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Sample records for 15n pool dilution

  1. Use of a {sup 15}N isotope dilution method to assess contaminant effects on soil nitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Nason, G.E.; Dinwoodie, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Ecologically relevant bioassays are needed to assess effects of contaminants on soil processes such as decomposition and nutrient cycling. This study was conducted to assess the potential of a soil-based nitrification bioassay. Soil samples adjusted to 0.03 MPa moisture content were amended with 0.1, 1.0, 10 and 100 mg kg{sup {minus}1} PCP or PCB, and 0.05, 0.5, 5 and 50 mg kg{sup {minus}1} Hg and preincubated for 7 days. A 2-d incubation was then started by addition of 10 mg kg{sup {minus}1} {sup 15}NO{sub 3}-N. Diethyl ether used as a carrier for PCP addition had little effect on inorganic nitrogen concentrations during the incubation. Net nitrogen mineralization and nitrification were unaffected by PCB. Higher amendment levels of both PCP and Hg resulted in increases in ammonium concentrations and decreases in net nitrification. {sup 15}N-nitrate pool dilution was sensitive to contamination and showed some gross nitrification was occurring even when net nitrification had ceased. Recoveries of Hg and PCB at the end of the study were greater than 90%. Recovery of PCP was 5%. Incubations carried out under sterile and non-sterile conditions indicated that both sorption and biological degradation were factors in the low PCP recovery.

  2. STATISTICAL ESTIMATES OF VARIANCE FOR 15N ISOTOPE DILUTION MEASUREMENTS OF GROSS RATES OF NITROGEN CYCLE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been fifty years since Kirkham and Bartholmew (1954) presented the conceptual framework and derived the mathematical equations that formed the basis of the now commonly employed method of 15N isotope dilution. Although many advances in methodology and analysis have been ma...

  3. Endogenous N-losses in broilers estimated by a [15N]-isotope dilution technique: effect of dietary fat type and xylanase addition.

    PubMed

    Dänicke, S; Jeroch, H; Simon, O

    2000-01-01

    Male broilers were given a low protein diet (15.5% CP) spiked with [15N]H4HCO3 from day 12 to day 18 of age to label the endogenous N-constituents. Experimental diets were subsequently fed from day 19 to day 24 of age and consisted of a rye based diet (56% dietary inclusion) which contained either 10% soya oil (S) or 10% beef tallow (T), each of which was either unsupplemented (-) or supplemented (+) with a xylanase containing enzyme preparation (2700 IU/kg at pH 5.3). [15N]-atom percent excess (APE) of excreta, faeces and urine were monitored on a daily basis during both experimental periods. Furthermore, APE was measured in various tissues at the end of the experiment. The APE of urine on the last day of the experiment was between the APE of the pancreas and that of the jejunal tissue, an observation which supported the usefulness of using urinary APE as an indicator for the endogenous N-pool. Endogenous N-proportions were estimated by an isotope dilution technique at the end of the experiment by examination of the ratio of APE in faeces and urine. The endogenous N-proportion in the faeces was greatest in birds receiving the T(-) diet. The proportions were 0.321, 0.319, 0.451 and 0.289 in S(-), S(+), T(-) and T(+) fed groups, respectively. Xylanase addition reduced endogenous N-proportion, a factor which was used to correct apparent crude protein digestibility (85.6, 86.2, 84.3 and 88.5% in S(-), S(+), T(-) and T(+) fed birds, respectively) for endogenous losses resulting in almost equal true digestibilities of crude protein for all treatments (90.3, 90.6, 90.4 and 91.5%). The amounts of endogenous N in faces were estimated to be 87, 69, 244 and 81 mg per day per kg0.67 body weight in S(-), S(+), T(-) and T(+) fed birds, respectively. It was concluded that xylanase supplementation of a rye based broiler diet does not change endogenous N-secretions when the supplemental fat is soya oil. However, addition of tallow rather than soya oil increased these N

  4. Route of tracer administration does not affect ileal endogenous nitrogen recovery measured with the 15N-isotope dilution technique in pigs fed rapidly digestible diets.

    PubMed

    Steendam, C A Carina; Verstegen, Martin W A; Tamminga, Seerp; Boer, Huug; van 't End, Marianne; Verstappen, Berthe; Caine, William R; Visser, G Henk

    2004-11-01

    The (15)N-isotope dilution technique ((15)N-IDT), with either pulse-dose oral administration or continuous i.v. administration of [(15)N]-l-leucine (carotid artery), both at 5 mg/(kg body weight . d), was used to measure ileal (postvalve T-cecum cannula) endogenous nitrogen recovery (ENR) in pigs (9 +/- 0.6 kg). Diets were cornstarch, enzyme-hydrolyzed casein with no (control) or high (4%) content of quebracho extract (Schinopsis spp.) rich in condensed tannins. Blood was sampled from a catheter in the external jugular vein. Mean plasma (15)N-enrichment at d 8-10 was higher (P = 0.0009) after i.v. than after oral administration [0.0356 vs. 0.0379 atom% excess (APE)]. Plasma (15)N-enrichment for i.v. infused pigs was 0.01117 APE higher (P < 0.0001) and for orally dosed pigs 0.0081 APE lower (P < 0.0001) at 11 h postprandial compared with 1 h postprandial. Apparent ileal N digestibility was higher (P < 0.0001) for the control (85.5%) than for the quebracho diet (69.5%). ENR was calculated from the ratio of (15)N-enrichment of plasma and digesta. The ENR for the quebracho diet was approximately 300% higher than for the control diet (6.03 vs. 1.94 g/kg dry matter intake, P < 0.001). The real N digestibility (92.2 +/- 0.4%) was equal for both diets (P = 0.1030) and both tracer methods (P = 0.9730). We concluded that oral administration of [(15)N]leucine provides reasonable estimates of ENR in pigs fed semipurified diets with high or low content of tannins; however, one must be careful in extrapolating this conclusion to studies with other protein sources or feeding frequencies. PMID:15514277

  5. Inoculation of Bacillus sphaericus UPMB-10 to Young Oil Palm and Measurement of Its Uptake of Fixed Nitrogen Using the 15N Isotope Dilution Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zakry, Fitri Abdul Aziz; Shamsuddin, Zulkifli H.; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Zakaria, Zin Zawawi; Rahim, Anuar Abdul

    2012-01-01

    There are increasing applications of diazotrophic rhizobacteria in the sustainable agriculture system. A field experiment on young immature oil palm was conducted to quantify the uptake of N derived from N2 fixation by the diazotroph Bacillus sphaericus strain UPMB-10, using the 15N isotope dilution method. Eight months after 15N application, young immature oil palms that received 67% of standard N fertilizer application together with B. sphaericus inoculation had significantly lower 15N enrichment than uninoculated palms that received similar N fertilizers. The dilution of labeled N served as a marker for the occurrence of biological N2 fixation. The proportion of N uptake that was derived from the atmosphere was estimated as 63% on the whole plant basis. The inoculation process increased the N and dry matter yields of the palm leaflets and rachis significantly. Field planting of young, immature oil palm in soil inoculated with B. sphaericus UPMB-10 might mitigate inorganic fertilizer-N application through supplementation by biological nitrogen fixation. This could be a new and important source of nitrogen biofertilizer in the early phase of oil palm cultivation in the field. PMID:22446306

  6. Assessing the labile arsenic pool in contaminated paddy soils by isotopic dilution techniques and simple extractions.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Jacqueline L; Khan, M Asaduzzman; Norton, Gareth J; Islam, M Rafiqul; Dasgupta, Tapash; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Price, Adam H; Meharg, Andrew A; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2011-05-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination of paddy soils threatens rice cultivation and the health of populations relying on rice as a staple crop. In the present study, isotopic dilution techniques were used to determine the chemically labile (E value) and phytoavailable (L value) pools of As in a range of paddy soils from Bangladesh, India, and China and two arable soils from the UK varying in the degree and sources of As contamination. The E value accounted for 6.2-21.4% of the total As, suggesting that a large proportion of soil As is chemically nonlabile. L values measured with rice grown under anaerobic conditions were generally larger than those under aerobic conditions, indicating increased potentially phytoavailable pool of As in flooded soils. In an incubation study, As was mobilized into soil pore water mainly as arsenite under flooded conditions, with Bangladeshi soils contaminated by irrigation of groundwater showing a greater potential of As mobilization than other soils. Arsenic mobilization was best predicted by phosphate-extractable As in the soils. PMID:21504212

  7. Enhancement of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer to dilute binary mixtures using endothermic chemical reactions around the smoothed horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarafraz, M. M.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Alavifazel, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    Experimental studies on enhancing the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient of binary dilute mixtures of water/glycerol, water/MEG (Mono-ethylene glycol) and water/DEG (di-ethylene glycol) have been carried out. Some particular endothermic chemical reactions related to ammonium salts were used to enhance the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient, simultaneously with occurrence of pool boiling heat transfer. Accordingly, 100 g of Ammonium nitrate, ammonium perborate and Ammonium sulfate were selected to dissolve into mixtures. High and extreme solution enthalpies of each of these ammonium salt powders are employed to reduce the surface temperature around the horizontal cylinder locally. Results demonstrated that presence of ammonium salts into the mixtures deteriorates the surface temperature of cylinder and as the result, higher pool boiling heat transfer coefficient is reported for tested solutions. Results are also reported and compared for different ammonium salts to find the influence of inducing different enthalpies of solution on pool boiling heat transfer coefficient. Obtained results also indicated that presence of endothermic reaction besides the pool boiling heat transfer enhances the heat transfer coefficients in comparison with nucleate pool boiling phenomenon solely.

  8. Refining cotton-wick method for 15N plant labelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fustec, Joëlle; Mahieu, Stéphanie

    2010-05-01

    The symbiosis Fabaceae/Rhizobiaceae plays a critical role in the nitrogen cycle. It gives the plant the ability to fix high amounts of atmospheric N. A part of this N can be transferred to the soil via rhizodeposition. The contribution of Fabaceae to the soil N pool is difficult to measure, since it is necessary for assessing N benefits for other crops, for soil biological activity, and for reducing water pollution in sustainable agriculture (Fustec, 2009). The aim of this study was to test and improve the reliability of the 15N cotton-wick method for measuring the soil N derived from plant rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2007). The effects of the concentration of the 15N-urea labelling solution and of the feeding frequency (continuous or pulses) on the assessment of nitrogen rhizodeposition were studied in two greenhouse experiments using the field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and the non-nodulating isoline P2. The plant parts and the soil were prepared for 15N:14N measurements for assessing N rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2009). The fraction of plants' belowground nitrogen allocated to rhizodeposition in both Frisson pea and P2 was 20 to more than 50% higher when plants were labelled continuously than when they were labelled using fortnightly pulses. Our results suggested that when 15N root enrichment was high, nitrogen rhizodeposition was underestimated only for plants that were 15N-fed by fortnightly pulses, and not in plants 15N-fed continuously. This phenomenon was especially observed for plants relying on symbiotic N fixation for N acquisition; it may be linked to the concentration of the labelling solution. In conclusion, N rhizodeposition assessment was strongly influenced by the 15N-feeding frequency and the concentration of the labelling solution. The estimation of N rhizodeposition was more reliable when plants were labelled continuously with a dilute solution of 15N urea. Fustec et al. 2009. Agron. Sustain. Dev., DOI 10.1051/agro/2009003, in press. Mahieu

  9. 13N,15N isotope and kinetic evidence against hyponitrite as an intermediate in dentrification.

    PubMed

    Hollocher, T C; Garber, E; Cooper, A J; Reiman, R E

    1980-06-10

    13N- and 15N-labeling experiments were carried out with Paracoccus denitrificans, grown anaerobically on nitrate, to determine whether hyponitrite might be an obligatory intermediate in denitrification and a precursor of nitrous oxide. From experiments designed to trap [13N]- or [15N,15N]hyponitrite by dilution into authentic hyponitrite it was calculated that the intracellular concentration of a presumptive hyponitrite pool must be less than 0.4 mM. In order for a pool of this size to turn over rapidly enough to handle the flux of nitrogen during dentrifucation, the spontaneous rate of hyponitrite dehydration must be enhanced by a factor of several thousand through enzyme catalysis. Cell extracts failed to catalyze this reaction under a variety of conditions. It is concluded that hyponitrite cannot be an intermediate in dentrification. In addition, the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen was studied in P. denitrificans using 13N as tracer. At low concentrations (less than 10(-8) M) of labeled nitrate and nitrite 5 to 10% of the label was assimilated into non-volatile metabolites and 90 to 95% was reduced to N2. Similarly, with 15 mM [13N]nitrate, 5% of the label went into metabolites and 95% to N2. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis of the labeled metabolites indicated that the major pathway for assimilation of inorganic nitrogen in P. denitrificans under these conditions is through ammonia incorporation via the aspartase reaction. PMID:7372623

  10. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  11. The contamination of commercial 15N2 gas stocks with 15N-labeled nitrate and ammonium and consequences for nitrogen fixation measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabundo, Richard; Lehmann, Moritz F; Treibergs, Lija; Tobias, Craig R; Altabet, Mark A; Moisander, Pia H; Granger, Julie

    2014-01-01

    We report on the contamination of commercial 15-nitrogen (15N) N2 gas stocks with 15N-enriched ammonium, nitrate and/or nitrite, and nitrous oxide. 15N2 gas is used to estimate N2 fixation rates from incubations of environmental samples by monitoring the incorporation of isotopically labeled 15N2 into organic matter. However, the microbial assimilation of bioavailable 15N-labeled N2 gas contaminants, nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, is liable to lead to the inflation or false detection of N2 fixation rates. 15N2 gas procured from three major suppliers was analyzed for the presence of these 15N-contaminants. Substantial concentrations of 15N-contaminants were detected in four Sigma-Aldrich 15N2 lecture bottles from two discrete batch syntheses. Per mole of 15N2 gas, 34 to 1900 µmoles of 15N-ammonium, 1.8 to 420 µmoles of 15N-nitrate/nitrite, and ≥21 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide were detected. One 15N2 lecture bottle from Campro Scientific contained ≥11 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide per mole of 15N2 gas, and no detected 15N-nitrate/nitrite at the given experimental 15N2 tracer dilutions. Two Cambridge Isotopes lecture bottles from discrete batch syntheses contained ≥0.81 µmoles 15N-nitrous oxide per mole 15N2, and trace concentrations of 15N-ammonium and 15N-nitrate/nitrite. 15N2 gas equilibrated cultures of the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta confirmed that the 15N-contaminants are assimilable. A finite-differencing model parameterized using oceanic field conditions typical of N2 fixation assays suggests that the degree of detected 15N-ammonium contamination could yield inferred N2 fixation rates ranging from undetectable, <0.01 nmoles N L(-1) d(-1), to 530 nmoles N L(-1) d(-1), contingent on experimental conditions. These rates are comparable to, or greater than, N2 fixation rates commonly detected in field assays. These results indicate that past reports of N2 fixation should be interpreted with caution, and demonstrate that the purity of commercial 15N2

  12. Non-homogeneity of isotopic labelling in 15N gas flux studies: theory, some observations and possible lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Deppe, Marianna; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Gattinger, Andreas; Giesemann, Anette; Krause, Hans-Martin; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika

    2015-04-01

    addressing cases iii. and iv.. Furthermore we present some experimental data illustrating this. These include two data sets from denitrification experiments exhibiting substantial deviations in 15N enrichment between the N pools producing N2 and N2O. Moreover, results from a lab incubation study to quantify NH4+-derived N2O with increasing NH4+ amendment under conditions favouring nitrification are shown, were non-labelled NH4+ was added together with 15N labelled NO3-. Here we found large deviations between the 15N enrichment of NO3- in extracted soil water and the 15N enrichment of the labelled N pool as calculated from N2O isotopologues (Bergsma et al., 2001). We think that this reflects type iv. bias, probably because enrichment of NO3- in anoxic micro-sites was less diluted by non-labelled NO3- from nitrification compared to NO3- in oxic zones. Our data analysis provides a means to overcome bias iv. and thus to obtain correct source apportionment. References: Arah, J.R.M. (1992): Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 56, 795 - 800, 1992. Bergsma, T. et al. (2001): Env. Sci. & Technol. 35(21): 4307-4312. Hauck, R.D., et al.(1958): Soil Science 86, 287 - 291, 1958. Lewicka-Szczebak, D. et al.(2013): Rapid Comm. Mass Spectrom., 27 1548-1558. Müller, C. et al. (2004): Soil Biol. Biochem. 36(4): 619-632. Mulvaney, R.L.(1984):. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 48:690 - 692. Spott, O, et al.. (2006): Rapid Comm. Mass Spectrom., 20: 3267-3274. Spott, O. and C. F. Stange (2007): Rapid Comm. Mass Spectrom., 21: 2398-2406.

  13. Nitrate reductase 15N discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Aspergillus niger, Pichea angusta, and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Eli; Yarnes, Chris; Toney, Michael D.; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Stable 15N isotopes have been used to examine movement of nitrogen (N) through various pools of the global N cycle. A central reaction in the cycle involves the reduction of nitrate (NO−3) to nitrite (NO−2) catalyzed by nitrate reductase (NR). Discrimination against 15N by NR is a major determinant of isotopic differences among N pools. Here, we measured in vitro 15N discrimination by several NRs purified from plants, fungi, and a bacterium to determine the intrinsic 15N discrimination by the enzyme and to evaluate the validity of measurements made using 15N-enriched NO−3. Observed NR isotope discrimination ranged from 22 to 32‰ (kinetic isotope effects of 1.022–1.032) among the different isozymes at natural abundance 15N (0.37%). As the fractional 15N content of substrate NO−3 increased from natural abundance, the product 15N fraction deviated significantly from that expected based on substrate enrichment and 15N discrimination measured at natural abundance. Additionally, isotopic discrimination by denitrifying bacteria used to reduce NO−3 and NO−2 in some protocols became a greater source of error as 15N enrichment increased. We briefly discuss potential causes of the experimental artifacts with enriched 15N and recommend against the use of highly enriched 15N tracers to study N discrimination in plants or soils. PMID:25071800

  14. 15N techniques and analytical procedures. Indo/U. S. science and technology initiative. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, L.K.; Mosier, A.R.

    1992-05-01

    (15)N technology is used to explore many agricultural research topics, including the movement of nitrates to groundwater, use of fertilizer nitrogen by plants, ways to increase nitrogen fixation, and effects of management practices on denitrification. The publication reviews (15)N procedures and methods for handling and collecting samples, introducing isotopes into plants and soils, and for performing Kjeldahl analyses, isotope dilutions, Rittenberg oxidation conversions for isotope-ration analyses, and automated Dumas isotope-ratio analyses.

  15. Soil processes drive seasonal variation in retention of 15N tracers in a deciduous forest catchment.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Christine L; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Weiss, Marissa S; McCalley, K; Sparks, Jed P; Thomas, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal patterns of stream nitrate concentration have long been interpreted as demonstrating the central role of plant uptake in regulating stream nitrogen loss from forested catchments. Soil processes are rarely considered as important drivers of these patterns. We examined seasonal variation in N retention in a deciduous forest using three whole-ecosystem 15N tracer additions: in late April (post-snowmelt, pre-leaf-out), late July (mid-growing- season), and late October (end of leaf-fall). We expected that plant 15N uptake would peak in late spring and midsummer, that immobilization in surface litter and soil would peak the following autumn leaf-fall, and that leaching losses would vary inversely with 15N retention. Similar to most other 15N tracer studies, we found that litter and soils dominated ecosystem retention of added 15N. However, 15N recovery in detrital pools varied tremendously by season, with > 90% retention in spring and autumn and sharply reduced 15N retention in late summer. During spring, over half of the 15N retained in soil occurred within one day in the heavy (mineral-associated) soil fraction. During summer, a large decrease in 15N retention one week after addition coincided with increased losses of 15NO3- to soil leachate and seasonal increases in soil and stream NO3- concentrations, although leaching accounted for only a small fraction of the lost 15N (< 0.2%). Uptake of 15N into roots did not vary by season and accounted for < 4% of each tracer addition. Denitrification or other processes that lead to N gas loss may have consumed the rest. These measurements of 15N movement provide strong evidence for the dominant role of soil processes in regulating seasonal N retention and losses in this catchment and perhaps others with similar soils. PMID:26649387

  16. Numerical evaluation of subsoil diffusion of (15) N labelled denitrification products during employment of the (15) N gas flux method in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Ruoss, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Common methods for measuring soil denitrification in situ include monitoring the accumulation of 15N labelled N2 and N2O evolved from 15N labelled soil nitrate pool in soil surface chambers. Gas diffusion is considered to be the main accumulation process. Because accumulation of the gases decreases concentration gradients between soil and chamber over time, gas production rates are underestimated if calculated from chamber concentrations. Moreover, concentration gradients to the non-labelled subsoil exist, inevitably causing downward diffusion of 15N labelled denitrification products. A numerical model for simulating gas diffusion in soil was used in order to determine the significance of this source of error. Results show that subsoil diffusion of 15N labelled N2 and N2O - and thus potential underestimation of denitrification derived from chamber fluxes - increases with cover closure time as well as with increasing diffusivity. Simulations based on the range of typical gas diffusivities of unsaturated soils show that the fraction of subsoil diffusion after chamber closure for 1 hour is always significant with values up to >30 % of total production of 15N labelled N2 and N2O. Field experiments for measuring denitrification with the 15N gas flux method were conducted. The ability of the model to predict the time pattern of gas accumulation was evaluated by comparing measured 15N2 concentrations and simulated values.

  17. Plant and Soil Natural Abundance delta-15N: Indicators of Nitrogen Cycling in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.; Lovett, G. M.; Weathers, K.; Arthur, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    We examined the potential use of natural abundance 15N of plants and soils as an indicator of forest nitrogen (N) cycling rates within the Catskill Mountains, NY. These watersheds receive among the highest rates of N deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Many studies have shown a link between increased N cycling rates and 15N enrichment of soil and plant pools. Faster rates of N cycling processes, especially nitrification, lead to fractionation of 14/15N, creating N products that are relatively depleted in 15N. This can lead to enrichment of soil pools, as lighter 14N is lost from the system via leaching or denitrification. Plant N pools can become increasingly enriched as they take up 15N-enriched soil N. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across the Catskill Mountains, forests dominated by different tree species appear to vary in the amount of N retained or lost to nearby streams. To determine if plant and soil 15N could be used as indicators of N cycling rates, we collected foliage, wood, litterfall, organic and mineral soil, and fine roots from single species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine roots and soil 15N were highest within sugar maple stands (p<0.05). Sugar maple soils also had the highest rates of net nitrification and N leaching. Therefore, soil 15N appears to correlate with forest N retention and loss. However, 15N enrichment was highest within foliage, litterfall and wood of beech trees (p<0.05). The decoupling between foliage 15N and N cycling, as well as between 15N of foliage and fine roots, illustrates that it may not be possible to use a single plant pool as an indicator of N cycling rates.

  18. Whole body nitric oxide synthesis in healthy men determined from [15N] arginine-to-[15N]citrulline labeling.

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, L; Beaumier, L; Ajami, A M; Young, V R

    1996-01-01

    The rates of whole body nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, plasma arginine flux, and de novo arginine synthesis and their relationships to urea production, were examined in a total of seven healthy adults receiving an L-amino acid diet for 6 days. NO synthesis was estimated by the rate of conversion of the [15N] guanidino nitrogen of arginine to plasma [15N] ureido citrulline and compared with that based on urinary nitrite (NO2-)/nitrate (NO3-) excretion. Six subjects received on dietary day 7, a 24-hr (12-hr fed/12-hr fasted) primed, constant, intravenous infusion of L-[guanidino-15N2]arginine and [13C]urea. A similar investigation was repeated with three of these subjects, plus an additional subject, in which they received L-[ureido-13C]citrulline, to determine plasma citrulline fluxes. The estimated rates (mean +/- SD) of NO synthesis over a period of 24 hr averaged 0.96 +/- 0.1 mumol .kg-1.hr-1 and 0.95 +/- 0.1 mumol.kg-1.hr-1, for the [15N]citrulline and the nitrite/nitrate methods, respectively. About 15% of the plasma arginine turnover was associated with urea formation and 1.2% with NO formation. De novo arginine synthesis averaged 9.2 +/- 1.4 mumol. kg-1.hr-1, indicating that approximately 11% of the plasma arginine flux originates via conversion of plasma citrulline to arginine. Thus, the fraction of the plasma arginine flux associated with NO and also urea synthesis in healthy humans is small, although the plasma arginine compartment serves as a significant precursor pool (54%) for whole body NO formation. This tracer model should be useful for exploring these metabolic relationships in vivo, under specific pathophysiologic states where the L-arginine-NO pathway might be altered. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8876157

  19. Climate-Dependence of Plant-Soil 15N/14N Interactions Across Tropical Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Sigman, D. M.; Hedin, L. O.

    2005-12-01

    In most areas of the world, the 15N/14N of bulk soils is higher than that of plant leaves, and the isotopic signatures of these two ecosystem N pools progressively diverge with increasing rainfall. However, both the cause for this isotopic trend and its implications for understanding interactions between climate and N cycles are largely unknown. We report 15N/14N measurements of nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N in soil extracts from a highly constrained rainfall sequence in Hawaii, across which this trend in ecosystem 15N/14N is captured, to examine the competing explanations for plant-soil 15N/14N uncouplings. While the isotopic influences of microbial transfers of N between nitrate and ammonium pools and plant-mycorrhizae interactions have been posited in plant-soil 15N/14N relationships, our data did not support an important role for either of these mechanisms. Instead, preferential regeneration of 14N during the breakdown of DON to ammonium explains why the 15N/14N of plants is lower than that of bulk soils. Fractionation at this step leads to two isotopically distinct N subcycles in each forest, a lower-15N/14N subcycle composed of ammonium, nitrate, and bulk plant biomass N that `spins' rapidly and a higher-15N/14N subcycle composed of bulk soil N and DON that is much less dynamic. The increased difference between soil and plant 15N/14N is due to changes in the impacts of nitrification and denitrification on the 15N/14N of ammonium and nitrate, coupled with a switch from nitrate to ammonium uptake by plants under the wettest conditions. For instance, the particularly large (~6 per mil) 15N/14N difference between plants and soils in the wettest sites is due to the lack of 15N-enrichment of ammonium by nitrification coupled with plant dependence on ammonium uptake only. Our results highlight the importance of interactions between DON breakdown, ecosystem N recycling, and gaseous N losses in the explaining the interactions between the 15N signatures of

  20. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  1. Complete fusion of 15N+27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosser, F. W., Jr.; Racca, R. A.; Daneshvar, K.; Geesaman, D. F.; Henning, W.; Kovar, D. G.; Rehm, K. E.; Tabor, S. L.

    1980-05-01

    The total fusion cross section for the system 15N + 27Al has been measured over an energy range 27 MeV<=Elab<=70 MeV by detection of the fusion-evaporation residues. In addition elastic scattering was measured at six energies and fitted by optical model calculations. The fusion cross section for the system saturates at 1150+/-50 mb. The data can be well described by the model of Glas and Mosel, using a reasonable set of parameters. The model of Horn and Ferguson also describes the data well if an appropriate charge radius is used. Comparison is made between these results and the fusion cross sections for 16O + 26Mg and 18O + 24Mg, which lead to the same compound nucleus. The results for 15N + 27Al are quite similar to those for 18O + 24Mg, and the differences between the fusion cross sections for these two systems and those for 16O + 26Mg may be evidence for an entrance channel effect. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 15N+27Al, Elab=27-70 MeV; measured σfusion(E) measured dσdΩ elastic scattering; data fitted with Glas and Mosel model, Horn and Ferguson model.

  2. The Contamination of Commercial 15N2 Gas Stocks with 15N–Labeled Nitrate and Ammonium and Consequences for Nitrogen Fixation Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dabundo, Richard; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treibergs, Lija; Tobias, Craig R.; Altabet, Mark A.; Moisander, Pia H.; Granger, Julie

    2014-01-01

    We report on the contamination of commercial 15-nitrogen (15N) N2 gas stocks with 15N-enriched ammonium, nitrate and/or nitrite, and nitrous oxide. 15N2 gas is used to estimate N2 fixation rates from incubations of environmental samples by monitoring the incorporation of isotopically labeled 15N2 into organic matter. However, the microbial assimilation of bioavailable 15N-labeled N2 gas contaminants, nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, is liable to lead to the inflation or false detection of N2 fixation rates. 15N2 gas procured from three major suppliers was analyzed for the presence of these 15N-contaminants. Substantial concentrations of 15N-contaminants were detected in four Sigma-Aldrich 15N2 lecture bottles from two discrete batch syntheses. Per mole of 15N2 gas, 34 to 1900 µmoles of 15N-ammonium, 1.8 to 420 µmoles of 15N-nitrate/nitrite, and ≥21 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide were detected. One 15N2 lecture bottle from Campro Scientific contained ≥11 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide per mole of 15N2 gas, and no detected 15N-nitrate/nitrite at the given experimental 15N2 tracer dilutions. Two Cambridge Isotopes lecture bottles from discrete batch syntheses contained ≥0.81 µmoles 15N-nitrous oxide per mole 15N2, and trace concentrations of 15N-ammonium and 15N-nitrate/nitrite. 15N2 gas equilibrated cultures of the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta confirmed that the 15N-contaminants are assimilable. A finite-differencing model parameterized using oceanic field conditions typical of N2 fixation assays suggests that the degree of detected 15N-ammonium contamination could yield inferred N2 fixation rates ranging from undetectable, <0.01 nmoles N L−1 d−1, to 530 nmoles N L−1 d−1, contingent on experimental conditions. These rates are comparable to, or greater than, N2 fixation rates commonly detected in field assays. These results indicate that past reports of N2 fixation should be interpreted with caution, and demonstrate that the purity of commercial 15N2

  3. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templer, P.H.; Mack, M.C.; Chapin, F. S., III; Christenson, L.M.; Compton, J.E.; Crook, H.D.; Currie, W.S.; Curtis, C.J.; Dail, D.B.; D'Antonio, C. M.; Emmett, B.A.; Epstein, H.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Gundersen, P.; Hobbie, S.E.; Holland, K.; Hooper, D.U.; Hungate, B.A.; Lamontagne, S.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Osenberg, C.W.; Perakis, S.S.; Schleppi, P.; Schimel, J.; Schmidt, I.K.; Sommerkorn, M.; Spoelstra, J.; Tietema, A.; Wessel, W.W.; Zak, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3–18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C: N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N·ha-1·yr-1 above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer addition.

  4. Ecosystem N distribution and δ15N during a century of forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compton, J.E.; Hooker, T.D.; Perakis, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of terrestrial ecosystem nitrogen (N) pools reflect internal processes and input–output balances. Disturbance generally increases N cycling and loss, yet few studies have examined ecosystem δ15N over a disturbance-recovery sequence. We used a chronosequence approach to examine N distribution and δ15N during forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment. Site ages ranged from 10 to 115 years, with similar soils, climate, land-use history, and overstory vegetation (white pine Pinus strobus). Foliar N and δ15N decreased as stands aged, consistent with a progressive tightening of the N cycle during forest regrowth on agricultural lands. Over time, foliar δ15N became more negative, indicating increased fractionation along the mineralization–mycorrhizal–plant uptake pathway. Total ecosystem N was constant across the chronosequence, but substantial internal N redistribution occurred from the mineral soil to plants and litter over 115 years (>25% of ecosystem N or 1,610 kg ha−1). Temporal trends in soil δ15N generally reflected a redistribution of depleted N from the mineral soil to the developing O horizon. Although plants and soil δ15N are coupled over millennial time scales of ecosystem development, our observed divergence between plants and soil suggests that they can be uncoupled during the disturbance-regrowth sequence. The approximate 2‰ decrease in ecosystem δ15N over the century scale suggests significant incorporation of atmospheric N, which was not detected by traditional ecosystem N accounting. Consideration of temporal trends and disturbance legacies can improve our understanding of the influence of broader factors such as climate or N deposition on ecosystem N balances and δ15N.

  5. Effect of protein restriction on (15)N transfer from dietary [(15)N]alanine and [(15)N]Spirulina platensis into urea.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, M J; Hoffer, L J

    2001-08-01

    Six normal men consumed a mixed test meal while adapted to high (1.5 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) and low (0.3 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) protein intakes. They completed this protocol twice: when the test meals included 3 mg/kg of [(15)N]alanine ([(15)N]Ala) and when they included 30 mg/kg of intrinsically labeled [(15)N]Spirulina platensis ([(15)N]SPI). Six subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) receiving conventional insulin therapy consumed the test meal with added [(15)N]Ala while adapted to their customary high-protein diet. Protein restriction increased serum alanine, glycine, glutamine, and methionine concentrations and reduced those of leucine. Whether the previous diet was high or low in protein, there was a similar increase in serum alanine, methionine, and branched-chain amino acid concentrations after the test meal and a similar pattern of (15)N enrichment in serum amino acids for a given tracer. When [(15)N]Ala was included in the test meal, (15)N appeared rapidly in serum alanine and glutamine, to a minor degree in leucine and isoleucine, and not at all in other circulating amino acids. With [(15)N]SPI, there was a slow appearance of the label in all serum amino acids analyzed. Despite the different serum amino acid labeling, protein restriction reduced the postmeal transfer of dietary (15)N in [(15)N]Ala or [(15)N]SPI into [(15)N]urea by similar amounts (38 and 43%, respectively, not significant). The response of the subjects with IDDM was similar to that of the normal subjects. Information about adaptive reductions in dietary amino acid catabolism obtained by adding [(15)N]Ala to a test meal appears to be equivalent to that obtained using an intrinsically labeled protein tracer. PMID:11440912

  6. Compound-specific 15N analysis of amino acids in 15N tracer experiments provide an estimate of newly synthesised soil protein from inorganic and organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, Alice; Michaelides, Katerina; Evershed, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Organic N concentrations far exceed those of inorganic N in most soils and despite much investigation, the composition and cycling of this complex pool of SOM remains poorly understood. A particular problem has been separating more recalcitrant soil organic N from that actively cycling through the soil system; an important consideration in N cycling studies and for the soil's nutrient supplying capacity. The use of 15N-labelled substrates as stable isotope tracers has contributed much to our understanding of the soil system, but the complexity and heterogeneity of soil organic N prevents thorough compound-specific 15N analyses of organic N compounds and makes it difficult to examine any 15N-labelled organic products in any detail. As a result, a significant proportion of previous work has either simply assumed that since the majority of soil N is organic, all of the 15N retained in the soil is organic N (e.g. Sebilo et al., 2013) or subtracted 15N-labelled inorganic compounds from bulk values (e.g. Pilbeam et al., 1997). While the latter approach is more accurate, these methods only provide an estimate of the bulk 15N value of an extremely complex and non-uniformly labelled organic pool. A more detailed approach has been to use microbial biomass extraction (Brookes et al., 1985) and subsequent N isotopic analysis to determine the 15N value of biomass-N, representing the fraction of 15N assimilated by microbes or the 15N cycling through the 'living' or 'active' portion of soil organic N. However, this extraction method can only generate estimates and some lack of confidence in its validity and reliability remains. Here, we present an alternative technique to obtain a measure of the assimilation of an applied 15N substrate by the soil microbial biomass and an estimate of the newly synthesized soil protein, which is representative of the magnitude of the active soil microbial biomass. The technique uses a stable isotope tracer and compound-specific 15N analysis, but

  7. Cryptic or day-to-day parts of the riverbed N cycle - new challenges for 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimmer, Mark; Ouyang, Liao; Lansdown, Katrina

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) not only changed our understanding of the nitrogen cycle in aquatic ecosystems but it also undermined some of the key 15N techniques used to study it. Reformulations of principle equations and the development of new 15N2 and 15N2O techniques enabled the simultaneous quantification of N2 production by anammox and denitrification in mainly soft, cohesive sediments where redox gradients are clearly defined and solute exchanged governed by diffusion. At the heart of the application of 15N, for the quantification of natural 14N cycling, is the key assumption that the respective pools of 15N and 14N are evenly mixed and that both are cycled without bias towards each other. Recent evidence, however, from a variety of aquatic ecosystems, suggests that this may not be the case. For example, organic N may be oxidised directly to N2 gas without ever mixing with the inorganic pool or inorganic intermediates (e.g. nitrite) are 'shunted' internally and also fail to mix evenly with the applied tracer pool. Our most recent work in permeable, oxic gravel riverbeds presents some particular challenges to the application of 15N. In these systems, a tight coupling between aerobic nitrification and anaerobic N2 production - in the presence of 100

  8. Continuous field measurement of N2O isotopologues using FTIR spectroscopy following 15N addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. L.; Griffith, D. W.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Lugg, G.; Lawrie, R.; Macdonald, B.

    2012-12-01

    15N applied was emitted as N2O. Average fractions of 15N recovered in soil, root, shoot, and microbial biomass pools varied between trials but were approximately 0.4, 0.08, 0.1 and 0.03, respectively. The results indicate that the portable FTIR spectroscopic technique can effectively trace transfer of 15N to the atmosphere as N2O after 15N addition, allowing for powerful quantification of N2O emissions under field conditions.

  9. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  10. Long-term 15N tracking from biological N fixation across different plant and humus components of the boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroniz-Crespo, Maria; Jones, David L.; Zackrisson, Olle; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2014-05-01

    Biological N2 fixation by cyanobacteria associated with feather mosses is an important cog in the nitrogen (N) cycle of boreal forests; still, our understanding of the turnover and fate of N fixed by this association remains greatly incomplete. The 15N signature of plants and soil serves as a powerful tool to explore N dynamics in forest ecosystems. In particular, in the present study we aimed to investigate the contribution of N2 fixation to δ15N signatures of plants and humus component of the boreal forest. Here we present results from a long-term (7 years) tacking of labelled 15N2 across the humus layer, seedlings of the tree species Pinus sylvestris, two common dwarf shrub species (Empetrum hermaphroditum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and the feather moss Pleurozium schreibery. The enriched experiment was conducted in 2005 in a natural boreal forest in northern Sweden. Two different treatments (10% 15N2 headspace enrichment and control) were setup in nine different plots (0.5 x 0.5 m) within the forest. We observed a significant reduction of δ15N signature of the 15N-enriched moss that could be explained by a growth dilution effect. Nevertheless, after 5 years since 15N2 enrichment some of the label 15N was still detected on the moss and in particular in the dead tissue. We could not detect a clear transfer of the labelled 15N2 from the moss-cyanobacteria system to other components of the ecosystem. However, we found consistence relationship through time between increments of δ15N signature of some of the forest components in plots which exhibited higher N fixation rates in the moss. In particular, changes in natural abundance δ15N that could be associated with N fixation were more apparent in the humus layer, the dwarf shrub Vaccinium vitis-idaea and the pine seedlings when comparing across plots and years.

  11. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  12. Box-modeling of 15N/14N in mammals.

    PubMed

    Balter, Vincent; Simon, Laurent; Fouillet, Hélène; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2006-03-01

    The 15N/14N signature of animal proteins is now commonly used to understand their physiology and quantify the flows of nutrient in trophic webs. These studies assume that animals are predictably 15N-enriched relative to their food, but the isotopic mechanism which accounts for this enrichment remains unknown. We developed a box model of the nitrogen isotope cycle in mammals in order to predict the 15N/14N ratios of body reservoirs as a function of time, N intake and body mass. Results of modeling show that a combination of kinetic isotope fractionation during the N transfer between amines and equilibrium fractionation related to the reversible conversion of N-amine into ammonia is required to account for the well-established approximately 4 per thousand 15N-enrichment of body proteins relative to the diet. This isotopic enrichment observed in proteins is due to the partial recycling of 15N-enriched urea and the urinary excretion of a fraction of the strongly 15N-depleted ammonia reservoir. For a given body mass and diet delta15N, the isotopic compositions are mainly controlled by the N intake. Increase of the urea turnover combined with a decrease of the N intake lead to calculate a delta15N increase of the proteins, in agreement with the observed increase of collagen delta15N of herbivorous animals with aridity. We further show that the low delta15N collagen values of cave bears cannot be attributed to the dormancy periods as it is commonly thought, but inversely to the hyperphagia behavior. This model highlights the need for experimental investigations performed with large mammals in order to improve our understanding of natural variations of delta15N collagen. PMID:16328553

  13. 15N/14N variations in Cretaceous Atlantic sedimentary sequences: implication for past changes in marine nitrogen biogeochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    At two locations in the Atlantic Ocean (DSDP Sites 367 and 530) early to middle Cretaceous organic-carbon-rich beds ("black shales") were found to have significantly lower ??15N values (lower 15N/14N ratios) than adjacent organic-carbon-poor beds (white limestones or green claystones). While these lithologies are of marine origin, the black strata in particular have ??15N values that are significantly lower than those previously found in the marine sediment record and most contemporary marine nitrogen pools. In contrast, black, organic-carbon-rich beds at a third site (DSDP Site 603) contain predominantly terrestrial organic matter and have C- and N-isotopic compositions similar to organic matter of modern terrestrial origin. The recurring 15N depletion in the marine-derived Cretaceous sequences prove that the nitrogen they contain is the end result of an episodic and atypical biogeochemistry. Existing isotopic and other data indicate that the low 15N relative abundance is the consequence of pelagic rather than post-depositional processes. Reduced ocean circulation, increased denitrification, and, hence, reduced euphotic zone nitrate availability may have led to Cretaceous phytoplankton assemblages that were periodically dominated by N2-fixing blue-green algae, a possible source of this sediment 15N-depletion. Lack of parallel isotopic shifts in Cretaceous terrestrially-derived nitrogen (Site 603) argues that the above change in nitrogen cycling during this period did not extend beyond the marine environment. ?? 1987.

  14. (15)N NMR studies of a nitrile-modified nucleoside.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Anne T; Gai, Xin Sonia; Buckwalter, Beth L; Fenlon, Edward E; Brewer, Scott H

    2010-12-30

    Nitrile-modified molecules have proven to be excellent probes of local environments in biomolecules via both vibrational and fluorescence spectroscopy. The utility of the nitrile group as a spectroscopic probe has been expanded here to (15)N NMR spectroscopy by selective (15)N incorporation. The (15)N NMR chemical shift (δ((15)N)) of the (15)N-labeled 5-cyano-2'-deoxyuridine (C(15)NdU, 1a) was found to change from 153.47 to 143.80 ppm in going from THF-d(8) to D(2)O. A 0.81 ppm downfield shift was measured upon formation of a hydrogen-bond-mediated heterodimer between 2,6-diheptanamidopyridine and a silyl ether analogue of 1a in chloroform, and the small intrinsic temperature dependence of δ((15)N) of C(15)NdU was measured as a 0.38 ppm downfield shift from 298 to 338 K. The experiments were complemented with density functional theory calculations exploring the effect of solvation on the (15)N NMR chemical shift. PMID:21126044

  15. Gluconeogenesis from labeled carbon: estimating isotope dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, J.K.

    1986-03-01

    To estimate the rate of gluconeogenesis from steady-state incorporation of labeled 3-carbon precursors into glucose, isotope dilution must be considered so that the rate of labeling of glucose can be quantitatively converted to the rate of gluconeogenesis. An expression for the value of this isotope dilution can be derived using mathematical techniques and a model of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The present investigation employs a more complex model than that used in previous studies. This model includes the following pathways that may affect the correction for isotope dilution: 1) flux of 3-carbon precursor to the oxaloacetate pool via acetyl-CoA and the TCA cycle; 2) flux of 4- or 5-carbon compounds into the TCA cycle; 3) reversible flux between oxaloacetate (OAA) and pyruvate and between OAA and fumarate; 4) incomplete equilibrium between OAA pools; and 5) isotope dilution of 3-carbon tracers between the experimentally measured pool and the precursor for the TCA-cycle OAA pool. Experimental tests are outlined which investigators can use to determine whether these pathways are significant in a specific steady-state system. The study indicated that flux through these five pathways can significantly affect the correction for isotope dilution. To correct for the effects of these pathways an alternative method for calculating isotope dilution is proposed using citrate to relate the specific activities of acetyl-CoA and OAA.

  16. Slow motions in microcrystalline proteins as observed by MAS-dependent 15N rotating-frame NMR relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; Zinkevich, Tatiana; Reif, Bernd; Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-11-01

    15N NMR relaxation rate R1ρ measurements reveal that a substantial fraction of residues in the microcrystalline chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain protein undergoes dynamics in the μs-ms timescale range. On the basis of a comparison of 2D site-resolved with 1D integrated 15N spectral intensities, we demonstrate that the significant fraction of broad signals in the 2D spectrum exhibits the most pronounced slow mobility. We show that 15N R1ρ's in proton-diluted protein samples are practically free from the coherent spin-spin contribution even at low MAS rates, and thus can be analysed quantitatively. Moderate MAS rates (10-30 kHz) can be more advantageous in comparison with the rates >50-60 kHz when slow dynamics are to be identified and quantified by means of R1ρ experiments.

  17. Pool Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Caribbean Clear, Inc. used NASA's silver ion technology as a basis for its automatic pool purifier. System offers alternative approach to conventional purification chemicals. Caribbean Clear's principal markets are swimming pool owners who want to eliminate chlorine and bromine. Purifiers in Caribbean Clear System are same silver ions used in Apollo System to kill bacteria, plus copper ions to kill algae. They produce spa or pool water that exceeds EPA Standards for drinking water.

  18. Variation in foliar [sup 15]N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr. )

    1993-10-01

    Spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance ([sigma][sup 15]N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N[sub 2]-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O[sub 1]-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar [sup 15]N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil. 34 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Isolation and measurement of 15N2 from respiratory gases of animals administered 15N-labeled substances.

    PubMed

    Springer, D L; Reed, D J; Dost, F N

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for collection of metabolic 15N2 from in vitro preparations or intact rats administered 15N-containing compounds. The methods enables routine collection and mass spectrometric measurement of as little as 10 mumol 15N2 respired by a rat over a 24-h period. A device is described that includes either an animal chamber or a tissue reaction vessel in a closed recycling atmosphere, with automatic O2 replenishment and removal of CO2 and water. It is capable of sustaining moderate vacuum and is coupled to a high-vacuum manifold designed to process the contained atmosphere and respiratory gases. The starting atmosphere is an 80:20 mix of sulfur hexafluoride and O2. Recovery of 15N2 gas from the system without an animal present was 101.3 +/- 5.75%. When 15N2 gas was very slowly infused iv into an animal, recovery was 89.1 +/- 5.38%. Use of the method in studies of the fate of [15N]hydrazine in rats indicated that about 15% of the administered hydrazine is rapidly converted to 15N2, followed by slower conversion of an additional 7-10% over the next several hours. PMID:7328697

  20. Identification of novel hydrazine metabolites by 15N-NMR.

    PubMed

    Preece, N E; Nicholson, J K; Timbrell, J A

    1991-05-01

    15N-NMR has been used to study the metabolism of hydrazine in rats in vivo. Single doses of [15N2]hydrazine (2.0 mmol/kg: 98.6% g atom) were administered to rats and urine collected for 24 hr over ice. A number of metabolites were detected by 15N-NMR analysis of lyophilized urine. Ammonia was detected as a singlet at 0 ppm and unchanged [15N2]hydrazine was present in the urine detectable as a singlet at 32 ppm. Peaks were observed at 107 and 110 ppm which were identified as being due to the hydrazido nitrogen of acetylhydrazine and diacetylhydrazine, respectively. A resonance at 85 ppm was ascribed to carbazic acid, resulting from reaction of hydrazine with carbon dioxide. A singlet detected at 316 ppm was thought to be due to the hydrazono nitrogen of the pyruvate hydrazone. The resonance at 56 ppm was assigned to 15N-enriched urea, this together with the presence of ammonia indicates that the N-N bond of hydrazine is cleaved in vivo, possibly by N-oxidation, and the resultant ammonia is incorporated into urea. A doublet centred at 150 ppm and a singlet at 294 ppm were assigned to a metabolite which results from cyclization of the 2-oxoglutarate hydrazone. Therefore 15N-NMR spectroscopic analysis of urine has yielded significant new information on the metabolism of hydrazine. PMID:2018564

  1. δ15N Value Does Not Reflect Fasting in Mysticetes

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Alex; Giménez, Joan; Gómez–Campos, Encarna; Cardona, Luís; Borrell, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    The finding that tissue δ15N values increase with protein catabolism has led researchers to apply this value to gauge nutritive condition in vertebrates. However, its application to marine mammals has in most occasions failed. We investigated the relationship between δ15N values and the fattening/fasting cycle in a model species, the fin whale, a migratory capital breeder that experiences severe seasonal variation in body condition. We analyzed two tissues providing complementary insights: one with isotopic turnover (muscle) and one that keeps a permanent record of variations in isotopic values (baleen plates). In both tissues δ15N values increased with intensive feeding but decreased with fasting, thus contradicting the pattern previously anticipated. The apparent inconsistency during fasting is explained by the fact that a) individuals migrate between different isotopic isoscapes, b) starvation may not trigger significant negative nitrogen balance, and c) excretion drops and elimination of 15N-depleted urine is minimized. Conversely, when intensive feeding is resumed in the northern grounds, protein anabolism and excretion start again, triggering 15N enrichment. It can be concluded that in whales and other mammals that accrue massive depots of lipids as energetic reserves and which have limited access to drinking water, the δ15N value is not affected by fasting and therefore cannot be used as an indicatior of nutritive condition. PMID:24651388

  2. Determination of the δ15N of total nitrogen in solids; RSIL lab code 2893

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2893 is to determine the δ(15N/14N), abbreviated as δ15N , of total nitrogen in solid samples. A Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA) is used to convert total nitrogen in a solid sample into N2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines relative difference in the isotope-amount ratios of stable nitrogen isotopes (15N/14N)of the product N2 gas. The combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. Samples are placed in a tin capsule and loaded into the Costech Zero Blank Autosampler of the EA. Under computer control, samples are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where the combustion takes place in a helium atmosphere containing an excess of oxygen gas. Combustion products are transported by a helium carrier through a reduction tube to remove excess oxygen and convert all nitrous oxides into N2 and through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly CO2 and N2, are separated by a gas chromatograph. The gas is then introduced into the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) through a Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) ConFlo II interface, which also is used to inject N2 reference gas and helium for sample dilution. The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus CF-IRMS. It has a universal triple collector, two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle, capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 28, 29, 30, simultaneously. The ion beams from N2 are as follows: m/z 28 = N2 = 14N14N; m/z 29 = N2 = 14N15N primarily; m/z 30 = NO = 14N16O primarily, which is a sign of contamination or incomplete reduction.

  3. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  4. A highly sensitive assay for xanthine oxidoreductase activity using a combination of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine and liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Murase, Takayo; Oka, Mitsuru; Nampei, Mai; Miyachi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we developed a highly sensitive assay for xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) activity utilizing a combination of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine and liquid chromatography (LC)/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (TQMS). In this assay, the amount of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]uric acid (UA) produced by XOR was determined by using LC/TQMS. For this assay, we synthesized [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine as a substrate, [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]UA as an analytical standard, and [(13) C3 ,(15) N3 ]UA as an internal standard. The [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]UA calibration curve obtained using LC/TQMS under the selected reaction monitoring mode was evaluated, and the results indicated good linearity (R(2)  = 0.998, weighting of 1/x(2) ) in the range of 20 to 4000 nM. As a model reaction of less active samples, the XOR activity of serial-diluted mouse plasma was measured. Thereby, the XOR activity of the 1024-fold-diluted mouse plasma was 4.49 ± 0.44 pmol/100 μL/h (mean ± standard deviation, n = 3). This value is comparable to the predicted XOR activity value of healthy human plasma. Hence, this combination method may be used to obtain high-sensitivity measurements required for XOR activity analysis on various organs or human plasma. PMID:27006202

  5. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  6. Role of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in furnishing aspartate nitrogen for urea synthesis: studies in perfused rat liver with 15N.

    PubMed Central

    Nissim, Itzhak; Horyn, Oksana; Luhovyy, Bohdan; Lazarow, Adam; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Nissim, Ilana; Yudkoff, Marc

    2003-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine: (i) the role of the reductive amination of alpha-ketoglutarate via the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in furnishing mitochondrial glutamate and its transamination into aspartate; (ii) the relative incorporation of perfusate 15NH4Cl, [2-15N]glutamine or [5-15N]glutamine into carbamoyl phosphate and aspartate-N and, thereby, [15N]urea isotopomers; and (iii) the extent to which perfusate [15N]aspartate is taken up by the liver and incorporated into [15N]urea. We used a liver-perfusion system containing a physiological mixture of amino acids and ammonia similar to concentrations in vivo, with 15N label only in glutamine, ammonia or aspartate. The results demonstrate that in perfusions with a physiological mixture of amino acids, approx. 45 and 30% of total urea-N output was derived from perfusate ammonia and glutamine-N respectively. Approximately two-thirds of the ammonia utilized for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis was derived from perfusate ammonia and one-third from glutamine. Perfusate [2-15N]glutamine, [5-15N]glutamine or [15N]aspartate provided 24, 10 and 10% respectively of the hepatic aspartate-N pool, whereas perfusate 15NH4Cl provided approx. 37% of aspartate-N utilized for urea synthesis, secondary to the net formation of [15N]glutamate via the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. The results suggest that the mitochondrial glutamate formed via the reductive amination of alpha-ketoglutarate may have a key role in ammonia detoxification by the following processes: (i) furnishing aspartate-N for ureagenesis; (ii) serving as a scavenger for excess ammonia; and (iii) improving the availability of the mitochondrial [glutamate] for synthesis of N -acetylglutamate. In addition, the current findings suggest that the formation of aspartate via the mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase reaction may play an important role in the synthesis of cytosolic argininosuccinate. PMID:12935293

  7. Compound-specific 15N stable isotope probing of N assimilation by the soil microbial biomass: a new methodological paradigm in soil N cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, A. F.; Knowles, T. D. J.; Michaelides, K.; Evershed, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    A compound-specific nitrogen-15 stable isotope probing (15N-SIP) technique is described which allows investigation of the fate of inorganic- or organic-N amendments to soils. The technique uses gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to determine the δ15N values of individual amino acids (AAs; determined as N-acetyl, O-isopropyl derivatives) as proxies of biomass protein production. The δ15N values are used together with AA concentrations to quantify N assimilation of 15N-labelled substrates by the soil microbial biomass. The utility of the approach is demonstrated through incubation experiments using inorganic 15N-labelled substrates ammonium (15NH4+) and nitrate (15NO3-) and an organic 15N-labelled substrate, glutamic acid (15N-Glu). Assimilation of all the applied substrates was undetectable based on bulk soil properties, i.e. % total N (% TN), bulk soil N isotope composition and AA concentrations, all of which remained relatively constant throughout the incubation experiments. In contrast, compound-specific AA δ15N values were highly sensitive to N assimilation, providing qualitative and quantitative insights into the cycling and fate of the applied 15N-labelled substrates. The utility of this 15N-AA-SIP technique is considered in relation to other currently available methods for investigating the microbially-mediated assimilation of nitrogenous substrates into the soil organic N pool. This approach will be generally applicable to the study of N cycling in any soil, or indeed, in any complex ecosystem.

  8. Thermodynamics of Dilute Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancso, Gabor; Fenby, David V.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses principles and definitions related to the thermodynamics of dilute solutions. Topics considered include dilute solution, Gibbs-Duhem equation, reference systems (pure gases and gaseous mixtures, liquid mixtures, dilute solutions), real dilute solutions (focusing on solute and solvent), terminology, standard states, and reference systems.…

  9. Stepwise enrichment of 15N along food chains: Further evidence and the relation between δ 15N and animal age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masao; Wada, Eitaro

    1984-05-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrogen was measured in marine and fresh-water animals from the East China Sea, The Bering Sea, Lake Ashinoko and Usujiri intertidal zone. Primary producers, showed average δ15Nversus atmospheric nitrogen of +5.0%. (+3.4 to +7.5) in the Bering Sea and Lake Ashinoko, and +6.8%. (+6.0 to +7.6) in Usujiri intertidal zone. Blue green algae from the East China Sea show an average -0.55%. (-0.8 to +1.2). All consumers, Zooplankton, fish and bird exhibited Stepwise enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level. The 15N enrichment at a single feeding process ranged from +1.3 to +5.3 averaging +3.4 ± 1.1%.. This isotopic fractionation seems to be independent of habitat. The effect of age in animals was obtained by analyzing two marine mussels. The soft tissue nitrogen showed +2.0%. enrichment relative to that of primary producers, and the magnitude was almost constant with shell ages ranging from 0 to 8 years. A similar 15N enrichment occurs in all Molluscs, Crustaceans, Insecta, Amphibia, Fish, Ave and Mammal species regardless of the difference in the form of excreted nitrogen and in laboratory cultured fish, brine shrimp and mice (+2.9 to +4.9%.). The excreted ammonia from guppy was sufficiently light to balance the concentration of 15N to animal body.

  10. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  11. The ring phenomenon of diluted blood droplets.

    PubMed

    Ramsthaler, Frank; Schlote, J; Wagner, C; Fiscina, J; Kettner, M

    2016-05-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis is occasionally required in practical forensic casework. Misinterpretations may occur in cases in which diluted bloodstains are formed either within the course of the crime or during cleaning attempts after the original crime. The resulting pale or diluted aspect of the bloodstains may also be produced by passive serum separation. To differentiate between diluted and non-diluted stains and the artifacts of pure serum separation, dripping experiments were performed using droplets of multiple sizes and dilutions dripped onto common indoor and fabric surfaces. In addition, pools of blood of different volumes were applied to solid surfaces with different inclinations to determine the conditions and properties of serum separation. This study yielded morphological characteristics that enable differentiation between stains of diluted and non-diluted blood: a prominent ring phenomenon indicates dilution with water. To elucidate the underlying physical mechanism of particle distribution within a blood stain, photomicrographs were taken during the drying process. The so-called contact line pinning effect was identified as the formation mechanism of this ring phenomenon. Serum separation was highly dependent on the applied blood volume, the ambient temperature, the time elapsed since the initial deposition, and the degree of floor inclination. PMID:26718842

  12. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of 15N NMR protonation shifts.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Valentin A; Samultsev, Dmitry O; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study revealed that the nature of the upfield (shielding) protonation effect in 15N NMR originates in the change of the contribution of the sp(2)-hybridized nitrogen lone pair on protonation resulting in a marked shielding of nitrogen of about 100 ppm. On the contrary, for amine-type nitrogen, protonation of the nitrogen lone pair results in the deshielding protonation effect of about 25 ppm, so that the total deshielding protonation effect of about 10 ppm is due to the interplay of the contributions of adjacent natural bond orbitals. A versatile computational scheme for the calculation of 15N NMR chemical shifts of protonated nitrogen species and their neutral precursors is proposed at the density functional theory level taking into account solvent effects within the supermolecule solvation model. PMID:25891386

  14. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported. PMID:24746715

  15. Marking Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) With Rubidium or 15N.

    PubMed

    Klick, J; Yang, W Q; Bruck, D J

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) has caused significant economic damage to berry and stone fruit production regions. Markers that are systemic in plants and easily transferred to target organisms are needed to track D. suzukii exploitation of host resources and trophic interactions. High and low concentrations of the trace element, rubidium (Rb), and the stable isotope, 15N, were tested to mark D. suzukii larvae feeding on fruits of enriched strawberry plants grown in containers under greenhouse conditions. Fly marker content and proportion of flies marked 1, 7, and 14 d after emergence from enriched fruits and fly dry mass were analyzed. Nearly 100% of the flies analyzed 14 d after emerging from 15N-enriched plants were marked, whereas only 30-75% and 0-3% were marked 14 d after emerging from high and low Rb concentration plants, respectively. Rapid Rb decay, strong 15N persistence, and the economics of using these markers in the field to elucidate D. suzukii pest ecology are discussed. PMID:26470275

  16. Compound specific amino acid δ15N in marine sediments: A new approach for studies of the marine nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Fabian C.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Crusius, John; Casso, Michael A.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-10-01

    into source AA versus trophic AA pools, and the integrated δ15NAA of all common protein AA (δ15NTHAA), which serves as a proxy for the δ15N of nutrient N. Together, we suggest that these can provide a coupled picture of regime shifts in planktonic ecosystem structure, δ15N at the base of food webs, and possibly additional information about nutrient dynamics.

  17. 15N investigation into the effect of a pollutant on the nitrogen metabolism of Tetrahymena pyriformis as a model for environmental medical research.

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, K; Hofmann, D; Gehre, M; Krumbiegel, P

    1998-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to examine the potential of stable isotope techniques for monitoring the impact of a harmful substance on the cellular nitrogen metabolism in the ciliate species Tetrahymena pyriformis. After identical cultivation periods of control cells and toluene-exposed cells in a defined culture medium enriched with [guanidino-15N2]l-arginine, a number of nitrogen-containing pools were analyzed: 1) quantity and 15N abundance of ammonia as the end product of nitrogen metabolism in the system; 2) pattern and 15N abundances of the protein-bound amino acids in the cells; 3) pattern and 15N abundances of free amino acids in the cells; and 4) pattern and 15N abundances of the amino acids in the culture medium. In addition to 15N emission spectrometry, a new gas chromatography/combustion interface-isotope ratio mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analytical system was used. The production and 15N content of ammonia were higher in the toluene-exposed system by 30% and 43%, respectively, indicating higher deamination rates and greater arginine consumption. The toluene-exposed cells exhibited increased 15N abundances of protein-bound amino acids in alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and tyrosine. Furthermore, structural analyses revealed the presence of N[Omega]-acetylarginine and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid--compounds that had not previously been detected in Tetrahymena pyriformis. Differences in the 15N-enrichment of free amino acids were also evident. This new effect-monitoring system designed to investigate the impact of a pollutant on protein metabolism by using a stable isotope-labeled cell culture is a powerful tool for environmental medical research. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9681977

  18. Uptake of stormwater nitrogen in bioretention systems demonstrated from 15N tracer techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdeshel, D.; Hultine, K. R.; Pomeroy, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Bioretention stormwater management systems are engineered ecosystems that capture urban stormwater in order to reduce the harmful effects of stormwater pollution on receiving waters. Bioretention systems have been shown to be effective at reducing the volume of runoff, and thereby reduce the nutrient loading to receiving waters from urban areas. However, little work has been done to evaluate the treatment processes that are responsible for reductions in effluent nitrogen (N). We hypothesize that the pulses of inorganic nitrogen associated with urban runoff events are captured in the plat tissues within these systems and not adsorbed to the soil media, thus creating a long-term, sustainable treatment approach to reducing the total nutrient loading to receiving waters. Nitrogen treatment performance was tested on two bioretention systems in Salt Lake City, UT: 1) an upland native community that does not require irrigation in semi-arid climates, and 2) a wetland community that requires 250 l of daily irrigation to offset the relatively high evaporative demand in the region. Each cell is sized to treat a 2.5 cm storm from a 140 m2 impervious surface: the area of the bioretention system is 10 m2. To test the N removal performance of each system, runoff events were simulated to represent an average precipitation regime using a synthetic stormwater blend starting in January, 2012. Effluent was collected from an underdrain and analyzed for total nitrogen (TN); mass removal was calculated for each month by subtracting the TN mass added to the garden minus the TN mass that flowed out of the garden. To test the hypothesis that plants assimilate stormwater N, 4 g of 100 atom% 15N NH4NO3 tracer was used as the N source in the synthetic stormwater during the first 2,000 l synthetic storm event in May. This isotopic label was calculated to enrich the total N pool of each garden to 100‰ 15N/14Nair. New growth was harvested from each plant in both cells and analyzed for 15N

  19. Grass species influence on plant N uptake - Determination of atmospheric N deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site using a 15N labelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Spott, Oliver; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2014-05-01

    Large areas of natural peat bogs in Northwestern Germany have been converted to arable land and were subjected to draining and peat cutting in the past. The few protected peatland areas remaining are affected by high nitrogen (N) deposition. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog - is surrounded by highly fertilized agricultural land and livestock production. In this study, we used a 15N pool dilution technique called 'Integrated Total Nitrogen Input' (ITNI) to quantify annual deposition of atmospheric N into biomonitoring pots over a two-year period. Since it considers direct N uptake by plants, it was expected to result in higher N input than conventional methods for determination of N deposition (e.g. micrometeorological approaches, bulk N samplers). Using Lolium multiflorum and Eriophorum vaginatum as monitor plants and low, medium and high levels of fertilization, we aimed to simulate increasing N deposition to planted pots and to allocate airborne N after its uptake by the soil-plant system in aboveground biomass, roots and soil. Increasing N fertilization was positively correlated with biomass production of Eriophorum vaginatum, whereas atmospheric plant N uptake decreased and highest airborne N input of 899.8 ± 67.4 µg N d-1 pot-1 was found for low N fertilization. In contrast, Lolium multiflorum showed a clear dependency of N supply on plant N uptake and was highest (688.7 ± 41.4 µg N d-1 pot-1) for highly fertilized vegetation pots. Our results suggest that grass species respond differently to increasing N input. While crop grasses such as Lolium multiflorum take up N according to N availability, species adopted to nutrient-limited conditions like Eriophorum vaginatum show N saturation effects with increasing N supply. Total airborne N input ranged from about 24 to 66 kg N ha-1 yr-1 dependent on the used indicator plant and the amount of added fertilizer. Parallel determination of atmospheric N deposition using a micrometeorological approach

  20. Measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy in [(13)C,(15)N] uniformly enriched proteins using CSA amplification.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Ge, Yuwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Mali; Li, Conggang; Gan, Zhehong

    2015-11-01

    Extended chemical shift anisotropy amplification (xCSA) is applied for measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of uniformly labeled proteins under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The amplification sequence consists of a sequence of π-pulses that repetitively interrupt MAS averaging of the CSA interaction. The timing of the pulses is designed to generate amplified spinning sideband manifolds which can be fitted to extract CSA parameters. The (13)C/(13)C homonuclear dipolar interactions are not affected by the π-pulses due to the bilinear nature of the spin operators and are averaged by MAS in the xCSA experiment. These features make the constant evolution-time experiment suitable for measuring CSA of uniformly labeled samples. The incorporation of xCSA with multi-dimensional (13)C/(15)N correlation is demonstrated with a GB1 protein sample as a model system for measuring (13)C/(15)N CSA of all backbone (15)NH, (13)CA and (13)CO sites. PMID:26404770

  1. Fast structure-based assignment of 15N HSQC spectra of selectively 15N-labeled paramagnetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Pintacuda, Guido; Keniry, Max A; Huber, Thomas; Park, Ah Young; Dixon, Nicholas E; Otting, Gottfried

    2004-03-10

    A novel strategy for fast NMR resonance assignment of (15)N HSQC spectra of proteins is presented. It requires the structure coordinates of the protein, a paramagnetic center, and one or more residue-selectively (15)N-labeled samples. Comparison of sensitive undecoupled (15)N HSQC spectra recorded of paramagnetic and diamagnetic samples yields data for every cross-peak on pseudocontact shift, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, cross-correlation between Curie-spin and dipole-dipole relaxation, and residual dipolar coupling. Comparison of these four different paramagnetic quantities with predictions from the three-dimensional structure simultaneously yields the resonance assignment and the anisotropy of the susceptibility tensor of the paramagnetic center. The method is demonstrated with the 30 kDa complex between the N-terminal domain of the epsilon subunit and the theta subunit of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III. The program PLATYPUS was developed to perform the assignment, provide a measure of reliability of the assignment, and determine the susceptibility tensor anisotropy. PMID:14995214

  2. Use of a 15N tracer to determine linkages between a mangrove and an upland freshwater swamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, R. A.; Cormier, N.

    2005-05-01

    Mangrove forests and adjacent upland freshwater swamps are important components of subsistence-based economies of Pacific islands. Mangroves provide valuable firewood (Rhizophora apiculata) and mangrove crabs (Scylla serrata); intact freshwater swamps are often used for agroforestry (e.g., taro cultivation). While these two systems are connected hydrologically via groundwater and surface flows, little information is available on how they may be biogeochemically or ecologically linked. For example, mangrove leaf litter was once thought to be an important food source for resident and transient nekton and invertebrates, but this value may have been overestimated. Instead, nutrients or allochthonous material (e.g., phytoplankton, detritus) delivered via groundwater or surface water from upland freshwater swamps may play a larger role in mangrove food webs. Understanding the linkages between these two ecologically and culturally important ecosystems will help us to understand the potential impacts of hydrological alterations that occur when roads or bridges are constructed through them. We conducted a 15N tracer study in the Yela watershed on the island of Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia. K15NO3 was continually added at trace levels for 4 weeks to the Yela River in an upland freshwater swamp adjacent to a mangrove forest. Nitrate and ammonium pools, major primary producers, macroinvertebrates, and fish were sampled from stations 5 m upstream (freshwater swamp) and 138, 188, 213, and 313 m downstream (mangrove) from the tracer addition. Samples were collected once a week prior to, during, and after the 15N addition for a total of 6 weeks. Preliminary results revealed no significant enrichment (< 1 ‰) in the 15N isotope composition of either resident shrimp (Macrobrachium sp.) or mudskipper fish (Periophthalmus sp.). However, the 15N signature of ammonium pools was enriched 10-60 ‰ by the end of the third week. These results suggest that the tracer was present

  3. Fate of nitrogen deposition and decomposed nitrogen from litter in a 15N-tracer mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, R.; Perks, M.; Mencuccini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic-derived nitrogen may be a major driver of the 0.6-0.7 Pg y-1 increase in the carbon sink in historically N-limited northern and boreal forests, but the magnitude of its effect is still uncertain. A strong effect depends on the allocation of N to trees, because of their high C:N ratio in woody tissues, and isotope tracer experiments have shown that the majority of 15N tracers applied directly to the soil are lost via leeching or retained in soil pools rather than being acquired by tree root systems. However, ambient anthropogenic inputs of N to these systems are transported in the atmosphere and intercepted by foliage before they reach the soil system, while labelled fertilization experiments also can only explicitly trace the fate of the 15N-tracer from deposition, as opposed to changes in the fate of N from litter, where decomposition rates may be enhanced at low ambient levels of deposition, affecting the availability of N from this pool for tree nutrition. We present initial results from a potted Sitka Spruce mesocosm 15N-tracer experiment where ambient nitrogen deposition was supplemented with a minor (0.4 kg ha-1 y-1) input of additional N, applied to either the soil or the foliage. Either this deposition, or litter in the pots, was enriched in 15N, allowing the fate of the isotope from two different methods of deposition to be compared with that of nitrogen released from the litter under the deposition treatment.

  4. Dilutions Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamin, Lawrence

    1996-01-01

    Presents problems appropriate for high school and college students that highlight dilution methods. Promotes an understanding of dilution methods in order to prevent the unnecessary waste of chemicals and glassware in biology laboratories. (JRH)

  5. Serial Dilution Simulation Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keler, Cynthia; Balutis, Tabitha; Bergen, Kim; Laudenslager, Bryanna; Rubino, Deanna

    2010-01-01

    Serial dilution is often a difficult concept for students to understand. In this short dry lab exercise, students perform serial dilutions using seed beads. This exercise helps students gain skill at performing dilutions without using reagents, bacterial cultures, or viral cultures, while being able to visualize the process.

  6. The vibrational spectra of [ 15N 2]-succinonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengler, O. I.

    2001-07-01

    For the first time, the infrared and Raman spectra of [ 15N 2]-succinonitrile are presented and discussed in detail. Assignments of the vibrational bands of its two rotational conformers gauche and trans, respectively, have been made for both infrared and Raman spectra. The assignments were based on a recent ab-initio force field calculation for succinonitrile, taking into account the vibrational frequencies of other succinonitrile isotopomers. There are differences in the frequencies of the vibrational bands due to the mass increase in the cyanide groups, which have been analysed in depth.

  7. The vibrational spectra of [15N2]-succinonitrile.

    PubMed

    Fengler, O I

    2001-07-01

    For the first time, the infrared and Raman spectra of [15N2]-succinonitrile are presented and discussed in detail. Assignments of the vibrational bands of its two rotational conformers gauche and trans, respectively, have been made for both infrared and Raman spectra. The assignments were based on a recent ab-initio force field calculation for succinonitrile, taking into account the vibrational frequencies of other succinonitrile isotopomers. There are differences in the frequencies of the vibrational bands due to the mass increase in the cyanide groups, which have been analysed in depth. PMID:11471715

  8. 15N NMR chemical shifts in papaverine decomposition products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyrski, Andrzej; Girreser, Ulrich; Hermann, Tadeusz

    2013-03-01

    Papaverine can be easily oxidized to papaverinol, papaveraldine and 2,3,9,10-tetramethoxy-12-oxo-12H-indolo[2,1-a]isoquinolinium chloride. On addition of alkali solution the latter compound forms 2-(2-carboxy-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-6,7-dimethoxyisoquinolinium inner salt. Together with these structures the interesting 13-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3,8,9-tetramethoxy-6a-12a-diazadibenzo[a,g]fluorenylium chloride is discussed, which is formed in the Gadamer-Schulemann reaction of papaverine as a side product. This letter reports the 15N NMR spectra of the above mentioned compounds.

  9. Nitrogen Dynamics in Stream Wood Samples Incubated with [14C]Lignocellulose and Potassium [15N]Nitrate †

    PubMed Central

    Aumen, Nicholas G.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Gregory, Stan V.

    1985-01-01

    Surface wood samples obtained from a Douglas fir log (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in a Pacific Northwest stream were incubated in vitro with [14C]lignocellulose in a defined mineral salts medium supplemented with 10 mg of N liter−1 of 15N-labeled NO3− (50 atom% 15N). Evolution of 14CO2, distribution and isotopic dilution of 15N, filtrate N concentrations, and the rates of denitrification, N2 fixation, and respiration were measured at 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation. The organic N content of the lignocellulose-wood sample mixture had increased from 132 μg of N to a maximum of 231 μg of N per treatment after 6 days of incubation. Rates of [14C]lignocellulose decomposition were greatest during the first 6 days and then began to decline over the remaining 12 days. Total CO2 evolution was also highest at day 6 and declined steadily over the remaining duration of the incubation. Filtrate NH4+-N increased from background levels to a final value of 57 μg of N per treatment. Filtrate NO3− N completely disappeared by day 6, and organic N showed a slight decline between days 12 and 18. The majority of the 15N that could be recovered appeared in the particulate organic fraction by day 6 (41 μg of N), and the filtrate NH4+ N fraction contained 11 μg of 15N by day 18. The 15N enrichment values of the filtrate NH4+ and the inorganic N associated with the particulate fraction had increased to approximately 20 atom% 15N by 18 days of incubation, whereas the particulate organic fraction reached its highest enrichment by day 6. Measurements of N2 fixation and denitrification indicated an insignificant gain or loss of N from the experimental system by these processes. The data show that woody debris in stream ecosystems might function as a rapid and efficient sink for exogenous N, resulting in stimulation of wood decomposition and subsequent activation of other N cycling processes. PMID:16346785

  10. Experimental plant for simultaneous production of (14)N and (15)N by (15)N/(14)N exchange in NO, NO(2)-HNO(3) system under pressure.

    PubMed

    Axente, Damian; Marcu, Cristina; Muresan, Ancuţa; Kaucsar, Martin; Misan, Ioan; Popeneciu, Gabriel; Gligan, Nicolae; Cristea, Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    An experimental study on (14)N and (15)N simultaneous separation using the chemical exchange in NO, NO(2)-HNO(3) system under pressure is presented. The influence of the pressure and of the interstage 10 M HNO(3) flow rate on the separation of (14)N and (15)N was measured on a packed column with product and waste refluxers. At steady state and 1.8 atm (absolute), the isotopic concentration at the bottom of the separation column was 0.563 at% (15)N, and in the top of the column was 0.159 at% (15)N. The height equivalent to a theoretical plate and interstage 10 M HNO(3) flow rate values, obtained in these experimental conditions, allows the separation of (14)N highly depleted of (15)N and of (15)N at 99 at% (15)N concentration. PMID:20582793

  11. Contribution of proteolysis and de novo synthesis to alanine production in diabetic rat skeletal muscle: a 15N/1H nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Meynial-Denis, D; Chavaroux, A; Foucat, L; Mignon, M; Prugnaud, J; Bayle, G; Renou, J P; Arnal, M

    1997-10-01

    To assess the role of leucine as a precursor of alanine alpha-amino nitrogen in skeletal muscle during diabetes, extensor digitorum longus muscles from control (n = 7 experiments) and streptozotocin-diabetic rats (n = 8 experiments) were isolated and superfused with [15N]leucine (3 mmol/l) in the presence of glucose (10 mmol/l) for 2 h. Muscle perchloric acid extraction was performed at the end of superfusion in order to quantify newly synthesized alanine by 15N/1H nuclear magnetic resonance. Release of [15N]alanine in the superfusion medium was also measured. The pool of newly synthesized [15N]alanine was significantly increased (approximately 40%) in extensor digitorum longus muscles from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Whereas a significant enhancement of total alanine release from muscle was induced by diabetes (20%), only a slight increase in [15N]alanine release was detectable under our experimental conditions. Consequently, we conclude that streptozotocin-diabetes in growing rats induces in skeletal muscle: 1) an increase in nitrogen exchange between leucine and alanine leading to newly synthesized [15N]alanine; and 2) an increase of total alanine release from muscle originating from both proteolysis and de novo synthesis. PMID:9349596

  12. HN(α/β-COCA-J) Experiment for Measurement of 1JC‧Cα Couplings from Two-Dimensional [15N, 1H] Correlation Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permi, Perttu; Sorsa, Tia; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Annila, Arto

    1999-11-01

    Anew method for measurement of one-bond 13C‧-13Cα scalar and dipolar couplings from a two-dimensional [15N, 1H] correlation spectrum is presented. The experiment is based on multiple-quantum coherence, which is created between nitrogen and carbonyl carbon for simultaneous evolution of 15N chemical shift and coupling between 13C‧ and 13Cα. Optional subspectral editing is provided by the spin-state-selective filters. The residual dipolar dipolar contribution to the 13C‧-13Cα coupling can be measured from these simplified [15N, 1H]-HSQC-like spectra. In this way, without explicit knowledge of carbon assignments, conformational changes of proteins dissolved in dilute liquid crystals can be probed conveniently, e.g., in structure activity relationship by NMR studies. The method is demonstrated with human cardiac troponin C.

  13. Microfluidic serial dilution ladder.

    PubMed

    Ahrar, Siavash; Hwang, Michelle; Duncan, Philip N; Hui, Elliot E

    2014-01-01

    Serial dilution is a fundamental procedure that is common to a large number of laboratory protocols. Automation of serial dilution is thus a valuable component for lab-on-a-chip systems. While a handful of different microfluidic strategies for serial dilution have been reported, approaches based on continuous flow mixing inherently consume larger amounts of sample volume and chip real estate. We employ valve-driven circulatory mixing to address these issues and also introduce a novel device structure to store each stage of the dilution process. The dilution strategy is based on sequentially mixing the rungs of a ladder structure. We demonstrate a 7-stage series of 1 : 1 dilutions with R(2) equal to 0.995 in an active device area of 1 cm(2). PMID:24231765

  14. Measuring denitrification after grassland renewal and grassland conversion to cropland by using the 15N gas-flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchen, Caroline; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Flessa, Heinz; Giesemann, Anette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    Denitrification, the reduction of oxidized forms of inorganic N to N2O and N2 is an important pathway of gaseous nitrogen losses. Measuring denitrification, especially the reduction of N2O to N2, expressed in the product ratio (N2O/(N2O + N2)), is rather difficult and hence rarely performed under field conditions. But using the 15N gas-flux method allows determining N transformation processes in their natural environment. In order to develop effective climate mitigation strategies understanding the N2O source is essential. We used the 15N gas-flux method to determine N2O and N2 emissions following grassland renewal and conversion techniques. Therefore we selected three different treatments: control (C), mechanical grassland renovation (GR) (autumn 2013) and grassland conversion to maize (GM) (spring 2014) from field plot trials on two different sites (Histic Gleysoil and Plaggic Anthrosol) near Oldenburg, Lower Saxony, Germany. We applied 15N labeled KNO3- (60 atom. % 15N) at a rate equivalent to common farming practices (150 kg N*ha-1) using needle injection of fertilizer solution in three different depths (10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm) for homogeneous soil labeling up to 30 cm in microplots. During the first 10 days after application (May 2014) gas flux measurements from closed chambers were performed every second day and then weekly following a period of 8 weeks. Gas samples were analyzed for δ15N of N2 and N2O by IRMS according to Lewicka-Szczebak et al. (2013). Concentration and 15N enrichment of NO3- in soil water was determined on weekly samples using the SPIN-MAS technique (Stange et al. 2007). Fluxes of N2 and N2O evolved from the 15N labeled soil nitrogen pool were calculated using the equations of Spott et al. (2006). Peak events of N2 and N2O emissions occurred during the first 10 days of measurement, showing differences in soil types, as well as treatment variations. N2 fluxes up to 178 g*ha-1*day-1 and N2O fluxes up to 280 g*ha-1*day-1 were measured on the

  15. Comparing the Influence of Wildfire and Prescribed Burns on Watershed Nitrogen Biogeochemistry Using 15N Natural Abundance in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystem Components

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Kirsten; Kavanagh, Kathleen L.; Koyama, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated differences in the effects of three low-severity spring prescribed burns and four wildfires on nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry in Rocky Mountain headwater watersheds. We compared paired (burned/unburned) watersheds of four wildfires and three spring prescribed burns for three growing seasons post-fire. To better understand fire effects on the entire watershed ecosystem, we measured N concentrations and δ15N in both the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems components, i.e., soil, understory plants in upland and riparian areas, streamwater, and in-stream moss. In addition, we measured nitrate reductase activity in foliage of Spiraea betulifolia, a dominant understory species. We found increases of δ15N and N concentrations in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem N pools after wildfire, but responses were limited to terrestrial N pools after prescribed burns indicating that N transfer from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystem components did not occur in low-severity prescribed burns. Foliar δ15N differed between wildfire and prescribed burn sites; the δ15N of foliage of upland plants was enriched by 2.9 ‰ (difference between burned and unburned watersheds) in the first two years after wildfire, but only 1.3 ‰ after prescribed burns. In-stream moss δ15N in wildfire-burned watersheds was enriched by 1.3 ‰, but there was no response by moss in prescription-burned watersheds, mirroring patterns of streamwater nitrate concentrations. S. betulifolia showed significantly higher nitrate reductase activity two years after wildfires relative to corresponding unburned watersheds, but no such difference was found after prescribed burns. These responses are consistent with less altered N biogeochemistry after prescribed burns relative to wildfire. We concluded that δ15N values in terrestrial and aquatic plants and streamwater nitrate concentrations after fire can be useful indicators of the magnitude and duration of fire effects and the fate of post

  16. Comparing the influence of wildfire and prescribed burns on watershed nitrogen biogeochemistry using 15N natural abundance in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem components.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Kirsten; Kavanagh, Kathleen L; Koyama, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated differences in the effects of three low-severity spring prescribed burns and four wildfires on nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry in Rocky Mountain headwater watersheds. We compared paired (burned/unburned) watersheds of four wildfires and three spring prescribed burns for three growing seasons post-fire. To better understand fire effects on the entire watershed ecosystem, we measured N concentrations and δ15N in both the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems components, i.e., soil, understory plants in upland and riparian areas, streamwater, and in-stream moss. In addition, we measured nitrate reductase activity in foliage of Spiraea betulifolia, a dominant understory species. We found increases of δ15N and N concentrations in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem N pools after wildfire, but responses were limited to terrestrial N pools after prescribed burns indicating that N transfer from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystem components did not occur in low-severity prescribed burns. Foliar δ15N differed between wildfire and prescribed burn sites; the δ15N of foliage of upland plants was enriched by 2.9 ‰ (difference between burned and unburned watersheds) in the first two years after wildfire, but only 1.3 ‰ after prescribed burns. In-stream moss δ15N in wildfire-burned watersheds was enriched by 1.3 ‰, but there was no response by moss in prescription-burned watersheds, mirroring patterns of streamwater nitrate concentrations. S. betulifolia showed significantly higher nitrate reductase activity two years after wildfires relative to corresponding unburned watersheds, but no such difference was found after prescribed burns. These responses are consistent with less altered N biogeochemistry after prescribed burns relative to wildfire. We concluded that δ15N values in terrestrial and aquatic plants and streamwater nitrate concentrations after fire can be useful indicators of the magnitude and duration of fire effects and the fate of post

  17. The effect of noncollinearity of 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA tensors and rotational anisotropy on 15N relaxation, CSA/dipolar cross correlation, and TROSY.

    PubMed

    Fushman, D; Cowburn, D

    1999-02-01

    Current approaches to 15N relaxation in proteins assume that the 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA tensors are collinear. We show theoretically that, when there is significant anisotropy of molecular rotation, different orientations of the two tensors, experimentally observed in proteins, nucleic acids, and small peptides, will result in differences in site-specific correlation functions and spectral densities. The standard treatments of the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation of amide 15N nuclei, of the 15N CSA/15N-1H dipolar cross correlation, and of the TROSY experiment are extended to account for the effect of noncollinearity of the 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA (chemical shift anisotropy) tensors. This effect, proportional to the degree of anisotropy of the overall motion, (D parallel/D perpendicular - 1), is sensitive to the relative orientation of the two tensors and to the orientation of the peptide plane with respect to the diffusion coordinate frame. The effect is negligible at small degrees of anisotropy, but is predicted to become significant for D parallel/D perpendicular > or = 1.5, and at high magnetic fields. The effect of noncollinearity of 15N CSA and 15N-1H dipolar interaction is sensitive to both gross (hydrodynamic) properties and atomic-level details of protein structure. Incorporation of this effect into relaxation data analysis is likely to improve both precision and accuracy of the derived characteristics of protein dynamics, especially at high magnetic fields and for molecules with a high degree of anisotropy of the overall motion. The effect will also make TROSY efficiency dependent on local orientation in moderately anisotropic systems. PMID:10070755

  18. New flaxseed orbitides: Detection, sequencing, and (15)N incorporation.

    PubMed

    Okinyo-Owiti, Denis P; Young, Lester; Burnett, Peta-Gaye G; Reaney, Martin J T

    2014-03-01

    Three new orbitides (cyclolinopeptides 17, 18, and 19) were identified in flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) extracts without any form of purification. Their structures were elucidated by a combination of (15) N-labeling experiments and extensive tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI). Putative linear peptide sequences of the new orbitides were used as the query in the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) searches of flax genome database. These searches returned linear sequences for the putative precursors of cyclolinopeptides 17 and 19 among others. Cyclolinopeptide 18 contains MetO (O) and is not directly encoded, but is a product of post-translation modification of the Met present in 17. The identification of precursor proteins in flax mRNA transcripts and DNA sequences confirmed the occurrence and amino acid sequences of these orbitides as [1-9-NαC]-MLKPFFFWI, [1-9-NαC]-OLKPFFFWI, and [1-9-NαC]-GIPPFWLTL for cyclolinopeptides 17, 18, and 19, respectively. PMID:24408479

  19. 15N2 formation and fast oxygen isotope exchange during pulsed 15N18O exposure of MnOx/CeO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-12-23

    Pulsing 15N18O onto an annealed 1% Mn16Ox/Ce16O2 catalyst resulted in very fast oxygen isotope exchange and 15N2 formation at 295 K. In the 1st 15N18O pulse, due to the presence of large number of surface oxygen defects, extensive 15N218O and 15N2 formations were observed. In subsequent pulses oxygen isotope exchange dominated as a result of highly labile oxygen in the oxide. We gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Vehicle Technologies Program for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  20. Swimming Pool Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... insist that the following rules are followed: Keep toys away from the pool when the pool is ... after each use. No tricycles or other riding toys at poolside. No electrical appliances near the pool. ...

  1. Studies with 15N-labeled ammonia and urea in the malnourished child

    PubMed Central

    Read, W. W. C.; McLaren, D. S.; Tchalian, Marie; Nassar, Siham

    1969-01-01

    Investigations using ammonium citrate-15N and urea-15N showed that children in the acute stage of kwashiorkor and marasmus receiving a diet of adequate protein content retained a considerable percentage of the label from both compounds. Excretion of both total 15N and urea-15N was subnormal and elimination was virtually completed 36 hr after administration of the isotope. During recovery from kwashiorkor total 15N excretion had approached normal a month after commencement of rehabilitation. Urea-15N excretion was still slightly subnormal after 3 months. In marasmus urea-15N formed a normal proportion of total 15N excretion after 1 month, although total 15N excretion then was still low. Ammonia nitrogen was retained to a greater extent than urea nitrogen in all cases. As it is known that a considerable amount of urea is degraded to ammonia in the gastrointestinal tract, it seems probable that urea nitrogen became available for use after this degradation. Examination of blood from one marasmic child after feeding ammonia-15N and from another after intravenous injection of urea-15N showed incorporation of the label into blood cells and plasma proteins. This did not occur in well nourished controls. It is concluded that ammonia and urea as sources of nonessential nitrogen may play an important part in protein metabolism in the malnourished child. PMID:5771193

  2. The Five-Year Fate of a 15N Tracer in a Mixed Deciduous Forest: Retention, Redistribution, and Differences by Mycorrhizal Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodale, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of nitrogen deposition on forest ecosystems depends in large part on its fate: uptake by trees can stimulate growth, while gaseous or leaching losses contribute to air and water pollution and represent the loss of a limiting nutrient. Past tracer studies have shown that soils dominate the short-term fate of added 15N, but its longer-term term fate remains uncertain. This study examined how much 15N tracer moved plant or soil pools or was lost over 5-6 years. In 2007, a 15N tracer (0.21 kg/ha as 99% enriched 15N-KNO3) was added to 0.25 ha mixed hardwood forest in central NY. All of the tracer was recovered in the days after its addition, but recovery fell to 78% by the end of this year (25% surface litter, 48% 0-10 cm soil, 5% roots). One year later, recovery in these pools fell (to 51%), with losses from surface litter (-11%) and the 0-10 cm soils (-15%), including losses from the "heavy" soil fraction. Additional tracer moved to other plant pools (+5%) and to deeper soil (+13%; up to 30 cm), for a total recovery of 69% of the added tracer. Between years 1 and 5-6, only total tracer recovery decreased by only 1.4%. Recovery decreased in foliage (-0.2%), all roots (-3.5%), and surface litter (-9.8%), while increasing in woody biomass (+0.9%), 0-10 cm soil (+8.9%), and deep soil (+2.3%; up to 50 cm). Tracer recovery in live and dead plant N pools (11%) did not change, as 3% moved from roots into aboveground plant tissues and 3% moved from live plant pools into leaf litter; these results imply no net transfer of 15N from soil to plants during this period. Over all 5-6 years, only 1.6% of the tracer moved into bark or wood, a small but important sink because of its high C:N ratio; however, roughly one-third of this total was in wood formed prior to the start of the tracer addition. Tree species differed in their recovery of 15N: the six species with ectomycorrhizal associations showed more enrichment than the four species with arbuscular mycorrhizae. It is

  3. Isolation and measurement of /sup 15/N/sub 2/ from respiratory gases of animals administered /sup 15/N-labeled substances

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.L.; Reed, D.J.; Dost, F.N.

    1981-07-01

    A method is described for collection of metabolic /sup 15/N/sub 2/ from in vitro preparations or intact rats administered /sup 15/N-containing compounds. The method enables routine collection and mass spectrometric measurement of as little as 10 ..mu..mol /sup 15/N/sub 2/ respired by a rat over a 24-h period. A device is described that includes either an animal chamber or a tissue reaction vessel in a closed recycling atmosphere, with automatic O/sub 2/ replenishment and removal of CO/sub 2/ and water. It is capable of sustaining moderate vacuum and is coupled to a high-vacuum manifold designed to process the contained atmosphere and respiratory gases. The starting atmosphere is an 80:20 mix of sulfur hexafluoride and O/sub 2/. Recovery of /sup 15/N/sub 2/ gas from the system without an animal present was 101.3 +/- 5.75%. When /sup 15/N/sub 2/ gas was very slowly infused iv into an animal, recovery was 89.1 +/- 5.38%. Use of the method in studies of the fate of (/sup 15/N)hydrazine in rats indicated that about 15% of the administered hydrazine is rapidly converted to /sup 15/N/sub 2/, followed by slower conversion of an additional 7-10% over the next several hours.

  4. Bomb-pulse 14C analysis combined with 13C and 15N measurements in blood serum from residents of Malmö, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Elisavet; Stenström, Kristina Eriksson; Uvo, Cintia Bertacchi; Nilsson, Peter; Skog, Göran; Mattsson, Sören

    2013-05-01

    The (14)C content of 60 human blood serum samples from residents of Malmö (Sweden) in 1978, obtained from a biobank, has been measured to estimate the accuracy of (14)C bomb-pulse dating. The difference between the date estimated using the Calibomb software and sampling date varied between -3 ± 0.4 and +0.2 ± 0.5 years. The average age deviation of all samples was -1.5 ± 0.7 years, with the delay between production and consumption of foodstuffs being probably the dominating cause. The potential influence of food habits on the (14)C date has been evaluated using stable isotope δ(13)C and δ(15)N analysis and information about the dietary habits of the investigated individuals. Although the group consisting of lacto-ovo vegetarians and vegans (pooled group) was not completely separated from the omnivores in a stable isotopic trophic level diagram, this analysis proved to add valuable information on probable dietary habits. The age deviation of the sampling date from the respective Calibomb date was found strongly correlated with the δ(13)C values, probably due to influence from marine diet components. For the omnivore individuals, there were indications of seasonal effects on δ(13)C and the age deviation. No significant correlation was found between the age deviation and the δ(15)N values of any dietary group. No influence of sex or year of birth was found on neither the (14)C nor the δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of the serum samples. The data were also divided into two groups (omnivores and pooled group), based on the level of δ(15)N in the samples. The consumption of high δ(15)N-valued fish and birds can be responsible for this clustering. PMID:23358598

  5. Production, Purification, and Characterization of 15N-Labeled DNA Repair Proteins as Internal Standards for Mass Spectrometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jaruga, Pawel; Nelson, Bryant C.; Lowenthal, Mark S.; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Loseva, Olga; Coskun, Erdem; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by a variety of damaging agents, resulting in the formation of a multiplicity of lesions, which are mutagenic and cytotoxic. Unless repaired by DNA repair mechanisms before DNA replication, DNA lesions can lead to genomic instability, which is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Oxidatively induced DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair pathway with the involvement of a plethora of proteins. Cancer tissues develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues by overexpressing DNA repair proteins. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions generated by therapeutic agents before they became toxic is a major mechanism in the development of therapy resistance. Evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker of patient response. Thus, knowledge of DNA–protein expressions in disease-free and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. Our laboratory has developed methodologies that use mass spectrometry with isotope dilution for the measurement of expression of DNA repair proteins in human tissues and cultured cells. For this purpose, full-length 15N-labeled analogs of a number of human DNA repair proteins have been produced and purified to be used as internal standards for positive identification and accurate quantification. This chapter describes in detail the protocols of this work. The use of 15N-labeled proteins as internal standards for the measurement of several DNA repair proteins in vivo is also presented. PMID:26791985

  6. Biosynthetic preparation of L-(/sup 13/C)- and (/sup 15/N)glutamate by Brevibacterium flavum

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; London, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    The biosynthesis of isotopically labeled L-glutamic acid by the microorganism Brevibacterium flavum was studied with a variety of carbon-13-enriched precursors. The purpose of this study was twofold: (i) to develop techniques for the efficient preparation of labeled L-glutamate with a variety of useful labeling patterns which can be used for other metabolic studies, and (ii) to better understand the metabolic events leading to label scrambling in these strains. B. flavum, which is used commercially for the production of monosodium glutamate, has the capability of utilizing glucose or acetate as a sole carbon source, and important criterion from the standpoint of developing labeling strategies. Unfortunately, singly labeled glucose precursors lead to excessive isotopic dilution which reduces their usefulness. Studies with (3-/sup 13/C)pyruvate indicate that this problem can in principle be overcome by using labeled three-carbon precursors; however, conditions could not be found which would lead to an acceptable yield of isotopically labeled L-glutamate. In contrast, (1-/sup 13/C)- or (2-/sup 13/C)acetate provides relatively inexpensive, readily available precursors for the production of selectively labeled, high enriched L-glutamate. The preparation of L-(/sup 15/N)glutamate from (/sup 15/N)ammonium sulfate was carried out and is a very effective labeling strategy. Analysis of the isotopic distribution in labeled glutamate provides details about the metabolic pathways in these interesting organisms.

  7. An AlN/Al0.85Ga0.15N high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baca, Albert G.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Douglas, Erica A.; Sanchez, Carlos A.; King, Michael P.; Coltrin, Michael E.; Fortune, Torben R.; Kaplar, Robert J.

    2016-07-01

    An AlN barrier high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based on the AlN/Al0.85Ga0.15N heterostructure was grown, fabricated, and electrically characterized, thereby extending the range of Al composition and bandgap for AlGaN channel HEMTs. An etch and regrowth procedure was implemented for source and drain contact formation. A breakdown voltage of 810 V was achieved without a gate insulator or field plate. Excellent gate leakage characteristics enabled a high Ion/Ioff current ratio greater than 107 and an excellent subthreshold slope of 75 mV/decade. A large Schottky barrier height of 1.74 eV contributed to these results. The room temperature voltage-dependent 3-terminal off-state drain current was adequately modeled with Frenkel-Poole emission.

  8. Binding of thiocyanate to lactoperoxidase: 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, S.; Behere, D.V.; Mitra, S. )

    1989-05-30

    The binding of thiocyanate to lactoperoxidase (LPO) has been investigated by 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy. 1H NMR of LPO shows that the major broad heme methyl proton resonance at about 61 ppm is shifted upfield by addition of the thiocyanate, indicating binding of the thiocyanate to the enzyme. The pH dependence of line width of 15N resonance of SC15N- in the presence of the enzyme has revealed that the binding of the thiocyanate to the enzyme is facilitated by protonation of an ionizable group (with pKa of 6.4), which is presumably distal histidine. Dissociation constants (KD) of SC15N-/LPO, SC15N-/LPO/I-, and SC15N-/LPO/CN- equilibria have been determined by 15N T1 measurements and found to be 90 +/- 5, 173 +/- 20, and 83 +/- 6 mM, respectively. On the basis of these values of KD, it is suggested that the iodide ion inhibits the binding of the thiocyanate but cyanide ion does not. The thiocyanate is shown to bind at the same site of LPO as iodide does, but the binding is considerably weaker and is away from the ferric ion. The distance of 15N of the bound thiocyanate ion from the iron is determined to be 7.2 +/- 0.2 A from the 15N T1 measurements.

  9. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27059012

  10. Consequences of Accounting for Isotopic Dilution in Thymidine Incorporation Assays

    PubMed Central

    Chrzanowski, Thomas H.

    1988-01-01

    Rates of thymidine incorporation into DNA were corrected for isotope dilution by internal nucleotide pools and were compared with rates obtained from uncorrected data. Differences as large as 109% were observed between corrected and uncorrected estimates of thymidine incorporation. The degree of underestimation varied seasonally and, to a lesser extent, spatially. PMID:16347698

  11. Pathways of nitrogen assimilation in cowpea nodules studied using /sup 15/N/sub 2/ and allopurinol. [Vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, C.A.; Storer, P.J.; Pate, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the presence of 0.5 millimolar allopurinol (4-hydroxypyrazolo (3,4-d)pyrimidine), an inhibitor of NAD:xanthine oxidoreductase (EC 1.2.3.2), intact attached nodules of cowpea (vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita 3) formed (/sup 15/N)xanthine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ at rates equivalent to those of ureide synthesis, confirming the direct assimilation of fixed nitrogen into purines. Xanthine accumulated in nodules and was exported in increasing amounts in xylem of allopurinol-treated plants. Other intermediates of purine oxidation, de novo purine synthesis, and ammonia assimilation did not increase and, over the time course of experiments (4 hours), allopurinol had no effect on nitrogenase (EC 1.87.99.2) activity. Negligible /sup 15/N -labeling of asparagine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ was observed, suggesting that the significant pool (up to 14 micromoles per gram of nodule fresh weight) of this amide in cowpea nodules was not formed directly from fixation but may have accumulated as a consequence of phloem delivery.

  12. Tracing the Cycling and Fate of the Explosive 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene in Coastal Marine Systems with a Stable Isotopic Tracer, (15)N-[TNT].

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard W; Vlahos, Penny; Böhlke, J K; Ariyarathna, Thivanka; Ballentine, Mark; Cooper, Christopher; Fallis, Stephen; Groshens, Thomas J; Tobias, Craig

    2015-10-20

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been used as a military explosive for over a hundred years. Contamination concerns have arisen as a result of manufacturing and use on a large scale; however, despite decades of work addressing TNT contamination in the environment, its fate in marine ecosystems is not fully resolved. Here we examine the cycling and fate of TNT in the coastal marine systems by spiking a marine mesocosm containing seawater, sediments, and macrobiota with isotopically labeled TNT ((15)N-[TNT]), simultaneously monitoring removal, transformation, mineralization, sorption, and biological uptake over a period of 16 days. TNT degradation was rapid, and we observed accumulation of reduced transformation products dissolved in the water column and in pore waters, sorbed to sediments and suspended particulate matter (SPM), and in the tissues of macrobiota. Bulk δ(15)N analysis of sediments, SPM, and tissues revealed large quantities of (15)N beyond that accounted for in identifiable derivatives. TNT-derived N was also found in the dissolved inorganic N (DIN) pool. Using multivariate statistical analysis and a (15)N mass balance approach, we identify the major transformation pathways of TNT, including the deamination of reduced TNT derivatives, potentially promoted by sorption to SPM and oxic surface sediments. PMID:26375037

  13. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  14. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  15. (15)N CSA tensors and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static (15)N NMR techniques for the determination of the (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and (15)N-(1)H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone (15)N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the (15)N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the (15)N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the "magic sandwich" SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the (15)N-(1)H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples. PMID:26367322

  16. Mechanism of dilute-spin-exchange in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-03-28

    In the stationary, aligned samples used in oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings are not attenuated as they are in magic angle spinning solid-state NMR; consequently, they are available for participation in dipolar coupling-based spin-exchange processes. Here we describe analytically the pathways of {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N spin-exchange mediated by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings. The mixed-order proton-relay mechanism can be differentiated from the third spin assisted recoupling mechanism by setting the {sup 1}H to an off-resonance frequency so that it is at the “magic angle” during the spin-exchange interval in the experiment, since the “magic angle” irradiation nearly quenches the former but only slightly attenuates the latter. Experimental spectra from a single crystal of N-acetyl leucine confirm that this proton-relay mechanism plays the dominant role in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N dilute-spin-exchange in OS solid-state NMR in crystalline samples. Remarkably, the “forbidden” spin-exchange condition under “magic angle” irradiation results in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N cross-peaks intensities that are comparable to those observed with on-resonance irradiation in applications to proteins. The mechanism of the proton relay in dilute-spin-exchange is crucial for the design of polarization transfer experiments.

  17. Nitrogen retention across a gradient of 15N additions to an unpolluted temperate forest soil in Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Compton, J.E.; Hedin, L.O.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated nitrogen (N) inputs can drive nonlinear changes in N cycling, retention, and loss in forest ecosystems. Nitrogen processing in soils is critical to understanding these changes, since soils typically are the largest N sink in forests. To elucidate soil mechanisms that underlie shifts in N cycling across a wide gradient of N supply, we added 15NH415NO3 at nine treatment levels ranging in geometric sequence from 0.2 kg to 640 kg NA? ha-1A? yr-1 to an unpolluted old-growth temperate forest in southern Chile. We recovered roughly half of tracers in 0-25 cm of soil, primarily in the surface 10 cm. Low to moderate rates of N supply failed to stimulate N leaching, which suggests that most unrecovered 15N was transferred from soils to unmeasured sinks above ground. However, soil solution losses of nitrate increased sharply at inputs > 160 kg NA? ha-1A? yr-1, corresponding to a threshold of elevated soil N availability and declining 15N retention in soil. Soil organic matter (15N in soils at the highest N inputs and may explain a substantial fraction of the 'missing N' often reported in studies of fates of N inputs to forests. Contrary to expectations, N additions did not stimulate gross N cycling, potential nitrification, or ammonium oxidizer populations. Our results indicate that the nonlinearity in N retention and loss resulted directly from excessive N supply relative to sinks, independent of plant-soil-microbial feedbacks. However, N additions did induce a sharp decrease in microbial biomass C:N that is predicted by N saturation theory, and which could increase long-term N storage in soil organic matter by lowering the critical C:N ratio for net N mineralization. All measured sinks accumulated 15N tracers across the full gradient of N supply, suggesting that short-term nonlinearity in N retention resulted from saturation of uptake kinetics, not uptake capacity, in plant, soil, and microbial pools.

  18. Sources and transformations of N in reclaimed coastal tidelands: evidence from soil δ15N data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jin-Hyeob; Choi, Woo-Jung; Lim, Sang-Sun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Lee, Sang-Mo; Chang, Scott X.; Jung, Jae-Woon; Yoon, Kwang-Sik; Choi, Soo-Myung

    2008-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of saturated soil extracts (ECe) in three reclaimed tideland (RTL) soils on the west coast of Korea decreased with time since reclamation, indicating natural desalinization through leaching of salts by precipitation water. Soil N concentration increased with decreasing ECe. With the increase in soil N concentration, the δ15N decreased, likely caused by the input of 15N-depleted N sources. As N2-fixing plant species were found in the oldest RTL, atmospheric N2 fixation likely contributed to the increase in soil N concentration in the oldest RTL. Negative δ15N (-7.1 to -2.0‰) of total inorganic N (NH4 ++NO3 -) and published data on N deposition near the study area indicate that atmospheric N deposition might be another source of N in the RTLs. Meanwhile, the consistently negative δ15N of soil NO3 - excluded N input from chemical fertilizer through groundwater flow as a potential N source, since NO3 - in groundwater generally have a positive δ15N. The patterns of δ15N of NH4 + (+2.3 to +5.1‰) and NO3 - (-9.2 to -5.0‰) suggested that nitrification was an active process that caused 15N enrichment in NH4 + but denitrification was probably minimal which would otherwise have caused 15N enrichment in NO3 -. A quantitative approach on N budget would provide a better understanding of soil N dynamics in the studied RTLs.

  19. Increased Plant Uptake of Nitrogen from 15N Depleted Fertilizer Using Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The techniques of 15N isotope have been very useful for determining the behavior and fate of N in soil, including the use efficiency of applied N fertilizers by plants. Our objective in this study was to use 15N isotope techniques to demonstrate that a model plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGP...

  20. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  1. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  2. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  3. δ 15 N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural abundance δ15N of ecosystems integrates nitrogen (N) inputs and losses, and thus reflects factors that control the long-term development of ecosystem N balances. We here report N and carbon (C) content of forest vegetation and soils, and associated δ15N, across nine Doug...

  4. Over 20% (15)N Hyperpolarization in Under One Minute for Metronidazole, an Antibiotic and Hypoxia Probe.

    PubMed

    Barskiy, Danila A; Shchepin, Roman V; Coffey, Aaron M; Theis, Thomas; Warren, Warren S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-07-01

    Direct NMR hyperpolarization of naturally abundant (15)N sites in metronidazole is demonstrated using SABRE-SHEATH (Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange in SHield Enables Alignment Transfer to Heteronuclei). In only a few tens of seconds, nuclear spin polarization P(15)N of up to ∼24% is achieved using parahydrogen with 80% para fraction corresponding to P(15)N ≈ 32% if ∼100% parahydrogen were employed (which would translate to a signal enhancement of ∼0.1-million-fold at 9.4 T). In addition to this demonstration on the directly binding (15)N site (using J(2)H-(15)N), we also hyperpolarized more distant (15)N sites in metronidazole using longer-range spin-spin couplings (J(4)H-(15)N and J(5)H-(15)N). Taken together, these results significantly expand the range of molecular structures and sites amenable to hyperpolarization via low-cost parahydrogen-based methods. In particular, hyperpolarized nitroimidazole and its derivatives have powerful potential applications such as direct in vivo imaging of mechanisms of action or hypoxia sensing. PMID:27321159

  5. Dilution, Concentration, and Flotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Ling; Schmuckler, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    As both classroom teaching practice and literature show, many students have difficulties learning science concepts such as density. Here are some investigations that identify the relationship between density and floating through experimenting with successive dilution of a liquid, or the systematic change of concentration of a saltwater solution.…

  6. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, P.R.; Gray, K.E.

    1988-09-13

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation is disclosed. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains [sup 3]He and [sup 4]He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing [sup 3]He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a [sup 3]He rich liquid phase from a dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the [sup 3]He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase. 2 figs.

  7. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick R.; Gray, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains .sup.3 He and .sup.4 He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing .sup.3 He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a .sup.3 He rich liquid phase from a dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the .sup.3 He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase.

  8. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  9. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin infection. It is caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium marinum . ... A swimming pool granuloma occurs when water containing Mycobacterium marinum bacteria enters a break in the skin. Signs of ...

  10. Determination of the delta(15N/14N)of Ammonium (NH4+) in Water: RSIL Lab Code 2898

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannon, Janet E.; Böhlke, John Karl

    2008-01-01

    into the IRMS through a Finnigan ConFlo II interface. The ConFlo II interface is used to introduce not only sample into the IRMS but also N2 reference gas and He for sample dilution. The flash combustion is quantitative, so no isotopic fractionation is involved. The IRMS is a Finnigan Delta V CF-IRMS with 10 cups and is capable of detecting ion beams with mass/charge (m/z) 28, 29, 30. The ion beams from N2 are as follows: m/z 28 = 14N14N, m/z 29 = 14N15N, and m/z 30 = 15N15N. The ion beam with m/z 30 also represents 14N16O, which may indicate contamination or incomplete reduction.

  11. Imprint of oaks on nitrogen availability and δ15N in California grassland-savanna: A case of enhanced N inputs?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, S.S.; Kellogg, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    Woody vegetation is distributed patchily in many arid and semi-arid ecosystems, where it is often associated with elevated nitrogen (N) pools and availability in islands of fertility. We measured N availability and δ15N in paired blue-oak versus annual grass dominated patches to characterize the causes and consequences of spatial variation in N dynamics of grassland-savanna in Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park. We found significantly greater surface soil N pools (0–20 cm) in oak patches compared to adjacent grass areas across a 700 m elevation gradient from foothills to the savanna-forest boundary. N accumulation under oaks was associated with a 0.6‰ depletion in soil δ15N relative to grass patches. Results from a simple δ15N mass balance simulation model, constrained by surface soil N and δ15N measured in the field, suggest that the development of islands of N fertility under oaks can be traced primarily to enhanced N inputs. Net N mineralization and percent nitrification in laboratory incubations were consistently higher under oaks across a range of experimental soil moisture regimes, suggesting a scenario whereby greater N inputs to oak patches result in net N accumulation and enhanced N cycling, with a potential for greater nitrate loss as well. N concentrations of three common herbaceous annual plants were nearly 50% greater under oak than in adjacent grass patches, with community composition shifted towards more N-demanding species under oaks. We find that oaks imprint distinct N-rich islands of fertility that foster local feedback between soil N cycling, plant N uptake, and herbaceous community composition. Such patch-scale differences in N inputs and plant–soil interactions increase biogeochemical heterogeneity in grassland-savanna ecosystems and may shape watershed-level responses to chronic N deposition.

  12. The 15N isotope effect in Escherichia coli: a neutron can make the difference.

    PubMed

    Filiou, Michaela D; Varadarajulu, Jeeva; Teplytska, Larysa; Reckow, Stefan; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W

    2012-11-01

    Several techniques based on stable isotope labeling are used for quantitative MS. These include stable isotope metabolic labeling methods for cells in culture as well as live organisms with the assumption that the stable isotope has no effect on the proteome. Here, we investigate the (15) N isotope effect on Escherichia coli cultures that were grown in either unlabeled ((14) N) or (15) N-labeled media by LC-ESI-MS/MS-based relative protein quantification. Consistent protein expression level differences and altered growth rates were observed between (14) N and (15) N-labeled cultures. Furthermore, targeted metabolite analyses revealed altered metabolite levels between (14) N and (15) N-labeled bacteria. Our data demonstrate for the first time that the introduction of the (15) N isotope affects protein and metabolite levels in E. coli and underline the importance of implementing controls for unbiased protein quantification using stable isotope labeling techniques. PMID:22887715

  13. {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N dynamic nuclear polarization studies of carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.Z.; Solum, M.S.; Wind, R.A.; Nilsson, B.L.; Peterson, M.A.; Pugmire, R.J.; Grant, D.M.

    2000-05-18

    {sup 15}N NMR experiments, combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), are reported on carbazole doped with the stable free radical 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA). Doping shortens the nuclear relaxation times and provides paramagnetic centers that can be used to enhance the nuclear signal by means of DNP so that {sup 15}N NMR experiments can be done in minutes. The factors were measured in a 1.4 T external field, using both unlabeled and 98% {sup 15}N labeled carbazole with doping levels varying between 0.65 and 5.0 wt {degree} BDPA. A doping level of approximately 1 wt {degree} produced optimal results. DNP enhancement factors of 35 and 930 were obtained for {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N, respectively, making it possible to perform {sup 15}N DNP NMR experiments at the natural abundance level.

  14. 1H and 15N Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Studies of Carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Solum, Mark S.; Wind, Robert A.; Nilsson, Brad L.; Peterson, Matt A.; Pugmire, Ronald J.; Grant, David M.

    2000-01-01

    15N NMR experiments, combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), are reported on carbazole doped with the stable free radical 1,3 bisdiphenylene-2 phenylally1 (BDPA). Doping shortens the nuclear relaxation times and provides paramagnetic centers that can be used to enhance the nuclear signal by means of DNP so that 15 N NMR experiments can be done in minutes. The factors were measured in a 1.4 T external field, using both unlabeled and 98% 15N labeled carbazole with doping levels varying between 0.65 and 5.0 wt % BDPA. A doping level of approximately 1 wt % produced optimal results. DNP enhancement factors of 35 and 930 were obtained for 1H and 15N, respectively making it possible to perform 15N DNP NMR experiments at the natural abundance level.

  15. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  16. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in an arid ecosystem measured by sup 15 N natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Plants dependent on nitrogen fixation have an {sup 15}N abundance similar to the atmosphere, while non-nitrogen fixing plants usually are enriched in {sup 15}N and are similar to soil nitrogen values. The natural abundance of {sup 15}N in leaf tissues and soils was determined to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation by several legumes and actinorhizal species in the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research area in central New Mexico. Comparison of {delta}{sup 15}N values for the legume Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) to adjacent Atriplex canascens (fourwing saltbush) indicated that P. glandulosa obtained 66% of its nitrogen by fixation. The legume Hoffmanseggia jamesii was found to be utilizing soil nitrogen. The {delta}{sup 15}N values for the actinorhizal plants, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Cercocarpus montanus, while below values for soil nitrogen, did not differ from associated non-fixing plants.

  17. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15 N over long-term forest succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven; Tepley, Alan J.; Compton, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession towards old-growth are thought to increase nitrogen (N) availability and N loss, which should increase soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across 800 years of forest succession in a topographically complex montane landscape influenced by human logging and wildfire. In contrast to expectations, we found that disturbance caused declines in surface mineral soil δ15N values, both in logged forests measured 40–50 years after disturbance, and in unlogged forests disturbed by severe wildfire within the last 200 years. Both symbiotic N fixation and N transfers from disturbed vegetation and detritus could lower soil δ15N values after disturbance. A more important role for symbiotic N fixation is suggested by lower soil δ15N values in slow-successional sites with slow canopy closure, which favors early-successional N fixers. Soil δ15N values increased only marginally throughout 800 years of succession, reflecting soil N uptake by vegetation and strong overall N retention. Although post-disturbance N inputs lowered surface soil δ15N values, steady-state mass balance calculations suggest that wildfire combustion of vegetation and detritus can dominate long-term N loss and increase whole-ecosystem δ15N. On steeper topography, declining soil δ15N values highlight erosion and accelerated soil turnover as an additional abiotic control on N balances. We conclude for N-limited montane forests that soil δ15N and N availability are less influenced by nitrate leaching and denitrification loss than by interactions between disturbance, N fixation, and erosion.

  18. The science of pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.

    1995-10-01

    The pooling of data from radon studies is described. Pooling refers to the analysis of original data from several studies, not meta-analysis in which summary measures from published data are analyzed. A main objective for pooling is to reduce uncertainty and to obtain more precise estimates of risk than would be available from any single study.

  19. Indirect Measurement of {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}){sup 12}C and {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N. Applications to the AGB Star Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tumino, A.; Tribble, R.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Banu, A.; Fu, C.; Goldberg, V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.

    2008-04-06

    The Trojan Horse Method has been recently applied to the study of reactions involved in fluorine nucleosynthesis inside AGB stars. Fluorine abundance is important since it allows to constrain mixing models from the comparison of the observed fluorine abundances with the ones predicted by models. Anyway direct measurements of the cross section do not extend down to the Gamow peak, which is the astrophysically relevant energy region. In particular the study focuses on the {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}){sup 12}C and the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reactions which can influence fluorine yield as they are part of {sup 19}F production/destruction network.

  20. 15N Content Reflects Development of Mycorrhizae and Nitrogen Dynamics During Primary Succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Jumpponen, A.

    2004-05-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous symbionts on terrestrial plants that are particularly important for plant nitrogen nutrition. 15N content appears to be a useful marker of the mycorrhizal role in plant nitrogen supply because of an apparent fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from mycorrhizal fungi to host plants. Because plants developing during primary succession are gradually colonized by mycorrhizal fungi, such situations provide good opportunities to study interactions between mycorrhizal colonization and plant 15N content. Here, we present results of a study of nitrogen isotope patterns in ecosystem components during the first 100 years of ecosystem development after glacial retreat, and compare those patterns with those on adjacent mature terrain. Soils in primary succession were depleted in 15N relative to nitrogen-fixing plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants generally colonized by ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, or arbuscular fungi showed similar 15N content very early in succession (-4 to -6‰ ), corresponding to low colonization levels of all plant species. Subsequent colonization of evergreen plants by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid fungi led to a 5-6‰ decline in 15N content, indicating transfer of 15N-depleted N from fungi to plants. The values recorded (-10 to -14‰ ) are among the lowest yet observed in vascular plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi did not decline in 15N content. Most ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi were similar in 15N content in early succession (-1 to -3‰ ), with the notable exception of ectomycorrhizal fungi suspected of proteolytic capabilities, which were 15N enriched relative to all other fungi. 15N contents in both plants and soil from the mature site were 5‰ greater than in recently exposed sites. We conclude that 1) the primary nitrogen source to this ecosystem must be atmospheric deposition, 2) low plant 15N content generally corresponds with greater

  1. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles. PMID:25621737

  2. Steroselective synthesis and application of L-( sup 15 N) amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J. ); Lodwig, S.N. . Div. of Science)

    1991-01-01

    We have developed two general approaches to the stereoselective synthesis of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-labeled amino acids. First, labeled serine, biosynthesized using the methylotrophic bacterium M. extorquens AM1, serves as a chiral precursor for the synthesis of other amino acids. For example, pyridoxal phosphate enzymes can be used for the conversion of L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)serine to L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tyrosine, L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tryptophan, and L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)cysteine. In the second approach, developed by Oppolzer and Tamura, an electrophilic amination'' reagent, 1-chloro-1-nitrosocyclohexane, was used to convert chiral enolates into L-{alpha}-amino acids. We prepared 1-chloro-1-({sup 15}N) nitrosocyclohexane and used it to aminate chiral enolates to produce L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)amino acids. The stereoselectivity of this scheme using the Oppolzer sultam chiral auxiliary is remarkable, producing enantiomer ratios of 200 to 1. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Production of 15N-depleted biomass during cyanobacterial N2-fixation at high Fe concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Junium, Christopher K.; Canfield, Donald E.; House, Christopher H.

    2008-09-01

    In this study we examine the effects of varying Fe, Mo, and P concentrations on δ15N fractionation during N2 fixation in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis. We show that when grown in Fe-enriched media ([Fe] ≥ 50 nM), this organism produces biomass up to 3‰ lower in δ15N than when grown in Fe-limited media ([Fe] < 50 nM). A compilation of our data with previous measurements of δ15N in N2-fixing cyanobacteria reveals a general trend toward the production of more 15N-depleted biomass at higher Fe concentrations. We discuss our results in the context of negative δ15N values preserved in Archean and some Phanerozoic sediments, generally attributed to the production of marine organic matter with low δ15N by N2 fixation (and potentially NH4+ regeneration) during periods of fluctuating nutrient dynamics. We suggest that enhanced Fe availability during periods of widespread ocean anoxia can further stimulate the production of 15N-depleted biomass by N2-fixing organisms, contributing to the isotopic record.

  4. Light-mediated 15N fractionation in Caribbean gorgonian octocorals: implications for pollution monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. M.; Kim, K.; Andras, J. P.; Sparks, J. P.

    2011-09-01

    The stable nitrogen isotope ratio ( δ 15N) of coral tissue is a useful recorder of anthropogenic pollution in tropical marine ecosystems. However, little is known of the natural environmentally induced fractionations that affect our interpretation of coral δ 15N values. In symbiotic scleractinians, light affects metabolic fractionation of N during photosynthesis, which may confound the identification of N pollution between sites of varied depth or turbidity. Given the superiority of octocorals for δ 15N studies, our goal was to quantify the effect of light on gorgonian δ 15N in the context of monitoring N pollution sources. Using field collections, we show that δ 15N declined by 1.4‰ over 20 m depth in two species of gorgonians, the common sea fan, Gorgonia ventalina, and the slimy sea plume, Pseudopterogorgia americana. An 8-week laboratory experiment with P. americana showed that light, not temperature causes this variation, whereby the lowest fractionation of the N source was observed in the highest light treatment. Finally, we used a yearlong reciprocal depth transplant experiment to quantify the time frame over which δ 15N changes in G. ventalina as a function of light regime . Over the year, δ 15N was unchanged and increased slightly in the deep control colonies and shallow colonies transplanted to the deep site, respectively. Within 6 months, colonies transplanted from deep to shallow became enriched by 0.8‰, mirroring the enrichment observed in the shallow controls, which was likely due to the combined effect of an increase in the source δ 15N and reduced fractionation. We conclude that light affects gorgonian δ 15N fractionation and should be considered in sampling designs for N pollution monitoring. However, these fractionations are small relative to differences observed between natural and anthropogenic N sources.

  5. Fate and metabolism of [15N]2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in soil.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Martin; Geyer, Roland; Russow, Rolf; Richnow, Hans H; Kästner, Matthias

    2004-08-01

    The fates of the labels from [14C] and [15N] trinitrotoluene were analyzed in bioreactors under aerobic conditions in soil treated by a fungal bioremediation process with Stropharia rugosoannulata and in control soil. Up to 17.5% of the 15N label had a different fate than the 14C label. Three N-mineralization processes were identified in detailed experiments with [15N]TNT. About 2% of the 15N label was found as NO3- and NH4+, showing simultaneous processes of direct TNT denitration (I) and reduction with cleavage of the amino groups (II). The enrichment of NO2-/NO3- (up to 7.5 atom% 15N abundance) indicates the formation of Meisenheimer complexes with a denitration of [15N]TNT. A 1.4% of the label was found distributed between N2O and N2. However, the 15N enrichment of the N2O (up to 38 atom%) demonstrated that both N atoms were generated from the labeled TNT and clearly indicates a novel formation process (III). We propose, as an explanation, the generation of N2O by cleavage from condensed azoxy metabolites. In addition, 1.7% of the 15N label was detected as biogenic amino acids in the wheat straw containing the fungus. Overall, 60 to 85% of the applied [15N]TNT was degraded and 52 to 64% was found as nonextractable residues in the soil matrix. Three percent was detected as 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene. PMID:15352472

  6. Radiative p 15N Capture in the Region of Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-06-01

    Within the framework of the modified potential cluster model with classification of orbital states according to the Young schemes, the possibility of describing experimental data for the astrophysical S-factor of p 15N radiative capture at energies from 50 to 1500 keV is considered. It is shown that on the basis of M1 and E1 transitions from various p 15N scattering states to the ground state of the 16O nucleus in the p 15N channel it is entirely possible to successfully explain the overall behavior of the S-factor in the considered energy region in the presence of two resonances.

  7. Nitrogen dynamics in a Western Boundary Upwelling System (Cabo Frio, Brazil) based on δ15N-nitrate and δ15N of sinking particle signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, L.; Belem, A. L.; Venancio, I.; Duarte, C.; Chiara, S. D.; Albuquerque, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    To improve the efficiency of upwelling to control nitrogen dynamic in the ocean, better understanding of the occurring processes is necessary. This research explores δ15N of nitrate and sinking particles on a western boundary upwelling System (Cabo Frio, Brazil). The Continental Shelf of southeastern Brazil is dominated by the oligotrophic Brazil Current, whose instabilities promote the coastal upwelling of South Atlantic Central Water (SACW), and consequently increases of primary productivity. The coastal upwelling system plays an important role in the nitrogen dynamics on the Cabo Frio Upwelling System (CFUS). However, the interactions between biological induced processes, including biological N-fixation and nitrate inputs from upwelled waters in CFUS still have not been well explored. Then, this study aims clarify N-dynamics on CFUS based on a cross-shelf approach. δ15N-nitrate was characterized for each water masses present on the shelf (South Atlantic Central Water, Tropical Water and Coastal Water) and associated with physicochemical parameters (T/S, nutrients), as well as the δ15N of sinking particles at different depths (from surface to the bottom water). Samples were collected in a time interval of 1 month during ~4 years (2011 to 2014). Cross-shelf gradients of nitrogen species concentration (ammonium + nitrite + nitrate) and stable isotopes were observed. The δ15N of nitrate and sinking particles were interpreted according to the prevailing processes of the N-transformations. Considering the region as N-limited (N:P < 16), processes as biological N-fixation seems to be dominant on oligotrophic Tropical Waters. Coastal upwelled SACW showed δ15N-nitrate signature within the global average of deep ocean (5-6‰) characterizing the inner and mid-shelf conditions, where the input of new nitrate from upwelling is rapidly used by organisms in the euphotic zone without any fractionation. On the other hands, the dominance of N-limited Tropical Waters on the

  8. Carbon-rich Presolar Grains from Massive Stars: Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N Ratios and the Mystery of 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.

  9. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  10. Increase of Natural 15N Enrichment of Soybean Nodules with Mean Nodule Mass 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Bryan, Barbara A.; Kohl, Daniel H.

    1984-01-01

    The 15N abundance of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill var Harosoy) nodules is usually greater than it is for other tissues or for atmospheric N2. Results of experiments in which nodules were separated by size show that the magnitude of the 15N enrichment is correlated with nodule mass. The results support the hypothesis that 15N enrichment of nodules results from differential N isotopic fractionation for synthesis of nodule tissue versus synthesis of compounds for export from the nodule. The physiological significance of this hypothesis is that it requires that a substantial fraction of the N for nodule tissue synthesis in 15N-enriched nodules be N recently fixed within the same nodule. PMID:16663917

  11. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  12. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  13. Sources of δ15N variability in sinking particulate nitrogen in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Enrique; Thunell, Robert; Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Lorenzoni, Laura; Tappa, Eric; Troccoli, Luis; Astor, Yrene; Varela, Ramón

    2013-09-01

    Ten years of monthly observations of the δ15N of sinking particulate nitrogen (δ15N-PN (in ‰ versus atmospheric N2)=[(15N/14N)sample/(15N/14N)standard)-1]1000) in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, confirm that the basin's bottom sediments store information about nitrogen dynamics related to seasonal and interannual variability in regional surface ocean processes. During the upwelling period of the southern Caribbean Sea (February-April), the δ15N-PN is similar to that of the thermocline nitrate (˜3.5‰). This nitrate is imported into the Cariaco Basin with Subtropical Underwater (SUW), which wells up near the coast. Thus, particles generated by phytoplankton photosynthesis during this productive period bear a sub-tropical North Atlantic isotopic imprint of N2 fixation (low compared to the global average of nitrate δ15N≈5‰). During the non-upwelling period when surface waters are stratified (September-November), the δ15N-PN is also 3.5-4.0‰, and reflects a mixture of local N2 fixation within the mixed layer, inputs of terrigenous organic matter and SUW nitrate consumption by phytoplankton below the mixed layer, which most likely exerts the strongest control on the δ15N-PN signal during this time. In the transition periods of May-July and December-January, the δ15N-PN increases to 4.5-6.5‰. This coincides with maxima of continental material fluxes (terrestrial PON δ15N is >6‰) into the Cariaco Basin. The δ15N signal in the sediments of the Cariaco Basin thus provides information about the relative strength of the local coastal upwelling, the relative input of continental material via river runoff, and local N2 fixation. The findings contribute to interpretations of the basin's paleoclimatic nitrogen cycle variations based on observations of the sedimentary δ15N record at this location.

  14. 15N fractionation in star-forming regions and Solar System objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirström, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, Gilles; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.

    2015-08-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristine molecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N/15N ~ 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N/15N < 100.The coherent 15N enrichment in comets from different formation zones suggests that these isotopic enhancements are remnants of the interstellar chemistry in the natal molecular cloud core and the outer protosolar nebula. Indeed, early chemical models of gas-phase ion-molecule nitrogen fractionation showed that HCN and HNC (nitriles) can hold significant 15N enrichments in cold dark clouds where CO is depleted onto dust grains. In addition, 15N fractionation in nitriles and amines (NH2, NH3) follow different chemical pathways. More recently we have shown that once the spin-state dependence in rates of reactions with H2 is included in the models, amines can either be enhanced or depleted in 15N, depending on the core’s evolutionary stage. Observed 15N fractionation in amines and nitriles therefore cannot be expected to be the same, instead their ratio is a potential chemical clock.Observations of molecular isotope ratios in dark cores are challenging. Limited published results in general show higher 15N/14N ratios in HCN and HNC than ammonia, but more measurements are necessary to confirm these trends. We will present recent results from our ongoing observing campaign of 14N/15N isotopic ratios in HCN, HNC and NH3 in dense cores and protostars which seem consistent with significant fractionation in nitriles as compared to other molecules in each object. The few 14N/15N ratios observed in N2H+ are similar to

  15. Effects of feed intake and dietary urea concentration on ruminal dilution rate and efficiency of bacteria growth in steers

    SciTech Connect

    Firkins, J.L.; Lewis, S.M. Montgomery, L.; Berger, L.L.; Merchen, N.R.; Fahey, G.C. Jr.

    1987-11-01

    Four multiple-fistulated steers (340 kg) were fed a diet containing 50% ground grass hay, 20% dry distillers grains, and 30% concentrate at two intakes (7.2 or 4.8 kg DM/d). Urea (.4 or 1.2% of the diet) was infused continuously into the steers' rumens. The experimental design was a 4 x 4 Latin square with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Infusing urea at .4 or 1.2% of the diet resulted in ruminal NH/sub 3/ N concentration of 4.97 and 9.10 mg/dl, respectively. Feeding steers at high rather than low intake decreased ruminal and total tract digestibilities of organic matter, NDF, and ADF but did not increase ruminal escape of N. However, apparent N escape from the rumen calculated using purines, but not /sup 15/N, as a bacterial marker was higher when 1.2 vs. .4% urea was infused. Feeding at high rather than at low intake increased the total pool of viable bacteria per gram organic matter fermented in the rumen. Although ruminal fluid outflows and particulate dilution rates were greater when steers were fed at high than low intakes, efficiencies of bacterial protein synthesis were unaffected by intake. The possibility of increased N recycling within the rumen with feeding at the higher intake is discussed.

  16. Elucidating the impact of nitrate and labile carbon application on spatial heterogeneity of denitrification by 15N modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Laura; Loick, Nadine; Dixon, Liz; Matthews, Peter; Gilsanz, Claudia; Bol, Roland; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    N2O is considered to be an important GHG with soils representing its major source and accounting for approximately 6% of the current global warming and is also implicated in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. The atmospheric N2O concentration has been increasing since the Industrial Revolution making the understanding of its sources and removal processes very important for development of mitigation strategies. Bergstermann et al. (2011) found evidence of the existence of more than one pool of nitrate undergoing denitrification in a silty clay loam arable soil amended with glucose/nitrate solution. The Rayleigh type model was used to simulate d15N of N2O using process rates and associated fractionation factors, but assumptions for some of the model parameters had to be made due to lack of available data. In this study we carried out 2 incubation experiments in order to parameterise the model. To restrict the volume of soil reached by the amendment, we used blocks containing 3 soil cores that were incubated in one vessel to measure emissions of NO, N2O, N2 and CO2 from a clay grassland soil amended with KNO3 (N) and glucose (C) in three treatments: '1C' only 1 core received N and C (the other 2 received water), '3C' 3 cores received N and C, and 'Control' (received water only). The results showed changes in the d15Nbulk trends after day 6 post amendment application, coinciding with the decrease of N2O fluxes. We also report the results in the 15N site preference (SP) and d18O. We will show the results from the model validation based on this data.

  17. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  18. Automatic diluter for bacteriological samples.

    PubMed

    Trinel, P A; Bleuze, P; Leroy, G; Moschetto, Y; Leclerc, H

    1983-02-01

    The described apparatus, carrying 190 tubes, allows automatic and aseptic dilution of liquid or suspended-solid samples. Serial 10-fold dilutions are programmable from 10(-1) to 10(-9) and are carried out in glass tubes with screw caps and split silicone septa. Dilution assays performed with strains of Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus permitted efficient conditions for sterilization of the needle to be defined and showed that the automatic dilutions were as accurate and as reproducible as the most rigorous conventional dilutions. PMID:6338826

  19. Automatic diluter for bacteriological samples.

    PubMed Central

    Trinel, P A; Bleuze, P; Leroy, G; Moschetto, Y; Leclerc, H

    1983-01-01

    The described apparatus, carrying 190 tubes, allows automatic and aseptic dilution of liquid or suspended-solid samples. Serial 10-fold dilutions are programmable from 10(-1) to 10(-9) and are carried out in glass tubes with screw caps and split silicone septa. Dilution assays performed with strains of Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus permitted efficient conditions for sterilization of the needle to be defined and showed that the automatic dilutions were as accurate and as reproducible as the most rigorous conventional dilutions. Images PMID:6338826

  20. Cold pool dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  1. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 15N ions by 9Be at 84 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudchik, A. T.; Chercas, K. A.; Kemper, K. W.; Rusek, K.; Rudchik, A. A.; Herashchenko, O. V.; Koshchy, E. I.; Pirnak, Val. M.; Piasecki, E.; Trzcińska, A.; Sakuta, S. B.; Siudak, R.; Strojek, I.; Stolarz, A.; Ilyin, A. P.; Ponkratenko, O. A.; Stepanenko, Yu. M.; Shyrma, Yu. O.; Szczurek, A.; Uleshchenko, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Angular distributions of the 9Be + 15N elastic and inelastic scattering were measured at Elab(15N) = 84 MeV (Ec.m. = 31.5 MeV) for the 0-6.76 MeV states of 9Be and 0-6.32 MeV states of 15N. The data were analyzed within the optical model and coupled-reaction-channels method. The elastic and inelastic scattering, spin reorientations of 9Be in ground and excited states and 15N in excited states as well as the most important one- and two-step transfer reactions were included in the channels-coupling scheme. The parameters of the 9Be + 15N optical potential of Woods-Saxon form as well as deformation parameters of these nuclei were deduced. The analysis showed that the 9Be + 15N pure potential elastic scattering dominates at the forward angles whereas the ground state spin reorientation of 9Be gives a major contribution to the elastic scattering cross sections at the large angles. Contributions from particle transfers are found to be negligible for the present scattering system.

  2. Highly 15N-Enriched Chondritic Clasts in the Isheyevo Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bonal, L; Huss, G R; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-01-14

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment ({delta}{sup 15}N up to +1500{per_thousand}), similar to {delta}{sup 15}N values reported in micron-sized regions (hotspots) of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) of possibly cometary origin and fine-grained matrices of unmetamorphosed chondrites. These {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are commonly attributed to low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in the protosolar molecular cloud or in the outer part of the protoplanetary disk. The nature of the whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment of the metal-rich chondrites is not understood. We report a discovery of a unique type of primitive chondritic clasts in the CH/CB-like meteorite Isheyevo, which provides important constraints on the origin of {sup 15}N anomaly in metal-rich chondrites and nitrogen-isotope fractionation in the Solar System. These clasts contain tiny chondrules and refractory inclusions (5-15 {micro}m in size), and abundant ferromagnesian chondrule fragments (1-50 {micro}m in size) embedded in the partly hydrated, fine-grained matrix material composed of olivines, pyroxenes, poorly-organized aromatic organics, phyllosilicates and other hydrous phases. The mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of chondrules and refractory inclusions in the clasts are similar to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting formation at similar heliocentric distances. In contrast to the previously known extraterrestrial samples, the fine-grained material in the clasts is highly and rather uniformly enriched in {sup 15}N, with bulk {delta}{sup 15}N values ranging between +1000 and +1300{per_thousand}; the {delta}{sup 15}N values in rare hotspots range from +1400 to +4000{per_thousand}. Since fine-grained matrices in the lithic clasts are the only component containing thermally unprocessed (during CAI and chondrule formation or during impact melting) materials that accreted into the metal rich chondrite parent body(ies), the {sup 15}N

  3. Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Lena, Rohe

    2013-04-01

    The measurement of denitrification in soils and aquifers is still challenging and often enough associated with considerable experimental effort and high costs. Against this background, the acetylene inhibition technique (AIT) applied in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays is by far the most effective approach. However, this method has been largely criticized, as it is susceptible to underestimate denitrification rates and adds an additional carbon source to the substrates to be investigated. Here we provide evidence that the AIT is not necessarily an inappropriate approach to measure denitrification, that its reliability depends on the drivers governing the process, and that the 15N site preference of N2O (SP) may serve as a tool to assess this reliability. Two laboratory batch experiments were conducted, where sandy aquifer material and a peat soil were incubated as slurries. We established (i) a standard anaerobic treatment by adding KNO3 (10 mg N L-1), (ii) an oxygen treatment by adding KNO3 and O2 (5 mg L-1), and (iii) a glucose treatment by adding KNO3 supplemented with glucose (200 mg C L-1). Both experiments were run under 10 % (v/v) acetylene atmosphere and as 15N tracer treatments using labeled K15NO3 (60 atom % 15N). In the case of the standard anaerobic treatments, we found a very good agreement of denitrification potential obtained by the AIT and 15N tracer methods. SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between -4.8 and 2.6 ‰ which is indicative for N2O production during bacterial denitrification but not for N2O reduction to N2. In contrast, we observed substantial underestimation of denitrification by AIT for the glucose treatments compared to the 15N method, i.e. denitrification was underestimated by 36 % (sandy aquifer material) and 47 % (peat soil). SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between 4.5 and 9.6 ‰, which suggests occurrence of bacterial N2O reduction. In the case of the oxygen

  4. Compound-specific δ15N and chlorin preservation in surface sediments of the Peru Margin with implications for ancient bulk δ15N records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junium, Christopher K.; Arthur, Michael A.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the processes that control the preservation of paleoceanographic proxies is of clear importance. Surface sediments from the Peru Margin oxygen-minimum zone are subject to lateral and downslope transport by bottom currents that decrease organic matter (OM) quality. Indicators of bulk OM quality (pyrolysis hydrogen index, pyrolysis S1 + S2 and C/N) demonstrate significant degradation between 150 and 400 m water depth, within the oxygen-minimum zone. Concentrations of the three most abundant chlorins (chlorophyllone, pheophytin and pyropheophytin) decrease from 750 to 150 nmol g TOC-1 from 150 to 400 m water depth though the relative abundances of the chlorins in an individual sample do not change. This suggests that the three chlorins have similar reactivity over the ambient conditions. Values for δ15N of bulk sediments (δ15Nbulk) decrease by 3‰ from the inner shelf to the upper slope (1000 m) but co-occurring compound-specific δ15N values (δ15Nchlorin) do not decrease downslope. The low variability of δ15Nchlorin values supports a single source for the chlorins, and demonstrates the recalcitrance of δ15Nchlorin values despite degradation. This set of observation raises questions about which type of OM fraction best records 'primary' signatures. We assess two possible models to guide our interpretation of these disparate datasets (1) that decreasing δ15Nbulk values are the result of degradation of a 15N-enriched fraction during downslope transport, and that δ15Nchlorin values reflect primary values; (2) that δ15Nbulk values are primary and that chlorins are derived from material transported from upslope. These data reaffirm that in active sedimentary environments such as the Eastern Tropical Pacific, transport of OM can significantly alter bulk geochemical parameters of OM integrity, but the impacts on the δ15N record of bulk sediments and chlorins are less clear, and require more study to be thoroughly understood.

  5. HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH experiment for (1)H(N) and (15)N sequential correlations in ((13)C, (15)N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Goradia, Nishit; Häfner, Sabine; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2015-10-01

    A simple triple resonance NMR experiment that leads to the correlation of the backbone amide resonances of each amino acid residue 'i' with that of residues 'i-1' and 'i+1' in ((13)C, (15)N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is presented. The experimental scheme, {HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH}, exploits the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of (1) J CαN and (2) J CαN couplings to transfer the (15)N x magnetisation from amino acid residue 'i' to adjacent residues via the application of a band-selective (15)N-(13)C(α) heteronuclear cross-polarisation sequence of ~100 ms duration. Employing non-uniform sampling in the indirect dimensions, the efficacy of the approach has been demonstrated by the acquisition of 3D HNN chemical shift correlation spectra of α-synuclein. The experimental performance of the RF pulse sequence has been compared with that of the conventional INEPT-based HN(CA)NH pulse scheme. As the availability of data from both the HCCNH and HNN experiments will make it possible to use the information extracted from one experiment to simplify the analysis of the data of the other and lead to a robust approach for unambiguous backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, a time-saving strategy for the simultaneous collection of HCCNH and HNN data is also described. PMID:26282620

  6. Sewage derive [sup 15]N in the Baltic traced in fucus

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbie, J.E.; Fry, B. ); Larsson, U.; Elmgren, R. )

    1990-01-09

    Himmerfjarden, a fjord-like bay on the eastern shore of the Baltic, receives treated sewage from 250,000 inhabitants. Because the inorganic N in the effluent is enriched in [sup 15]N through denitrification, nitrification, and ammonia volatilization, an analysis of the distribution of [sup 15]N in the Bay tells how far from the source the sewage nitrogen moves. The attached macroalga Fucus vesiculosus was collected in early May from rocky shore at 0-0.5 m depth and the [sup 15]N content of the tips of the fronds analyzed. This N represents uptake and storage during the previous six months and growth during March and April. The [delta][sup 15]N was uniformly high (11-13[per thousand]) in the main body of the Bay within 15 km from the sewage source. Beyond 15 km values decreased with distance to a low of 4.6[per thousand] at 35 km, where the Bay ends and the coastal waters begin. Using the 11-13 and 4.6[per thousand] as endmembers, the percentage of sewage N making up the Fucus at any point may be calculated. The [delta][sub 15]N of particulate organic matter in the offshore Baltic waters was around 0[per thousand] and Fucus had an [delta][sup 15]N about 1.5[per thousand] higher than the POM. From this and other evidence we conclude that there is a belt of coastal water with an elevated [delta][sup 15]N lying along the east coast of the Baltic. This presumably derives from sewage and perhaps from agriculture and is potentially of use as a tracer of coastal zone/pelagic zone interactions.

  7. Why is Mineral-Associated Organic Matter Enriched in 15N? Evidence from Grazed Pasture Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, W. T.; Wells, N. S.; Mudge, P. L.; Clough, T. J.; Schipper, L. A.; Ghani, A.; Stevenson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Throughout the scientific literature, measurements across soil depth and density fractions suggest that, with few exceptions, mineral-associated organic matter (OM) has higher δ15N than non-mineral-associated OM. This implies that the δ15N difference between N inputs and mineral-stabilized OM may characterize the microbial processes involved in stabilization and mineral association. Yet current understanding of observed N isotope fractionation in terrestrial ecosystems suggests the large isotope effects are expressed during inorganic N transformations from NH4 to gaseous loss pathways of NH3 volatilization and denitrification. How can the relative importance of N isotope fractionation during OM stabilization versus loss pathways be resolved? We recently examined N isofluxes when a temporary nitrogen excess is created by urine deposition in a New Zealand dairy pasture. We found that the N isotopic composition of volatilized NH3, and NO3 available for leaching or denitrification could not be linked back to the added N using Rayleigh distillation models. Instead, the results imply that the added N was immobilized, and the N available for losses was increasingly derived from mineralization of organic matter during the course of the experiment. These results are consistent with recent evidence of enhanced OM mineralization in urine patches, understanding of N isotope mass balances and long-standing evidence that gross mineralization and immobilization fluxes greatly exceed net mineralization and nitrification, except at very high N saturation. These results suggest that where 15N enrichment occurs due to fractionating loss pathways, the isotope effects are primarily transmitted to immobilized N, forming 15N enriched stabilized OM. This further explains earlier findings that the δ15N of soil OM represents an integrated indicator of losses, reflecting the intensity and duration of pastoral agriculture. We suggest that development of an indicator based on δ15N in

  8. Nitrogen source tracking with delta(15)N content of coastal wetland plants in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Bruland, Gregory L; MacKenzie, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Inter- and intra-site comparisons of the nitrogen (N) stable isotope composition of wetland plant species have been used to identify sources of N in coastal areas. In this study, we compared delta(15)N values from different herbaceous wetland plants across 34 different coastal wetlands from the five main Hawaiian Islands and investigated relationships of delta(15)N with land use, human population density, and surface water quality parameters (i.e., nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N). The highest delta(15)N values were observed in plants from wetlands on the islands of Oahu (8.7-14.6 per thousand) and Maui (8.9-9.2 per thousand), whereas plants from wetlands on the islands of Kauai, Hawaii, and Molokai had delta(15)N values usually <4 per thousand. The enrichment in delta(15)N values in plant tissues from wetlands on Oahu and Maui was most likely a result of the more developed and densely populated watersheds on these two islands. Urban development within a 1000-m radius and population density were positively correlated to average delta(15)N vegetation values from each wetland site (r = 0.56 and 0.51, respectively; p < 0.001). This suggested that site mean delta(15)N values from mixed stands of wetland plants have potential as indices of N sources in coastal lowland wetlands in Hawaii and that certain sites on Oahu and Maui have experienced significant anthropogenic N loading. This information can be used to monitor future changes in N inputs to coastal wetlands throughout Hawaii and the Pacific. PMID:20048329

  9. Ureide assay for measuring nitrogen fixation by nodulated soybean calibrated by sup 15 N methods. [Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Herridge, D.F. ); Peoples, M.B. )

    1990-06-01

    We report experiments to quantify the relationships between the relative abundance of ureide-N in root-bleeding sap, vacuum-extracted sap, and hot water extracts of stems and petioles of nodulated soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv Bragg) and the proportion of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation. Additional experiments examined the effects of plant genotype and strain of rhizobia on these relationships. In each of the five experiments reported, plants of cv Bragg (experiment 1), cv Lincoln (experiments 3, 4, 5), or six cultivars/genotypes (experiment 2) were grown in a sand:vermiculite mixture in large pots in a naturally lit, temperature-controlled glasshouse during summer. Pots were inoculated at sowing with effective Bradyrhizobium japonicum CB 1809 (USDA 136) or with one of 21 different strains of rhizobia. The proportions of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation were determined using {sup 15}N dilution. Results show that assessment of nitrogen fixation by soybean using the ureide technique should now be possible with the standard curves presented, irrespective of genotype or strain of rhizobia occupying the nodules.

  10. δ 13C and δ 15N Values of Soil Organic Matter Over Drought and Non-drought Affected Elevation Gradients in Ethiopia: Calibrating for Environmental Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwilliger, V. J.; Eshetu, Z.; Colman, A. S.; Fogel, M.

    2004-12-01

    Portions of Ethiopia today are experiencing increasing temperatures and drought frequencies. The longest known hominid record is in Ethiopia's Awash Basin. Reconstructing past environments in Ethiopia may, therefore, contribute both to understanding present day and past consequences of climate change. Studies suggest that at least 7000 years of environmental reconstruction may be possible from isotopic analyses of organic matter in some Ethiopian paleosols. We have measured δ 13C and δ 15N of organic matter from modern soils in Ethiopia to explore the climatic dependence of these signals and thus to determine the maximum resolution of climatic reconstruction possible by bulk isotopic analyses of soil organic matter (SOM). Surface soil samples were taken at elevations from 350 - 3500 m in drought affected regions and from 1050 - 3100 m in regions with no history of drought. Collections were made at an altitude resolution of better than 150 m. Deeper soil samples (max. 27 m) were also obtained at 22 elevations in sites of the Awash Basin that had already been studied using other paleoenvironmental proxies. Soils were sampled in grassland, shrubland, forest, and grass/sedge wetland. The δ 15N values of SOM decreased significantly with increase in elevation and were sensitive to both overlaying vegetation type and drought proclivity. Our results support hypotheses that δ 15N values vary with total nitrogen pools in soils which, in turn vary with humidity and associated microbial influences. The δ 13C values of SOM had a quadratic relationship to elevation that most likely reflected the relative compositions of C3 and C4 biomass in overlying vegetation. Exposure to drought could not be detected by δ 13C values. At sites in the Hadar region where depth profile measurements were made to 27 m, δ 13C values decreased with depth. This result conforms to inferences from other proxy that a cooler, wetter climate previously existed. Nitrogen contents of soils below 3 m

  11. The fate of 15N-nitrate in mesocosms from five European peatlands differing in long-term nitrogen deposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, K.; Blodau, C.

    2016-02-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition changes the retention, transformation, and fluxes of N in ombrotrophic peatlands. To evaluate such effects we applied a 15N tracer (NH4 15NO3) at a rate of 2.3 g N m-2 yr-1 to mesocosms of five European peatlands with differing long-term N deposition rates for a period of 76 days of dry and 90 days of wet conditions. We determined background N content and moss length growth, and recovered the 15N tracer from the mosses, graminoids, shrubs, the peat, and dissolved N. Background N contents in Sphagnum mosses increased from 5.5 (Degerö Stormyr, deposition < 0.2 g N m-2 yr-1) up to 12.2 mg g-1 (Frölichshaier Sattelmoor, 4.7-6.0 g N m-2 yr-1). In peat from Degerö, nitrate and ammonium concentrations were below 3 mg L-1, whereas up to 30 (nitrate) and 11 mg L-1 (ammonium) was found in peat from Frölichshaier Sattelmoor. Sphagnum mosses (down to 5 cm below surface) generally intercepted large amounts of 15N (0.2-0.35 mg g-1) and retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Similar quantities of the 15N were recovered from the peat, followed by shrubs, graminoids, and the dissolved pool. At the most polluted sites we recovered more 15N from shrubs (up to 12.4 %) and from nitrate and ammonium (up to 0.7 %). However, no impact of N deposition on 15N retention by Sphagnum could be identified and their length growth was highest under high N background deposition. Our experiment suggests that the decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, is likely more modest than previously thought. This conclusion is related to the finding that Sphagnum species can apparently thrive at elevated long-term N deposition rates in European peatlands.

  12. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates. 120.611 Section 120.611 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As...

  13. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  14. Highly 15N-enriched chondritic clasts in the CB/CH-like meteorite Isheyevo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, L.; Huss, G. R.; Krot, A. N.; Nagashima, K.; Ishii, H. A.; Bradley, J. P.

    2010-11-01

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock 15N-enrichments (δ 15N up to 1500‰) among planetary materials. They are also characterized by the absence of interchondrule fine-grained matrix. The only fine-grained material is present as lithic clasts, which experienced extensive aqueous alteration in contrast to the surrounding high-temperature components (chondrules, refractory inclusions, metal grains). Hence, the clasts are foreign objects that were incorporated at a late stage into the final parent body of Isheyevo. Their origin is poorly constrained. Based on mineralogy, petrography, and thermal processing of the aromatic carbonaceous component, different types of clasts have been previously identified in the CB/CH-like chondrite Isheyevo. Here, we focus on the rare lithic clasts characterized by the presence of anhydrous silicates (chondrules, chondrule fragments, and CAIs). Their mineralogy and oxygen isotopic compositions reveal them to be micro-chondrules, fragments of chondrules, and refractory inclusions related to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting accretion in the same region. In contrast to previously studied IDPs or primitive chondritic matrices, the fine-grained material in the clasts we studied is highly and rather uniformly enriched in heavy nitrogen, with bulk δ 15N values ranging between 1000‰ and 1300‰. It is also characterized by the presence of numerous 15N hotspots (δ 15N ranging from 1400‰ to 4000‰). No bulk (δD <-240‰) or localized deuterium enrichments were observed. These clasts have the highest bulk enrichment in heavy nitrogen measured to date in a fine-grained material. They represent a unique material, of asteroidal or cometary origin, in our collection of cosmomaterials. We show that they were 15N-enriched before their incorporation in the final parent body of Isheyevo. They experienced an extensive aqueous alteration that most likely played a role in redistributing 15N over the

  15. Nitrogen Isotopic Ratios in Cometary NH2: Implication for 15N-fractionation in Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuël; Decock, Alice; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arai, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Isotopic ratios in cometary molecules are diagnostic for the physico-chemical conditions where molecules formed and are processed, from the interstellar medium to the solar nebula. Usually temperatures at the molecular formation control the fractionation of the heavier element in molecular species, e.g., D-fractionation in water.In cometary volatiles, the 14N/15N ratios in CN have been well observed (Manfroid et al. 2009, A&A, 503, 613, and reference therein) and is consistent with the ratio in HCN (a most probable parent of CN) measured in few comets (Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2008, ApJ, 679, L49). Those ratios are enriched compared to the proto-solar value by a factor of ~3. In contrast to those Nitriles, there are only few reports on 14N/15N ratios in Ammonia (as Amine) (Rousselot et al. 2014, ApJ, 780, L17; Shinnaka et al. 2014, ApJ, 782, L16). Ammonia (NH3) is usually the most abundant and HCN is the second most abundant N-bearing volatiles in cometary ice. Especially, recent observations of 15NH2 revealed the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 are comparable to those of CN. However, from the viewpoint of theoretical work, the enrichment of 15N in cometary NH3 cannot be reproduced by current chemical network models. Information about the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 of individual comets is needed to understand the formation mechanisms/environments of NH3 in the early solar system.To clarify the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in cometary NH3, we determine the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets individually which include not only Oort cloud comets but also short period comets by using the high-resolution optical spectra of NH2. These spectra were obtained with both the UVES mounted on the VLT in Chile and the HDS on the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii.The derived 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets show high 15N-enrichment compared with the elemental abundances of nitrogen in the Sun by about factor of ~3 and has no large diversity depending on

  16. Standard dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Willis B; Donati, George L; Calloway, Clifton P; Jones, Bradley T

    2015-02-17

    Standard dilution analysis (SDA) is a novel calibration method that may be applied to most instrumental techniques that will accept liquid samples and are capable of monitoring two wavelengths simultaneously. It combines the traditional methods of standard additions and internal standards. Therefore, it simultaneously corrects for matrix effects and for fluctuations due to changes in sample size, orientation, or instrumental parameters. SDA requires only 200 s per sample with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Neither the preparation of a series of standard solutions nor the construction of a universal calibration graph is required. The analysis is performed by combining two solutions in a single container: the first containing 50% sample and 50% standard mixture; the second containing 50% sample and 50% solvent. Data are collected in real time as the first solution is diluted by the second one. The results are used to prepare a plot of the analyte-to-internal standard signal ratio on the y-axis versus the inverse of the internal standard concentration on the x-axis. The analyte concentration in the sample is determined from the ratio of the slope and intercept of that plot. The method has been applied to the determination of FD&C dye Blue No. 1 in mouthwash by molecular absorption spectrometry and to the determination of eight metals in mouthwash, wine, cola, nitric acid, and water by ICP OES. Both the accuracy and precision for SDA are better than those observed for the external calibration, standard additions, and internal standard methods using ICP OES. PMID:25599250

  17. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ15N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Nelson, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the ‘rivermouth effect’). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  18. Hydrogen Bonds in Crystalline Imidazoles Studied by 15N NMR and ab initio MO Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Masui, Hirotsugu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Hayashi, Shigenobu

    1999-07-01

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonds of the type N-H...N in crystals of imidazole and its 4-substituted and 4,5-disubstituted derivatives were studied by 15N CP/MAS NMR and an ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculation. In the 15N CP/MAS NMR spectrum of each of the imidazole derivatives, two peaks due to the two different functional groups, >NH and =N-, were observed. The value of the 15N isotropic chemical shift for each nitrogen atom depends on both the length of the intermolecular hydrogen bond and the kind of the substituent or substituents. It was found that the difference between the experimen-tal chemical shifts of >NH and =N-varies predominantly with the hydrogen bond length but does not show any systematic dependence on the kind of substituent. The ab initio MO calculations suggest that the hydrogen bond formation influences the 15N isotropic chemical shift predominantly, and that the difference between the 15N isotropic chemical shift of >NH and =N-varies linearly with the hydrogen bond length.

  19. Whole-body protein turnover in preterm appropriate for gestational age and small for gestational age infants: comparison of [15N]glycine and [1-(13)C]leucine administered simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Van Goudoever, J B; Sulkers, E J; Halliday, D; Degenhart, H J; Carnielli, V P; Wattimena, J L; Sauer, P J

    1995-04-01

    Measurements of whole-body protein turnover in preterm infants have been made using different stable isotope methods. Large variation in results has been found, which could be due to different clinical conditions and/or the use of different tracers. We studied 14 appropriate for gestational age and nine small for gestational age orally fed preterm infants using [15N]glycine and [1-(13)C]leucine simultaneously, which allowed us to make a comparison of commonly used methods to calculate whole-body protein turnover. Whole-body protein turnover was calculated from 15N enrichment in urinary ammonia and urea after [15N]-glycine administration and from the 13C enrichment in expired CO2 after administration of [1-(13)C]leucine. Enrichment of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid after [1-(13)C]leucine constant infusion was measured as a direct parameter of whole-body protein turnover. Group means for whole-body protein turnover using [15N]glycine or [1-(13)C]leucine ranged from 10 to 14 g.kg-1.d-1, except when using the end product method that assumes a correlation between leucine oxidation and total nitrogen excretion. We found very low 15N enrichment of urinary urea in the majority of small for gestational age infants. These infants also had a lower nitrogen excretion in urine and oxidized less leucine. Nitrogen balance was higher in small for gestational age infants (416 +/- 25 mg.kg-1.d-1) compared with appropriate for gestational age infants (374 +/- 41 mg.kg-1.d-1, p = 0.003). [15N]Glycine does not seem to exchange its label with the body nitrogen pool to a significant degree and is therefore not always suitable as a carrier for 15N in protein turnover studies in premature infants. PMID:7596675

  20. Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Swimming pool. View of aisle between swimming pool and seating area. Non-original spa pool is partially visible on right. - Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, 3200 California Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. Development of a stable isotope dilution assay for tenuazonic acid.

    PubMed

    Asam, Stefan; Liu, Yang; Konitzer, Katharina; Rychlik, Michael

    2011-04-13

    A stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) for the Alternaria mycotoxin tenuazonic acid was developed. Therefore, [(13)C(6),(15)N]-tenuazonic acid was synthesized from [(13)C(6),(15)N]-isoleucine by Dieckmann intramolecular cyclization after acetoacetylation with diketene. The synthesized [(13)C(6),(15)N]-tenuazonic acid was used as the internal standard for determination of tenuazonic acid in tomato products by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Method validation revealed a limit of detection of 0.1 μg/kg and a limit of quantitation of 0.3 μg/kg. Recovery was close to 100% in the range of 3-300 μg/kg. Determination of tenuazonic acid in two samples of different tomato ketchups (naturally contaminated) was achieved with a coefficient of variation of 2.3% and 4.7%. Different tomato products (n = 16) were analyzed for their content of tenuazonic acid using the developed SIDA. Values were between 15 and 195 μg/kg (tomato ketchup, n = 9), 363 and 909 μg/kg (tomato paste, n = 2), and 8 and 247 μg/kg (pureed tomatoes and comparable products, n = 5). PMID:21370870

  2. Heavy water and (15) N labelling with NanoSIMS analysis reveals growth rate-dependent metabolic heterogeneity in chemostats.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Sebastian H; McGlynn, Shawn E; Green-Saxena, Abigail; Guan, Yunbin; Newman, Dianne K; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-07-01

    To measure single-cell microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns in environmental systems, we employ a new technique using stable isotope labelling of microbial populations with heavy water (a passive tracer) and (15) N ammonium in combination with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry. We demonstrate simultaneous NanoSIMS analysis of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen at high spatial and mass resolution, and report calibration data linking single-cell isotopic compositions to the corresponding bulk isotopic equivalents for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that heavy water is capable of quantifying in situ single-cell microbial activities ranging from generational time scales of minutes to years, with only light isotopic incorporation (∼0.1 atom % (2) H). Applying this approach to study the rates of fatty acid biosynthesis by single cells of S. aureus growing at different rates in chemostat culture (∼6 h, 1 day and 2 week generation times), we observe the greatest anabolic activity diversity in the slowest growing populations. By using heavy water to constrain cellular growth activity, we can further infer the relative contributions of ammonium versus amino acid assimilation to the cellular nitrogen pool. The approach described here can be applied to disentangle individual cell activities even in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:25655651

  3. 13C- and 15N-Labeling Strategies Combined with Mass Spectrometry Comprehensively Quantify Phospholipid Dynamics in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Robin; Gafken, Philip R.; Olsen, Carissa Perez

    2015-01-01

    Membranes define cellular and organelle boundaries, a function that is critical to all living systems. Like other biomolecules, membrane lipids are dynamically maintained, but current methods are extremely limited for monitoring lipid dynamics in living animals. We developed novel strategies in C. elegans combining 13C and 15N stable isotopes with mass spectrometry to directly quantify the replenishment rates of the individual fatty acids and intact phospholipids of the membrane. Using multiple measurements of phospholipid dynamics, we found that the phospholipid pools are replaced rapidly and at rates nearly double the turnover measured for neutral lipid populations. In fact, our analysis shows that the majority of membrane lipids are replaced each day. Furthermore, we found that stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs), critical enzymes in polyunsaturated fatty acid production, play an unexpected role in influencing the overall rates of membrane maintenance as SCD depletion affected the turnover of nearly all membrane lipids. Additionally, the compromised membrane maintenance as defined by LC-MS/MS with SCD RNAi resulted in active phospholipid remodeling that we predict is critical to alleviate the impact of reduced membrane maintenance in these animals. Not only have these combined methodologies identified new facets of the impact of SCDs on the membrane, but they also have great potential to reveal many undiscovered regulators of phospholipid metabolism. PMID:26528916

  4. Heavy water and 15N labeling with NanoSIMS analysis reveals growth-rate dependent metabolic heterogeneity in chemostats

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Green-Saxena, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    To measure single cell microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns in environmental systems, we employ a new technique using stable isotope labeling of microbial populations with heavy water (a passive tracer) and 15N ammonium in combination with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry. We demonstrate simultaneous NanoSIMS analysis of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen at high spatial and mass resolution, and report calibration data linking single cell isotopic compositions to the corresponding bulk isotopic equivalents for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that heavy water is capable of quantifying in situ single cell microbial activities ranging from generational time scales of minutes to years, with only light isotopic incorporation (∼0.1 atom % 2H). Applying this approach to study the rates of fatty acid biosynthesis by single cells of S. aureus growing at different rates in chemostat culture (∼6 hours, 1 day and 2 week generation times), we observe the greatest anabolic activity diversity in the slowest growing populations. By using heavy water to constrain cellular growth activity, we can further infer the relative contributions of ammonium vs. amino acid assimilation to the cellular nitrogen pool. The approach described here can be applied to disentangle individual cell activities even in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:25655651

  5. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  6. Neutron capture cross section of {sup 15}N at stellar energies

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, J.; Schatz, H.; Herndl, H.; Wiescher, M.; Beer, H.; Kaeppeler, F.

    1996-02-01

    The neutron capture rate on {sup 15}N may be of considerable importance for {ital s}-process nucleosynthesis in red giants as well as for the nucleosynthesis in inhomogeneous big bang scenarios. We measured the reaction cross section of {sup 15}N({ital n},{gamma}){sup 16}N at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with a fast cyclic neutron activation technique at laboratory neutron energies of 25, 152, and 370 keV. Direct capture and shell model calculations were performed to interpret the results. The presented reaction rate is 30{endash}50{percent} smaller than the previously used theoretical rates. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  8. Isotopic fractionation of nitrogen and carbon in Paleoarchean cherts from Pilbara craton, Western Australia: Origin of 15N-depleted nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Daniele L.; Hashizume, Ko; Sugihara, Akiyo; Massault, Marc; Philippot, Pascal

    2009-07-01

    Nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions, together with mineralogy and trace element geochemistry, were studied in a few kerogen-rich Paleoarchean cherts, a barite and a dolomitic stromatolite belonging to the eastern (Dixon Island Formation) and western (Dresser and Strelley Pool Chert Formations; North Pole Dome and Marble Bar) terranes of Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. The aim of the study was to search for 15N-depleted isotopic signatures, often found in kerogens of this period, and explain the origin of these anomalies. Trace elements suggest silica precipitation by hydrothermal fluids as the main process of chert formation with a contamination from volcanoclastic detritus. This is supported by the occurrence of hydrothermal-derived minerals in the studied samples indicating precipitation temperatures up to 350 °C. Only a dolomitic stromatolite from Strelley Pool shows a superchondritic Y/Ho ratio of 72 and a positive Eu/Eu * anomaly of 1.8, characteristic of chemical precipitates from the Archean seawater. The bulk δ 13C vs. δ 15N values measured in the cherts show a roughly positive co-variation, except for one sample from the North Pole (PI-85-00). The progressive enrichment in 15N and 13C from a pristine source having δ 13C ⩽ -36‰ and δ 15N ⩽ -4‰ is correlated with a progressive depletion in N content and to variations in Ba/La and Co/As ratios. These trends have been interpreted as a progressive hydrothermal alteration of the cherts by metamorphic fluids. Isotopic exchange at 350 °C between NH 4+(rock) and N 2(fluid) may explain the isotopic and elemental composition of N in the studied cherts. However, we need to assume isotopic exchange at 350 °C between carbonate C and graphite to explain the large 13C enrichment recorded. Only sample PI-85-00 shows a large N loss (90%) with a positive δ 15N value (+11‰), while C (up to 120 ppm and δ 13C -38‰) seems to be unaffected. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of

  9. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  10. First results on the incorporation and excretion of 15N from orally administered urea in lactating pony mares.

    PubMed

    Schubert, R; Zander, R; Gruhn, K; Hennig, A

    1991-05-01

    Two lactating pony mares were given oral offers of 20 g 15N urea [95 atom-% 15N-excess (15N')] on 6 subsequent days. About 80% of the consumed 15N' were excreted via urine and faeces, but only about 2% via milk. The 15N' secreted via milk-lysine only amounted to 0.04% of the 15N' intake. The recovery was about 90% in each case. Tissues with active metabolism had an unexpectedly high labelling (greater than 0.3 atom-% 15N'). The low extent of the conversion of oral urea N into milk-lysine speaks against an essential participation of the enteral synthesis in meeting the amino acid requirement of lactating mares. It was already concluded from this results that the determination of the amino acid requirement will be necessary for this group of performance. PMID:1888274

  11. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  12. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Cancer.gov

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  13. Pools for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Three institutions in Ohio now stress hydrotherapy and water recreation as important parts of individual educational programs for the handicapped. Specially designed and adapted pools provide freedom of movement and ego building as well as physical education and recreation. (Author)

  14. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    Aquarium granuloma; Fish tank granuloma ... Risks include exposure to swimming pools, salt water aquariums, or ocean fish. ... Wash hands and arms thoroughly after cleaning aquariums. Or, wear rubber gloves when cleaning.

  15. Spectroscopic labeling of A, S/T in the 1H- 15N HSQC spectrum of uniformly ( 15N- 13C) labeled proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugh, Jeetender; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2008-10-01

    A new triple resonance two-dimensional experiment, termed (HC)NH, has been described to generate specific labels on the peaks of alanines and serines/threonines, separately, in the 1H- 15N HSQC spectrum of a protein. The performance of the pulse sequence has been demonstrated with a 151 residue protein. The method permits the investigation of local environments around those specific residues without actually having to obtain complete resonance assignments for the entire protein. With this one can envisage use of the technique for studying large protein systems from different points of view.

  16. Stress in dilute suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passman, Stephen L.

    1989-01-01

    Generally, two types of theory are used to describe the field equations for suspensions. The so-called postulated equations are based on the kinetic theory of mixtures, which logically should give reasonable equations for solutions. The basis for the use of such theory for suspensions is tenuous, though it at least gives a logical path for mathematical arguments. It has the disadvantage that it leads to a system of equations which is underdetermined, in a sense that can be made precise. On the other hand, the so-called averaging theory starts with a determined system, but the very process of averaging renders the resulting system underdetermined. A third type of theory is proposed in which the kinetic theory of gases is used to motivate continuum equations for the suspended particles. This entails an interpretation of the stress in the particles that is different from the usual one. Classical theory is used to describe the motion of the suspending medium. The result is a determined system for a dilute suspension. Extension of the theory to more concentrated systems is discussed.

  17. Compound-Specific δ15N Amino Acid Measurements in Littoral Mussels in the California Upwelling Ecosystem: A New Approach to Generating Baseline δ15N Isoscapes for Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ15N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ15N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ15N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ15N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼7‰ to ∼12‰, R2 = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ15N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ15N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ15N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with15N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ15N values of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ15N values. We hypothesize δ15NPhe values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ15N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ15NPhe values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ15N values. We propose that δ15NPhe isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ15N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives. PMID:24887109

  18. Nitrate Removal in Two Relict Oxbow Urban Wetlands: A 15N Mass-balance Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 15N-tracer method was used to quantify nitrogen (N) removal processes in two relict oxbow wetlands located adjacent to the Minebank Run restored stream reach in Baltimore County (Maryland, USA) during summer 2009 and early spring 2010. A mass-balance approach was used to determ...

  19. Using a Macroalgal δ15N Bioassay to Detect Cruise Ship Waste Water Effluent Inputs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  20. {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 12}C S factor

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, F. C.

    2008-10-15

    Experimental values of the astrophysical S factor for the {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 12}C reaction are available both from direct measurements and from the Trojan horse method. We here use R-matrix formulas to fit these values and to extrapolate to zero energy to obtain values of S(0)

  1. The use of delta(15)N in assessing sewage stress on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Risk, Michael J; Lapointe, Brian E; Sherwood, Owen A; Bedford, Bradley J

    2009-06-01

    While coral reefs decline, scientists argue, and effective strategies to manage land-based pollution lag behind the extent of the problem. There is need for objective, cost-effective, assessment methods. The measurement of stable nitrogen isotope ratios, delta(15)N, in tissues of reef organisms shows promise as an indicator of sewage stress. The choice of target organism will depend upon study purpose, availability, and other considerations such as conservation. Algae are usually plentiful and have been shown faithfully to track sewage input. The organic matrix of bivalve shells can provide time series spanning, perhaps, decades. Gorgonians have been shown to track sewage, and can provide records potentially centuries-long. In areas where baseline data are lacking, which is almost everywhere, delta(15)N in gorgonians can provide information on status and trends. In coral tissue, delta(15)N combined with insoluble residue determination can provide information on both sewage and sediment stress in areas lacking baseline data. In the developed world, delta(15)N provides objective assessment in a field complicated by conflicting opinions. Sample handling and processing are simple and analysis costs are low. This is a method deserving widespread application. PMID:19286230

  2. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  3. Tracing Nitrogen through Landscapes to Coastal Wetlands using d15N of Larval Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to evaluate the use of the nitrogen stable isotope value (d15N) of larval fish as an indicator of incipient anthropogenic nitrogen loading to coastal wetlands in the Great Lakes. We sampled coastal wetlands in five Lake Superior south shore tributaries that had ...

  4. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts. PMID:26590548

  5. Vertical δ13C and δ15N changes during pedogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunn, Melanie; Spielvogel, Sandra; Wells, Andrew; Condron, Leo; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2015-04-01

    The natural abundance of soil organic matter (SOM) stable C and N isotope ratios are subjected to vertical changes throughout the soil profile. This vertical distribution is a widely reported phenomenon across varieties of ecosystems and constitutes important insights of soil carbon cycling. In most ecosystems, SOM becomes enriched in heavy isotopes by several per mill in the first few centimeters of the topsoil. The enrichment of 13C in SOM with soil depth is attributed to biological and physical-chemical processes in soil e.g., plant physiological impacts, microbial decomposition, sorption and transport processes. Such vertical trends in 13C and 15N abundance have rarely been related to SOM composition during pedogenesis. The aims of our study were to investigate short and long-term δ13C and δ15N depth changes and their interrelations under progressing pedogenesis and ecosystem development. We sampled soils across the well studied fordune progradation Haast-chronosequence, a dune ridge system under super-humid climate at the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island (43° 53' S, 169° 3' E). Soils from 11 sites with five replicates each covered a time span of around 2870 yr of soil development (from Arenosol to Podzol). Vertical changes of δ13C and δ15N values of SOM were investigated in the organic layers and in 1-cm depth intervals of the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. With increasing soil depth SOM became enriched in δ13C by 1.9 ± SE 0.1 o and in δ15N by 6.0 ± 0.4 ‰˙Litter δ13C values slightly decreased with increasing soil age (r = -0.61; p = 0.00) likely due to less efficient assimilation linked to nutrient limitations. Fractionation processes during mycorrhizal transfer appeared to affect δ15N values in the litter. We found a strong decrease of δ15N in the early succession stages ≤ 300 yr B.P. (r = -0.95; p = 0.00). Positive relations of vertical 13C and 15N enrichment with soil age might be related to decomposition and appeared to be

  6. Analysis of the coexisting pathways for NO and N2O formation in Chernozem using the (15)N-tracer SimKIM-Advanced model.

    PubMed

    Stange, Claus Florian; Spott, Oliver; Russow, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle consists of a variety of microbial processes. These processes often occur simultaneously in soils, but respond differently to local environmental conditions due to process-specific biochemical restrictions (e.g. oxygen levels). Hence, soil nitrogen cycling (e.g. soil N gas production through nitrification and denitrification) is individually affected through these processes, resulting in the complex and highly dynamic behaviour of total soil N turnover. The development and application of methods that facilitate the quantification of individual contributions of coexisting processes is a fundamental prerequisite for (i) understanding the dynamics of soil N turnover and (ii) implementing these processes in ecosystem models. To explain the unexpected results of the triplet tracer experiment (TTE) of Russow et al. (Role of nitrite and nitric oxide in the processes of nitrification and denitrification in soil: results from (15)N tracer experiments. Soil Biol Biochem. 2009;41:785-795) the existing SimKIM model was extended to the SimKIM-Advanced model through the addition of three separate nitrite subpools associated with ammonia oxidation, oxidation of organic nitrogen (Norg), and denitrification, respectively. For the TTE, individual treatments with (15)N ammonium, (15)N nitrate, and (15)N nitrite were conducted under oxic, hypoxic, and anoxic conditions, respectively, to clarify the role of nitric oxide as a denitrification intermediate during N2O formation. Using a split nitrite pool, this analysis model explains the observed differences in the (15)N enrichments in nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) which occurred in dependence on different oxygen concentrations. The change from oxic over hypoxic to anoxic conditions only marginally increased the NO and N2O release rates (1.3-fold). The analysis using the model revealed that, under oxic and hypoxic conditions, Norg-based N2O production was the dominant pathway, contributing to 90 and 50

  7. Variable δ15N Diet-Tissue Discrimination Factors among Sharks: Implications for Trophic Position, Diet and Food Web Models

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Jill A.; Hussey, Nigel E.; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W.; Wintner, Sabine P.; Fisk, Aaron T.

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ15N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆15N). As ∆15N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆15N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆15N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆15N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ15N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆15N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ15N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆15N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆15N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ15N = 9‰) whereas a ∆15N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ15N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆15N-dietary δ15N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆15N values that reflect the predators’ δ15N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a species’ ecological role in their

  8. Variable δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors among sharks: implications for trophic position, diet and food web models.

    PubMed

    Olin, Jill A; Hussey, Nigel E; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W; Wintner, Sabine P; Fisk, Aaron T

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆(15)N). As ∆(15)N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆(15)N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆(15)N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆(15)N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ(15)N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆(15)N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ(15)N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆(15)N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆(15)N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 9‰) whereas a ∆(15)N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆(15)N-dietary δ(15)N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆(15)N values that reflect the predators' δ(15)N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a

  9. Addiction to MTH1 protein results in intense expression in human breast cancer tissue as measured by liquid chromatography-isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Erdem; Jaruga, Pawel; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Loseva, Olga; Scanlan, Leona D; Tona, Alessandro; Lowenthal, Mark S; Helleday, Thomas; Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2015-09-01

    MTH1 protein sanitizes the nucleotide pool so that oxidized 2'-deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) cannot be used in DNA replication. Cancer cells require MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized dNTPs into DNA that results in mutations and cell death. Inhibition of MTH1 eradicates cancer, validating MTH1 as an anticancer target. By overexpressing MTH1, cancer cells may mediate cancer growth and resist therapy. To date, there is unreliable evidence suggesting that MTH1 is increased in cancer cells, and available methods to measure MTH1 levels are indirect and semi-quantitative. Accurate measurement of MTH1 in disease-free tissues and malignant tumors of patients may be essential for determining if the protein is truly upregulated in cancers, and for the development and use of MTH1 inhibitors in cancer therapy. Here, we present a novel approach involving liquid chromatography-isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry to positively identify and accurately quantify MTH1 in human tissues. We produced full length (15)N-labeled MTH1 and used it as an internal standard for the measurements. Following trypsin digestion, seven tryptic peptides of both MTH1 and (15)N-MTH1 were identified by their full scan and product ion spectra. These peptides provided a statistically significant protein score that would unequivocally identify MTH1. Next, we identified and quantified MTH1 in human disease-free breast tissues and malignant breast tumors, and in four human cultured cell lines, three of which were cancer cells. Extreme expression of MTH1 in malignant breast tumors was observed, suggesting that cancer cells are addicted to MTH1 for their survival. The approach described is expected to be applicable to the measurement of MTH1 levels in malignant tumors vs. surrounding disease-free tissues in cancer patients. This attribute may help develop novel treatment strategies and MTH1 inhibitors as potential drugs, and guide therapies. PMID:26202347

  10. Do Low 15N Values in Paleozoic Epeiric Basins Indicate High Rates of N Fixation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuite, M. L.; Macko, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    As a consequence of the high energetic requirements of dinitrogen (N2) fixation, organic N produced by diazotrophic microorganisms typically exhibits δ15N values similar to atmospheric N2 (approximately 0%). Because the δ15N of organic-rich Paleozoic epeiric basin sediments often has values in the vicinity of 0%, it is frequently asserted that N2 fixation was the primary source of new reactive N for productivity. There are two broad reasons why recourse to widespread and intensive N fixation as the primary source of the organic N is problematic. First, there are substantial physiological and ecological constraints on marine N fixation that limit its extent in modern oceans primarily to open ocean basins. Second, preservation of an unaltered isotopic signature of diazotrophy in underlying sediments is not a likely outcome of oxic and anoxic diagenetic alteration and repeated cycles of mineralization and assimilation. Constraining the sources of reactive N for primary productivity is critical to understanding the N cycle in Paleozoic epeiric seas. In this study we report δ15N values from high organic matter Middle Ordovician through Late Devonian dysoxic and euxinic basinal sediments. We propose a nitrogen isotope mass balance model that incorporates the microbial ecology of a stratified water column and the biochemical stoichiometry of primary production and organic matter diagenesis. Results from the model support our contention that high rates of N fixation over extended time periods were not the cause of depleted nitrogen isotope values in organic-rich Paleozoic basinal sediments. Rather, the depleted values were a consequence of a diminished role for nitrification and subsequent N loss via denitrification and anammox, and the preferential preservation of a substantially 15N-depleted chlorophyll-influenced lipid fraction. The model may be applicable to earlier and later geological periods where high organic matter sediments feature depleted δ15N values.

  11. Evaluating δ(15)N-body size relationships across taxonomic levels using hierarchical models.

    PubMed

    Reum, Jonathan C P; Marshall, Kristin N

    2013-12-01

    Ecologists routinely set out to estimate the trophic position of individuals, populations, and species composing food webs, and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ(15)N) are a widely used proxy for trophic position. Although δ(15)N values are often sampled at the level of individuals, estimates and confidence intervals are frequently sought for aggregations of individuals. If individual δ(15)N values are correlated as an artifact of sampling design (e.g., clustering of samples in space or time) or due to intrinsic groupings (e.g., life history stages, social groups, taxonomy), such estimates may be biased and exhibit overly optimistic confidence intervals. However, these issues can be accommodated using hierarchical modeling methods. Here, we demonstrate how hierarchical models offer an additional quantitative tool for investigating δ(15)N variability and we explicitly evaluate how δ(15)N varies with body size at successively higher levels of taxonomic aggregation in a diverse fish assemblage. The models take advantage of all available data, better account for uncertainty in parameters estimates, may improve inferences on coefficients corresponding to groups with small to moderate sample sizes, and partition variation across model levels, which provides convenient summaries of the 'importance' of each level in terms of unexplained heterogeneity in the data. These methods can easily be applied to diet-based studies of trophic position. Although hierarchical models are well-understood and established tools, their benefits have yet to be fully reaped by stable isotope and food web ecologists. We suggest that hierarchical models can provide a robust framework for conceptualizing and statistically modeling trophic position at multiple levels of aggregation. PMID:23812110

  12. Influence of open ocean nitrogen supply on the skeletal δ15N of modern shallow-water scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen T.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Cohen, Anne L.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Cobb, Kim M.; Erler, Dirk V.; Stolarski, Jarosław; Kitahara, Marcelo V.; Ren, Haojia

    2016-05-01

    The isotopic composition of skeleton-bound organic nitrogen in shallow-water scleractinian corals (hereafter, CS-δ15N) is an emerging tool for studying the marine nitrogen cycle in the past. The CS-δ15N has been shown to reflect the δ15N of nitrogen (N) sources to corals, with most applications to date focusing on the anthropogenic/terrestrial N inputs to reef environments. However, many coral reefs receive their primary N sources from the open ocean, and the CS-δ15N of these corals may provide information on past changes in the open ocean regional and global N cycle. Using a recently developed persulfate/denitrifier-based method, we measured CS-δ15N in modern shallow-water scleractinian corals from 8 sites proximal to the open ocean. At sites with low open ocean surface nitrate concentrations typical of the subtropics and tropics, measured CS-δ15N variation on seasonal and annual timescales is most often less than 2‰. In contrast, a broad range in CS-δ15N (of ∼10‰) is measured across these sites, with a strong correlation between CS-δ15N and the δ15N of the deep nitrate supply to the surface waters near the reefs. While CS-δ15N can be affected by other N sources as well and can vary in response to local reef conditions as well as coral/symbiont physiological changes, this survey indicates that, when considering corals proximal to the open ocean, the δ15N of the subsurface nitrate supply to surface waters drives most of the CS-δ15N variation across the global ocean. Thus, CS-δ15N is a promising proxy for reconstructing the open ocean N cycle in the past.

  13. Characteristics of the δ ^{15} N_{NO_3 } distribution and its drivers in the Changjiang River estuary and adjacent waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Wu, Zaixing; Yuan, Yongquan; Zhou, Peng; Cao, Xihua

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we conducted investigations in the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary and adjacent waters (CREAW) in June and November of 2014. We collected water samples from different depths to analyze the nitrogen isotopic compositions of nitrate, nutrient concentrations (including inorganic N, P, and Si), and other physical and biological parameters, along with the vertical distribution and seasonal variations of these parameters. The compositions of nitrogen isotope in nitrate were measured with the denitrifier method. Results show that the Changjiang River diluted water (CDW) was the main factor aff ecting the shallow waters (above 10 m) of the CREAW, and CDW tended to influence the northern areas in June and the southern areas in November. δ ^{15} N_{NO_3 } values in CDW ranged from 3.21‰-3.55‰. In contrast, the deep waters (below 30 m) were aff ected by the subsurface water of the Kuroshio Current, which intruded into the waters near 31°N in June. The δ ^{15} N_{NO_3 } values of these waters were 6.03‰-7.6‰, slightly higher than the values of the Kuroshio Current. Nitrate assimilation by phytoplankton in the shallow waters of the study area varied seasonally. Because of the favorable temperature and nutrient conditions in June, abundant phytoplankton growth resulted in harmful algae blooms (HABs). Therefore, nitrate assimilation was strong in June and weak in November. The δ ^{15} N_{NO_3 } fractionations caused by assimilation of phytoplankton were 4.57‰ and 4.41‰ in the shallow waters in June and November, respectively. These results are consistent with previous laboratory cultures and in situ investigations. Nitrification processes were observed in some deep waters of the study area, and they were more apparent in November than in June. The fractionation values of nitrification ranged from 24‰-25‰, which agrees with results for Nitrosospira tenuis reported by previous studies.

  14. Dilution refrigeration for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, U. E.; Petrac, D.

    1990-01-01

    Dilution refrigerators are presently used routinely in ground based applications where temperatures below 0.3 K are required. The operation of a conventional dilution refrigerator depends critically on the presence of gravity. To operate a dilution refrigerator in space many technical difficulties must be overcome. Some of the anticipated difficulties are identified in this paper and possible solutions are described. A single cycle refrigerator is described conceptually that uses forces other than gravity to function and the stringent constraints imposed on the design by requiring the refrigerator to function on the earth without using gravity are elaborated upon.

  15. Vernal Pool Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nancy; Colburn, Betsy

    This curriculum guide accompanies Certified: A Citizen's Step-by-Step Guide to Protecting Vernal Pools which is designed to train volunteers in the process of identifying vernal pool habitat so that as many of these pools as possible can be certified by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program. Vernal pools are a kind of…

  16. Application of unsymmetrical indirect covariance NMR methods to the computation of the (13)C <--> (15)N HSQC-IMPEACH and (13)C <--> (15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectra.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary E; Hilton, Bruce D; Irish, Patrick A; Blinov, Kirill A; Williams, Antony J

    2007-10-01

    Utilization of long-range (1)H--(15)N heteronuclear chemical shift correlation has continually grown in importance since the first applications were reported in 1995. More recently, indirect covariance NMR methods have been introduced followed by the development of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing methods. The latter technique has been shown to allow the calculation of hyphenated 2D NMR data matrices from more readily acquired nonhyphenated 2D NMR spectra. We recently reported the use of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing to combine (1)H--(13)C GHSQC and (1)H--(15)N GHMBC long-range spectra to yield a (13)C--(15)N HSQC-HMBC chemical shift correlation spectrum that could not be acquired in a reasonable period of time without resorting to (15)N-labeled molecules. We now report the unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing of (1)H--(13)C GHMBC and (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectra to afford a (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH spectrum that has the potential to span as many as six to eight bonds. Correlations for carbon resonances long-range coupled to a protonated carbon in the (1)H--(13)C HMBC spectrum are transferred via the long-range (1)H--(15)N coupling pathway in the (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectrum to afford a much broader range of correlation possibilities in the (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectrum. The indole alkaloid vincamine is used as a model compound to illustrate the application of the method. PMID:17729230

  17. Regional patterns of 15N natural abundance in forest ecosystems along a large transect in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Wenping; Yu, Guirui; Fang, Huajun; Liu, Yingchun; Wang, Qiufeng; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Li

    2014-02-01

    The regional determining factors underlying inter- and intra-site variation of 15N natural abundance in foliage, O horizon and mineral soil were investigated in eastern China.15N natural abundance values for these forest ecosystems were in the middle of the range of values previously found for global forest ecosystems. In contrast to commonly reported global patterns, temperate forest ecosystems were significantly more15N-enriched than tropical forest ecosystems, and foliage δ15N was negatively correlated with increasing mean annual temperature and net soil N mineralisation in eastern China. Tight N cycling in forest ecosystems and the use of atmospheric N deposition by trees might underlie the δ15N distribution patterns in eastern China. The existence of mycorrhizal fungi and root distribution profiles in the soil may also influence the15N natural abundance patterns in forest ecosystems of eastern China.

  18. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ15N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Francisca P.; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ15N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ15N and δ13C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ15N values span the entire gradient, soil δ15N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ15N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ15N values.

  19. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ(15)N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Francisca P; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ(15)N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ(15)N and δ(13)C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ(15)N values span the entire gradient, soil δ(15)N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ(15)N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ(15)N values. PMID:26956399

  20. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ15N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Francisca P.; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ15N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ15N and δ13C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ15N values span the entire gradient, soil δ15N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ15N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ15N values. PMID:26956399

  1. Occurrence and daily variability of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Teo, Tiffany L L; Coleman, Heather M; Khan, Stuart J

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the presence and daily variability of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in public swimming pools. Various types of public swimming pool water were analysed, taken from freshwater indoor swimming pools, outdoor swimming pools, spa pools and seawater swimming pools. Swimming pool water samples were analysed for 30 PPCPs using solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). All PPCPs were below quantification limits in seawater pools. However, caffeine was detected in 12 chlorinated swimming pools at concentrations up to 1540 ng/L and ibuprofen was observed in 7 chlorinated pools at concentrations up to 83 ng/L. Caffeine and ibuprofen concentrations were below quantification limits in all fill water samples, eliminating this as their source in swimming pools. High variations in caffeine concentrations monitored throughout the day roughly reflect bather loads in swimming pools. Future monitoring of these compounds may assist in evaluating what portion of organic matter measured in swimming pools may come from human excretions. PMID:26705754

  2. Isotopic variability of cave bears (δ15N, δ13C) across Europe during MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajcarz, Magdalena; Pacher, Martina; Krajcarz, Maciej T.; Laughlan, Lana; Rabeder, Gernot; Sabol, Martin; Wojtal, Piotr; Bocherens, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, the organic fraction of bone, records the isotopic parameters of consumed food for carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). This relationship of isotopic signature between diet and tissue is an important tool for the study of dietary preferences of modern and fossil animal species. Since the first information on the isotopic signature of cave bear was reported, numerous data from Europe have become available. The goal of this work is to track the geographical variation of cave bear collagen isotopic values in Europe during Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (about 60,000-25,000 yr BP). In this study the results of new δ13C and δ15N isotopic analyses of cave bear collagen from four Central-Eastern European sites are presented, as well as a review of all published isotopic data for cave bears of the same period. The main conclusion is a lack of geographical East-West pattern in the variations of δ13C and δ15N values of cave bear collagen. Moreover, no relationship was found between cave bear taxonomy and isotopic composition. The cave bears from Central-Eastern Europe exhibit δ13C and δ15N values near the average of the range of Central, Western and Southern European cave bears. Despite the fact that most cave bear sites follow an altitudinal gradient, separate groups of sites exhibit shift in absolute values of δ13C, what disturbs an altitude-related isotopic pattern. The most distinct groups are: high Alpine sites situated over 1500 m a.s.l. - in terms of δ13C; and two Romanian sites Peştera cu Oase and Urşilor - in case of δ15N. Although the cave bear isotopic signature is driven by altitude, the altitudinal adjustment of isotopic data is not enough to explain the isotopic dissimilarity of these cave bears. The unusually high δ15N signature of mentioned Romanian sites is an isolated case in Europe. Cave bears from relatively closely situated Central-Eastern European sites and other Romanian sites are more similar to Western European than to Romanian

  3. Intermittency in dilute granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenxuan; Zhang, Qiang; Wylie, Jonathan J.

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we show that dilute granular systems can exhibit a type of intermittency that has no analogue in gas dynamics. We consider a simple system in which a very dilute set of granular particles falls under gravity through a nozzle. This setting is analogous to the classical problem of high-speed nozzle flow in the study of compressible gases. It is well known that very dilute granular systems exhibit behavior qualitatively similar to gases, and that gas flowing through a nozzle does not exhibit intermittency. Nevertheless, we show that the intermittency in dilute granular nozzle flows can occur and corresponds to complicated transitions between supersonic and subsonic regimes. We also provide detailed explanations of the mechanism underlying this phenomenon.

  4. Closed-loop 15N measurement of N2O and its isotopomers for real-time greenhouse gas tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaets, Johanna; Mayr, Leopold; Heiling, Maria; Zaman, Mohammad; Resch, Christian; Weltin, Georg; Gruber, Roman; Dercon, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying sources of nitrous oxide is essential to improve understanding of the global N cycle and to develop climate-smart agriculture, as N2O has a global warming potential 300 times higher than CO2. The isotopic signature and the intramolecular distribution (site preference) of 15N are powerful tools to trace N2O, but the application of these methods is limited as conventional methods cannot provide continuous and in situ data. Here we present a method for closed-loop, real time monitoring of the N2O flux, the isotopic signature and the intramolecular distribution of 15N by using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, Los Gatos Research). The developed method was applied to a fertilizer inhibitor experiment, in which N2O emissions were measured on undisturbed soil cores for three weeks. The treatments consisted of enriched urea-N (100 kg urea-N/ha), the same fertilizer combined with the nitrification inhibitor nitrapyrin (375 g/100 kg urea), and control cores. Monitoring the isotopic signature makes it possible to distinguish emissions from soil and fertilizer. Characterization of site preference could additionally provide a tool to identify different microbial processes leading to N2O emissions. Furthermore, the closed-loop approach enables direct measurement on site and does not require removal of CO2 and H2O. Results showed that 75% of total N2O emissions (total=11 346 μg N2O-N/m2) in the fertilized cores originated from fertilizer, while only 55% of total emissions (total=2 450 μg N2ON/m2) stemmed from fertilizer for the cores treated with nitrapyrin. In the controls, N2O derived from soil was only 40% of the size of the corresponding pool from the fertilized cores, pointing towards a priming effect on the microbial community from the fertilizer and demonstrating the bias that could be introduced by relying on non-treated cores to estimate soil emission rates, rather than using the isotopic signature. The site preference increased linearly

  5. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; Kispal, Brianna M.; Mireault, Christopher R.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W.

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  6. Interference effects in proton scattering on {sup 15}N nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraeva, E. T.; Zhusupov, M.A.; Imambekov, O.; Krassovitskiy, P. M.

    2010-08-15

    The differential cross section for proton scattering on {sup 15}N nuclei is calculated within Glauber diffraction theory at energies of 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0 GeV. Use is made of the shell-model wave function for the {sup 15}N nucleus. The contribution of single and double collisions to the Glauber operator {Omega} is taken into account. The sensitivity of the differential cross sections to the contributions of scattering on nucleons from different shells, to the parameters of the elementary pN amplitude, and to the energy of projectile protons is investigated. It is shown that the interference between amplitudes corresponding to different collision multiplicities, as well as between the amplitudes for scattering on nucleons from different shells, determines special features of the cross section.

  7. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of URNdesign, a computationally redesigned RRM protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Neil; Dantas, Gautam; Varani, Gabriele

    2005-10-01

    Protein design represents one of the great challenges of computational structural biology. The ability to successfully design new proteins would allow us to generate new reagents and enzymes, while at the same time providing us with an understanding of the principles of protein stability. Here we report 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of a redesigned U1A protein, URNdesign. U1A has been studied extensively by our group and hence was chosen as a design target. For the assignments we sued 2D and 3D heteronuclearNMR experiments with uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled URNdesign. The assignments for the backbone NH, CO,Ca and Cb nuclei are 94%complete. Sidechain 1Hand13C, aromatic andQ/NNH2 resonances are essentially complete with guanidinium and K NH3 residues unassigned. BMRB deposit with accession number 6493

  8. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of phenazopyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Mora-Pérez, Yolanda; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    Phenazopyridine hydrochloride (1), a drug in clinical use for many decades, and some derivatives were studied by one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR methodology. The assignments, combined with DFT calculations, reveal that the preferred protonation site of the drug is the pyridine ring nitrogen atom. The chemoselective acetylation of phenazopyridine (2) and its influence on the polarization of the azo nitrogen atoms were evidenced by the (15)N NMR spectra. Molecular calculations of the phenazopyridines 2-4 show that the pyridine and phenyl groups are oriented in an antiperiplanar conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-b atom and the C-2 amino group preserving the E-azo stereochemistry. PMID:15625718

  9. Catalytic Roles of βLys87 in Tryptophan Synthase: 15N Solid State NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Caulkins, Bethany G.; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4′ for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-15N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. PMID:25688830

  10. Thread Pool Interface (TPI)

    2008-04-01

    Thread Pool Interface (TpI) provides a simple interface for running functions written in C or C++ in a thread-parallel mode. Application or library codes may need to perform operations thread-parallel on machines with multicore processors. the TPI library provides a simple mechanism for managing thread activation, deactivation, and thread-parallel execution of application-provided subprograms.

  11. The Future of Pooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Peter C.; Fone, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses seven propositions underlying the strategies that insurance pools can, will, and must pursue: (1) risk management versus risk financing; (2) elimination of windfall advantages; (3) the maintenance of market-dominant status; (4) cost leadership; (5) client focus; (6) innovation and diversification; and (7) leadership challenges. A sidebar…

  12. Data Pool Description

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-04-29

    ... "Internet Options", "Advanced" tab, "Enable FTP folder view (outside of Internet Explorer)" under "Browsing"  • Use IE7 for FTP ... FTP mode is required to access the Data Pool from the command line as "ftp -p l5eil01.larc.nasa.gov" , where the system translates ...

  13. Mycorrhizal Fungi Provide Most of the Nitrogen for Symbiotic Arctic Plants: 15N Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, J. E.; Hobbie, E. A.

    2004-12-01

    When soil nitrogen is in short supply, most terrestrial plants form symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizae) in which fine hyphal threads take up soil nitrogen, transport it into plant roots, and in return receive plant sugars. Because the transfer rates are very difficult to measure in nature, ecologists need new tools by which to assess the role of mycorrhizal fungi in carbon and nitrogen cycling. Recent studies indicate that the natural abundance of 15N taken up from the soil by hyphae is changed during transfer of nitrogen to roots; the result is large differences among the natural abundance of 15N in soil, symbiotic plants, and symbiotic fungi that depend on the mass balance of nitrogen in the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Measurements were carried out in acidic tussock tundra at the Toolik Lake LTER site in Arctic Alaska (68\\deg N 149\\deg W). The \\delta15N of soil N was 1.5%, of soil ammonium was 1.5%, of ericoid and ectomycorrhizal plants was -5.0%, and of ectomycorrhizal fungi was 7.0 parts per mille%. The mass balance of the 15N shows that the plants received 61-86% of their nitrogen from the fungal hyphae. These values, when combined with known plant growth rates, reveal that the plants provided 7-16% of their photosynthetic carbon to the fungi for growth and respiration, or about 25% of all carbon allocated to belowground processes. This analytical technique could be readily applied to other nitrogen-limited ecosystems such as many temperate and boreal forests to quantify the importance for terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling of mycorrhizally mediated transfers at the plant-soil interface.

  14. δ15N in the turtle grass from the Mexican Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talavera-Saenz, A.; Sanchez, A.; Ortiz-Hernandez, M.

    2013-05-01

    Nutrient inputs associated with population growth threaten the integrity of coastal ecosystems. To assess the rapid increase in tourism, we compared the δ15N from Thalassia testudinum collected at sites with different levels of tourism development and population to detect the N inputs of wastewater discharge (WD) along the coast of Quintana Roo. The contributions of nitrogen enriched in 15N are directly related to the increase of WD inputs in areas of high tourism development (Nichupte Lagoon in Cancun, >3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.7 million of resident population) and decreased towards Bahia Akumal and Tulum (>3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.15 million of resident population). The δ15N from T. testudinum was significantly lower at Mahahual and Puerto Morelos (about 0.4 million tourists per year in 2007 to 2011 and 0.25 million of resident population) than other the sites. In areas of the lowest development and with tourist activity restricted and small population, such as the Yum Balam Reserve and Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve, the δ15N values were in much higher enrichment that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. Therefore is suggested that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos may be used for baseline isotopic monitoring, over environmental pressure on the reef lagoon ecosystem, where tourist activities and population are growing very slow rate. The anthropogenic N input has the potential to impact, both environmentally and economically, the seagrass meadows and the coral reefs along the coast of Quintana Roo and the Caribbean.

  15. δ15N as a Potential Paleoenvironmental Proxy for Nitrogen Loading in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, H. D.; Andrus, C. F.; Rick, T.; Hines, A.

    2013-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis of Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and other mollusk shells from archaeological sites is a useful means of acquiring paleoenvironmental data. Recently, nitrogen isotopes have been identified as a potential new proxy in these shells. δ15N content in mollusk shells is affected by numerous anthropogenic and natural influences and may be used as an environmental proxy for nitrogen loading conditions. Chesapeake Bay is well known for both historic and modern pollution problems from numerous anthropogenic sources, such as fertilizer runoff, sewage discharge, and densely populated land use and serves as an ideal study location for long-term nitrogen loading processes. Longer records of these processes may be recorded in abundant archaeological remains around the bay, however, little is known about the stability of δ15N and %N in shell material over recent geologic time. In this study, 90 archaeological C. virginica shells were collected by the Smithsonian Institution from the Rhode River Estuary within Chesapeake Bay and range in age from ~150 to 3200 years old. Twenty-two modern C. virginica shells were also collected from nearby beds in the bay. All shell samples were subsampled from the resilifer region of the calcitic shell using a hand-held micro drill and were analyzed using EA-IRMS analysis to determine the potential temporal variability of δ15N and %N as well as creating a baseline for ancient nitrogen conditions in the bay area. Modern POM water samples and C. virginica soft tissues were also analyzed in this study to determine the degree of seasonal variation of δ15N and %N in Chesapeake Bay.

  16. SEARCH FOR AN 80-ms SPONTANEOUS FISSION ACTIVITY IN BOMBARDMENTS OF 249Bk WITH 15N

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.; Fowler, M.; Ghiorso, A.; Leber, R.E.; Nurmia, M.J.; Somerville, L.P.; Williams, K.E.; Hulet, E.K.; Landrum, J.H.; Lougheed, R.W.; Wild, J.F.; Bemis, Jr., C.E.; Silva, R.J.; Eskola, P.

    1980-01-01

    A rotating drum system was used to search for an 80-ms spontaneous fission (sf) activity in the reaction of {sup 15}N with {sup 249}Bk. No such activity was found beyond a cross section limit of 0.3 {+-} 0.3 nb. A sf activity with a half-life of about 20 ms and a formation cross section of 12 nb at 82 MeV was observed. The identity of this activity has not been determined.

  17. Community 15N isoscapes to resolve plant-plant-interactions at the spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Christine; Rascher, Katherine G.; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Isoscapes have greatly improved our ability to understand biogeochemical processes on continental to global scales. However, the isoscapes framework may also have significant potential to resolve the spatial component of within-community interactions. For example, exotic plant invaders often exert strong impacts on ecosystem functioning, particularly regarding water-, carbon- and nutrient-cycles, but the spatial extent of such alterations is largely unknown. Here we show that massive N input by the N2-fixing exotic invasive Acacia longifolia to a Portuguese dune system can be traced using spatially resolved information on native plants' leaf δ15N. We found isotopic signatures of N to differ strongly between the native system (δ15N c. -10 o) and the atmospherically derived N in A. longifolia phyllodes (δ15N c. 0 o). Thus, sources of N for native plants could be readily distinguished. Leaf δ15N of a native, non-fixing species was increasingly enriched the closer the plant grew to the invader, indicating uptake of fixed N provided by A. longifolia. The enrichment was evident far beyond the stands of the invader, demonstrating that A. longifolia affected N budgets of native species up to a distance of 8 m exceeding the margin of the canopy. Furthermore, using the isoscapes approach, we were able to quantify the total area of N enrichment and could thus show that the area affected by invasion was at least 3.5 times larger than the area actually occupied by the invader. However, a native N2-fixing species had no such effects. Thus, downscaling isoscapes to the community level opens new frontiers in quantifying the spatial dimension of functional changes associated with plant invasions. Moreover, considering the feasibility and applicability of this approach, it may provide a promising tool to identify, quantify and monitor different types of functional plant-plant interactions within communities at a spatially explicit scale.

  18. Food webs of two intermittently open estuaries receiving 15N-enriched sewage effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadwen, Wade L.; Arthington, Angela H.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures were used to assess the response of food webs to sewage effluent discharged into two small intermittently open estuaries in northern New South Wales, Australia. One of these systems, Tallows Creek, has a history of direct sewage inputs, whilst the other, Belongil Creek, receives wastewater via an extensive wetland treatment system. The food webs of both systems were driven by algal sources of carbon, reflecting high autotrophic productivity in response to the nutrients entering the system from sewage effluent. All aquatic biota collected from Tallows Creek had significantly enriched δ15N signatures relative to their conspecifics from Belongil Creek, indicating that sewage nitrogen had been assimilated and transferred throughout the Tallows Creek food web. These δ15N values were higher than those reported from studies in permanently open estuaries receiving sewage effluent. We suggest that these enriched signatures and the transfer of nitrogen throughout the entire food web reflect differences in hydrology and associated nitrogen cycling processes between permanently open and intermittently open estuaries. Although all organisms in Tallows Creek were generally 15N-enriched, isotopically light (less 15N-enriched) individuals of estuary perchlet ( Ambassis marianus) and sea mullet ( Mugil cephalus) were also collected. These individuals were most likely recent immigrants into Tallows Creek, as this system had only recently been opened to the ocean. This isotopic discrimination between resident (enriched) and immigrant (significantly less enriched) individuals can provide information on fish movement patterns and the role of heavily polluted intermittently open estuaries in supporting commercially and recreationally valuable estuarine species.

  19. Food webs in Mongolian grasslands: the analysis of 13C and 15N natural abundances.

    PubMed

    Kohzu, Ayato; Iwata, T; Kato, M; Nishikawa, J; Wada, Eitaro; Amartuvshin, N; Namkhaidorj, B; Fujita, N

    2009-09-01

    Overgrazing often lowers species richness and productivity of grassland communities. For Mongolian grassland ecosystems, a lack of detailed information about food-web structures makes it difficult to predict the effects of overgrazing on species diversity and community composition. We analysed the delta13C and delta15N signatures of herbaceous plants, arthropods (grouped by feeding habit), wild and domestic mammals, and humans in central Mongolia to understand the predominant food-web pathways in this grassland ecosystem. The delta13C and delta15N values of mammals showed little variation within species, but varied considerably with slope position for arthropods. The apparent isotopic discrimination between body tissue and hair of mammals was estimated as 2.0 per thousand for delta13C and 2.1 per thousand for delta15N, which was large enough to cause overestimation of the trophic level of mammals if not taken into account when using hair samples to measure isotopic enrichment. PMID:19507080

  20. Determination of the δ15N and δ13C of total nitrogen and carbon in solids; RSIL lab code 1832

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga; Qi, Haiping; Coplan, Tyler B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1832 is to determine the δ(15N/14N), abbreviated as δ15N, and the δ(13C/12C), abbreviated as δ13C, of total nitrogen and carbon in a solid sample. A Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA) is used to convert total nitrogen and carbon in a solid sample into N2 and CO2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines the relative difference in stable nitrogen isotope-amount ratio (15N/14N) of the product N2 gas and the relative difference in stable carbon isotope-amount ratio (13C/12C) of the product CO2 gas. The combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. Samples are placed in tin capsules and loaded into a Costech Zero Blank Autosampler on the EA. Under computer control, samples then are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where combustion takes place in a helium atmosphere containing an excess of oxygen gas. Combustion products are transported by a helium carrier through a reduction furnace to remove excess oxygen and to convert all nitrous oxides into N2 and through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly CO2 and N2, are separated by a gas chromatograph. The gas is then introduced into the IRMS through a Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) ConFlo II interface. The Finnigan MAT ConFlo II interface is used for introducing not only sample into the IRMS but also N2 and CO2 reference gases and helium for sample dilution. The flash combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V CF-IRMS. It has a universal triple collector, two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 28, 29, 30 or with a magnet current change 44, 45, 46, simultaneously. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 28 = N2 = 14N/14N; m/z 29 = N2 = 14N/15N primarily; m/z 30 = NO = 14N/16O

  1. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  2. A novel method for trapping and analyzing 15N in NO for tracing NO sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ronghua; Mulder, Jan; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    15N isotope tracing is an effective and direct approach to investigate the biological and chemical sources of nitric oxide (NO) in soil. However, NO is highly reactive and rapidly converted to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the presence of ozone. Various chemical conversions of NO to the more stable solutes nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) have been proposed, which allow analysing the 15N abundance without major fractionation. However, NO emissions from soils are usually small, posing major challenges to conversion efficiency and background contamination. Here we present a novel method in which NO is oxidized to NO2- by chromium trioxide (CrO3) prior to conversion to NO2- and NO3- in an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. Immediately following trapping, manganese dioxide (MnO2) and 5M HCl are added to remove excess H2O2, and to adjust the pH to around 6.0-7.0, respectively. The resulting solution can be stored until analysis and is none-toxic, allowing to use a modified denitrifier method (Zhu et al., submitted), where NO2- and NO3- are reduced quantitatively to nitrous oxide (N2O). Optimum NO conversion rates of > 90% even at extremely low initial NO concentration were obtained with 4% H2O2, 0.5 M NaOH, and 0.5 L min-1 gas flow rate. In a laboratory test, using NO gas with different 15N signals produced from unlabelled and labelled NO2-, we found an overall precision of 0.4‰ for unlabelled and 49.7‰ for NO enriched with 1.0 atom% 15N, respectively. This indicates that this method can be used for both natural abundance studies of NO, as well as in labelling studies tracing NO sources. Zhu J, Yu L, Bakken LR, Mørkved PT, Mulder J, Dörsch P. Controlled induction of denitrification in Pseudomonas aureofaciens: a modified denitrifier method for 15N and 18O analysis in NO3- from natural water samples by IRMS. Submitted.

  3. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen isoscapes of the California Coast: integrated δ15N and δ13C of suspended particulate organic matter inferred from tissues of the California Mussel (mytilus californianus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhshoori, N. L.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial maps of isotopic variability in a single species, or isoscapes, can characterize the natural variability in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) isotope ratios across ecosystems on broad spatial scales, trace the signature of a source across a given area, as well as constrain animal migration patterns (Graham et al. 2002). In this study, isoscapes of stable carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes were constructed using intertidal mussels for northeast Pacific coastal waters of California. In this region biogeochemical cycling is primarily controlled by upwelling intensity and large-scale transport of the California Current System (CCS). We hypothesize that sampling specific tissues of filter-feeding organisms can provide an integrated measure of variation in 15N and 13C of the suspended particulate organic matter (POM) pool vs. latitude within the CCS, as well indicate main sources of both organic C and N to littoral food webs. California mussels (mytilus californianus) were collected from 28 sites between Coos Bay, OR and La Jolla, CA in the winter of 2009-2010 and summer of 2011, and adductor tissue was analyzed for δ13C and δ15N. Mussel size classes were chosen to provide ~ 1 yr integrated signal. Spatial trends in δ15N from the winter sampling show a strong linear trend in increasing δ15N values with latitude north to south (δ15N values range from 7 % to 12%) consistent with slowly attenuating northward transport of 15N-depleted nitrate via California Undercurrent (Altabet et al. 1999). The δ13C values have no strong north to south correlation, but exhibit strong location-specific variability. The δ13C values range between -13 % and -18%. We propose the site-specific signature of δ13C indicates relative source of primary productin to POM at a given region (i.e. kelp, phytoplankton, zooplankton). Overall, these results suggest that isoscapes for filter-feeding organisms may offer a more accurate integrated picture of 15N and 13C values of POM than is

  4. Estimation of internal and external nitrogen for corals with a long-term 15N-labelling experiment and subsequent model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuaki; Grottoli, Andréa; Matsui, Yohei; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    quantitatively showed that the internal N pool in the coral tissue plays an important role in the symbiotic algal metabolism. The application of the present 15N-tracer technique would enable us to further calculate the fluxes of internal and external N in not only corals but also other algal-animal symbiotic organisms under various environmental conditions.

  5. δ15N patterns of Douglas-fir and red alder riparian forests in the Oregon Coast Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, E.E.; Perakis, S.S.; Hibbs, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    We used naturally occurring stable isotopes of N to compare N dynamics in near-stream and upslope environments along riparian catenas in N-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in the Coast Range of western Oregon. Based on the existing literature, we expected soil δ15N to be enriched closer to streams owing to inputs of isotopically heavy, marine-derived N by spawning salmon, higher rates of denitrification near the stream, or both. However, it has been unclear what effect red alder might have on soil δ15N patterns near streams. We found a consistent −1‰ δ15N signature in red alder foliage, and δ15N of total N in soils under red alder averaged 2.2‰ along sampling transects extending 20 m upslope from the stream. Surprisingly, δ15N of total N in soil under Douglas-fir was progressively depleted nearer to streams, opposite from the pattern expected from N losses by denitrification or N inputs from anadromous salmon. Instead, δ15N of total N in soil under Douglas-fir converged toward soil δ15N values typical of red alder sites. We consider that the historic presence of red alder may have contributed a legacy of lower soil δ15N nearer to streams on sites that are currently dominated by young Douglas-fir forest.

  6. Growth and foliar d15N of a Mojave desert shrub in relation to soil hydrological dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar 15N ratios (del15N), % N, and canopy volumes were measured in the two Mojave Desert dominant shrubs, the evergreen Larrea tridentata and drought deciduous Ambrosia dumosa growing across a geomorphically determined soil mosaic. Across three soils with increasingly strong age-dependent surface...

  7. Soil organic matter stability in agricultural land: New insights using δ15N, δ13C and C:N ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yanling; Heiling, Maria; De Clercq, Tim; Resch, Christian; Aigner, Martina; Mayr, Leo; Vanlauwe, Bernard; Thuita, Moses; Steier, Peter; Leifeld, Jens; Merckx, Roel; Spiegel, Heide; Cepuder, Peter; Nguyen, Minh-Long; Zaman, Mohammad; Dercon, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) contains three times more carbon than in the atmosphere or terrestrial vegetation. This major pool of organic carbon is sensitive to climate change, but the mechanisms for carbon stabilization in soils are still not well understood and the ultimate potential for carbon stabilization is unknown. For predicting SOM dynamics, it is necessary to gain information on the turnover rates or stability of different soil organic carbon pools. The common method to determine stability and age of SOM is the 14C radio carbon technique, which is very expensive and therefore limited in use. Conen et al. (2008) developed a model to estimate the SOM stability based on the isotopic discrimination of 15N natural abundance by soil micro-organisms, and the decreasing C:N ratio during organic matter decomposition. This model has been developed for permanent grasslands in the Swiss Alps under steady-state conditions. The objective of our study was to validate whether this model could be used or adapted, in combination with 13C isotope signatures of SOM, to predict the relative age and stability of SOM fractions in more disturbed agricultural ecosystems. The present study was carried out on soils collected from six long-term experimental trials (from 12 to 50 years) under different agricultural management practices (e.g. no tillage vs conventional tillage, and mulch, fertilizer, green or animal manure application), located in Austria, Belgium, Kenya and China. Top and subsoil were sampled until 80-100 cm depth. Particulate organic matter (POM) fraction was obtained by wet sieving (> 63μm) after sonification and density separation (<1.8 g cm-3). Carbon and nitrogen contents and their stable isotopic ratios (i.e. 15N and 13C) were measured in POM and bulk soils. The mineral associated matter fraction (mOM), as the protected carbon, was calculated by difference to the bulk soil organic carbon. The relative age of the SOM was calculated using the Conen model and

  8. Macroalgae δ15N values in well-mixed estuaries: Indicator of anthropogenic nitrogen input or macroalgae metabolism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Guillou, Gaël; Mornet, Françoise; Richard, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Although nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in macroalgae is widely used as a bioindicator of anthropogenic nitrogen inputs to the coastal zone, recent studies suggest the possible role of macroalgae metabolism in δ15N variability. Simultaneous determinations of δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) along the land-sea continuum, inter-species variability of δ15N and its sensitivity to environmental factors are necessary to confirm the efficiency of macroalgae δ15N in monitoring nitrogen origin in mixed-use watersheds. In this study, δ15N of annual and perennial macroalgae (Ulva sp., Enteromorpha sp., Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus) are compared to δ15N-DIN along the Charente Estuary, after characterizing δ15N of the three main DIN sources (i.e. cultivated area, pasture, sewage treatment plant outlet). During late winter and spring, when human activities produce high DIN inputs, DIN sources exhibit distinct δ15N signals in nitrate (NO) and ammonium (NH): cultivated area (+6.5 ± 0.6‰ and +9.0 ± 11.0‰), pasture (+9.2 ± 1.8‰ and +12.4‰) and sewage treatment plant discharge (+16.9 ± 8.7‰ and +25.4 ± 5.9‰). While sources show distinct δN- in this multiple source catchment, the overall mixture of NO sources - generally >95% DIN - leads to low variations of δN-NO at the mouth of the estuary (+7.7 to +8.4‰). Even if estuarine δN-NO values are not significantly different from pristine continental and oceanic site (+7.3‰ and +7.4‰), macroalgae δ15N values are generally higher at the mouth of the estuary. This highlights high anthropogenic DIN inputs in the estuary, and enhanced contribution of 15N-depleted NH in oceanic waters. Although seasonal variations in δN-NO are low, the same temporal trends in macroalgae δ15N values at estuarine and oceanic sites, and inter-species differences in δ15N values, suggest that macroalgae δ15N values might be modified by the metabolic response of macroalgae to environmental parameters (e

  9. Enzymatic synthesis of guanine nucleotides labeled with 15N at the 2-amino group of the purine ring.

    PubMed

    Bouhss, A; Sakamoto, H; Palibroda, N; Chiriac, M; Sarfati, R; Smith, J M; Craescu, C T; Bârzu, O

    1995-02-10

    GMP and dGMP labeled with 15N at the 2-amino group of the purine ring was obtained enzymatically from NH4Cl (> 99 at.% 15N) and from IMP or dIMP, respectively, by several reactions involving IMP-dehydrogenase, GMP-synthetase, adenylate kinase, and creatine kinase. The first three enzymes were obtained by overexpression in Escherichia coli of the corresponding genes. The isotope content of the primary amino group of guanine determined by mass spectrometry after acid hydrolysis of nucleotides was found higher than 98 at.% 15N. The proton NMR spectrum of [15N]GMP in solution in the absence of nitrogen decoupling showed a doublet with a coupling constant of 92 Hz. When nitrogen decoupling was used during the acquisition time, the doublet was replaced by a single peak at 6.47 ppm, indicating that the corresponding proton is bound to 15N. PMID:7778777

  10. A 15N-poor isotopic composition for the solar system as shown by Genesis solar wind samples.

    PubMed

    Marty, B; Chaussidon, M; Wiens, R C; Jurewicz, A J G; Burnett, D S

    2011-06-24

    The Genesis mission sampled solar wind ions to document the elemental and isotopic compositions of the Sun and, by inference, of the protosolar nebula. Nitrogen was a key target element because the extent and origin of its isotopic variations in solar system materials remain unknown. Isotopic analysis of a Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator target material shows that implanted solar wind nitrogen has a (15)N/(14)N ratio of 2.18 ± 0.02 × 10(-3) (that is, ≈40% poorer in (15)N relative to terrestrial atmosphere). The (15)N/(14)N ratio of the protosolar nebula was 2.27 ± 0.03 × 10(-3), which is the lowest (15)N/(14)N ratio known for solar system objects. This result demonstrates the extreme nitrogen isotopic heterogeneity of the nascent solar system and accounts for the (15)N-depleted components observed in solar system reservoirs. PMID:21700869

  11. Allergic to Pool Water

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To identify the allergy problem of a 36-year old swimming instructor, who experiences heavy itching and rashes whenever she comes in contact with pool water. Patch tests were performed with European standard series and materials from the work floor. A positive patch test to aluminum chloride and flocculant was observed. Occupational dermatitis is, based on a contact allergy to aluminum chloride in the flocculant. PMID:22993713

  12. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travelers' Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  13. Effects of Four Different Restoration Treatments on the Natural Abundance of 15N Stable Isotopes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Temperton, Vicky M.; Märtin, Lea L. A.; Röder, Daniela; Lücke, Andreas; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    δ15N signals in plant and soil material integrate over a number of biogeochemical processes related to nitrogen (N) and therefore provide information on net effects of multiple processes on N dynamics. In general little is known in many grassland restoration projects on soil–plant N dynamics in relation to the restoration treatments. In particular, δ15N signals may be a useful tool to assess whether abiotic restoration treatments have produced the desired result. In this study we used the range of abiotic and biotic conditions provided by a restoration experiment to assess to whether the restoration treatments and/or plant functional identity and legume neighborhood affected plant δ15N signals. The restoration treatments consisted of hay transfer and topsoil removal, thus representing increasing restoration effort, from no restoration measures, through biotic manipulation to major abiotic manipulation. We measured δ15N and %N in six different plant species (two non-legumes and four legumes) across the restoration treatments. We found that restoration treatments were clearly reflected in δ15N of the non-legume species, with very depleted δ15N associated with low soil N, and our results suggest this may be linked to uptake of ammonium (rather than nitrate). The two non-legume species differed considerably in their δ15N signals, which may be related to the two species forming different kinds of mycorrhizal symbioses. Plant δ15N signals could clearly separate legumes from non-legumes, but our results did not allow for an assessment of legume neighborhood effects on non-legume δ15N signals. We discuss our results in the light of what the δ15N signals may be telling us about plant–soil N dynamics and their potential value as an indicator for N dynamics in restoration. PMID:22645597

  14. Retrieving nitrogen isotopic signatures from fresh leaf reflectance spectra: disentangling δ15N from biochemical and structural leaf properties

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, Christine; Große-Stoltenberg, André; Lauströ, Verena; Oldeland, Jens; Werner, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Linking remote sensing methodology to stable isotope ecology provides a promising approach to study ecological processes from small to large spatial scales. Here, we show that δ15N can be detected in fresh leaf reflectance spectra of field samples along a spatial gradient of increasing nitrogen input from an N2-fixing invasive species. However, in field data it is unclear whether δ15N directly influences leaf reflectance spectra or if the relationship is based on covariation between δ15N and foliar nitrogen content or other leaf properties. Using a 15N-labeling approach, we experimentally varied δ15N independently of any other leaf properties in three plant species across different leaf developmental and physiological states. δ15N could successfully be modeled by means of partial least squares (PLSs) regressions, using leaf reflectance spectra as predictor variables. PLS models explained 53–73% of the variation in δ15N within species. Several wavelength regions important for predicting δ15N were consistent across species and could furthermore be related to known absorption features of N-containing molecular bonds. By eliminating covariation with other leaf properties as an explanation for the relationship between reflectance and δ15N, our results demonstrate that 15N itself has an inherent effect on leaf reflectance spectra. Thus, our study substantiates the use of spectroscopic measurements to retrieve isotopic signatures for ecological studies and encourages future development. Furthermore, our results highlight the great potential of optical measurements for up-scaling isotope ecology to larger spatial scales. PMID:25983740

  15. Localization of 15N uptake in a Tibetan alpine Kobresia pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleuß, Per-Marten; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    The Kobresia Pygmea ecotone covers approximately 450.000 km2 and is of large global and regional importance due several socio-ecological aspects. For instance Kobresia pastures store high amounts of carbon, nitrogen and other nutrients, represent large grazing areas for herbivores, provide a fast regrowth after grazing events and protect against mechanical degradation and soil erosion. However, Kobresia pastures are assumed to be a grazing induced and are accompanied with distinct root mats varying in thickness between 5-30 cm. Yet, less is known about the morphology and the functions of this root mats, especially in the background of a progressing degradation due to changes of climate and management. Thus we aimed to identify the importance of single soil layers for plant nutrition. Accordingly, nitrogen uptake from different soil depths and its remain in above-ground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB) and soil were determined by using a 15N pulse labeling approach during the vegetation period in summer 2012. 15N urea was injected into six different soil depths (0.5 cm, 2.5 cm, 7.5 cm, 12.5 cm, 17.5 cm, 22.5 cm / for each 4 replicates) and plots were sampled 45 days after the labeling. For soil and BGB samples were taken in strict sample intervals of 0-1 cm, 1-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-15 cm, 15-20 cm, 20-25 cm. Results indicate that total recovery (including AGB, BGB and soil) was highest, if tracer was injected into the top 5 cm and subsequently decreased with decreasing injection depth. This is especially the case for the 15N recovery of BGB, which is clearly attributed to the root density and strongly decreased with soil depth. In contrast, the root activity derived from the 15N content of roots increased with soil depth, which is primary associated to a proportionate increase of living roots related to dead roots. However, most 15N was captured in plant biomass (67.5-85.3 % of total recovery), indicating high 15N uptake efficiency possibly due to N limitation

  16. Black Sea nitrogen cycling and the preservation of phytoplankton δ15N signals during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, James M.; Arthur, Michael A.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2012-06-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of bulk, clay-bound, organic, and compound-specific nitrogen were determined for mid to late Holocene Black Sea sediments from a set of box and gravity cores. The data demonstrate that cyanobacterial N2fixation provided ˜55% of phytoplankton-derived N preserved in the top 1-2 cm of the sediments. Prior to widespread agricultural and industrial development in the catchment, N2fixation was more prominent, providing 70-80% of phytoplankton N. Organic and clay-bound nitrogen fractions record different down-coreδ15N trends that reflect phytoplankton and detrital sources, respectively, and in samples with low organic matter content, the clay-bound fraction comprises up to 38% of bulk nitrogen. Compared with bulk samples, pyropheophytina (Pphe a), which is a chlorophyll a (Chl a) degradation product, provides a more accurate record of changing phytoplankton δ15N values during the Holocene. An examination of the δ15NPphe a values in light of published and new estimates of the isotopic difference between biomass and Chl a suggests that most of the preserved Pphe a was derived from eukaryotic algae, not cyanobacteria. We infer from these data that cyanobacterial biomass is rapidly recycled in the photic zone, with 15N-depleted NH4+ released during heterotrophy and assimilated by other phytoplankton. A conceptual model for N2 fixation in the Black Sea is presented, drawing upon water column nutrient and hydrographic data as well as regional climate variability to explain the proposed temporal variability in N2 fixation.

  17. Nitrate Reduction in a Groundwater Microcosm Determined by 15N Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Göran; Annadotter, Heléne

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic groundwater continuous-flow microcosms were designed to study nitrate reduction by the indigenous bacteria in intact saturated soil cores from a sandy aquifer with a concentration of 3.8 mg of NO3−-N liter−1. Traces of 15NO3− were added to filter-sterilized groundwater by using a Darcy flux of 4 cm day−1. Both assimilatory and dissimilatory reduction rates were estimated from analyses of 15N2, 15N2O, 15NH4+, and 15N-labeled protein amino acids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. N2 and N2O were separated on a megabore fused-silica column and quantified by electron impact-selected ion monitoring. NO3− and NH4+ were analyzed as pentafluorobenzoyl amides by multiple-ion monitoring and protein amino acids as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl ester derivatives by negative ion-chemical ionization. The numbers of bacteria and their [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation rates were simultaneously measured. Nitrate was completely reduced in the microcosms at a rate of about 250 ng g−1 day−1. Of this nitrate, 80 to 90% was converted by aerobic denitrification to N2, whereas only 35% was denitrified in the anaerobic microcosm, where more than 50% of NO3− was reduced to NH4+. Assimilatory reduction was recorded only in the aerobic microcosm, where N appeared in alanine in the cells. The nitrate reduction rates estimated for the aquifer material were low in comparison with rates in eutrophic lakes and coastal sediments but sufficiently high to remove nitrate from an uncontaminated aquifer of the kind examined in less than 1 month. PMID:16348048

  18. Site-Selective Synthesis of (15)N- and (13)C-Enriched Flavin Mononucleotide Coenzyme Isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Neti, Syam Sundar; Poulter, C Dale

    2016-06-17

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is a coenzyme for numerous proteins involved in key cellular and physiological processes. Isotopically labeled flavin is a powerful tool for studying the structure and mechanism of flavoenzyme-catalyzed reactions by a variety of techniques, including NMR, IR, Raman, and mass spectrometry. In this report, we describe the preparation of labeled FMN isotopologues enriched with (15)N and (13)C isotopes at various sites in the pyrazine and pyrimidine rings of the isoalloxazine core of the cofactor from readily available precursors by a five-step chemo-enzymatic synthesis. PMID:27176708

  19. Interaction of thiocyanate with horseradish peroxidase. 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Modi, S; Behere, D V; Mitra, S

    1989-11-25

    Interaction of thiocyanate with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was investigated by relaxation rate measurements (at 50.68 MHz) of the 15N resonance of thiocyanate nitrogen and by following the hyperfine shifted ring methyl proton resonances (at 500 MHz) of the heme group of SCN-.HRP solutions. At pH 4.0, the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for thiocyanate binding to HRP was deduced to be 158 mM from the relaxation rate measurements. Chemical shift changes of 1- and 8-ring methyl proton resonances in the presence of various amounts of thiocyanate at pH 4.0 yielded KD values of 166 and 136 mM, respectively. From the pH dependence of KD and the 15N resonance line width, it was observed that thiocyanate binds to HRP only under acidic conditions (pH less than 6). The binding was found to be facilitated by protonation of an acid group on the enzyme with pKa 4.0. The pH dependence of the 15N line width as well as the apparent dissociation constant were quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a reaction scheme in which thiocyanate in deprotonated ionic form binds to the enzyme in protonated acidic form. The KD for thiocyanate binding to HRP was also evaluated in the presence of an excess of exogenous substrates such as resorcinol, cyanide, and iodide ions. It was found that the presence of cyanide (which binds to heme iron at the sixth coordination position) and resorcinol did not have any effect on the binding of thiocyanate, indicating that the binding site of the thiocyanate ion is located away from the ferric center as well as from the aromatic donor binding site. The KD in the presence of iodide, however, showed that iodide competes with thiocyanate for binding at the same site. The distance of the bound thiocyanate ion from the ferric center was deduced from the 15N relaxation time measurements and was found to be a 6.8 A. From the distance as well as the change in the chemical shifts and line width of 1- and 8-methyl proton resonances, it is suggested that the

  20. Determination of the δ15N of nitrate in solids; RSIL lab code 2894

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2894 is to determine the δ15N of nitrate (NO3-) in solids. The nitrate fraction of the nitrogen species is dissolved by water (called leaching) and can be analyzed by the bacterial method covered in RSIL lab code 2899. After leaching, the δ15N of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  1. Determination of the δ15N of nitrate in water; RSIL lab code 2899

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2899 is to determine the δ15N of nitrate (NO3-) in water. The δ15N of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of the NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  2. Optical Microscopy Characterization for Borehole U-15n#12 in Support of NCNS Source Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jennifer E.; Sussman, Aviva Joy

    2015-05-22

    Optical microscopy characterization of thin sections from corehole U-15n#12 is part of a larger material characterization effort for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). The SPE program was conducted in Nevada with a series of explosive tests designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves inside Stock quartz monzonite. Optical microscopy analysis includes the following: 1) imaging of full thin sections (scans and mosaic maps); 2) high magnification imaging of petrographic texture (grain size, foliations, fractures, etc.); and 3) measurement of microfracture density.

  3. Presence and select determinants of organophosphate flame retardants in public swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Teo, Tiffany L L; Coleman, Heather M; Khan, Stuart J

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of five organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) consisting of tributyl phosphate (TNBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tris(1.3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) in swimming pools were investigated. Fifteen chlorinated public swimming pools were sampled, including indoor pools, outdoor pools and spa pools. The analyses were carried out using isotope dilution gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. All five PFRs were detected in swimming pool waters with concentrations ranging from 5-27ng/L (TNBP), 7-293ng/L (TCEP), 62-1180ng/L (TCIPP), 10-670ng/L (TDCIPP) and 8-132ng/L (TPHP). The concentrations of PFRs were generally higher in indoor swimming pools compared to outdoor swimming pools. In municipal water supplies, used to fill the swimming pools in three of the sampling locations, the five PFRs were all below the limit of quantifications, eliminating this as the source. Potential leaching of PFRs from commonly used swimming equipment, including newly purchased kickboards and swimsuits was investigated. These experiments revealed that PFRs leached from swimsuits, and may be a source of PFRs in swimming pools. A quantitative risk assessment revealed that the health risk to PFRs via swimming pools was generally low and below commonly applied health risk benchmarks. PMID:27355519

  4. Plant and soil natural abundance delta (15)N: indicators of relative rates of nitrogen cycling in temperate forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Templer, Pamela H; Arthur, Mary A; Lovett, Gary M; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2007-08-01

    Watersheds within the Catskill Mountains, New York, receive among the highest rates of nitrogen (N) deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across watersheds within the Catskill Mountains, rates of soil N cycling and N retention vary significantly among stands of different tree species. We examined the potential use of delta (15)N of plants and soils as an indicator of relative forest soil N cycling rates. We analyzed the delta (15)N of foliage, litterfall, bole wood, surface litter layer, fine roots and organic soil from single-species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine root and organic soil delta (15)N values were highest within sugar maple stands, which correlated significantly with higher rates of net mineralization and nitrification. Results from this study suggest that fine root and organic soil delta (15)N can be used as an indicator of relative rates of soil N cycling. Although not statistically significant, delta (15)N was highest within foliage, wood and litterfall of beech stands, a tree species associated with intermediate levels of soil N cycling rates and forest N retention. Our results show that belowground delta (15)N values are a better indicator of relative rates of soil N cycling than are aboveground delta (15)N values. PMID:17479293

  5. Major Sources of Organic Matter in a Complex Coral Reef Lagoon: Identification from Isotopic Signatures (δ13C and δ15N).

    PubMed

    Briand, Marine J; Bonnet, Xavier; Goiran, Claire; Guillou, Gaël; Letourneur, Yves

    2015-01-01

    A wide investigation was conducted into the main organic matter (OM) sources supporting coral reef trophic networks in the lagoon of New Caledonia. Sampling included different reef locations (fringing, intermediate and barrier reef), different associated ecosystems (mangroves and seagrass beds) and rivers. In total, 30 taxa of macrophytes, plus pools of particulate and sedimentary OM (POM and SOM) were sampled. Isotopic signatures (C and N) of each OM sources was characterized and the composition of OM pools assessed. In addition, spatial and seasonal variations of reef OM sources were examined. Mangroves isotopic signatures were the most C-depleted (-30.17 ± 0.41 ‰) and seagrass signatures were the most C-enriched (-4.36 ± 0.72 ‰). Trichodesmium spp. had the most N-depleted signatures (-0.14 ± 0.03 ‰) whereas mangroves had the most N-enriched signatures (6.47 ± 0.41 ‰). The composition of POM and SOM varied along a coast-to-barrier reef gradient. River POM and marine POM contributed equally to coastal POM, whereas marine POM represented 90% of the POM on barrier reefs, compared to 10% river POM. The relative importance of river POM, marine POM and mangroves to the SOM pool decreased from fringing to barrier reefs. Conversely, the relative importance of seagrass, Trichodesmium spp. and macroalgae increased along this gradient. Overall, spatial fluctuations in POM and SOM were much greater than in primary producers. Seasonal fluctuations were low for all OM sources. Our results demonstrated that a large variety of OM sources sustain coral reefs, varying in their origin, composition and role and suggest that δ13C was a more useful fingerprint than δ15N in this endeavour. This study also suggested substantial OM exchanges and trophic connections between coral reefs and surrounding ecosystems. Finally, the importance of accounting for environmental characteristics at small temporal and spatial scales before drawing general patterns is highlighted. PMID

  6. Major Sources of Organic Matter in a Complex Coral Reef Lagoon: Identification from Isotopic Signatures (δ13C and δ15N)

    PubMed Central

    Briand, Marine J.; Bonnet, Xavier; Goiran, Claire; Guillou, Gaël; Letourneur, Yves

    2015-01-01

    A wide investigation was conducted into the main organic matter (OM) sources supporting coral reef trophic networks in the lagoon of New Caledonia. Sampling included different reef locations (fringing, intermediate and barrier reef), different associated ecosystems (mangroves and seagrass beds) and rivers. In total, 30 taxa of macrophytes, plus pools of particulate and sedimentary OM (POM and SOM) were sampled. Isotopic signatures (C and N) of each OM sources was characterized and the composition of OM pools assessed. In addition, spatial and seasonal variations of reef OM sources were examined. Mangroves isotopic signatures were the most C-depleted (-30.17 ± 0.41 ‰) and seagrass signatures were the most C-enriched (-4.36 ± 0.72 ‰). Trichodesmium spp. had the most N-depleted signatures (-0.14 ± 0.03 ‰) whereas mangroves had the most N-enriched signatures (6.47 ± 0.41 ‰). The composition of POM and SOM varied along a coast-to-barrier reef gradient. River POM and marine POM contributed equally to coastal POM, whereas marine POM represented 90% of the POM on barrier reefs, compared to 10% river POM. The relative importance of river POM, marine POM and mangroves to the SOM pool decreased from fringing to barrier reefs. Conversely, the relative importance of seagrass, Trichodesmium spp. and macroalgae increased along this gradient. Overall, spatial fluctuations in POM and SOM were much greater than in primary producers. Seasonal fluctuations were low for all OM sources. Our results demonstrated that a large variety of OM sources sustain coral reefs, varying in their origin, composition and role and suggest that δ13C was a more useful fingerprint than δ15N in this endeavour. This study also suggested substantial OM exchanges and trophic connections between coral reefs and surrounding ecosystems. Finally, the importance of accounting for environmental characteristics at small temporal and spatial scales before drawing general patterns is highlighted. PMID

  7. Estimation of biological nitrogen fixation by black locust in short-rotation forests using natural 15N abundance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veste, M.; Böhm, C.; Quinckenstein, A.; Freese, D.

    2012-04-01

    The importance of short rotation forests and agroforestry systems for woody biomass production for bioenergy will increase in Central Europe within the next decades. In this context, black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) has a high growth potential especially at marginal, drought-susceptible sites such as occur in Brandenburg State (Eastern Germany). As a pioneer tree species black locust grows under a wide range of site conditions. The native range of black locust in Northern America is classified by a humid to sub-humid climate with a mean annual precipitation of 1020 to 1830 mm. In Central and Eastern Europe, this species is cultivated in a more continental climate with an annual precipitation often below 600 mm. Therefore, black locust is known to be relatively drought tolerant compared to other temperate, deciduous tree species. Because of its N2-fixation ability black locust plays generally an important role for the improvement of soil fertility. This effect is of particular interest at marginal sites in the post-mining landscapes. In order to estimate the N2-fixation potential of black locust at marginal sites leaf samples were taken from black locust trees in short rotation plantations planted between 1995 and 2007 in post-mining sites south of Cottbus (Brandenburg, NE Germany). The variation of the natural 15N abundance was measured to evaluate the biological nitrogen fixation. The nitrogen derived from the atmosphere can be calculated using a two-pool model from the quotient of the natural 15N abundances of the N2-fixing plant and the plant available soil N. Because representatively determining the plant available soil N is difficult, a non-N2-fixing reference plant growing at the same site with a similar root system and temporal N uptake pattern to the N2-fixing plant is often used. In our case we used red oak (Quercus rubra) as a reference. The average nitrogen content in the leaves of black locust ranged from 3.1% (C/N 14.8) in 15 years old trees to 3

  8. Stellar Origins of Extremely 13C- and 15N-enriched Presolar SiC Grains: Novae or Supernovae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Nittler, Larry R.; O'D. Alexander, Conel M.; Wang, Jianhua; Pignatari, Marco; José, Jordi; Nguyen, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Extreme excesses of 13C (12C/13C < 10) and 15N (14N/15N < 20) in rare presolar SiC grains have been considered diagnostic of an origin in classical novae, though an origin in core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) has also been proposed. We report C, N, and Si isotope data for 14 submicron- to micron-sized 13C- and 15N-enriched presolar SiC grains (12C/13C < 16 and 14N/15N < ˜100) from Murchison, and their correlated Mg-Al, S, and Ca-Ti isotope data when available. These grains are enriched in 13C and 15N, but with quite diverse Si isotopic signatures. Four grains with 29,30Si excesses similar to those of type C SiC grains likely came from CCSNe, which experienced explosive H burning occurred during explosions. The independent coexistence of proton- and neutron-capture isotopic signatures in these grains strongly supports heterogeneous H ingestion into the He shell in pre-supernovae. Two of the seven putative nova grains with 30Si excesses and 29Si depletions show lower-than-solar 34S/32S ratios that cannot be explained by classical nova nucleosynthetic models. We discuss these signatures within the CCSN scenario. For the remaining five putative nova grains, both nova and supernova origins are viable because explosive H burning in the two stellar sites could result in quite similar proton-capture isotopic signatures. Three of the grains are sub-type AB grains that are also 13C enriched, but have a range of higher 14N/15N. We found that 15N-enriched AB grains (˜50 < 14N/15N < ˜100) have distinctive isotopic signatures compared to putative nova grains, such as higher 14N/15N, lower 26Al/27Al, and lack of 30Si excess, indicating weaker proton-capture nucleosynthetic environments.

  9. Plant community change mediates the response of foliar δ(15)N to CO 2 enrichment in mesic grasslands.

    PubMed

    Polley, H Wayne; Derner, Justin D; Jackson, Robert B; Gill, Richard A; Procter, Andrew C; Fay, Philip A

    2015-06-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may change the isotopic signature of plant N by altering plant and microbial processes involved in the N cycle. CO2 may increase leaf δ(15)N by increasing plant community productivity, C input to soil, and, ultimately, microbial mineralization of old, (15)N-enriched organic matter. We predicted that CO2 would increase aboveground productivity (ANPP; g biomass m(-2)) and foliar δ(15)N values of two grassland communities in Texas, USA: (1) a pasture dominated by a C4 exotic grass, and (2) assemblages of tallgrass prairie species, the latter grown on clay, sandy loam, and silty clay soils. Grasslands were exposed in separate experiments to a pre-industrial to elevated CO2 gradient for 4 years. CO2 stimulated ANPP of pasture and of prairie assemblages on each of the three soils, but increased leaf δ(15)N only for prairie plants on a silty clay. δ(15)N increased linearly as mineral-associated soil C declined on the silty clay. Mineral-associated C declined as ANPP increased. Structural equation modeling indicted that CO2 increased ANPP partly by favoring a tallgrass (Sorghastrum nutans) over a mid-grass species (Bouteloua curtipendula). CO2 may have increased foliar δ(15)N on the silty clay by reducing fractionation during N uptake and assimilation. However, we interpret the soil-specific, δ(15)N-CO2 response as resulting from increased ANPP that stimulated mineralization from recalcitrant organic matter. By contrast, CO2 favored a forb species (Solanum dimidiatum) with higher δ(15)N than the dominant grass (Bothriochloa ischaemum) in pasture. CO2 enrichment changed grassland δ(15)N by shifting species relative abundances. PMID:25604918

  10. Preparation of 13C and 15N labelled RNAs for heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Nikonowicz, E P; Sirr, A; Legault, P; Jucker, F M; Baer, L M; Pardi, A

    1992-09-11

    A procedure is described for the efficient preparation of isotopically enriched RNAs of defined sequence. Uniformly labelled nucleotide 5'triphosphates (NTPs) were prepared from E.coli grown on 13C and/or 15N isotopically enriched media. These procedures routinely yield 180 mumoles of labelled NTPs per gram of 13C enriched glucose. The labelled NTPs were then used to synthesize RNA oligomers by in vitro transcription. Several 13C and/or 15N labelled RNAs have been synthesized for the sequence r(GGCGCUUGCGUC). Under conditions of high salt or low salt, this RNA forms either a symmetrical duplex with two U.U base pairs or a hairpin containing a CUUG loop respectively. These procedures were used to synthesize uniformly labelled RNAs and a RNA labelled only on the G and C residues. The ability to generate milligram quantities of isotopically labelled RNAs allows application of multi-dimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance experiments that enormously simplify the resonance assignment and solution structure determination of RNAs. Examples of several such heteronuclear NMR experiments are shown. PMID:1383927

  11. Automated Protein Turnover Calculations from 15N Partial Metabolic Labeling LC/MS Shotgun Proteomics Data

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, David; Castillejo, Maria Angeles; Staudinger, Christiana; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Egelhofer, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Protein turnover is a well-controlled process in which polypeptides are constantly being degraded and subsequently replaced with newly synthesized copies. Extraction of composite spectral envelopes from complex LC/MS shotgun proteomics data can be a challenging task, due to the inherent complexity of biological samples. With partial metabolic labeling experiments this complexity increases as a result of the emergence of additional isotopic peaks. Automated spectral extraction and subsequent protein turnover calculations enable the analysis of gigabytes of data within minutes, a prerequisite for systems biology high throughput studies. Here we present a fully automated method for protein turnover calculations from shotgun proteomics data. The approach enables the analysis of complex shotgun LC/MS 15N partial metabolic labeling experiments. Spectral envelopes of 1419 peptides can be extracted within an hour. The method quantifies turnover by calculating the Relative Isotope Abundance (RIA), which is defined as the ratio between the intensity sum of all heavy (15N) to the intensity sum of all light (14N) and heavy peaks. To facilitate this process, we have developed a computer program based on our method, which is freely available to download at http://promex.pph.univie.ac.at/protover. PMID:24736476

  12. MUSIC in Triple-Resonance Experiments: Amino Acid Type-Selective 1H- 15N Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Mario; Smalla, Maika; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective 1H-15N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH2 or XH3 (X can be 15N or 13C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains.

  13. MUSIC in triple-resonance experiments: amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations

    PubMed

    Schubert; Smalla; Schmieder; Oschkinat

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH(2) or XH(3) (X can be (15)N or (13)C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10527741

  14. Stereospecific assignments of glycine in proteins by stereospecific deuteration and {sup 15}N labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Curley, R.W. Jr.; Panigot, M.J.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Stereospecific assignments are important for accurately determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins through the use of multidimensional NMR techniques. It is especially important to stereospecifically assign the glycine {alpha}-protons in proteins because of the potential for different backbone conformations of this residue. These stereospecific assignments are critical for interpreting the {sup 3}J{sub NH,{alpha}H} coupling constants and NOEs involving the glycine {alpha}-protons that determine the conformation of this part of the protein. However, it is often difficult to unambiguously obtain the stereospecific assignments for glycine residues by using only NOE data. In this poster, we present a method for unambiguous, stereospecific assignment of the {alpha}-protons of glycine residues. This method involves synthesis of stereo-specifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gly using a slightly modified procedure originally described by Woodard and coworkers for the stereoselective deuteration of glycine. The stereospecifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gy has been incorporated into recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial systems (FKBP) and mammalian cells (u-PA). Two- and three-dimensional isotope-filtered and isotope-edited NMR experiments were used to obtain the stereospecific assignments of the glycine {alpha}-protons for these proteins.

  15. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported. PMID:25451865

  16. Oxygen determination in materials by 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Sunitha, Y.; Reddy, G. L. N.; Sukumar, A. A.; Ramana, J. V.; Sarkar, A.; Verma, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents a proton induced γ-ray emission method based on 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction to determine bulk oxygen in materials. The determination involves the measurement of 5.27 MeV γ-rays emitted following the de-excitation of 15N nuclei. A description of the energetics of the reaction is given to provide an insight into the origin of 5.27 MeV γ-rays. In addition, thick target γ-ray yields and the limits of detection are measured to ascertain the analytical potential of the reaction. The thick-target γ-ray yields are measured with a high purity germanium detector and a bismuth germanate detector at 0° as well as 90° angles in 3.0-4.2 MeV proton energy region. The best limit of detection of about 1.3 at.% is achieved at 4.2 MeV proton energy for measurements at 0° as well 90° angles with the bismuth germanate detector while the uncertainty in quantitative analysis is <8%. The reaction has a probing depth of several tens of microns. Interferences can arise from fluorine due to the occurrence of 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction that emits 6-7 MeV γ-rays. The analytical potential of the methodology is demonstrated by determining oxygen in several oxide as well as non-oxide materials.

  17. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  18. Contribution of 19F resonances on 18O( p, α)15N reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmeslem, Meriem; Chafa, Azzedine; Barhoumi, Slimane; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-08-01

    The 18O( p, α)15N reaction influences the isotopes production such as 19F, 18O, and 15N which can be used to test the models of stellar evolution. 19F is synthesized in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Using R-matrix theory we allow new values of resonances parameters in 19F. We show that the most important contribution to the differential and total cross section at low energies, comes from the levels in 19F situated at resonances energies E R =151, 680 and 840 keV with spin and parity 1/2+. The total width of the 680 keV resonance is badly known. So, we have focused on this broad resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level in 19F. We delimit the temperature range in which each resonance contribution to the total reaction rate occurs by analyzing the ratio ( N A < σν> i / N A < σν>). This allowed us to show that the 680 and 840 keV broad resonances strongly dominate the reaction rate over the stellar temperature range T 9=0.02-0.06 and T 9=0.5-5. Finally, these results were compared to NACRE and Iliadis astrophysical compilations.

  19. The coral δ15N record of terrestrial nitrate loading varies with river catchment land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, A.; Watanabe, T.; Tsunogai, U.; Hasegawa, H.; Yamano, H.

    2015-03-01

    We analysed the nitrogen isotopes in two coral cores (δ15Ncoral) from the mouth of the Todoroki River, Ishigaki Island, Japan, to examine whether the δ15Ncoral reflects the run-off of nitrate related to the land use in the river catchment. The two coral cores were used to examine the seasonal variation in δ15Ncoral for 14 years (CORE1; 1993-2007) and the annual variation of δ15Ncoral for 52 years (CORE2; 1958-2010). In CORE1, the 5-month running mean of δ15Ncoral was positively correlated with that of monthly precipitation, excluding all strong precipitation events (>150 mm d-1). In CORE2, the δ15Ncoral mean in the earlier period (1958-1980) was 1.0 ‰ greater than that in the later period (1981-2010). The annual averages of δ15Ncoral are positively correlated with the total precipitation in the rainy season (May-June) for both time periods. The difference in the δ15Ncoral between the earlier and later periods is probably caused by the land use changed from paddy fields with 15N-rich manure to sugar cane fields in the early 1980s. Although some uncertainties still remain regarding the precision of δ15N coral proxy records, this study emphasises the clear potential for their use in reconstructing terrestrial nitrate discharge records from corals.

  20. Protein synthesis in cancer patients with inflammatory response: investigations with [15N]glycine.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D C; Preston, T; Fearon, K C; Burns, H J; Slater, C; Shenkin, A

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that the increase in amino acid flux and derived protein synthesis rates observed in weight-losing cancer patients may contribute to an ongoing negative energy balance. The mediators and tissues responsible for such apparent increased protein synthesis have not been clearly identified. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between protein synthetic rates in whole-body, skeletal muscle, and circulating cortisol concentrations in healthy subjects (n = 6) and cancer patients with evidence of an inflammatory response (n = 6). Protein synthetic rates were measured with a primed continuous 20-h infusion of [15N]glycine. Skeletal muscle was biopsied at laparotomy. Serum cortisol, resting energy expenditure, plasma proteins, nitrogen metabolites in urine, and skeletal muscle free amino acids were also measured. Derived whole-body and skeletal muscle protein synthetic rates in the cancer group were increased significantly (by 70 and 93%, respectively, p < 0.05). Circulating concentrations of cortisol, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein were also significantly increased in the cancer group and indicated the presence of an inflammatory response. However, there was no significant increase in resting energy expenditure. Mechanisms by which apparent increases in whole-body and skeletal protein synthesis do not result in an increase in resting energy expenditure are discussed. We conclude that glycine utilization is increased in cancer patients but that rates of protein synthesis derived from [15N]glycine kinetics may not be valid in such patients. PMID:7919675

  1. Mammalian DNA δ15N exhibits 40‰ intramolecular variation and is unresponsive to dietary protein level

    PubMed Central

    Strable, Maggie S.; Tschanz, Carolyn L.; Varamini, Behzad; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We report the first high precision characterization of molecular and intramolecular δ15N of nucleosides derived from mammalian DNA. The influence of dietary protein level on brain amino acids and deoxyribonucleosides was determined to investigate whether high protein turnover would alter amino acid 15N or 13C. Pregnant guinea pig dams were fed control diets, or high or low levels of dietary protein throughout gestation, and all pups were fed control diets. Cerebellar DNA of offspring was extracted at 2 and 120 days of life, nucleosides isolated and δ15N and δ13C characterized. Mean diet δ15N = 0.45±0.33‰, compared to cerebellar whole tissue and DNA δ15N = +4.1±0.7‰ and −4.5±0.4‰, respectively. Cerebellar deoxythymidine (dT), deoxycytidine (dC), deoxyadenosine (dA), and deoxyguanosine (dG) δ15N were +1.4±0.4, −2.1±0.9, −7.2±0.3, and −10.4±0.5‰, respectively. There were no changes in amino acid or deoxyribonucleoside δ15N due to dietary protein level. Using known metabolic relationships, we developed equations to calculate the intramolecular δ15N originating from aspartate (asp) in purines (pur) or pyrimidines (pyr), glutamine (glu), and glycine (gly) to be δ15NASP-PUR, δ15NASP-PYR, δ15NGLN, and δ15NGLY +11.9±2.3‰, +7.0±2.0‰, −9.1±2.4‰, and −31.8±8.9‰, respectively. A subset of twelve amino acids from food and brain had mean δ15N of 4.3±3.2‰ and 13.8±3.1‰, respectively, and δ15N for gly and asp were 12.6±2.2‰ and 15.2±0.8‰, respectively. A separate isotope tracer study detected no significant turnover of cerebellar DNA in the first six months of life. The large negative δ15N difference between gly and cerebellar purine N at the gly (7) position implies either that there is a major isotope effect during DNA synthesis, or that in utero gly has a different isotope ratio during rapid growth and metabolism than in adult life. Our data show that cerebellar nucleoside intramolecular δ15N vary over more than

  2. NITROGEN DISTRIBUTION AND 15N IN A 115-YEAR CHRONOSEQUENCE OF OLD-FIELD WHITE PINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regrowing forests of the northeastern US are expected to serve as an important sink for carbon and nitrogen as they recover from extensive clearing and agriculture. We used a chronosequence approach to examine the changes in ecosystem N pools during the first 115 years after agri...

  3. Novel labeling technique illustrates transfer of 15N2 from Sphagnum moss to vascular plants via diazotrophic nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Vile, M. A.; Wieder, R.

    2013-12-01

    We used 15N2 gas to trace nitrogen (N) from biological N2-fixation to vascular plant uptake in an Alberta bog in order to determine if neighboring bog plants acquire recently fixed N from diazotrophs associating with Sphagnum mosses. Recent evidence indicates high rates of N2-fixation in Sphagnum mosses of Alberta bogs (Vile et al. 2013). Our previous work has shown that mosses can assimilate fixed N from associated diazotrophs as evidenced by the high N content of mosses despite minimal inputs from atmospheric deposition, retranslocation, and N mineralization. Therefore, the potential exists for vascular plants to obtain N from ';leaky' tissues of live mosses, however, this phenomenon has not been tested previously. Here we document the potential for relatively rapid transfer to vascular plants of N fixed by Sphagnum moss-associated diazotrophs. We utilized the novel approach of incubating mosses in 15N2 to allow the process of diazotrophic N2-fixation to mechanistically provide the 15N label, which is subsequently transferred to Sphagnum mosses. The potential for vascular bog natives to tap this N was assessed by planting the vascular plants in the labeled moss. Sphagnum mosses (upper 3 cm of live plants) were incubated in the presence of 98 atom % 15N2 gas for 48 hours. Two vascular plants common to Alberta bogs; Picea mariana and Vaccinium oxycoccus were then placed in the labeled mosses, where the mosses served as the substrate. Tissue samples from these plants were collected at three time points during the incubation; prior to 15N2 exposure (to determine natural abundance 15N), and at one and two months after 15N2 exposure. Roots and leaves were separated and run separately on a mass spectrometer to determine 15N concentrations. Sphagnum moss capitula obtained N from N2-fixation (δ15N of -2.43 × 0.40, 122.76 × 23.78, 224.92 × 68.37, 143.74 × 54.38 prior to, immediately after, and at 1 and 2 months after exposure to 15N2, respectively). Nitrogen was

  4. Comparison of bile acid synthesis determined by isotope dilution versus fecal acidic sterol output in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, W.C.; Holloway, D.E.; Hutton, S.W.; Corcoran, P.J.; Haas, N.A.

    1982-05-01

    Fecal acidic sterol output has been found to be much lower than bile acid synthesis determined by isotope dilution. Because of this confusing discrepancy, we compared these 2 measurements done simultaneously on 13 occasions in 5 normal volunteers. In contrast to previous findings, bile acid synthesis by the Lindstedt isotope dilution method averaged 16.3% lower than synthesis simultaneously determined by fecal acidic sterol output (95% confidence limit for the difference - 22.2 to -10.4%). When one-sample determinations of bile acid pools were substituted for Lindstedt pools, bile acid synthesis by isotope dilution averaged 5.6% higher than synthesis by fecal acidic sterol output (95% confidence limits -4.9 to 16.1%). These data indicate that the 2 methods yield values in reasonably close agreement with one another. If anything, fecal acidic sterol outputs are slightly higher than synthesis by isotope dilution.

  5. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  6. Effects of climate on deer bone δ15N and δ13C: Lack of precipitation effects on δ15N for animals consuming low amounts of C 4 plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormie, A. B.; Schwarcz, H. P.

    1996-11-01

    We have examined the relationship of bone collagen δ15N and δ13C to climatic variables, humidity, temperature, and amount of precipitation using fifty-nine specimens of North American white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus) from forty-six different locations. In previous studies of African mammals there was a significant correlation between bone collagen δ15N and local amount of precipitation. Results presented here similarly show an increase in δ15N with decreasing amount of precipitation but only for 25% of the animals, namely those consuming more than 10% C 4 plants. These animals also exhibited a significant correlation between δ13C and temperature which mirrors previous observations for grasses suggesting that these deer consume grasses during times of population and nutrient stress. In contrast, even in dry areas containing high proportions of C 4 grasses, the majority of the deer had consumed low amounts of C 4 plants and these deer did not have δ15N which correlate with amount of precipitation. Only when deer deviated from their normal feeding pattern by consuming C 4 plants or grasses did their δ15N correlate with amount of rainfall. For these animals, consumption of C 4 plants or grasses may signal conditions of water and nutrient stress. An increase in δ15N of bone collagen may result from combined effects from excretion of concentrated urine (to conserve water) and increased internal recycling of nitrogen (to conserve nitrogen).

  7. Synthesis of 7-15N-Oroidin and Evaluation of Utility for Biosynthetic Studies of Pyrrole-Imidazole Alkaloids by Microscale1H-15N HSQC and FTMS†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Gang; Morinaka, Brandon I.; Reyes, Jeremy Chris P.; Wolff, Jeremy H.; Romo, Daniel; Molinski, Tadeusz F.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous marine-derived pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids (PIAs), ostensibly derived from the simple precursor oroidin, 1a, have been reported and have garnered intense synthetic interest due to their complex structures and in some cases biological activity; however very little is known regarding their biosynthesis. We describe a concise synthesis of 7-15N-oroidin (1d) from urocanic acid and a direct method for measurement of 15N incorporation by pulse labeling and analysis by 1D 1H-15N HSQC NMR and FTMS. Using a mock pulse labeling experiment, we estimate the limit of detection (LOD) for incorporation of newly biosynthesized PIA by 1D 1H-15N HSQC to be 0.96 μg equivalent of 15N oroidin (2.4 nmole) in a background of 1500 μg unlabeled oroidin (about 1 part per 1600). 7-15N-Oroidin will find utility in biosynthetic feeding experiments with live sponges to provide direct information to clarify the pathways leading to more complex pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids. PMID:20095632

  8. Paleoenvironmental implications of taxonomic variation among δ15N values of chloropigments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, Meytal B.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Robinson, Rebecca S.; Qin, Yelun; Saito, Mark A.; Pearson, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Natural variations in the ratios of nitrogen isotopes in biomass reflect variations in nutrient sources utilized for growth. In order to use δ15N values of chloropigments of photosynthetic organisms to determine the corresponding δ15N values of biomass – and by extension, surface waters – the isotopic offset between chlorophyll and biomass must be constrained. Here we examine this offset in various geologically-relevant taxa, grown using nutrient sources that may approximate ocean conditions at different times in Earth’s history. Phytoplankton in this study include cyanobacteria (diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic), eukaryotic algae (red and green), and anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (Proteobacteria), as well as environmental samples from sulfidic lake water. Cultures were grown using N2, NO3−, and NH4+ as nitrogen sources, and were examined under different light regimes and growth conditions. We find surprisingly high variability in the isotopic difference (δ15Nbiomass − δ15Nchloropigment) for prokaryotes, with average values for species ranging from −12.2‰ to +11.7‰. We define this difference as εpor, a term that encompasses diagenetic porphyrins and chlorins, as well as chlorophyll. Negative values of εpor reflect chloropigments that are 15N-enriched relative to biomass. Notably, this enrichment appears to occur only in cyanobacteria. The average value of εpor for freshwater cyanobacterial species is −9.8 ± 1.8‰, while for marine cyanobacteria it is −0.9 ± 1.3‰. These isotopic effects group environmentally but not phylogenetically, e.g., εpor values for freshwater Chroococcales resemble those of freshwater Nostocales but differ from those of marine Chroococcales. Our measured values of εpor for eukaryotic algae (range = 4.7–8.7‰) are similar to previous reports for pure cultures. For all taxa studied, values of εpor do not depend on the type of nitrogen substrate used for growth. The observed

  9. Sample Artefacts in δ15N and δ18O of Nitrate in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, A.; Norman, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrate is one of the major inorganic anions in aerosols. Recently nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in nitrates have been used to trace sources and chemical processes in the atmosphere. High volume samplers are used in order to gain enough material for isotope analysis, but artefacts can occur when measuring with this technique. Besides retaining NO3 from aerosol, gaseous HNO3 can be absorbed on the filter increasing the reported values of nitrate reported. Alternatively; when elevated temperatures are present in the atmosphere, nitrate is volatized in the form of NH3NO3 which would lead to an underestimation of nitrogen on the filter [Schaap et al., 2004]. The artefacts from high volume sampling may cause inaccuracies in the reported isotope values due to isotope fractionation or different initial isotope values between gaseous HNO3 and particulate nitrate. High volume samplers were deployed on board a ship in the summer of 2003 jointly with the Canadian Surface Ocean - Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS). A quartz filter was positioned on a high volume sampler. A cellulose acetate filter treated with potassium carbonate and glycerol was placed underneath the quartz filter. The cellulose acetate filter is designed to catch sticky gaseous (such as SO2) but was also found to catch a nitrogen gas species (most probable HNO3 and/or NH3NO3). Analysis of isotopic composition of nitrate for both nitrogen and oxygen was carried out on selected samples by the denitrifier method. Values ranged between -4 and +1‰ for δ15N and between +49 and +66‰ for δ18O for quartz filter. The nitrogen gas species had ranges between -11 and -0‰ for δ15N and between +44 and +62‰ for δ18O. Average differences between the aerosol (caught on the quartz filter) and the nitrogen gas species (on the cellulose acetate filter) were 3±4 ‰ for δ15N and 10±7 ‰ for δ18O. These values are examined to find insights in possible fractionation in the nitrate collection method currently used in

  10. Rapid and accurate calculation of protein 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Neal, Stephen; Nip, Alex M; Zhang, Haiyan; Wishart, David S

    2003-07-01

    A computer program (SHIFTX) is described which rapidly and accurately calculates the diamagnetic 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts of both backbone and sidechain atoms in proteins. The program uses a hybrid predictive approach that employs pre-calculated, empirically derived chemical shift hypersurfaces in combination with classical or semi-classical equations (for ring current, electric field, hydrogen bond and solvent effects) to calculate 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts from atomic coordinates. The chemical shift hypersurfaces capture dihedral angle, sidechain orientation, secondary structure and nearest neighbor effects that cannot easily be translated to analytical formulae or predicted via classical means. The chemical shift hypersurfaces were generated using a database of IUPAC-referenced protein chemical shifts--RefDB (Zhang et al., 2003), and a corresponding set of high resolution (<2.1 A) X-ray structures. Data mining techniques were used to extract the largest pairwise contributors (from a list of approximately 20 derived geometric, sequential and structural parameters) to generate the necessary hypersurfaces. SHIFTX is rapid (<1 CPU second for a complete shift calculation of 100 residues) and accurate. Overall, the program was able to attain a correlation coefficient (r) between observed and calculated shifts of 0.911 (1Halpha), 0.980 (13Calpha), 0.996 (13Cbeta), 0.863 (13CO), 0.909 (15N), 0.741 (1HN), and 0.907 (sidechain 1H) with RMS errors of 0.23, 0.98, 1.10, 1.16, 2.43, 0.49, and 0.30 ppm, respectively on test data sets. We further show that the agreement between observed and SHIFTX calculated chemical shifts can be an extremely sensitive measure of the quality of protein structures. Our results suggest that if NMR-derived structures could be refined using heteronuclear chemical shifts calculated by SHIFTX, their precision could approach that of the highest resolution X-ray structures. SHIFTX is freely available as a web server at http

  11. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using 15N isotopic tracer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct 15N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the 15N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. 15N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. 15N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  12. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using {sup 15}N isotopic tracer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-09-25

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct {sup 15}N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the {sup 15}N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. {sup 15}N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. {sup 15}N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  13. Variations of soil δ13C and δ15N across a precipitation gradient in a savanna ecosystem: Implications of climate change on the carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dintwe, K.; Gilhooly, W., III; Wang, L.; O'Donnell, F. C.; Bhattachan, A.; D'Odorico, P.; Okin, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Savannas are the third largest terrestrial carbon pool after only tropical and borealforests. They are highly productive ecosystems and contribute about 30% of the globalterrestrial net primary productivity and potentially contain 20% of the world's soilorganic carbon. Global circulation models have predicted that many savannas willbecome warmer and drier during the twenty-first century. The impacts of the projectedclimatic trend on the productivity and biogeochemical cycles of savannas are not fullyunderstood. Here, we assessed the abundance of stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N)isotopes in soil profiles at four sites along a 1000 km transect with a strong south-northprecipitation gradient in southern Africa. The south receives about 180 mm of rainfall peryear and dominated by grass species (C4) whereas the north receives 540 mm·yr-1 anddominated by woody plants (C3). Soil surface δ13C showed that woody vegetation contributedmore than 75% of soil carbon input in the wet sites whereas grasses contributed about65% of soil carbon input in the dry sites. The soil profile δ13C indicated that intermediatesites have shifted from grass dominated to woody-shrub-dominated statesduring recent past. The dry sites had relatively higher δ15N (~10‰) compared to the wetsites (~5‰) indicating significantly greater N2 fixation in the wetter sites or high rates ofNH3 volatilization in the drier sites. Our results suggest that as savannas become warmerand drier due to climate change, woody shrubs are likely to be the dominant form ofvegetation structure, a process that could alter biogeochemical processes and results insavannas becoming net carbon sink or source.

  14. Nitrogen limitation, 15N tracer retention, and growth response in intact and Bromus tectorum-invaded Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witwicki, Dana L.; Doescher, Paul S.; Pyke, David A.; DeCrappeo, Nicole M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    Annual grass invasion into shrub-dominated ecosystems is associated with changes in nutrient cycling that may alter nitrogen (N) limitation and retention. Carbon (C) applications that reduce plant-available N have been suggested to give native perennial vegetation a competitive advantage over exotic annual grasses, but plant community and N retention responses to C addition remain poorly understood in these ecosystems. The main objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the degree of N limitation of plant biomass in intact versus B. tectorum-invaded sagebrush communities, (2) determine if plant N limitation patterns are reflected in the strength of tracer 15N retention over two growing seasons, and (3) assess if the strength of plant N limitation predicts the efficacy of carbon additions intended to reduce soil N availability and plant growth. Labile C additions reduced biomass of exotic annual species; however, growth of native A. tridentata shrubs also declined. Exotic annual and native perennial plant communities had divergent responses to added N, with B. tectorum displaying greater ability to use added N to rapidly increase aboveground biomass, and native perennials increasing their tissue N concentration but showing little growth response. Few differences in N pools between the annual and native communities were detected. In contrast to expectations, however, more 15N was retained over two growing seasons in the invaded annual grass than in the native shrub community. Our data suggest that N cycling in converted exotic annual grasslands of the northern Intermountain West, USA, may retain N more strongly than previously thought.

  15. Species specific and environment induced variation of δ13C and δ15N in alpine plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Körner, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signals in plant tissues integrate plant-environment interactions over long periods. In this study, we hypothesized that humid alpine life conditions are narrowing the scope for significant deviations from common carbon, water and nitrogen relations as captured by stable isotope signals. We explored the variation in δ13C and δ15N in 32 plant species from tissue type to ecosystem scale across a suite of locations at c. Two thousand five hundred meter elevation in the Swiss Alps. Foliar δ13C and δ15N varied among species by about 3–4‰ and 7–8‰ respectively. However, there was no overall difference in means of δ13C and δ15N for species sampled in different plant communities or when bulk plant dry matter harvests of different plant communities were compared. δ13C was found to be highly species specific, so that the ranking among species was mostly maintained across 11 habitats. However, δ15N varied significantly from place to place in all species (a range of 2.7‰) except in Fabaceae (Trifolium alpinum) and Juncaceae (Luzula lutea). There was also a substantial variation among individuals of the same species collected next to each other. No difference was found in foliar δ15N of non-legumes, which were either collected next to or away from the most common legume, T. alpinum. δ15N data place Cyperaceae and Juncaceae, just like Fabaceae, in a low discrimination category, well separated from other families. Soil δ15N was higher than in plants and increased with soil depth. The results indicate a high functional diversity in alpine plants that is similar to that reported for low elevation plants. We conclude that the surprisingly high variation in δ13C and δ15N signals in the studied high elevation plants is largely species specific (genetic) and insensitive to obvious environmental cues. PMID:26097487

  16. /sup 15/N and /sup 13/C NMR determination of methionine metabolism in developing soybean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, G.T. III; Garbow, J.R.; Schaefer, J.

    1987-03-01

    The metabolism of D- and L-methionine by immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max, L. cv Elf) grown in culture has been investigated using solid-state /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance. D-Methionine is taken up by the cotyledons and converted to an amide, most likely by N-malonylation. About 16% of the L-methionine taken up is incorporated intact into protein, and 25% remains as soluble methionine. Almost two-thirds of the L-methionine that enters the cotyledons is degraded. The largest percentage of this is used in transmethylation of the carboxyl groups of pectin. Methionine is not extensively converted to polyamines. The authors attribute the stimulation of growth of the cotyledons by exogenous methionine to the bypassing of a rate-limiting methyl-transfer step in the synthesis of methionine itself, and subsequently of pectins and proteins.

  17. (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR studies on albendazole and cyclodextrin albendazole complexes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M João G; García, A; Leonardi, D; Salomon, Claudio J; Lamas, M Celina; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-06-01

    (13)C and (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were recorded from albendazole (ABZ) and from ABZ:β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:methyl-β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and ABZ:citrate-β-cyclodextrin, which were prepared by the spray-drying technique. ABZ signals were typical of a crystalline solid for the pure drug and of an amorphous compound obtained from ABZ:cyclodextrin samples. Relevant spectral differences were correlated with chemical interaction between ABZ and cyclodextrins. The number and type of complexes revealed a strong dependence on the cyclodextrin group substituent. Solid-state NMR data were consistent with the presence of stable inclusion complexes. PMID:25843843

  18. Creating 13C- and 15N-enriched tree leaf litter for decomposition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlavecz, K. A.; Pitz, S.; Chang, C.; Bernard, M.

    2013-12-01

    Labeling plant material with heavy isotopes of carbon and nitrogen can produce a traceable nutrient signal that can be followed into the different trophic levels and decomposer food web. We treated 60 tree saplings with 13C-enriched CO2 gas and 15N-enriched ammonium nitrate over a three-month period to create dually-labeled plant material for future decomposition experiments. The trees included both early (Red maple, Sweetgum, Tulip poplar) and late (American beech, White oak) successional deciduous tree species, and a conifer, White pine. We constructed a 2.4 m × 2.4 m × 2.4 m environmental chamber that was climate-controlled using an air conditioning system. An Arduino microcontroller interfaced with a Vaisala GMP343 CO2 probe maintained a CO2 concentration between 500-520 ppm by controlling a solenoid valve on the CO2 tank regulator. The trees were placed into the chamber in August 2012 and remained until senescence unless they were lost to death or disease. Ammonium nitrate was added twice, in September and October. Leaf samples were collected prior to the start of the experiment and after senescence, whereas root samples were collected only in December. Samples were dried, ground and analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. American beech and White oak had 40% mortality, and 34% of tulip poplar trees were removed because of powdery mildew overgrowth or death. Most tulip poplar trees exhibited a second leaf out following senescence in late September. Nearly 1 kg of litter was produced with tulip poplar representing over half of the total mass. Levels of enrichment varied greatly by species. Beech (-14.2‰) and White oak (-4.8‰) had low levels of enrichment in comparison to early successional species such as Sweetgum (41.7‰) and Tulip poplar (30.7‰ [first leaf fall] and 238.0‰ [second leaf fall]). Leaf enrichment with 15N followed a similar pattern, though it was achieved at a higher level with δ15N values varying from 271.6‰ to 1354.2

  19. Determination of 15N/14N and 13C/12C in Solid and Aqueous Cyanides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of nitrogen and carbon in cyanide compounds can be determined by combusting aliquots in sealed tubes to form N2 gas and CO2 gas and analyzing the gases by mass spectrometry. Free cyanide (CN-aq + HCNaq) in simple solutions can also be analyzed by first precipitating the cyanide as copper(II) ferrocyanide and then combusting the precipitate. Reproducibility is ??0.5??? or better for both ??15N and ??13C. If empirical corrections are made on the basis of carbon yields, the reproducibility of ??13C can be improved to ??0.2???. The analytical methods described herein are sufficiently accurate and precise to apply stable isotope techniques to problems of cyanide degradation in natural waters and industrial process solutions.

  20. A 115-year δ15N record of cumulative nitrogen pollution in California serpentine grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallano, D.; Zavaleta, E. S.

    2010-12-01

    Until the 1980s, California’s biodiverse serpentine grasslands were threatened primarily by development and protected by reserve creation. However, nitrogen (N) fertilization due to increasing fossil fuel emissions in the expanding Bay Area is thought to be contributing to rapid, recent invasion of these ecosystems by exotic annual grasses that are displacing rare and endemic serpentine species. Documenting the cumulative effects of N deposition in this ecosystem can direct policy and management actions to mitigate the role of N deposition in its transformation. Natural abundance stable isotopes of N in vegetation have been increasingly used as bio-indicators of N deposition patterns and subsequent changes to plant N cycling and assimilation. However, the long-term record of atmospheric reactive N enrichment and the resulting changes in ecosystem N dynamics have yet to be adequately reconstructed in many ecosystems. Museum archives of vascular plant tissue are valuable sources of materials to reconstruct temporal and spatial isotopic patterns of N inputs to ecosystems. Here, we present N stable isotope data from archived and current specimens of an endemic California serpentine grassland species, leather oak (Quercus durata), since 1895 across the greater San Francisco Bay region. We measured spatial and temporal trends in stable isotope composition (δ15N and δ13C) and concentration (%N and %C) of historical and current samples of leather oak leaves from sites within the Bay Area, impacted by increasing development, and sites northeast of the Bay Area, with significantly lower rates of urbanization and industrialization. Specifically, we sampled dry museum and fresh leaf specimens from serpentine sites within Lake (n=27) and Santa Clara (n=30) counties dating from 1895 to 2010. Leaf δ15N values were stable from 1895 to the 1950s and then decreased strongly throughout the last 50 years as fossil fuel emissions rapidly increased in the Bay Area, indicating that

  1. Using dual-bacterial denitrification to improve δ15N determinations of nitrates containing mass-independent 17O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Casciotti, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterial denitrification method for isotopic analysis of nitrate using N2O generated from Pseudomonas aureofaciens may overestimate ??15N values by as much as 1-2??? for samples containing atmospheric nitrate because of mass-independent 17O variations in such samples. By analyzing such samples for ??15N and ??18O using the denitrifier Pseudomonas chlororaphis, one obtains nearly correct ??15N values because oxygen in N 2O generated by P. chlororaphis is primarily derived from H 2O. The difference between the apparent ??15N value determined with P. aureofaciens and that determined with P. chlororaphis, assuming mass-dependent oxygen isotopic fractionation, reflects the amount of mass-independent 17O in a nitrate sample. By interspersing nitrate isotopic reference materials having substantially different ?? 18O values with samples, one can normalize oxygen isotope ratios and determine the fractions of oxygen in N2O derived from the nitrate and from water with each denitrifier. This information can be used to improve ??15N values of nitrates having excess 17O. The same analyses also yield estimates of the magnitude of 17O excess in the nitrate (expressed as ??17O) that may be useful in some environmental studies. The 1-?? uncertainties of ??15N, ??18O and ??17O measurements are ??0.2, ??0.3 and ??5???, respectively. Copyright ?? 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Investigating patterns of symbiotic nitrogen fixation during vegetation change from grassland to woodland using fine scale δ(15) N measurements.

    PubMed

    Soper, Fiona M; Boutton, Thomas W; Sparks, Jed P

    2015-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in woody plants is often investigated using foliar measurements of δ(15) N and is of particular interest in ecosystems experiencing increases in BNF due to woody plant encroachment. We sampled δ(15) N along the entire N uptake pathway including soil solution, xylem sap and foliage to (1) test assumptions inherent to the use of foliar δ(15) N as a proxy for BNF; (2) determine whether seasonal divergences occur between δ(15) Nxylem sap and δ(15) Nsoil inorganic N that could be used to infer variation in BNF; and (3) assess patterns of δ(15) N with tree age as indicators of shifting BNF or N cycling. Measurements of woody N-fixing Prosopis glandulosa and paired reference non-fixing Zanthoxylum fagara at three seasonal time points showed that δ(15) Nsoil inorganic N varied temporally and spatially between species. Fractionation between xylem and foliar δ(15) N was consistently opposite in direction between species and varied on average by 2.4‰. Accounting for these sources of variation caused percent nitrogen derived from fixation values for Prosopis to vary by up to ∼70%. Soil-xylem δ(15) N separation varied temporally and increased with Prosopis age, suggesting seasonal variation in N cycling and BNF and potential long-term increases in BNF not apparent through foliar sampling alone. PMID:24890575

  3. Afforestation impacts microbial biomass and its natural (13)C and (15)N abundance in soil aggregates in central China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-10-15

    We investigated soil microbial biomass and its natural abundance of δ(13)C and δ(15)N in aggregates (>2000μm, 250-2000μm, 53-250μm and <53μm) of afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) soils, adjacent croplands and open area (i.e., control) in the Danjiangkou Reservoir area of central China. The afforested soils averaged higher microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) levels in all aggregates than in open area and cropland, with higher microbial biomass in micro-aggregates (<250μm) than in macro-aggregates (>2000μm). The δ(13)C of soil microbial biomass was more enriched in woodland soils than in other land use types, while δ(15)N of soil microbial biomass was more enriched compared with that of organic soil in all land use types. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N of microbial biomass were positively correlated with the δ(13)C and δ(15)N of organic soil across aggregates and land use types, whereas the (13)C and (15)N enrichment of microbial biomass exhibited linear decreases with the corresponding C:N ratio of organic soil. Our results suggest that shifts in the natural (13)C and (15)N abundance of microbial biomass reflect changes in the stabilization and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby imply that afforestation can greatly impact SOM accumulation over the long-term. PMID:27285796

  4. Lineshape-based polarimetry of dynamically-polarized 15N2O in solid-state mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Håkansson, P.; Pourfathi, M.; Ghosh, R. K.; Kara, H.; Kadlecek, S. J.; Pileio, G.; Levitt, M. H.; Rizi, R. R.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of 15N2O, known for its long-lived singlet-state order at low magnetic field, is demonstrated in organic solvent/trityl mixtures at ∼1.5 K and 5 T. Both 15N polarization and intermolecular dipolar broadening are strongly affected by the sample's thermal history, indicating spontaneous formation of N2O clusters. In situ 15N NMR reveals four distinct powder-pattern spectra, attributed to the chemical-shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors of the two 15N nuclei, further split by the intramolecular dipolar coupling between their magnetic moments. 15N polarization is estimated by fitting the free-induction decay (FID) signals to the analytical model of four single-quantum transitions. This analysis implies (10.2±2.2)% polarization after 37 h of DNP, and provides a direct, instantaneous probe of the absolute 15N polarization, without a need for time-consuming referencing to a thermal-equilibrium NMR signal.

  5. Regional, seasonal and interspecific variation in 15N and 13C in sympatric mouse lemurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotondranary, S. Jacques; Struck, Ulrich; Knoblauch, Christian; Ganzhorn, Jörg U.

    2011-11-01

    Madagascar provides some of the rare examples where two or more primate species of the same genus and with seemingly identical niche requirements occur in sympatry. If congeneric primate species co-occur in other parts of the world, they differ in size in a way that is consistent with Hutchinson's rule for coexisting species, or they occupy different ecological niches. In some areas of Madagascar, mouse lemurs do not follow these "rules" and thus seem to violate one of the principles of community ecology. In order to understand the mechanisms that allow coexistence of sympatric congeneric species without obvious niche differentiation, we studied food composition of two identical sized omnivorous mouse lemur species, Microcebus griseorufus and M. murinus with the help of stable isotope analyses ( δ 15N and δ 13C). The two species are closely related sister species. During the rich season, when food seems abundant, the two species do not differ in their nitrogen isotope composition, indicating that the two species occupy the same trophic level. But they differ in their δ 13C values, indicating that M. griseorufus feeds more on C4 and CAM (Crassulacean-acid-metabolism) plants than M. murinus. During the lean season, M. murinus has lower δ 15N values, indicating that the two species feed at different trophic levels during times of food shortage. Hybrids between the two species showed intermediate food composition. The results reflect subtle differences in foraging or metabolic adaptations that are difficult to quantify by traditional observations but that represent possibilities to allow coexistence of species.

  6. Intraskeletal isotopic compositions (δ(13) C, δ(15) N) of bone collagen: nonpathological and pathological variation.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Karyn C; White, Christine D; Longstaffe, Fred J; von Heyking, Kristin; McGlynn, George; Grupe, Gisela; Rühli, Frank J

    2014-04-01

    Paleodiet research traditionally interprets differences in collagen isotopic compositions (δ(13) C, δ(15) N) as indicators of dietary distinction even though physiological processes likely play some role in creating variation. This research investigates the degree to which bone collagen δ(13) C and δ(15) N values normally vary within the skeleton and examines the influence of several diseases common to ancient populations on these isotopic compositions. The samples derive from two medieval German cemeteries and one Swiss reference collection and include examples of metabolic disease (rickets/osteomalacia), degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis), trauma (fracture), infection (osteomyelitis), and inflammation (periostitis). A separate subset of visibly nonpathological skeletal elements from the German collections established normal intraindividual variation. For each disease type, tests compared bone lesion samples to those near and distant to the lesions sites. Results show that normal (nonpathological) skeletons exhibit limited intraskeletal variation in carbon- and nitrogen-isotope ratios, suggesting that sampling of distinct elements is appropriate for paleodiet studies. In contrast, individuals with osteomyelitis, healed fractures, and osteoarthritis exhibit significant intraskeletal differences in isotope values, depending on whether one is comparing lesions to near or to distant sites. Skeletons with periostitis result in significant intraskeletal differences in nitrogen isotope values only, while those with rickets/osteomalacia do not exhibit significant intraskeletal differences. Based on these results, we suggest that paleodiet researchers avoid sampling collagen at or close to lesion sites because the isotope values may be reflecting both altered metabolic processes and differences in diet relative to others in the population. PMID:24374993

  7. δ15N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, S.S.; Sinkhorn, E.R.; Compton, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Biogeochemical theory emphasizes nitrogen (N) limitation and the many factors that can restrict N accumulation in temperate forests, yet lacks a working model of conditions that can promote naturally high N accumulation. We used a dynamic simulation model of ecosystem N and δ15N to evaluate which combination of N input and loss pathways could produce a range of high ecosystem N contents characteristic of forests in the Oregon Coast Range. Total ecosystem N at nine study sites ranged from 8,788 to 22,667 kg ha−1 and carbon (C) ranged from 188 to 460 Mg ha−1, with highest values near the coast. Ecosystem δ15N displayed a curvilinear relationship with ecosystem N content, and largely reflected mineral soil, which accounted for 96–98% of total ecosystem N. Model simulations of ecosystem N balances parameterized with field rates of N leaching required long-term average N inputs that exceed atmospheric deposition and asymbiotic and epiphytic N2-fixation, and that were consistent with cycles of post-fire N2-fixation by early-successional red alder. Soil water δ15NO3 − patterns suggested a shift in relative N losses from denitrification to nitrate leaching as N accumulated, and simulations identified nitrate leaching as the primary N loss pathway that constrains maximum N accumulation. Whereas current theory emphasizes constraints on biological N2-fixation and disturbance-mediated N losses as factors that limit N accumulation in temperate forests, our results suggest that wildfire can foster substantial long-term N accumulation in ecosystems that are colonized by symbiotic N2-fixing vegetation.

  8. Backbone dynamics of the oligomerization domain of p53 determined from 15N NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Omichinski, J G; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1995-05-01

    The backbone dynamics of the tetrameric p53 oligomerization domain (residues 319-360) have been investigated by two-dimensional inverse detected heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy at 500 and 600 MHz. 15N T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOEs were measured for 39 of 40 non-proline backbone NH vectors at both field strengths. The overall correlation time for the tetramer, calculated from the T1/T2 ratios, was found to be 14.8 ns at 35 degrees C. The correlation times and amplitudes of the internal motions were extracted from the relaxation data using the model-free formalism (Lipari G, Szabo A, 1982, J Am Chem Soc 104:4546-4559). The internal dynamics of the structural core of the p53 oligomerization domain are uniform and fairly rigid, with residues 327-354 exhibiting an average generalized order parameter (S2) of 0.88 +/- 0.08. The N- and C-termini exhibit substantial mobility and are unstructured in the solution structure of p53. Residues located at the N- and C-termini, in the beta-sheet, in the turn between the alpha-helix and beta-sheet, and at the C-terminal end of the alpha-helix display two distinct internal motions that are faster than the overall correlation time. Fast internal motions (< or = 20 ps) are within the extreme narrowing limit and are of uniform amplitude. The slower motions (0.6-2.2 ns) are outside the extreme narrowing limit and vary in amplitude.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663341

  9. A pipeline for 15N metabolic labeling and phosphoproteome analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, Benjamin B; Burch, Heather L; Sussman, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Within the past two decades, the biological application of mass spectrometric technology has seen great advances in terms of innovations in hardware, software, and reagents. Concurrently, the burgeoning field of proteomics has followed closely (Yates et al., Annu Rev Biomed Eng 11:49-79, 2009)-and with it, importantly, the ability to globally assay altered levels of posttranslational modifications in response to a variety of stimuli. Though many posttranslational modifications have been described, a major focus of these efforts has been protein-level phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues (Schreiber et al., Proteomics 8:4416-4432, 2008). The desire to examine changes across signal transduction cascades and networks in their entirety using a single mass spectrometric analysis accounts for this push-namely, preservation and enrichment of the transient yet informative phosphoryl side group. Analyzing global changes in phosphorylation allows inferences surrounding cascades/networks as a whole to be made. Towards this same end, much work has explored ways to permit quantitation and combine experimental samples such that more than one replicate or experimental condition can be identically processed and analyzed, cutting down on experimental and instrument variability, in addition to instrument run time. One such technique that has emerged is metabolic labeling (Gouw et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 9:11-24, 2010), wherein biological samples are labeled in living cells with nonradioactive heavy isotopes such as (15)N or (13)C. Since metabolic labeling in living organisms allows one to combine the material to be processed at the earliest possible step, before the tissue is homogenized, it provides a unique and excellent method for comparing experimental samples in a high-throughput, reproducible fashion with minimal technical variability. This chapter describes a pipeline used for labeling living Arabidopsis thaliana plants with nitrogen-15 ((15)N) and how

  10. Search for d3/2 single particle strength in 15N in Unbound Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertin, C. E.; Caussyn, D. D.; Crisp, A. M.; Keeley, N.; Kemper, K. W.; Momotyuk, O.; Roeder, B. T.; Volya, A.

    2013-10-01

    The population of states in the nucleus 15N provides the opportunity to investigate both single particle and cluster structures in the 1p and 2s1d shells. Single, two, three and four particle transfer reactions selectively excite states in 15N thus providing a way to explore current nuclear structure models. Narrow structures are observed in the various transfer reactions up to at least 20 MeV in excitation well above the neutron (10.8 MeV) and proton (10.2 MeV) separation energies. In the present work new results for the reaction 14N(d,p) are presented that explore possible single particle strengths up to 18 MeV in excitation. The beam energies used in the present work were between 10.5 and 16 MeV. An early work with a beam energy of 8 MeV clearly populated strong sharp levels at 10.07 and 11.23 MeV and the present work confirms their existence. In addition, very weak broader levels are populated at 12.13 and 12.5 MeV but no other structures are found experimentally at higher excitation energies. The results of shell model calculations that include the 1p and 2s1d shells will be presented. The centroid energies for the 1d5/2 and 2s1/2 single particle strength have been obtained through comparison with FRESCO calculations. This work was supported by the NSF, DOE and Florida State University.

  11. MILLIMETER-WAVE OBSERVATIONS OF CN AND HNC AND THEIR {sup 15}N ISOTOPOLOGUES: A NEW EVALUATION OF THE {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N RATIO ACROSS THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Adande, G. R.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    The N = 1 {yields} 0 transitions of CN and C{sup 15}N (X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}), as well as the J = 1 {yields} 0 lines of HN{sup 13}C and H{sup 15}NC, have been observed toward 11 molecular clouds using the new 3 mm ALMA-type receiver of the 12 m telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory. These sources span a wide range of distances from the Galactic center and are all regions of star formation. From these observations, {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios have been determined using two independent methods. First, the measurements of C{sup 14}N and C{sup 15}N were directly compared to establish this ratio, correcting for high opacities when needed, as indicated by the nitrogen hyperfine intensities. Second, the ratio was calculated from the quantity [HN{sup 13}C]/[H{sup 15}NC], determined from the HNC data, and then scaled by {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios previously established, i.e., the so-called double isotope method. Values from both methods are in reasonable agreement, and fall in the range {approx}120-400, somewhat lower than previous {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios derived from HCN. The ratios exhibit a distinct positive gradient with distance from the Galactic center, following the relationship{sup 14}N/{sup 15}N = 21.1 (5.2) kpc{sup -1} D{sub GC} + 123.8 (37.1). This gradient is consistent with predictions of Galactic chemical evolution models in which {sup 15}N has a secondary origin in novae, while primary and secondary sources exist for {sup 14}N. The local interstellar medium value was found to be {sup 4}N/{sup 15}N = 290 {+-} 40, in agreement with the ratio found in nearby diffuse clouds and close to the value of 272 found in Earth's atmosphere.

  12. Solar heater for swimming pools

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, H.W.

    1984-12-04

    A solar heater for swimming pools is provided having one or more heating panels installable on a roof or the like and arranged to discharge into a pool equipped with an apron without need for disturbing or obstructing the apron. This is accomplished by the provision of an elevated bistable dumper adjacent the perimeter of the apron having a dispensing spout normally inclined upwardly but pivoting at intervals to discharge into the pool across the apron without obstructing it. Water to be heated is diverted from the pool filtering system to the solar heater via a pressure regulator and a solar responsive flow control.

  13. Synaptic vesicle pools: an update.

    PubMed

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or "pools". We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are "fixed". Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  14. Science Notes: Dilution of a Weak Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Wai, Chooi Khee

    2014-01-01

    This "Science note" arose out of practical work involving the dilution of ethanoic acid, the measurement of the pH of the diluted solutions and calculation of the acid dissociation constant, K[subscript a], for each diluted solution. The students expected the calculated values of K[subscript a] to be constant but they found that the…

  15. Use of a novel nitrification inhibitor to reduce nitrous oxide emission from (15)N-labelled dairy slurry injected into soil.

    PubMed

    Dittert, K; Bol, R; King, R; Chadwick, D; Hatch, D

    2001-01-01

    Recent recommendations for environmentally sound use of liquid animal manure often include injection of slurry into soil. Two of the most important undesired side effects, ammonia (NH(3)) volatilisation and odour emissions, are usually significantly reduced by slurry injection. On the other hand, because of the higher amount of nitrogen (N) remaining in soil, the risk of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) leaching and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions is increased. Thus, the reduction of local effects caused by NH(3) deposition, e.g. N enrichment and soil acidification, may be at the cost of large-scale effects such as ozone depletion and global warming as a result of emitted N(2)O. In this context, nitrification inhibitors can contribute significantly to a reduction in NO(3)(-) leaching and N(2)O production. A field experiment was carried out at IGER, North Wyke, which aimed to evaluate the effect of the new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP/ENTEC). For this experiment, (15)N enriched dairy slurry was used and the isotopic label in soil N as well as in N(2)O were studied. After slurry injection into the grassland soil in August 2000, the major emissions of N(2)O occurred during the first ten days. As expected, high N(2)O emission rates and (15)N content of the emissions were concentrated on the slurry injection slots, showing a steep decrease towards the untreated centre-point between slurry injection slots. The nitrification inhibitor DMPP proved to be very efficient in reducing N(2)O emissions. At a rate of 2 kg DMPP ha(-1), the total amount of N(2)O emitted was reduced by 32%, when compared with slurry injection without DMPP. The isotopic label of the emitted N(2)O showed that during the 22-day experimental period, emissions from the slurry N pool were strongly reduced by DMPP from 0.93 kg N(2)O-N ha(-1) (-DMPP) to 0.50 kg N(2)O-N ha(-1) (+DMPP), while only a minor effect on emissions from the soil N pool was observed (0.69 to 0.60 kg N(2)O-N ha(-1

  16. Effect of body size and body mass on δ 13 C and δ 15 N in coastal fishes and cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, C.; Máguas, C.; Cabral, H. N.; Costa, M. J.

    2011-11-01

    Carbon and nitrogen isotopes have been widely used in the investigation of trophic relations, energy pathways, trophic levels and migrations, under the assumption that δ 13C is independent of body size and that variation in δ 15N occurs exclusively due to ontogenetic changes in diet and not body size increase per se. However, several studies have shown that these assumptions are uncertain. Data from food-webs containing an important number of species lack theoretical support on these assumptions because very few species have been tested for δ 13C and δ 15N variation in captivity. However, if sampling comprises a wide range of body sizes from various species, the variation of δ 13C and δ 15N with body size can be investigated. While correlation between body size and δ 13C and δ 15N can be due to ontogenetic diet shifts, stability in such values throughout the size spectrum can be considered an indication that δ 13C and δ 15N in muscle tissues of such species is independent of body size within that size range, and thus the basic assumptions can be applied in the interpretation of such food webs. The present study investigated the variation in muscle δ 13C and δ 15N with body size and body mass of coastal fishes and cephalopods. It was concluded that muscle δ 13C and δ 15N did not vary with body size or mass for all bony fishes with only one exception, the dragonet Callionymus lyra. Muscle δ 13C and δ 15N also did not vary with body size or mass in cartilaginous fishes and cephalopods, meaning that body size/mass per se have no effect on δ 13C or δ 15N, for most species analysed and within the size ranges sampled. The assumption that δ 13C is independent of body size and that variation in δ 15N is not affected by body size increase per se was upheld for most organisms and can be applied to the coastal food web studied taking into account that C. lyra is an exception.

  17. 15N-labeled tRNA. Identification of 4-thiouridine in Escherichia coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2 by 1H-15N two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffey, R H; Davis, D R; Yamaizumi, Z; Nishimura, S; Hawkins, B L; Poulter, C D

    1986-09-15

    Uridine is uniquely conserved at position 8 in elongator tRNAs and binds to A14 to form a reversed Hoogsteen base pair which folds the dihydrouridine loop back into the core of the L-shaped molecule. On the basis of 1H NMR studies, Hurd and co-workers (Hurd, R. E., Robillard, G. T., and Reid, B. R. (1977) Biochemistry 16, 2095-2100) concluded that the interaction between positions 8 and 14 is absent in Escherichia coli tRNAs with only 3 base pairs in the dihydrouridine stem. We have taken advantage of the unique 15N chemical shift of N3 in thiouridine to identify 1H and 15N resonances for the imino units of S4U8 and s4U9 in E. coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2. Model studies with chloroform-soluble derivatives of uridine and 4-thiouridine show that the chemical shifts of the protons in the imino moieties move downfield from 7.9 to 14.4 ppm and from 9.1 to 15.7 ppm, respectively; whereas, the corresponding 15N chemical shifts move downfield from 157.5 to 162.5 ppm and from 175.5 to 180.1 ppm upon hydrogen bonding to 5'-O-acetyl-2',3'-isopropylidene adenosine. The large difference in 15N chemical shifts for U and s4U allows one to unambiguously identify s4U imino resonances by 15N NMR spectroscopy. E. coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2 were selectively enriched with 15N at N3 of all uridines and modified uridines. Two-dimensional 1H-15N chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy revealed that both tRNAs have resonances with 1H and 15N chemical shifts characteristic of s4UA pairs. The 1H shift is approximately 1 ppm upfield from the typical s4U8 resonance at 14.8 ppm, presumably as a result of local diamagnetic anisotropies. An additional s4U resonance with 1H and 15N shifts typical of interaction of a bound water or a sugar hydroxyl group with s4U9 was discovered in the spectrum of tRNATyr2. Our NMR results for tRNAs with 3-base pair dihydrouridine stems suggest that these molecules have an U8A14 tertiary interaction similar to that found in tRNAs with 4-base pair dihydrouridine

  18. sup 15 N NMR study on cyanide (C sup 15 N sup minus ) complex of cytochrome P-450 sub cam. Effects of d-camphor and putidaredoxin on the iron-ligand structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Iizuka, Tetsutaro ); Makino, Ryu; Ishimura, Yuzuru ); Morishima, Isao )

    1989-11-27

    The cyanide (C{sup 15}N{sup {minus}}) complex of Pseudomonas putida cytochrome P-450 (P-450{sub cam}) exhibited well-resolved and hyperfine-shifted {sup 15}N NMR resonances arising from the iron-bound C{sup 15}N{sup {minus}} at 423 and 500 ppm in the absence and presence of the substrate, d-camphor, respectively. The values were smaller than those for cyanide complexes of myoglobin and hemoglobin ({approx} 1000 ppm) but fell into the same range as those for the cyanide complexes of peroxidases ({approx} 500 ppm). The {sup 15}N shift values of P-450{sub cam} were not incompatible with the existence of anionic ligand, such as cysteinyl thiolate anion, at the fifth coordination site of heme iron. The difference in the {sup 15}N chemical shift values between camphor-free and bound enzymes was inferred by the increase in the steric constraint to the Fe-C-N bond upon substrate binding.

  19. Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients from the {sup 15}N({sup 3}He,d){sup 16}O Reaction and the Astrophysical Factor for the {sup 15}N(p,{gamma}){sup 16}O Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Burjan, V.; Bem, P.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J.; Novak, J.; Piskor, S.; Simeckova, E.; Vincour, J.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Tumino, A.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Plunkett, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2008-05-12

    The angular distributions of the {sup 15}N({sup 3}He,d){sup 16}O reaction were measured with the aim to determine the direct capture rate of the astrophysical reaction {sup 15}N(p, {gamma}){sup 16}O by deducing asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANC). The {sup 15}N(p,{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction is a part of the CNO cycle having importance in the nucleosynthesis of the N and O isotopes. The measurement was carried out on the cyclotron U120M of NPI CAS at the energy 25.74 MeV of {sup 3}He ions in a gas chamber containing the high purity {sup 15}N isotope. The preliminary results of corresponding spectroscopic factors and ANC's were used for the estimation of the S-factor for the direct capture {sup 15}N(p,{gamma}){sup 16}O. Using the widths of the resonances E{sub R} = 312 and 962 keV, the total S-factor was determined within the framework of the R-matrix approach.

  20. Cerebral glutamine metabolism under hyperammonemia determined in vivo by localized 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cudalbu, Cristina; Lanz, Bernard; Duarte, João MN; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Pilloud, Yves; Mlynárik, Vladimir; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Brain glutamine synthetase (GS) is an integral part of the glutamate–glutamine cycle and occurs in the glial compartment. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allows noninvasive measurements of the concentrations and synthesis rates of metabolites. 15N MRS is an alternative approach to 13C MRS. Incorporation of labeled 15N from ammonia in cerebral glutamine allows to measure several metabolic reactions related to nitrogen metabolism, including the glutamate–glutamine cycle. To measure 15N incorporation into the position 5N of glutamine and position 2N of glutamate and glutamine, we developed a novel 15N pulse sequence to simultaneously detect, for the first time, [5-15N]Gln and [2-15N]Gln+Glu in vivo in the rat brain. In addition, we also measured for the first time in the same experiment localized 1H spectra for a direct measurement of the net glutamine accumulation. Mathematical modeling of 1H and 15N MRS data allowed to reduce the number of assumptions and provided reliable determination of GS (0.30±0.050 μmol/g per minute), apparent neurotransmission (0.26±0.030 μmol/g per minute), glutamate dehydrogenase (0.029±0.002 μmol/g per minute), and net glutamine accumulation (0.033±0.001 μmol/g per minute). These results showed an increase of GS and net glutamine accumulation under hyperammonemia, supporting the concept of their implication in cerebral ammonia detoxification. PMID:22167234

  1. Tidal Pools--Miniature Oceans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plake, Linda Perry

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of the biological activity in tidal pools is provided. The importance of environmental factors such as oxygen supply, temperature, salinity, and light is detailed. Plants and animals that might be found in a tidal pool are identified and described. (BT)

  2. Synaptic Vesicle Pools: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or “pools”. We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are “fixed”. Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  3. Spatial Patterns of Plant δ13C and δ15N Along a Topoedaphic Gradient in a Subtropical Savanna Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, E.; Boutton, T. W.; Liu, F.; Wu, B.; Archer, S. R.

    2005-12-01

    δ13C and δ15N values of plants are powerful tools in physiological ecology, ecosystem science, and global biogeochemistry, yet we know relatively little about their variation and controls at the landscape scale. In this study, we investigated landscape-scale spatial variations in the foliar isotopic composition of 3 woody plant species across a 308 m topoedaphic gradient, along which soil texture and plant resources (water and nitrogen availability) varied from upland (86 m) to lowland (84 m) portions of the landscape. The study was conducted in a subtropical savanna at the La Copita Research Area, approximately 60 km west of Corpus Christi, TX. Foliar δ13C, δ15N, leaf nitrogen concentration ([N]), and specific leaf area (SLA) were measured on all individuals of Prosopis glandulosa, Condalia hookeri, and Zanthoxylum fagara present within a belt transect 308 m long x 12 m wide. Soil texture, available soil moisture, and total N were measured at 1 m intervals along the center-line of the belt transect. Clay content, available soil moisture, and soil total N were all negatively correlated with elevation along the transect. Leaf δ13C and δ15N values for all 3 species increased by 1-4 o/oo with decreasing elevation along the transect. Contrary to theory and previous studies, δ13C values were highest where soil water was most available, suggesting that some other variable could be overriding or interacting with water availability. Foliar [N] appeared to exert the strongest control over landscape-level variation, and was positively correlated with δ13C of all species (R 2 = 0.58, p<0.0001). Since leaf [N] is positively related to photosynthetic capacity, plants with high [N] are likely to have low Ci/Ca ratios and therefore higher δ13C values. δ15N values of Zanthoxylum and Condalia were positively correlated with leaf [N] and soil water availability; however, these relationships were absent for Prosopis, an N-fixing tree legume. We speculate that the

  4. Elucidating the trophodynamics of four coral reef fishes of the Solomon Islands using δ15N and δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, N. D. W.; Sweeting, C. J.; Polunin, N. V. C.

    2010-09-01

    Size-related diet shifts are important characteristics of fish trophodynamics. Here, body size-related changes in muscle δ15N and δ13C of four coral reef fishes, Acanthurus nigrofuscus (herbivore), Chaetodon lunulatus (corallivore) , Chromis xanthura (planktivore) and Plectropomus leopardus (piscivore) were investigated at two locations in the Solomon Islands. All four species occupied distinct isotopic niches and the concurrent δ13C' values of C. xanthura and P. leopardus suggested a common planktonic production source. Size-related shifts in δ15N, and thus trophic level, were observed in C. xanthura, C. lunulatus and P. leopardus, and these trends varied between location, indicating spatial differences in trophic ecology. A literature review of tropical fishes revealed that positive δ15N-size trends are common while negative δ15N-size trends are rare. Size-δ15N trends fall into approximately equal groups representing size-based feeding within a food chain, and that associated with a basal resource shift and occurs in conjunction with changes in production source, indicated by δ13C. The review also revealed large scale differences in isotope-size trends and this, combined with small scale location differences noted earlier, highlights a high degree of plasticity in the reef fishes studied. This suggests that trophic size analysis of reef fishes would provide a productive avenue to identify species potentially vulnerable to reef impacts as a result of constrained trophic behaviour.

  5. Range expansion of the jumbo squid in the NE Pacific: δ15N decrypts multiple origins, migration and habitat use.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I; Ballance, Lisa T; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Coincident with climate shifts and anthropogenic perturbations, the highly voracious jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas reached unprecedented northern latitudes along the NE Pacific margin post 1997-98. The physical or biological drivers of this expansion, as well as its ecological consequences remain unknown. Here, novel analysis from both bulk tissues and individual amino acids (Phenylalanine; Phe and Glutamic acid; Glu) in both gladii and muscle of D. gigas captured in the Northern California Current System (NCCS) documents for the first time multiple geographic origins and migration. Phe δ(15)N values, a proxy for habitat baseline δ(15)N values, confirm at least three different geographic origins that were initially detected by highly variable bulk δ(15)N values in gladii for squid at small sizes (<30 cm gladii length). In contrast, bulk δ(15)N values from gladii of large squid (>60 cm) converged, indicating feeding in a common ecosystem. The strong latitudinal gradient in Phe δ(15)N values from composite muscle samples further confirmed residency at a point in time for large squid in the NCCS. These results contrast with previous ideas, and indicate that small squid are highly migratory, move into the NCCS from two or more distinct geographic origins, and use this ecosystem mainly for feeding. These results represent the first direct information on the origins, immigration and habitat use of this key "invasive" predator in the NCCS, with wide implications for understanding both the mechanisms of periodic D. gigas population range expansions, and effects on ecosystem trophic structure. PMID:23527242

  6. High resolution (13)C MRI with hyperpolarized urea: in vivo T(2) mapping and (15)N labeling effects.

    PubMed

    Reed, Galen D; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J; Hong Shang; Larson, Peder E Z; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-02-01

    (13)C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [(13)C] urea and [(13) C,(15)N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. (15)N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [(13) C,(15) N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [(13)C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [(13)C,(15)N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [(13)C,(15) N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio over [(13)C] urea. PMID:24235273

  7. A closer look at the nitrogen next door: 1H-15N NMR methods for glycosaminoglycan structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beni, Szabolcs; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, experimental conditions were presented for the detection of the N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) NHSO3- or sulfamate 1H and 15N NMR resonances of the pharmaceutically and biologically important glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin in aqueous solution. In the present work, we explore further the applicability of nitrogen-bound proton detection to provide structural information for GAGs. Compared to the detection of 15N chemical shifts of aminosugars through long-range couplings using the IMPACT-HNMBC pulse sequence, the more sensitive two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiments provided additional structural data. The IMPACT-HNMBC experiment remains a powerful tool as demonstrated by the spectrum measured for the unsubstituted amine of 3-O-sulfoglucosamine (GlcN(3S)), which cannot be observed with the 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiment due to the fast exchange of the amino group protons with solvent. The 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectrum reported for the mixture of model compounds GlcNS and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrate the broad utility of this approach. Measurements for the synthetic pentasaccharide drug Arixtra® (Fondaparinux sodium) in aqueous solution illustrate the power of this NMR pulse sequence for structural characterization of highly similar N-sulfoglucosamine residues in GAG-derived oligosaccharides.

  8. Sources of nitrate in the Arno River waters: Constraints from d15N and d18O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nisi, Barbara; Vaselli, Orlando; Buccianti, Antonella; Silva, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Running waters in anthropogenically affected areas are susceptible to nitrate contamination. Source identification is a fundamental step for the development of effective remediation. Previous studies pointed to pollution by nitrogen-bearing contaminants in the Arno Basin. In this paper, eleven surface water samples have been analysed for main and trace components and 15N/14N and 18O/16O ratios, with the aim of identifying for the first time the origin of nitrate in the Arno River Basin so that further investigations can appropriately be designed. d18O(NO3)and d15N(NO3) values have allowed to hypothesise the main sources of nitrate, as follows: i) mineralized fertilizer, ii) soil-organic nitrogen, iii) manure and septic waste. The anomalously high d15N and d18O values in the Chiana (d15N=24.9‰ and d18O=15.5‰) and Usciana tributaries (d15N=30.1‰ and d18O=7.2‰) show a low probability of belonging to the same population as that of the other samples and can be related to denitrification process of nitrate from animal waste/sewage and/or an industrial process (e.g. tanneries).

  9. Impact of pooling on accuracy of hepatitis B virus surface antigen screening of blood donations.

    PubMed

    Novack, L; Sarov, B; Goldman-Levi, R; Yahalom, V; Safi, J; Soliman, H; Orgel, M; Yaari, A; Galai, N; Pliskin, J S; Shinar, E

    2008-08-01

    Expenditure on screening blood donations in developing countries can be reduced by testing donations in pools. This study evaluated serological screening in pools for hepatitis B virus (HBV) at the Israeli national blood bank and a hospital blood bank in Gaza, the Palestinian Authority. The accuracy of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) enzyme immunoassay performed on pools of 3-24 samples was compared with individual tests. Delay in detecting positive samples due to dilution in pools and the possibility of antibody-antigen neutralization were analyzed. The sensitivity of pooled testing for HBsAg was 93-99%, prolonging the window period by 5 days (8.3%). Neutralization of HBsAg by hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-HBs) could be minimized by testing immediately after pooling. Serological testing for HBsAg in pools may be performed using manually created pools of up to six samples, with 5% loss in sensitivity and a risk of neutralization by anti-HBs present in the donor population. Pooling can therefore be considered as an option only in countries with a low prevalence of HBV. PMID:18486172

  10. Dilute acid and autohydrolysis pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E

    2009-01-01

    Exposure of cellulosic biomass to temperatures of about 120-210 degrees C can remove most of the hemicellulose and produce cellulose-rich solids from which high glucose yields are possible with cellulase enzymes. Furthermore, the use of dilute sulfuric acid in this pretreatment operation can increase recovery of hemicellulose sugars substantially to about 85-95% of the maximum possible versus only about 65% if no acid is employed. The use of small-diameter tubes makes it possible to employ high solids concentrations similar to those preferred for commercial operations, with rapid heat-up, good temperature control, and accurate closure of material balances. Mixed reactors can be employed to pretreat larger amounts of biomass than possible in such small-diameter tubes, but solids concentrations are limited to about 15% or less to provide uniform temperatures. Pretreatment of large amounts of biomass at high solids concentrations is best carried out using direct steam injection and rapid pressure release, but closure of material balances in such "steam gun" devices is more difficult. Although flow of water alone or containing dilute acid is not practical commercially, such flow-through configurations provide valuable insight into biomass deconstruction kinetics not possible in the batch tubes, mixed reactors, or steam gun systems. PMID:19768619

  11. A Microgravity Helium Dilution Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Sperans, Joel (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We are developing a He-3-He-4 dilution cooler to operate in microgravity. It uses charcoal adsorption pumps and heaters for its operation; it has no moving parts. It currently operates cyclically to well below 0.1 K and we have designed a version to operate continuously. We expect that the continuous version will be able to provide the long-duration cooling that many experiments need at temperatures down to 0.040 K. More importantly, such a dilution cooler could provide the precooling that enables the use of adiabatic demagnetization techniques that can reach temperatures below 0.001 K. At temperatures below 0.002 K many fascinating microgravity experiments on superfluid He-3 become possible. Among the possibilities are: research into a superfluid He-3 gyroscope, study of the nucleation of the B-phase of superfluid He-3 when the sample is floating out of contact with walls, study of the anisotropy of the surface tension of the B-phase, and NMR experiments on tiny free-floating clusters of superfluid He-3 atoms that should model the shell structure of nuclei.

  12. 15N labeled brain enables quantification of proteome and phosphoproteome in cultured primary neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lujian; Sando, Richard C.; Farnum, John B.; Vanderklish, Peter W.; Maximov, Anton; Yates, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Terminally differentiated primary cells represent a valuable in vitro model to study signaling events associated within a specific tissue. Quantitative proteomic methods using metabolic labeling in primary cells encounter labeling efficiency issues hindering the use of these cells. Here we developed a method to quantify the proteome and phosphoproteome of cultured neurons using 15N labeled brain tissue as an internal standard, and applied this method to determine how an inhibitor of an excitatory neural transmitter receptor, phencyclidine (PCP), affects the global phosphoproteome of cortical neurons. We identified over 10,000 phosphopeptides and made accurate quantitative measurements of the neuronal phosphoproteome after neuronal inhibition. We show that short PCP treatments lead to changes in phosphorylation for 7% of neuronal phosphopeptides and that prolonged PCP treatment alters the total levels of several proteins essential for synaptic transmission and plasticity and leads to a massive reduction in the synaptic strength of inhibitory synapses. The results provide valuable insights into the dynamics of molecular networks implicated in PCP-mediated NMDA receptor inhibition and sensorimotor deficits. PMID:22070516

  13. Tracking the incorporation of 15N from labeled beech litter into mineral-organic associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, M.; Hatton, P.; Derrien, D.; Lajtha, K.; Zeller, B.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen containing organic compounds are thought to have a role in the complex web of processes that control the turnover time of soil organic matter. The sequential density fractionation technique is increasingly used for the purpose of investigating the association of organic materials with the mineral matrix. Organic materials in the denser fractions (>2.0 kg L-1) typically show 13C NMR signals indicative of carbohydrate and aliphatic structures, an absence of lignin and tannin structures and a narrow C:N ratio, suggesting a microbial origin of organic matter in these fractions. Here we take advantage of a labeling experiment conducted at two different sites in Germany and in France to investigate the incorporation of organic nitrogen into physical fractions of increasing density, representing a proximity gradient to mineral surfaces. 15N labeled beech litter was applied to two acidic forest topsoils 8 and 12 years ago. Although there are differences in the distribution patterns between the two soils, and the majority of the organic nitrogen was recovered in fractions representing organic matter of plant origin and not bound to the mineral matrix, our data clearly show that after a decade, significant amounts of the nitrogen had been incorporated in mineral-organic fractions of supposedly slow turnover. It remains to be shown to which extent the N in the densest fractions was incorporated by soil microbiota and associated with mineral surfaces in organic form or adsorbed to mineral surfaces in inorganic form (NH4+).

  14. Tracing sewage water by 15N in a mangrove ecosystem to test its bioremediation ability.

    PubMed

    Lambs, Luc; Léopold, Audrey; Zeller, Bernd; Herteman, Mélanie; Fromard, Francois

    2011-10-15

    Mangrove forests could be a simple and effective alternative to conventional sewage treatment, particularly for island communities given its low cost and low maintenance. Due to their high adaptation capacity, these plants are able to tolerate and bioremediate the high levels of nutrients and pollutants found in sewage water. This solution could be applied to small tropical islands with high population density such as Mayotte in the Indian Ocean. This paper reports on a trial by stable isotopic (15)N tracing of such a bioremediation process on pre-treated wastewater near the village of Malamani, in the middle of the large coastal mangrove in the bay near Chirongui. The first results show a boost in the mangrove growth, but a longer period of observation is needed to confirm the beneficial effects, and also to clarify the role of the local crab population, whose engineering activities play an important part in the ecosystem. The exact denitrification process is not yet understood, and the mass balance equation also reveals loss of nitrogen-containing compounds, which needs to be analyzed more closely. PMID:21913255

  15. Ammonia 15N/14N Isotope Ratio in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.R.; Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, M. H.; Owen, T. C; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Data from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer has been used to derive the N-15/N-14 isotope ratio in ammonia at Jupiter. Although the mass spectral interference from the water contribution to 18 amu makes an accurate derivation of the (N-15)H3/(N-14)H3 ratio difficult from measurements of the singly ionized signals at 18 and 17 amu, this interference is not present in the doubly charged 8.5 and 9.0 amu signals from (N-14)H3++ and (N-15)H3++ respectively. Although the count rate from the 9 amu signal is low during the direct sampling of the atmosphere, the ammonia signal was considerably enhanced during the first enrichment cell (EC1) experiment that measured gas sampled between 0.8 and 2.8 bar. Count rates at 9 amu in the EC1 experiment reach 60/second and measure ammonia sampled from 0.88 to 2.8 bar. In the EC1 measurements the 8.5 amu signal is not measured directly, but can be calculated from the ammonia contribution to 17 amu and the ratio of NH3 ions of a double to single charged observed during a high resolution mass scan taken near the end of the descent. The high resolution scan gives this ratio from ammonia sampled much deeper in the atmosphere. These results are described and compared with Infrared Space Observatory-Short Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-SWS) observations that give this ratio at 400 mbar.

  16. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds. PMID:19685922

  17. Qualitative Study of Substituent Effects on NMR 15N and 17O Chemical Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Rubén H.; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Bustamante, Manuel G.; Pasqualini, Enrique E.; Melo, Juan I.; Tormena, Cláudio F.

    2009-08-01

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-β substituent effects on both 15N and 17O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and σ-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  18. Quantifying denitrification losses from a sub-tropical pasture in Queensland/Australia - use of the 15N gas flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Johannes; Scheer, Clemens; Warner, Daniel; Grace, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The microbial mediated production of nitrous oxide (N2O) and its reduction to dinitrogen (N2) via denitrification represents a loss of nitrogen (N) from fertilised agro ecosystems to the atmosphere. Although denitrification remains a major uncertainty in estimating N losses from soils, the magnitude of N2 losses and related N2:N2O ratios from soils are largely unknown due to difficulties measuring N2 against a high atmospheric background. In order to address this lack of data, this study investigated the influence of different soil moisture contents on N2 and N2O emissions from a sub-tropical pasture in Queensland/Australia using the 15N gas flux method. Intact soil cores were incubated over 14 days at 80% and 100% water filled pore space (WFPS). Gas samples were taken up to six times per day after application of 15N labelled nitrate, equivalent to 50 kg N ha-1 and analysed for N2 and N2O by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Fluxes were calculated assuming non-random 15N distribution in the headspace according to Mulvaney and Kurtz (1984) using the labelled pool of nitrate estimated from N2O measurements (Stevens and Laughlin 2001). The main product of denitrification in both treatments was N2. N2 emissions exceeded N2O emissions by a factor of 1.3 ± 0.3 at 80% WFPS and a factor of 3 ± 0.8 at 100% WFPS. The total amount of N-N2 lost over the incubation period was 13.5±1.0 kg N ha-1 at 80% WFPS and 21.8±1.8 kg ha-1 at 100% WFPS respectively. Over the entire incubation period, N2 emissions remained elevated at 100% WFPS, showing high variation between soil cores, while related N2O emissions decreased. At 80% WFPS, N2 emissions increased constantly over time showing significantly higher values after day five. At the same time, N2O fluxes declined. Consequently, N2:N2O ratios rose over the incubation period in both treatments. Overall denitrification rates and related N2:N2O ratios were higher at 100% WFPS compared to 80% WFPS, confirming WFPS as a major driver of

  19. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... (“Other Gambling Industries”); golf courses—713910 (“Golf Courses and Country Clubs”); or aquariums...

  20. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... (“Other Gambling Industries”); golf courses—713910 (“Golf Courses and Country Clubs”); or aquariums...

  1. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... (“Other Gambling Industries”); golf courses—713910 (“Golf Courses and Country Clubs”); or aquariums...

  2. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... (“Other Gambling Industries”); golf courses—713910 (“Golf Courses and Country Clubs”); or aquariums...

  3. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... (“Other Gambling Industries”); golf courses—713910 (“Golf Courses and Country Clubs”); or aquariums...

  4. Organic vs. Conventional Grassland Management: Do 15N and 13C Isotopic Signatures of Hay and Soil Samples Differ?

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Valentin H.; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ15N and δ13C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ15N15N plant - δ15N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ13C in hay and δ15N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ13C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ15N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ13C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently used in practice

  5. Towards interpreting nitrate-δ15N records in ice cores in terms of nitrogen oxide sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, M. G.; Buffen, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrate preserved in ice cores offers unique potential for reconstructing past contributions of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO and NO2) to the atmosphere. Sources of NOx imprint a nitrogen stable isotopic (δ15N) signature, which can be conserved during subsequent oxidation to form nitrate. Major sources of NOx include fossil fuels combustion, biomass burning, microbial processes in soils, and lightning, and thus a quantitative tracer of emissions would help detail connections between the atmosphere, the biosphere, and climate. Unfortunately, the δ15N signatures of most NOx sources are not yet well enough constrained to allow for quantitative partitioning, though new methodology for directly collecting NOx for isotopic analysis is promising (Fibiger and Hastings, A43D-0265, AGU 2010). Still, a growing network of ice core δ15N records may offer insight into source signatures, as different sources are important to different regions of the world. For example, a 300-year ice core record of nitrate-δ15N from Summit, Greenland shows a clear and significant 12% (vs. N2) decrease since the Preindustrial that reflects emissions from fossil fuel combustion and/or soils related to changing agricultural practices in North America and Europe. Over the same time period, Antarctic ice cores show no such trend in δ15N. This would be consistent with previous work suggesting that biomass burning and/or stratospheric intrusion of NOx produced from N2O oxidation are dominant sources for nitrate formation at high southern latitudes. In comparison to the polar records, nitrate in tropical ice cores should represent more significant inputs from lightning, microbial processes in soils, and biomass burning. This may be reflected in new results from a high-elevation site in the Peruvian Andes that shows strong seasonal δ15N cycles of up to 15% (vs. N2). We compare and contrast these records in an effort to evaluate the contribution of NOx sources to nitrate over

  6. [Effect of fertilization depth on 15N-urea absorption, utilization and loss in dwarf apple trees].

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Chen, Qian; Xu, Hai-gang; Ji, Meng-meng; Jiang, Han; Jiang, Yuan-mao

    2015-03-01

    Five-year-old 'Fuji'3/M26/M. hupehensis Rehd. seedlings were treated by 15N tracer to study the effects of fertilization depth (0, 20 and 40 cm) on 15N-urea absorption, distribution, utilization and loss in soil. The results showed that the plant leaf area, chlorophyll content and total N of apple leaves in 20 cm treatment were obviously higher than 0 cm and 40 cm treatments. The 15N derived from fertilizer (Ndff) in different organs of apple plant under different depths were significantly different, and the Ndff was the highest in roots at the full-bloom stage, and then in perennial branches. During the shoot rapid-growing and flower bud differentiation stage, the Ndff of new organs higher than that of the storage organs, and the Ndff of different organs were high level at fruit rapid-expanding stage, and the Ndff of fruit was the highest. The distribution ratio of 15N at fruit maturity stage was significantly different under fertilization depths, and that of the vegetative and repro- ductive organs of 20 cm treatment were obviously higher than 0 cm and 40 cm treatments, but that of the storage organs of 20 cm treatment was lower than 0 cm and 40 cm treatments. At fruit maturity stage, 15N utilization rate of apple plant of 20 cm treatment was 24.0%, which was obviously higher than 0 cm (14.1%) and 40 cm (7.6%) treatments, and 15N loss rate was 54.0%, which was obviously lower than 0 cm (67.8%) and 40 cm (63.5%) treatments. With the increase of fertilization depths, the N residue in soil increased sharply. PMID:26211056

  7. Choice of dietary protein of vegetarians and omnivores is reflected in their hair protein 13C and 15N abundance.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Boeing, Heiner; Metges, Cornelia C

    2005-01-01

    Stable isotopic (15N, 13C) composition of tissues depends on isotopic pattern of food sources. We investigated whether the isotopic compositions of human hair protein and amino acids reflect the habitual dietary protein intake. Hair samples were analyzed from 100 omnivores (selected randomly out of the 1987-1988 German nutrition survey VERA), and from 15 ovo-lacto-vegetarians (OLV), and from 6 vegans recruited separately. Hair bulk and amino acid specific isotopic compositions were analyzed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS and GC/C/IRMS, respectively) and the results were correlated with data of the 7 day dietary records. Hair bulk 15N and 13C abundances clearly reflect the particular eating habits. Vegans can be distinguished from OLV and both are significantly distinct from omnivores in both 15N and 13C abundances. 15N and 13C abundances rose with a higher proportion of animal to total protein intake (PAPI). Individual proportions of animal protein consumption (IPAP) were calculated using isotopic abundances and a linear regression model using animal protein consumption data of vegans (PAPI = 0) and omnivores (mean PAPI = 0.639). IPAP values positively correlated with the intake of protein, meat, meat products, and animal protein. Distinct patterns for hair amino acid specific 15N and 13C abundances were measured but with lower resolution between food preference groups compared with bulk values. In conclusion, hair 13C and 15N values both reflected the extent of animal protein consumption. Bulk isotopic abundance of hair can be tested for future use in the validation of dietary assessment methods. PMID:15880664

  8. Pooling techniques for bioassay screening

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.C.; Baum, J.W.; Kaplan, E; Moorthy, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    Pooling techniques commonly are used to increase the throughput of samples used for screening purposes. While the advantages of such techniques are increased analytical efficiency and cost savings, the sensitivity of measurements decreases because it is inversely proportional to the number of samples in the pools. Consequently, uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk which are based on the results of pooled samples increase as the number of samples in the pools increases in all applications. However, sensitivities may not be seriously degraded, for example, in urinalysis, if the samples in the pools are of known time duration, or if the fraction of some attribute of the grab urine samples to that in a 24-hour composite is known (e.g., mass, specific gravity, creatinine, or volume, per 24-h interval). This paper presents square and cube pooling schemes that greatly increase throughput and can considerably reduce analytical costs (on a sample basis). The benefit-cost ratios for 5{times}5 square and 5{times}5{times}5 cube pooling schemes are 2.5 and 8.3, respectively. Three-dimensional and higher arrayed pooling schemes would result in even greater economies; however, significant improvements in analytical sensitivity are required to achieve these advantages. These are various other considerations for designing a pooling scheme, where the number of dimensions and of samples in the optimum array are influenced by: (1) the minimal detectable amount (MDA) of the analytical processes, (2) the screening dose-rate requirements, (3) the maximum masses or volumes of the composite samples that can be analyzed, (4) the information already available from results of composite analysis, and (5) the ability of an analytical system to guard against both false negative and false positive results. Many of these are beyond the scope of this paper but are being evaluated.

  9. Quantifying nitrate retention processes in a riparian buffer zone using the natural abundance of 15N in NO3-.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Karel; Boeckx, Pascal; Van Cleemput, Oswald; Hofman, Georges

    2003-01-01

    Quantifying the relative importance of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention in riparian zones may lead to methods optimising the construction of riparian zones for water pollution control. The natural abundance of 15N in NO3- has been shown to be an interesting tool for providing insights into the NO3- retention processes occurring in riparian zones. In this study, 15N isotope fractionation (variation in delta15N of the residual NO3-) due to denitrification and due to plant uptake was measured in anaerobic soil slurries at different temperatures (5, 10 and 15 degrees C) and in hydroponic systems with different plant species (Lolium perenne L., Urtica dioica L. and Epilobium hirsutum L.). It was found that temperature had no significant effect on isotope fractionation during denitrification, which resulted in a 15N enrichment factor epsilonD of -22.5 +/- 0.6 per thousand. On the other hand, nitrate uptake by plants resulted in 15N isotope fractionation, but was independent of plant species, leading to a 15N enrichment factor epsilonP of -4.4 +/- 0.3 per thousand. By relating these two laboratory-defined enrichment factors to a field enrichment factor for groundwater nitrate retention during the growing season (epsilonR = -15.5 +/- 1.0 per thousand ), the contribution of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention could be calculated. The relative importance of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention in the riparian buffer zone was 49 and 51% during spring, 53 and 47% during summer, and 75 and 25% during autumn. During wintertime, high micropore dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and low redox potentials due to decomposition of the highly productive riparian vegetation probably resulted in a higher denitrification rate and favoured other nitrate retention processes such as nitrate immobilisation or dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). This could have biased the 15N

  10. Application of 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to the determination of the stability of aryl nitrogen mustards.

    PubMed

    Wilman, D E; Palmer, B D; Denny, W A

    1995-06-01

    An excellent correlation has been shown to exist between the 15N NMR chemical shifts of a series of aryl nitrogen mustards and the Hammett constant, sigma, which is much improved by the use of sigma-. These chemical shifts also correlate well with the hydrolysis rates of the compounds in 50% aqueous acetone at 66 degrees C and their alkylation of 4-(4'-nitrobenzyl)pyridine under similar conditions. Thus 15N NMR is a straightforward and material-conserving method for estimating the relative stabilities of aryl nitrogen mustards. PMID:7783158

  11. Nitrogen mineralization from selected /sup 15/N-labelled crop residues and humus as affected by inorganic nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of cover crops or crop residues as a source of N to succeeding crops has become a matter of increasing importance for economic and environmental reason. Greenhouse and field studies were conducted to determine the N contribution of four /sup 15/N labelled crop residues, rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), crimson clover (Trifolium encarnatum L.), and hairy vetch (Vicia sativa L.), to successive crops and to evaluate the effect of different organic (ON) and inorganic N (IN) combinations on mineralization of the above residues. Total /sup 15/N recovery from the residues ranged from 51% to 85% and 4% to 74% for the greenhouse and field studies, respectively.

  12. In vivo activity of glutaminase in the brain of hyperammonaemic rats measured by 15N nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, K; Ross, B D

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo activity of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) was measured in the brain of hyperammonaemic rat by 15N n.m.r. Brain glutamine was 15N-enriched by intravenous infusion of 15NH4+ until the concentration of [5-15N]glutamine reached 6.1 mumol/g. Further glutamine synthesis was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, and the infusate was changed to 14NH4+ during observation of decrease in brain [5-15N]glutamine due to PAG and other glutamine utilization pathways. Progressive decrease in brain [5-15N]glutamine, PAG-catalysed production of 15NH4+ and its subsequent assimilation into glutamate by glutamate dehydrogenase were monitored in vivo by 15N n.m.r. Brain [5-15N]glutamine (15N enrichment of 0.35-0.50) decreased at a rate of 1.2 mumol/h per g of brain. The in vivo PAG activity, determined from the observed rate and the quantity of 15NH4+ produced and subsequently assimilated into glutamate and aspartate, was 0.9-1.3 mumol/h per g. This activity is less than 1.1% of the reported activity in vitro measured in rat brain homogenate at a 10 mM concentration of the activator Pi. Inhibition by ammonia (brain level 1.4 mumol/g) alone does not account for the observed low activity in vivo. The result strongly suggests that, in intact brain, PAG activity is maintained at a low level by a suboptimal in situ concentration of Pi and the strong inhibitory effect of glutamate. The observed PAG activity in vivo is lower than the reported in vivo activity of glutamate decarboxylase which converts glutamate into gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). The result suggests that PAG-catalysed hydrolysis of glutamine is not the sole provider of glutamate used for GABA synthesis. PMID:7826349

  13. Cytochrome-P450-Cytochrome-b5 Interaction in a Membrane Environment Changes 15N Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Ahuja, Shivani; Huang, Rui; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    It has been well realized that the dependence of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors on the amino acid sequence, secondary structure, dynamics and electrostatic interactions can be utilized in the structural and dynamic studies of proteins by NMR spectroscopy. In addition, CSA tensors could also be utilized to measure the structural interactions between proteins in a protein-protein complex. To this end, here we report the experimentally measured backbone amide-15N CSA tensors for a membrane-bound 16.7-kDa full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5), in complexation with a 55.8-kDa microsomal rabbit cytochrome P450 2B4 (cytP4502B4). The 15N-CSAs, determined using the 15N CSA/15N-1H dipolar coupling transverse cross-correlated rates, for free cytb5 are compared with that for the cytb5 bound to cytP4502B4. An overall increase in backbone amide-15N transverse cross-correlated rates for the cytb5 residues in the cytb5-cytP450 complex was observed as compared to the free cytb5 residues. Due to fast spin-spin relaxation (T2) and subsequent broadening of the signals in the complex, we were able to measure amide-15N CSAs only for 48 residues of cytb5 as compared to 84 residues of free cytb5. We observed a change in 15N CSA for most residues of cytb5 in the complex, when compared to free cytb5, suggesting a dynamic interaction between the oppositely charged surfaces of anionic cytb5 and cationic cytP450. The mean values of 15N CSA determined for residues in helical, sheet and turn regions of cytb5 in the complex are −184.5, −146.8, and −146.2 ppm, respectively, with an overall average value of −165.5 ppm (excluding the values from residues in more flexible termini). The measured CSA value for residues in helical conformation is slightly larger as compared to previously reported values. This may be attributed to the paramagnetic effect from Fe(III) of the heme in cytb5, which is similar to our previously reported values for the free cytb5. PMID:24107224

  14. The fate of nitrogen in grain cropping systems: a meta-analysis of 15N field experiments.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jennifer B; Drinkwater, Laurie E

    2009-12-01

    Intensively managed grain farms are saturated with large inputs of nitrogen (N) fertilizer, leading to N losses and environmental degradation. Despite decades of research directed toward reducing N losses from agroecosystems, progress has been minimal, and the currently promoted best management practices are not necessarily the most effective. We investigated the fate of N additions to temperate grain agroecosystems using a meta-analysis of 217 field-scale studies that followed the stable isotope 15N in crops and soil. We compared management practices that alter inorganic fertilizer additions, such as application timing or reduced N fertilizer rates, to practices that re-couple the biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C) and N, such as organic N sources and diversified crop rotations, and analyzed the following response variables: 15N recovery in crops, total recovery of 15N in crops and soil, and crop yield. More of the literature (94%) emphasized crop recovery of 15N than total 15N recovery in crops and soil (58%), though total recovery is a more ecologically appropriate indicator for assessing N losses. Findings show wide differences in the ability of management practices to improve N use efficiency. Practices that aimed to increase crop uptake of commercial fertilizer had a lower impact on total 15N recovery (3-21% increase) than practices that re-coupled C and N cycling (30-42% increase). A majority of studies (66%) were only one growing season long, which poses a particular problem when organic N sources are used because crops recover N from these sources over several years. These short-term studies neglect significant ecological processes that occur over longer time scales. Field-scale mass balance calculations using the 15N data set show that, on average, 43 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1) was unaccounted for at the end of one growing season out of 114 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1), representing approximately 38% of the total 15N applied. This comprehensive assessment of

  15. Residual Resistivity of Dilute Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    The residual resistivity for 156 dilute alloys of 19 hosts of different groups of the periodic table has been studied on the basis of the single parametric model potential formalism. Ashcroft's empty core model (EMC) potential is explored for the first time with five different local field correction functions, viz, Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F), and Sarkar et al. (S) to investigate the effect of the exchange and correlation on the aforesaid properties. The comparison of the presently computed outcomes with the available theoretical and experimental data is highly encouraging. The investigation of residual resistivity is found to be quite sensitive to the selection of local field correction function, showing a significant variation with the change in the function.

  16. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  17. Desynchronization in diluted neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Zillmer, Ruediger; Livi, Roberto; Politi, Antonio; Torcini, Alessandro

    2006-09-15

    The dynamical behavior of a weakly diluted fully inhibitory network of pulse-coupled spiking neurons is investigated. Upon increasing the coupling strength, a transition from regular to stochasticlike regime is observed. In the weak-coupling phase, a periodic dynamics is rapidly approached, with all neurons firing with the same rate and mutually phase locked. The strong-coupling phase is characterized by an irregular pattern, even though the maximum Lyapunov exponent is negative. The paradox is solved by drawing an analogy with the phenomenon of 'stable chaos', i.e., by observing that the stochasticlike behavior is 'limited' to an exponentially long (with the system size) transient. Remarkably, the transient dynamics turns out to be stationary.

  18. XAFS in dilute magnetic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihu; Yan, Wensheng; Yao, Tao; Liu, Qinghua; Xie, Yi; Wei, Shiqiang

    2013-10-14

    X-Ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy has experienced a rapid development in the last four decades and has proved to be a powerful structure characterization technique in the study of local environments in condensed matter. In this article, we first introduce the XAFS basic principles including theory, data analysis and experiment in some detail. Then we attempt to make a review on the applications of XAFS to the study of atomic and electronic structure in dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) systems. The power of XAFS in characterizing this interesting material system, such as determining the occupation sites and distribution of the dopants, detecting the presence of metal clusters or secondary phases, as well as identifying the defect types and dopant valence, will be illuminated by selected examples. This review should be of interest both to newcomers in the DMS field and to an interdisciplinary community of researchers working in synthesis, characterization and utilization of DMS materials. PMID:23884341

  19. The first synthesis of [9,Amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2}]adenine and {beta}- 2{prime}-Deoxy-[9,Amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2}]adenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Orji, C.C.; Silks, L.A. III

    1995-12-31

    {beta}-2{prime}-Deoxy-[9, Amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2}] Adenosine has been constructed in 4 steps from commercially available 5-amino-4,6-dichloropyrimidine and {sup 15}NH{sub 3}. The reactions have been scaled provide grams quantities of labeled nucleoside.

  20. Global modeling of the 15N216O line positions within the framework of the polyad model of effective Hamiltonian and a room temperature 15N216O line list

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashkun, S. A.; Perevalov, V. I.; Liu, A.-W.; Hu, S.-M.

    2016-05-01

    The global modeling of 15N216O line positions in the 4-12,516 cm-1 region has been performed using the polyad model of effective Hamiltonian. The effective Hamiltonian parameters were fitted to the line positions collected from an exhaustive review of the literature. The dimensionless weighted standard deviation of the fit is 1.31. The fitted set of 109 parameters allowed reproducing more than 18,000 measured line positions with an RMS value of 0.001 cm-1. A line list was calculated for a reference temperature 296 K, natural abundance (1.32×10-5), and an intensity cutoff 10-30 cm/molecule. The line list is based on the fitted set of the effective Hamiltonian parameters for 15N216O obtained in this work and the effective dipole moment parameters of the 15N216O and 14N216O isotopologues. Accurate values of the 15N216O total partition function are also given.

  1. Determination of δ18O and δ15N in Nitrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, K.; Böhlke, J.K.; Yoshinari, T.

    1997-01-01

    The analyses of both O and N isotopic compositions of nitrate have many potential applications in studies of nitrate sources and reactions in hydrology, oceanography, and atmospheric chemistry, but simple and precise methods for these analyses have yet to be developed. Testing of a new method involving reaction of potassium nitrate with catalyzed graphite (C + Pd + Au) at 520 °C resulted in quantitative recovery of N and O from nitrate as free CO2, K2CO3, and N2. The δ18O values of nitrate reference materials were obtained by analyzing both the CO2 and K2CO3 from catalyzed graphite combustion. Provisional values of δ18OVSMOW for the internationally distributed KNO3 reference materials IAEA-N3 and USGS-32 were both equal to +22.7 ± 0.5‰. Because the fraction of free CO2 and the isotopic fractionation factor between CO2 and K2CO3 were constant in the combustion products, the δ18O value of KNO3 could be calculated from measurements of the δ18O of free CO2. Thus, δ18OKNO3 = aδ18Ofree CO2 − b, where a and b were equal to 0.9967 and 3.3, respectively, for the specific conditions of the experiments. The catalyzed graphite combustion method can be used to determine δ18O of KNO3 from measurements of δ18O of free CO2 with reproducibility on the order of ±0.2‰ or better if local reference materials are prepared and analyzed with the samples. Reproducibility of δ15N was ±0.1‰ after trace amounts of CO were removed.

  2. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: 2. Denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Hall, Robert; Sobota, Daniel; Dodds, Walter; Findlay, Stuart; Grimm, Nancy; Hamilton, Stephen; McDowell, William; O'Brien, Jon; Tank, Jennifer; Ashkenas, Linda; Cooper, Lee W; Dahm, Cliff; Gregory, Stanley; Johnson, Sherri; Meyer, Judy; Peterson, Bruce; Poole, Geoff; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson; Arango, Clay; Beaulieu, Jake; Bernot, Melody; Burgin, Amy; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Helton, Ashley; Johnson, Laura; Niederlehner, Bobbie; Potter, Jody; Sheibley, Rich; Thomas, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field {sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (S{sub Wden}) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N{sub 2} production rates far exceeded N{sub 2}O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling S{sub Wden} were specific discharge (discharge/width) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (U{sub den}) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although U{sub den} increased with increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, the efficiency of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO{sub 3}{sup -} load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration.

  3. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulholland, P.J.; Hall, R.O., Jr.; Sobota, D.J.; Dodds, W.K.; Findlay, S.E.G.; Grimm, N. B.; Hamilton, S.K.; McDowell, W.H.; O'Brien, J. M.; Tank, J.L.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Cooper, L.W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Gregory, S.V.; Johnson, S.L.; Meyer, J.L.; Peterson, B.J.; Poole, G.C.; Valett, H.M.; Webster, J.R.; Arango, C.P.; Beaulieu, J.J.; Bernot, M.J.; Burgin, A.J.; Crenshaw, C.L.; Helton, A.M.; Johnson, L.T.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Potter, J.D.; Sheibley, R.W.; Thomasn, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field 15N-NO- 3 tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (SWden) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N2 production rates far exceeded N2O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO-3 removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NHz 4 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling SWden were specific discharge (discharge / width) and NO-3 concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (Uden) and NO- 3 concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although Uden increased with increasing NO- 3 concentration, the efficiency of NO-3 removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO-3 load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO-3 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO-3 concentration. ?? 2009.

  4. Patent pools and diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Verbeure, Birgit; van Zimmeren, Esther; Matthijs, Gert; Van Overwalle, Geertrui

    2006-03-01

    There is increasing concern that overlapping patents in the field of genetics will create a costly and legally complex situation known as a patent thicket, which, along with the associated issues of accumulating royalty payments, can act as a disincentive for innovation. One potential means of preventing this is for the patent holders to enter into a so-called patent pool, such as those established in the electronics and telecommunications industries. Precedents for these also exist in the field of genetics, notably with the patents pertaining to the SARS genome. In this review, we initially address the patent pool concept in general and its application in genetics. Following this, we will explore patent pools in the diagnostic field in more detail, and examine some existing and novel examples of patent pools in genetics. PMID:16443296

  5. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  6. Using macroalgal δ15N bioassay to detect cruise ship waste water effluent inputs in Skagway, AK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  7. Increasing plant use of organic nitrogen with elevation is reflected in nitrogen uptake rates and ecosystem delta15N.

    PubMed

    Averill, Colin; Finzi, Adrien

    2011-04-01

    It is hypothesized that decreasing mean annual temperature and rates of nitrogen (N) cycling causes plants to switch from inorganic to organic forms of N as the primary mode of N nutrition. To test this hypothesis, we conducted field experiments and collected natural-abundance delta15N signatures of foliage, soils, and ectomycorrhizal sporocarps along a steep elevation-climate gradient in the White Mountains, New Hampshire, USA. Here we show that with increasing elevation organic forms of N became the dominant source of N taken up by hardwood and coniferous tree species based on dual-labeled glycine uptake analysis, an important confirmation of an emerging theory for the biogeochemistry of the N cycle. Variation in natural abundance foliar delta15N with elevation was also consistent with increasing organic N uptake, though a simple, mass balance model demonstrated that the uptake of delta15N depleted inorganic N, rather than fractionation upon transfer of N from mycorrhizal fungi, best explains variations in foliar delta15N with elevation. PMID:21661551

  8. Insight on RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus strains using 13C and 15N kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Anat; Ronen, Zeev; Gelman, Faina

    2013-01-01

    The explosive Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is known to be degraded aerobically by various isolates of the Rhodococcus species, with denitration being the key step, mediated by Cytochrome P450. Our study aimed at gaining insight into the RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus species and comparing isotope effects associated with RDX degradation by distinct Rhodococcus strains. For these purposes, enrichment in (13)C and (15)N isotopes throughout RDX denitration was studied for three distinct Rhodococcus strains, isolated from soil and groundwater in an RDX-contaminated site. The observable (15)N enrichment throughout the reaction, together with minor (13)C enrichment, suggests that N-N bond cleavage is likely to be the key rate-limiting step in the reaction. The similarity in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect between the three tested strains suggests that either isotope-masking effects are negligible, or are of a similar extent for all tested strains. The lack of variability in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect allows the interpretation of environmental studies with greater confidence. PMID:23215036

  9. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Verma, Deepshikha; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2016-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a 150-residue long calmodulin-like calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6), as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization. PMID:26377206

  10. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  11. Stable isotope (13C, 15N and 34S) analysis of the hair of modern humans and their domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Bol, Roland; Pflieger, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Relationships between dietary status and recent migration were examined by delta(13)C, delta(15)N and delta(34)S analysis of hair samples from 43 modern humans living in a rural community in SW England. The isotopic content of 38 'local' hair samples was compared with that of five recently arrived individuals (from Canada, Chile, Germany and the USA). Hair samples from domestic animals (i.e. mainly cats, dogs, cows and horses) were analysed to examine the difference in delta(13)C, delta(15)N and delta(34)S values between herbivores and carnivores. Generally, modern human hair data from the triple stable isotope (delta(13)C, delta(15)N and delta(34)S) provided enough information to confirm the dietary status and origin of the individual subjects. The dietary intake was generally reflected in the animal hair delta(15)N and delta(13)C values, i.e. highest in the carnivores (cats). However, a non-local origin of food sources given to domesticated omnivores (i.e. dogs) was suggested by their hair delta(34)S values. PMID:12442295

  12. Plant community change mediates the response of foliar delta15N to CO2 enrichment in mesic grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may change the isotopic signature of plant N by altering plant and microbial processes involved in the N cycle. Isotope fractionation theory and limited experimental evidence indicate that CO2 may increase leaf delta15N by increasing plant community productivity,...

  13. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with {sup 15}N solid-state NMR shift tensor data

    SciTech Connect

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K.; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T.

    2015-11-21

    The {sup 15}N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated {sup 15}N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2–3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X–Y and X–H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of {sup 15}N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved {sup 1}H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental {sup 15}N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than {sup 13}C tensors due to nitrogen’s greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  14. Contrasting food web linkages for the grazing pathway in 3 temperate forested streams using {sup 15}N as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Tank, J.L.; Mulholland, P.J.; Meyer, J.L.; Bowden, W.B.; Webster, J.R.; Peterson, B.J.

    1998-11-01

    Nitrogen is a critical element controlling the productivity and dynamics of stream ecosystems and many streams are limited by the supply of biologically available nitrogen. The authors are learning more about the fate of inorganic nitrogen entering streams through {sup 15}N tracer additions. The Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiment (LINX) is studying the uptake, cycling, and fate of {sup 15}N-NH{sub 4} in the stream food web of 10 streams draining different biomes. Using the {sup 15}N tracer method and data from 3 sites in the study, the authors can differentiate patterns in the cycling of nitrogen through the grazing pathway (N from the epilithon to grazing macroinvertebrates) for 3 temperate forested streams. Here, they quantify the relationship between the dominant grazer and its proposed food resource, the epilithon, by comparing {sup 15}N levels of grazers with those of the epilithon, as well as the biomass, nitrogen content, and chlorophyll a standing stocks of the epilithon in 3 streams.

  15. Chemoselective detection and discrimination of carbonyl-containing compounds in metabolite mixtures by 1H-detected 15N NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Arumugam, Sengodagounder; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Higashi, Richard M.; Laulhé, Sébastien; Nantz, Michael H.; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectra of mixtures of metabolites extracted from cells or tissues are extremely complex, reflecting the large number of compounds that are present over a wide range of concentrations. Although multidimensional NMR can greatly improve resolution as well as improve reliability of compound assignments, lower abundance metabolites often remain hidden. We have developed a carbonyl selective aminooxy probe that specifically reacts with free keto and aldehyde functions, but not carboxylates. By incorporating 15N in the aminooxy functional group, 15N-edited NMR was used to select exclusively those metabolites that contain a free carbonyl function while all other metabolites are rejected. Here we demonstrate that the chemical shifts of the aminooxy adducts of ketones and aldehydes are very different, which can be used to discriminate between aldoses and ketoses for example. Utilizing the 2 or 3 bond 15N-1H couplings, the 15N-edited NMR analysis was optimized first with authentic standards and then applied to an extract of the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. More than 30 carbonyl containing compounds at NMR detectable levels, 6 of which we have assigned by reference to our database. As the aminooxy probe contains a permanently charged quaternary ammonium group, the adducts are also optimized for detection by mass spectrometry. Thus, this sample preparation technique provides a better link between the two structural determination tools, thereby paving the way to faster and more reliable identification of both known and unknown metabolites directly in crude biological extracts. PMID:25616249

  16. Variation in hair δ13C and δ15N values in long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) from Singapore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schillaci, Michael A.; Castellini, J. Margaret; Stricker, Craig A.; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Lee, Benjamin P.Y.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the primatology literature on stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) has focused on African and New World species, with comparatively little research published on Asian primates. Here we present hair δ13C and δ15N isotope values for a sample of 33 long-tailed macaques from Singapore. We evaluate the suggestion by a previous researcher that forest degradation and biodiversity loss in Singapore have led to a decline in macaque trophic level. The results of our analysis indicated significant spatial variability in δ13C but not δ15N. The range of variation in δ13C was consistent with a diet based on C3 resources, with one group exhibiting low values consistent with a closed canopy environment. Relative to other macaque species from Europe and Asia, the macaques from Singapore exhibited a low mean δ13C value but mid-range mean δ15N value. Previous research suggesting a decline in macaque trophic level is not supported by the results of our study.

  17. Diatom-bound 15N/14N: New support for enhanced nutrient consumption in the ice age subantarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Rebecca S.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Difiore, Peter J.; Rohde, Melissa M.; Mashiotta, Tracy A.; Lea, David W.

    2005-09-01

    Diatom-bound 15N/14N was used to reconstruct the glacial nutrient status of the Subantarctic Zone in the Southern Ocean. Down-core records from both the Pacific and Indian sectors show δ15N of 5 to 6‰ during the Last Glacial Maximum and a decrease, coincident with the glacial termination, to values as low as 2‰. The effect of either diatom assemblage or physiological change on the diatom-bound 15N/14N is unknown and cannot yet be ruled out as a possible explanation for the observed change. However, the consistency between Indian and Pacific sector records and with other paleoceanographic data suggests that the glacial-interglacial difference in diatom-bound 15N/14N was driven by higher consumption of nitrate in the subantarctic surface during the last ice age. Such a change in nutrient consumption may have resulted from atmospheric iron fertilization and/or decreased glacial mixed layer depths associated with sea ice melting. Enhanced nutrient consumption in the glacial subantarctic would have worked to lower the concentration of CO2 in the ice age atmosphere. It also would have reduced the preformed nutrient content of the low-latitude thermocline, leading to decreases in low-latitude productivity, suboxia, and denitrification.

  18. First Experimental Measurement of the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N Reaction at Astrophysical Energies

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Goldberg, V.; Tribble, R.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Sereville, N. de; Tumino, A.

    2010-11-24

    The {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reactions are of primary importance in several as-trophysical scenarios, including nucleosynthesis inside Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. They are also key reactions to understand exotic systems such as R-Coronae Borealis stars and novae. Thus, the measurement of their cross sections in the low energy region can be crucial to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions, because the resonance parameters are poorly determined. The Trojan Horse Method, in its newly developed form particularly suited to investigate low-energy resonances, has been applied to the {sup 2}H({sup 18}O,{alpha}{sup 15}N)n and {sup 2}H({sup 17}O,{alpha}{sup 14}N)n reactions to deduce the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N cross sections at low energies. Resonances in the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N excitation functions have been studied and the resonance parameters deduced.

  19. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of the KSR1 CA1 domain

    PubMed Central

    Koveal, Dorothy; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the murine KSR1 CA1 domain have been determined based on triple-resonance experiments using uniformly [13C, 15N]-labeled protein. This assignment is the first step towards the determination of the three-dimensional structure of the unique KSR1 CA1 domain. PMID:20737253

  20. Direct quantitative determination of cyanamide by stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Kamo, Tsunashi; Nakajima, Eri; Kato, Kenji; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2005-12-01

    Cyanamide is a multifunctional agrochemical used, for example, as a pesticide, herbicide, and fertilizer. Recent research has revealed that cyanamide is a natural product biosynthesized in a leguminous plant, hairy vetch (Vicia villosa). In the present study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with a capillary column for amines was used for direct quantitative determination of cyanamide. Quantitative signals for ((14)N(2))cyanamide, ((15)N(2))cyanamide (internal standard for stable isotope dilution method), and m-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile (internal standard for correcting errors in GC-MS analysis) were recorded as peak areas on mass chromatograms at m/z 42 (A(42)), 44 (A(44)), and 171 (A(IS)), respectively. Total cyanamide content, ((14)N(2))cyanamide plus ((15)N(2))cyanamide, was determined as a function of (A(42)+A(44))/A(IS). Contents of ((14)N(2))cyanamide and ((15)N(2))cyanamide were then calculated by multiplying the total cyanamide content by A(42)/(A(42)+A(44)) and A(44)/(A(42)+A(44)), respectively. The limit of detection for the total cyanamide content by the GC-MS analysis was around 1ng. The molar ratio of ((14)N(2))cyanamide to ((15)N(2))cyanamide in the injected sample was equal to the observed A(42)/A(44) value in the range from 0.1 to 5. It was, therefore, possible to use the stable isotope dilution method to quantify the natural cyanamide content in samples; i.e., the natural cyanamide content was derived by subtracting the A(42)/A(44) ratio of the internal standard from the A(42)/A(44) ratio of sample spiked with internal standard, and then multiplying the resulting difference by the amount of added ((15)N(2))cyanamide (SID-GC-MS method). This method successfully gave a reasonable value for the natural cyanamide content in hairy vetch, concurring with the value obtained by a conventional method in which cyanamide was derivatized to a photometrically active compound 4-cyanimido-1,2-naphthoquinone and analyzed with reversed

  1. The Titan 14N/ 15N and 12C/ 13C isotopic ratios in HCN from Cassini/CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Nixon, Conor A.

    2007-11-01

    We report the detection of H 13CN and HC 15N in mid-infrared spectra recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini, along with the determination of the 12C/ 13C and 14N/ 15N isotopic ratios. We analyzed two sets of limb spectra recorded near 13-15° S (Tb flyby) and 83° N (T4 flyby) at 0.5 cm -1 resolution. The spectral range 1210-1310 cm -1 was used to retrieve the temperature profile in the range 145-490 km at 13° S and 165-300 km at 83° N. These two temperature profiles were then incorporated in the atmospheric model to retrieve the abundance profile of H 12C 14N, H 13CN and HC 15N from their bands at 713, 706 and 711 cm -1, respectively. The HCN abundance profile was retrieved in the range 90-460 km at 15° S and 165-305 km at 83° N. There is no evidence for vertical variations of the isotopic ratios. Constraining the isotopic abundance profiles to be proportional to the HCN one, we find C12/C13=89-18+22 at 15° S, and 68-12+16 at 83° N, two values that are statistically consistent. A combination of these results yields a 12C/ 13C value equal to 75±12. This global result, as well as the 15° S one, envelop the value in Titan's methane ( 82.3±1) [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779-784] measured at 10° S and is slightly lower than the terrestrial inorganic standard value (89). The 14N/ 15N isotopic ratio is found equal to 56-13+16 at 15° S and 56-9+10 at 83° N. Combining the two values yields 14N/ 15N = 56 ± 8, which corresponds to an enrichment in 15N of about 4.9 compared with the terrestrial ratio. These results agree with the values obtained from previous ground-based millimeter observations [Hidayat, T., Marten, A., Bézard, B., Gautier, D., Owen, T., Matthews, H.E., Paubert, G., 1997. Icarus 126, 170-182; Marten, A., Hidayat, T., Biraud, Y., Moreno, R., 2002. Icarus 158, 532-544]. The 15N/ 14N ratio found in HCN is ˜3 times higher than in N 2 [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779

  2. Whole-genome haplotyping by dilution, amplification, and sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kaper, Fiona; Swamy, Sajani; Klotzle, Brandy; Munchel, Sarah; Cottrell, Joseph; Bibikova, Marina; Chuang, Han-Yu; Kruglyak, Semyon; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Eberle, Michael A.; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Standard whole-genome genotyping technologies are unable to determine haplotypes. Here we describe a method for rapid and cost-effective long-range haplotyping. Genomic DNA is diluted and distributed into multiple aliquots such that each aliquot receives a fraction of a haploid copy. The DNA template in each aliquot is amplified by multiple displacement amplification, converted into barcoded sequencing libraries using Nextera technology, and sequenced in multiplexed pools. To assess the performance of our method, we combined two male genomic DNA samples at equal ratios, resulting in a sample with diploid X chromosomes with known haplotypes. Pools of the multiplexed sequencing libraries were subjected to targeted pull-down of a 1-Mb contiguous region of the X-chromosome Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene. We were able to phase the Duchenne muscular dystrophy region into two contiguous haplotype blocks with a mean length of 494 kb. The haplotypes showed 99% agreement with the consensus base calls made by sequencing the individual DNAs. We subsequently used the strategy to haplotype two human genomes. Standard genomic sequencing to identify all heterozygous SNPs in the sample was combined with dilution-amplification–based sequencing data to resolve the phase of identified heterozygous SNPs. Using this procedure, we were able to phase >95% of the heterozygous SNPs from the diploid sequence data. The N50 for a Yoruba male DNA was 702 kb whereas the N50 for a European female DNA was 358 kb. Therefore, the strategy described here is suitable for haplotyping of a set of targeted regions as well as of the entire genome. PMID:23509297

  3. Whole-genome haplotyping by dilution, amplification, and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kaper, Fiona; Swamy, Sajani; Klotzle, Brandy; Munchel, Sarah; Cottrell, Joseph; Bibikova, Marina; Chuang, Han-Yu; Kruglyak, Semyon; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Eberle, Michael A; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2013-04-01

    Standard whole-genome genotyping technologies are unable to determine haplotypes. Here we describe a method for rapid and cost-effective long-range haplotyping. Genomic DNA is diluted and distributed into multiple aliquots such that each aliquot receives a fraction of a haploid copy. The DNA template in each aliquot is amplified by multiple displacement amplification, converted into barcoded sequencing libraries using Nextera technology, and sequenced in multiplexed pools. To assess the performance of our method, we combined two male genomic DNA samples at equal ratios, resulting in a sample with diploid X chromosomes with known haplotypes. Pools of the multiplexed sequencing libraries were subjected to targeted pull-down of a 1-Mb contiguous region of the X-chromosome Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene. We were able to phase the Duchenne muscular dystrophy region into two contiguous haplotype blocks with a mean length of 494 kb. The haplotypes showed 99% agreement with the consensus base calls made by sequencing the individual DNAs. We subsequently used the strategy to haplotype two human genomes. Standard genomic sequencing to identify all heterozygous SNPs in the sample was combined with dilution-amplification-based sequencing data to resolve the phase of identified heterozygous SNPs. Using this procedure, we were able to phase >95% of the heterozygous SNPs from the diploid sequence data. The N50 for a Yoruba male DNA was 702 kb whereas the N50 for a European female DNA was 358 kb. Therefore, the strategy described here is suitable for haplotyping of a set of targeted regions as well as of the entire genome. PMID:23509297

  4. Trophic guilds of generalist feeders in soil animal communities as indicated by stable isotope analysis (15N/14N).

    PubMed

    Oelbermann, K; Scheu, S

    2010-10-01

    We investigated if the commonly used aggregation of organisms into trophic guilds, such as detritivores and predators, in fact represent distinct trophic levels. Soil arthropods of a forest-meadow transect were ascribed a priori to trophic guilds (herbivores, detritivores, predators and necrovores), which are often used as an equivalent to trophic levels. We analysed natural variations in 15N/14N ratios of the animals in order to investigate the trophic similarity of organisms within (a priori defined) trophic guilds. Using trophic guilds as an equivalent to trophic level, the assumed stepwise enrichment of 15N by 3.4 per thousand per trophic level did not apply to detritivores; they were only enriched in 15N by on average 1.5 per thousand compared to litter materials. Predators on average were enriched in 15N by 3.5 per thousand compared to detritivores. Within detritvores and predators delta15N signatures varied markedly, indicating that these trophic guilds are dominated by generalist feeders which form a gradient of organisms feeding on different resources. The results indicate that commonly used trophic guilds, in particular detritivores and predators, do not represent trophic levels but consist of subguilds, i.e. subsets of organisms differing in resource utilization. In particular, in soil and litter food webs where trophic level omnivory is common, the use of distinct trophic levels may be inappropriate. Guilds of species delineated by natural variations of stable isotope ratios are assumed to more adequately represent the structure of litter and soil food webs allowing a more detailed understanding of their functioning. PMID:20109270

  5. Retrospective characterization of ontogenetic shifts in killer whale diets via δ13C and δ15N analysis of teeth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsome, Seth D.; Etnier, Michael A.; Monson, Daniel H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolically inert, accretionary structures such as the dentin growth layers in teeth provide a life history record of individual diet with near-annual resolution. We constructed ontogenetic δ13C and δ15N profiles by analyzing tooth dentin growth layers from 13 individual killer whales Orcinus orca collected in the eastern northeast Pacific Ocean between 1961 and 2003. The individuals sampled were 6 to 52 yr old, representing 2 ecotypes—resident and transient—collected across ~25° of latitude. The average isotopic values of transient individuals (n = 10) are consistent with a reliance on mammalian prey, while the average isotopic values of residents (n = 3) are consistent with piscivory. Regardless of ecotype, most individuals show a decrease in δ15N values of ~2.5‰ through the first 3 yr of life, roughly equivalent to a decrease of one trophic level. We interpret this as evidence of gradual weaning, after which, ontogenetic shifts in isotopic values are highly variable. A few individuals (n = 2) maintained relatively stable δ15N and δ13C values throughout the remainder of their lives, whereas δ15N values of most (n = 11) increased by ~1.5‰, suggestive of an ontogenetic increase in trophic level. Significant differences in mean δ13C and δ15N values among transients collected off California suggest that individuality in prey preferences may be prevalent within this ecotype. Our approach provides retrospective individual life history and dietary information that cannot be obtained through traditional field observations of free-ranging and elusive species such as killer whales, including unique historic ecological information that pre-dates modern studies. By providing insights into individual diet composition, stable isotope analysis of teeth and/or bones may be the only means of evaluating a number of hypothesized historical dietary shifts in killer whales of the northeast Pacific Ocean

  6. Retrospective characterization of ontogenetic shifts in killer whale diets via δ13C and δ15N analysis of teeth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsome, Seth D.; Etnier, Michael A.; Monson, Daniel H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolically inert, accretionary structures such as the dentin growth layers in teeth provide a life history record of individual diet with near-annual resolution. We constructed ontogenetic ??13C and ??15N profiles by analyzing tooth dentin growth layers from 13 individual killer whales Orcinus orca collected in the eastern northeast Pacific Ocean between 1961 and 2003. The individuals sampled were 6 to 52 yr old, representing 2 ecotypes-resident and transient - collected across ???25?? of latitude. The average isotopic values of transient individuals (n = 10) are consistent with a reliance on mammalian prey, while the average isotopic values of residents (n = 3) are consistent with piscivory. Regardless of ecotype, most individuals show a decrease in ??15N values of ???2.5% through the first 3 yr of life, roughly equivalent to a decrease of one trophic level. We interpret this as evidence of gradual weaning, after which, ontogenetic shifts in isotopic values are highly variable. A few individuals (n = 2) maintained relatively stable ??15N and ??13C values throughout the remainder of their lives, whereas ??15N values of most (n = 11) increased by ???1.5%, suggestive of an ontogenetic increase in trophic level. Significant differences in mean ??13C and ??15N values among transients collected off California suggest that individuality in prey preferences may be prevalent within this ecotype. Our approach provides retrospective individual life history and dietary information that cannot be obtained through traditional field observations of free-ranging and elusive species such as killer whales, including unique historic ecological information that pre-dates modern studies. By providing insights into individual diet composition, stable isotope analysis of teeth and/or bones may be the only means of evaluating a number of hypothesized historical dietary shifts in killer whales of the northeast Pacific Ocean. ?? Inter-Research 2009.

  7. Range Expansion of the Jumbo Squid in the NE Pacific: δ15N Decrypts Multiple Origins, Migration and Habitat Use

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I.; Ballance, Lisa T.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Coincident with climate shifts and anthropogenic perturbations, the highly voracious jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas reached unprecedented northern latitudes along the NE Pacific margin post 1997–98. The physical or biological drivers of this expansion, as well as its ecological consequences remain unknown. Here, novel analysis from both bulk tissues and individual amino acids (Phenylalanine; Phe and Glutamic acid; Glu) in both gladii and muscle of D. gigas captured in the Northern California Current System (NCCS) documents for the first time multiple geographic origins and migration. Phe δ15N values, a proxy for habitat baseline δ15N values, confirm at least three different geographic origins that were initially detected by highly variable bulk δ15N values in gladii for squid at small sizes (<30 cm gladii length). In contrast, bulk δ15N values from gladii of large squid (>60 cm) converged, indicating feeding in a common ecosystem. The strong latitudinal gradient in Phe δ15N values from composite muscle samples further confirmed residency at a point in time for large squid in the NCCS. These results contrast with previous ideas, and indicate that small squid are highly migratory, move into the NCCS from two or more distinct geographic origins, and use this ecosystem mainly for feeding. These results represent the first direct information on the origins, immigration and habitat use of this key “invasive” predator in the NCCS, with wide implications for understanding both the mechanisms of periodic D. gigas population range expansions, and effects on ecosystem trophic structure. PMID:23527242

  8. (15)N methodologies for quantifying the response of N2-fixing associations to elevated [CO2]: A review.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Phillip M; Lam, Shu K; Chen, Deli

    2016-11-15

    Methodologies based on (15)N enrichment (E) and (15)N natural abundance (NA) have been used to obtain quantitative estimates of the response of biological N2 fixation (BNF) of legumes (woody, grain and forage) and actinorhizal plants grown in artificial media or in soil exposed to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide e[CO2] for extended periods of time, in growth rooms, greenhouses, open top chambers or free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facilities. (15)N2 has also been used to quantify the response of endophytic and free-living diazotrophs to e[CO2]. The primary criterion of response was the proportional dependence of the N2-fixing system on the atmosphere as a source of N. i.e. the symbiotic dependence (Patm). The unique feature of (15)N-based methods is their ability to provide time-integrated and yield-independent estimates of Patm. In studies conducted in artificial media or in soil using the E methodology there was either no response or a positive response of Patm to e[CO2]. The interpretation of results obtained in artificial media or with (15)N2 is straight forward, not being subject to the assumptions on which the E and NA soil-cultured methods are based. A variety of methods have been used to estimate isotopic fractionation attendant on the NA technique, the so-called 'B value', which attaches a degree of uncertainty to the results obtained. Using the NA technique, a suite of responses of Patm to e[CO2] has been published, from positive to neutral to sometimes negative effects. Several factors which interact with the response of N2-fixing species to e[CO2] were identified. PMID:27424117

  9. Oceanic δ15N biogeography: a novel top-down approach to examine nutrient dynamics in the equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, B. S.; Fry, B.; Popp, B. N.; Allain, V.; Olson, R.; Galvan, F.

    2010-12-01

    By mapping the δ15N and δ13C values of three top-level pelagic predators, yellowfin (Thunnus albacares), bigeye (T. obesus), and skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) tuna throughout the equatorial Pacific Ocean, we demonstrated systematic geographic isotopic variation (up to ~12‰ for the δ15N values) that reflect nutrient dynamics that occur at the base of the food web. Remarkably the variation observed in the δ15N values of the tunas is geographically similar to δ15N values previously reported in surface particulate organic matter and deep-sea sediments in the tropical Pacific. We discuss the mechanisms occurring at the base of the food web that could produce the spatial variability observed in tropical tuna δ15N values. We present a simple Rayleigh fractionation model that can explain much of the spatial structure. We also discuss the temporal stability in the isotopic compositions at the base and top of the food web. Overall, this nitrogen isotope cartography or “isoscapes” suggests nitrogen is tightly retained in the marine food web, up to the top predators, and that the uptake of nitrate from the equatorial upwelling zone, denitrification in the oxygen minimum zones, and nitrogen fixation at the base of the food web play major roles in the observed geographical variation. In addition to providing insight into the nutrient dynamics of the open ocean, these predator isoscapes can begin to be used to characterize regional residency in tropical tunas, which is important for the successful management of tuna fisheries.

  10. Quantum Chemical Calculations of Amide-15N Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors for a Membrane-Bound Cytochrome b5

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining amide-15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors from biomolecules and understanding their variation for structural and dynamics studies using solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy and also by quantum chemical calculations. Due to the difficulties associated with the measurement of CSA tensors from membrane proteins, NMR-based structural studies heavily relied on the CSA tensors determined from model systems, typically single crystals of model peptides. In the present study, the principal components of backbone amide-15N CSA tensor have been determined using density functional theory for a 16.7-kDa membrane-bound paramagnetic heme containing protein, cytochrome b5 (cytb5). All the calculations were performed by taking residues within 5Å distance from the backbone amide-15N nucleus of interest. The calculated amide-15N CSA spans agree less well with our solution NMR data determined for an effective internuclear distance rN-H = 1.023 Å and a constant angle β = 18° that the least shielded component (δ11) makes with the N-H bond. The variation of amide-15N CSA span obtained using quantum chemical calculations is found to be smaller than that obtained from solution NMR measurements, whereas the trends of the variations are found to be in close agreement. We believe that the results reported in this study will be useful in studying the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and heme-containing proteins, and also membrane-bound protein-protein complexes such as cytochromes-b5-P450. PMID:23268659

  11. SRLS analysis of 15N spin relaxation from E. coli ribonuclease HI: the tensorial perspective.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Eva; Shapiro, Yury E; Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino

    2012-01-19

    15N–H relaxation parameters from ribonuclease HI (RNase H), acquired in previous work at magnetic fields of 14.1 and 18.8 T, and at 300 K, are analyzed with the mode-coupling slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach. In accordance with standard theoretical treatments of restricted motions, SRLS approaches N-H bond dynamics from a tensorial perspective. As shown previously, a physically adequate description of this phenomenon has to account for the asymmetry of the local spatial restrictions. So far, we used rhombic local ordering tensors; this is straightforward but computationally demanding. Here, we propose substantiating the asymmetry of the local spatial restrictions in terms of tilted axial local ordering (S) and local diffusion (D2) tensors. Although less straightforward, this description provides physically sound structural and dynamic information and is efficient computationally. We find that the local order parameter, S(0)2, is on average 0.89 (0.84, and may be as small as 0.6) for the secondary structure elements (loops). The main local ordering axis deviates from the C(i-1)α-C(i)α axis by less than 6°. At 300 K, D(2,perpendicular) is virtually the same as the global diffusion rate, D1 = 1.8 × 10(7) s(-1). The correlation time 1/6D(2,parallel) ranges from 3-125 (208-344) ps for the secondary structure elements (loops) and is on average 125 ps for the C-terminal segment. The main local diffusion axis deviates from the N-H bond by less than 2° (10°) for the secondary structure elements (loops). An effective data-fitting protocol, which leads in most cases to unambiguous results with limited uncertainty, has been devised. A physically sound and computationally effective methodology for analyzing 15N relaxation in proteins, that provides a new picture of N–H bond structural dynamics in proteins, has been set forth. PMID:22126306

  12. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Kaiser, M.; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; Sommer, M.

    2011-03-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. We used the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractions from soil to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We used OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1) OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY)) and (2) OM stabilized in microstructures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER)). Furthermore, because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms within these soils. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established proxies of different binding mechanisms. Parsing soil OM into different fractions is a systematic method of dissection, however, we are primarily interested in how OM is bound in soil as a whole, requiring a means of re-assembly. Thus, we implemented the recent zonal framework described by Kleber et al. (2007) to relate our findings to undisturbed soil. The δ15N signature of OM fractions served as a reliable indicator for microbial processed carbon in both arable and forest land use types. The δ13C signature of OM fractions in arable sites did not correlate well with proxies of soil mineral properties while a consistent pattern of enrichment was seen in the δ13C of OM fractions in the forest sites. We found a significant difference in δ13C of pooled OM fractions between the forest and arable land use type although it was relatively small (<1‰). We found different binding mechanisms predominate in each land use type. The isotopic signatures of OM fractions from arable soils were highly related to the clay and silt size particles amount while

  13. Defining fish community structure in Lake Winnipeg using stable isotopes (δ(13)C, δ(15)N, δ(34)S): implications for monitoring ecological responses and trophodynamics of mercury & other trace elements.

    PubMed

    Ofukany, Amy F A; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Bond, Alexander L; Hobson, Keith A

    2014-11-01

    The ecological integrity of freshwater lakes is influenced by atmospheric and riverine deposition of contaminants, shoreline development, eutrophication, and the introduction of non-native species. Changes to the trophic structure of Lake Winnipeg, Canada, and consequently, the concentrations of contaminants and trace elements measured in tissues of native fishes, are likely attributed to agricultural runoff from the 977,800 km(2) watershed and the arrival of non-native zooplankters and fishes. We measured δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(34)S along with concentrations of 15 trace elements in 17 native fishes from the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg in 2009 and 2010. After adjusting for differences in isotopic baseline values between the two basins, fishes in the south basin had consistently higher δ(13)C and δ(34)S, and lower δ(15)N. We found little evidence of biomagnification of trace elements at the community level, but walleye (Sander vitreus) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) had higher mercury and selenium concentrations with increased trophic position, coincident with increased piscivory. There was evidence of growth dilution of cobalt, copper, manganese, molybdenum, thallium, and vanadium, and bioaccumulation of mercury, which could be explained by increases in algal (and consequently, lake and fish) productivity. We conclude that the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg represent very different communities with different trophic structures and trace element concentrations. PMID:25129159

  14. Electrocoalescence based serial dilution of microfluidic droplets

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Biddut; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of microfluidic droplets where the concentration of a reagent is incrementally varied is a key operation in drop-based biological analysis. Here, we present an electrocoalescence based dilution scheme for droplets based on merging between moving and parked drops. We study the effects of fluidic and electrical parameters on the dilution process. Highly consistent coalescence and fine resolution in dilution factor are achieved with an AC signal as low as 10 V even though the electrodes are separated from the fluidic channel by insulator. We find that the amount of material exchange between the droplets per coalescence event is high for low capillary number. We also observe different types of coalescence depending on the flow and electrical parameters and discuss their influence on the rate of dilution. Overall, we find the key parameter governing the rate of dilution is the duration of coalescence between the moving and parked drop. The proposed design is simple incorporating the channel electrodes in the same layer as that of the fluidic channels. Our approach allows on-demand and controlled dilution of droplets and is simple enough to be useful for assays that require serial dilutions. The approach can also be useful for applications where there is a need to replace or wash fluid from stored drops. PMID:25379096

  15. DAVINCI a Dilute Aperture Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The motivation for DAVINCI was originally to make use of the technology developed for space interferometers like SIM to build a coronagraph from four 1.1m telescopes that was dramatically lower in cost than a 4 5m filled aperture offaxis coronagraph. Our initial studies through team X have shown this cost savings to be real. But a more careful analysis showed that DAVINCI would have an inner working angle of 35mas a factor of 2 smaller than a 2 lambda/D 4 meter coronagraph or 70m external occulter, resulting in a 10X increase in the number of potential Earth-Clone targets. DAVINCI uses a nulling interferometer as a coronagraph, a nulling interferometer is one the few coronagraph architectures that are compatible with segmented and dilute aperture telescopes. Combined with a post coronagraph wavefront sensor several ultra-demanding tolerances of conventional coronagraphs can be relaxed by factors of 100. The post coronagraph wavefront sensor is also much less affected by local and exozodi background than wavefront sensors that use the science camera as the wavefront sensor. The post coronagraph interferometer is also used on ground based extreme AO coronagraphs, GPI, and P1640.

  16. Simple approach for the preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water for nitrogen fixation assessments: evaluation, application and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Klawonn, Isabell; Lavik, Gaute; Böning, Philipp; Marchant, Hannah K.; Dekaezemacker, Julien; Mohr, Wiebke; Ploug, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings revealed that the commonly used 15N2 tracer assay for the determination of dinitrogen (N2) fixation can underestimate the activity of aquatic N2-fixing organisms. Therefore, a modification to the method using pre-prepared 15−15N2-enriched water was proposed. Here, we present a rigorous assessment and outline a simple procedure for the preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water. We recommend to fill sterile-filtered water into serum bottles and to add 15−15N2 gas to the water in amounts exceeding the standard N2 solubility, followed by vigorous agitation (vortex mixing ≥ 5 min). Optionally, water can be degassed at low-pressure (≥950 mbar) for 10 min prior to the 15−15N2 gas addition to indirectly enhance the 15−15N2 concentration. This preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water can be done within 1 h using standard laboratory equipment. The final 15N-atom% excess was 5% after replacing 2–5% of the incubation volume with 15−15N2-enriched water. Notably, the addition of 15−15N2-enriched water can alter levels of trace elements in the incubation water due to the contact of 15−15N2-enriched water with glass, plastic and rubber ware. In our tests, levels of trace elements (Fe, P, Mn, Mo, Cu, Zn) increased by up to 0.1 nmol L−1 in the final incubation volume, which may bias rate measurements in regions where N2 fixation is limited by trace elements. For these regions, we tested an alternative way to enrich water with 15−15N2. The 15−15N2 was injected as a bubble directly to the incubation water, followed by gentle shaking. Immediately thereafter, the bubble was replaced with water to stop the 15−15N2 equilibration. This approach achieved a 15N-atom% excess of 6.6 ± 1.7% when adding 2 mL 15−15N2 per liter of incubation water. The herein presented methodological tests offer guidelines for the 15N2 tracer assay and thus, are crucial to circumvent methodological draw-backs for future N2 fixation assessments. PMID:26300853

  17. Simple approach for the preparation of (15-15)N2-enriched water for nitrogen fixation assessments: evaluation, application and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Klawonn, Isabell; Lavik, Gaute; Böning, Philipp; Marchant, Hannah K; Dekaezemacker, Julien; Mohr, Wiebke; Ploug, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings revealed that the commonly used (15)N2 tracer assay for the determination of dinitrogen (N2) fixation can underestimate the activity of aquatic N2-fixing organisms. Therefore, a modification to the method using pre-prepared (15-15)N2-enriched water was proposed. Here, we present a rigorous assessment and outline a simple procedure for the preparation of (15-15)N2-enriched water. We recommend to fill sterile-filtered water into serum bottles and to add (15-15)N2 gas to the water in amounts exceeding the standard N2 solubility, followed by vigorous agitation (vortex mixing ≥ 5 min). Optionally, water can be degassed at low-pressure (≥950 mbar) for 10 min prior to the (15-15)N2 gas addition to indirectly enhance the (15-15)N2 concentration. This preparation of (15-15)N2-enriched water can be done within 1 h using standard laboratory equipment. The final (15)N-atom% excess was 5% after replacing 2-5% of the incubation volume with (15-15)N2-enriched water. Notably, the addition of (15-15)N2-enriched water can alter levels of trace elements in the incubation water due to the contact of (15-15)N2-enriched water with glass, plastic and rubber ware. In our tests, levels of trace elements (Fe, P, Mn, Mo, Cu, Zn) increased by up to 0.1 nmol L(-1) in the final incubation volume, which may bias rate measurements in regions where N2 fixation is limited by trace elements. For these regions, we tested an alternative way to enrich water with (15-15)N2. The (15-15)N2 was injected as a bubble directly to the incubation water, followed by gentle shaking. Immediately thereafter, the bubble was replaced with water to stop the (15-15)N2 equilibration. This approach achieved a (15)N-atom% excess of 6.6 ± 1.7% when adding 2 mL (15-15)N2 per liter of incubation water. The herein presented methodological tests offer guidelines for the (15)N2 tracer assay and thus, are crucial to circumvent methodological draw-backs for future N2 fixation assessments. PMID:26300853

  18. Color-dilution alopecia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Kang, Kyung Il; Sohn, Hyun Joo; Woo, Gye Hyeong; Jean, Young Hwa; Hwang, Eui Kyung

    2005-09-01

    Color-dilution alopecia is a relatively uncommon hereditary skin disease seen in "Blue" and other color-diluted dogs. This syndrome is associated with a color-dilution gene. The initial clinical signs are the gradual onset of a dry, dull and poor hair coat quality. Hair shafts and hair regrowth are poor, and follicular papules may develop and progress to frank comedones. Hair loss and comedo formation are usually most severe on the trunk, especially color-diluted area on the skin. Six cases of color-dilution alopecia are reported in 3 months to 10 years old dogs. The breeds of dogs are blue Doberman Pinscher, Miniature Pinscher, Dachshund, and Schnauzer. Grossly, extensive partial hair loss was seen on the skin. Histopathologically, the epidermis is relatively normal but may be hyperplastic. Hair follicles are characterized by atrophy and distortion. Heavily clumped melanin is present in the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles. PMID:16131833

  19. 47 CFR 13.215 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Question pools. 13.215 Section 13.215... Question pools. The question pool for each written examination element will be composed of questions acceptable to the FCC. Each question pool must contain at least five (5) times the number of...

  20. 47 CFR 13.215 - Question pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Question pools. 13.215 Section 13.215... Question pools. The question pool for each written examination element will be composed of questions acceptable to the FCC. Each question pool must contain at least five (5) times the number of...

  1. HYDROLOGY AND LANDSCAPE CONNECTIVITY OF VERNAL POOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vernal pools are shaped by hydrologic processes which influence many aspects of pool function. The hydrologic budget of a pool can be summarized by a water balance equation that relates changes in the amount of water in the pool to precipitation, ground- and surface-water flows, ...

  2. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swimming pools. 1250.89 Section 1250.89 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.89 Swimming pools. (a) Fill and draw swimming pools shall not be installed or used. (b) Swimming pools of the recirculation type shall...

  3. Swimming Pools. Managing School Facilities, Guide 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England). Architects and Building Branch.

    This guide for schools with swimming pools offers advice concerning appropriate training for pool managers, the importance of water quality and testing, safety in the handling of chemicals, maintenance and cleaning requirements, pool security, and health concerns. The guide covers both indoor and outdoor pools, explains some technical terms,…

  4. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Udgaonkar, J B; Hosur, R V

    2000-10-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 degrees C, pH 6.6, using 15N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D [1H]-15N NMR spectroscopy. 15N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R2), and steady-state heteronuclear [1H]-15N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide 15N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times (tau(m)) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motion's cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface may have important implications for remote effects and regulation of the enzyme action. PMID

  5. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Gabe V.; Carlson, Nancy M.; Donaldson, Alan D.

    1991-01-01

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid.

  6. Solving the woolly mammoth conundrum: amino acid 15N-enrichment suggests a distinct forage or habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz-Narbonne, Rachel; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Metcalfe, Jessica Z.; Zazula, Grant

    2015-06-01

    Understanding woolly mammoth ecology is key to understanding Pleistocene community dynamics and evaluating the roles of human hunting and climate change in late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions. Previous isotopic studies of mammoths’ diet and physiology have been hampered by the ‘mammoth conundrum’: woolly mammoths have anomalously high collagen δ15N values, which are more similar to coeval carnivores than herbivores, and which could imply a distinct diet and (or) habitat, or a physiological adaptation. We analyzed individual amino acids from collagen of adult woolly mammoths and coeval species, and discovered greater  15N enrichment in source amino acids of woolly mammoths than in most other herbivores or carnivores. Woolly mammoths consumed an isotopically distinct food source, reflective of extreme aridity, dung fertilization, and (or) plant selection. This dietary signal suggests that woolly mammoths occupied a distinct habitat or forage niche relative to other Pleistocene herbivores.

  7. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry: delta13C and delta15 N analysis for tracing the origin of illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    Galimov, E M; Sevastyanov, V S; Kulbachevskaya, E V; Golyavin, A A

    2005-01-01

    Gas chromatography/combustion/mass spectrometry (GC-C-MS) and elemental analysis/mass spectrometry (EA-MS) techniques are proposed to estimate delta(13)C and delta(15)N values in heroin, morphine, cocaine and hemp leaves, for the purposes of tracing the geographical origins of seized drugs. The values of isotope ratios for pure drugs and drugs with impurities were compared. It was demonstrated that large samples (up to 3 x 10(-6) g C) were combusted completely, so that the results obtained were valid. The data are considered to be an essential supplement to a wide-scale database designed specifically for the delta(13)C and delta(15)N values of drugs. The potential forensic and academic significance of the results is discussed. PMID:15832288

  8. Solving the woolly mammoth conundrum: amino acid 15N-enrichment suggests a distinct forage or habitat

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz-Narbonne, Rachel; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Metcalfe, Jessica Z.; Zazula, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Understanding woolly mammoth ecology is key to understanding Pleistocene community dynamics and evaluating the roles of human hunting and climate change in late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions. Previous isotopic studies of mammoths’ diet and physiology have been hampered by the ‘mammoth conundrum’: woolly mammoths have anomalously high collagen δ15N values, which are more similar to coeval carnivores than herbivores, and which could imply a distinct diet and (or) habitat, or a physiological adaptation. We analyzed individual amino acids from collagen of adult woolly mammoths and coeval species, and discovered greater  15N enrichment in source amino acids of woolly mammoths than in most other herbivores or carnivores. Woolly mammoths consumed an isotopically distinct food source, reflective of extreme aridity, dung fertilization, and (or) plant selection. This dietary signal suggests that woolly mammoths occupied a distinct habitat or forage niche relative to other Pleistocene herbivores. PMID:26056037

  9. Cross sections for n+{sup 14}N from an R-matrix analysis of the {sup 15}N system

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.M.; Young, P.G.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program, a new evaluation of the neutron cross sections for {sup 14}N was made for ENDF/B-VI, based at energies below 2.5 MeV on a multichannel R-matrix analysis of reactions in the {sup 15}N system. The types of data used in the analysis, and the resulting cross sections and resonance structure for {sup 15}N are briefly described. The resonant features of the neutron cross sections were especially well determined by including precise, high-resolution neutron total cross section measurements from ORNL. While the new evaluated cross section appear to be significant improvements over the earlier ones, they still need to be tested more extensively against recent measurements of the differential elastic cross section from Oak Ridge.

  10. Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15N, 13C, and 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Hoatson, G. L.; Holloway, B. C.; Vold, R. L.; Reilly, A. C.

    2003-11-01

    The nitrogen bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is examined with 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests revealed an elastic recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. The NMR results show that nitrogen bonding in this material is consistent with sp2 hybridized nitrogen incorporated in an aromatic carbon environment. The data also indicate that the a-CNx prepared for this study has very low hydrogen content and is hydrophilic. Specifically, analysis of 15N and 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning and 1H NMR experiments suggests that water preferentially protonates nitrogen sites.

  11. Determining the source of nitrate pollution in the Niger discontinuous aquifers using the natural {15N }/{14N } ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Pierre; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    1997-12-01

    In the semi-arid Niamey area (Niger), more than 10% of the deep wells exploiting the fracture network of the Precambrian aquifer are contaminated by nitrates, with concentrations as high as 10 meq l -1. In order to identify the source(s) of this pollution, nitrate and 15N contents in the polluted wells were monitored over a 20-month period. Potential sources of nitrate contamination were also analyzed for their 15N content. The isotopic compositions of nitrate in polluted waters were > + 12‰ and in rare cases exceeded +17‰. Latrines (˜ + 15‰) may be the major nitrate source for wells showing δ15N values above +15‰. Below this value, waters may be polluted by a combination of nitrates from both latrine and soil sources (˜ + 10‰). In some cases, the soil may account for up to 85% of the groundwater nitrate load. This mode of groundwater pollution is thought to be a consequence of deforestation. Despite their reputation as polluting agents, fertilizers ( +0.5 < δ 15N < + 3.6‰ ) which are used in rice paddies close to the contaminated areas, do not appear to be a significant source of nitrate contamination. Denitrification is probably not a significant process in the study area. Results suggest that nitrate contamination of the aquifer is a consequence of unregulated urbanization (home-made latrines) and deforestation. While latrines are limited to the urban zones, intensive cutting of the forest to meet the city dwellers' wood demand occurs in an ever increasing area around the capital, threatening the local water supply.

  12. Assignment of the sup 1 H and sup 15 N NMR spectra of Rhodobacter capsulatus ferrocytochrome c sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gooley, P.R.; Caffrey, M.S.; Cusanovich, M.A.; MacKenzie, N.E. )

    1990-03-06

    The peptide resonances of the {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of ferrocytochrome c{sub 2} from Rhodobacter capsulatus are sequentially assigned by a combination of 2D {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N spectroscopy, the latter performed on {sup 15}N-enriched protein. Short-range nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data show {alpha}-helices from residues 3-17, 55-65, 69-88, and 103-115. Within the latter two {alpha}-helices, there are three single 3{sub 10} turns, 70-72, 76-78, and 107-109. In addition {alpha}H-NH{sub i+1} and {alpha}H-NH{sub i+2} NOEs indicate that the N-terminal helix (3-17) is distorted. Compared to horse or tuna cytochrome c and cytochrome c{sub 2} of Rhodospirillium rubrum, there is a 6-residue insertion at residues 23-29 in R. capsulatus cytochrome c{sub 2}. The NOE data show that this insertion forms a loop, probably an {Omega} loop. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation experiments are used to follow NH exchange over a period of 40 h. As the 2D spectra are acquired in short time periods (30 min), rates for intermediate exchanging protons can be measured. Comparison of the NH exchange data for the N-terminal helix of cytochrome c{sub 2} of R. capsulatus with the highly homologous horse heart cytochrome c shows that this helix is less stable in cytochrome c{sub 2}.

  13. Secondary structure and (1)H, (13)C, (15)N resonance assignments of the endosomal sorting protein sorting nexin 3.

    PubMed

    Overduin, Michael; Rajesh, Sandya; Gruenberg, Jean; Lenoir, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Sorting nexin 3 (SNX3) belongs to a sub-family of sorting nexins that primarily contain a single Phox homology domain capable of binding phosphoinositides and membranes. We report the complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the full-length human SNX3 protein and identification of its secondary structure elements, revealing a canonical fold and unstructured termini. PMID:25893673

  14. Evaluating mercury biomagnification in fish from a tropical marine environment using stable isotopes (delta13C and delta15N).

    PubMed

    Al-Reasi, Hassan A; Ababneh, Fuad A; Lean, David R

    2007-08-01

    Concentrations of total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) were measured in zooplankton and 13 fish species from a coastal food web of the Gulf of Oman, an arm of the Arabian Sea between Oman and Iran. Stable isotope ratios (delta13C and delta15N) also were determined to track mercury biomagnification. The average concentration of T-Hg in zooplankton was 21 +/- 8.0 ng g(-1) with MeHg accounting 10% of T-Hg. Total mercury levels in fish species ranged from 3.0 ng g(-1) (Sardinella longiceps) to 760 ng g(-1) (Rhizoprionodon acutus) with relatively lower fraction of MeHg (72%) than that found in other studies. The average trophic difference (Deltadelta13C) between zooplankton and planktivorous fish (Selar crumenopthalmus, Rastrelliger kanagurta, and S. longiceps) was higher (3.4 per thousandth) than expected, suggesting that zooplankton may not be the main diet or direct carbon source for these fish species. However, further sampling would be required to compensate for temporal changes in zooplankton and the influence of their lipid content. Trophic position inferred by delta15N and and slopes of the regression equations (log10[T-Hg] = 0.13[delta15N] - 3.57 and log10[MeHg] = 0.14[delta15N] - 3.90) as estimates of biomagnification indicate that biomagnification of T-Hg and MeHg was lower in this tropical ocean compared to what has been observed in arctic and temperate ecosystems and tropical African lakes. The calculated daily intake of methylmercury in the diet of local people through fish consumption was well below the established World Health Organization (WHO) tolerable daily intake threshold for most of the fish species except Euthynnus affinis, Epinephelus epistictus, R. acutus, and Thunnus tonggol, illustrating safe consumption of the commonly consumed fish species. PMID:17702328

  15. Simple, efficient protocol for enzymatic synthesis of uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled DNA for heteronuclear NMR studies.

    PubMed Central

    Masse, J E; Bortmann, P; Dieckmann, T; Feigon, J

    1998-01-01

    The use of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled RNA has greatly facilitated structural studies of RNA oligonucleotides by NMR. Application of similar methodologies for the study of DNA has been limited, primarily due to the lack of adequate methods for sample preparation. Methods for both chemical and enzymatic synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides uniformly labeled with 13C and/or 15N have been published, but have not yet been widely used. We have developed a modified procedure for preparing uniformly 13C,15N-labeled DNA based on enzymatic synthesis using Taq DNA polymerase. The highly efficient protocol results in quantitative polymerization of the template and approximately 80% incorporation of the labeled dNTPs. Procedures for avoiding non-templated addition of nucleotides or for their removal are given. The method has been used to synthesize several DNA oligonucleotides, including two complementary 15 base strands, a 32 base DNA oligonucleotide that folds to form an intramolecular triplex and a 12 base oligonucleotide that dimerizes and folds to form a quadruplex. Heteronuclear NMR spectra of the samples illustrate the quality of the labeled DNA obtained by these procedures. PMID:9592146

  16. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve

    PubMed Central

    van Gils, Jan A.; Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus), consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis). Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from ‘normal’ bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment. PMID:26458005

  17. Differentiation of histidine tautomeric states using (15)N selectively filtered (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-08-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional (15)N selectively filtered (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all (13)C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When (15)N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the (13)C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of (13)C, (15)N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture. PMID:25026459

  18. Differentiation of Histidine Tautomeric States using 15N Selectively Filtered 13C Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-01-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C,15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture. PMID:25026459

  19. Tracing the diet of the monitor lizard Varanus mabitang by stable isotope analyses (δ15N, δ13C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, Ulrich; Altenbach, Alexander; Gaulke, Maren; Glaw, Frank

    2002-09-01

    In this study, we used analyses of stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) to determine the trophic ecology of the monitor lizard Varanus mabitang. Stable isotopes from claws, gut contents, and soft tissues were measured from the type specimen. Samples from Varanus olivaceus, Varanus prasinus, Varanus salvator, the herbivorous agamid lizard Hydrosaurus pustulatus, and some plant matter were included for comparison. Our data show a rapid decrease in δ13C (about10‰) from food plants towards gut contents and soft tissues of herbivorous species. For the varanids, we found a significant linear correlation of decreasing δ13C and increasing δ15N from herbivorous towards carnivorous species. In terms of trophic isotope ecology, the type specimen of V. mabitang is a strict herbivore. Thus it differs significantly in its isotopic composition from the morphologically next closest related species V. olivaceus. The most highly carnivorous species is V. salvator, while δ15N values for V. prasinus and V. olivaceus are intermediate. Claws provide very valuable samples for such measurements, because they can be sampled from living animals without harm. Additionally, their range of variability is relatively small in comparison with measurements from soft tissues.

  20. Individual protein balance strongly influences δ15N and δ13C values in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert; Abel, Hansjörg; Becker, Klaus

    Although stable isotope ratios in animals have often been used as indicators of the trophic level and for the back-calculation of diets, few experiments have been done under standardized laboratory conditions to investigate factors influencing δ15N and δ13C values. An experiment using Nile tilapia [Oreochromis niloticus (L.)] was therefore carried out to test the effect of different dietary protein contents (35.4, 42.3, and 50.9%) on δ15N and δ13C values of the whole tilapia. The fish were fed the isoenergetic and isolipidic semi-synthetic diets at a relatively low level. δ15N and δ13C values of the lipid-free body did not differ between the fish fed the diets with different protein contents, but the trophic shift for N and C isotopes decreased with increasing protein accretion in the individual fish, for N from 6.5‰ to 4‰ and for C in the lipid-free body from 4‰ to 2.5‰. This is the first study showing the strong influence of the individual protein balance to the degree to which the isotopic signature of dietary protein was modified in tissue protein of fish. The extrapolation of the trophic level or the reconstruction of the diet of an animal from stable isotope ratios without knowledge of the individual physiological condition and the feeding rate may lead to erroneous results.

  1. (13)C, (15)N CPMAS NMR and GIAO DFT calculations of stereoisomeric oxindole alkaloids from Cat's Claw (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wolniak, Michał; Pisklak, Maciej; Gliński, Jan A; Davey, Matthew H; Wawer, Iwona

    2008-11-01

    Oxindole alkaloids, isolated from the bark of Uncaria tomentosa [Willd. ex Schult.] Rubiaceae, are considered to be responsible for the biological activity of this herb. Five pentacyclic and two tetracyclic alkaloids were studied by solid-state NMR and theoretical GIAO DFT methods. The (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra were recorded for mitraphylline, isomitraphylline, pteropodine (uncarine C), isopteropodine (uncarine E), speciophylline (uncarine D), rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline. Theoretical GIAO DFT calculations of shielding constants provide arguments for identification of asymmetric centers and proper assignment of NMR spectra. These alkaloids are 7R/7S and 20R/20S stereoisomeric pairs. Based on the (13)C CP MAS chemical shifts the 7S alkaloids (delta C3 70-71ppm) can be easily and conveniently distinguished from 7R (deltaC3 74.5-74.9ppm), also 20R (deltaC20 41.3-41.7ppm) from the 20S (deltaC20 36.3-38.3ppm). The epiallo-type isomer (3R, 20S) of speciophylline is characterized by a larger (15)N MAS chemical shift of N4 (64.6ppm) than the allo-type (3S, 20S) of isopteropodine (deltaN4 53.3ppm). (15)N MAS chemical shifts of N1-H in pentacyclic alkaloids are within 131.9-140.4ppm. PMID:19019638

  2. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve.

    PubMed

    van Gils, Jan A; Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus), consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis). Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from 'normal' bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment. PMID:26458005

  3. Differentiation of histidine tautomeric states using 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-08-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C, 15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture.

  4. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Thorn, K A; Kennedy, K R

    2002-09-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined. PMID:12322752

  5. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Kennedy, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined.

  6. 15N NMR investigation of the reduction and binding of TNT in an aerobic bench scale reactor simulating windrow composting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Hayes, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    T15NT was added to a soil of low organic carbon content and composted for 20 days in an aerobic bench scale reactor. The finished whole compost and fulvic acid, humic acid, humin, and lignocellulose fractions extracted from the compost were analyzed by solid-state CP/MAS and DP/MAS 15N NMR. 15N NMR spectra provided direct spectroscopic evidence for reduction of TNT followed by covalent binding of the reduced metabolites to organic matter of the composted soil, with the majority of metabolite found in the lignocellulose fraction, by mass also the major fraction of the compost. In general, the types of bonds formed between soil organic matter and reduced TNT amines in controlled laboratory reactions were observed in the spectra of the whole compost and fractions, confirming that during composting TNT is reduced to amines that form covalent bonds with organic matter through aminohydroquinone, aminoquinone, heterocyclic, and imine linkages, among others. Concentrations of imine nitrogens in the compost spectra suggestthat covalent binding bythe diamines 2,4DANT and 2,6DANT is a significant process in the transformation of TNT into bound residues. Liquid-phase 15N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid and humin fractions provided possible evidence for involvement of phenoloxidase enzymes in covalent bond formation.

  7. Seasonal δ13C and δ15N isoscapes of fish populations along a continental shelf trophic gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radabaugh, Kara R.; Hollander, David J.; Peebles, Ernst B.

    2013-10-01

    The West Florida Shelf, located in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, transitions from a eutrophic ecosystem dominated by the Mississippi River plume to mesotrophic and oligotrophic ecosystems off the coast of peninsular Florida. Three extensive trawl surveys in this region were used to acquire samples of fish muscle, benthic algae from sea urchin stomach contents, and filtered particulate organic matter (POM) to create δ13C and δ15N isoscapes. Muscle δ15N from three widely distributed fish species, Synodus foetens (inshore lizardfish), Calamus proridens (littlehead porgy), and Syacium papillosum (dusky flounder), exhibited strong longitudinal correlations (Pearson‧s r=-0.67 to -0.90, p<0.001) that coincided with the principal trophic gradient, whereas δ13C values of fish muscle and benthic algae were correlated with depth (Pearson‧s r=-0.34 to -0.73, p<0.05). Correlations between isotopic values and surface concentrations of chlorophyll and particulate organic carbon (POC) imply linkages between the isotopic baseline and transitions from eutrophic to oligotrophic waters. The δ13C depth gradient and the δ15N longitudinal gradient were consistent between seasons and years, providing a foundation for future stable isotope studies of animal migration in the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs. PMID:27302905

  9. Flame spread across liquid pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-01-01

    For flame spread over liquid fuel pools, the existing literature suggests three gravitational influences: (1) liquid phase buoyant convection, delaying ignition and assisting flame spread; (2) hydrostatic pressure variation, due to variation in the liquid pool height caused by thermocapillary-induced convection; and (3) gas-phase buoyant convection in the opposite direction to the liquid phase motion. No current model accounts for all three influences. In fact, prior to this work, there was no ability to determine whether ignition delay times and flame spread rates would be greater or lesser in low gravity. Flame spread over liquid fuel pools is most commonly characterized by the relationship of the initial pool temperature to the fuel's idealized flash point temperature, with four or five separate characteristic regimes having been identified. In the uniform spread regime, control has been attributed to: (1) gas-phase conduction and radiation; (2) gas-phase conduction only; (3) gas-phase convection and liquid conduction, and most recently (4) liquid convection ahead of the flame. Suggestions were made that the liquid convection was owed to both vuoyancy and thermocapillarity. Of special interest to this work is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread can and will occur in microgravity in the absence of buoyant flows in both phases. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity experiments and advanced diagnostics; (2) microgravity experiments; and (3) numerical modelling at arbitrary gravitational level.

  10. Compound-specific amino acid δ15N patterns in marine algae: Tracer potential for cyanobacterial vs. eukaryotic organic nitrogen sources in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Matthew D.; Lehman, Jennifer; Kudela, Raphael

    2013-02-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopic analysis of individual amino acids (δ15N-AA) has unique potential to elucidate the complexities of food webs, track heterotrophic transformations, and understand diagenesis of organic nitrogen (ON). While δ15N-AA patterns of autotrophs have been shown to be generally similar, prior work has also suggested that differences may exist between cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae. However, δ15N-AA patterns in differing oceanic algal groups have never been closely examined. The overarching goals of this study were first to establish a more quantitative understanding of algal δ15N-AA patterns, and second to examine whether δ15N-AA patterns have potential as a new tracer for distinguishing prokaryotic vs. eukaryotic N sources. We measured δ15N-AA from prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton cultures and used a complementary set of statistical approaches (simple normalization, regression-derived fractionation factors, and multivariate analyses) to test for variations. A generally similar δ15N-AA pattern was confirmed for all algae, however significant AA-specific variation was also consistently identified between the two groups. The relative δ15N fractionation of Glx (glutamine + glutamic acid combined) vs. total proteinaceous N appeared substantially different, which we hypothesize could be related to differing enzymatic forms. In addition, the several other AA (most notably glycine and leucine) appeared to have strong biomarker potential. Finally, we observed that overall patterns of δ15N values in algae correspond well with the Trophic vs. Source-AA division now commonly used to describe variable AA δ15N changes with trophic transfer, suggesting a common mechanistic basis. Overall, these results show that autotrophic δ15N-AA patterns can differ between major algal evolutionary groupings for many AA. The statistically significant multivariate results represent a first approach for testing ideas about relative eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic

  11. Difference in delta(15)N signatures between nodulated roots and shoots of soybean is indicative of the contribution of symbiotic N(2) fixation to plant N.

    PubMed

    Wanek, Wolfgang; Arndt, Stefan K

    2002-05-01

    Symbiotic N(2) fixation has a variable effect on the (15)N abundance of different parts of legumes. Increases in fixation result in (15)N enrichment of nodules, while decreases, in combination with an increased uptake of mineral N, result in (15)N depletion of the root system. The difference between soybean shoot and below-ground delta(15)N (Deltadelta(15)N=delta(15)N(shoot)-delta(15)N(belowground)) was assessed in hydroponic culture over a range of rates of supply of mineral N. The fractional contribution of N(2) fixation to N uptake (%Ndfa) was determined using the natural abundance (NA) technique with ryegrass as a reference plant. Deltadelta(15)N and %Ndfa were highly correlated, and the relationship was tested using the same soybean cultivar grown in pots in N-rich soil. Estimates of %Ndfa derived from the NA method and from the Deltadelta(15)N approach yielded near-identical values. A literature survey showed similar relationships between %Ndfa and Deltadelta(15)N with different growth stages of soybeans grown under glasshouse and field conditions, different cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) cultivars in the field, and tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) in hydroponic culture. Possible confounding and species-specific (either plant or Rhizobium spp.) influences are discussed. The difference in delta(15)N signatures between nodulated roots and shoots is confirmed as a robust means of quantifying %Ndfa: it is independent of reference plants and offers the possibility of estimating %Ndfa in soils where the isotope composition of mineral N closely matches that of atmospheric N(2). PMID:11971922

  12. Monitoring pool-tail fines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Potyondy, J. P.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    Fine sediment < 2 and < 6 mm deposited in pool-tail areas of mountain streams is often measured to monitor changes in the supply of fines (e.g., by dam removal, bank erosion, or watershed effects including fires and road building) or to assess the status and trend of aquatic ecosystems. Grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric bedmaterial samples are typically used to quantify pool-tail fines. Grid-count results exhibit a high degree of variability not only among streams and among operators, but also among crews performing a nearly identical procedure (Roper et al. 2010). Variability is even larger when diverse methods are employed, each of which quantifies fines in a different way: grid counts visually count surface fines on small patches within the pool-tail area, pebble counts pick up and tally surface particles along (riffle) transects, and volumetric samples sieve out fines from small-scale bulk samples; and even when delimited to pool-tail areas, individual methods focus on different sampling locales. Two main questions were analyzed: 1) Do pool-tail fines exhibit patterns of spatial variability and are some grid count schemes more likely to provide accurate results than others. 2) How and why does the percentage of fines vary among grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric samples. In a field study, grids were placed at 7 locales in two rows across the wetted width of 10 pool tails in a 14-m wide 3rd order coarse gravel-bed mountain stream with <4% sand and <8% < 6 mm. Several pebble count transects were placed across each pool-tail area, and three volumetric samples were collected in each of three pool tails. Pebble and grid counts both indicated a fining trend towards one or both banks, sometimes interrupted by a secondary peak of fines within the central half of the wetted width. Among the five sampling schemes tested, grid counts covering the wetted width with 7 locales produced the highest accuracy and the least variability among the pools of the

  13. Teasing Apart the Effects of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition from Grazing and Drought in Vernal Pool Wetlands and Adjacent Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, M. L.; Araiza, D. N.; Nakamoto, B. J.; Vega, M. C.; Bradley, C. J.; Swarth, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    The remaining vernal pools flanking California's Central Valley may be protected from development, but they are not pristine environments. At UC Merced's Vernal Pools and Grassland Reserve, dairy cattle grazing is a fact of life, needed to keep non-native grasses from encroaching on and dominating these low lying, ephemeral pools. In addition to grazing, atmospheric deposition of nitrogen from adjacent agricultural farms and dairies has affected the biogeochemical cycling here, in particular because the area has never been ploughed and is essentially a terminal, interior catchment with almost no outputs. For the past two years, the region has been subjected to extreme drought resulting in altered patterns in vernal pool development and nutrient exchange. We are using stable nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen isotopes in organic and inorganic reservoirs to understand which of the three stressors (e.g. N loading, grazing, or drought) affects the ecosystem functioning the most. Simple measurements of residual dry matter (the rancher's standard) coupled with soil analyses and plant distribution, isotopic composition, and productivity will be presented at a landscape scale. Atmospheric deposition, as rain in winter and early spring and as dust in summer and fall, delivers substantial ammonium and nitrate to the Reserve and could be traced back to nearby hotspots, as well as from major storm systems. Concentrations and compositions of N in precipitation were highly variable depending on when the last storm event had occurred. Ammonia/ammonium in rainwater ranged from δ15N= -24 to +7‰, probably explaining the large range in the δ15N of plant tissues collected in winter/spring (-4.3 to +10.9‰,) and that of extractable ammonium from surface soils (δ15N = -7 to +13‰). Interior grassland and vernal pool ecosystems, with substantial inputs and little to no outputs, host biogeochemical processes that amplify heterogeneity on relative small scales.

  14. Mangrove isotopic (δ15N and δ13C) fractionation across a nitrogen vs. phosphorus limitation gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Karen L.; Feller, Ilka C.; Popp, Marianne; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Mangrove islands in Belize are characterized by a unique switching from nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) limitation to tree growth from shoreline to interior. Fertilization has previously shown that Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) fringe trees (5–6 m tall) growing along the shoreline are N limited; dwarf trees (!1.5 m tall) in the forestinterior are P limited; and transition trees (2–4 m tall) are co-limited by both N and P.  Growth patterns paralleled a landward decrease in soil flushing by tides and an increase in bioavailable N, but P availability remained consistently low across the gradient. Stable isotopic composition was measured in R. mangle leaves to aid in explaining this nutrient switching pattern and growth variation. Along control transects, leaf !15N decreased from "0.10‰ (fringe) to #5.38‰ (dwarf). The !15N of N-fertilized trees also varied spatially, but the values were consistently more negative (by $3‰) compared to control trees. Spatial variation in !15N values disappeared when the trees were fertilized with P, and values averaged "0.12‰, similar to that in control fringe trees. Neither variation in source inputs nor microbial fractionation could fully account for the observed patterns in !15N. The results instead suggest that the lower !15N values in transition and dwarf control trees were due to plant fractionation as a consequence of slower growth and lower N demand. P fertilization increased N demand and decreased fractionation. Although leaf !13C was unaffected by fertilization, values increased from fringe (#28.6‰) to transition (#27.9‰) to dwarf (#26.4‰) zones, indicating spatial variation in environmental stresses affecting stomatal conductance or carboxylation. The results thus suggest an interaction of external supply, internal demand, and plant ability to acquire nutrients under different hydro-edaphic conditions that vary across this tree-height gradient. The findings not only aid in understanding

  15. Production of 15N-Labelled Liquid Organic Fertilisers Based on Manure and Crop Residue for Use in Fertigation Studies.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Fernández, Carlos; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of crop residue and animal manure from agricultural and livestock activities are annually produced worldwide. With proper management, these residues are potentially valuable sources of plant nutrients, mainly N. Recycling such subproducts in sustainably-based agricultural systems can minimise the use of mineral fertilisers, and hence reduce the potential risk of surface and groundwater pollution. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to obtain (small scale) two liquid labelled-organic fertilisers, an animal- and a vegetal-based organic (AO and VO, respectively) fertiliser, to be used as organic N sources in subsequent fertigation studies. Forage maize (Zea mays L.) grown under 15N-labelled fertiliser supply was used as raw material for VO fertiliser production, and also as 15N-labelled sheep feed to obtain 15N-labelled manure. The labelled faeces fraction was used as raw material for the AO fertiliser. The VO fertiliser was obtained after an acidic and an enzyme-driven hydrolysis. The AO fertiliser was obtained after acidic hydrolysis. The VO liquid fertiliser presented an N concentration of 330 mg·L-1, 85% of total N was organic, while ammonium and nitrate N accounted for 55% and 45% of the mineral nitrogen fraction, respectively. This fertiliser also exhibited high K, Ca and S concentrations and notable values for the remaining macro- and micronutrients. The AO liquid fertiliser had a similar total N concentration (496 mg·L-1, 82% of total N in an organic form) to that of VO, but its mineral N fraction significantly differed, which came in a predominantly (95%) ammonia form. It also had a high content of N, P, K and other macronutrients, and sufficient Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu and B levels, which suggests its suitability as a potential fertiliser. The percentage of 15N enrichment in both VO and AO liquid fertilisers exceeded 2% 15N atom excess, which enabled their use in subsequent assays run to assess nitrogen uptake efficiency. PMID:26982183

  16. Production of 15N-Labelled Liquid Organic Fertilisers Based on Manure and Crop Residue for Use in Fertigation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Fernández, Carlos; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of crop residue and animal manure from agricultural and livestock activities are annually produced worldwide. With proper management, these residues are potentially valuable sources of plant nutrients, mainly N. Recycling such subproducts in sustainably-based agricultural systems can minimise the use of mineral fertilisers, and hence reduce the potential risk of surface and groundwater pollution. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to obtain (small scale) two liquid labelled-organic fertilisers, an animal- and a vegetal-based organic (AO and VO, respectively) fertiliser, to be used as organic N sources in subsequent fertigation studies. Forage maize (Zea mays L.) grown under 15N-labelled fertiliser supply was used as raw material for VO fertiliser production, and also as 15N-labelled sheep feed to obtain 15N-labelled manure. The labelled faeces fraction was used as raw material for the AO fertiliser. The VO fertiliser was obtained after an acidic and an enzyme-driven hydrolysis. The AO fertiliser was obtained after acidic hydrolysis. The VO liquid fertiliser presented an N concentration of 330 mg·L-1, 85% of total N was organic, while ammonium and nitrate N accounted for 55% and 45% of the mineral nitrogen fraction, respectively. This fertiliser also exhibited high K, Ca and S concentrations and notable values for the remaining macro- and micronutrients. The AO liquid fertiliser had a similar total N concentration (496 mg·L-1, 82% of total N in an organic form) to that of VO, but its mineral N fraction significantly differed, which came in a predominantly (95%) ammonia form. It also had a high content of N, P, K and other macronutrients, and sufficient Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu and B levels, which suggests its suitability as a potential fertiliser. The percentage of 15N enrichment in both VO and AO liquid fertilisers exceeded 2% 15N atom excess, which enabled their use in subsequent assays run to assess nitrogen uptake efficiency. PMID:26982183

  17. Reconstruction of the oceanic nitrate inventory in the Pliocene Caribbean Sea: Foraminifera-bound δ15N - A new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, M.; Haug, G. H.; Sigman, D. M.; Ren, H.

    2010-12-01

    The nitrate budget in the low-latitude surface ocean is mainly controlled by the opposing effects of denitrification and nitrate fixation. The state of the global ocean nitrate inventory highly affects primary production, which allows sequestering CO2 into the deep ocean. This may influence climate variability and control warm and cold periods in Earth history. Studies have shown that nitrogen isotopes reflect the nutrient status of the upper water column and therefore can be used as proxy for the state of the ocean’s ‘biological pump’. The nitrate inventory has mostly been reconstructed based on bulk sedimentary N-isotope measurements, which can be affected by syn- and post-sedimentary processes. Promising approaches to circumvent these potential biases are based on measurements of foraminifera-bound δ15N isotopes. In the subtropical and tropical ocean, planktonic foraminifera are a main component of the sinking particle flux. The organic compounds encapsulated within the foraminiferal tests are protected from sedimentary diagenetic processes and record a pristine signal of the nitrate composition of the upper water column. The novel method used in this study employs denitrifying bacteria (Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas aureofaciens) to produce nitrous oxide (N2O), recovered from the nitrate extracted from the organic matter sheltered within the foraminifera shell. The extracted N2O is analyzed for δ15N with a Gas bench II - IRMS and yields results with reproducible isotopic measurements of samples with nitrate concentrations down to 1 μM. Previous data from the investigated site (ODP Leg 165, Site 999A, Caribbean Sea), spanning the last 30’000 yrs using the same method, indicate a systematic difference between glacial and interglacial values. The glacial state is characterized by high δ15N values around ~ 5 ‰ (suggesting less N-fixation) and the interglacial by low δ15N values around ~ 3 ‰ (N-fixation increase). Pliocene data from

  18. Tracing nitrate in a restored river reach using 18O and 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Benjamin; Bernasconi, Stefano; Luster, Jörg; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Riparian zones, including alluvial forests are important for biodiversity, flood mitigation and water retention. They can remove nitrate from adjacent upland areas and atmospheric deposition by natural processes such as plant uptake, denitrification and dilution. Riparian zones have become rare since rivers have been canalized to avoid flooding. However, their area might increase in the future with the changing policy for river management in Europe and in Switzerland. A good understanding of flow paths and nitrate sources in catchments is therefore important to assess the soil influence on groundwater quality and to select the most effective land management practices (forest, agriculture, river) to ensure a sustainable water supply of good quality. Numerous studies have investigated either the chemistry of percolation waters in the root zone or the groundwater quality. However, very few have assessed the biochemical transformation of the water composition along its flow path from the soil to the aquifer and the mixing in the aquifer with water from other sources within the catchment. The proposed project aims at identifying the different sources of nitrate in soil- and groundwater (atmospheric deposition, nitrification, fertilizers and manure) and to better understand the N transformations along the flow paths from the soil to the aquifer by analyzing the oxygen and nitrogen isotopes in nitrate. The study is performed within a restored section of the river Thur (Canton Thurgau, Switzerland). It is part of the project cluster RECORD of the ETH domain, Switzerland, which was initiated to increase the mechanistic understanding of coupled hydrological and ecological processes in river corridors. Besides the sampling of river-, ground- and rainwater, soil solutions are collected in the unsaturated zone at three different depths (10, 50, 100 cm) and along two terrestrial transects following approximately the flow paths through different functional process zones (river

  19. Interactions between pool geometry and hydraulics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, D.M.; Nelson, J.M.; Wohl, E.E.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental and computational research approach was used to determine interactions between pool geometry and hydraulics. A 20-m-long, 1.8-m-wide flume was used to investigate the effect of four different geometric aspects of pool shape on flow velocity. Plywood sections were used to systematically alter constriction width, pool depth, pool length, and pool exit-slope gradient, each at two separate levels. Using the resulting 16 unique geometries with measured pool velocities in four-way factorial analyses produced an empirical assessment of the role of the four geometric aspects on the pool flow patterns and hence the stability of the pool. To complement the conclusions of these analyses, a two-dimensional computational flow model was used to investigate the relationships between pool geometry and flow patterns over a wider range of conditions. Both experimental and computational results show that constriction and depth effects dominate in the jet section of the pool and that pool length exhibits an increasing effect within the recirculating-eddy system. The pool exit slope appears to force flow reattachment. Pool length controls recirculating-eddy length and vena contracta strength. In turn, the vena contracta and recirculating eddy control velocities throughout the pool.

  20. Estimation method for serial dilution experiments.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai; Davidson, Charles E

    2014-12-01

    Titration of microorganisms in infectious or environmental samples is a corner stone of quantitative microbiology. A simple method is presented to estimate the microbial counts obtained with the serial dilution technique for microorganisms that can grow on bacteriological media and develop into a colony. The number (concentration) of viable microbial organisms is estimated from a single dilution plate (assay) without a need for replicate plates. Our method selects the best agar plate with which to estimate the microbial counts, and takes into account the colony size and plate area that both contribute to the likelihood of miscounting the number of colonies on a plate. The estimate of the optimal count given by our method can be used to narrow the search for the best (optimal) dilution plate and saves time. The required inputs are the plate size, the microbial colony size, and the serial dilution factors. The proposed approach shows relative accuracy well within ±0.1log10 from data produced by computer simulations. The method maintains this accuracy even in the presence of dilution errors of up to 10% (for both the aliquot and diluent volumes), microbial counts between 10(4) and 10(12) colony-forming units, dilution ratios from 2 to 100, and plate size to colony size ratios between 6.25 to 200. PMID:25205541

  1. Minimal Coital Dilution in Accra, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Jenness, Samuel M.; Biney, Adriana A. E.; Ampofo, William Kwabena; Dodoo, F. Nii-Amoo; Cassels, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background Coital dilution, the reduction in the coital frequency per partner when an additional ongoing partner is added, may reduce the transmission potential of partnership concurrency for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Empirical estimates of dilution, especially dilution of sexual acts unprotected by condoms, are needed to inform prevention research. Methods Sexually active adults in Accra, Ghana were recruited in a multi-stage household probability sample. Degree (number of ongoing partners), total acts, and unprotected acts were measured retrospectively for each month in the past year through an event-history calendar. Random effects negative binomial models estimated the association between degree and coital frequency. Results Compared to person-months with a single partner (monogamy), 2.06 times as many total acts and 1.94 times as many unprotected acts occurred in months with 2 partners. In months with 3 partners, 2.90 times as many total acts and 2.39 times as many unprotected acts occurred compared to monogamous months. Total acts but not unprotected acts also declined with partnership duration. Conclusions No dilution was observed for total acts with up to three concurrent partners, but a small amount of dilution was observed for unprotected acts for months with multiple concurrencies. This suggests moderate selective condom use in months with multiple concurrencies. The implications of the observed dilution for future HIV transmission must be investigated with mathematical models. PMID:25622062

  2. Evidence for bias in measured δ15N values of terrestrial and aquatic organic materials due to pre-analysis acid treatment methods.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Chris R; Heaton, Tim H E; Leng, Melanie J; Kendrick, Christopher P; Casford, James S L; Lloyd, Jeremy M

    2011-04-30

    We investigate the effect of acid treatment methods on δ(15)N values from a range of environmental organic materials in the context of the increased application of 'dual-mode' isotope analysis (the simultaneous measurement of δ(13)C and δ(15)N from the same acid-treated sample). Three common methods are compared; (i) untreated samples; (ii) acidification followed by sequential water rinse (rinse method); and (iii) acidification in silver capsules (capsule method). The influence of capsule type (silver and tin) on δ(15)N is also independently assessed (as the capsule and rinse methods combust samples in different capsules; silver and tin, respectively). We find significant differences in δ(15)N values between methods and the precision of any one method varies significantly between sample materials and above the instrument precision (>0.3‰). The δ(15)N values of untreated samples did not produce the most consistent data on all sample materials. In addition, the capsule type appears to influence the measured δ(15)N value of some materials, particularly those combusted only in silver capsules. We also compare the new δ(15)N data with previously published δ(13)C data on the same materials. The response of δ(13)C and δ(15)N within and between methods and sample materials to acidification appears to be relatively disproportionate, which can influence the environmental interpretation of the measured data. In addition, statistical methods used to estimate inorganic nitrogen are shown to be seriously flawed. PMID:21452387

  3. Using d15 N in Fish Larvae as an Indicator of Watershed Sources of Anthropogenic Nitrogen: Response at Multiple Spatial Scales

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nitrogen stable isotope, 15N, is an effective tool to track anthropogenic N sources to aquatic ecosystems. It may be difficult to identify potential N sources, however, where 15N responds similarly to multiple, concurrent activities in the watershed that cause higher nutrient...

  4. Quantitative analysis of 15N labeled positional isomers of glutamine and citrulline via electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of their dansyl derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enteral metabolism of glutamine and citrulline are intertwined because, while glutamine is one of the main fuel sources for the enterocyte, citrulline is one of its products. It has been shown that the administration of 15N labeled glutamine results in the incorporation of the 15N label into cit...

  5. Natural (15)N Abundance in Key Amino Acids from Lamb Muscle: Exploring a New Horizon in Diet Authentication and Assessment of Feed Efficiency in Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, Gonzalo; Ortigues-Marty, Isabelle; Schiphorst, Anne-Marie; Robins, Richard J; Tea, Illa; Prache, Sophie

    2016-05-25

    Natural (15)N abundance (δ(15)N) varies between individual amino acids (AAs). We hypothesized that δ(15)N of nontransaminating and essential AAs ("source" AAs, such as phenylalanine) present in animal tissues could be used as a marker of dietary origin, whereas δ(15)N of transaminating AAs ("trophic" AAs, such as glutamic acid) could give more detailed insights into animal feed efficiency. Two diets based on dehydrated Lucerne pellets were tested in growing lambs, which promoted different feed efficiencies. No dietary effects were noted on δ(15)N of any AAs analyzed in lamb muscle. In addition, δ(15)N of phenylalanine was unexpectedly similar to that of glutamic acid, suggesting that δ(15)N of AAs is significantly derived from the metabolism of the rumen microbiota and, thus, are not suited for diet authentication in ruminants. In contrast, the δ(15)N of transaminating AAs facilitates an improved prediction of animal feed efficiency compared to the classical isotopic bulk N analysis. PMID:27148901

  6. 15N Isotopic Crop Exchange Residue Studies Suggest that IPCC N Input Methodologies to Assess N2O-N Emissions Should be Reevaluated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is difficult to quantify nitrogen (N) losses from agricultural systems to the environment, however we can use 15N isotopic techniques to conduct site specific studies to increase our knowledge about N management and fate. This manuscript synthesizes the review of two selected 15N isotopic studies...

  7. Isotope Fractionation During N Mineralization and the N Isotope Composition of Terrestrial Ecosystem N Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; Schwartz, E.; Hungate, B. A.; Hart, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    It has been an open question for several decades whether N mineralization is a fractionating process. This question is important for N cycling in terrestrial ecosystems because even a small fractionation during N mineralization could potentially have a large influence on the N isotope composition of other ecosystem N pools. Fractionation during N mineralization should result in a difference between the N isotope composition of the soil microorganisms, that of its substrates, and products. We analyzed the N isotope composition of the soil microbial biomass in a variety of ecosystems, and found that it was 15N enriched compared to that of other soil N pools, such as soil soluble, organic and inorganic N (Dijkstra et al. 2006a,b). We observed a negative correlation between the 15N enrichment of the microorganisms and the relative C and N availability for soil from ecosystems in Hawaii and Arizona, across a broad range of climates, grasslands and forests, and more than four million years of ecosystem development. This suggests that during N dissimilation (and associated transaminations) and N export, the lighter 14N N isotope is preferentially removed in a manner similar to that proposed for animals and ectomycorrhizae. This was further confirmed by the positive correlation between microbial 15N enrichment and net N mineralization rate (Dijkstra et al. 2008, Ecology Letters 11: 389-397) and by culture experiments with Escherichia coli (Collins et al. 2008). Since mineralization is the largest flux of N in ecosystems, fractionation during N mineralization has the potential to influence the N isotope composition of other N pools, such as inorganic N, plant N and soil organic matter N. We demonstrate that the N isotope compositions of these ecosystem N pools exhibit differences that are consistent with fractionation during N mineralization. Our results show that the N isotope composition can be used as a measure to trace N mineralization and decomposition in ecosystems

  8. Comparison of isotope dilution and excretion methods for determining the half-life of ascorbic acid in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, D.E.; Rivers, J.M.

    1984-08-01

    The half-life of ascorbic acid (AA) in guinea pigs was investigated by the isotope dilution and excretion methods. The dilution method measures (1-14C)AA disappearance from the plasma, whereas the excretion method measures the elimination of (1-14C)AA and the metabolites from the body. Two groups of animals underwent both isotope studies in reverse order. Animals were conditioned to the experimental procedures and fed 2.5 mg AA/100 g body weight orally to maintain a daily intake of the vitamin independent of food consumption. The two isotope procedures imposed similar stress on the animals, as determined by plasma cortisol levels and body weight changes. The AA half-life calculations of the rapidly exchangeable pool by the isotope dilution method yielded values of 1.23 and 0.34 hours for the two groups, respectively. The half-life of the slowly exchangeable pool for the two groups was 60.2 and 65.8 hours, respectively. The half-life of AA in the rapidly exchangeable pool, as measured by the excretion studies, was 4.57-8.75 hours. For the slowly exchangeable pool, it was 146-149 hours. The longer half-life of both pools obtained with the excretion method indicates that the isotope is disappearing from the plasma more rapidly than it is being excreted. This suggests that a portion of the (1-14C)AA leaving the plasma is removed to a body pool that is not sampled by the isotope excretion method.

  9. Dynamics of δ(15)N isotopic signatures of different intertidal macroalgal species: Assessment of bioindicators of N sources in coastal areas.

    PubMed

    Lemesle, Stéphanie; Erraud, Alexandre; Mussio, Isabelle; Rusig, Anne-Marie; Claquin, Pascal

    2016-09-15

    δ(15)N of annual (Ulva sp., Porphyra sp.) and perennial intertidal seaweed species (Chondrus crispus, Fucus sp.) collected on 17 sampling points along the French coast of the English Channel in 2012 and 2013 were assessed on their suitability as bioindicators of N pollution in coastal areas. A sine function applied for δ(15)N time series data showed for all the species the same seasonal trend with lowest δ(15)N values in April and highest in summer but with no significant interspecific differences of amplitude (α) and phase angle (ϕ). This model provides a useful tool for monitoring the inter-annual changes of N pollution. An interspecific variability of δ(15)N values was observed, probably due to their tolerance to emersion. An in vitro study for comparing the kinetic acquisition of the isotopic signal and N uptake mechanisms of each species underlined the influence of algal physiology on the δ(15)N interspecific variability. PMID:27349382

  10. PARTITIONING THE RELATIVE INFLUENCE OF SOIL N, MYCORRHIZAE, AND FOLIAR N UPTAKE ON FOLIAR δ15N PATTERNS: CAN WE DETECT FOLIAR UPTAKE OF REACTIVE N?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallano, D.; Sparks, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation is an important sink for atmospheric reactive N in N-limited systems and may be capable of incorporating reactive N compounds directly into leaves through the foliar uptake pathway. A proxy for atmospheric reactive N entering vegetation would be useful to estimate the impact of direct foliar N uptake on plant metabolism. Natural abundance foliar N isotopic composition (δ15N) is a practical tool for this purpose because plant-available N sources often have different isotopic compositions. Current understanding of foliar δ15N suggests these values primarily represent the integration of soil δ15N, direct foliar N uptake, mycorrhizal fractionation, and within-plant fractionations. Using a potted plant mesocosm system, we estimated the influence of mycorrhizae on foliar δ15N patterns in red maple (Acer rubrum) seedlings along an N deposition gradient in New York State. We found that mycorrhizal associations altered foliar δ15N in red maple seedlings from 0.03 - 1.01‰ across sites. Along the same temporal and spatial scales, we examined the influence of soil δ15N, foliar N uptake, and mycorrhizae on foliar δ15N in adult stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), black birch (Betula lenta), red maple (A. rubrum), and red oak (Quercus rubra). Using multiple regression models, atmospheric NO2 concentration explained 0%, 69%, 23%, and 45% of the residual variation in foliar δ15N remaining in American beech, red maple, red oak, and black birch, respectively, after accounting for soil δ15N. Our results suggest that foliar δ15N may be used to estimate pollution-derived atmospheric reactive N entering vegetation via the foliar N uptake pathway.

  11. Implications of scaled δ15N fractionation for community predator-prey body mass ratio estimates in size-structured food webs.

    PubMed

    Reum, Jonathan C P; Jennings, Simon; Hunsicker, Mary E

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ(15) N) may be used to estimate community-level relationships between trophic level (TL) and body size in size-structured food webs and hence the mean predator to prey body mass ratio (PPMR). In turn, PPMR is used to estimate mean food chain length, trophic transfer efficiency and rates of change in abundance with body mass (usually reported as slopes of size spectra) and to calibrate and validate food web models. When estimating TL, researchers had assumed that fractionation of δ(15) N (Δδ(15) N) did not change with TL. However, a recent meta-analysis indicated that this assumption was not as well supported by data as the assumption that Δδ(15) N scales negatively with the δ(15) N of prey. We collated existing fish community δ(15) N-body size data for the Northeast Atlantic and tropical Western Arabian Sea with new data from the Northeast Pacific. These data were used to estimate TL-body mass relationships and PPMR under constant and scaled Δδ(15) N assumptions, and to assess how the scaled Δδ(15) N assumption affects our understanding of the structure of these food webs. Adoption of the scaled Δδ(15) N approach markedly reduces the previously reported differences in TL at body mass among fish communities from different regions. With scaled Δδ(15) N, TL-body mass relationships became more positive and PPMR fell. Results implied that realized prey size in these size-structured fish communities are less variable than previously assumed and food chains potentially longer. The adoption of generic PPMR estimates for calibration and validation of size-based fish community models is better supported than hitherto assumed, but predicted slopes of community size spectra are more sensitive to a given change or error in realized PPMR when PPMR is small. PMID:26046788

  12. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N) of soil nematodes from four feeding groups

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Bryan; Dyckmans, Jens; Schmidt, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Soil nematode feeding groups are a long-established trophic categorisation largely based on morphology and are used in ecological indices to monitor and analyse the biological state of soils. Stable isotope ratio analysis (13C/12C and 15N/14N, expressed as δ13C and δ15N) has provided verification of, and novel insights into, the feeding ecology of soil animals such as earthworms and mites. However, isotopic studies of soil nematodes have been limited to date as conventional stable isotope ratio analysis needs impractically large numbers of nematodes (up to 1,000) to achieve required minimum sample weights (typically >100 µg C and N). Here, micro-sample near-conventional elemental analysis–isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (μEA–IRMS) of C and N using microgram samples (typically 20 µg dry weight), was employed to compare the trophic position of selected soil nematode taxa from four feeding groups: predators (Anatonchus and Mononchus), bacterial feeders (Plectus and Rhabditis), omnivores (Aporcelaimidae and Qudsianematidae) and plant feeder (Rotylenchus). Free-living nematodes were collected from conventionally and organically managed arable soils. As few as 15 nematodes, for omnivores and predators, were sufficient to reach the 20 µg dry weight target. There was no significant difference in δ15N (p = 0.290) or δ13C (p = 0.706) between conventional and organic agronomic treatments but, within treatments, there was a significant difference in N and C stable isotope ratios between the plant feeder, Rotylenchus (δ15N = 1.08 to 3.22 mUr‰, δ13C = –29.58 to –27.87 mUr) and all other groups. There was an average difference of 9.62 mUr in δ15N between the plant feeder and the predator group (δ15N = 9.89 to 12.79 mUr, δ13C = –27.04 to –25.51 mUr). Isotopic niche widths were calculated as Bayesian derived standard ellipse areas and were smallest for the plant feeder (1.37 mUr2) and the predators (1.73 mUr2), but largest for omnivores (3.83 mUr2

  13. Cortical attractor network dynamics with diluted connectivity.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Edmund T; Webb, Tristan J

    2012-01-24

    The connectivity of the cerebral cortex is diluted, with the probability of excitatory connections between even nearby pyramidal cells rarely more than 0.1, and in the hippocampus 0.04. To investigate the extent to which this diluted connectivity affects the dynamics of attractor networks in the cerebral cortex, we simulated an integrate-and-fire attractor network taking decisions between competing inputs with diluted connectivity of 0.25 or 0.1, and with the same number of synaptic connections per neuron for the recurrent collateral synapses within an attractor population as for full connectivity. The results indicated that there was less spiking-related noise with the diluted connectivity in that the stability of the network when in the spontaneous state of firing increased, and the accuracy of the correct decisions increased. The decision times were a little slower with diluted than with complete connectivity. Given that the capacity of the network is set by the number of recurrent collateral synaptic connections per neuron, on which there is a biological limit, the findings indicate that the stability of cortical networks, and the accuracy of their correct decisions or memory recall operations, can be increased by utilizing diluted connectivity and correspondingly increasing the number of neurons in the network, with little impact on the speed of processing of the cortex. Thus diluted connectivity can decrease cortical spiking-related noise. In addition, we show that the Fano factor for the trial-to-trial variability of the neuronal firing decreases from the spontaneous firing state value when the attractor network makes a decision. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Neural Coding". PMID:21875702

  14. Pool Safety: A Few Simple Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Presents suggestions by the National Swimming Pool Safety Committee on how to keep children safe while swimming. Ideas include maintaining strict adult supervision, pool and spa barriers, and knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (SM)

  15. Cold Pools in the Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Shaw, William J.; Hubbe, John M.; Bian, Xindi; Mittelstadt, J.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent midwinter cold air pools produce multi-day periods of cold, dreary weather in valleys and basins. Persistent stable stratification leads to the buildup of pollutants and moisture in the pool. Because the pool sometimes has temperatures below freezing while the air above is warmer, freezing precipitation often occurs with consequent effects on transportation and safety. Forecasting the buildup and breakdown of these cold pools is difficult because the physical mechanisms leading to their formation, maintenance, and destruction have received little study. This paper provides a succinct meteorological definition of a cold pool, develops a climatology of Columbia Basin cold pools, and analyzes remote and in situ temperature and wind sounding data for two winter cold pool episodes that were accompanied by fog and stratus, illustrating many of the physical mechanisms affecting cold pool evolution.

  16. Pool power control in remelting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Rodney L.; Melgaard, David K.; Beaman, Joseph J.

    2011-12-13

    An apparatus for and method of controlling a remelting furnace comprising adjusting current supplied to an electrode based upon a predetermined pool power reference value and adjusting the electrode drive speed based upon the predetermined pool power reference value.

  17. CDC Study Finds Fecal Contamination in Pools

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communication (404) 639-3286 CDC study finds fecal contamination in pools A study of public pools done ... The E. coli is a marker for fecal contamination. Finding a high percentage of E. coli-positive ...

  18. Assessing denitrification in groundwater using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N: In situ measurement of a sequential multistep reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; Garabedian, S.P.; Revesz, K.M.; Yoshinari, T.

    2004-01-01

    Denitrification was measured within a nitrate-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N nitrate. The aquifer contained zones of relatively high concentrations of nitrite (up to 77 ??M) and nitrous oxide (up to 143 ??M) and has been the site of previous studies examining ground water denitrification using the acetylene block technique. Small-scale (15-24 m travel distance) tracer tests were conducted by injecting 15N nitrate and bromide as tracers into a depth interval that contained nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and excess nitrogen gas. The timing of the bromide breakthrough curves at down-gradient wells matched peaks in 15N abundance above background for nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gas after more than 40 days of travel. Results were simulated with a one-dimensional transport model using linked reaction kinetics for the individual steps of the denitrification reaction pathway. It was necessary to include within the model spatial variations in background concentrations of all nitrogen oxide species. The model indicated that nitrite production (0.036-0.047 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d -1) was faster than the subsequent denitrification steps (0.013-0.016 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrous oxide and 0.013-0.020 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrogen gas) and that the total rate of reaction was slower than indicated by both acetylene block tracer tests and laboratory incubations. The rate of nitrate removal by denitrification was much slower than the rate of transport, indicating that nitrate would migrate several kilometers down-gradient before being completely consumed.

  19. Revision of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction rate and oxygen abundance in H-burning zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caciolli, A.; Mazzocchi, C.; Capogrosso, V.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Elekes, Z.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Lemut, A.; Marta, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Palmerini, S.; Prati, P.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H. P.; Vomiero, A.

    2011-09-01

    Context. The NO cycle takes place in the deepest layer of a H-burning core or shell, when the temperature exceeds T ≃ 30 × 106 K. The O depletion observed in some globular cluster giant stars, always associated with a Na enhancement, may be due to either a deep mixing during the red giant branch (RGB) phase of the star or to the pollution of the primordial gas by an early population of massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, whose chemical composition was modified by the hot bottom burning. In both cases, the NO cycle is responsible for the O depletion. Aims: The activation of this cycle depends on the rate of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction. A precise evaluation of this reaction rate at temperatures as low as experienced in H-burning zones in stellar interiors is mandatory to understand the observed O abundances. Methods: We present a new measurement of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction performed at LUNA covering for the first time the center of mass energy range 70-370 keV, which corresponds to stellar temperatures between 65 × 106 K and 780 × 106 K. This range includes the 15N(p, γ)16O Gamow-peak energy of explosive H-burning taking place in the external layer of a nova and the one of the hot bottom burning (HBB) nucleosynthesis occurring in massive AGB stars. Results: With the present data, we are also able to confirm the result of the previous R-matrix extrapolation. In particular, in the temperature range of astrophysical interest, the new rate is about a factor of 2 smaller than reported in the widely adopted compilation of reaction rates (NACRE or CF88) and the uncertainty is now reduced down to the 10% level.

  20. Endogenous and environmental factors influence the dietary fractionation of 13C and 15N in hissing cockroaches Gromphadorhina portentosa.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D

    2008-01-01

    Since DeNiro and Epstein's discovery that the (13)C and (15)N isotopic signatures of animals approximate those of their respective diets, the measurement of stable isotope signatures has become an important tool for ecologists studying the diets of wild animals. This study used Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa) to examine several preexisting hypotheses about the relationship between the isotopic composition of an animal and its diet. Contrary to my predictions, the results revealed that the tissues of adult cockroaches raised for two generations on a diet of known isotopic composition did not demonstrate enrichment of heavy stable isotopes. Moreover, the (15)N signatures of cockroaches were neither influenced by periods of rapid growth (i.e., 300-fold increase in dry body mass over 120 d) nor by imposed periods of starvation lasting up to 80 d. The offspring born to mothers raised on known diets were enriched in (15)N. Diet-switching experiments showed that turnover times of (13)C were highly correlated with age and ranged from 9 to 10 d to 60 to 75 d in subadults and adults, respectively. Adults subjected to diet switches differed from the subadults in that the adults achieved equilibrated isotopic signatures that were shifted approximately 1.0 per thousand toward their respective original diets. Lipid fractions of adult cockroaches averaged 2.9 per thousand more depleted in (13)C than in lipid-free fractions, but no changes in (13)C were observed in aging adults. Exposure to reduced ambient temperature from 33 degrees C to 23 degrees C over 120 d did not influence isotopic signatures of tissues. Overall, the results of this study reveal that different endogenous and exogenous factors can influence the isotopic signatures of cockroaches. These findings reinforce the need to conduct controlled studies to further examine environmental factors that influence the relationships between the isotopic signatures of animals and their diets. PMID

  1. Changes in soil nitrogen storage and δ15N with woody plant encroachment in a subtropical savanna parkland landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutton, T. W.; Liao, J. D.

    2010-09-01

    Subtropical woodlands dominated by N-fixing tree legumes have largely replaced grasslands in the Rio Grande Plains, southwestern United States, during the past century. To evaluate the impact of this vegetation change on the N cycle, we measured the mass and isotopic composition (δ15N) of N in the soil system of remnant grasslands and woody plant stands ranging in age from 10 to 130 years. Nitrogen accumulated at linear rates following woody encroachment in the litter (0.10-0.14 g N m-2 yr-1), roots (0.63-0.98 g N m-2 yr-1), and soils (0.75-3.50 g N m-2 yr-1), resulting in a 50%-150% increase in N storage in the soil system (0-30 cm) in woody stands older than 60 years. Simultaneous decreases in soil δ15N of up to 2‰ in the upper 30 cm of the profile are consistent with a scenario in which N inputs have exceeded losses following woody encroachment and suggest N accrual was derived from symbiotic N fixation by tree legumes and/or differential atmospheric N deposition to wooded areas. Vertical uplift and lateral transfer of N by the more deeply and intensively rooted woody plants may have contributed to N accumulation in wooded areas, but soil δ15N values are inconsistent with this explanation. N accumulation following woody encroachment may alter soil N availability, species interactions and successional dynamics, flux rates of key trace gases such as NOX and N2O and ecosystem C sequestration. Given the geographic dimensions of woody encroachment, these results may have implications for atmospheric composition and the climate system.

  2. Stable Isotope Tracking of Endangered Sea Turtles: Validation with Satellite Telemetry and δ15N Analysis of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Seminoff, Jeffrey A.; Benson, Scott R.; Arthur, Karen E.; Eguchi, Tomoharu; Dutton, Peter H.; Tapilatu, Ricardo F.; Popp, Brian N.

    2012-01-01

    Effective conservation strategies for highly migratory species must incorporate information about long-distance movements and locations of high-use foraging areas. However, the inherent challenges of directly monitoring these factors call for creative research approaches and innovative application of existing tools. Highly migratory marine species, such as marine turtles, regularly travel hundreds or thousands of kilometers between breeding and feeding areas, but identification of migratory routes and habitat use patterns remains elusive. Here we use satellite telemetry in combination with compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids to confirm that insights from bulk tissue stable isotope analysis can reveal divergent migratory strategies and within-population segregation of foraging groups of critically endangered leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) across the Pacific Ocean. Among the 78 turtles studied, we found a distinct dichotomy in δ15N values of bulk skin, with distinct “low δ15N” and “high δ15N” groups. δ15N analysis of amino acids confirmed that this disparity resulted from isotopic differences at the base of the food chain and not from differences in trophic position between the two groups. Satellite tracking of 13 individuals indicated that their bulk skin δ15N value was linked to the particular foraging region of each turtle. These findings confirm that prevailing marine isoscapes of foraging areas can be reflected in the isotopic compositions of marine turtle body tissues sampled at nesting beaches. We use a Bayesian mixture model to show that between 82 and 100% of the 78 skin-sampled turtles could be assigned with confidence to either the eastern Pacific or western Pacific, with 33 to 66% of all turtles foraging in the eastern Pacific. Our forensic approach validates the use of stable isotopes to depict leatherback turtle movements over broad spatial ranges and is timely for establishing wise conservation efforts in

  3. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  4. Early life histories of the London poor using δ13C and δ15N stable isotope incremental dentine sampling.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Rowena C; Lee-Thorp, Julia; Loe, Louise

    2014-08-01

    High resolution incremental isotopic analysis of the dentine from early forming teeth, especially first molars (M1s), provides a means to assess the effects of poor childhood nutrition and healthcare on individuals in an assemblage where there are no infants to study. This approach is applied to an 18th and 19th century cemetery population associated with St Saviour's Almshouse burial ground in Southwark, London, to assess whether, or how, early dietary history, including weaning age, influenced health and nutritional status. The results show a general pattern in which non-breast milk foods were introduced before or by 6 months of age, as indicated by elevated δ(15) N during this period. Almost all individuals for which we also have second molar (M2) records, showed lower δ(15) N values from a very young age (>1 year) until approximately 8-10 years, compared to adult values. The overall results show a significant difference in δ(1) (3) C (p = 0 to 4sf, F = 17.327) and a weaker statistical difference in δ(15) N between males and females (p = 0.019, F = 5.581). One possible cause of this is a difference in the diet of males and females early in life, or alternatively, a greater susceptibility of males to nutritional deprivation compared to females. The latter argument is strengthened by a significant difference in the incidence of enamel hypoplasia between the males and females, with 7.7% of male teeth showing defects, compared to 3.9% of females. PMID:24898314

  5. Benchmark fragment-based (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua D; Kudla, Ryan A; Day, Graeme M; Mueller, Leonard J; Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-08-21

    The performance of fragment-based ab initio(1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions is assessed against experimental NMR chemical shift data in four benchmark sets of molecular crystals. Employing a variety of commonly used density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP, TPSSh, OPBE, PBE, TPSS), we explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, and combined cluster/fragment models. The hybrid density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP and TPSSh) generally out-perform their generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based counterparts. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O isotropic chemical shifts can be predicted with root-mean-square errors of 0.3, 1.5, 4.2, and 9.8 ppm, respectively, using a computationally inexpensive electrostatically embedded two-body PBE0 fragment model. Oxygen chemical shieldings prove particularly sensitive to local many-body effects, and using a combined cluster/fragment model instead of the simple two-body fragment model decreases the root-mean-square errors to 7.6 ppm. These fragment-based model errors compare favorably with GIPAW PBE ones of 0.4, 2.2, 5.4, and 7.2 ppm for the same (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O test sets. Using these benchmark calculations, a set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided and their robustness assessed using statistical cross-validation. We demonstrate the utility of these approaches and the reported scaling parameters on applications to 9-tert-butyl anthracene, several histidine co-crystals, benzoic acid and the C-nitrosoarene SnCl2(CH3)2(NODMA)2. PMID:27431490

  6. Climbing up the vibrational ladder of HC15N: High-temperature near-infrared emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, A.; Johnson, E.; Hemsing, D.; Rozario, H.; Mellau, Georg Ch.

    2013-11-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) emission spectrum of H12C15N was measured in the 6050-6500 cm-1 range at a resolution of 0.044 cm-1 using an emission setup available at the Justus-Liebig Universität, Giessen, Germany. The rich emission spectrum showing numerous overlapped spectral profiles was analyzed with the spectrum analysis software SyMath running using Mathematica as a platform. This approach allowed us to retrieve the vibrational-rotational constants for 32 bands. Many spectroscopic transitions have been observed for the first time in a lab environment. We quantified four newly observed Coriolis resonances.

  7. Partitioning Residue-derived and Residue-induced Emissions of N2O Using 15N-labelled Crop Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, R. E.; Carverhill, J.; Lemke, R.; Knight, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of N2O emissions in Canada indicate that 17% of all agriculture-based emissions are associated with the decomposition of crop residues. However, research specific to the western Canadian prairies (including Saskatchewan) has shown that the N2O emission factor for N sources in this region typically ranges between 0.2 and 0.6%, which is well below the current IPCC default emission factor of 1.0%. Thus, it stands to reason that emissions from crop residues should also be lower than those calculated using the current IPCC emission factor. Current data indicates that residue decomposition, N mineralization and N2O production are affected by a number of factors such as C:N ratio and chemical composition of the residue, soil type, and soil water content; thus, a bench-scale incubation study was conducted to examine the effects of soil type and water content on N2O emissions associated with the decomposition of different crop residues. The study was carried out using soils from the Black, Dark Brown, Brown, and Gray soil zones and was conducted at both 50% and 70% water-filled pore space (WFPS); the soils were amended with 15N-labeled residues of wheat, pea, canola, and flax, or with an equivalent amount of 15N-labeled urea; 15N2O production was monitored using a Picarro G5101-i isotopic N2O analyzer. Crop residue additions to the soils resulted in both direct and indirect emissions of N2O, with residue derived emissions (RDE; measured as 15N2O) generally exceeding residue-induced emissions (RIE) at 50% WFPS—with RDEs ranging from 42% to 88% (mean = 58%) of the total N2O. Conversely, at 70% WFPS, RDEs were generally lower than RIEs—ranging from 21% to 83% (mean = 48%). Whereas both water content and soil type had an impact on N2O production, there was a clear and consistent trend in the emission factors for the residues; i.e., emissions were always greatest for the canola residue and lowest for the wheat residue and urea fertilizer; and intermediate for pea

  8. A new strategy for sequential assignment of intrinsically unstructured proteins based on 15N single isotope labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Gerard, Melanie; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy

    2013-11-01

    We describe a new efficient strategy for the sequential assignment of amide resonances of a conventional 15N-1H HSQC spectrum of intrinsically unfolded proteins, based on composite NOESY-TOCSY and TOCSY-NOESY mixing times. These composite mixing times lead to a Hα-proton mediated unidirectional transfer of amide to amide proton. We have implemented the composite mixing times in an HSQC-NOESY-HSQC manner to obtain directional connectivity between amides of neighbouring residues. We experimentally determine the optimal mixing times for both transfer schemes, and demonstrate its use in the assignment for both a fragment of the neuronal tau protein and for α-synuclein.

  9. A priori predictions of the rotational constants for HC13N, HC15N, C5O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeFrees, D. J.; McLean, A. D.

    1989-01-01

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory is used to estimate the rotational constant for several carbon-chain molecules that are candidates for discovery in interstellar space. These estimated rotational constants can be used in laboratory or astronomical searches for the molecules. The rotational constant for HC13N is estimated to be 0.1073 +/- 0.0002 GHz and its dipole moment 5.4 D. The rotational constant for HC15N is estimated to be 0.0724 GHz, with a somewhat larger uncertainty. The rotational constant of C5O is estimated to be 1.360 +/- 2% GHz and its dipole moment 4.4. D.

  10. Determination of the δ15N and δ18O of nitrate in solids; RSIL lab code 2897

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2897 is to determine the δ15N and δ18O of nitrate (NO3-) in solids. The NO3- fraction of the nitrogen species is dissolved by water (called leaching) and can be analyzed by the bacterial method covered in RSIL lab code 2900. After leaching, the δ15N and δ18O of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  11. Determination of the δ15N and δ18O of nitrate in water; RSIL lab code 2900

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2900 is to determine the δ15N and δ18O of nitrate (NO3-) in water. The δ15N and δ18O of the dissolved NO3- are analyzed by converting the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of the NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  12. Improved mass analysis of oligoribonucleotides by 13C, 15N double depletion and electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ying; Schroeder, Kersten; Greenbaum, Nancy L; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Marshall, Alan G

    2004-03-15

    13C, 15N doubly depleted 32-ribonucleotide was synthesized enzymatically by in vitro transcription from nucleoside triphosphates isolated from E. coli grown in a minimal medium containing 12C, 14N-enriched glucose and ammonium sulfate. Following purification and desalting by reversed-phase HPLC, buffer exchange with Microcon YM-3, and ethanol precipitation, electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra revealed greatly enhanced abundance of monoisotopic ions (by a factor of approximately 100) and a narrower isotopic distribution with higher signal-to-noise ratio. The abrupt onset and high magnitude of the monoisotopic species promise to facilitate accurate mass measurement of RNA's. PMID:15018587

  13. Uniform {sup 15}N- and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeling of proteins in mammalian cells and solution structure of the amino terminal fragment of u-PA

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Petros, A.M.; Meadows, R.P.; Mazar, A.P.; Nettesheim, D.G.; Pederson, T.M.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) is a 54-kDa glycoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, a broad-specificity protease responsible for the degradation of fibrin clots and extracellular matrix components. The u-PA protein consists of three individual modules: a growth factor domain (GFD), a kringle, and a serine protease domain. The amino terminal fragment (ATF) includes the GFD-responsible for u-PA binding to its receptor-and the kringle domains. This protein was expressed and uniformly {sup 15}N-and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled in mammalian cells by methods that will be described. In addition, we present the three-dimensional structure of ATF that was derived from 1299 NOE-derived distance restraints along with the {phi} angle and hydrogen bonding restraints. Although the individual domains in the structures were highly converged, the two domains are structurally independent. The overall structures of the individual domains are very similar to the structures of homologous proteins. However, important structural differences between the growth factor domain of u-PA and other homologous proteins were observed in the region that has been implicated in binding the urokinase receptor. These results may explain, in part, why other growth factors show no appreciable affinity for the urokinase receptor.

  14. The decrease in Greenland ice-core δ15N of nitrate in the industrial period: influenced by changes in atmospheric acidity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, L.; Cole-Dai, J.; Alexander, B.; Steig, E. J.; Schauer, A. J.; Savarino, J.

    2012-12-01

    Previous study in a central Greenland ice core has revealed a decreasing trend in δ15N of nitrate (δ15N (nitrate)) starting as early as 1850 C.E.. Lake sediment cores from North America show a similar trend in δ15N of total nitrogen starting around 1895 C.E.. The decrease in δ15N has been proposed to be due to the increasing deposition of anthropogenically derived (i.e., fossil fuel combustion) nitrate in the industrial period. However, this interpretation is questioned by measurements of δ15N in NOx and atmospheric nitrate. Here, we present new, annually-resolved records of δ15N (nitrate) and major ion concentrations (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) obtained from two central Greenland ice cores. The results (Figure 1) indicate that the significant decrease in δ15N is coincident with an increase in acidity (H+ concentration estimated based on ionic balance) beginning around 1895 C.E., which is about 50 years earlier than the start of the increase in nitrate concentration (~1945 C.E.) . This observation suggests that it is likely the acidity change, instead of the input of anthropogenic nitrate, triggered the decrease in ice-core δ15N (nitrate). Atmospheric aerosol acidity influences the partitioning of atmospheric nitrate between its gaseous (HNO3) and particulate (p-NO3-) phases, resulting in a depletion of δ15N in HNO3 relative to p-NO3-. If atmospheric nitrate is transported to central Greenland preferentially in its gaseous form (HNO3), which is an open question, a decrease in ice-core δ15N (nitrate) would be expected with an increase in atmospheric acidity. We will examine the relationships between δ15N (nitrate) and the ice-core records of acidity, and HNO3, to discern the processes from changes in atmospheric acidity to the observed variability in ice core δ15N (nitrate) during the Industrial era.igure 1. The annual NO3- (blue curve), H+ (black curve) concentrations, and annual δ15N (nitrate) (red curve, y-axis is reversely

  15. (15)N in tree rings as a bio-indicator of changing nitrogen cycling in tropical forests: an evaluation at three sites using two sampling methods.

    PubMed

    van der Sleen, Peter; Vlam, Mart; Groenendijk, Peter; Anten, Niels P R; Bongers, Frans; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Hietz, Peter; Pons, Thijs L; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is currently causing a more than twofold increase of reactive nitrogen input over large areas in the tropics. Elevated (15)N abundance (δ(15)N) in the growth rings of some tropical trees has been hypothesized to reflect an increased leaching of (15)N-depleted nitrate from the soil, following anthropogenic nitrogen deposition over the last decades. To find further evidence for altered nitrogen cycling in tropical forests, we measured long-term δ(15)N values in trees from Bolivia, Cameroon, and Thailand. We used two different sampling methods. In the first, wood samples were taken in a conventional way: from the pith to the bark across the stem of 28 large trees (the "radial" method). In the second, δ(15)N values were compared across a fixed diameter (the "fixed-diameter" method). We sampled 400 trees that differed widely in size, but measured δ(15)N in the stem around the same diameter (20 cm dbh) in all trees. As a result, the growth rings formed around this diameter differed in age and allowed a comparison of δ(15)N values over time with an explicit control for potential size-effects on δ(15)N values. We found a significant increase of tree-ring δ(15)N across the stem radius of large trees from Bolivia and Cameroon, but no change in tree-ring δ(15)N values over time was found in any of the study sites when controlling for tree size. This suggests that radial trends of δ(15)N values within trees reflect tree ontogeny (size development). However, for the trees from Cameroon and Thailand, a low statistical power in the fixed-diameter method prevents to conclude this with high certainty. For the trees from Bolivia, statistical power in the fixed-diameter method was high, showing that the temporal trend in tree-ring δ(15)N values in the radial method is primarily caused by tree ontogeny and unlikely by a change in nitrogen cycling. We therefore stress to account for tree size before tree-ring δ(15)N values can be properly

  16. 15N in tree rings as a bio-indicator of changing nitrogen cycling in tropical forests: an evaluation at three sites using two sampling methods

    PubMed Central

    van der Sleen, Peter; Vlam, Mart; Groenendijk, Peter; Anten, Niels P. R.; Bongers, Frans; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Hietz, Peter; Pons, Thijs L.; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is currently causing a more than twofold increase of reactive nitrogen input over large areas in the tropics. Elevated 15N abundance (δ15N) in the growth rings of some tropical trees has been hypothesized to reflect an increased leaching of 15N-depleted nitrate from the soil, following anthropogenic nitrogen deposition over the last decades. To find further evidence for altered nitrogen cycling in tropical forests, we measured long-term δ15N values in trees from Bolivia, Cameroon, and Thailand. We used two different sampling methods. In the first, wood samples were taken in a conventional way: from the pith to the bark across the stem of 28 large trees (the “radial” method). In the second, δ15N values were compared across a fixed diameter (the “fixed-diameter” method). We sampled 400 trees that differed widely in size, but measured δ15N in the stem around the same diameter (20 cm dbh) in all trees. As a result, the growth rings formed around this diameter differed in age and allowed a comparison of δ15N values over time with an explicit control for potential size-effects on δ15N values. We found a significant increase of tree-ring δ15N across the stem radius of large trees from Bolivia and Cameroon, but no change in tree-ring δ15N values over time was found in any of the study sites when controlling for tree size. This suggests that radial trends of δ15N values within trees reflect tree ontogeny (size development). However, for the trees from Cameroon and Thailand, a low statistical power in the fixed-diameter method prevents to conclude this with high certainty. For the trees from Bolivia, statistical power in the fixed-diameter method was high, showing that the temporal trend in tree-ring δ15N values in the radial method is primarily caused by tree ontogeny and unlikely by a change in nitrogen cycling. We therefore stress to account for tree size before tree-ring δ15N values can be properly interpreted. PMID

  17. Swimming pools soak up the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Cuoghi, D.; Hesse, P.; Schiller, T.

    1996-05-01

    Solar pool heaters survived the boom and bust solar years of the 1970s and 1980s. Today they are even popular and cost-effective in parts of the country where many people think solar is impractical. This article discusses the following topics: how solar pool heaters work; types of solar pool heater collectors; collector and pump sizing; collector siting and mounting; systems costs and economics; pool covers. 3 figs.

  18. Quantification of Labile Soil Mercury by Stable Isotope Dilution Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetaya, Waleed; Huang, Jen-How; Osterwalder, Stefan; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that can cause severe health problems to humans. Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources and can be transported over long distances before it is deposited to aquatic and terrestrial environments. Aside from accumulation in soil solid phases, Hg deposited in soils may migrate to surface- and ground-water or enter the food chain, depending on its lability. There are many operationally-defined extraction methods proposed to quantify soil labile metals. However, these methods are by definition prone to inaccuracies such as non-selectivity, underestimation or overestimation of the labile metal pool. The isotopic dilution technique (ID) is currently the most promising method for discrimination between labile and non-labile metal fractions in soil with a minimum disturbance to soil-solid phases. ID assesses the reactive metal pool in soil by defining the fraction of metal both in solid and solution phases that is isotopically-exchangeable known as the 'E-value'. The 'E-value' represents the metal fraction in a dynamic equilibrium with the solution phase and is potentially accessible to plants. This is carried out by addition of an enriched metal isotope to soil suspensions and quantifying the fraction of metal that is able to freely exchange with the added isotope by measuring the equilibrium isotopic ratio by ICP-MS. E-value (mg kg‑1) is then calculated as follows: E-Value = (Msoil/ W) (CspikeVspike/ Mspike) (Iso1IAspike ‑Iso2IAspikeRss / Iso2IAsoil Rss - Iso1IAsoil) where M is the average atomic mass of the metal in the soil or the spike, W is the mass of soil (kg), Cspike is the concentration of the metal in the spike (mg L‑1), Vspike is the volume of spike (L), IA is isotopic abundance, and Rss is the equilibrium ratio of isotopic abundances (Iso1:Iso2). Isotopic dilution has been successfully applied to determine E-values for several elements. However, to our knowledge, this method has not

  19. 1968 Listing of Swimming Pool Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Testing Lab.

    An up-to-date listing of swimming pool equipment including--(1) companies authorized to display the National Sanitation Foundation seal of approval, (2) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standards relating to diatomite type filters, (3) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standard relating to sand type…

  20. Apparatus for heating a swimming pool

    SciTech Connect

    Kremen, R.D.

    1983-09-06

    This disclosure relates to a solar heater apparatus for a swimming pool which incorporates a submersible suspendible black body sheet to serve as a device to absorb solar radiation and transfer the collected energy to the pool water so that the pool water can be efficiently heated.

  1. 7 CFR 1131.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1131.7 Section 1131.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1131.7 Pool plant. Pool Plant means a plant or unit of plants specified in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section, but excluding a plant specified in paragraph (g) of this...

  2. 7 CFR 1001.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pool plant. 1001.7 Section 1001.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1001.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant described in paragraph (h)...

  3. 7 CFR 1126.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pool plant. 1126.7 Section 1126.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1126.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  4. 7 CFR 1005.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool plant. 1005.7 Section 1005.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1005.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  5. 7 CFR 1007.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pool plant. 1007.7 Section 1007.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1007.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section, a unit of plants as specified in paragraph (e) of this section, or a plant...

  6. 7 CFR 1001.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pool plant. 1001.7 Section 1001.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1001.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant described in paragraph (h)...

  7. 7 CFR 1030.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Pool plant. 1030.7 Section 1030.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1030.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant specified in paragraph (h)...

  8. 7 CFR 1006.7 - Pool plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Pool plant. 1006.7 Section 1006.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1006.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant spec