewis, B.R., Gibson, S.T., Stark, G. [2005]. J. Chem. Phys. 123, 214304) show that the peak magnitudes of the 14N2 and 14N15N absorption bandhead cross-sections are similar, but the locations of the bandhead peaks are offset in wavelength by ∼0.05-0.1 nm. These offsets make the segregation of the 14N2 and 14N15N absorption signatures possible. We use the most recent N2 isotopologue absorption cross-section calculations and the atmospheric density profiles resulting from photochemical models developed by Krasnopolsky and Cruickshank (Krasnopolsky, V.A., Cruickshank, D.P. [1999]. J. Geophys. Res. 104, 21979-21996) to predict the level of solar light that will be transmitted through Pluto’s atmosphere as a function of altitude during a Pluto solar occultation. We characterize the detectability of the isotopic absorption signature per altitude assuming 14N15N concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 2% of the 14N2 density and instrumental spectral resolutions ranging from 0.01 to 0.3 nm. Our simulations indicate that optical depth of unity is

  8. Determination of γ -ray widths in 15N using nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szücs, T.; Bemmerer, D.; Caciolli, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Massarczyk, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Schwengner, R.; Takács, M. P.; Ur, C. A.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, L.

    2015-07-01

    Background: The stable nucleus 15N is the mirror of 15O, the bottleneck in the hydrogen burning CNO cycle. Most of the 15N level widths below the proton emission threshold are known from just one nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurement, with limited precision in some cases. A recent experiment with the AGATA demonstrator array determined level lifetimes using the Doppler shift attenuation method in 15O. As a reference and for testing the method, level lifetimes in 15N have also been determined in the same experiment. Purpose: The latest compilation of 15N level properties dates back to 1991. The limited precision in some cases in the compilation calls for a new measurement to enable a comparison to the AGATA demonstrator data. The widths of several 15N levels have been studied with the NRF method. Method: The solid nitrogen compounds enriched in 15N have been irradiated with bremsstrahlung. The γ rays following the deexcitation of the excited nuclear levels were detected with four high-purity germanium detectors. Results: Integrated photon-scattering cross sections of 10 levels below the proton emission threshold have been measured. Partial γ -ray widths of ground-state transitions were deduced and compared to the literature. The photon-scattering cross sections of two levels above the proton emission threshold, but still below other particle emission energies have also been measured, and proton resonance strengths and proton widths were deduced. Conclusions: Gamma and proton widths consistent with the literature values were obtained, but with greatly improved precision.

  9. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-29

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP), have been studied in depth and have different features, challenging our ability to extract design principles. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin represent a challenging but necessary step to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids and silaffin peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of proteins interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniquesmore » have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet, the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multi-dimensional techniques is advancing, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area.« less

  10. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-29

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP), have been studied in depth and have different features, challenging our ability to extract design principles. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin represent a challenging but necessary step to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids and silaffin peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of proteins interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniques have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet, the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multi-dimensional techniques is advancing, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area.

  11. Proton NMR studies of PECVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and HWCVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberg, Julie Lynn

    This dissertation discusses a new understanding of the internal structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Recent research in our group has included nuclear spin echo double resonance (SEDOR) measurements on device quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaic films. Using the SEDOR pulse sequence with and without the perturbing 29Si pulse, we obtain Fourier transform spectra for film at 80K that allows us to distinguish between molecular hydrogen and hydrogen bonded to silicon. Using such an approach, we have demonstrated that high quality a-Si:H films produced by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) from SiH 4 contains about ten atomic percent hydrogen, nearly 40% of which is molecular hydrogen, individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of tetragonal sites (T-sites). The main objective of this dissertation is to examine the difference between a-Si:H made by PECVD techniques and a-Si:H made by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) techniques. Proton NMR and 1H- 29Si SEDOR NMR are used to examine the hydrogen structure of HWCVD a-Si:H films prepared at the University of Utrecht and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Past NMR studies have shown that high quality PECVD a-Si:H films have geometries in which 40% of the contained hydrogen is present as H2 molecules individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of T-sites. A much smaller H2 fraction sometimes is physisorbed on internal surfaces. In this dissertation, similar NMR methods are used to perform structural studies of the two HWCVD aSi:H samples. The 3kHz resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole-burn behavior similar to that found for PECVD a-Si:H films as does the 24kHz FWHM line from clustered hydrogen bonded to silicon. Radio frequency hole-burning is a tool to distinguish between inhomogenous and homogeneous broadening. In the hole-burn experiments, the 3kHz FWHM resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole

  12. Solid state NMR and LVSEM studies on the hardening of latex modified tile mortar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rottstegge, J.; Arnold, M.; Herschke, L.; Glasser, G.; Wilhelm, M.; Spiess, H.W. . E-mail: spiess@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hergeth, W.D.

    2005-12-15

    Construction mortars contain a broad variety of both inorganic and organic additives beside the cement powder. Here we present a study of tile mortar systems based on portland cement, quartz, methyl cellulose and different latex additives. As known, the methyl cellulose stabilizes the freshly prepared cement paste, the latex additive enhances final hydrophobicity, flexibility and adhesion. Measurements were performed by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) to probe the influence of the latex additives on the hydration, hardening and the final tile mortar properties. While solid state NMR enables monitoring of the bulk composition, scanning electron microscopy affords visualization of particles and textures with respect to their shape and the distribution of the different phases. Within the alkaline cement paste, the poly(vinyl acetate) (VAc)-based latex dispersions stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were found to be relatively stable against hydrolysis. The influence of the combined organic additives methyl cellulose, poly(vinyl alcohol) and latexes stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) on the final silicate structure of the cement hydration products is small. But even small amounts of additives result in an increased ratio of ettringite to monosulfate within the final hydrated tile mortar as monitored by {sup 27}Al NMR. The latex was found to be adsorbed to the inorganic surfaces, acting as glue to the inorganic components. For similar latex water interfaces built up by poly(vinyl alcohol), a variation in the latex polymer composition results in modified organic textures. In addition to the networks of the inorganic cement and of the latex, there is a weak network build up by thin polymer fibers, most probably originating from poly(vinyl alcohol). Besides the weak network, polymer fibers form well-ordered textures covering inorganic crystals such as portlandite.

  13. Local electromagnetic properties of magnetic pnictides: a comparative study probed by NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Majumder, M; Ghoshray, K; Ghoshray, A; Pal, A; Awana, V P S

    2013-05-15

    (75)As and (31)P NMR studies are performed in PrCoAsO and NdCoPO respectively. The Knight shift data in PrCoAsO indicate the presence of an antiferromagnetic interaction between the 4f moments along the c axis in the ferromagnetic state of Co 3d moments. We propose a possible spin structure in this system. The (75)As quadrupolar coupling constant, νQ, increases continuously with decrease of temperature and is found to vary linearly with the intrinsic spin susceptibility, K(iso). This indicates the possibility of the presence of a coupling between charge density and spin density fluctuations. Further, the (31)P NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) in the paramagnetic state of NdCoPO indicate that the differences of LaCoPO and NdCoPO from SmCoPO are due to the decrement of the interlayer separation and not due to the moments of the 4f electrons. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) in NdCoPO shows weak anisotropy at 300 K. Using the self-consistent renormalization (SCR) theory of itinerant ferromagnets, it is shown that in the ab plane, the spin fluctuations are three-dimensional ferromagnetic in nature. From SCR theory the important spin-fluctuation parameters (T0, TA, F¯1) are evaluated. The similarities and dissimilarities of the NMR results in As and P based systems with different rare earths are also discussed.

  14. Chain orientation in natural rubber, Part II: 2H-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Rault, J; Marchal, J; Judeinstein, P; Albouy, P A

    2006-11-01

    Stress-induced crystallisation (SIC) and stress-induced melting (SIM) in natural rubbers (NR), unfilled and filled with carbon black (CB) have been studied by (2)H-NMR measurements. Various materials have been swollen with small amount (< 2%) of deuterated alkane chains. The orientation of the amorphous chains, then the local deformation of the amorphous chains during deformation cycles and during stress relaxation, permits to clarify the SIC and SIM processes during hardening and recovery. By mechanical, WAXS and NMR measurements one determines the same critical draw ratio for appearance lambda(A) and disappearance lambda(E) of the crystallites. It is demonstrated that the hysteresis observed by the different techniques (stress sigma, crystallinity chi, NMR splitting Deltanu) are due to the supercooling effect ( lambda(A) > lambda(E), at constant temperature). During hardening at constant strain rate it is found that the local draw ratio remains constant and equal to lambda(A), whereas the crystallinity increases linearly with the macroscopic draw ratio lambda. The hardening sigma approximately (lambda - lambda(A))(2) is then interpreted as a reinforcement effect due to the crystallites, which act as new crosslinks. This confirms the prediction of Flory. In filled rubber the same effects are observed, and the stress amplification factor is determined as a function of the CB content. It is found that the fillers act as nucleation centres for the NR crystallites. The reinforcement of such materials is due principally to this nucleation effect and to the presence of a super network formed by both the NR crystallites and the CB fillers.

  15. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Brian Finley

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  16. Multinuclear NMR study of the solvated electron in lithium-methylamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Holton, D.M.; Edwards, P.P.; McFarlane, W.; Wood, B.

    1983-04-20

    We report a multinuclear NMR study of lithium-methylamine solutions. NMR Knight shift data for solvent (/sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 14/N) and metal (/sup 6/Li, /sup 7/Li) nuclei are reported for concentrations from 2 mol % lithium to saturation at ca 200 K. The NMR results have been used in conjunction with recent magnetic susceptibility measurements on the title system to provide a precise description of the unpaired-electron spin-density distribution in both the solvated electron, e/sub s//sup -/, and lithium monomer species, Li/sup +//sub s/e/sup -//sub s/. For both species, the vast majority of the unpaired-electron spin density resides in the nitrogen fragment of the solvent molecule. As with metal-ammonia solutions, we also find a small, negative spin density in the /sup 1/H is orbital. The occupancy of the /sup 6/Li and /sup 7/Li 2s orbital in the electron-cation aggregate species Li/sup +//sub s/e/sub s//sup -/ corresponds to approximately 0.5% of the lithium free-atom value for a 7 mol % metal solution. We conclude that the excess-electron species in lithium-methylamine solutions resides in a ground-state orbital which is composed of a simple 1s-like orbital for the electron within a solvent cavity in combination with a set of Rydberg-like orbitals derived from the 3s orbitals of the host solvent matrix.

  17. Interaction of melittin with mixed phospholipid membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine studied by deuterium NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, C.; Bitbol, M.; Watts, A. )

    1989-08-08

    The interaction of bee venom melittin with mixed phospholipid bilayers composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine deuterated in the {alpha}- and {beta}-methylenes of the choline head group (DMPC-d{sub 4}) and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine deuterated in the {alpha}-methylene and {beta}-CH positions of the serine head group (DMPS-d{sub 3}) was studied in ternary mixtures by using deuterium NMR spectroscopy. The changes in the deuterium quadrupole splittings of the head-group deuteriomethylenes of DMPC-d{sub 4} induced by DMPS in binary mixtures were systematically reversed by increasing concentrations of melittin, so that at a melittin concentration of 4 mol % relative to total lipid the deuterium NMR spectrum from DMPC-d{sub 4} in the ternary mixture was similar to the spectrum from pure DMPC-d{sub 4} bilayers. The absence of deuterium NMR signals arising from melittin-bound DMPS in ternary mixtures containing DMPS-d{sub 3} indicates that the reversal by melittin of the effects of DMPS on the quadrupole splittings of DMPC-d{sub 4} results from the response of the choline head group to the net surface charge rather than from phase separation of melittin-DMPS complexes. The similarity in the effects of the two cationic but otherwise dissimilar peptides indicates that the DMPS head group responds to the surface charge resulting from the presence in the bilayer of charged amphiphiles, in a manner analogous to the response of the choline head group of phosphatidylcholine to the bilayer surface charge. The presence of DMPS greatly stabilized DMPC bilayers with respect to melittin-induced micellization, indicating that the latter effect of melittin may not be important for the hemolytic activity of the peptide.

  18. Optimizing nanodiscs and bicelles for solution NMR studies of two β-barrel membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kucharska, Iga; Edrington, Thomas C.; Liang, Binyong

    2015-01-01

    Solution NMR spectroscopy has become a robust method to determine structures and explore the dynamics of integral membrane proteins. The vast majority of previous studies on membrane proteins by solution NMR have been conducted in lipid micelles. Contrary to the lipids that form a lipid bilayer in biological membranes, micellar lipids typically contain only a single hydrocarbon chain or two chains that are too short to form a bilayer. Therefore, there is a need to explore alternative more bilayer-like media to mimic the natural environment of membrane proteins. Lipid bicelles and lipid nanodiscs have emerged as two alternative membrane mimetics that are compatible with solution NMR spectroscopy. Here, we have conducted a comprehensive comparison of the physical and spectroscopic behavior of two outer membrane proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, OprG and OprH, in lipid micelles, bicelles, and nanodiscs of five different sizes. Bicelles stabilized with a fraction of negatively charged lipids yielded spectra of almost comparable quality as in the best micellar solutions and the secondary structures were found to be almost indistinguishable in the two environments. Of the five nanodiscs tested, nanodiscs assembled from MSP1D1ΔH5 performed the best with both proteins in terms of sample stability and spectral resolution. Even in these optimal nanodiscs some broad signals from the membrane embedded barrel were severely overlapped with sharp signals from the flexible loops making their assignments difficult. A mutant OprH that had two of the flexible loops truncated yielded very promising spectra for further structural and dynamical analysis in MSP1D1ΔH5 nanodiscs. PMID:25869397

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in vivo studies: known thresholds for health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, T.F.

    1981-12-01

    Three sources of harmful health effects from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in vivo techniques have been examined with the following conclusions: (a) Static magnetic fields. Harmful effects on humans and reproducible cellular, biochemical, or genetic effects have not yet been observed at fields less than 2 Tesla (20,000 gauss). (b) Changing magnetic fields. The threshold for effects of induced currents is above that produced from <1 to 100 Hz sinusoidal field changes with a maximum field of 5 mT (50 gauss). Waveform, repetition rate, maximum B field, and duration of exposure are parameters requiring further study, (c) Radiofrequency (RF) heating. A practical upper level for absorbed power is 4 W/kg in medically important studies of short duration (less than 10 min). For long-term studies, 1.5 W/kg is a reasonable level in low humidity environments. The power absorbed by the subject can be estimated by measuring the RF coil Q before and after the subject is placed in the NMR instrument. Large metal objects will absorb power in proportion to the conductivity of the device of prosthesis.

  20. Review of NMR studies of nanoscale molecular magnets composed of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic triangles

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies performed on three nanoscale molecular magnets with different novel configurations of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic (AFM) triangles: (1) the isolated single AFM triangle K6[V15As6O42(H2O)]·8H2O (in short V15), (2) the spin ball [Mo72Fe30O252(Mo2O7(H2O))2(Mo2O8H2(H2O)) (CH3COO)12(H2O)91]·150H2O (in short Fe30 spin ball), and (3) the twisted triangular spin tube [(CuCl2tachH)3Cl]Cl2 (in short Cu3 spin tube). In V15t, from 51V NMR spectra, the local spin configurations were directly determined in both the nonfrustrated total spin ST = 3/2 state at higher magnetic fields (H ge; 2.7 T) and the two nearly degenerate ST = 1/2 ground states at lower magnetic fields (H ≤ 2.7 T). The dynamical magnetic properties of V15 were investigated by proton spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) measurements. In the ST = 3/2 state, 1/T1 shows thermally activated behaviour as a function of temperature. On the other hand, the temperature independent behaviour of 1/T1 at very low temperatures is observed in the frustrated ST = 1/2 ground state. Possible origins for the peculiar behaviour of 1/T1 will be discussed in terms of magnetic fluctuations due to spin frustrations. In Fe30, static and dynamical properties of Fe3+ (s = 5/2) have been investigated by proton NMR spectra and 1/T1 measurements. From the temperature dependence of 1/T1, the fluctuation frequency of the Fe3+ spins is found to decrease with decreasing temperature, indicating spin freezing at low temperatures. The

  1. Stepwise enrichment of 15N along food chains: Further evidence and the relation between δ 15N and animal age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masao; Wada, Eitaro

    1984-05-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrogen was measured in marine and fresh-water animals from the East China Sea, The Bering Sea, Lake Ashinoko and Usujiri intertidal zone. Primary producers, showed average δ15Nversus atmospheric nitrogen of +5.0%. (+3.4 to +7.5) in the Bering Sea and Lake Ashinoko, and +6.8%. (+6.0 to +7.6) in Usujiri intertidal zone. Blue green algae from the East China Sea show an average -0.55%. (-0.8 to +1.2). All consumers, Zooplankton, fish and bird exhibited Stepwise enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level. The 15N enrichment at a single feeding process ranged from +1.3 to +5.3 averaging +3.4 ± 1.1%.. This isotopic fractionation seems to be independent of habitat. The effect of age in animals was obtained by analyzing two marine mussels. The soft tissue nitrogen showed +2.0%. enrichment relative to that of primary producers, and the magnitude was almost constant with shell ages ranging from 0 to 8 years. A similar 15N enrichment occurs in all Molluscs, Crustaceans, Insecta, Amphibia, Fish, Ave and Mammal species regardless of the difference in the form of excreted nitrogen and in laboratory cultured fish, brine shrimp and mice (+2.9 to +4.9%.). The excreted ammonia from guppy was sufficiently light to balance the concentration of 15N to animal body.

  2. Ab initio and DFT study of 31P-NMR chemical shifts of sphingomyelin and dihydrosphingomyelin lipid molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimori, K.; Kawabe, H.; Nagao, H.; Nishikawa, K.

    One of the phospholipids, sphingomyelin (SM, N-acyl-sphingosine-1-phosphorylcholine) is the most abundant component of mammalian membranes in brain, nervous tissues, and human ocular lens. It plays an important role for apoptosis, aging, and signal transduction. Recently, Yappert and coworkers have shown that human lens sphingomyelin and its hydrogenated derivative, dihydrosphingomyelin (DHSM) are interacted with Ca2+ ions to develop human cataracts. Previously, we have investigated conformational differences between an isolated SM/DHSM molecule and Ca2+-coordinated form by using density functional theory (DFT) for geometry optimization and normal mode analysis. As a result, one of stable conformers of SMs has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl group and phosphate group, whereas another conformer has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl and phosphate amide group. In this study, 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) shielding constants of the obtained conformers are investigated by using ab initio and DFT with NMR-gauge invariant atomic orbitals (NMR-GIAO) calculations. The experimental 31P-NMR chemical shifts of SMs and DHSMs have significant small value around 0.1 ppm. We consider the relative conformational changes between SMs and DHSMs affect the slight deviations of 31P-NMR chemical shifts, and discuss intramolecular hydrogen bondings and the solvent effect in relation to NMR experimental reference.

  3. A structural study of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) and its cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative using NMR spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Hamzah, Rosniza; Bakar, Mohamad Abu; Khairuddean, Melati; Mohammed, Issam Ahmed; Adnan, Rohana

    2012-09-12

    A structural study of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) and its cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative was carried out using NMR spectroscopy techniques. The overlapping (1)H-NMR signals of ENR-50 at δ 1.56, 1.68-1.70, 2.06, 2.15-2.17 ppm were successfully assigned. In this work, the <(13)C-NMR chemical shift assignments of ENR-50 were consistent to the previously reported work. A cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative of ENR-50 was synthesized from the reaction of purified ENR-50 with carbon disulfide (CS(2)), in the presence of 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) as catalyst at reflux temperature. The cyclic dithiocarbonate formation involved the epoxide ring opening of the ENR-50. This was followed by insertion of the C-S moiety of CS(2) at the oxygen attached to the quaternary carbon and methine carbon of epoxidized isoprene unit, respectively. The bands due to the C=S and C-O were clearly observed in the FTIR spectrum while the (1)H-NMR spectrum of the derivative revealed the peak attributed to the methylene protons had split. The (13)C-NMR spectrum of the derivative further indicates two new carbon peaks arising from the >C=S and quaternary carbon of cyclic dithiocarbonate. All other (1)H- and (13)C-NMR chemical shifts of the derivative remain unchanged with respect to the ENR-50.

  4. Proton NMR spectral study of UV treated live Escherichia coli Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokopud, Michael

    The lethal effects of ultraviolet radiation on microorganisms have been known and utilized for many years. In sufficiently high photon fluences, light and in particular, UV light, is an effective and subtle means of killing or at least immobilizing most, if not all cells and micro-organisms. Because of their small size, light can penetrate the enclosing protective walls and enter the inner volumes where it can break organic bonds in components that are vital to cell function. Despite the fact that a very low dose of UV light (1-9 mJ/cm2) has been shown to inactivate many micro-organisms, there remains a dearth of biological information about light induced effects in molecules and their interactions within living microbial systems. The use of 1H NMR as a spectroscopic tool was chosen to undertake an examination of the possible effects resulting from exposing E. coli to lethal fluencies of UV radiation. Once sample preparation, treatment, and NMR mounting methods were optimized, the high sensitivity and high resolution capabilities of the method produced reproducible results for a series of experiments. These results reveal significant changes in the ratio of the 1H NMR spectra of the treated to untreated E.coli samples when the treated sample was exposed to a lethal fluence of 275nm light. Photons at the 275nm wavelength, used in this study, have enough energy to break all of the principle bonds in an organic molecule. The difference spectrum between treated to untreated samples appears to be fitted well using specific component spectra from these groups of compounds. Increases in NMR peak amplitudes are observed and appear to be correlated with the spectral locations of several amino acids, membrane components and several sugars/saccharides. Increases in peak intensities of 4-8% were observed in the 0.8-1.1 ppm chemical shift region, characteristic of lipid and amino acid groups. A 3.5-4% increase was observed in the 2 ppm and 3.4-4 ppm region characteristic of

  5. Synthesis and NMR studies of (13)C-labeled vitamin D metabolites.

    PubMed

    Okamura, William H; Zhu, Gui-Dong; Hill, David K; Thomas, Richard J; Ringe, Kerstin; Borchardt, Daniel B; Norman, Anthony W; Mueller, Leonard J

    2002-03-08

    Isotope-labeled drug molecules may be useful for probing by NMR spectroscopy the conformation of ligand associated with biological hosts such as membranes and proteins. Triple-labeled [7,9,19-(13)C(3)]-vitamin D(3) (56), its 25-hydroxylated and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxylated metabolites (58 and 68, respectively), and other labeled materials have been synthesized via coupling of [9-(13)C]-Grundmann's ketone 39 or its protected 25-hydroxy derivative 43 with labeled A ring enyne fragments 25 or 26. The labeled CD-ring fragment 39 was prepared by a sequence involving Grignard addition of [(13)C]-methylmagnesium iodide to Grundmann's enone 28, oxidative cleavage, functional group modifications leading to seco-iodide 38, and finally a kinetic enolate S(N)2 cycloalkylation. The C-7,19 double labeling of the A-ring enyne was achieved by the Corey-Fuchs/Wittig processes on keto aldehyde 11. By employing these labeled fragments in the Wilson-Mazur route, the C-7,9,19 triple-(13)C-labeled metabolites 56, 58, and 68 as well as other (13)C-labeled metabolites have been prepared. In an initial NMR investigation of one of the labeled metabolites prepared in this study, namely [7,9,19-(13)C(3)]-25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (58), the three (13)C-labeled carbons of the otherwise water insoluble steroid could be clearly detected by (13)C NMR analysis at 0.1 mM in a mixture of CD(3)OD/D(2)O (60/40) or in aqueous dimethylcyclodextrin solution and at 2 mM in 20 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) aqueous micellar solution. In the SDS micellar solution, a double half-filter NOESY experiment revealed that the distance between the H(19Z) and H(7) protons is significantly shorter than that of the corresponding distance calculated from the solid state (X-ray) structure of the free ligand. The NMR data in micelles reveals that 58 exists essentially completely in the alpha-conformer with the 3 beta-hydroxyl equatorially oriented, just as in the solid state. The shortened distance (H(19Z))-H(7)) in micellar

  6. The new face of isotopic NMR at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Jézéquel, Tangi; Joubert, Valentin; Giraudeau, Patrick; Remaud, Gérald S; Akoka, Serge

    2017-02-01

    The most widely used method for isotope analysis at natural abundance is isotope ratio monitoring by Mass Spectrometry (irm-MS) which provides bulk isotopic composition in (2) H, (13) C, (15) N, (18) O or (34) S. However, in the 1980s, the direct access to Site-specific Natural Isotope Fractionation by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNIF-NMR(TM) ) was immediately recognized as a powerful technique to authenticate the origin of natural or synthetic products. The initial - and still most popular - application consisted in detecting the chaptalization of wines by irm-(2) H NMR. The approach has been extended to a wide range of methodologies over the last decade, paving the way to a wide range of applications, not only in the field of authentication but also to study metabolism. In particular, the emerging irm-(13) C NMR approach delivers direct access to position-specific (13) C isotope content at natural abundance. After highlighting the application scope of irm-NMR ((2) H and (13) C), this article describes the major improvements which made possible to reach the required accuracy of 1‰ (0.1%) in irm-(13) C NMR. The last part of the manuscript summarizes the different steps to perform isotope analysis as a function of the sample properties (concentration, peak overlap) and the kind of targeted isotopic information (authentication, affiliation). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Cold brittleness of corrosion-resistant maraging steel 08Kh15N5D2T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhneva, T. M.

    2012-03-01

    Results of a study of the effect of the method of remelting and of heat treatment modes on the behavior of serial curves of impact toughness and on the position of cold-shortness threshold in steel 08Kh15N5D2T are presented.

  8. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    Many structures of the proteins and protein assemblies that play central roles in fundamental biological processes and disease pathogenesis are not readily accessible via the conventional techniques of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the other hand, many of these challenging biological systems are suitable targets for atomic-level structural and dynamic analysis by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that has far less stringent limitations on the molecular size and crystalline state. Over the past decade, major advances in instrumentation and methodology have prompted rapid growth in the field of biological solid-state NMR. However, despite this progress, one challenge for the elucidation of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures via conventional MAS NMR methods is the relative lack of long-distance data. Specifically, extracting unambiguous interatomic distance restraints larger than ∼5 Å from through-space magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei has proven to be a considerable challenge for researchers. It is possible to circumvent this problem by extending the structural studies to include several analogs of the protein of interest, intentionally modified to contain covalently attached paramagnetic tags at selected sites. In these paramagnetic proteins, the hyperfine couplings between the nuclei and unpaired electrons can manifest themselves in NMR spectra in the form of relaxation enhancements of the nuclear spins that depend on the electron-nucleus distance. These effects can be significant for nuclei located up to ∼20 Å away from the paramagnetic center. In this Account, we discuss MAS NMR structural studies of nitroxide and EDTA-Cu(2+) labeled variants of a model 56 amino acid globular protein, B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), in the microcrystalline solid phase. We used a set of six EDTA-Cu(2

  9. (1)H-NMR-based metabolomic studies of bisphenol A in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Changshin; Yoon, Dahye; Cho, Junghee; Kim, Siwon; Lee, Heonho; Choi, Hyeonsoo; Kim, Suhkmann

    2017-04-03

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the response of zebrafish (Danio rerio) to increasing concentrations of bisphenol A (4,4'-(propane-2,2-diyl)diphenol, BPA). Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was applied to detect aberrant metabolomic profiles after 72 h of BPA exposure at all levels tested (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg/L). The OPLS-DA score plots showed that BPA exposure caused significant alterations in the metabolome. The metabolomic changes in response to BPA exposure generally exhibited nonlinear patterns, with the exception of reduced levels of several metabolites, including glutamine, inosine, lactate, and succinate. As the level of BPA exposure increased, individual metabolite patterns indicated that the zebrafish metabolome was subjected to severe oxidative stress. Interestingly, ATP levels increased significantly at all levels of BPA exposure. In the present study, we demonstrated the applicability of (1)H-NMR-based metabolomics to identify the discrete nature of metabolic changes.

  10. Simulation studies of instrumental artifacts on spin I=1 double quantum filtered NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the results of a simulation based study of the effect of various experimental artifacts for spin I=1 double quantum filtered NMR. The simulation captures the effects of static field inhomogeneity, finite pulse widths, phase errors, transients and radio frequency inhomogeneity. We simulated the spectral distortions introduced under these errors for four, eight and sixteen step phase cycles that are well known in the NMR community. The dominating pulse errors are radio frequency field inhomogeneity and antisymmetric pulse transients. These errors result in the reduction of signal intensity as well as an introduction of distortions in the detected double quantum filtered spectrum. Using the simulation tool we studied the improvement one obtains when implementing a sixteen step phase cycle over a four step phase cycle. The results indicate that implementing a sixteen step phase cycle over an eight or four step phase cycle does not result in a significant reduction in the DQF intensity loss, or reduction in spectral distortions for antisymmetric transients. PMID:20451432

  11. Postharvest ripening study of sweet lime (Citrus limettioides) in situ by volume-localized NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhishek; George, Christy; Bharathwaj, Sathyamoorthy; Chandrakumar, Narayanan

    2009-02-25

    Spatially resolved NMR--especially volume-localized spectroscopy (VLS)is useful in various fields including clinical diagnosis, process monitoring, etc. VLS carries high significance because of its ability to identify molecular species and hence track molecular events. This paper reports the application of VLS at 200 MHz to study the postharvest ripening of sweet lime ( Citrus limettioides ) in situ, including a comparative study of normal and acetylene-mediated ripening. Localization to a cubic voxel of 64 microL was achieved with point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS). Glucose, sucrose, fructose, and citric acid are found to be among the main constituents in the fruit. In the natural process, the sugar to acid ratio increases with ripening. Ethanol generation is seen to occur at a faster rate in acetylene-mediated ripening. Whereas NMR imaging experiments including parametric imaging (e.g., T(1) or T(2) maps) may be employed for "macro" monitoring of processes such as these, this work demonstrates that the molecular imprint of the process may be tracked noninvasively by VLS.

  12. NMR and computational studies of chiral discrimination by amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate).

    PubMed

    Ye, Yun K; Bai, Shi; Vyas, Shyam; Wirth, Mary J

    2007-02-08

    Proton NMR and simulations were combined to study the origin of chiral selectivity by a polysaccharide used in a commercial chromatographic stationary phase: amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate). This material has unusually high enantioselectivity for p-O-tert-butyltyrosine allyl ester, which is activated by the presence of an acid. Proton NMR spectra agreed with the HPLC in showing that the l-enantiomer interacts much more strongly with the polysaccharide and that acidity switches on the selectivity. 2D NOESY spectra revealed which protons of each enantiomer and the polysaccharide were in proximity, and these spectra revealed folding of the l-enantiomer. Computations generated energy-minimized structures for the polysaccharide-enantiomer complexes, independently predicting folding of the l-enantiomer. Molecular dynamics simulations 2 ns in duration, repeated for three different energy-minimized structures, generated pair distribution functions that are in excellent agreement with the 2D NOESY spectra. The modeling studies revealed why acidity switches on chiral selectivity and minimally affects the chromatographic retention time of the unfavored d-enantiomer. The results comprise the first case of a chiral separation by a commercial polysaccharide stationary phase being explained using a combination of 2D NOESY and simulations, providing excellent agreement between experiment and computation and lending detailed molecular insight into enantioselectivity for this system.

  13. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹⁹F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute is rather different from the bulk IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.

  14. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹⁹F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute is rather different from the bulkmore » IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.« less

  15. Multinuclear NMR Study of the Solid Electrolyte Interface Formed in Lithium Metal Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chuan; Xu, Suochang; Hu, Mary Y; Cao, Ruiguo; Qian, Jiangfeng; Qin, Zhaohai; Liu, Jun; Mueller, Karl T; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2017-04-04

    The composition of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layers formed in Cu|Li cells using lithium bis(fluorosulfonyi)imide (LiFSI) and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) electrolytes is determined by a multinuclear solid-state MAS NMR study at high magnetic field. It is found that the "dead" metallic Li is largely reduced in the SEI layers formed in a 4 M LiFSI-DME electrolyte system compared with those formed in a 1 M LiFSI-DME electrolyte system. This finding relates directly to the safety of Li metal batteries, as one of the main safety concerns for these batteries is associated with the "dead" metallic Li formed after long term cycling. It is also found that a large amount of LiF, which exhibits superior mechanical strength and good Li(+) ionic conductivity, is observed in the SEI layer formed in the concentrated 4 M LiFSI-DME and 3 M LiTFSI-DME systems, but not in the diluted 1 M LiFSI-DME system. Quantitative (6)Li MAS NMR results indicate that the SEI associated with the 4 M LiFSI-DME electrolyte is denser than those formed in the 1 M LiFSI-DME and 3 M LiTFSI-DME systems. These studies reveal the fundamental mechanisms behind the excellent electrochemical performance associated with higher concentration LiFSI-DME electrolyte systems.

  16. Rapid, storm-induced changes in the natural abundance of sup 15 N in a planktonic ecosystem, Chesapeake Bay, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, J.P.; McCarthy, J.J. ); Horrigan, S.G. )

    1991-12-01

    Samples of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), particulate nitrogen (PN), and two species of zooplankton were collected during two north-south transects of the Chesapeake Bay in the autumn of 1984 (27-28 September and 3-5 October). During the first transect, the natural abundance of {sup 15}N ({delta} {sup 15}N) in the major dissolved and planktonic pools of nitrogen suggested that the {delta}{sup 15}N of PN was largely determined by isotopic fractionation during uptake of NH{sub 4}{sup +} by phytoplankton. Averaged over the transect as a whole, the {delta}{sup 15}N of the herbivorous calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa was 4.1% higher than that of the PN, while the {delta}{sup 15}N of the carnivorous ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi was 6.4% higher than that of the PN. In the interval between the two transects, storm-induced mixing of the water column resulted in the injection of NH{sub 4}{sup +} into the surface layer of the bay. In combination with ancillary physical, chemical, and biological data, these changes in {delta}{sup 15}N provided estimates of the isotopic fractionation factor for NH{sub 4}{sup +} uptake by phytoplankton ({alpha} = 1.0065-1.0080) as well as the turnover time of nitrogen in Acartia tonsa (6.0-9.6 days). Despite the changes in {delta}{sup 15}N observed during this cruise, the relative distribution of {sup 15}N between trophic levels was preserved: during the second transect, the difference in {delta}{sup 15}N between Acartia tonsa and PN was 3.6%, and the difference in {delta}{sup 15}N between Mnemiopsis leidyi and PN was 7.3%. These results demonstrate that the natural abundance of {sup 15}N can change dramatically on a time scale of days, and that time-series studies of the natural abundance of {sup 15}N can be a useful complement to studies using tracer additions of {sup 15}N to document nitrogen transformations in planktonic ecosystems.

  17. 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of light organ-associated fatty acid-binding protein of Taiwanese fireflies.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kai-Li; Lee, Yi-Zong; Chen, Yun-Ru; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2016-04-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are a family of proteins that modulate the transfer of various fatty acids in the cytosol and constitute a significant portion in many energy-consuming cells. The ligand binding properties and specific functions of a particular type of FABP seem to be diverse and depend on the respective binding cavity as well as the cell type from which this protein is derived. Previously, a novel FABP (lcFABP; lc: Luciola cerata) was identified in the light organ of Taiwanese fireflies. The lcFABP was proved to possess fatty acids binding capabilities, especially for fatty acids of length C14-C18. However, the structural details are unknown, and the structure-function relationship has remained to be further investigated. In this study, we finished the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of (15)N/(13)C-enriched lcFABP by solution NMR spectroscopy. In addition, the secondary structure distribution was revealed based on the backbone N, H, Cα, Hα, C and side chain Cβ assignments. These results can provide the basis for further structural exploration of lcFABP.

  18. Near-complete 1H, 13C, 15N resonance assignments of dimethylsulfoxide-denatured TGFBIp FAS1-4 A546T.

    PubMed

    Kulminskaya, Natalia V; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Runager, Kasper; Sørensen, Charlotte S; Bjerring, Morten; Andreasen, Maria; Otzen, Daniel E; Enghild, Jan J; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Mulder, Frans A A

    2016-04-01

    The transforming growth factor beta induced protein (TGFBIp) is a major protein component of the human cornea. Mutations occurring in TGFBIp may cause corneal dystrophies, which ultimately lead to loss of vision. The majority of the disease-causing mutations are located in the C-terminal domain of TGFBIp, referred as the fourth fascilin-1 (FAS1-4) domain. In the present study the FAS1-4 Ala546Thr, a mutation that causes lattice corneal dystrophy, was investigated in dimethylsulfoxide using liquid-state NMR spectroscopy, to enable H/D exchange strategies for identification of the core formed in mature fibrils. Isotope-labeled fibrillated FAS1-4 A546T was dissolved in a ternary mixture 95/4/1 v/v/v% dimethylsulfoxide/water/trifluoroacetic acid, to obtain and assign a reference 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum for the H/D exchange analysis. Here, we report the near-complete assignments of backbone and aliphatic side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances for unfolded FAS1-4 A546T at 25 °C.

  19. Solid-state NMR characterization of amphomycin effects on peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid biosyntheses in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manmilan; Chang, James; Coffman, Lauryn; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Amphomycin and MX-2401 are cyclic lipopeptides exhibiting bactericidal activities against Gram-positive pathogens. Amphomycin and MX-2401 share structural similarities with daptomycin, but unlike daptomycin they do not target bacterial membrane. In this study, we investigate in vivo modes of action for amphomycin and MX-2401 in intact whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus by measuring the changes of peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid compositions using solid-state NMR. S. aureus were grown in a defined media containing isotope labels [1-13C]glycine and L-[ε-15N]lysin, L-[1-13C]lysine and D-[15N]alanine, or D-[1-13C]alanine and [15N]glycine, to selectively 13C-15N pair label peptidoglycan bridge-link, stem-link, and cross-link, respectively. 13C{15N} and 15N{13C} rotational-echo double resonance NMR measurements determined that cyclic lipopeptide-treated S. aureus exhibited thinning of the cell wall, accumulation of Park’s nucleotide, inhibition of glycine utilization for purine biosynthesis, reduction of ester-linked D-Ala in teichoic acids, and reduction of peptidoglycan cross-linking. Whole cell NMR analysis also revealed that S. aureus, in presence of amphomycin and MX-2401, maintained the incorporation of D-Ala during peptidoglycan biosynthesis while the incorporation of D-Ala into teichoic acids was inhibited. These effects are consistent with amphomycin’s dual inhibition of both peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid biosyntheses in S. aureus. PMID:27538449

  20. Expression, purification, and characterization of coiled coil and leucine zipper domains of C-terminal myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase for solution NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok K; Sawhney, Paramvir; Memisoglu, Gonen; Rigby, Alan C

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions between MBS and PKG are mediated by the involvement of C-terminal domain of MBS, MBS(CT180) and N-terminal coiled coil (CC) leucine zipper (LZ) domain of PKG-Iα, PKG-Iα1(-59). MBS(CT180) is comprised of three structurally variant domains of non-CC, CC, and LZ nature. Paucity of three-dimensional structural information of these MBS domains precludes atomic level understanding of MBS-PKG contractile complex structure. Here we present data on cloning, expression, and purification of CC, LZ, and CCLZ domains of MBS(CT180) and their biophysical characterization using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), circular dichroism (CD), and two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR. The methods as detailed resulted in high level protein expression and high milligram quantities of purified isotopically ((15)N and (13)C) enriched polypeptides. SEC, CD, and (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR experiments demonstrated that recombinantly expressed MBS CC domain is well folded and exists as a dimer within physiologic pH range, which is supported by our previous findings. The dimerization of CC MBS is likely mediated through formation of coiled coil conformation. In contrast, MBS LZ domain was almost unfolded that exists as non-stable low structured monomer within physiologic pH range. Protein folding and stability of MBS LZ was improved as a function of decrease in pH that adopts a folded, stable, and structured conformation at acidified pH 4.5. SEC and NMR analyses of LZ vs. CCLZ MBS domains indicated that inclusion of CC domain partially improves protein folding of LZ domain.

  1. Cereal grain, rachis and pulse seed amino acid δ15N values as indicators of plant nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Styring, Amy K; Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Natural abundance δ(15)N values of plant tissue amino acids (AAs) reflect the cycling of N into and within plants, providing an opportunity to better understand environmental and anthropogenic effects on plant metabolism. In this study, the AA δ(15)N values of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) grains and rachis and broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, grown at the experimental farm stations of Rothamsted, UK and Bad Lauchstädt, Germany, were determined by GC-C-IRMS. It was found that the δ(15)N values of cereal grain and rachis AAs could be largely attributed to metabolic pathways involved in their biosynthesis and catabolism. The relative (15)N-enrichment of phenylalanine can be attributed to its involvement in the phenylpropanoid pathway and glutamate has a δ(15)N value which is an average of the other AAs due to its central role in AA-N cycling. The relative AA δ(15)N values of broad bean and pea seeds were very different from one another, providing evidence for differences in the metabolic routing of AAs to the developing seeds in these leguminous plants. This study has shown that AA δ(15)N values relate to known AA biosynthetic pathways in plants and thus have the potential to aid understanding of how various external factors, such as source of assimilated N, influence metabolic cycling of N within plants.

  2. Size-dependent properties of Tl2Se studied by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, A. M.; Shao, M.; Teske, C. L.; Bensch, W.

    2006-12-01

    We report on size-dependent properties of dithallium selenide, Tl2Se . We have carried out a comparative nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of Tl2Se nanorods and bulk samples, measuring NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation rate of Tl203 and Tl205 isotopes. Though bulk Tl2Se was reported to be a metal, the Korringa-like spin-lattice relaxation behavior is observed only at low temperatures and is transformed to an activation regime above ˜200K . This finding is interpreted assuming a two-band model in the semimetallic compound. Our measurements show significant difference in the Knight shift and indirect nuclear exchange coupling for the bulk and nanorod Tl2Se samples, reflecting noticeable distinction in their electronic structure. At that, Tl2Se nanorods are semiconductors and exhibit a characteristic activation behavior in the spin-lattice relaxation rate due to the thermal excitation of carriers to the conduction band. The obtained size dependence of the Tl2Se properties is interpreted in terms of the semimetal-semiconductor transformation due to the quantum confinement.

  3. Relaxation NMR as a tool to study the dispersion and formulation behavior of nanostructured carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, David; Cosgrove, Terence; Prescott, Stuart W

    2016-06-01

    Solvent relaxation NMR has been used to estimate the surface areas and wettability of various types of nanostructured carbon materials in a range of solvents including water, ethanol, and tetrahydrofuran. We illustrate the application of the technique through several short case studies using samples including nanocarbon blacks, graphene oxide, nanographites, and porous graphenes. The technique is shown to give a good measure of surface area, correlating well with conventional surface area estimates obtained by nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, or light scattering for the non-porous samples. NMR relaxation has advantages in terms of speed of analysis and being able to use concentrated, wet, and opaque samples. For samples that are porous, two distinct surface areas can be estimated assuming the two environments ('inner' and 'outer') have the same surface chemistry, and that there is a slow exchange of solvent molecules between them. Furthermore, we show that differences in wettability and dispersability between samples dispersed in water, ethanol, and cyclopentanone can be observed, along with changes to the surface chemistry of the interface. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. [Study on three different species tibetan medicine sea buckthorn by 1H-NMR-based metabonomics].

    PubMed

    Su, Yong-Wen; Tan, Er; Zhang, Jing; You, Jia-Li; Liu, Yue; Liu, Chuan; Zhou, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Yi

    2014-11-01

    The 1H-NMR fingerprints of three different species tibetan medicine sea buckthorn were established by 1H-HMR metabolomics to find out different motablism which could provide a new method for the quality evaluation of sea buckthorn. The obtained free induction decay (FID) signal will be imported into MestReNova software and into divide segments. The data will be normalized and processed by principal component analysis and.partial least squares discriminant analysis to perform pattern recognition. The results showed that 25 metabolites belonging to different chemical types were detected from sea buckthorn,including flavonoids, triterpenoids, amino acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, etc. PCA and PLS-DA analysis showed three different varietiest of sea buckthorn that can be clearly separated by the content of L-quebrachitol, malic acid and some unidentified sugars, which can be used as the differences metabolites of three species of sea buckthorn. 1H-NMR-based metabonomies method had a holistic characteristic with sample preparation and handling. The results of this study can offer an important reference for the species identification and quality control of sea buckthorn.

  5. Theoretical study of NMR, infrared and Raman spectra on triple-decker phthalocyanines

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Oku, Takeo

    2016-02-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic properties of multi-decker phthalocyanines were studied by theoretical calculation. Electronic structures, excited processes at multi-states, isotropic chemical shifts of {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N and {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), principle V-tensor in electronic field gradient (EFG) tensor and asymmetry parameters (η), vibration mode in infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of triple-decker phthalocyanines were calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT using B3LYP as basis function. Electron density distribution was delocalized on the phthalocyanine rings with electron static potential. Considerable separation of chemical shifts in {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N and {sup 1}H-NMR was originated from nuclear spin interaction between nitrogen and carbon atoms, nuclear quadrupole interaction based on EFG and η of cen