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Sample records for 15n relaxation experiments

  1. A 15N CPMG relaxation dispersion experiment more resistant to resonance offset and pulse imperfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Yu, Binhan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili; Yang, Daiwen

    2015-08-01

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is a powerful NMR method to study protein dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. J-coupling, resonance offset, radio frequency field inhomogeneity, and pulse imperfection often introduce systematic errors into the measured transverse relaxation rates. Here we proposed a modified continuous wave decoupling CPMG experiment, which is more unaffected by resonance offset and pulse imperfection. We found that it is unnecessary to match the decoupling field strength with the delay between CPMG refocusing pulses, provided that decoupling field is strong enough. The performance of the scheme proposed here was shown by simulations and further demonstrated experimentally on a fatty acid binding protein.

  2. A (15)N CPMG relaxation dispersion experiment more resistant to resonance offset and pulse imperfection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Yu, Binhan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili; Yang, Daiwen

    2015-08-01

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is a powerful NMR method to study protein dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. J-coupling, resonance offset, radio frequency field inhomogeneity, and pulse imperfection often introduce systematic errors into the measured transverse relaxation rates. Here we proposed a modified continuous wave decoupling CPMG experiment, which is more unaffected by resonance offset and pulse imperfection. We found that it is unnecessary to match the decoupling field strength with the delay between CPMG refocusing pulses, provided that decoupling field is strong enough. The performance of the scheme proposed here was shown by simulations and further demonstrated experimentally on a fatty acid binding protein. PMID:26037134

  3. H/D exchange of a 15N labelled Tau fragment as measured by a simple Relax-EXSY experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Huvent, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2014-12-01

    We present an equilibrium H/D exchange experiment to measure the exchange rates of labile amide protons in intrinsically unfolded proteins. By measuring the contribution of the H/D exchange to the apparent T1 relaxation rates in solvents of different D2O content, we can easily derive the rates of exchange for rapidly exchanging amide protons. The method does not require double isotope labelling, is sensitive, and requires limited fitting of the data. We demonstrate it on a functional fragment of Tau, and provide evidence for the hydrogen bond formation of the phosphate moiety of Ser214 with its own amide proton in the same fragment phosphorylated by the PKA kinase.

  4. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  5. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  6. The effect of noncollinearity of 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA tensors and rotational anisotropy on 15N relaxation, CSA/dipolar cross correlation, and TROSY.

    PubMed

    Fushman, D; Cowburn, D

    1999-02-01

    Current approaches to 15N relaxation in proteins assume that the 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA tensors are collinear. We show theoretically that, when there is significant anisotropy of molecular rotation, different orientations of the two tensors, experimentally observed in proteins, nucleic acids, and small peptides, will result in differences in site-specific correlation functions and spectral densities. The standard treatments of the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation of amide 15N nuclei, of the 15N CSA/15N-1H dipolar cross correlation, and of the TROSY experiment are extended to account for the effect of noncollinearity of the 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA (chemical shift anisotropy) tensors. This effect, proportional to the degree of anisotropy of the overall motion, (D parallel/D perpendicular - 1), is sensitive to the relative orientation of the two tensors and to the orientation of the peptide plane with respect to the diffusion coordinate frame. The effect is negligible at small degrees of anisotropy, but is predicted to become significant for D parallel/D perpendicular > or = 1.5, and at high magnetic fields. The effect of noncollinearity of 15N CSA and 15N-1H dipolar interaction is sensitive to both gross (hydrodynamic) properties and atomic-level details of protein structure. Incorporation of this effect into relaxation data analysis is likely to improve both precision and accuracy of the derived characteristics of protein dynamics, especially at high magnetic fields and for molecules with a high degree of anisotropy of the overall motion. The effect will also make TROSY efficiency dependent on local orientation in moderately anisotropic systems. PMID:10070755

  7. Heteronuclear transverse and longitudinal relaxation in AX4 spin systems: Application to 15N relaxations in 15NH4+

    PubMed Central

    Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Hansen, D. Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The equations that describe the time-evolution of transverse and longitudinal 15N magnetisations in tetrahedral ammonium ions, 15NH4+, are derived from the Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield density operator relaxation theory. It is assumed that the relaxation of the spin-states is dominated by (1) the intra-molecular 15N–1H and 1H–1H dipole–dipole interactions and (2) interactions of the ammonium protons with remote spins, which also include the contribution to the relaxations that arise from the exchange of the ammonium protons with the bulk solvent. The dipole–dipole cross-correlated relaxation mechanisms between each of the 15N–1H and 1H–1H interactions are explicitly taken into account in the derivations. An application to 15N-ammonium bound to a 41 kDa domain of the protein DnaK is presented, where a comparison between experiments and simulations show that the ammonium ion rotates rapidly within its binding site with a local correlation time shorter than approximately 1 ns. The theoretical framework provided here forms the basis for further investigations of dynamics of AX4 spin systems, with ammonium ions in solution and bound to proteins of particular interest. PMID:25128779

  8. Slow motions in microcrystalline proteins as observed by MAS-dependent 15N rotating-frame NMR relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; Zinkevich, Tatiana; Reif, Bernd; Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-11-01

    15N NMR relaxation rate R1ρ measurements reveal that a substantial fraction of residues in the microcrystalline chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain protein undergoes dynamics in the μs-ms timescale range. On the basis of a comparison of 2D site-resolved with 1D integrated 15N spectral intensities, we demonstrate that the significant fraction of broad signals in the 2D spectrum exhibits the most pronounced slow mobility. We show that 15N R1ρ's in proton-diluted protein samples are practically free from the coherent spin-spin contribution even at low MAS rates, and thus can be analysed quantitatively. Moderate MAS rates (10-30 kHz) can be more advantageous in comparison with the rates >50-60 kHz when slow dynamics are to be identified and quantified by means of R1ρ experiments.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION REAGENTS ON 15N SPIN RELAXATION AND THE USE OF GD(DPM)3 AS A NITROGEN-15 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPIN LABEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron-nuclear relaxation times (T(1) sup e's) for (15)N and (13)C in natural abundance are measured for a series of amines of a wide range of pK(a)s using four paramagnetic relaxation reagents that are soluable in organic solutions. Cr(acac)3 and Cr(dpm)3 are seen to affect th...

  10. Backbone dynamics of the oligomerization domain of p53 determined from 15N NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Omichinski, J G; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1995-05-01

    The backbone dynamics of the tetrameric p53 oligomerization domain (residues 319-360) have been investigated by two-dimensional inverse detected heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy at 500 and 600 MHz. 15N T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOEs were measured for 39 of 40 non-proline backbone NH vectors at both field strengths. The overall correlation time for the tetramer, calculated from the T1/T2 ratios, was found to be 14.8 ns at 35 degrees C. The correlation times and amplitudes of the internal motions were extracted from the relaxation data using the model-free formalism (Lipari G, Szabo A, 1982, J Am Chem Soc 104:4546-4559). The internal dynamics of the structural core of the p53 oligomerization domain are uniform and fairly rigid, with residues 327-354 exhibiting an average generalized order parameter (S2) of 0.88 +/- 0.08. The N- and C-termini exhibit substantial mobility and are unstructured in the solution structure of p53. Residues located at the N- and C-termini, in the beta-sheet, in the turn between the alpha-helix and beta-sheet, and at the C-terminal end of the alpha-helix display two distinct internal motions that are faster than the overall correlation time. Fast internal motions (< or = 20 ps) are within the extreme narrowing limit and are of uniform amplitude. The slower motions (0.6-2.2 ns) are outside the extreme narrowing limit and vary in amplitude.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663341

  11. HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH experiment for (1)H(N) and (15)N sequential correlations in ((13)C, (15)N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Goradia, Nishit; Häfner, Sabine; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2015-10-01

    A simple triple resonance NMR experiment that leads to the correlation of the backbone amide resonances of each amino acid residue 'i' with that of residues 'i-1' and 'i+1' in ((13)C, (15)N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is presented. The experimental scheme, {HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH}, exploits the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of (1) J CαN and (2) J CαN couplings to transfer the (15)N x magnetisation from amino acid residue 'i' to adjacent residues via the application of a band-selective (15)N-(13)C(α) heteronuclear cross-polarisation sequence of ~100 ms duration. Employing non-uniform sampling in the indirect dimensions, the efficacy of the approach has been demonstrated by the acquisition of 3D HNN chemical shift correlation spectra of α-synuclein. The experimental performance of the RF pulse sequence has been compared with that of the conventional INEPT-based HN(CA)NH pulse scheme. As the availability of data from both the HCCNH and HNN experiments will make it possible to use the information extracted from one experiment to simplify the analysis of the data of the other and lead to a robust approach for unambiguous backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, a time-saving strategy for the simultaneous collection of HCCNH and HNN data is also described. PMID:26282620

  12. SRLS analysis of 15N spin relaxation from E. coli ribonuclease HI: the tensorial perspective.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Eva; Shapiro, Yury E; Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino

    2012-01-19

    15N–H relaxation parameters from ribonuclease HI (RNase H), acquired in previous work at magnetic fields of 14.1 and 18.8 T, and at 300 K, are analyzed with the mode-coupling slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach. In accordance with standard theoretical treatments of restricted motions, SRLS approaches N-H bond dynamics from a tensorial perspective. As shown previously, a physically adequate description of this phenomenon has to account for the asymmetry of the local spatial restrictions. So far, we used rhombic local ordering tensors; this is straightforward but computationally demanding. Here, we propose substantiating the asymmetry of the local spatial restrictions in terms of tilted axial local ordering (S) and local diffusion (D2) tensors. Although less straightforward, this description provides physically sound structural and dynamic information and is efficient computationally. We find that the local order parameter, S(0)2, is on average 0.89 (0.84, and may be as small as 0.6) for the secondary structure elements (loops). The main local ordering axis deviates from the C(i-1)α-C(i)α axis by less than 6°. At 300 K, D(2,perpendicular) is virtually the same as the global diffusion rate, D1 = 1.8 × 10(7) s(-1). The correlation time 1/6D(2,parallel) ranges from 3-125 (208-344) ps for the secondary structure elements (loops) and is on average 125 ps for the C-terminal segment. The main local diffusion axis deviates from the N-H bond by less than 2° (10°) for the secondary structure elements (loops). An effective data-fitting protocol, which leads in most cases to unambiguous results with limited uncertainty, has been devised. A physically sound and computationally effective methodology for analyzing 15N relaxation in proteins, that provides a new picture of N–H bond structural dynamics in proteins, has been set forth. PMID:22126306

  13. Effects of ion binding on the backbone dynamics of calbindin D9k determined by 15N NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Akke, M; Skelton, N J; Kördel, J; Palmer, A G; Chazin, W J

    1993-09-21

    The backbone dynamics of apo- and (Cd2+)1-calbindin D9k have been characterized by 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rate constants and steady-state [1H]-15N nuclear Overhauser effects were measured at a magnetic field strength of 11.74 T by two-dimensional, proton-detected heteronuclear NMR experiments using 15N-enriched samples. The relaxation parameters were analyzed using a model-free formalism that characterizes the dynamics of the N-H bond vectors in terms of generalized order parameters and effective correlation times. The data for the apo and (Cd2+)1 states were compared to those for the (Ca2+)2 state [Kördel, J., Skelton, N. J., Akke, M., Palmer, A. G., & Chazin, W. J. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4856-4866] to ascertain the effects on ion ligation on the backbone dynamics of calbindin D9k. The two binding loops respond differently to ligation by metal ions: high-frequency (10(9)-10(12) s-1) fluctuations of the N-terminal ion-binding loop are not affected by ion binding, whereas residues G57, D58, G59, and E60 in the C-terminal ion-binding loop have significantly lower order parameters in the apo state than in the metal-bound states. The dynamical responses of the four helices to binding of ions are much smaller than that for the C-terminal binding loop, with the strongest effect on helix III, which is located between the linker loop and binding site II. Significant fluctuations on slower time scales also were detected in the unoccupied N-terminal ion-binding loop of the apo and (Cd2+)1 states; the apparent rates were greater for the (Cd2+)1 state. These results on the dynamical response to ion binding in calbindin D9k provide insights into the molecular details of the binding process and qualitative evidence for entropic contributions to the cooperative phenomenon of calcium binding for the pathway in which the ion binds first in the C-terminal site. PMID:8373781

  14. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Udgaonkar, J B; Hosur, R V

    2000-10-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 degrees C, pH 6.6, using 15N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D [1H]-15N NMR spectroscopy. 15N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R2), and steady-state heteronuclear [1H]-15N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide 15N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times (tau(m)) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motion's cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface may have important implications for remote effects and regulation of the enzyme action. PMID

  15. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  16. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  17. Extension of transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy techniques to allosteric proteins: CO- and paramagnetic fluoromet-hemoglobin [beta (15N-valine)].

    PubMed

    Nocek, J M; Huang, K; Hoffman, B M

    2000-03-14

    We present the first steps in applying transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) techniques to the study of allosterism. Each beta-chain of the hemoglobin (Hb) tetramer has 17 valine residues. We have (15)N-labeled the beta-chain Val residues and detected 16 of the 17 (1)H-(15)N correlation peaks for beta-chain Val of the R state CO-Hb structure by using the TROSY technique. Sequence-specific assignments are suggested, based mainly on analysis of the (1)H pseudocontact-shift increments produced by oxidizing the diamagnetic R state HbCO to the paramagnetic R state fluoromet form. When possible, we support these assignments with sequential nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) information obtained from a two-dimensional [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY-TROSY experiment (NOESY, NOE spectroscopy). We have induced further the R-T conformational change by adding the allosteric effector, inositol hexaphosphate, to the fluoromet-Hb sample. This change induces substantial increments in the (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts, and we discuss the implication of these findings in the context of the tentative sequence assignments. These preliminary results suggest that amide nitrogen and amide proton chemical shifts in a selectively labeled sample are site-specific probes for monitoring the allosteric response of the ensemble-averaged solution structure of Hb. More important, the chemical-shift dispersion obtained is adequate to permit a complete assignment of the backbone (15)N/(13)C resonances upon nonselective labeling. PMID:10716987

  18. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins. PMID:25296323

  19. Slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) analysis of 15N-H relaxation from the prototypical small proteins GB1 and GB3.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Yury E; Meirovitch, Eva

    2012-04-01

    15N-H relaxation parameters from the first (GB1) and third (GB3) immunoglobulin-binding domains of streptococcal protein G were analyzed previously with the traditional model-free (MF) method. These proteins comprise an α-helix and a four-stranded β-sheet. An extensive study of GB1 (GB3) used combined three-field (five-field) data acquired in the 278-323 K range (at 297 K). For successful analysis of the GB3 data, it was necessary to allow for variations in the 15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor and virtually eliminate the local motion. In the case of GB1, the spectral density was parametrized. Here, we analyze these data with the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach, which is the generalization of MF in allowing for general tensorial properties, and accounting for mode-coupling. A standard (featuring constant magnetic tensors) SRLS fitting scheme is used. This analysis accounts for the important asymmetry of the local spatial restrictions; it provides physical order parameters, local diffusion rates, related activation energies, and key features of local geometry. Using data from GB3 we show that the main local ordering axis is C(i-1)(α) - C(i)(α), and the average axial (rhombic) order parameter is -0.457 ± 0.017 (1.156 ± 0.015) for the α-helix and -0.484 ± 0.002 (1.10 ± 0.04) for the rest of the polypeptide chain. The N-H bonds within (outside of) the α-helix reorient locally with an average correlation time, (τ), of 310 (130) ps, as compared to 3.33 ns for the global tumbling. Several N-H bonds in the loops β1/β2, β2/α-helix, and α-helix/β3 have (τ) of 380, 320, and 750 ps, respectively. The distinctive experimental data of the α-helix are due to relatively weak and substantially rhombic local ordering and slow local motion. For GB1, we derive activation energies from local diffusion rates. They are 43.3 ± 7.1 kJ/mol for the β-strands, 24.7 ± 3.9 kJ/mol for the α-helix (and approximately for the loop β3/β4), and 18.9

  20. MUSIC in Triple-Resonance Experiments: Amino Acid Type-Selective 1H- 15N Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Mario; Smalla, Maika; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective 1H-15N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH2 or XH3 (X can be 15N or 13C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains.

  1. MUSIC in triple-resonance experiments: amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations

    PubMed

    Schubert; Smalla; Schmieder; Oschkinat

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH(2) or XH(3) (X can be (15)N or (13)C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10527741

  2. Optical Microscopy Characterization for Borehole U-15n#12 in Support of NCNS Source Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jennifer E.; Sussman, Aviva Joy

    2015-05-22

    Optical microscopy characterization of thin sections from corehole U-15n#12 is part of a larger material characterization effort for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). The SPE program was conducted in Nevada with a series of explosive tests designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves inside Stock quartz monzonite. Optical microscopy analysis includes the following: 1) imaging of full thin sections (scans and mosaic maps); 2) high magnification imaging of petrographic texture (grain size, foliations, fractures, etc.); and 3) measurement of microfracture density.

  3. Efficient and accurate determination of the overall rotational diffusion tensor of a molecule from 15N relaxation data using computer program ROTDIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Olivier; Varadan, Ranjani; Fushman, David

    2004-06-01

    We present a computer program ROTDIF for efficient determination of a complete rotational diffusion tensor of a molecule from NMR relaxation data. The derivation of the rotational diffusion tensor in the case of a fully anisotropic model is based on a six-dimensional search, which could be very time consuming, particularly if a grid search in the Euler angle space is involved. Here, we use an efficient Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm combined with Monte Carlo generation of initial guesses. The result is a dramatic, up to 50-fold improvement in the computational efficiency over the previous approaches [Biochemistry 38 (1999) 10225; J. Magn. Reson. 149 (2001) 214]. This method is demonstrated on a computer-generated and real protein systems. We also address the issue of sensitivity of the diffusion tensor determination from 15N relaxation measurements to experimental errors in the relaxation rates and discuss possible artifacts from applying higher-symmetry tensor model and how to recognize them.

  4. Creating 13C- and 15N-enriched tree leaf litter for decomposition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlavecz, K. A.; Pitz, S.; Chang, C.; Bernard, M.

    2013-12-01

    Labeling plant material with heavy isotopes of carbon and nitrogen can produce a traceable nutrient signal that can be followed into the different trophic levels and decomposer food web. We treated 60 tree saplings with 13C-enriched CO2 gas and 15N-enriched ammonium nitrate over a three-month period to create dually-labeled plant material for future decomposition experiments. The trees included both early (Red maple, Sweetgum, Tulip poplar) and late (American beech, White oak) successional deciduous tree species, and a conifer, White pine. We constructed a 2.4 m × 2.4 m × 2.4 m environmental chamber that was climate-controlled using an air conditioning system. An Arduino microcontroller interfaced with a Vaisala GMP343 CO2 probe maintained a CO2 concentration between 500-520 ppm by controlling a solenoid valve on the CO2 tank regulator. The trees were placed into the chamber in August 2012 and remained until senescence unless they were lost to death or disease. Ammonium nitrate was added twice, in September and October. Leaf samples were collected prior to the start of the experiment and after senescence, whereas root samples were collected only in December. Samples were dried, ground and analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. American beech and White oak had 40% mortality, and 34% of tulip poplar trees were removed because of powdery mildew overgrowth or death. Most tulip poplar trees exhibited a second leaf out following senescence in late September. Nearly 1 kg of litter was produced with tulip poplar representing over half of the total mass. Levels of enrichment varied greatly by species. Beech (-14.2‰) and White oak (-4.8‰) had low levels of enrichment in comparison to early successional species such as Sweetgum (41.7‰) and Tulip poplar (30.7‰ [first leaf fall] and 238.0‰ [second leaf fall]). Leaf enrichment with 15N followed a similar pattern, though it was achieved at a higher level with δ15N values varying from 271.6‰ to 1354.2

  5. Paramagnetic Inversion of the Sign of the Interference Contribution to the Transverse Relaxation of the Imido Protons of the Coordinated Imidazoles in the Uniformly 15N-Labeled Cytochrome c3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Tomoaki; Harada, Erisa; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kawai, Gota; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Akutsu, Hideo

    1998-04-01

    In the spectrum of uniformly15N-labeled cytochromec3, the relative linewidths of the doublet peaks of the15N-coupled imido proton of the coordinated imidazole group were reversed on oxidation. This inversion was explained by the interference relaxation process between the electron-proton dipolar and15N-1H dipolar interactions. The inversion can be used to assign the imido protons of the coordinated imidazole groups in heme proteins.

  6. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  7. Improved accuracy of 15N-1H scalar and residual dipolar couplings from gradient-enhanced IPAP-HSQC experiments on protonated proteins.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2009-03-01

    The presence of dipole-dipole cross-correlated relaxation as well as unresolved E.COSY effects adversely impacts the accuracy of (1)J(NH) splittings measured from gradient-enhanced IPAP-HSQC spectra. For isotropic samples, the size of the systematic errors caused by these effects depends on the values of (2)J(NHalpha), (3)J(NHbeta) and (3)J(HNHalpha). Insertion of band-selective (1)H decoupling pulses in the IPAP-HSQC experiment eliminates these systematic errors and for the protein GB3 yields (1)J(NH) splittings that agree to within a root-mean-square difference of 0.04 Hz with values measured for perdeuterated GB3. Accuracy of the method is also highlighted by a good fit to the GB3 structure of the (1)H-(15)N RDCs extracted from the minute differences in (1)J(NH) splitting measured at 500 and 750 MHz (1)H frequencies, resulting from magnetic susceptibility anisotropy. A nearly complete set of (2)J(NHalpha) couplings was measured in GB3 in order to evaluate whether the impact of cross-correlated relaxation is dominated by the (15)N-(1)H(alpha) or (15)N-(1)H(beta) dipolar interaction. As expected, we find that (2)J(NHalpha) < or = 2 Hz, with values in the alpha-helix (0.86 +/- 0.52 Hz) slightly larger than in beta-sheet (0.66 +/- 0.26 Hz). Results indicate that under isotropic conditions, N-H(N)/N-H(beta) cross-correlated relaxation often dominates. Unresolved E.COSY effects under isotropic conditions involve (3)J(HNHalpha) and J(NHalpha), but when weakly aligned any aliphatic proton proximate to both N and H(N) can contribute. PMID:19205898

  8. Main chain and side chain dynamics of a heme protein: 15N and 2H NMR relaxation studies of R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c2.

    PubMed

    Flynn, P F; Bieber Urbauer, R J; Zhang, H; Lee, A L; Wand, A J

    2001-06-01

    A detailed characterization of the main chain and side chain dynamics in R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c(2) derived from (2)H NMR relaxation of methyl group resonances is presented. (15)N relaxation measurements confirm earlier results indicating that R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c(2) exhibits minor rotational anisotropy in solution. The current study is focused on the use of deuterium relaxation in side chain methyl groups, which has been shown to provide a detailed and accurate measure of internal dynamics. Results obtained indicate that the side chains of ferrocytochrome c(2) exhibit a wide range of motional amplitudes, but are more rigid than generally found in the interior of nonprosthetic group bearing globular proteins. This unusual rigidity is ascribed to the interactions of the protein with the large heme prosthetic group. This observation has significant implications for the potential of the heme-protein interface to modulate the redox properties of the protein and also points to the need for great precision in the design and engineering of heme proteins. PMID:11380250

  9. SRLS analysis of 15N relaxation from bacteriophage T4 lysozyme: a tensorial perspective that features domain motion.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Eva

    2012-05-31

    Bacteriophage T4L lysozyme (T4L) comprises two domains connected by a helical linker. Several methods detected ns domain motion associated with the binding of the peptidoglycan substrate. An ESR study of nitroxide-labeled T4L, based on the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach, detected ns local motion involving the nitroxide and the helix housing it. (15)N−H spin relaxation data from T4L acquired at magnetic fields of 11.7 and 18.8 T, and 298 K, were analyzed previously with the model-free (MF) method. The results did not detect domain motion. SRLS is the generalization of MF. Here, we apply it to the same data analyzed previously with MF. The restricted local N−H motion is described in terms of tilted axial local ordering (S) and local diffusion (D(2)) tensors; dynamical coupling to the global tumbling is accounted for. We find that D(2,⊥) is 1.62 × 10(7) (1.56 × 10(7)) s(−1) for the N-terminal (C-terminal) domain. This dynamic mode represents domain motion. For the linker D(2,⊥) is the same as the rate of global tumbling, given by (1.46 ± 0.04) × 10(7) s(−1). D(2,∥) is 1.3 × 10(9), 1.8 × 10(9) and 5.3 × 10(9) s(−1) for the N-terminal domain, the C-terminal domain, and the linker, respectively. This dynamic mode represents N−H bond vector fluctuations. The principal axis of D(2) is virtually parallel to the N−H bond. The order parameter, S(0)(2), is 0.910 ± 0.046 for most N−H bonds. The principal axis of S is tilted from the C(i−1)(α) −C(i)(α) axis by −2° to 6° for the N-, and C-terminal domains, and by 2.5° for the linker. The tensorial-perspective-based and mode-coupling-based SRLS picture provides new insights into the structural dynamics of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme. PMID:22568692

  10. Analysis of internal motions of interleukin-13 variant associated with severe bronchial asthma using {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Takeda, Chika; Kuroki, Ryota; Izuhara, Kenji; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi . E-mail: ueda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-22

    The single nucleotide polymorphism interleukin-13 (IL-13) R110Q is associated with severe bronchial asthma because its lower affinity leads to the augmentation of local IL-13 concentration, resulting in an increase in the signal transduction via IL-13R. Since the mutation site does not directly bind to IL-13R{alpha}2, we carried out NMR relaxation analyses of the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q in order to examine whether the R110Q mutation affects the internal motions in IL-13 molecules. The results showed that the internal motion in the micro- to millisecond time scale on helix D, which is suggested to be important for the interaction between IL-13 and IL-13R{alpha}2, is increased in IL-13-R110Q compared with that in the wild-type IL-13. It therefore appears that the difference in the internal motions on helix D between the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q may be involved in their affinity differences with IL-13R{alpha}2.

  11. Compound-specific 15N analysis of amino acids in 15N tracer experiments provide an estimate of newly synthesised soil protein from inorganic and organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, Alice; Michaelides, Katerina; Evershed, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Organic N concentrations far exceed those of inorganic N in most soils and despite much investigation, the composition and cycling of this complex pool of SOM remains poorly understood. A particular problem has been separating more recalcitrant soil organic N from that actively cycling through the soil system; an important consideration in N cycling studies and for the soil's nutrient supplying capacity. The use of 15N-labelled substrates as stable isotope tracers has contributed much to our understanding of the soil system, but the complexity and heterogeneity of soil organic N prevents thorough compound-specific 15N analyses of organic N compounds and makes it difficult to examine any 15N-labelled organic products in any detail. As a result, a significant proportion of previous work has either simply assumed that since the majority of soil N is organic, all of the 15N retained in the soil is organic N (e.g. Sebilo et al., 2013) or subtracted 15N-labelled inorganic compounds from bulk values (e.g. Pilbeam et al., 1997). While the latter approach is more accurate, these methods only provide an estimate of the bulk 15N value of an extremely complex and non-uniformly labelled organic pool. A more detailed approach has been to use microbial biomass extraction (Brookes et al., 1985) and subsequent N isotopic analysis to determine the 15N value of biomass-N, representing the fraction of 15N assimilated by microbes or the 15N cycling through the 'living' or 'active' portion of soil organic N. However, this extraction method can only generate estimates and some lack of confidence in its validity and reliability remains. Here, we present an alternative technique to obtain a measure of the assimilation of an applied 15N substrate by the soil microbial biomass and an estimate of the newly synthesized soil protein, which is representative of the magnitude of the active soil microbial biomass. The technique uses a stable isotope tracer and compound-specific 15N analysis, but

  12. Polar Versus Non-polar Local Ordering at Mobile Sites in Proteins: Slowly Relaxing Local Structure Analysis of (15)N Relaxation in the Third Immunoglobulin-Binding Domain of Streptococcal Protein G.

    PubMed

    Tchaicheeyan, Oren; Meirovitch, Eva

    2016-01-28

    We developed recently the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for studying restricted motions in proteins by NMR. The spatial restrictions have been described by potentials comprising the traditional L = 2, K = 0, 2 spherical harmonics. However, the latter are associated with non-polar ordering whereas protein-anchored probes experience polar ordering, described by odd-L spherical harmonics. Here we extend the SRLS potential to include the L = 1, K = 0, 1 spherical harmonics and analyze (15)N-(1)H relaxation from the third immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB3) with the polar L = 1 potential (coefficients c0(1) and c1(1)) or the non-polar L = 2 potential (coefficients c0(2) and c2(2)). Strong potentials, with ⟨c0(1)⟩ ∼ 60 for L = 1 and ⟨c0(2)⟩ ∼ 20 for L = 2 (in units of kBT), are detected. In the α-helix of GB3 the coefficients of the rhombic terms are c1(1) ∼ c2(2) ∼ 0; in the preceding (following) chain segment they are ⟨c1(1)⟩ ∼ 6 for L = 1 and ⟨c2(2)⟩ ∼ 14 for L = 2 (⟨c1(1)⟩ ∼ 3 for L = 1 and ⟨c2(2)⟩ ∼ 7 for L = 2). The local diffusion rate, D2, lies in the 5 × 10(9)-1 × 10(11) s(-1) range; it is generally larger for L = 1. The main ordering axis deviates moderately from the N-H bond. Corresponding L = 1 and L = 2 potentials and probability density functions are illustrated for residues A26 of the α-helix, Y3 of the β1-strand, and L12 of the β1/β2 loop; they differ considerably. Polar/orientational ordering is shown to be associated with GB3 binding to its cognate Fab fragment. The polarity of the local ordering is clearly an important factor. PMID:26731631

  13. Fate of nitrogen deposition and decomposed nitrogen from litter in a 15N-tracer mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, R.; Perks, M.; Mencuccini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic-derived nitrogen may be a major driver of the 0.6-0.7 Pg y-1 increase in the carbon sink in historically N-limited northern and boreal forests, but the magnitude of its effect is still uncertain. A strong effect depends on the allocation of N to trees, because of their high C:N ratio in woody tissues, and isotope tracer experiments have shown that the majority of 15N tracers applied directly to the soil are lost via leeching or retained in soil pools rather than being acquired by tree root systems. However, ambient anthropogenic inputs of N to these systems are transported in the atmosphere and intercepted by foliage before they reach the soil system, while labelled fertilization experiments also can only explicitly trace the fate of the 15N-tracer from deposition, as opposed to changes in the fate of N from litter, where decomposition rates may be enhanced at low ambient levels of deposition, affecting the availability of N from this pool for tree nutrition. We present initial results from a potted Sitka Spruce mesocosm 15N-tracer experiment where ambient nitrogen deposition was supplemented with a minor (0.4 kg ha-1 y-1) input of additional N, applied to either the soil or the foliage. Either this deposition, or litter in the pots, was enriched in 15N, allowing the fate of the isotope from two different methods of deposition to be compared with that of nitrogen released from the litter under the deposition treatment.

  14. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: 2. Denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Hall, Robert; Sobota, Daniel; Dodds, Walter; Findlay, Stuart; Grimm, Nancy; Hamilton, Stephen; McDowell, William; O'Brien, Jon; Tank, Jennifer; Ashkenas, Linda; Cooper, Lee W; Dahm, Cliff; Gregory, Stanley; Johnson, Sherri; Meyer, Judy; Peterson, Bruce; Poole, Geoff; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson; Arango, Clay; Beaulieu, Jake; Bernot, Melody; Burgin, Amy; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Helton, Ashley; Johnson, Laura; Niederlehner, Bobbie; Potter, Jody; Sheibley, Rich; Thomas, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field {sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (S{sub Wden}) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N{sub 2} production rates far exceeded N{sub 2}O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling S{sub Wden} were specific discharge (discharge/width) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (U{sub den}) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although U{sub den} increased with increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, the efficiency of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO{sub 3}{sup -} load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration.

  15. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulholland, P.J.; Hall, R.O., Jr.; Sobota, D.J.; Dodds, W.K.; Findlay, S.E.G.; Grimm, N. B.; Hamilton, S.K.; McDowell, W.H.; O'Brien, J. M.; Tank, J.L.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Cooper, L.W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Gregory, S.V.; Johnson, S.L.; Meyer, J.L.; Peterson, B.J.; Poole, G.C.; Valett, H.M.; Webster, J.R.; Arango, C.P.; Beaulieu, J.J.; Bernot, M.J.; Burgin, A.J.; Crenshaw, C.L.; Helton, A.M.; Johnson, L.T.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Potter, J.D.; Sheibley, R.W.; Thomasn, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field 15N-NO- 3 tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (SWden) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N2 production rates far exceeded N2O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO-3 removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NHz 4 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling SWden were specific discharge (discharge / width) and NO-3 concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (Uden) and NO- 3 concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although Uden increased with increasing NO- 3 concentration, the efficiency of NO-3 removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO-3 load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO-3 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO-3 concentration. ?? 2009.

  16. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Total uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Hall, Robert; Tank, Jennifer; Sobota, Daniel; O'Brien, Jon; Webster, Jackson; Valett, H. Maurice; Dodds, Walter; Poole, Geoff; Peterson, Chris G.; Meyer, Judy; McDowell, William; Johnson, Sherri; Hamilton, Stephen; Gregory, Stanley; Grimm, Nancy; Dahm, Cliff; Cooper, Lee W; Ashkenas, Linda; Thomas, Suzanne; Sheibley, Rich; Potter, Jody; Niederlehner, Bobbie; Johnson, Laura; Helton, Ashley; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Burgin, Amy; Bernot, Melody; Beaulieu, Jake; Arango, Clay

    2009-01-01

    We measured uptake length of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -} in 72 streams in eight regions across the United States and Puerto Rico to develop quantitative predictive models on controls of NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake length. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiment II project, we chose nine streams in each region corresponding to natural (reference), suburban-urban, and agricultural land uses. Study streams spanned a range of human land use to maximize variation in NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, geomorphology, and metabolism. We tested a causal model predicting controls on NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake length using structural equation modeling. The model included concomitant measurements of ecosystem metabolism, hydraulic parameters, and nitrogen concentration. We compared this structural equation model to multiple regression models which included additional biotic, catchment, and riparian variables. The structural equation model explained 79% of the variation in log uptake length (S{sub Wtot}). Uptake length increased with specific discharge (Q/w) and increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations, showing a loss in removal efficiency in streams with high NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration. Uptake lengths shortened with increasing gross primary production, suggesting autotrophic assimilation dominated NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal. The fraction of catchment area as agriculture and suburban-urban land use weakly predicted NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake in bivariate regression, and did improve prediction in a set of multiple regression models. Adding land use to the structural equation model showed that land use indirectly affected NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake lengths via directly increasing both gross primary production and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration. Gross primary production shortened S{sub Wtot}, while increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} lengthened S{sub Wtot} resulting in no net effect of land use on NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal.

  17. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Total uptake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.O., Jr.; Tank, J.L.; Sobota, D.J.; Mulholland, P.J.; O'Brien, J. M.; Dodds, W.K.; Webster, J.R.; Valett, H.M.; Poole, G.C.; Peterson, B.J.; Meyer, J.L.; McDowell, W.H.; Johnson, S.L.; Hamilton, S.K.; Grimm, N. B.; Gregory, S.V.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Cooper, L.W.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Thomas, S.M.; Sheibley, R.W.; Potter, J.D.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Johnson, L.T.; Helton, A.M.; Crenshaw, C.M.; Burgin, A.J.; Bernot, M.J.; Beaulieu, J.J.; Arangob, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    We measured uptake length of 15NO-3 in 72 streams in eight regions across the United States and Puerto Rico to develop quantitative predictive models on controls of NO-3 uptake length. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen eXperiment II project, we chose nine streams in each region corresponding to natural (reference), suburban-urban, and agricultural land uses. Study streams spanned a range of human land use to maximize variation in NO-3 concentration, geomorphology, and metabolism. We tested a causal model predicting controls on NO-3 uptake length using structural equation modeling. The model included concomitant measurements of ecosystem metabolism, hydraulic parameters, and nitrogen concentration. We compared this structural equation model to multiple regression models which included additional biotic, catchment, and riparian variables. The structural equation model explained 79% of the variation in log uptake length (S Wtot). Uptake length increased with specific discharge (Q/w) and increasing NO-3 concentrations, showing a loss in removal efficiency in streams with high NO-3 concentration. Uptake lengths shortened with increasing gross primary production, suggesting autotrophic assimilation dominated NO-3 removal. The fraction of catchment area as agriculture and suburban-urban land use weakly predicted NO-3 uptake in bivariate regression, and did improve prediction in a set of multiple regression models. Adding land use to the structural equation model showed that land use indirectly affected NO-3 uptake lengths via directly increasing both gross primary production and NO-3 concentration. Gross primary production shortened SWtot, while increasing NO-3 lengthened SWtot resulting in no net effect of land use on NO- 3 removal. ?? 2009.

  18. Interresidue carbonyl-carbonyl polarization transfer experiments in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Rafal; Ritz, Emily; Gravelle, Andrew; Shi, Lichi; Peng, Xiaohu; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that Homonuclear Rotary Resonance Recoupling (HORROR) can be used to reintroduce carbonyl-carbonyl interresidue dipolar interactions and to achieve efficient polarization transfer between carbonyl atoms in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled peptides and proteins. We show that the HORROR condition is anisotropically broadened and overall shifted to higher radio frequency intensities because of the CSA effects. These effects are analyzed theoretically using Average Hamiltonian Theory. At spinning frequencies used in this study, 22 kHz, this broadening is experimentally found to be on the order of a kilohertz at a proton field of 600 MHz. To match HORROR condition over all powder orientations, variable amplitude radio frequency (RF) fields are required, and efficient direct transfers on the order of 20-30% can be straightforwardly established. Two- and three-dimensional chemical shift correlation experiments establishing long-range interresidue connectivities (e.g., (N[i]-CO[i - 2])) are demonstrated on the model peptide N-acetyl-valine-leucine, and on the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. Possible future developments are discussed.

  19. Interresidue carbonyl-carbonyl polarization transfer experiments in uniformly 13C,15N-labeled peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Janik, Rafal; Ritz, Emily; Gravelle, Andrew; Shi, Lichi; Peng, Xiaohu; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that Homonuclear Rotary Resonance Recoupling (HORROR) can be used to reintroduce carbonyl-carbonyl interresidue dipolar interactions and to achieve efficient polarization transfer between carbonyl atoms in uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled peptides and proteins. We show that the HORROR condition is anisotropically broadened and overall shifted to higher radio frequency intensities because of the CSA effects. These effects are analyzed theoretically using Average Hamiltonian Theory. At spinning frequencies used in this study, 22kHz, this broadening is experimentally found to be on the order of a kilohertz at a proton field of 600MHz. To match HORROR condition over all powder orientations, variable amplitude radio frequency (RF) fields are required, and efficient direct transfers on the order of 20-30% can be straightforwardly established. Two- and three-dimensional chemical shift correlation experiments establishing long-range interresidue connectivities (e.g., (N[i]-CO[i-2])) are demonstrated on the model peptide N-acetyl-valine-leucine, and on the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. Possible future developments are discussed. PMID:20060344

  20. Solution NMR Experiment for Measurement of (15)N-(1)H Residual Dipolar Couplings in Large Proteins and Supramolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eletsky, Alexander; Pulavarti, Surya V S R K; Beaumont, Victor; Gollnick, Paul; Szyperski, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) are exquisite probes of protein structure and dynamics. A new solution NMR experiment named 2D SE2 J-TROSY is presented to measure N-H RDCs for proteins and supramolecular complexes in excess of 200 kDa. This enables validation and refinement of their X-ray crystal and solution NMR structures and the characterization of structural and dynamic changes occurring upon complex formation. Accurate N-H RDCs were measured at 750 MHz (1)H resonance frequency for 11-mer 93 kDa (2)H,(15)N-labeled Trp RNA-binding attenuator protein tumbling with a correlation time τc of 120 ns. This is about twice as long as that for the most slowly tumbling system, for which N-H RDCs could be measured, so far, and corresponds to molecular weights of ∼200 kDa at 25 °C. Furthermore, due to the robustness of SE2 J-TROSY with respect to residual (1)H density from exchangeable protons, increased sensitivity at (1)H resonance frequencies around 1 GHz promises to enable N-H RDC measurement for even larger systems. PMID:26293598

  1. The fate of nitrogen in grain cropping systems: a meta-analysis of 15N field experiments.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jennifer B; Drinkwater, Laurie E

    2009-12-01

    Intensively managed grain farms are saturated with large inputs of nitrogen (N) fertilizer, leading to N losses and environmental degradation. Despite decades of research directed toward reducing N losses from agroecosystems, progress has been minimal, and the currently promoted best management practices are not necessarily the most effective. We investigated the fate of N additions to temperate grain agroecosystems using a meta-analysis of 217 field-scale studies that followed the stable isotope 15N in crops and soil. We compared management practices that alter inorganic fertilizer additions, such as application timing or reduced N fertilizer rates, to practices that re-couple the biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C) and N, such as organic N sources and diversified crop rotations, and analyzed the following response variables: 15N recovery in crops, total recovery of 15N in crops and soil, and crop yield. More of the literature (94%) emphasized crop recovery of 15N than total 15N recovery in crops and soil (58%), though total recovery is a more ecologically appropriate indicator for assessing N losses. Findings show wide differences in the ability of management practices to improve N use efficiency. Practices that aimed to increase crop uptake of commercial fertilizer had a lower impact on total 15N recovery (3-21% increase) than practices that re-coupled C and N cycling (30-42% increase). A majority of studies (66%) were only one growing season long, which poses a particular problem when organic N sources are used because crops recover N from these sources over several years. These short-term studies neglect significant ecological processes that occur over longer time scales. Field-scale mass balance calculations using the 15N data set show that, on average, 43 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1) was unaccounted for at the end of one growing season out of 114 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1), representing approximately 38% of the total 15N applied. This comprehensive assessment of

  2. HN(α/β-COCA-J) Experiment for Measurement of 1JC‧Cα Couplings from Two-Dimensional [15N, 1H] Correlation Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permi, Perttu; Sorsa, Tia; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Annila, Arto

    1999-11-01

    Anew method for measurement of one-bond 13C‧-13Cα scalar and dipolar couplings from a two-dimensional [15N, 1H] correlation spectrum is presented. The experiment is based on multiple-quantum coherence, which is created between nitrogen and carbonyl carbon for simultaneous evolution of 15N chemical shift and coupling between 13C‧ and 13Cα. Optional subspectral editing is provided by the spin-state-selective filters. The residual dipolar dipolar contribution to the 13C‧-13Cα coupling can be measured from these simplified [15N, 1H]-HSQC-like spectra. In this way, without explicit knowledge of carbon assignments, conformational changes of proteins dissolved in dilute liquid crystals can be probed conveniently, e.g., in structure activity relationship by NMR studies. The method is demonstrated with human cardiac troponin C.

  3. Dynamics of a truncated prion protein, PrP(113-231), from (15)N NMR relaxation: order parameters calculated and slow conformational fluctuations localized to a distinct region.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Denis B D; Jones, Christopher E; Abdelraheim, Salama R; Brazier, Marcus W; Toms, Harold; Brown, David R; Viles, John H

    2009-02-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the misfolding of the prion protein (PrP(C)) from a largely alpha-helical isoform to a beta-sheet rich oligomer (PrP(Sc)). Flexibility of the polypeptide could contribute to the ability of PrP(C) to undergo the conformational rearrangement during PrP(C)-PrP(Sc) interactions, which then leads to the misfolded isoform. We have therefore examined the molecular motions of mouse PrP(C), residues 113-231, in solution, using (15)N NMR relaxation measurements. A truncated fragment has been used to eliminate the effect of the 90-residue unstructured tail of PrP(C) so the dynamics of the structured domain can be studied in isolation. (15)N longitudinal (T(1)) and transverse relaxation (T(2)) times as well as the proton-nitrogen nuclear Overhauser effects have been used to calculate the spectral density at three frequencies, 0, omega(N,) and 0.87omega(H). Spectral densities at each residue indicate various time-scale motions of the main-chain. Even within the structured domain of PrP(C), a diverse range of motions are observed. We find that removal of the tail increases T(2) relaxation times significantly indicating that the tail is responsible for shortening of T(2) times in full-length PrP(C). The truncated fragment of PrP has facilitated the determination of meaningful order parameters (S(2)) from the relaxation data and shows for the first time that all three helices in PrP(C) have similar rigidity. Slow conformational fluctuations of mouse PrP(C) are localized to a distinct region that involves residues 171 and 172. Interestingly, residues 170-175 have been identified as a segment within PrP that will form a steric zipper, believed to be the fundamental amyloid unit. The flexibility within these residues could facilitate the PrP(C)-PrP(Sc) recognition process during fibril elongation. PMID:19173221

  4. {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N dynamic nuclear polarization studies of carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.Z.; Solum, M.S.; Wind, R.A.; Nilsson, B.L.; Peterson, M.A.; Pugmire, R.J.; Grant, D.M.

    2000-05-18

    {sup 15}N NMR experiments, combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), are reported on carbazole doped with the stable free radical 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA). Doping shortens the nuclear relaxation times and provides paramagnetic centers that can be used to enhance the nuclear signal by means of DNP so that {sup 15}N NMR experiments can be done in minutes. The factors were measured in a 1.4 T external field, using both unlabeled and 98% {sup 15}N labeled carbazole with doping levels varying between 0.65 and 5.0 wt {degree} BDPA. A doping level of approximately 1 wt {degree} produced optimal results. DNP enhancement factors of 35 and 930 were obtained for {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N, respectively, making it possible to perform {sup 15}N DNP NMR experiments at the natural abundance level.

  5. 1H and 15N Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Studies of Carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Solum, Mark S.; Wind, Robert A.; Nilsson, Brad L.; Peterson, Matt A.; Pugmire, Ronald J.; Grant, David M.

    2000-01-01

    15N NMR experiments, combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), are reported on carbazole doped with the stable free radical 1,3 bisdiphenylene-2 phenylally1 (BDPA). Doping shortens the nuclear relaxation times and provides paramagnetic centers that can be used to enhance the nuclear signal by means of DNP so that 15 N NMR experiments can be done in minutes. The factors were measured in a 1.4 T external field, using both unlabeled and 98% 15N labeled carbazole with doping levels varying between 0.65 and 5.0 wt % BDPA. A doping level of approximately 1 wt % produced optimal results. DNP enhancement factors of 35 and 930 were obtained for 1H and 15N, respectively making it possible to perform 15N DNP NMR experiments at the natural abundance level.

  6. Biogenic N2 and δ15 N-N2 As Proxies for N-Loss in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific: A Lagrangian Float Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Altabet, M. A.; McNeil, C. L.; Larkum, J.; Reed, A. C.; D'Asaro, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    A large portion of the ocean's bioavailable N, a macronutrient limiting primary productivity, is lost in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Mesoscale processes (e.g. eddies, meandering currents), can transport highly productive waters from the coasts, increasing the downward flux of organic material, a substrate for N-loss, and thus can act as N-loss hotspots in OMZs. However, due to their transient nature, these mesoscale events are difficult to monitor using traditional shipboard observations. We deployed biogeochemical Lagrangian floats in the eastern tropical North Pacific during a research cruise in May/June 2014, where transport of high chlorophyll waters from the coast were inferred from satellite imagery. These Lagrangian floats are automonous platforms with the ability to follow isopycnals and were equipped with a suite of gas tension devices and other sensors to measure N2(g), O2, NO3- and NO2- concentrations. We concurrently collected discrete samples to calibrate and complement float measurements. We present here biogenic N2, i.e. N2 produced by local N-loss processes and derived from measured N2/Ar and δ15N-N2 anomaly, i.e. the difference between δ15N-N2 observed and at equilibrium for in-situ temperature and salinity, during a ~4 weeks Lagrangian experiment. During N-loss, the product (N2) is depleted in 15N because of kinetic isotope fractionation. While biogenic N2 only reached up to ~10 µmol/kg, the δ15N-N2 anomalies were relatively low (down to ~-0.4‰). The δ15N-N2 anomalies are low compared to values always >-0.1‰) for equivalent biogenic N2 in the OMZ of the eastern tropical South Pacific. We will discuss the implication of these results for the global oceanic N budget.

  7. Relaxation-relaxation exchange experiments in porous media with portable Halbach-Magnets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, A.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2009-04-01

    Mobile NMR became a powerful tool following the development of portable NMR sensors for well logging. By now there are numerous applications of mobile NMR in materials analysis and chemical engineering where, for example, unique information about the structure, morphology and dynamics of polymers is obtained, and new opportunities are provided for geo-physical investigations [1]. In particular, dynamic information can be retrieved by two-dimensional Laplace exchange NMR, where the initial NMR relaxation environment is correlated with the final relaxation environment of molecules migrating from one environment to the other within a so-called NMR mixing time tm [2]. Relaxation-relaxation exchange experiments of water in inorganic porous media were performed at low and moderately inhomogeneous magnetic field with a simple, portable Halbach-Magnet. By conducting NMR transverse relaxation exchange experiments for several mixing times and converting the results to 2D T2 distributions (joint probability densities of transverse relaxation times T2) with the help of the inverse 2D Laplace Transformation (ILT), we obtained characteristic exchange times for different pore sizes. The results of first experiments on soil samples are reported, which reveal information about the complex pore structure of soil and the moisture content. References: 1. B. Blümich, J. Mauler, A. Haber, J. Perlo, E. Danieli, F. Casanova, Mobile NMR for Geo-Physical Analysis and Material Testing, Petroleum Science, xx (2009) xxx - xxx. 2. K. E. Washburn, P.T. Callaghan, Tracking pore to pore exchange using relaxation exchange spectroscopy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 175502.

  8. Cooling overall spin temperature: Protein NMR experiments optimized for longitudinal relaxation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Michaël; Campbell, Iain D.

    2006-02-01

    In experiments performed on protonated proteins at high fields, 80% of the NMR spectrometer time is spent waiting for the 1H atoms to recover their polarization after recording the free induction decay. Selective excitation of a fraction of the protons in a large molecule has previously been shown to lead to faster longitudinal relaxation for the selected protons [K. Pervushin, B. Vögeli, A. Eletsky, Longitudinal 1H relaxation optimization in TROSY NMR spectroscopy, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 12898-12902; P. Schanda, B. Brutscher, Very fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for real-time investigation of dynamic events in proteins on the time scale of seconds, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 8014-8015; H.S. Attreya, T. Szyperski, G-matrix Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy for complete protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101 (2004) 9642-9647]. The pool of non-selected protons acts as a "thermal bath" and spin-diffusion processes ("flip-flop" transitions) channel the excess energy from the excited pool to the non-selected protons in regions of the molecule where other relaxation processes can dissipate the excess energy. We present here a sensitivity enhanced HSQC sequence (COST-HSQC), based on one selective E-BURP pulse, which can be used on protonated 15N enriched proteins (with or without 13C isotopic enrichment). This experiment is compared to a gradient sensitivity enhanced HSQC with a water flip-back pulse (the water flip-back pulse quenches the spin diffusion between 1H N and 1H α spins). This experiment is shown to have significant advantages in some circumstances. Some observed limitations, namely sample overheating with short recovery delays and complex longitudinal relaxation behaviour are discussed and analysed.

  9. Cooling overall spin temperature: protein NMR experiments optimized for longitudinal relaxation effects.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Michaël; Campbell, Iain D

    2006-02-01

    In experiments performed on protonated proteins at high fields, 80% of the NMR spectrometer time is spent waiting for the (1)H atoms to recover their polarization after recording the free induction decay. Selective excitation of a fraction of the protons in a large molecule has previously been shown to lead to faster longitudinal relaxation for the selected protons [K. Pervushin, B. Vögeli, A. Eletsky, Longitudinal (1)H relaxation optimization in TROSY NMR spectroscopy, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 12898-12902; P. Schanda, B. Brutscher, Very fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for real-time investigation of dynamic events in proteins on the time scale of seconds, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 8014-8015; H.S. Attreya, T. Szyperski, G-matrix Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy for complete protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101 (2004) 9642-9647]. The pool of non-selected protons acts as a "thermal bath" and spin-diffusion processes ("flip-flop" transitions) channel the excess energy from the excited pool to the non-selected protons in regions of the molecule where other relaxation processes can dissipate the excess energy. We present here a sensitivity enhanced HSQC sequence (COST-HSQC), based on one selective E-BURP pulse, which can be used on protonated (15)N enriched proteins (with or without (13)C isotopic enrichment). This experiment is compared to a gradient sensitivity enhanced HSQC with a water flip-back pulse (the water flip-back pulse quenches the spin diffusion between (1)H(N) and (1)H(alpha) spins). This experiment is shown to have significant advantages in some circumstances. Some observed limitations, namely sample overheating with short recovery delays and complex longitudinal relaxation behaviour are discussed and analysed. PMID:16249110

  10. Estimation of internal and external nitrogen for corals with a long-term 15N-labelling experiment and subsequent model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuaki; Grottoli, Andréa; Matsui, Yohei; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Coral reef ecosystems maintain high primary productivity though the seawater is extremely oligotrophic. One of the hypotheses to explain this paradox is the recycling of nutrients in animal-algal symbiotic organisms such as corals. It is relatively easy to measure nutrient uptake rates by corals from seawater, but the proportion of internally circulating nutrients between the coral host and the endosymbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) is more challenging. Here, we performed a long-term and continuous 15N-labelling experiment to quantify the proportionate contribution of seawater (external N source) and the animal host (internal N source) to the total N influx in the endosymbiotic algae. Branches from the scleractinian corals Porites cylindrica and Montipora digitata from Okinawa, Japan, were cultured for 2 months in indoor, flow-through, filtered seawater tanks with the continuous supply of 15N-labelled nitrate. At the initial and after 2, 4, and 9 weeks of the study, coral branches were collected and the algal and animal fractions were separated for isotopic analyses. In both corals, the N isotope ratio of symbiotic algae exponentially increased and the values were much higher than those of the host tissue, suggesting that the algae had a faster turnover N time than the animal host. Algal and host N biomass normalized to the coral surface area slowly decreased in both coral species over the study period. To calculate the contribution of internal and external N, a simple mixing model of algal N metabolism was designed. Using differential equations of 15N balance and N biomass balance, F1 and F2 (external and internal N fluxes to symbiotic algae, respectively) were expressed as the functions of time. The model calculations showed that F2 was much higher than F1 in P. cylindrica and the percentage of internal N to the total influx N (PIN) was >70%. On the other hand, the contribution of F1 and F2 was comparable in M. digitata and the PIN was 40-70%. These results

  11. Balancing the (carbon) budget: Using linear inverse models to estimate carbon flows and mass-balance 13C:15N labelling experiments in low oxygen sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, William Ross; Van Oevelen, Dick; Witte, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    Over 1 million km2 of seafloor experience permanent low-oxygen conditions within oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). OMZs are predicted to grow as a consequence of climate change, potentially affecting oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The Arabian Sea OMZ impinges upon the western Indian continental margin at bathyal depths (150 - 1500m) producing a strong depth dependent oxygen gradient at the sea floor. The influence of the OMZ upon the short term processing of organic matter by sediment ecosystems was investigated using in situ stable isotope pulse chase experiments. These deployed doses of 13C:15N labeled organic matter onto the sediment surface at four stations from across the OMZ (water depth 540 - 1100 m; [O2] = 0.35 - 15 μM). In order to prevent experimentally anoxia, the mesocosms were not sealed. 13C and 15N labels were traced into sediment, bacteria, fauna and 13C into sediment porewater DIC and DOC. However, the DIC and DOC flux to the water column could not be measured, limiting our capacity to obtain mass-balance for C in each experimental mesocosm. Linear Inverse Modeling (LIM) provides a method to obtain a mass-balanced model of carbon flow that integrates stable-isotope tracer data with community biomass and biogeochemical flux data from a range of sources. Here we present an adaptation of the LIM methodology used to investigate how ecosystem structure influenced carbon flow across the Indian margin OMZ. We demonstrate how oxygen conditions affect food-web complexity, affecting the linkages between the bacteria, foraminifera and metazoan fauna, and their contributions to benthic respiration. The food-web models demonstrate how changes in ecosystem complexity are associated with oxygen availability across the OMZ and allow us to obtain a complete carbon budget for the stationa where stable-isotope labelling experiments were conducted.

  12. Amino-acid selective experiments on uniformly 13C and 15N labeled proteins by MAS NMR: Filtering of lysines and arginines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehle, Stefan; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2006-12-01

    Amino-acid selective magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments can aid the assignment of ambiguous cross-peaks in crowded spectra of solid proteins. In particular for larger proteins, data analysis can be hindered by severe resonance overlap. In such cases, filtering techniques may provide a good alternative to site-specific spin-labeling to obtain unambiguous assignments that can serve as starting points in the assignment procedure. In this paper we present a simple pulse sequence that allows selective excitation of arginine and lysine residues. To achieve this, we make use of a combination of specific cross-polarization for selective excitation [M. Baldus, A.T. Petkova, J. Herzfeld, R.G. Griffin, Cross polarization in the tilted frame: assignment and spectral simplification in heteronuclear spin systems, Mol. Phys. 95 (1998) 1197-1207.] and spin diffusion for transfer along the amino-acid side-chain. The selectivity of the filter is demonstrated with the excitation of lysine and arginine side-chain resonances in a uniformly 13C and 15N labeled protein preparation of the α-spectrin SH3 domain. It is shown that the filter can be applied as a building block in a 13C- 13C lysine-only correlation experiment.

  13. Influence of roots and mycorrhiza on the internal nitrogen cycle in an organic forest soil ­revealed by a 15N tracing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, M.; Rutting, T.; Klemedtsson, L.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The cycle of nitrogen in soil is complex, consisting of many simultaneous occurring transformation processes. So far, microorganisms have been thought to govern N cycling in soil. Nevertheless, plant roots and their associated mycorrhizal symbionts may exert control on N turnover for example by input of labile C to soil. However, studies investigating the effect of roots on gross N turnover rates are scarce. We conducted a 15N tracer study under field conditions to reveal the effect of plants on soil N cycle. The experiment includes three treatments: (a) control, (b) excluding roots and (c) excluding roots + mycorrhiza. On the study site, exclusion of roots + mycorrhiza has previously been shown to increase N2O emissions which indicate that plants affect internal N cycling. 15NH4NO3 and NH415NO3 were given to the soil and traced for a period of 10 days. Gross N turnover rates were determined applying a numerical 15N tracing model. Results on N turnover rates showed that roots and their fungal symbionts increased N cycling probably by input of labile C to soil which may results in an activation of the microbial biomass. While gross N mineralization increased by 270 and 313 % compared to the treatment excluding roots + mycorrhiza, NH4+ immobilization increased by 402 and 489 %. Differences in ammonium and nitrate immobilization further indicated that ammonium was the preferred N source for roots and microorganisms. While ammonium availability decreased with trenching (0.59 compared to -0.47 and -0.96 μg N g-1 d-1), the opposite was true for nitrate (0.50 compared to 2.08 and 2.18 μg N g-1 d-1), explaining the increased N2O emissions which were likely caused by denitrification. Further, plants increased dissimilarity nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and affected autotrophic nitrification probably by the release of nitrification inhibitors and by influencing ammonium availability. We conclude that plants and their mycorrhizal symbionts actively control N cycling

  14. Jointly deriving NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions by NMR relaxation experiments on partially desaturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Hughes, B.

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a geophysical method widely used in borehole and laboratory applications to nondestructively infer transport and storage properties of rocks and soils as it is directly sensitive to the water/oil content and pore sizes. However, for inferring pore sizes, NMR relaxometry data need to be calibrated with respect to a surface interaction parameter, surface relaxivity, which depends on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock. This study introduces an inexpensive and quick alternative to the classical calibration methods, e.g., mercury injection, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR, or grain size analysis, which allows for jointly estimating NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions using NMR relaxometry data from partially desaturated rocks. Hereby, NMR relaxation experiments are performed on the fully saturated sample and on a sample partially drained at a known differential pressure. Based on these data, the (capillary) pore radius distribution and surface relaxivity are derived by joint optimization of the Brownstein-Tarr and the Young-Laplace equation assuming parallel capillaries. Moreover, the resulting pore size distributions can be used to predict water retention curves. This inverse modeling approach—tested and validated using NMR relaxometry data measured on synthetic porous borosilicate samples with known petrophysical properties (i.e., permeability, porosity, inner surfaces, pore size distributions)—yields consistent and reproducible estimates of surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions. Also, subsequently calculated water retention curves generally correlate well with measured water retention curves.

  15. Ammonium and nitrate uptake lengths in a small forested stream determined by {sup 15}N tracer and short-term nutrient enrichment experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, P.J.; Tank, J.L.; Sanzone, D.M.; Webster, J.R.; Wollheim, W.; Peterson, B.J.; Meyer, J.L.

    1998-11-01

    Nutrient cycling is an important characteristic of all ecosystems, including streams. Nutrients often limit the growth rates of stream algae and heterotrophic microbes and the decomposition rate of allochthonous organic matter. Nutrient uptake (S{sub W}), defined as the mean distance traveled by a nutrient atom dissolved in stream water before uptake by biota is often used as an index of nutrient cycling in streams. It is often overlooked, however, that S{sub W} is not a measure of nutrient uptake rate per se, but rather a measure of the efficiency with which a stream utilizes the available nutrient supply. The ideal method for measuring S{sub W} involves short-term addition of a nutrient tracer. Regulatory constraints often preclude use of nutrient radiotracers in field studies and methodological difficulties and high analytical costs have previously hindered the use of stable isotope nutrient tracers (e.g., {sup 15}N). Short-term nutrient enrichments are an alternative to nutrient tracer additions for measuring S{sub W}.

  16. Can Stress Relaxation Experiments be Used to Assess Deformation Induced Mobility in Glassy Polymers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropka, Jamie; Long, Kevin

    The observance of an increase in glassy polymer relaxation rates under a mechanical deformation is often referred to as deformation induced mobility (DIM). It has been argued that stress relaxation experiments can provide indirect evidence of this phenomenon. Recently, stress relaxation experiments have been interpreted as demonstrating a mobility decrease with increased deformation when very slow strain rates, 1.2 x 10-5 s-1, are used to apply the deformation. This would suggest against generality of DIM and would have significant implications to constitutive models founded on this principle. Here, a mathematical exercise is performed to evaluate the implications of DIM on stress relaxation response. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Use of 13C and 15N mass spectrometry to study the decomposition of Calamagrostis epigeios in soil column experiments with and without ash additions.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, B; Heil, B; Flessa, H; Beese, F

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of C and N in terrestrial ecosystems are not completely understood and the use of stable isotopes may be useful to gain further insight in the pathways of CO2 emissions and leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) during decomposition of litter. Objectives were (i) to study the decomposition dynamics of Calamagrostis epigeios, a common grass species in forests, using 13C-depleted and 15N-enriched plants and (ii) to quantify the effect wood ash addition on the decomposition and leaching of DOC and DON. Decomposition was studied for 128 days under aerobic conditions at 8 degrees C and moisture close to field capacity in a spodic dystric Cambisol with mor-moder layer. Variants included control plots and additions of (i) Calamagrostis litter and (ii) Calamagrostis litter plus 4 kg ash m-2. (i) Decomposition of Calamagrostis resulted in a CO2 production of 76.2 g CO2-C m-2 (10% of added C) after 128 days and cumulative DOC production was 14.0 g C m-2 out of which 0.9 g C m-2 was Calamagrostis-derived (0.1% of added C). The specific CO2 formation and specific DOC production from Calamagrostis were 6 times higher (CO2) and 4 times smaller (DOC) than those from the organic layer. The amount of Calamagrostis-derived total N (NH4+, NO3-, DON) leached was 0.7 g N m-2 (4.8% of added N). Cumulative DON production was 0.8 g N m-2 which was slightly higher than for the control. During soil passage, much of the DOC and DON was removed due to sorption or decomposition. DOC and DON releases from the mineral soil (17 cm depth) were 6.3 g C m-2 and 0.5 g N m-2. (ii) Addition of ash resulted in a complete fixing of CO2 for 40 days due to carbonatisation. Afterwards, the CO2 production rates were similar to the variant without ash addition. Production of DOC (98.6 g C m-2) and DON (2.5 g N m-2) was marked, mainly owing to humus decay. However, Calamagrostis-derived DOC and Calamagrostis-derived total N were only 3.9 g C m-2 (0.5% of added C) and 0.5 g N

  18. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  19. Introductory Chemistry: A Molar Relaxivity Experiment in the High School Classroom.

    PubMed

    Dawsey, Anna C; Hathaway, Kathryn L; Kim, Susie; Williams, Travis J

    2013-07-01

    Dotarem and Magnevist, two clinically available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, were assessed in a high school science classroom with respect to which is the better contrast agent. Magnevist, the more efficacious contrast agent, has negative side effects because its gadolinium center can escape from its ligand. However, Dotarem, though a less efficacious contrast agent, is a safer drug choice. After the experiment, students are confronted with the FDA warning on Magnevist, which enabled a discussion of drug efficacy versus safety. We describe a laboratory experiment in which NMR spin lattice relaxation rate measurements are used to quantify the relaxivities of the active ingredients of Dotarem and Magnevist. The spin lattice relaxation rate gives the average amount of time it takes the excited nucleus to relax back to the original state. Students learn by constructing molar relaxivity curves based on inversion recovery data sets that Magnevist is more relaxive than Dotarem. This experiment is suitable for any analytical chemistry laboratory with access to NMR. PMID:23929983

  20. The influence of Mg(2+) coordination on (13) C and (15) N chemical shifts in CKI1RD protein domain from experiment and molecular dynamics/density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Babinský, Martin; Demo, Gabriel; Otrusinová, Olga; Jansen, Séverine; Pekárová, Blanka; Žídek, Lukáš; Munzarová, Markéta L

    2016-05-01

    Sequence dependence of (13) C and (15) N chemical shifts in the receiver domain of CKI1 protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, CKI1RD , and its complexed form, CKI1RD •Mg(2+) , was studied by means of MD/DFT calculations. MD simulations of a 20-ns production run length were performed. Nine explicitly hydrated structures of increasing complexity were explored, up to a 40-amino-acid structure. The size of the model necessary depended on the type of nucleus, the type of amino acid and its sequence neighbors, other spatially close amino acids, and the orientation of amino acid NH groups and their surface/interior position. Using models covering a 10 and a 15 Å environment of Mg(2+) , a semi-quantitative agreement has been obtained between experiment and theory for the V67-I73 sequence. The influence of Mg(2+) binding was described better by the 15 Å as compared to the 10 Å model. Thirteen chemical shifts were analyzed in terms of the effect of Mg(2+) insertion and geometry preparation. The effect of geometry was significant and opposite in sign to the effect of Mg(2+) binding. The strongest individual effects were found for (15) N of D70, S74, and V68, where the electrostatics dominated; for (13) Cβ of D69 and (15) N of K76, where the influences were equal, and for (13) Cα of F72 and (13) Cβ of K76, where the geometry adjustment dominated. A partial correlation between dominant geometry influence and torsion angle shifts upon the coordination has been observed. Proteins 2016; 84:686-699. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26879585

  1. Charge-carrier relaxation in disordered organic semiconductors studied by dark injection: Experiment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesta, M.; Schaefer, C.; de Groot, J.; Cottaar, J.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of stationary charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors has matured during recent years. However, charge-carrier relaxation in nonstationary situations is still poorly understood. Such relaxation can be studied in dark injection experiments, in which the bias applied over an unilluminated organic semiconductor device is abruptly increased. The resulting transient current reveals both charge-carrier transport and relaxation characteristics. We performed such experiments on hole-only devices of a polyfluorene-based organic semiconductor. Modeling the dark injection by solving a one-dimensional master equation using the equilibrium carrier mobility leads to a too-slow current transient, since this approach does not account for carrier relaxation. Modeling by solving a three-dimensional time-dependent master equation does take into account all carrier transport and relaxation effects. With this modeling, the time scale of the current transient is found to be in agreement with experiment. With a disorder strength somewhat smaller than extracted from the temperature-dependent stationary current-voltage characteristics, also the shape of the experimental transients is well described.

  2. New method for predicting lifetime of seals from compression-stress relaxation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.; Keenan, M.R.; Wise, J.

    1998-06-01

    Interpretation of compression stress-relaxation (CSR) experiments for elastomers in air is complicated by (1) the presence of both physical and chemical relaxation and (2) anomalous diffusion-limited oxidation (DLO) effects. For a butyl material, the authors first use shear relaxation data to indicate that physical relaxation effects are negligible during typical high temperature CSR experiments. They then show that experiments on standard CSR samples ({approximately}15 mm diameter when compressed) lead to complex non-Arrhenius behavior. By combining reaction kinetics based on the historic basic autoxidation scheme with a diffusion equation appropriate to disk-shaped samples, they derive a theoretical DLO model appropriate to CSR experiments. Using oxygen consumption and permeation rate measurements, the theory shows that important DLO effects are responsible for the observed non-Arrhenius behavior. To minimize DLO effects, they introduce a new CSR methodology based on the use of numerous small disk samples strained in parallel. Results from these parallel, minidisk experiments lead to Arrhenius behavior with an activation energy consistent with values commonly observed for elastomers, allowing more confident extrapolated predictions. In addition, excellent correlation is noted between the CSR force decay and the oxygen consumption rate, consistent with the expectation that oxidative scission processes dominate the CSR results.

  3. (15)N NMR studies of a nitrile-modified nucleoside.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Anne T; Gai, Xin Sonia; Buckwalter, Beth L; Fenlon, Edward E; Brewer, Scott H

    2010-12-30

    Nitrile-modified molecules have proven to be excellent probes of local environments in biomolecules via both vibrational and fluorescence spectroscopy. The utility of the nitrile group as a spectroscopic probe has been expanded here to (15)N NMR spectroscopy by selective (15)N incorporation. The (15)N NMR chemical shift (δ((15)N)) of the (15)N-labeled 5-cyano-2'-deoxyuridine (C(15)NdU, 1a) was found to change from 153.47 to 143.80 ppm in going from THF-d(8) to D(2)O. A 0.81 ppm downfield shift was measured upon formation of a hydrogen-bond-mediated heterodimer between 2,6-diheptanamidopyridine and a silyl ether analogue of 1a in chloroform, and the small intrinsic temperature dependence of δ((15)N) of C(15)NdU was measured as a 0.38 ppm downfield shift from 298 to 338 K. The experiments were complemented with density functional theory calculations exploring the effect of solvation on the (15)N NMR chemical shift. PMID:21126044

  4. Water 1H relaxation dispersion analysis on a nitroxide radical provides information on the maximal signal enhancement in Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization experiments.

    PubMed

    Bennati, Marina; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo; Türke, Maria-Teresa

    2010-06-14

    Water (1)H relaxation rate measurements of (15)N-(2)H-TEMPONE solutions at temperatures ranging from 298 to 328 K have been performed as a function of magnetic field from 0.00023 to 9.4 T, corresponding to (1)H Larmor frequencies of 0.01 to 400 MHz. The relaxation profiles were analyzed according to the full theory for dipolar and contact relaxation, and used to estimate the coupling factor responsible for observed solution DNP effects. The experimental DNP enhancement at (1)H Larmor frequency of 15 MHz obtained by saturating one of the lines of the (15)N doublet is only ca. 20% lower than the limiting value predicted from the relaxation data, indicating that the experimental DNP setup is nearly optimal, the residual discrepancy arising from incomplete saturation of the other line. PMID:20458388

  5. δ15N Value Does Not Reflect Fasting in Mysticetes

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Alex; Giménez, Joan; Gómez–Campos, Encarna; Cardona, Luís; Borrell, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    The finding that tissue δ15N values increase with protein catabolism has led researchers to apply this value to gauge nutritive condition in vertebrates. However, its application to marine mammals has in most occasions failed. We investigated the relationship between δ15N values and the fattening/fasting cycle in a model species, the fin whale, a migratory capital breeder that experiences severe seasonal variation in body condition. We analyzed two tissues providing complementary insights: one with isotopic turnover (muscle) and one that keeps a permanent record of variations in isotopic values (baleen plates). In both tissues δ15N values increased with intensive feeding but decreased with fasting, thus contradicting the pattern previously anticipated. The apparent inconsistency during fasting is explained by the fact that a) individuals migrate between different isotopic isoscapes, b) starvation may not trigger significant negative nitrogen balance, and c) excretion drops and elimination of 15N-depleted urine is minimized. Conversely, when intensive feeding is resumed in the northern grounds, protein anabolism and excretion start again, triggering 15N enrichment. It can be concluded that in whales and other mammals that accrue massive depots of lipids as energetic reserves and which have limited access to drinking water, the δ15N value is not affected by fasting and therefore cannot be used as an indicatior of nutritive condition. PMID:24651388

  6. Fast structure-based assignment of 15N HSQC spectra of selectively 15N-labeled paramagnetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Pintacuda, Guido; Keniry, Max A; Huber, Thomas; Park, Ah Young; Dixon, Nicholas E; Otting, Gottfried

    2004-03-10

    A novel strategy for fast NMR resonance assignment of (15)N HSQC spectra of proteins is presented. It requires the structure coordinates of the protein, a paramagnetic center, and one or more residue-selectively (15)N-labeled samples. Comparison of sensitive undecoupled (15)N HSQC spectra recorded of paramagnetic and diamagnetic samples yields data for every cross-peak on pseudocontact shift, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, cross-correlation between Curie-spin and dipole-dipole relaxation, and residual dipolar coupling. Comparison of these four different paramagnetic quantities with predictions from the three-dimensional structure simultaneously yields the resonance assignment and the anisotropy of the susceptibility tensor of the paramagnetic center. The method is demonstrated with the 30 kDa complex between the N-terminal domain of the epsilon subunit and the theta subunit of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III. The program PLATYPUS was developed to perform the assignment, provide a measure of reliability of the assignment, and determine the susceptibility tensor anisotropy. PMID:14995214

  7. Active Despite Pain: Patient Experiences With Guided Imagery With Relaxation Compared to Planned Rest.

    PubMed

    Adeola, Mope T; Baird, Carol L; Sands, Laura; Longoria, Nancy; Henry, Una; Nielsen, Jacqueline; Shields, Cleveland G

    2015-12-01

    Inadequate pain control remains a threat to the quality of life of patients with cancer. Guided imagery with relaxation (GIR) is a mind-body therapy that has shown promise in reducing chronic pain. This article discusses a qualitative, descriptive study for which the objective was to compare the experiences of patients with cancer with reported pain using GIR compared to planned rest.
. PMID:26583627

  8. Geometric Approximation: A New Computational Approach To Characterize Protein Dynamics from NMR Adiabatic Relaxation Dispersion Experiments.

    PubMed

    Chao, Fa-An; Byrd, R Andrew

    2016-06-15

    A new computational strategy is reported that provides a fast approximation of numerical solutions of differential equations in general. The method is demonstrated with the analysis of NMR adiabatic relaxation dispersion experiments to reveal biomolecular dynamics. When an analytical solution to the theoretical equations describing a physical process is not available, the new approach can significantly accelerate the computational speed of the conventional numerical integration up to 10(5) times. NMR adiabatic relaxation dispersion experiments enhanced with optimized proton-decoupled pulse sequences, although extremely powerful, have previously been refractory to quantitative analysis. Both simulations and experimental validation demonstrate detectable "slow" (microsecond to millisecond) conformational exchange rates from 10(2) to 10(5) s(-1). This greatly expanded time-scale range enables the characterization of a wide array of conformational fluctuations for individual residues, which correlate with biomolecular function and were previously inaccessible. Moreover, the new computational method can be potentially generalized for analysis of new types of relaxation dispersion experiments to characterize the various dynamics of biomolecular systems. PMID:27225523

  9. Rotational relaxation in ortho-terphenyl: using atomistic simulations to bridge theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Michael P; Chitra, Tarun; Jumper, John M; Palmo, Kim; Pan, Albert C; Shaw, David E

    2013-10-24

    Understanding the nature of the glass transition--the dramatic slowing of dynamics and eventual emergence of a disordered solid from a cooling liquid--is a fundamental challenge in physical science. A central characteristic of glass-forming liquids is a non-exponential main relaxation process. The extent of deviation from exponential relaxation typically becomes more pronounced on cooling. Theories that predict a growth of spatially heterogeneous dynamics as temperature is lowered can explain these observations. In apparent contradiction to these theories, however, some experiments suggest that certain substances--notably including the intensely studied molecular glass-former ortho-terphenyl (OTP)--have a main relaxation process whose shape is essentially temperature independent, even though other observables predicted to be correlated with the degree of dynamical heterogeneity are temperature dependent. Here we report the first simulations based on an atomistic model of OTP that reach equilibrium at temperatures well into the supercooled regime. We first show that the results of these simulations are in reasonable quantitative agreement with experimental data for several basic properties over a wide range of temperatures. We then focus on rotational relaxation, finding nearly exponential behavior at high temperatures with clearly increasing deviations as temperature is lowered. The much weaker temperature dependence observed in light-scattering experiments also emerges from the same simulation data when we calculate correlation functions similar to those probed experimentally; this highlights the diversity of temperature dependencies that can be obtained with different probes. Further analysis suggests that the temperature insensitivity observed in the light-scattering experiments stems from the dependence of these measurements on internal as well as rotational molecular motion. Within the temperature range of our OTP simulations, our results strongly suggest that

  10. Effects of microgeometry and surface relaxation on NMR pulsed-field-gradient experiments: Simple pore geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Partha P.; Sen, Pabitra N.

    1992-01-01

    We derive an expression for the magnetization M(k,Δ) in a pulsed-field-gradient experiment for spins diffusing in a confined space with relaxation at the pore walls. Here k=γδg, δ= pulse width, g= gradient strength, γ= the gyromagnetic ratio, and Δ is the time between gradient pulses. We show that the deviation of -ln[M(k,Δ)/M(0,Δ)] from quadratic behavior in k in experiments in porous media can be a more sensitive probe of the microgeometry (size, connectivity, size distribution, shape, etc.), than either the enhancement of 1/T1 over the bulk water value, or the macroscopic diffusion coefficient, which is derived from the slope of -ln[M(k,Δ)/M(0,Δ)] at small k2, in the limit of large Δ. We propose some simple models of randomly oriented tubes and sheets to interpret the k dependence of the amplitude beyond the leading small-k quadratic behavior. When the macroscopic diffusion coefficient is unobtainable, due to the decay, the present considerations should be useful in extracting geometrical information. The effective diffusion constant derived from NMR exactly equals that derived from electrical conductivity only when the surface relaxivity is zero, but can be close to each other in favorable circumstances even for finite surface relaxivity. Exact solutions with partially absorbing boundary conditions are obtained for a slab and a sphere to infer that the normalized amplitude M(k,Δ,ρ)/M(0,Δ,ρ) depends only weakly on the surface relaxivity ρ for monodisperse convex-shaped pores in the parameter ranges of interest. We also obtain expressions for the mean lifetime of the amplitude in the geometries considered.

  11. Dynamical fingerprints for probing individual relaxation processes in biomolecular dynamics with simulations and kinetic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Noe, F; Diadone, Isabella; Lollmann, Marc; Sauer, Marcus; Chondera, John D; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    There is a gap between kinetic experiment and simulation in their views of the dynamics of complex biomolecular systems. Whereas experiments typically reveal only a few readily discernible exponential relaxations, simulations often indicate complex multistate behavior. Here, a theoretical framework is presented that reconciles these two approaches. The central concept is dynamical fingerprints which contain peaks at the time scales of the dynamical processes involved with amplitudes determined by the experimental observable. Fingerprints can be generated from both experimental and simulation data, and their comparison by matching peaks permits assignment of structural changes present in the simulation to experimentally observed relaxation processes. The approach is applied here to a test case interpreting single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments on a set of fluorescent peptides with molecular dynamics simulations. The peptides exhibit complex kinetics shown to be consistent with the apparent simplicity of the experimental data. Moreover, the fingerprint approach can be used to design new experiments with site-specific labels that optimally probe specific dynamical processes in the molecule under investigation.

  12. Experiment and m.h.d. theory of stability and relaxation in toroidal discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, D. C.

    1981-04-01

    The experimental behavior of plasma instabilities in high-current discharges is found to be in good agreement with the predictions of linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic theory. Observations show that on time-scales comparable with the Alfven transit time there are rapidly growing ideal magnetohydrodynamic perturbations whereas experiments on longer time-scales show the growth and saturation of resistive instabilities which involve changes in field line topology. The plasmas are observed to exhibit self-control mechanisms which are related to the relaxation of configurations to states of lower magnetic energy. Rapid magnetic field line reconnection phenomena, as in solar flares, are observed.

  13. Stress relaxation experiments of olivine under conditions of subducted slab in Earth's deep upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Yu; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Higo, Yuji; Tsujino, Noriyoshi; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Kubo, Tomoaki; Shimojuku, Akira; Terasaki, Hidenori; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas; Jellinek, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Stress relaxation experiments of olivine were conducted under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions up to 10 GPa and 1273 K using a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus. A pre-sintered San Carlos olivine sample rod was inserted between two dense Al2O3 pistons to yield high stress at high-pressure within an octahedral pressure medium. Stress was determined from the two-dimensional diffraction pattern taken using monochromatic X-rays and an imaging-plate, and sample length was determined from an X-ray radiograph. In these experiments, pressure was first increased at room temperature, and then the temperature was increased and kept at 673, 873, 1073, and 1273 K. Four relaxation cycles, in total, were carried out in two experimental runs. The magnitude of deviatoric stress was calculated from five diffraction peaks with the following hkls: 0 2 1, 1 0 1, 1 3 0, 1 3 1, and 1 1 2. The calculated deviatoric stress was significantly different depending on which diffraction peak was used (up to a factor of ∼2) due to plastic deformation within the polycrystalline sample. The deviatoric stress decreased with increasing temperature in all of relaxation cycles. At given temperatures, the final-state value of deviatoric stress increased with increasing pressure. The upper bound for the plastic strain rate in the final-state was determined to be 10-7 s-1 based on a comparison between the total sample length determined from the radiograph and the d-spacings along the piston direction determined from X-ray diffraction. Present results suggest a positive activation volume for the low-temperature rheology of olivine.

  14. Refining cotton-wick method for 15N plant labelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fustec, Joëlle; Mahieu, Stéphanie

    2010-05-01

    The symbiosis Fabaceae/Rhizobiaceae plays a critical role in the nitrogen cycle. It gives the plant the ability to fix high amounts of atmospheric N. A part of this N can be transferred to the soil via rhizodeposition. The contribution of Fabaceae to the soil N pool is difficult to measure, since it is necessary for assessing N benefits for other crops, for soil biological activity, and for reducing water pollution in sustainable agriculture (Fustec, 2009). The aim of this study was to test and improve the reliability of the 15N cotton-wick method for measuring the soil N derived from plant rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2007). The effects of the concentration of the 15N-urea labelling solution and of the feeding frequency (continuous or pulses) on the assessment of nitrogen rhizodeposition were studied in two greenhouse experiments using the field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and the non-nodulating isoline P2. The plant parts and the soil were prepared for 15N:14N measurements for assessing N rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2009). The fraction of plants' belowground nitrogen allocated to rhizodeposition in both Frisson pea and P2 was 20 to more than 50% higher when plants were labelled continuously than when they were labelled using fortnightly pulses. Our results suggested that when 15N root enrichment was high, nitrogen rhizodeposition was underestimated only for plants that were 15N-fed by fortnightly pulses, and not in plants 15N-fed continuously. This phenomenon was especially observed for plants relying on symbiotic N fixation for N acquisition; it may be linked to the concentration of the labelling solution. In conclusion, N rhizodeposition assessment was strongly influenced by the 15N-feeding frequency and the concentration of the labelling solution. The estimation of N rhizodeposition was more reliable when plants were labelled continuously with a dilute solution of 15N urea. Fustec et al. 2009. Agron. Sustain. Dev., DOI 10.1051/agro/2009003, in press. Mahieu

  15. Determination of Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Time Using (Super 13)C NMR: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasyna, Zbigniew L.; Jurkiewicz, Antoni

    2004-01-01

    An experiment designed for the physical chemistry laboratory where (super 13)C NMR is applied to determine the spin-lattice relaxation time for carbon atoms in n-hexanol is proposed. It is concluded that students learn the principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy as well as dynamic NMR experiments.

  16. Glassy dynamics of polymers confined to nanoporous glasses revealed by relaxational and scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Schönhals, A; Goering, H; Schick, Ch; Frick, B; Zorn, R

    2003-09-01

    The glassy dynamics of poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) and poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) confined to a nanoporous host system revealed by dielectric spectroscopy, temperature-modulated DSC and neutron scattering is compared. For both systems the relaxation rates estimated from dielectric spectroscopy and temperature-modulated DSC agree quantitatively indicating that both experiments sense the glass transition. For PPG the segmental dynamics is determined by a counterbalance of adsorption and confinement effect. The former results form an interaction of the confined macromolecules with the internal surfaces. A confinement effect originates from an inherent length scale on which the underlying molecular motions take place. The increment of the specific-heat capacity [Formula: see text] at the glass transition vanishes at a finite length scale of 1.8 nm. Both results support the conception that a characteristic length scale is relevant for glassy dynamics. For PDMS only a confinement effect is observed which is much stronger than that for PPG. Down to a pore size of 7.5 nm, the temperature dependence of the relaxation times follows the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann dependence. At a pore size of 5 nm this changes to an Arrhenius-like behaviour with a low activation energy. At the same pore size [Formula: see text] vanishes for PDMS. Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments reveal that also the diffusive character of the relevant molecular motions --found to be characteristic above the glass transition-- seems to disappear at this length scale. These results gives further strong support that the glass transition has to be characterised by an inherent length scale of the relevant molecular motions. PMID:15007697

  17. Feasibility studies for light scattering experiments to determine the velocity relaxation of small particles in a fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquista, C.; Narducci, L. M.

    1980-01-01

    An approach for measuring the non-Markoffian component in the relaxation mechanism of a Brownian particle is proposed which combines desirable features of both the shock wave experiment and conventional light scattering experiments. It is suggested that the radiation pressure generated by a C.W. laser be used to guide an individual spherical particle to terminal velocity. At an appropriate time, the beam intensity is suddenly lowered to a value at which the radiation pressure is negligible, and the ensuing velocity relaxation is measured directly.

  18. Application of muon spin relaxation experiment to the mixed state superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, M. ); Harshman, D.R. )

    1991-05-09

    We discuss the use of muon spin relaxation ({mu}{sup +}SR) technique to study the mixed state of superconductors. Besides the application for static vortex configurations, we argue that large vortex motion can manifest itself as a narrowed time-averaged field distribution, which in turn results in a smaller relaxation rate. A static but disordered vortex configuration can also reduce the relaxation. We summarize these arguments. 7 refs.

  19. Complete fusion of 15N+27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosser, F. W., Jr.; Racca, R. A.; Daneshvar, K.; Geesaman, D. F.; Henning, W.; Kovar, D. G.; Rehm, K. E.; Tabor, S. L.

    1980-05-01

    The total fusion cross section for the system 15N + 27Al has been measured over an energy range 27 MeV<=Elab<=70 MeV by detection of the fusion-evaporation residues. In addition elastic scattering was measured at six energies and fitted by optical model calculations. The fusion cross section for the system saturates at 1150+/-50 mb. The data can be well described by the model of Glas and Mosel, using a reasonable set of parameters. The model of Horn and Ferguson also describes the data well if an appropriate charge radius is used. Comparison is made between these results and the fusion cross sections for 16O + 26Mg and 18O + 24Mg, which lead to the same compound nucleus. The results for 15N + 27Al are quite similar to those for 18O + 24Mg, and the differences between the fusion cross sections for these two systems and those for 16O + 26Mg may be evidence for an entrance channel effect. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 15N+27Al, Elab=27-70 MeV; measured σfusion(E) measured dσdΩ elastic scattering; data fitted with Glas and Mosel model, Horn and Ferguson model.

  20. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported. PMID:24746715

  1. The complexity of protein energy landscapes studied by solution NMR relaxation dispersion experiments

    PubMed Central

    Khirich, Gennady; Loria, J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The millisecond timescale motions in ribonuclease A (RNase A) were studied by solution NMR CPMG and off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion experiments over a wide pH and temperature range. These experiments identify three separate protein regions termed Cluster 1, Cluster 2, and R33 whose motions are governed by distinct thermodynamic parameters. Moreover each of these regions has motions with different pH dependencies. Cluster 1 shows an increase in activation enthalpy and activation entropy as the pH is lowered, whereas Cluster two exhibits the opposite behavior. In contrast the activation enthalpy and entropy of R33 show no pH dependence. Compounding the differences, Δω values for Cluster 2 are characteristic of two-site conformational exchange yet similar analysis for Cluster 1 indicates that this region of the enzyme exhibits conformational fluctuations between a major conformer and a pH-dependent average of protonated and de-protonated minor conformers. PMID:25680027

  2. Measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy in [(13)C,(15)N] uniformly enriched proteins using CSA amplification.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Ge, Yuwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Mali; Li, Conggang; Gan, Zhehong

    2015-11-01

    Extended chemical shift anisotropy amplification (xCSA) is applied for measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of uniformly labeled proteins under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The amplification sequence consists of a sequence of π-pulses that repetitively interrupt MAS averaging of the CSA interaction. The timing of the pulses is designed to generate amplified spinning sideband manifolds which can be fitted to extract CSA parameters. The (13)C/(13)C homonuclear dipolar interactions are not affected by the π-pulses due to the bilinear nature of the spin operators and are averaged by MAS in the xCSA experiment. These features make the constant evolution-time experiment suitable for measuring CSA of uniformly labeled samples. The incorporation of xCSA with multi-dimensional (13)C/(15)N correlation is demonstrated with a GB1 protein sample as a model system for measuring (13)C/(15)N CSA of all backbone (15)NH, (13)CA and (13)CO sites. PMID:26404770

  3. Numerical evaluation of subsoil diffusion of (15) N labelled denitrification products during employment of the (15) N gas flux method in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Ruoss, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Common methods for measuring soil denitrification in situ include monitoring the accumulation of 15N labelled N2 and N2O evolved from 15N labelled soil nitrate pool in soil surface chambers. Gas diffusion is considered to be the main accumulation process. Because accumulation of the gases decreases concentration gradients between soil and chamber over time, gas production rates are underestimated if calculated from chamber concentrations. Moreover, concentration gradients to the non-labelled subsoil exist, inevitably causing downward diffusion of 15N labelled denitrification products. A numerical model for simulating gas diffusion in soil was used in order to determine the significance of this source of error. Results show that subsoil diffusion of 15N labelled N2 and N2O - and thus potential underestimation of denitrification derived from chamber fluxes - increases with cover closure time as well as with increasing diffusivity. Simulations based on the range of typical gas diffusivities of unsaturated soils show that the fraction of subsoil diffusion after chamber closure for 1 hour is always significant with values up to >30 % of total production of 15N labelled N2 and N2O. Field experiments for measuring denitrification with the 15N gas flux method were conducted. The ability of the model to predict the time pattern of gas accumulation was evaluated by comparing measured 15N2 concentrations and simulated values.

  4. Thermal and Gamma-ray induced relaxation in As-S glasses: modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Pierre; King, Ellyn A.; Erdmann, Robert G.; Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; McCloy, John S.

    2011-09-09

    Enthalpy relaxation is measured in a series of As-S glasses irradiated with gamma rays and these samples are compared with a set of identical control samples kept in the dark. It is shown that gamma irradiation lifts the kinetic barrier for relaxation at room temperature and speeds up the enthalpy release. The measured values of thermal relaxation in the dark agree closely with modeling results obtained by fitting differential scanning calorimetry curves with the TNM equations. The measured values of activation energy for enthalpy relaxation are also in close agreement with that predicted by the TNM model therefore lending credence to the fitting results. These measurements permit extraction of the effect of gamma irradiation on the glass structure for a series of As-S glasses with increasing structural coordination, and gamma irradiation is shown to reduce the structural relaxation time. It is also shown that lower coordination glasses exhibit greater radiation sensitivity but also greater thermal relaxation due to their lower Tg. On the other end, over-coordinated glasses show lower relaxation and almost no radiation sensitivity. This behavior is similar to the glass response under sub-bandgap light irradiation.

  5. Microsecond protein dynamics measured by 13Calpha rotating-frame spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Patrik; Akke, Mikael

    2005-09-01

    NMR spin relaxation in the rotating frame (R1rho) is a unique method for atomic-resolution characterization of conformational (chemical) exchange processes occurring on the microsecond timescale. We present a rotating-frame 13C(alpha) relaxation dispersion experiment for measuring conformational dynamics in uniformly 13C-labeled proteins. The experiment was validated by using the E140Q mutant of the C-terminal fragment of calmodulin, which exhibits significant conformational exchange between two major conformations, as gauged from previous 15N and 1H relaxation studies. Consistent with previous work, the present 13C(alpha) R1rho experiment detects conformational-exchange dynamics throughout the protein. The average correlation time of =25+/-8 micros is in excellent agreement with those determined previously from 1H and 15N R1rho relaxation data: =19+/-7 and 21+/-3 micros, respectively. The extracted chemical-shift differences between the exchanging states reveal significant fluctuations in dihedral angles within single regions of Ramachandran phi-psi space, that were not identified from the 1H and 15N relaxation data. The present results underscore the advantage of using several types of nuclei to probe exchange dynamics in biomolecules. PMID:16028301

  6. Estimates of thermochemical relaxation lengths behind normal shock waves relevant to manned lunar and Mars return missions, the aeroassist flight experiment, and Mars entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1991-01-01

    Thermochemical relaxation distances behind the strong normal shock waves associated with vehicles that enter the Earth atmosphere upon returning from a manned lunar or Mars mission are estimated. The relaxation distances for a Mars entry are estimated as well, in order to highlight the extent of the relaxation phenomena early in currently envisioned space exploration studies. The thermochemical relaxation length for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment is also considered. These estimates provide an indication as to whether finite relaxation needs to be considered in subsequent detailed analyses. For the Mars entry, relaxation phenomena that are fully coupled to the flow field equations are used. The relaxation-distance estimates can be scaled to flight conditions other than those discussed.

  7. Effect of protein restriction on (15)N transfer from dietary [(15)N]alanine and [(15)N]Spirulina platensis into urea.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, M J; Hoffer, L J

    2001-08-01

    Six normal men consumed a mixed test meal while adapted to high (1.5 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) and low (0.3 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) protein intakes. They completed this protocol twice: when the test meals included 3 mg/kg of [(15)N]alanine ([(15)N]Ala) and when they included 30 mg/kg of intrinsically labeled [(15)N]Spirulina platensis ([(15)N]SPI). Six subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) receiving conventional insulin therapy consumed the test meal with added [(15)N]Ala while adapted to their customary high-protein diet. Protein restriction increased serum alanine, glycine, glutamine, and methionine concentrations and reduced those of leucine. Whether the previous diet was high or low in protein, there was a similar increase in serum alanine, methionine, and branched-chain amino acid concentrations after the test meal and a similar pattern of (15)N enrichment in serum amino acids for a given tracer. When [(15)N]Ala was included in the test meal, (15)N appeared rapidly in serum alanine and glutamine, to a minor degree in leucine and isoleucine, and not at all in other circulating amino acids. With [(15)N]SPI, there was a slow appearance of the label in all serum amino acids analyzed. Despite the different serum amino acid labeling, protein restriction reduced the postmeal transfer of dietary (15)N in [(15)N]Ala or [(15)N]SPI into [(15)N]urea by similar amounts (38 and 43%, respectively, not significant). The response of the subjects with IDDM was similar to that of the normal subjects. Information about adaptive reductions in dietary amino acid catabolism obtained by adding [(15)N]Ala to a test meal appears to be equivalent to that obtained using an intrinsically labeled protein tracer. PMID:11440912

  8. In vivo creep and stress relaxation experiments to determine the wall extensibility and yield threshold for the sporangiophores of phycomyces

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Joseph K. E.; Zehr, Edwin G.; Keanini, Russell G.

    1989-01-01

    The pressure probe was used to conduct in vivo creep and in vivo stress relaxation experiments on the sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus. The in vivo creep and in vivo stress relaxation methods are compared with respect to their utility for determining the irreversible wall extensibility and the yield threshold. The results of the in vivo stress relaxation experiments demonstrate that the growth usually does not cease when the external water supply is removed, and the turgor pressure does not decay for hours afterwards. A successful stress relaxation experiment requires that the cell enlargement rate (growth rate) be zero during the turgor pressure decay. In a few experiments, the growth rate was zero during the turgor pressure decay. However, in general only the yield threshold could be determined. In vivo creep experiments proved to be easier to conduct and more useful in determining values for both the irreversible wall extensibility and the yield threshold. The results of the in vivo creep experiments demonstrate that small steps-up in turgor pressure, generally <0.02 MPa, elicit increases in growth rate as predicted by the growth equations and the augmented growth equations. The irreversible wall extensibility and the yield threshold were determined from these results. The results also demonstrate that steps-up in turgor pressure larger than 0.02 MPa, produce a different response; a decrease in growth rate. The decreased growth rate behavior is related to the magnitude of the step-up, and in general, larger steps-up in turgor pressure produce larger decreases in growth rate and longer periods of decreased growth rate. Qualitatively, this growth behavior is very similar to the “stretch response” previously reported by Dennison and Roth (1967). PMID:19431745

  9. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei. PMID:8995843

  10. Post-buckling relaxation of an elastic layer and its geological relevance: Insights from analogue experiments in pure shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Fernando O.; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-02-01

    By physical modelling we investigated the buckling and post-buckling behaviour of an elastic layer hosted in a viscous medium, as analogue of the elastic response of crustal rocks. The experiments were performed by embedding thin elastic layers of finite length in a linear viscous medium, and in two successive stages: a first stage of layer-parallel shortening in pure shear, followed by a second stage of post-buckling unfolding with zero velocity at the bounding walls. The experimental results show that the fold wavelength varies inversely with applied piston velocity, following an exponential function for which the higher the piston velocity the higher the number of waves. With cessation of layer-parallel shortening, the buckled layers underwent post-buckling relaxation in response to the elastic strain accumulated during the buckling stage. Such relaxation reduces the number of waves by successive elimination of the lower amplitude folds. The relaxation process gives rise to larger folds of higher amplitude in the centre of the elastic layer, concomitantly with the production of a train of gentle folds in the outer domains by outward motion of the ends of the elastic layer. This means that relaxation is more efficient away from the central domain. Comparison of our experimental results with available analytical solutions reveals significant discrepancies. Finally, we suggest that a similar process of relaxation of the elastic strain, although of lower amplitude, may explain the late stage open folding and the formation of overlying extensional basins observed in past orogens like the Caledonides in western Norway.

  11. Temperature dependence of enhanced spin relaxation time in metallic nanoparticles: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, T.; Mitani, S.; Takahashi, S.; Mizuguchi, M.; Sato, K.; Konno, T. J.; Maekawa, S.; Takanashi, K.

    2016-02-01

    We study the enhanced spin relaxation time of Au nanoparticles in nanopillar-shaped double-barrier junction devices with a stacked Fe/MgO/Au-nanoparticle/MgO/Fe structure. The size of Au nanoparticles located in a current path is deduced from a transmission electron micrograph and the Coulomb blockade behavior in the current-voltage characteristics of the devices. A finite tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) is observed above a critical current and is attributable to spin accumulation in Au nanoparticles. Based on a simple model of TMR due to spin accumulation in a nanoparticle, the spin relaxation time τs is estimated from the magnitude of the critical current. The temperature and bias-voltage region where TMR appears are determined from systematic observations, showing that the appearance of TMR is not associated with the Coulomb blockade but with spin accumulation. We find that the obtained τs is anomalously extended (˜800 ns) at low temperatures and abruptly decreases above a critical temperature. Interestingly, the critical temperature strongly depends on the size of the Au nanoparticles and is much lower than the effective temperature corresponding to the discrete energy spacing. A theoretical analysis for the spin relaxation of electrons with discrete energy levels shows that not only the anomalously extended spin relaxation time, but also the strong temperature dependence of τs arise from the broadening of discrete energy levels due to coupling with phonons in the surrounding matrix. Numerical calculations using reasonable parameter values well reproduce the observed temperature and size dependence of the spin relaxation time in Au nanoparticles.

  12. Light-mediated 15N fractionation in Caribbean gorgonian octocorals: implications for pollution monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. M.; Kim, K.; Andras, J. P.; Sparks, J. P.

    2011-09-01

    The stable nitrogen isotope ratio ( δ 15N) of coral tissue is a useful recorder of anthropogenic pollution in tropical marine ecosystems. However, little is known of the natural environmentally induced fractionations that affect our interpretation of coral δ 15N values. In symbiotic scleractinians, light affects metabolic fractionation of N during photosynthesis, which may confound the identification of N pollution between sites of varied depth or turbidity. Given the superiority of octocorals for δ 15N studies, our goal was to quantify the effect of light on gorgonian δ 15N in the context of monitoring N pollution sources. Using field collections, we show that δ 15N declined by 1.4‰ over 20 m depth in two species of gorgonians, the common sea fan, Gorgonia ventalina, and the slimy sea plume, Pseudopterogorgia americana. An 8-week laboratory experiment with P. americana showed that light, not temperature causes this variation, whereby the lowest fractionation of the N source was observed in the highest light treatment. Finally, we used a yearlong reciprocal depth transplant experiment to quantify the time frame over which δ 15N changes in G. ventalina as a function of light regime . Over the year, δ 15N was unchanged and increased slightly in the deep control colonies and shallow colonies transplanted to the deep site, respectively. Within 6 months, colonies transplanted from deep to shallow became enriched by 0.8‰, mirroring the enrichment observed in the shallow controls, which was likely due to the combined effect of an increase in the source δ 15N and reduced fractionation. We conclude that light affects gorgonian δ 15N fractionation and should be considered in sampling designs for N pollution monitoring. However, these fractionations are small relative to differences observed between natural and anthropogenic N sources.

  13. Molecular mobility and relaxation process of isolated lignin studied by multifrequency calorimetric experiments.

    PubMed

    Guigo, Nathanael; Mija, Alice; Vincent, Luc; Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas

    2009-02-28

    The glass transition of lignin has been studied by multifrequency calorimetric measurements in order to highlight the morphological changes and the dynamic aspects associated to this relaxation process. Influences of water sorption and thermal annealing on molecular mobility have been considered. Additional investigations by thermogravimetry, infra-red spectroscopy and rheometry have been performed to corroborate the claims. The relaxation process of annealed lignin shows a different behaviour as the consequence of micro-structural modifications of lignin. These are explained by redistribution of secondary bonds as well as formation of new interunit linkages. Concerning the dynamic aspects, apparent activation energy, E, and sizes of cooperatively rearranging region, V(crr), have been evaluated respectively from the frequency dependence and heat capacity measurements of the glass transition. Compared to dried lignin, both E and V(crr) significantly decrease in a water-sorbed matrix indicating that the three-dimensional structure presents a higher mobility and is less confined. PMID:19209367

  14. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T1-T2 and diffusion-T2), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  15. Creep Analysis for a Wide Stress Range Based on Stress Relaxation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbach, Holm; Naumenko, Konstantin; Gorash, Yevgen

    Many materials exhibit a stress range dependent creep behavior. The power-law creep observed for a certain stress range changes to the viscous type creep if the stress value decreases. Recently published experimental data for advanced heat resistant steels indicates that the high creep exponent (in the range 5-12 for the power-law behavior) may decrease to the low value of approximately 1 within the stress range relevant for engineering structures. The aim of this paper is to confirm the stress range dependence of creep behavior based on the experimental data of stress relaxation. An extended constitutive model for the minimum creep rate is introduced to consider both the linear and the power law creep ranges. To take into account the primary creep behavior a strain hardening function is introduced. The material constants are identified for published experimental data of creep and relaxation tests for a 12%Cr steel bolting material at 500°C. The data for the minimum creep rate are well-defined only for moderate and high stress levels. To reconstruct creep rates for the low stress range the data of the stress relaxation test are applied. The results show a gradual decrease of the creep exponent with the decreasing stress level. Furthermore, they illustrate that the proposed constitutive model well describes the creep rates for a wide stress range.

  16. Fate and metabolism of [15N]2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in soil.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Martin; Geyer, Roland; Russow, Rolf; Richnow, Hans H; Kästner, Matthias

    2004-08-01

    The fates of the labels from [14C] and [15N] trinitrotoluene were analyzed in bioreactors under aerobic conditions in soil treated by a fungal bioremediation process with Stropharia rugosoannulata and in control soil. Up to 17.5% of the 15N label had a different fate than the 14C label. Three N-mineralization processes were identified in detailed experiments with [15N]TNT. About 2% of the 15N label was found as NO3- and NH4+, showing simultaneous processes of direct TNT denitration (I) and reduction with cleavage of the amino groups (II). The enrichment of NO2-/NO3- (up to 7.5 atom% 15N abundance) indicates the formation of Meisenheimer complexes with a denitration of [15N]TNT. A 1.4% of the label was found distributed between N2O and N2. However, the 15N enrichment of the N2O (up to 38 atom%) demonstrated that both N atoms were generated from the labeled TNT and clearly indicates a novel formation process (III). We propose, as an explanation, the generation of N2O by cleavage from condensed azoxy metabolites. In addition, 1.7% of the 15N label was detected as biogenic amino acids in the wheat straw containing the fungus. Overall, 60 to 85% of the applied [15N]TNT was degraded and 52 to 64% was found as nonextractable residues in the soil matrix. Three percent was detected as 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene. PMID:15352472

  17. Continuous field measurement of N2O isotopologues using FTIR spectroscopy following 15N addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. L.; Griffith, D. W.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Lugg, G.; Lawrie, R.; Macdonald, B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic additions of fertilizer nitrogen (N) have significantly increased the mole fraction of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the troposphere. Tracking the fate of fertilizer N and its transformation to N2O is important to advance knowledge of greenhouse gas emissions from soils. Transport and transformations are frequently studied using 15N labeling experiments, but instruments capable of continuous measurements of 15N-N2O at the surface of soil have only recently come to the fore. Our primary aim was to quantify emissions of N2O and the fraction of 15N emitted as N2O from an agricultural soil following 15N addition using a mobile Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. We set up a short-term field experiment on a coastal floodplain site near Nowra, New South Wales. We deployed an automated chamber system connected to a multi-pass cell (optical pathlength 24 m) and low resolution FTIR spectrometer to measure fluxes of all N2O isotopologues collected from five 0.25 m2 chambers every three hours. We measured N2O fluxes pre and post-application of 15N-labeled substrate as potassium nitrate (KNO3) or urea [CO(NH2)2] to the soil surface. Root mean square uncertainties for all isotopologue measurements were less than 0.3 nmol mol-1 for 1 minute average concentration measurements, and minimum detectable fluxes for each isotopologue were <0.1 ng N m-2 s-1. Emissions of all N2O isotopologues were evident immediately following 15N addition. Emissions of 14N15NO, 15N14NO and 15N15NO isotopologues subsided within 10 d, but 14N14NO fluxes were evident over the entire experiment. The figure provides an overview of the emissions. Cumulative 15N-N2O fluxes (sum of the three 15N isotopologues) per chamber for the 14 days following 15N addition ranged from 1.5 to 10.3 mg 15N-N2O m-2. The chambers were destructively sampled after 2 weeks and 15N analyzed in soil and plant material using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Approximately 1% (range 0.7 - 1.9%) of the total amount of

  18. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  19. (15)N CSA tensors and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static (15)N NMR techniques for the determination of the (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and (15)N-(1)H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone (15)N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the (15)N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the (15)N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the "magic sandwich" SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the (15)N-(1)H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples. PMID:26367322

  20. AQUEOUS RELAXATION REAGENTS IN NITROGEN-15 NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron-nuclear relaxation times T(1)supe's for 15N and 13C in natural abundance are measured for a series of amines in aqueous solution using Gd(III) complexes of a series of polyaminocarboxylate ligands as paramagnetic relaxation reagents (PARRs). The PARRs are classified by t...

  1. Increase of Natural 15N Enrichment of Soybean Nodules with Mean Nodule Mass 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Bryan, Barbara A.; Kohl, Daniel H.

    1984-01-01

    The 15N abundance of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill var Harosoy) nodules is usually greater than it is for other tissues or for atmospheric N2. Results of experiments in which nodules were separated by size show that the magnitude of the 15N enrichment is correlated with nodule mass. The results support the hypothesis that 15N enrichment of nodules results from differential N isotopic fractionation for synthesis of nodule tissue versus synthesis of compounds for export from the nodule. The physiological significance of this hypothesis is that it requires that a substantial fraction of the N for nodule tissue synthesis in 15N-enriched nodules be N recently fixed within the same nodule. PMID:16663917

  2. Deriving NMR surface relaxivities, pore size distributions and water retention curves by NMR relaxation experiments on partially de-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Nordlund, C. L.; Klitzsch, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a method used over a wide field of geophysical applications to non-destructively determine transport and storage properties of rocks and soils. In NMR relaxometry signal amplitudes correspond directly to the rock's fluid (water, oil) content. On the other hand the NMR relaxation behavior, i.e. the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) NMR relaxation times, can be used to derive pore sizes and permeability as it is linearly linked to the pore's surface-to-volume-ratio and physiochemical properties of the rock-fluid interface by the surface relaxivity ρ_s This parameter, however, is dependent on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock sample and thus has to be determined and calibrated prior to estimating pore sizes from NMR relaxometry measurements. Frequently used methods to derive surface relaxivity to calibrate NMR pore sizes comprise mercury injection, pulsed field gradients (PFG-NMR) or grain size analysis. This study introduces an alternative approach to jointly estimate NMR surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions using NMR relaxation data obtained from partially de-saturated rocks. In this, inverse modeling is carried on a linked Young Laplace equation for capillary bundles and the Brownstein and Tarr equations. Subsequently, this approach is used to predict water retention curves of the investigated rocks. The method was tested and validated on simulated and laboratory transverse NMR data. Calculated inverse models are generally in a good agreement with results obtained from mercury injection and drainage measurements. Left: Measured and predicted water retention (pF) curves. Center: NMR relaxometry data, fit and error. Right: Mercury injection data (HgPor, dashed line) and jointly derived pore radii distributions and surface relaxivity by joint inverse modelling

  3. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusion–T{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  4. Variable δ15N Diet-Tissue Discrimination Factors among Sharks: Implications for Trophic Position, Diet and Food Web Models

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Jill A.; Hussey, Nigel E.; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W.; Wintner, Sabine P.; Fisk, Aaron T.

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ15N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆15N). As ∆15N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆15N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆15N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆15N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ15N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆15N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ15N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆15N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆15N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ15N = 9‰) whereas a ∆15N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ15N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆15N-dietary δ15N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆15N values that reflect the predators’ δ15N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a species’ ecological role in their

  5. Variable δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors among sharks: implications for trophic position, diet and food web models.

    PubMed

    Olin, Jill A; Hussey, Nigel E; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W; Wintner, Sabine P; Fisk, Aaron T

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆(15)N). As ∆(15)N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆(15)N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆(15)N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆(15)N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ(15)N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆(15)N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ(15)N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆(15)N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆(15)N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 9‰) whereas a ∆(15)N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆(15)N-dietary δ(15)N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆(15)N values that reflect the predators' δ(15)N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a

  6. Helium-3 relaxation time measurements at low temperatures for the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qiang

    The search for the existence of a nonzero neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) has the potential to reveal new sources of T and CP violation beyond the Standard Model and may have a significant impact on our understanding of the universe. A new experiment aiming at two orders of magnitude improvement (˜ 10--28 e·cm) over the current experimental upper limit has been proposed in the United States. In the experiment, the measurement cell will be made of dTPB-dPS coated acrylic and filled with superfluid 4He at ˜300-500 mK. The measurement of the neutron precession frequency will rely on the spin-dependence of the cross section of the nuclear reaction between polarized neutrons and 3He atoms: n⃗+H3 ⃗e → p + t + 764 keV. Polarized 3He will also be used as a comagnetometer based on the nuclear magnetic resonance technique. The 3He polarization needs to have sufficiently long relaxation time so that little polarization is lost during the measurement period in order to achieve the proposed sensitivity. Understanding the relaxation mechanism of 3He polarization in the measurement cell under the nEDM experimental conditions and maintaining 3He polarization is crucial for the experiment. With the presence of superfluid 4He, 3He relaxation time measurements in a dTPB-dPS coated cylindrical acrylic cell at the temperature of 1.9 K and ˜400 mK have been performed at the Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) on the campus of Duke University. The extracted depolarization probabilities of polarized 3He on the cell surface are on the order of (1 -- 2) x 10--7 at 1.9 K and ˜ 4.7 x 10--7 at ˜400 mK. The extrapolated relaxation time of polarized 3He in the nEDM cell geometry is ˜ 4870 seconds at ˜400 mK, which is sufficiently long for the nEDM experiment and further improvements are anticipated.

  7. Dynamic aspects of extracellular loop region as a proton release pathway of bacteriorhodopsin studied by relaxation time measurements by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Izuru; Ohmine, Masato; Tanabe, Junko; Tuzi, Satoru; Saitô, Hazime; Naito, Akira

    2007-12-01

    Local dynamics of interhelical loops in bacteriorhodopsin (bR), the extracellular BC, DE and FG, and cytoplasmic AB and CD loops, and helix B were determined on the basis of a variety of relaxation parameters for the resolved 13C and 15N signals of [1-13C]Tyr-, [15N]Pro- and [1-13C]Val-, [15N]Pro-labeled bR. Rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) filter experiments were used to assign [1-13C]Val-, [15N]Pro signals to the specific residues in bR. The previous assignments of [1-13C]Val-labeled peaks, 172.9 or 171.1 ppm, to Val69 were revised: the assignment of peak, 172.1 ppm, to Val69 was made in view of the additional information of conformation-dependent 15N chemical shifts of Pro bonded to Val in the presence of 13C-15N correlation, although no assignment of peak is feasible for 13C nuclei not bonded to Pro. 13C or 15N spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), spin-spin relaxation times under the condition of CP-MAS (T2), and cross relaxation times (TCH and TNH) for 13C and 15N nuclei and carbon or nitrogen-resolved, 1H spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating flame (1H T1 rho) for the assigned signals were measured in [1-13C]Val-, [15N]Pro-bR. It turned out that V69-P70 in the BC loop in the extracellular side has a rigid beta-sheet in spite of longer loop and possesses large amplitude motions as revealed from 13C and 15N conformation-dependent chemical shifts and T1, T2, 1H T1 rho and cross relaxation times. In addition, breakage of the beta-sheet structure in the BC loop was seen in bacterio-opsin (bO) in the absence of retinal. PMID:18036552

  8. Ion heating during magnetic relaxation in the helicity injected torus-II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, R.G.; Redd, A.J.; Hamp, W.T.; Smith, R.J.; Jarboe, T.R.

    2005-12-15

    Ion doppler spectroscopy (IDS) is applied to the helicity injected torus (HIT-II) spherical torus to measure impurity ion temperature and flows. [A. J. Redd et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2006 (2002)] The IDS instrument employs a 16-channel photomultiplier and can track temperature and velocity continuously through a discharge. Data for the coaxial helicity injection (CHI), transformer, and combined current drive configurations are presented. Ion temperatures for transformer-driven discharges are typically equal to or somewhat lower than electron temperatures measured by Thomson scattering. Internal reconnection events in transformer-driven discharges cause rapid ion heating. The CHI discharges exhibit anomalously high ion temperatures >250 eV, which are an order of magnitude higher than Thomson measurements, indicating ion heating through magnetic relaxation. The CHI discharges that exhibit current and poloidal flux buildup after bubble burst show sustained ion heating during current drive.

  9. Site-resolved 2H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindh, E. L.; Stilbs, P.; Furó, I.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in 2H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the 2H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two 2H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In 2H-exchanged cellulose containing two 2H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics.

  10. Site-resolved (2)H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Lindh, E L; Stilbs, P; Furó, I

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in (2)H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the (2)H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two (2)H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In (2)H-exchanged cellulose containing two (2)H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics. PMID:27152833

  11. Box-modeling of 15N/14N in mammals.

    PubMed

    Balter, Vincent; Simon, Laurent; Fouillet, Hélène; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2006-03-01

    The 15N/14N signature of animal proteins is now commonly used to understand their physiology and quantify the flows of nutrient in trophic webs. These studies assume that animals are predictably 15N-enriched relative to their food, but the isotopic mechanism which accounts for this enrichment remains unknown. We developed a box model of the nitrogen isotope cycle in mammals in order to predict the 15N/14N ratios of body reservoirs as a function of time, N intake and body mass. Results of modeling show that a combination of kinetic isotope fractionation during the N transfer between amines and equilibrium fractionation related to the reversible conversion of N-amine into ammonia is required to account for the well-established approximately 4 per thousand 15N-enrichment of body proteins relative to the diet. This isotopic enrichment observed in proteins is due to the partial recycling of 15N-enriched urea and the urinary excretion of a fraction of the strongly 15N-depleted ammonia reservoir. For a given body mass and diet delta15N, the isotopic compositions are mainly controlled by the N intake. Increase of the urea turnover combined with a decrease of the N intake lead to calculate a delta15N increase of the proteins, in agreement with the observed increase of collagen delta15N of herbivorous animals with aridity. We further show that the low delta15N collagen values of cave bears cannot be attributed to the dormancy periods as it is commonly thought, but inversely to the hyperphagia behavior. This model highlights the need for experimental investigations performed with large mammals in order to improve our understanding of natural variations of delta15N collagen. PMID:16328553

  12. High resolution (13)C MRI with hyperpolarized urea: in vivo T(2) mapping and (15)N labeling effects.

    PubMed

    Reed, Galen D; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J; Hong Shang; Larson, Peder E Z; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-02-01

    (13)C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [(13)C] urea and [(13) C,(15)N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. (15)N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [(13) C,(15) N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [(13)C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [(13)C,(15)N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [(13)C,(15) N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio over [(13)C] urea. PMID:24235273

  13. Safety Report - Experiments 999 and 891 Muon Spin Relaxation in Pu and Pu-based Heavy Fermion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M; Heffner, R; Morris, G

    2004-04-23

    Experiment E999 proposes to carry out conventional muon spin relaxation ({mu}SR) measurements on solid samples of plutonium and plutonium alloys. Experiment 891 will be involved with {mu}SR experiments on PuCoGa{sub 5} and related Pu-based superconductors. Other than a dedicated cryostat to be provided by Los Alamos and a pumping station provided by Livermore, the experiments will use existing {mu}SR User Facility spectrometers and associated equipment such as detectors and electronics. The main topics of this report are therefore (1) the passivation of the samples with a polymer coating, (2) the design, fabrication and testing of a sealed titanium sample secondary encapsulation cell, (3) the transport of samples to and from TRIUMF and (4) the related on-site procedures for the safe handling of the encapsulated samples. Because both E999 and E891 share the same equipment and Pu-safety related issues, we are submitting a single safety report for both experiments.

  14. Measurement of orientation and alignment moment relaxation by polarization spectroscopy: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Costen, Matthew L; Crichton, Hilary J; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2004-05-01

    A diagrammatic perturbation theory description of one-color polarization spectroscopy (PS) is developed which emphasizes the significance of orientation and alignment tensor moments of the rotational angular momentum, and their collisional evolution. The influences of Doppler motion, velocity-changing collisions, decay of population, orientation and alignment, and nuclear hyperfine depolarization on the calculated PS signal are discussed. Illustrative simulations are presented of the evolution of the PS signal as a function of pump-probe laser delay. These are generated by a Monte Carlo integration of the derived equations for the signal electric field over typical experimental pump and probe laser temporal profiles and velocity distributions for a commonly studied system, the OH A 2Sigma+ -X 2Pi (0,0) band. These predictions are compared with a preliminary set of results obtained in an experimental apparatus designed for one-color polarization spectroscopy using independent pump and probe lasers. Measurements are presented using linearly polarized pump light on the Q1(2.5) transition of the OH A 2Sigma+ -X 2Pi (0,0) band with He as the collision partner. The decay of the experimental PS pump-probe signal is discussed with reference to inelastic collisional population transfer rates in the literature. It is concluded that the collisional depolarization of rotational alignment is rapid, with a rate approximately twice that of population transfer. This is consistent with previous measurements in atmospheric pressure flames. PS is shown to be a viable novel spectroscopic method for determining rotational angular momentum orientation and alignment relaxation rates, which are valuable quantities because they are sensitive probes of the forces involved in inelastic collisions. PMID:15267706

  15. Why is Mineral-Associated Organic Matter Enriched in 15N? Evidence from Grazed Pasture Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, W. T.; Wells, N. S.; Mudge, P. L.; Clough, T. J.; Schipper, L. A.; Ghani, A.; Stevenson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Throughout the scientific literature, measurements across soil depth and density fractions suggest that, with few exceptions, mineral-associated organic matter (OM) has higher δ15N than non-mineral-associated OM. This implies that the δ15N difference between N inputs and mineral-stabilized OM may characterize the microbial processes involved in stabilization and mineral association. Yet current understanding of observed N isotope fractionation in terrestrial ecosystems suggests the large isotope effects are expressed during inorganic N transformations from NH4 to gaseous loss pathways of NH3 volatilization and denitrification. How can the relative importance of N isotope fractionation during OM stabilization versus loss pathways be resolved? We recently examined N isofluxes when a temporary nitrogen excess is created by urine deposition in a New Zealand dairy pasture. We found that the N isotopic composition of volatilized NH3, and NO3 available for leaching or denitrification could not be linked back to the added N using Rayleigh distillation models. Instead, the results imply that the added N was immobilized, and the N available for losses was increasingly derived from mineralization of organic matter during the course of the experiment. These results are consistent with recent evidence of enhanced OM mineralization in urine patches, understanding of N isotope mass balances and long-standing evidence that gross mineralization and immobilization fluxes greatly exceed net mineralization and nitrification, except at very high N saturation. These results suggest that where 15N enrichment occurs due to fractionating loss pathways, the isotope effects are primarily transmitted to immobilized N, forming 15N enriched stabilized OM. This further explains earlier findings that the δ15N of soil OM represents an integrated indicator of losses, reflecting the intensity and duration of pastoral agriculture. We suggest that development of an indicator based on δ15N in

  16. A fast field-cycling device for high-resolution NMR: Design and application to spin relaxation and hyperpolarization experiments.

    PubMed

    Kiryutin, Alexey S; Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Grishin, Yuri A; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V

    2016-02-01

    A device for performing fast magnetic field-cycling NMR experiments is described. A key feature of this setup is that it combines fast switching of the external magnetic field and high-resolution NMR detection. The field-cycling method is based on precise mechanical positioning of the NMR probe with the mounted sample in the inhomogeneous fringe field of the spectrometer magnet. The device enables field variation over several decades (from 100μT up to 7T) within less than 0.3s; progress in NMR probe design provides NMR linewidths of about 10(-3)ppm. The experimental method is very versatile and enables site-specific studies of spin relaxation (NMRD, LLSs) and spin hyperpolarization (DNP, CIDNP, and SABRE) at variable magnetic field and at variable temperature. Experimental examples of such studies are demonstrated; advantages of the experimental method are described and existing challenges in the field are outlined. PMID:26773525

  17. A fast field-cycling device for high-resolution NMR: Design and application to spin relaxation and hyperpolarization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryutin, Alexey S.; Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Grishin, Yuri A.; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.

    2016-02-01

    A device for performing fast magnetic field-cycling NMR experiments is described. A key feature of this setup is that it combines fast switching of the external magnetic field and high-resolution NMR detection. The field-cycling method is based on precise mechanical positioning of the NMR probe with the mounted sample in the inhomogeneous fringe field of the spectrometer magnet. The device enables field variation over several decades (from 100 μT up to 7 T) within less than 0.3 s; progress in NMR probe design provides NMR linewidths of about 10-3 ppm. The experimental method is very versatile and enables site-specific studies of spin relaxation (NMRD, LLSs) and spin hyperpolarization (DNP, CIDNP, and SABRE) at variable magnetic field and at variable temperature. Experimental examples of such studies are demonstrated; advantages of the experimental method are described and existing challenges in the field are outlined.

  18. Long-term 15N tracking from biological N fixation across different plant and humus components of the boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroniz-Crespo, Maria; Jones, David L.; Zackrisson, Olle; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2014-05-01

    Biological N2 fixation by cyanobacteria associated with feather mosses is an important cog in the nitrogen (N) cycle of boreal forests; still, our understanding of the turnover and fate of N fixed by this association remains greatly incomplete. The 15N signature of plants and soil serves as a powerful tool to explore N dynamics in forest ecosystems. In particular, in the present study we aimed to investigate the contribution of N2 fixation to δ15N signatures of plants and humus component of the boreal forest. Here we present results from a long-term (7 years) tacking of labelled 15N2 across the humus layer, seedlings of the tree species Pinus sylvestris, two common dwarf shrub species (Empetrum hermaphroditum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and the feather moss Pleurozium schreibery. The enriched experiment was conducted in 2005 in a natural boreal forest in northern Sweden. Two different treatments (10% 15N2 headspace enrichment and control) were setup in nine different plots (0.5 x 0.5 m) within the forest. We observed a significant reduction of δ15N signature of the 15N-enriched moss that could be explained by a growth dilution effect. Nevertheless, after 5 years since 15N2 enrichment some of the label 15N was still detected on the moss and in particular in the dead tissue. We could not detect a clear transfer of the labelled 15N2 from the moss-cyanobacteria system to other components of the ecosystem. However, we found consistence relationship through time between increments of δ15N signature of some of the forest components in plots which exhibited higher N fixation rates in the moss. In particular, changes in natural abundance δ15N that could be associated with N fixation were more apparent in the humus layer, the dwarf shrub Vaccinium vitis-idaea and the pine seedlings when comparing across plots and years.

  19. Isolation and measurement of 15N2 from respiratory gases of animals administered 15N-labeled substances.

    PubMed

    Springer, D L; Reed, D J; Dost, F N

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for collection of metabolic 15N2 from in vitro preparations or intact rats administered 15N-containing compounds. The methods enables routine collection and mass spectrometric measurement of as little as 10 mumol 15N2 respired by a rat over a 24-h period. A device is described that includes either an animal chamber or a tissue reaction vessel in a closed recycling atmosphere, with automatic O2 replenishment and removal of CO2 and water. It is capable of sustaining moderate vacuum and is coupled to a high-vacuum manifold designed to process the contained atmosphere and respiratory gases. The starting atmosphere is an 80:20 mix of sulfur hexafluoride and O2. Recovery of 15N2 gas from the system without an animal present was 101.3 +/- 5.75%. When 15N2 gas was very slowly infused iv into an animal, recovery was 89.1 +/- 5.38%. Use of the method in studies of the fate of [15N]hydrazine in rats indicated that about 15% of the administered hydrazine is rapidly converted to 15N2, followed by slower conversion of an additional 7-10% over the next several hours. PMID:7328697

  20. Being Relaxed and Powerful: Children's Lived Experiences of Coping with Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostenius, Catrine; Ohrling, Kerstin

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to describe and develop an understanding of children's lived experiences of coping with stress. Twenty-three Swedish children, ages 10-12, wrote open letters and were interviewed. The phenomenological analysis resulted in three main themes: (i) depending on oneself, others and the world around, (ii) choosing to be a doer and (iii)…

  1. New flaxseed orbitides: Detection, sequencing, and (15)N incorporation.

    PubMed

    Okinyo-Owiti, Denis P; Young, Lester; Burnett, Peta-Gaye G; Reaney, Martin J T

    2014-03-01

    Three new orbitides (cyclolinopeptides 17, 18, and 19) were identified in flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) extracts without any form of purification. Their structures were elucidated by a combination of (15) N-labeling experiments and extensive tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI). Putative linear peptide sequences of the new orbitides were used as the query in the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) searches of flax genome database. These searches returned linear sequences for the putative precursors of cyclolinopeptides 17 and 19 among others. Cyclolinopeptide 18 contains MetO (O) and is not directly encoded, but is a product of post-translation modification of the Met present in 17. The identification of precursor proteins in flax mRNA transcripts and DNA sequences confirmed the occurrence and amino acid sequences of these orbitides as [1-9-NαC]-MLKPFFFWI, [1-9-NαC]-OLKPFFFWI, and [1-9-NαC]-GIPPFWLTL for cyclolinopeptides 17, 18, and 19, respectively. PMID:24408479

  2. Identification of novel hydrazine metabolites by 15N-NMR.

    PubMed

    Preece, N E; Nicholson, J K; Timbrell, J A

    1991-05-01

    15N-NMR has been used to study the metabolism of hydrazine in rats in vivo. Single doses of [15N2]hydrazine (2.0 mmol/kg: 98.6% g atom) were administered to rats and urine collected for 24 hr over ice. A number of metabolites were detected by 15N-NMR analysis of lyophilized urine. Ammonia was detected as a singlet at 0 ppm and unchanged [15N2]hydrazine was present in the urine detectable as a singlet at 32 ppm. Peaks were observed at 107 and 110 ppm which were identified as being due to the hydrazido nitrogen of acetylhydrazine and diacetylhydrazine, respectively. A resonance at 85 ppm was ascribed to carbazic acid, resulting from reaction of hydrazine with carbon dioxide. A singlet detected at 316 ppm was thought to be due to the hydrazono nitrogen of the pyruvate hydrazone. The resonance at 56 ppm was assigned to 15N-enriched urea, this together with the presence of ammonia indicates that the N-N bond of hydrazine is cleaved in vivo, possibly by N-oxidation, and the resultant ammonia is incorporated into urea. A doublet centred at 150 ppm and a singlet at 294 ppm were assigned to a metabolite which results from cyclization of the 2-oxoglutarate hydrazone. Therefore 15N-NMR spectroscopic analysis of urine has yielded significant new information on the metabolism of hydrazine. PMID:2018564

  3. Interaction of thiocyanate with horseradish peroxidase. 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Modi, S; Behere, D V; Mitra, S

    1989-11-25

    Interaction of thiocyanate with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was investigated by relaxation rate measurements (at 50.68 MHz) of the 15N resonance of thiocyanate nitrogen and by following the hyperfine shifted ring methyl proton resonances (at 500 MHz) of the heme group of SCN-.HRP solutions. At pH 4.0, the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for thiocyanate binding to HRP was deduced to be 158 mM from the relaxation rate measurements. Chemical shift changes of 1- and 8-ring methyl proton resonances in the presence of various amounts of thiocyanate at pH 4.0 yielded KD values of 166 and 136 mM, respectively. From the pH dependence of KD and the 15N resonance line width, it was observed that thiocyanate binds to HRP only under acidic conditions (pH less than 6). The binding was found to be facilitated by protonation of an acid group on the enzyme with pKa 4.0. The pH dependence of the 15N line width as well as the apparent dissociation constant were quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a reaction scheme in which thiocyanate in deprotonated ionic form binds to the enzyme in protonated acidic form. The KD for thiocyanate binding to HRP was also evaluated in the presence of an excess of exogenous substrates such as resorcinol, cyanide, and iodide ions. It was found that the presence of cyanide (which binds to heme iron at the sixth coordination position) and resorcinol did not have any effect on the binding of thiocyanate, indicating that the binding site of the thiocyanate ion is located away from the ferric center as well as from the aromatic donor binding site. The KD in the presence of iodide, however, showed that iodide competes with thiocyanate for binding at the same site. The distance of the bound thiocyanate ion from the ferric center was deduced from the 15N relaxation time measurements and was found to be a 6.8 A. From the distance as well as the change in the chemical shifts and line width of 1- and 8-methyl proton resonances, it is suggested that the

  4. Theory and experimental results of transfer-NOE experiments. 1. The influence of the off rate versus cross-relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippens, R. M.; Cerf, C.; Hallenga, K.

    The theory of the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect is presented in the framework of an extended relaxation matrix representation. This matrix representation allows a coherent description of all one- and two-dimensional experiments. We present analytical solutions for the buildup of magnetization in the 2D transfer-NOE experiment, for all ratios of the off rate k to the cross-relaxation rates R involved. We show that systematic deviations in distance determination occur when the off rate becomes comparable to or smaller than the relaxation rates. Experimental results on the peptide/protein system oxytocin/neurophysin confirming this analysis are presented. The importance of residual mobility in the bound ligand, as demonstrated by the experimental data, is also discussed.

  5. Diagnosing GCM errors over West Africa using relaxation experiments. Part I: summer monsoon climatology and interannual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Benjamin; Douville, Hervé

    2011-10-01

    The CNRM atmospheric general circulation model Arpege-Climat is relaxed towards atmospheric reanalyses outside the 10°S-32°N 30°W-50°E domain in order to disentangle the regional versus large-scale sources of climatological biases and interannual variability of the West African monsoon (WAM). On the one hand, the main climatological features of the monsoon, including the spatial distribution of summer precipitation, are only weakly improved by the nudging, thereby suggesting the regional origin of the Arpege-Climat biases. On the other hand, the nudging technique is relatively efficient to control the interannual variability of the WAM dynamics, though the impact on rainfall variability is less clear. Additional sensitivity experiments focusing on the strong 1994 summer monsoon suggest that the weak sensitivity of the model biases is not an artifact of the nudging design, but the evidence that regional physical processes are the main limiting factors for a realistic simulation of monsoon circulation and precipitation in the Arpege-Climat model. Sensitivity experiments to soil moisture boundary conditions are also conducted and highlight the relevance of land-atmosphere coupling for the amplification of precipitation biases. Nevertheless, the land surface hydrology is not the main explanation for the model errors that are rather due to deficiencies in the atmospheric physics. The intraseasonal timescale and the model internal variability are discussed in a companion paper.

  6. Effects of Four Different Restoration Treatments on the Natural Abundance of 15N Stable Isotopes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Temperton, Vicky M.; Märtin, Lea L. A.; Röder, Daniela; Lücke, Andreas; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    δ15N signals in plant and soil material integrate over a number of biogeochemical processes related to nitrogen (N) and therefore provide information on net effects of multiple processes on N dynamics. In general little is known in many grassland restoration projects on soil–plant N dynamics in relation to the restoration treatments. In particular, δ15N signals may be a useful tool to assess whether abiotic restoration treatments have produced the desired result. In this study we used the range of abiotic and biotic conditions provided by a restoration experiment to assess to whether the restoration treatments and/or plant functional identity and legume neighborhood affected plant δ15N signals. The restoration treatments consisted of hay transfer and topsoil removal, thus representing increasing restoration effort, from no restoration measures, through biotic manipulation to major abiotic manipulation. We measured δ15N and %N in six different plant species (two non-legumes and four legumes) across the restoration treatments. We found that restoration treatments were clearly reflected in δ15N of the non-legume species, with very depleted δ15N associated with low soil N, and our results suggest this may be linked to uptake of ammonium (rather than nitrate). The two non-legume species differed considerably in their δ15N signals, which may be related to the two species forming different kinds of mycorrhizal symbioses. Plant δ15N signals could clearly separate legumes from non-legumes, but our results did not allow for an assessment of legume neighborhood effects on non-legume δ15N signals. We discuss our results in the light of what the δ15N signals may be telling us about plant–soil N dynamics and their potential value as an indicator for N dynamics in restoration. PMID:22645597

  7. Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Lena, Rohe

    2013-04-01

    The measurement of denitrification in soils and aquifers is still challenging and often enough associated with considerable experimental effort and high costs. Against this background, the acetylene inhibition technique (AIT) applied in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays is by far the most effective approach. However, this method has been largely criticized, as it is susceptible to underestimate denitrification rates and adds an additional carbon source to the substrates to be investigated. Here we provide evidence that the AIT is not necessarily an inappropriate approach to measure denitrification, that its reliability depends on the drivers governing the process, and that the 15N site preference of N2O (SP) may serve as a tool to assess this reliability. Two laboratory batch experiments were conducted, where sandy aquifer material and a peat soil were incubated as slurries. We established (i) a standard anaerobic treatment by adding KNO3 (10 mg N L-1), (ii) an oxygen treatment by adding KNO3 and O2 (5 mg L-1), and (iii) a glucose treatment by adding KNO3 supplemented with glucose (200 mg C L-1). Both experiments were run under 10 % (v/v) acetylene atmosphere and as 15N tracer treatments using labeled K15NO3 (60 atom % 15N). In the case of the standard anaerobic treatments, we found a very good agreement of denitrification potential obtained by the AIT and 15N tracer methods. SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between -4.8 and 2.6 ‰ which is indicative for N2O production during bacterial denitrification but not for N2O reduction to N2. In contrast, we observed substantial underestimation of denitrification by AIT for the glucose treatments compared to the 15N method, i.e. denitrification was underestimated by 36 % (sandy aquifer material) and 47 % (peat soil). SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between 4.5 and 9.6 ‰, which suggests occurrence of bacterial N2O reduction. In the case of the oxygen

  8. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  9. Plant community change mediates the response of foliar δ(15)N to CO 2 enrichment in mesic grasslands.

    PubMed

    Polley, H Wayne; Derner, Justin D; Jackson, Robert B; Gill, Richard A; Procter, Andrew C; Fay, Philip A

    2015-06-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may change the isotopic signature of plant N by altering plant and microbial processes involved in the N cycle. CO2 may increase leaf δ(15)N by increasing plant community productivity, C input to soil, and, ultimately, microbial mineralization of old, (15)N-enriched organic matter. We predicted that CO2 would increase aboveground productivity (ANPP; g biomass m(-2)) and foliar δ(15)N values of two grassland communities in Texas, USA: (1) a pasture dominated by a C4 exotic grass, and (2) assemblages of tallgrass prairie species, the latter grown on clay, sandy loam, and silty clay soils. Grasslands were exposed in separate experiments to a pre-industrial to elevated CO2 gradient for 4 years. CO2 stimulated ANPP of pasture and of prairie assemblages on each of the three soils, but increased leaf δ(15)N only for prairie plants on a silty clay. δ(15)N increased linearly as mineral-associated soil C declined on the silty clay. Mineral-associated C declined as ANPP increased. Structural equation modeling indicted that CO2 increased ANPP partly by favoring a tallgrass (Sorghastrum nutans) over a mid-grass species (Bouteloua curtipendula). CO2 may have increased foliar δ(15)N on the silty clay by reducing fractionation during N uptake and assimilation. However, we interpret the soil-specific, δ(15)N-CO2 response as resulting from increased ANPP that stimulated mineralization from recalcitrant organic matter. By contrast, CO2 favored a forb species (Solanum dimidiatum) with higher δ(15)N than the dominant grass (Bothriochloa ischaemum) in pasture. CO2 enrichment changed grassland δ(15)N by shifting species relative abundances. PMID:25604918

  10. Synthesis of 7-15N-Oroidin and Evaluation of Utility for Biosynthetic Studies of Pyrrole-Imidazole Alkaloids by Microscale1H-15N HSQC and FTMS†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Gang; Morinaka, Brandon I.; Reyes, Jeremy Chris P.; Wolff, Jeremy H.; Romo, Daniel; Molinski, Tadeusz F.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous marine-derived pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids (PIAs), ostensibly derived from the simple precursor oroidin, 1a, have been reported and have garnered intense synthetic interest due to their complex structures and in some cases biological activity; however very little is known regarding their biosynthesis. We describe a concise synthesis of 7-15N-oroidin (1d) from urocanic acid and a direct method for measurement of 15N incorporation by pulse labeling and analysis by 1D 1H-15N HSQC NMR and FTMS. Using a mock pulse labeling experiment, we estimate the limit of detection (LOD) for incorporation of newly biosynthesized PIA by 1D 1H-15N HSQC to be 0.96 μg equivalent of 15N oroidin (2.4 nmole) in a background of 1500 μg unlabeled oroidin (about 1 part per 1600). 7-15N-Oroidin will find utility in biosynthetic feeding experiments with live sponges to provide direct information to clarify the pathways leading to more complex pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids. PMID:20095632

  11. Relaxed Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    Relaxed intensity refers to a professional philosophy, demeanor, and way of life. It is the key to being an effective educational leader. To be successful one must be relaxed, which means managing stress efficiently, having fun, and enjoying work. Intensity allows one to get the job done and accomplish certain tasks or goals. Educational leaders…

  12. The contamination of commercial 15N2 gas stocks with 15N-labeled nitrate and ammonium and consequences for nitrogen fixation measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabundo, Richard; Lehmann, Moritz F; Treibergs, Lija; Tobias, Craig R; Altabet, Mark A; Moisander, Pia H; Granger, Julie

    2014-01-01

    We report on the contamination of commercial 15-nitrogen (15N) N2 gas stocks with 15N-enriched ammonium, nitrate and/or nitrite, and nitrous oxide. 15N2 gas is used to estimate N2 fixation rates from incubations of environmental samples by monitoring the incorporation of isotopically labeled 15N2 into organic matter. However, the microbial assimilation of bioavailable 15N-labeled N2 gas contaminants, nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, is liable to lead to the inflation or false detection of N2 fixation rates. 15N2 gas procured from three major suppliers was analyzed for the presence of these 15N-contaminants. Substantial concentrations of 15N-contaminants were detected in four Sigma-Aldrich 15N2 lecture bottles from two discrete batch syntheses. Per mole of 15N2 gas, 34 to 1900 µmoles of 15N-ammonium, 1.8 to 420 µmoles of 15N-nitrate/nitrite, and ≥21 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide were detected. One 15N2 lecture bottle from Campro Scientific contained ≥11 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide per mole of 15N2 gas, and no detected 15N-nitrate/nitrite at the given experimental 15N2 tracer dilutions. Two Cambridge Isotopes lecture bottles from discrete batch syntheses contained ≥0.81 µmoles 15N-nitrous oxide per mole 15N2, and trace concentrations of 15N-ammonium and 15N-nitrate/nitrite. 15N2 gas equilibrated cultures of the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta confirmed that the 15N-contaminants are assimilable. A finite-differencing model parameterized using oceanic field conditions typical of N2 fixation assays suggests that the degree of detected 15N-ammonium contamination could yield inferred N2 fixation rates ranging from undetectable, <0.01 nmoles N L(-1) d(-1), to 530 nmoles N L(-1) d(-1), contingent on experimental conditions. These rates are comparable to, or greater than, N2 fixation rates commonly detected in field assays. These results indicate that past reports of N2 fixation should be interpreted with caution, and demonstrate that the purity of commercial 15N2

  13. Measuring the Longitudinal NMR Relaxation Rates of Fast Relaxing Nuclei Using a Signal Eliminating Relaxation Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Led, Jens J.

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180° inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180° pulses separated by two variable delays, Δ1 and Δ2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  14. Measurement of wall relaxation times of polarized Helium-3 in bulk liquid Helium-4 for the neutron electric dipole moment experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Jacob

    The Neutron Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) experiment that will take place at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee will measure the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron with a precision of order 10-28 e-cm, utilizing spin-polarized 3He in bulk liquid 4He to detect neutron precession in a 10 mG magnetic field and 50 kV/cm electric field. Since depolarized 3He will produce a background, relaxation of the polarized 3He, characterized by the probability of depolarization per bounce, Pd, was measured for materials that will be in contact with polarized 3He. Depolarization probabilities were determined from measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time of polarized 3He in bulk liquid 4He inside an acrylic cell coated with the wavelength shifter deuterated tetraphenyl butadiene (d-TPB), which will be used to coat the nEDM measurement cell. Relaxation measurements were also performed while rods, made from plumbing material Torlon and valve bellows material BeCu, were present in the cell. The BeCu was coated with Pyralin resin prior to relaxation measurements, while relaxation measurements were performed both before and after the Torlon rod was coated with Pyralin resin. The depolarization probabilities were found to be Pd-TPBd <1.32x10-7 PBareTorlon d=1.01+/-0.08 x10-6 PCoatedTorlon d=2.5+/-0.1 x10-7 PCoatedBeCu d=7.9+/-0.3 x10-7 The relaxation rates extrapolated from the observed values of Pd for d-TPB, coated Torlon, and coated BeCu in the nEDM apparatus were found to be consistent with design goals.

  15. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; Kispal, Brianna M.; Mireault, Christopher R.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W.

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  16. Stepwise enrichment of 15N along food chains: Further evidence and the relation between δ 15N and animal age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masao; Wada, Eitaro

    1984-05-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrogen was measured in marine and fresh-water animals from the East China Sea, The Bering Sea, Lake Ashinoko and Usujiri intertidal zone. Primary producers, showed average δ15Nversus atmospheric nitrogen of +5.0%. (+3.4 to +7.5) in the Bering Sea and Lake Ashinoko, and +6.8%. (+6.0 to +7.6) in Usujiri intertidal zone. Blue green algae from the East China Sea show an average -0.55%. (-0.8 to +1.2). All consumers, Zooplankton, fish and bird exhibited Stepwise enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level. The 15N enrichment at a single feeding process ranged from +1.3 to +5.3 averaging +3.4 ± 1.1%.. This isotopic fractionation seems to be independent of habitat. The effect of age in animals was obtained by analyzing two marine mussels. The soft tissue nitrogen showed +2.0%. enrichment relative to that of primary producers, and the magnitude was almost constant with shell ages ranging from 0 to 8 years. A similar 15N enrichment occurs in all Molluscs, Crustaceans, Insecta, Amphibia, Fish, Ave and Mammal species regardless of the difference in the form of excreted nitrogen and in laboratory cultured fish, brine shrimp and mice (+2.9 to +4.9%.). The excreted ammonia from guppy was sufficiently light to balance the concentration of 15N to animal body.

  17. Spectroscopic labeling of A, S/T in the 1H- 15N HSQC spectrum of uniformly ( 15N- 13C) labeled proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugh, Jeetender; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2008-10-01

    A new triple resonance two-dimensional experiment, termed (HC)NH, has been described to generate specific labels on the peaks of alanines and serines/threonines, separately, in the 1H- 15N HSQC spectrum of a protein. The performance of the pulse sequence has been demonstrated with a 151 residue protein. The method permits the investigation of local environments around those specific residues without actually having to obtain complete resonance assignments for the entire protein. With this one can envisage use of the technique for studying large protein systems from different points of view.

  18. Novel labeling technique illustrates transfer of 15N2 from Sphagnum moss to vascular plants via diazotrophic nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Vile, M. A.; Wieder, R.

    2013-12-01

    transferred to P. mariana roots (mean δ15N at 1 and 2 months of 15.26 × 3.30 and 16.19 × 1.21) more than shoots (mean δ15N at 1 and 2 months of 6.57 × 0.52 and 4.67×0.17) (initial δ15N values of roots and shoots of 2.16 × 0.37 and 5.54 × 0.35, respectively). Nitrogen also was transferred to V. oxycoccos roots (δ15N at 2 months of 21.46 × 3.61) more than shoots (δ15N 2 months of -2.17 × 0.23) (initial δ15N values of roots and shoots of -6.41 × 0.21 and -6.85 × 0.15, respectively). A two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD verified that both vascular plants' roots were significantly enriched with 15N (P. mariana roots; p < 0.0001, V. oxycoccus roots; p < 0.0001) after 1 month. These results indicate that bog vascular plants may derive considerable nitrogen from biological N2-fixation taking place in Sphagnum moss capitula. The experiment was subsequently repeated in-situ.

  19. Interaction study of bioactive molecules with fibrinogen and human platelets determined by 1H NMR relaxation experiments.

    PubMed

    Bonechi, Claudia; Martini, Silvia; Rossi, Claudio

    2009-02-15

    In order to investigate the interaction processes between bioactive molecules and macromolecular receptors NMR methodology based on the analysis of selective and non-selective spin-lattice relaxation rate enhancements of ligand protons was used. The contribution from the bound ligand fraction to the observed relaxation rate in relation to macromolecular target concentration allowed the calculation of the normalized affinity index[A(I)(N)](L)(T) in which the effects of motional anisotropies and different proton densities have been removed. In this paper, we applied this methodology to investigate the affinity of epinephrine and isoproterenol towards two different systems: fibrinogen and platelets. PMID:19157885

  20. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of 15N NMR protonation shifts.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Valentin A; Samultsev, Dmitry O; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study revealed that the nature of the upfield (shielding) protonation effect in 15N NMR originates in the change of the contribution of the sp(2)-hybridized nitrogen lone pair on protonation resulting in a marked shielding of nitrogen of about 100 ppm. On the contrary, for amine-type nitrogen, protonation of the nitrogen lone pair results in the deshielding protonation effect of about 25 ppm, so that the total deshielding protonation effect of about 10 ppm is due to the interplay of the contributions of adjacent natural bond orbitals. A versatile computational scheme for the calculation of 15N NMR chemical shifts of protonated nitrogen species and their neutral precursors is proposed at the density functional theory level taking into account solvent effects within the supermolecule solvation model. PMID:25891386

  2. Saturation factor of nitroxide radicals in liquid DNP by pulsed ELDOR experiments.

    PubMed

    Türke, Maria-Teresa; Bennati, Marina

    2011-03-01

    We propose the use of the pulse electron double resonance (ELDOR) method to determine the effective saturation factor of nitroxide radicals for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments in liquids. The obtained values for the nitroxide radical TEMPONE-D,(15)N at different concentrations are rationalized in terms of spin relaxation and are shown to fulfil the Overhauser theory. PMID:21264371

  3. Marking Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) With Rubidium or 15N.

    PubMed

    Klick, J; Yang, W Q; Bruck, D J

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) has caused significant economic damage to berry and stone fruit production regions. Markers that are systemic in plants and easily transferred to target organisms are needed to track D. suzukii exploitation of host resources and trophic interactions. High and low concentrations of the trace element, rubidium (Rb), and the stable isotope, 15N, were tested to mark D. suzukii larvae feeding on fruits of enriched strawberry plants grown in containers under greenhouse conditions. Fly marker content and proportion of flies marked 1, 7, and 14 d after emergence from enriched fruits and fly dry mass were analyzed. Nearly 100% of the flies analyzed 14 d after emerging from 15N-enriched plants were marked, whereas only 30-75% and 0-3% were marked 14 d after emerging from high and low Rb concentration plants, respectively. Rapid Rb decay, strong 15N persistence, and the economics of using these markers in the field to elucidate D. suzukii pest ecology are discussed. PMID:26470275

  4. 13N,15N isotope and kinetic evidence against hyponitrite as an intermediate in dentrification.

    PubMed

    Hollocher, T C; Garber, E; Cooper, A J; Reiman, R E

    1980-06-10

    13N- and 15N-labeling experiments were carried out with Paracoccus denitrificans, grown anaerobically on nitrate, to determine whether hyponitrite might be an obligatory intermediate in denitrification and a precursor of nitrous oxide. From experiments designed to trap [13N]- or [15N,15N]hyponitrite by dilution into authentic hyponitrite it was calculated that the intracellular concentration of a presumptive hyponitrite pool must be less than 0.4 mM. In order for a pool of this size to turn over rapidly enough to handle the flux of nitrogen during dentrifucation, the spontaneous rate of hyponitrite dehydration must be enhanced by a factor of several thousand through enzyme catalysis. Cell extracts failed to catalyze this reaction under a variety of conditions. It is concluded that hyponitrite cannot be an intermediate in dentrification. In addition, the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen was studied in P. denitrificans using 13N as tracer. At low concentrations (less than 10(-8) M) of labeled nitrate and nitrite 5 to 10% of the label was assimilated into non-volatile metabolites and 90 to 95% was reduced to N2. Similarly, with 15 mM [13N]nitrate, 5% of the label went into metabolites and 95% to N2. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis of the labeled metabolites indicated that the major pathway for assimilation of inorganic nitrogen in P. denitrificans under these conditions is through ammonia incorporation via the aspartase reaction. PMID:7372623

  5. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of URNdesign, a computationally redesigned RRM protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Neil; Dantas, Gautam; Varani, Gabriele

    2005-10-01

    Protein design represents one of the great challenges of computational structural biology. The ability to successfully design new proteins would allow us to generate new reagents and enzymes, while at the same time providing us with an understanding of the principles of protein stability. Here we report 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of a redesigned U1A protein, URNdesign. U1A has been studied extensively by our group and hence was chosen as a design target. For the assignments we sued 2D and 3D heteronuclearNMR experiments with uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled URNdesign. The assignments for the backbone NH, CO,Ca and Cb nuclei are 94%complete. Sidechain 1Hand13C, aromatic andQ/NNH2 resonances are essentially complete with guanidinium and K NH3 residues unassigned. BMRB deposit with accession number 6493

  6. Catalytic Roles of βLys87 in Tryptophan Synthase: 15N Solid State NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Caulkins, Bethany G.; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4′ for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-15N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. PMID:25688830

  7. Improvement of Orthography Test Performance by Relaxation Exercises: Results of a Controlled Field Experiment in Basic Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krampen, Gunter

    2010-01-01

    The effects of relaxation exercises on orthography performance in language arts education of fifth to seventh graders were experimentally tested. Participants were 399 basic secondary school students and their language arts teachers from the Hauptschule, a German type of secondary education covering grades five to nine that leads to a basic…

  8. Cytochrome-P450-Cytochrome-b5 Interaction in a Membrane Environment Changes 15N Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Ahuja, Shivani; Huang, Rui; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    It has been well realized that the dependence of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors on the amino acid sequence, secondary structure, dynamics and electrostatic interactions can be utilized in the structural and dynamic studies of proteins by NMR spectroscopy. In addition, CSA tensors could also be utilized to measure the structural interactions between proteins in a protein-protein complex. To this end, here we report the experimentally measured backbone amide-15N CSA tensors for a membrane-bound 16.7-kDa full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5), in complexation with a 55.8-kDa microsomal rabbit cytochrome P450 2B4 (cytP4502B4). The 15N-CSAs, determined using the 15N CSA/15N-1H dipolar coupling transverse cross-correlated rates, for free cytb5 are compared with that for the cytb5 bound to cytP4502B4. An overall increase in backbone amide-15N transverse cross-correlated rates for the cytb5 residues in the cytb5-cytP450 complex was observed as compared to the free cytb5 residues. Due to fast spin-spin relaxation (T2) and subsequent broadening of the signals in the complex, we were able to measure amide-15N CSAs only for 48 residues of cytb5 as compared to 84 residues of free cytb5. We observed a change in 15N CSA for most residues of cytb5 in the complex, when compared to free cytb5, suggesting a dynamic interaction between the oppositely charged surfaces of anionic cytb5 and cationic cytP450. The mean values of 15N CSA determined for residues in helical, sheet and turn regions of cytb5 in the complex are −184.5, −146.8, and −146.2 ppm, respectively, with an overall average value of −165.5 ppm (excluding the values from residues in more flexible termini). The measured CSA value for residues in helical conformation is slightly larger as compared to previously reported values. This may be attributed to the paramagnetic effect from Fe(III) of the heme in cytb5, which is similar to our previously reported values for the free cytb5. PMID:24107224

  9. A closer look at the nitrogen next door: 1H-15N NMR methods for glycosaminoglycan structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beni, Szabolcs; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, experimental conditions were presented for the detection of the N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) NHSO3- or sulfamate 1H and 15N NMR resonances of the pharmaceutically and biologically important glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin in aqueous solution. In the present work, we explore further the applicability of nitrogen-bound proton detection to provide structural information for GAGs. Compared to the detection of 15N chemical shifts of aminosugars through long-range couplings using the IMPACT-HNMBC pulse sequence, the more sensitive two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiments provided additional structural data. The IMPACT-HNMBC experiment remains a powerful tool as demonstrated by the spectrum measured for the unsubstituted amine of 3-O-sulfoglucosamine (GlcN(3S)), which cannot be observed with the 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiment due to the fast exchange of the amino group protons with solvent. The 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectrum reported for the mixture of model compounds GlcNS and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrate the broad utility of this approach. Measurements for the synthetic pentasaccharide drug Arixtra® (Fondaparinux sodium) in aqueous solution illustrate the power of this NMR pulse sequence for structural characterization of highly similar N-sulfoglucosamine residues in GAG-derived oligosaccharides.

  10. Whole body nitric oxide synthesis in healthy men determined from [15N] arginine-to-[15N]citrulline labeling.

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, L; Beaumier, L; Ajami, A M; Young, V R

    1996-01-01

    The rates of whole body nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, plasma arginine flux, and de novo arginine synthesis and their relationships to urea production, were examined in a total of seven healthy adults receiving an L-amino acid diet for 6 days. NO synthesis was estimated by the rate of conversion of the [15N] guanidino nitrogen of arginine to plasma [15N] ureido citrulline and compared with that based on urinary nitrite (NO2-)/nitrate (NO3-) excretion. Six subjects received on dietary day 7, a 24-hr (12-hr fed/12-hr fasted) primed, constant, intravenous infusion of L-[guanidino-15N2]arginine and [13C]urea. A similar investigation was repeated with three of these subjects, plus an additional subject, in which they received L-[ureido-13C]citrulline, to determine plasma citrulline fluxes. The estimated rates (mean +/- SD) of NO synthesis over a period of 24 hr averaged 0.96 +/- 0.1 mumol .kg-1.hr-1 and 0.95 +/- 0.1 mumol.kg-1.hr-1, for the [15N]citrulline and the nitrite/nitrate methods, respectively. About 15% of the plasma arginine turnover was associated with urea formation and 1.2% with NO formation. De novo arginine synthesis averaged 9.2 +/- 1.4 mumol. kg-1.hr-1, indicating that approximately 11% of the plasma arginine flux originates via conversion of plasma citrulline to arginine. Thus, the fraction of the plasma arginine flux associated with NO and also urea synthesis in healthy humans is small, although the plasma arginine compartment serves as a significant precursor pool (54%) for whole body NO formation. This tracer model should be useful for exploring these metabolic relationships in vivo, under specific pathophysiologic states where the L-arginine-NO pathway might be altered. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8876157

  11. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  12. The vibrational spectra of [ 15N 2]-succinonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengler, O. I.

    2001-07-01

    For the first time, the infrared and Raman spectra of [ 15N 2]-succinonitrile are presented and discussed in detail. Assignments of the vibrational bands of its two rotational conformers gauche and trans, respectively, have been made for both infrared and Raman spectra. The assignments were based on a recent ab-initio force field calculation for succinonitrile, taking into account the vibrational frequencies of other succinonitrile isotopomers. There are differences in the frequencies of the vibrational bands due to the mass increase in the cyanide groups, which have been analysed in depth.

  13. The vibrational spectra of [15N2]-succinonitrile.

    PubMed

    Fengler, O I

    2001-07-01

    For the first time, the infrared and Raman spectra of [15N2]-succinonitrile are presented and discussed in detail. Assignments of the vibrational bands of its two rotational conformers gauche and trans, respectively, have been made for both infrared and Raman spectra. The assignments were based on a recent ab-initio force field calculation for succinonitrile, taking into account the vibrational frequencies of other succinonitrile isotopomers. There are differences in the frequencies of the vibrational bands due to the mass increase in the cyanide groups, which have been analysed in depth. PMID:11471715

  14. 15N NMR chemical shifts in papaverine decomposition products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyrski, Andrzej; Girreser, Ulrich; Hermann, Tadeusz

    2013-03-01

    Papaverine can be easily oxidized to papaverinol, papaveraldine and 2,3,9,10-tetramethoxy-12-oxo-12H-indolo[2,1-a]isoquinolinium chloride. On addition of alkali solution the latter compound forms 2-(2-carboxy-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-6,7-dimethoxyisoquinolinium inner salt. Together with these structures the interesting 13-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3,8,9-tetramethoxy-6a-12a-diazadibenzo[a,g]fluorenylium chloride is discussed, which is formed in the Gadamer-Schulemann reaction of papaverine as a side product. This letter reports the 15N NMR spectra of the above mentioned compounds.

  15. Experimental plant for simultaneous production of (14)N and (15)N by (15)N/(14)N exchange in NO, NO(2)-HNO(3) system under pressure.

    PubMed

    Axente, Damian; Marcu, Cristina; Muresan, Ancuţa; Kaucsar, Martin; Misan, Ioan; Popeneciu, Gabriel; Gligan, Nicolae; Cristea, Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    An experimental study on (14)N and (15)N simultaneous separation using the chemical exchange in NO, NO(2)-HNO(3) system under pressure is presented. The influence of the pressure and of the interstage 10 M HNO(3) flow rate on the separation of (14)N and (15)N was measured on a packed column with product and waste refluxers. At steady state and 1.8 atm (absolute), the isotopic concentration at the bottom of the separation column was 0.563 at% (15)N, and in the top of the column was 0.159 at% (15)N. The height equivalent to a theoretical plate and interstage 10 M HNO(3) flow rate values, obtained in these experimental conditions, allows the separation of (14)N highly depleted of (15)N and of (15)N at 99 at% (15)N concentration. PMID:20582793

  16. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  17. Cerebral glutamine metabolism under hyperammonemia determined in vivo by localized 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cudalbu, Cristina; Lanz, Bernard; Duarte, João MN; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Pilloud, Yves; Mlynárik, Vladimir; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Brain glutamine synthetase (GS) is an integral part of the glutamate–glutamine cycle and occurs in the glial compartment. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allows noninvasive measurements of the concentrations and synthesis rates of metabolites. 15N MRS is an alternative approach to 13C MRS. Incorporation of labeled 15N from ammonia in cerebral glutamine allows to measure several metabolic reactions related to nitrogen metabolism, including the glutamate–glutamine cycle. To measure 15N incorporation into the position 5N of glutamine and position 2N of glutamate and glutamine, we developed a novel 15N pulse sequence to simultaneously detect, for the first time, [5-15N]Gln and [2-15N]Gln+Glu in vivo in the rat brain. In addition, we also measured for the first time in the same experiment localized 1H spectra for a direct measurement of the net glutamine accumulation. Mathematical modeling of 1H and 15N MRS data allowed to reduce the number of assumptions and provided reliable determination of GS (0.30±0.050 μmol/g per minute), apparent neurotransmission (0.26±0.030 μmol/g per minute), glutamate dehydrogenase (0.029±0.002 μmol/g per minute), and net glutamine accumulation (0.033±0.001 μmol/g per minute). These results showed an increase of GS and net glutamine accumulation under hyperammonemia, supporting the concept of their implication in cerebral ammonia detoxification. PMID:22167234

  18. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of the KSR1 CA1 domain

    PubMed Central

    Koveal, Dorothy; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the murine KSR1 CA1 domain have been determined based on triple-resonance experiments using uniformly [13C, 15N]-labeled protein. This assignment is the first step towards the determination of the three-dimensional structure of the unique KSR1 CA1 domain. PMID:20737253

  19. Fitting stress relaxation experiments with fractional Zener model to predict high frequency moduli of polymeric acoustic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinxin; Yan, Guqi; Benyahia, Lazhar; Sahraoui, Sohbi

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a time domain method to determine viscoelastic properties of open-cell foams on a wide frequency range. This method is based on the adjustment of the stress-time relationship, obtained from relaxation tests on polymeric foams' samples under static compression, with the four fractional derivatives Zener model. The experimental relaxation function, well described by the Mittag-Leffler function, allows for straightforward prediction of the frequency-dependence of complex modulus of polyurethane foams. To show the feasibility of this approach, complex shear moduli of the same foams were measured in the frequency range between 0.1 and 16 Hz and at different temperatures between -20 °C and 20 °C. A curve was reconstructed on the reduced frequency range (0.1 Hz-1 MHz) using the time-temperature superposition principle. Very good agreement was obtained between experimental complex moduli values and the fractional Zener model predictions. The proposed time domain method may constitute an improved alternative to resonant and non-resonant techniques often used for dynamic characterization of polymers for the determination of viscoelastic moduli on a broad frequency range.

  20. Compound-specific 15N stable isotope probing of N assimilation by the soil microbial biomass: a new methodological paradigm in soil N cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, A. F.; Knowles, T. D. J.; Michaelides, K.; Evershed, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    A compound-specific nitrogen-15 stable isotope probing (15N-SIP) technique is described which allows investigation of the fate of inorganic- or organic-N amendments to soils. The technique uses gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to determine the δ15N values of individual amino acids (AAs; determined as N-acetyl, O-isopropyl derivatives) as proxies of biomass protein production. The δ15N values are used together with AA concentrations to quantify N assimilation of 15N-labelled substrates by the soil microbial biomass. The utility of the approach is demonstrated through incubation experiments using inorganic 15N-labelled substrates ammonium (15NH4+) and nitrate (15NO3-) and an organic 15N-labelled substrate, glutamic acid (15N-Glu). Assimilation of all the applied substrates was undetectable based on bulk soil properties, i.e. % total N (% TN), bulk soil N isotope composition and AA concentrations, all of which remained relatively constant throughout the incubation experiments. In contrast, compound-specific AA δ15N values were highly sensitive to N assimilation, providing qualitative and quantitative insights into the cycling and fate of the applied 15N-labelled substrates. The utility of this 15N-AA-SIP technique is considered in relation to other currently available methods for investigating the microbially-mediated assimilation of nitrogenous substrates into the soil organic N pool. This approach will be generally applicable to the study of N cycling in any soil, or indeed, in any complex ecosystem.

  1. 1H NMR relaxation in urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Bacher, Alfred D.; Dybowski, C.

    2007-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times T1 were measured for urea as a function of temperature. An activation energy of 46.3 ± 4.7 kJ/mol was extracted and compared with the range of 38-65 kJ/mol previously reported in the literature as measured by different magnetic resonance techniques. In addition, proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame T1 ρ were measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide acquisition conditions for the 13C and 15N CP/MAS spectra of pure urea in the crystalline phase.

  2. XUV excitation followed by ultrafast non-adiabatic relaxation in PAH molecules as a femto-astrochemistry experiment

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, A.; Despré, V.; Barillot, T.; Rouzée, A.; Galbraith, M.C.E.; Klei, J.; Yang, C.-H.; Smeenk, C.T.L.; Loriot, V.; Reddy, S. Nagaprasad; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Mahapatra, S.; Kuleff, A. I.; Vrakking, M.J.J.; Lépine, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highly excited molecular species are at play in the chemistry of interstellar media and are involved in the creation of radiation damage in a biological tissue. Recently developed ultrashort extreme ultraviolet light sources offer the high excitation energies and ultrafast time-resolution required for probing the dynamics of highly excited molecular states on femtosecond (fs) (1 fs=10−15s) and even attosecond (as) (1 as=10−18 s) timescales. Here we show that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) undergo ultrafast relaxation on a few tens of femtoseconds timescales, involving an interplay between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. Our work reveals a general property of excited radical PAHs that can help to elucidate the assignment of diffuse interstellar absorption bands in astrochemistry, and provides a benchmark for the manner in which coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics determines reaction pathways in large molecules following extreme ultraviolet excitation. PMID:26268456

  3. Simultaneous cross polarization to 13C and 15N with 1H detection at 60 kHz MAS solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe high resolution MAS solid-state NMR experiments that utilize 1H detection with 60 kHz magic angle spinning; simultaneous cross-polarization from 1H to 15N and 13C nuclei; bidirectional cross-polarization between 13C and 15N nuclei; detection of both amide nitrogen and aliphatic carbon 1H; and measurement of both 13C and 15N chemical shifts through multi-dimensional correlation experiments. Three-dimensional experiments correlate amide 1H and alpha 1H selectively with 13C or 15N nuclei in a polypeptide chain. Two separate three-dimensional spectra correlating 1Hα/13Cα/1HN and 1HN/15N/1Hα are recorded simultaneously in a single experiment, demonstrating that a twofold savings in experimental time is potentially achievable. Spectral editing using bidirectional coherence transfer pathways enables simultaneous magnetization transfers between 15N, 13Cα(i) and 13C‧(i-1), facilitating intra- and inter-residue correlations for sequential resonance assignment. Non-uniform sampling is integrated into the experiments, further reducing the length of experimental time.

  4. Organic vs. Conventional Grassland Management: Do 15N and 13C Isotopic Signatures of Hay and Soil Samples Differ?

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Valentin H.; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ15N and δ13C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ15N15N plant - δ15N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ13C in hay and δ15N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ13C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ15N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ13C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently used in practice

  5. Preparation of 13C and 15N labelled RNAs for heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Nikonowicz, E P; Sirr, A; Legault, P; Jucker, F M; Baer, L M; Pardi, A

    1992-09-11

    A procedure is described for the efficient preparation of isotopically enriched RNAs of defined sequence. Uniformly labelled nucleotide 5'triphosphates (NTPs) were prepared from E.coli grown on 13C and/or 15N isotopically enriched media. These procedures routinely yield 180 mumoles of labelled NTPs per gram of 13C enriched glucose. The labelled NTPs were then used to synthesize RNA oligomers by in vitro transcription. Several 13C and/or 15N labelled RNAs have been synthesized for the sequence r(GGCGCUUGCGUC). Under conditions of high salt or low salt, this RNA forms either a symmetrical duplex with two U.U base pairs or a hairpin containing a CUUG loop respectively. These procedures were used to synthesize uniformly labelled RNAs and a RNA labelled only on the G and C residues. The ability to generate milligram quantities of isotopically labelled RNAs allows application of multi-dimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance experiments that enormously simplify the resonance assignment and solution structure determination of RNAs. Examples of several such heteronuclear NMR experiments are shown. PMID:1383927

  6. Automated Protein Turnover Calculations from 15N Partial Metabolic Labeling LC/MS Shotgun Proteomics Data

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, David; Castillejo, Maria Angeles; Staudinger, Christiana; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Egelhofer, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Protein turnover is a well-controlled process in which polypeptides are constantly being degraded and subsequently replaced with newly synthesized copies. Extraction of composite spectral envelopes from complex LC/MS shotgun proteomics data can be a challenging task, due to the inherent complexity of biological samples. With partial metabolic labeling experiments this complexity increases as a result of the emergence of additional isotopic peaks. Automated spectral extraction and subsequent protein turnover calculations enable the analysis of gigabytes of data within minutes, a prerequisite for systems biology high throughput studies. Here we present a fully automated method for protein turnover calculations from shotgun proteomics data. The approach enables the analysis of complex shotgun LC/MS 15N partial metabolic labeling experiments. Spectral envelopes of 1419 peptides can be extracted within an hour. The method quantifies turnover by calculating the Relative Isotope Abundance (RIA), which is defined as the ratio between the intensity sum of all heavy (15N) to the intensity sum of all light (14N) and heavy peaks. To facilitate this process, we have developed a computer program based on our method, which is freely available to download at http://promex.pph.univie.ac.at/protover. PMID:24736476

  7. Mechanism of Solid-State Thermolysis of Ammonia Boraine: 15N NMR Study Using Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Gupta, Shalabh; Caporini, Marc A; Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Pruski, Marek

    2014-08-28

    The solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) was explored using state-of-the-art 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including 2D indirectly detected 1H{15N} heteronuclear correlation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 15N{1H} cross-polarization experiments as well as 11B NMR. The complementary use of 15N and 11B NMR experiments, supported by density functional theory calculations of the chemical shift tensors, provided insights into the dehydrogenation mechanism of AB—insights that have not been available by 11B NMR alone. Specifically, highly branched polyaminoborane derivatives were shown to form from AB via oligomerization in the “head-to-tail” manner, which then transform directly into hexagonal boron nitride analog through the dehydrocyclization reaction, bypassing the formation of polyiminoborane.

  8. NMR profiling of biomolecules at natural abundance using 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C multiplicity-separated (MS) HSQC spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Freedberg, Darón I.; Keire, David A.

    2015-02-01

    2D NMR 1H-X (X = 15N or 13C) HSQC spectra contain cross-peaks for all XHn moieties. Multiplicity-edited1H-13C HSQC pulse sequences generate opposite signs between peaks of CH2 and CH/CH3 at a cost of lower signal-to-noise due to the 13C T2 relaxation during an additional 1/1JCH period. Such CHn-editing experiments are useful in assignment of chemical shifts and have been successfully applied to small molecules and small proteins (e.g. ubiquitin) dissolved in deuterated solvents where, generally, peak overlap is minimal. By contrast, for larger biomolecules, peak overlap in 2D HSQC spectra is unavoidable and peaks with opposite phases cancel each other out in the edited spectra. However, there is an increasing need for using NMR to profile biomolecules at natural abundance dissolved in water (e.g., protein therapeutics) where NMR experiments beyond 2D are impractical. Therefore, the existing 2D multiplicity-edited HSQC methods must be improved to acquire data on nuclei other than 13C (i.e.15N), to resolve more peaks, to reduce T2 losses and to accommodate water suppression approaches. To meet these needs, a multiplicity-separated1H-X HSQC (MS-HSQC) experiment was developed and tested on 500 and 700 MHz NMR spectrometers equipped with room temperature probes using RNase A (14 kDa) and retroviral capsid (26 kDa) proteins dissolved in 95% H2O/5% D2O. In this pulse sequence, the 1/1JXH editing-period is incorporated into the semi-constant time (semi-CT) X resonance chemical shift evolution period, which increases sensitivity, and importantly, the sum and the difference of the interleaved 1JXH-active and the 1JXH-inactive HSQC experiments yield two separate spectra for XH2 and XH/XH3. Furthermore we demonstrate improved water suppression using triple xyz-gradients instead of the more widely used z-gradient only water-suppression approach.

  9. Relaxation mechanisms affecting magneto-optical resonances in an extremely thin cell: Experiment and theory for the cesium D1 line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzinsh, M.; Berzins, A.; Ferber, R.; Gahbauer, F.; Kalnins, U.; Kalvans, L.; Rundans, R.; Sarkisyan, D.

    2015-02-01

    We have measured magneto-optical signals obtained by exciting the D1 line of cesium atoms confined to an extremely thin cell (ETC), whose walls are separated by less than 1 μ m , and developed an improved theoretical model to describe these signals with experimental precision. The theoretical model was based on the optical Bloch equations and included all neighboring hyperfine transitions, the mixing of the magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, and the Doppler effect, as in previous studies. However, in order to model the extreme conditions in the ETC more realistically, the model was extended to include a unified treatment of transit relaxation and wall collisions with relaxation rates that were obtained directly from the thermal velocities of the atoms and the length scales involved. Furthermore, the interactions of the atoms with different regions of the laser beam were modeled separately to account for the varying laser beam intensity over the beam profile as well as saturation effects that become important near the center of the beam at the relatively high laser intensities used during the experiments in order to obtain measurable signals. The model described the experimentally measured signals for laser intensities for magnetic fields up to 55 G and laser intensities up to 1 W/cm2 with excellent agreement.

  10. 15N2 formation and fast oxygen isotope exchange during pulsed 15N18O exposure of MnOx/CeO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-12-23

    Pulsing 15N18O onto an annealed 1% Mn16Ox/Ce16O2 catalyst resulted in very fast oxygen isotope exchange and 15N2 formation at 295 K. In the 1st 15N18O pulse, due to the presence of large number of surface oxygen defects, extensive 15N218O and 15N2 formations were observed. In subsequent pulses oxygen isotope exchange dominated as a result of highly labile oxygen in the oxide. We gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Vehicle Technologies Program for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  11. Uptake of stormwater nitrogen in bioretention systems demonstrated from 15N tracer techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdeshel, D.; Hultine, K. R.; Pomeroy, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    before the isotopic label was introduced and weekly thereafter. In May 2012, the upland garden captured 6.2 grams of TN from the added stormwater (55% of TN added), and the wetland garden captured 7.1 grams of TN from the added stormwater (67% of TN added). Within two weeks of adding the label, the 15N ratio increased 500‰ to 3,000‰ in all plant tissues tested in both systems. The results of the isotopic labeling experiment support the hypothesis that the plants used in both vegetated bioretention systems directly contribute to stormwater N treatment through N assimilation.

  12. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  13. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  14. Studies with 15N-labeled ammonia and urea in the malnourished child

    PubMed Central

    Read, W. W. C.; McLaren, D. S.; Tchalian, Marie; Nassar, Siham

    1969-01-01

    Investigations using ammonium citrate-15N and urea-15N showed that children in the acute stage of kwashiorkor and marasmus receiving a diet of adequate protein content retained a considerable percentage of the label from both compounds. Excretion of both total 15N and urea-15N was subnormal and elimination was virtually completed 36 hr after administration of the isotope. During recovery from kwashiorkor total 15N excretion had approached normal a month after commencement of rehabilitation. Urea-15N excretion was still slightly subnormal after 3 months. In marasmus urea-15N formed a normal proportion of total 15N excretion after 1 month, although total 15N excretion then was still low. Ammonia nitrogen was retained to a greater extent than urea nitrogen in all cases. As it is known that a considerable amount of urea is degraded to ammonia in the gastrointestinal tract, it seems probable that urea nitrogen became available for use after this degradation. Examination of blood from one marasmic child after feeding ammonia-15N and from another after intravenous injection of urea-15N showed incorporation of the label into blood cells and plasma proteins. This did not occur in well nourished controls. It is concluded that ammonia and urea as sources of nonessential nitrogen may play an important part in protein metabolism in the malnourished child. PMID:5771193

  15. Simulation of DNA Supercoil Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ivenso, Ikenna D; Lillian, Todd D

    2016-05-24

    Several recent single-molecule experiments observe the response of supercoiled DNA to nicking endonucleases and topoisomerases. Typically in these experiments, indirect measurements of supercoil relaxation are obtained by observing the motion of a large micron-sized bead. The bead, which also serves to manipulate DNA, experiences significant drag and thereby obscures supercoil dynamics. Here we employ our discrete wormlike chain model to bypass experimental limitations and simulate the dynamic response of supercoiled DNA to a single strand nick. From our simulations, we make three major observations. First, extension is a poor dynamic measure of supercoil relaxation; in fact, the linking number relaxes so fast that it cannot have much impact on extension. Second, the rate of linking number relaxation depends upon its initial partitioning into twist and writhe as determined by tension. Third, the extensional response strongly depends upon the initial position of plectonemes. PMID:27224483

  16. Stereospecific assignments of glycine in proteins by stereospecific deuteration and {sup 15}N labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Curley, R.W. Jr.; Panigot, M.J.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Stereospecific assignments are important for accurately determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins through the use of multidimensional NMR techniques. It is especially important to stereospecifically assign the glycine {alpha}-protons in proteins because of the potential for different backbone conformations of this residue. These stereospecific assignments are critical for interpreting the {sup 3}J{sub NH,{alpha}H} coupling constants and NOEs involving the glycine {alpha}-protons that determine the conformation of this part of the protein. However, it is often difficult to unambiguously obtain the stereospecific assignments for glycine residues by using only NOE data. In this poster, we present a method for unambiguous, stereospecific assignment of the {alpha}-protons of glycine residues. This method involves synthesis of stereo-specifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gly using a slightly modified procedure originally described by Woodard and coworkers for the stereoselective deuteration of glycine. The stereospecifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gy has been incorporated into recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial systems (FKBP) and mammalian cells (u-PA). Two- and three-dimensional isotope-filtered and isotope-edited NMR experiments were used to obtain the stereospecific assignments of the glycine {alpha}-protons for these proteins.

  17. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve

    PubMed Central

    van Gils, Jan A.; Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus), consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis). Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from ‘normal’ bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment. PMID:26458005

  18. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve.

    PubMed

    van Gils, Jan A; Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus), consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis). Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from 'normal' bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment. PMID:26458005

  19. ESR lineshape and 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals - Joint analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.; Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpała, A.; Oglodek, I.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16 containing 15N and 14N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to 1H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz-20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the 1H relaxation of the solvent. The 1H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  20. Increasing plant use of organic nitrogen with elevation is reflected in nitrogen uptake rates and ecosystem delta15N.

    PubMed

    Averill, Colin; Finzi, Adrien

    2011-04-01

    It is hypothesized that decreasing mean annual temperature and rates of nitrogen (N) cycling causes plants to switch from inorganic to organic forms of N as the primary mode of N nutrition. To test this hypothesis, we conducted field experiments and collected natural-abundance delta15N signatures of foliage, soils, and ectomycorrhizal sporocarps along a steep elevation-climate gradient in the White Mountains, New Hampshire, USA. Here we show that with increasing elevation organic forms of N became the dominant source of N taken up by hardwood and coniferous tree species based on dual-labeled glycine uptake analysis, an important confirmation of an emerging theory for the biogeochemistry of the N cycle. Variation in natural abundance foliar delta15N with elevation was also consistent with increasing organic N uptake, though a simple, mass balance model demonstrated that the uptake of delta15N depleted inorganic N, rather than fractionation upon transfer of N from mycorrhizal fungi, best explains variations in foliar delta15N with elevation. PMID:21661551

  1. Contrasting food web linkages for the grazing pathway in 3 temperate forested streams using {sup 15}N as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Tank, J.L.; Mulholland, P.J.; Meyer, J.L.; Bowden, W.B.; Webster, J.R.; Peterson, B.J.

    1998-11-01

    Nitrogen is a critical element controlling the productivity and dynamics of stream ecosystems and many streams are limited by the supply of biologically available nitrogen. The authors are learning more about the fate of inorganic nitrogen entering streams through {sup 15}N tracer additions. The Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiment (LINX) is studying the uptake, cycling, and fate of {sup 15}N-NH{sub 4} in the stream food web of 10 streams draining different biomes. Using the {sup 15}N tracer method and data from 3 sites in the study, the authors can differentiate patterns in the cycling of nitrogen through the grazing pathway (N from the epilithon to grazing macroinvertebrates) for 3 temperate forested streams. Here, they quantify the relationship between the dominant grazer and its proposed food resource, the epilithon, by comparing {sup 15}N levels of grazers with those of the epilithon, as well as the biomass, nitrogen content, and chlorophyll a standing stocks of the epilithon in 3 streams.

  2. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  3. Challenges to the Application of δ15N measurements of the organic fraction of archaeological and fossil mollusk shells to assess paleoenvironmental change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen isotope analysis of the organic fraction of mollusk shells is beginning to be applied to questions of past anthropogenic and natural environmental variation using samples from archaeological and fossil deposits. Fairly extensive proxy validation research has been conducted in the past decade, documenting the relationship between the δ15N of ambient particulate organic matter, mollusk soft tissues, and shell organic matrix. However, comparatively little research has addressed the potential effects of taphonomy and diagenesis on these proxy records. Assessing archaeological samples are especially complex in that humans may have transported and/or cooked shell prior to deposition. Shell δ15N data will be presented from modern and archaeological oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and clam shell (Mercenaria spp.) of various late Holocene ages and late Cretaceous Crassatellites vadosus shells. Archaeological shells show some loss of organic matter over time, yet some Cretaceous shells retain enough matrix to permit δ15N analysis. The Cretaceous samples required concentration of the remaining organic matrix by removing carbonate via acid pretreatment prior to EA-IRMS analysis, but modern and archaeological shells had sufficient organic matrix to permit analysis without acid pretreatment. The δ15N data from the archaeological shells do not display obvious alteration from the loss of organic matrix. The results of cooking experiments performed on modern oyster shells also indicate little alteration of δ15N values, unless the shell was heated to the point of disintegration. While these experiments indicate promise for the application of δ15N analysis of shell organic matter, the results are incomplete and lack ideal control over initial δ15N values in ancient samples used for comparisons. Future research, perhaps focused on compound-specific δ15N analysis and additional controlled experiments on moderns shells, may improve this assessment.

  4. Isolation and measurement of /sup 15/N/sub 2/ from respiratory gases of animals administered /sup 15/N-labeled substances

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.L.; Reed, D.J.; Dost, F.N.

    1981-07-01

    A method is described for collection of metabolic /sup 15/N/sub 2/ from in vitro preparations or intact rats administered /sup 15/N-containing compounds. The method enables routine collection and mass spectrometric measurement of as little as 10 ..mu..mol /sup 15/N/sub 2/ respired by a rat over a 24-h period. A device is described that includes either an animal chamber or a tissue reaction vessel in a closed recycling atmosphere, with automatic O/sub 2/ replenishment and removal of CO/sub 2/ and water. It is capable of sustaining moderate vacuum and is coupled to a high-vacuum manifold designed to process the contained atmosphere and respiratory gases. The starting atmosphere is an 80:20 mix of sulfur hexafluoride and O/sub 2/. Recovery of /sup 15/N/sub 2/ gas from the system without an animal present was 101.3 +/- 5.75%. When /sup 15/N/sub 2/ gas was very slowly infused iv into an animal, recovery was 89.1 +/- 5.38%. Use of the method in studies of the fate of (/sup 15/N)hydrazine in rats indicated that about 15% of the administered hydrazine is rapidly converted to /sup 15/N/sub 2/, followed by slower conversion of an additional 7-10% over the next several hours.

  5. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by 13C CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion.

    PubMed

    Hass, Mathias A S; Yilmaz, Ali; Christensen, Hans E M; Led, Jens J

    2009-08-01

    The use of 13C NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically 13C labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for 13C(epsilon1) nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from 15N backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, 13C(epsilon1) dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the 13C(epsilon1) dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains are discussed. PMID:19533375

  6. Anisotropic collective motion contributes to nuclear spin relaxation in crystalline proteins.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Józef R; Sein, Julien; Blackledge, Martin; Emsley, Lyndon

    2010-02-01

    A model for calculating the influence of anisotropic collective motions on NMR relaxation rates in crystalline proteins is presented. We show that small-amplitude (<10 degrees ) fluctuations may lead to substantial contributions to the (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rates and propose that the effect of domain motions should be included in solid-state NMR analyses of protein dynamics. PMID:19916496

  7. Contribution of proteolysis and de novo synthesis to alanine production in diabetic rat skeletal muscle: a 15N/1H nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Meynial-Denis, D; Chavaroux, A; Foucat, L; Mignon, M; Prugnaud, J; Bayle, G; Renou, J P; Arnal, M

    1997-10-01

    To assess the role of leucine as a precursor of alanine alpha-amino nitrogen in skeletal muscle during diabetes, extensor digitorum longus muscles from control (n = 7 experiments) and streptozotocin-diabetic rats (n = 8 experiments) were isolated and superfused with [15N]leucine (3 mmol/l) in the presence of glucose (10 mmol/l) for 2 h. Muscle perchloric acid extraction was performed at the end of superfusion in order to quantify newly synthesized alanine by 15N/1H nuclear magnetic resonance. Release of [15N]alanine in the superfusion medium was also measured. The pool of newly synthesized [15N]alanine was significantly increased (approximately 40%) in extensor digitorum longus muscles from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Whereas a significant enhancement of total alanine release from muscle was induced by diabetes (20%), only a slight increase in [15N]alanine release was detectable under our experimental conditions. Consequently, we conclude that streptozotocin-diabetes in growing rats induces in skeletal muscle: 1) an increase in nitrogen exchange between leucine and alanine leading to newly synthesized [15N]alanine; and 2) an increase of total alanine release from muscle originating from both proteolysis and de novo synthesis. PMID:9349596

  8. Diagnosing GCM errors over West Africa using relaxation experiments. Part II: intraseasonal variability and African easterly waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Benjamin; Douville, Hervé

    2011-10-01

    A near-global grid-point nudging of the Arpege-Climat atmospheric General Circulation Model towards ECMWF reanalyses is used to diagnose the regional versus remote origin of the summer model biases and variability over West Africa. First part of this study revealed a limited impact on the monsoon climatology compared to a control experiment without nudging, but a significant improvement of interannual variability, although the amplitude of the seasonal anomalies remained underestimated. Focus is given here on intraseasonal variability of monsoon rainfall and dynamics. The reproducible part of these signals is investigated through 30-member ensemble experiments computed for the 1994 rainy season, a year abnormally wet over the Sahel but representative of the model systematic biases. In the control experiment, Arpege-Climat simulates too few rainy days that are associated with too low rainfall amounts over the central and western Sahel, in line with the seasonal dry biases. Nudging the model outside Africa tends to slightly increase the number of rainy days over the Sahel, but has little effect on associated rainfall amounts. However, results do indicate that a significant part of the monsoon intraseasonal variability simulated by Arpege-Climat is controlled by lateral boundary conditions. Parts of the wet/dry spells over the Sahel occur in phase in the 30 members of the nudging experiment, and are therefore embedded in larger-scale variability patterns. Inter-member spread is however not constant across the selected summer season. It is partly controlled by African Easterly Waves, which show dissimilar amplitude from one member to another, but a coherent phasing in all members. A lowpass filtering of the nudging fields suggests that low frequency variations in the lateral boundary conditions can lead to eastward extensions of the African Easterly Jet, creating a favorable environment for easterly waves, while high frequency perturbations seem to control their

  9. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  10. Carbonyl carbon transverse relaxation dispersion measurements and ms-micros timescale motion in a protein hydrogen bond network.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Rieko; Baber, James; Louis, John M; Torchia, Dennis A

    2004-06-01

    A constant-time, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) transverse relaxation, R(2), dispersion experiment for carbonyl carbons was designed and executed to detect micros-ms time-scale dynamics of protein backbone carbonyl sites. Because of the large (ca. 55 Hz) C(alpha)-C' J-coupling, the carbonyl signal intensity is strongly modulated as the spacing between CPMG pulses is varied, in uniformly (13)C enriched proteins, unless care is taken to minimize the perturbation of the C(alpha) magnetization by the CPMG pulses. CPMG pulse trains consisting of either a band-selective pulse, such as RE-BURP, or rectangular (with an excitation null in the C(alpha) region of the spectrum) pulses were employed in order to minimize C' signal modulation by C(alpha)-C' J-coupling. The performance of these types of CPMG refocusing pulses was assessed by computer simulation, and by comparing dispersion profiles measured for (1) uniformly [(13)C,(15)N, (2)H] ((2)H at non-labile hydrogen sites) labeled, and (2) uniformly (15)N/selectively-(13)C' labeled samples of HIV-1 protease bound to a potent inhibitor, DMP323. In addition, because the uniformly (13)C/(15)N/(2)H labeled sample was well suited to measure (15)N and (1)H R(2) dispersion as well as (13)C' dispersion, conformational exchange in the inter subunit beta-sheet hydrogen-bond network of the inhibitor-bound protease was elucidated using relaxation dispersion data of all three types of nuclei. PMID:15014232

  11. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  12. Soil processes drive seasonal variation in retention of 15N tracers in a deciduous forest catchment.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Christine L; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Weiss, Marissa S; McCalley, K; Sparks, Jed P; Thomas, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal patterns of stream nitrate concentration have long been interpreted as demonstrating the central role of plant uptake in regulating stream nitrogen loss from forested catchments. Soil processes are rarely considered as important drivers of these patterns. We examined seasonal variation in N retention in a deciduous forest using three whole-ecosystem 15N tracer additions: in late April (post-snowmelt, pre-leaf-out), late July (mid-growing- season), and late October (end of leaf-fall). We expected that plant 15N uptake would peak in late spring and midsummer, that immobilization in surface litter and soil would peak the following autumn leaf-fall, and that leaching losses would vary inversely with 15N retention. Similar to most other 15N tracer studies, we found that litter and soils dominated ecosystem retention of added 15N. However, 15N recovery in detrital pools varied tremendously by season, with > 90% retention in spring and autumn and sharply reduced 15N retention in late summer. During spring, over half of the 15N retained in soil occurred within one day in the heavy (mineral-associated) soil fraction. During summer, a large decrease in 15N retention one week after addition coincided with increased losses of 15NO3- to soil leachate and seasonal increases in soil and stream NO3- concentrations, although leaching accounted for only a small fraction of the lost 15N (< 0.2%). Uptake of 15N into roots did not vary by season and accounted for < 4% of each tracer addition. Denitrification or other processes that lead to N gas loss may have consumed the rest. These measurements of 15N movement provide strong evidence for the dominant role of soil processes in regulating seasonal N retention and losses in this catchment and perhaps others with similar soils. PMID:26649387

  13. Binding of thiocyanate to lactoperoxidase: 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, S.; Behere, D.V.; Mitra, S. )

    1989-05-30

    The binding of thiocyanate to lactoperoxidase (LPO) has been investigated by 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy. 1H NMR of LPO shows that the major broad heme methyl proton resonance at about 61 ppm is shifted upfield by addition of the thiocyanate, indicating binding of the thiocyanate to the enzyme. The pH dependence of line width of 15N resonance of SC15N- in the presence of the enzyme has revealed that the binding of the thiocyanate to the enzyme is facilitated by protonation of an ionizable group (with pKa of 6.4), which is presumably distal histidine. Dissociation constants (KD) of SC15N-/LPO, SC15N-/LPO/I-, and SC15N-/LPO/CN- equilibria have been determined by 15N T1 measurements and found to be 90 +/- 5, 173 +/- 20, and 83 +/- 6 mM, respectively. On the basis of these values of KD, it is suggested that the iodide ion inhibits the binding of the thiocyanate but cyanide ion does not. The thiocyanate is shown to bind at the same site of LPO as iodide does, but the binding is considerably weaker and is away from the ferric ion. The distance of 15N of the bound thiocyanate ion from the iron is determined to be 7.2 +/- 0.2 A from the 15N T1 measurements.

  14. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27059012

  15. Free volume from positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature experiments in relation to structural relaxation of van der Waals molecular glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Dlubek, G; Shaikh, M Q; Rätzke, K; Paluch, M; Faupel, F

    2010-06-16

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is employed to characterize the temperature dependence of the free volume in two van der Waals liquids: 1, 1'-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexane (BMPC) and 1, 1'-di(4-methoxy-5-methylphenyl)cyclohexane (BMMPC). From the PALS spectra analysed with the routine LifeTime9.0, the size (volume) distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer size holes), its mean, [v(h)], and mean dispersion, σ(h), were calculated. A comparison with the macroscopic volume from pressure-volume-temperature (PV T) experiments delivered the hole density and the specific hole free volume and a complete characterization of the free volume microstructure in that sense. These data are used in correlation with structural (α) relaxation data from broad-band dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) in terms of the Cohen-Grest and Cohen-Turnbull free volume models. An extension of the latter model allows us to quantify deviations between experiments and theory and an attempt to systematize these in terms of T(g) or of the fragility. The experimental data for several fragile and less fragile glass formers are involved in the final discussion. It was concluded that, for large differences in the fragility of different glass formers, the positron lifetime mirrors clearly the different character of these materials. For small differences in the fragility, additional properties like the character of bonds and chemical structure of the material may affect size, distribution and thermal behaviour of the free volume. PMID:21393763

  16. Stress Relaxation of Magnetorheological Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. H.; Chen, G.; Yeo, S. H.; Du, H.

    In this paper, the experimental and modeling study and analysis of the stress relaxation characteristics of magnetorheological (MR) fluids under step shear are presented. The experiments are carried out using a rheometer with parallel-plate geometry. The applied strain varies from 0.01% to 100%, covering both the pre-yield and post-yield regimes. The effects of step strain, field strength, and temperature on the stress modulus are addressed. For small step strain ranges, the stress relaxation modulus G(t,γ) is independent of step strain, where MR fluids behave as linear viscoelastic solids. For large step strain ranges, the stress relaxation modulus decreases gradually with increasing step strain. Morever, the stress relaxation modulus G(t,γ) was found to obey time-strain factorability. That is, G(t,γ) can be represented as the product of a linear stress relaxation G(t) and a strain-dependent damping function h(γ). The linear stress relaxation modulus is represented as a three-parameter solid viscoelastic model, and the damping function h(γ) has a sigmoidal form with two parameters. The comparison between the experimental results and the model-predicted values indicates that this model can accurately describe the relaxation behavior of MR fluids under step strains.

  17. Individual protein balance strongly influences δ15N and δ13C values in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert; Abel, Hansjörg; Becker, Klaus

    Although stable isotope ratios in animals have often been used as indicators of the trophic level and for the back-calculation of diets, few experiments have been done under standardized laboratory conditions to investigate factors influencing δ15N and δ13C values. An experiment using Nile tilapia [Oreochromis niloticus (L.)] was therefore carried out to test the effect of different dietary protein contents (35.4, 42.3, and 50.9%) on δ15N and δ13C values of the whole tilapia. The fish were fed the isoenergetic and isolipidic semi-synthetic diets at a relatively low level. δ15N and δ13C values of the lipid-free body did not differ between the fish fed the diets with different protein contents, but the trophic shift for N and C isotopes decreased with increasing protein accretion in the individual fish, for N from 6.5‰ to 4‰ and for C in the lipid-free body from 4‰ to 2.5‰. This is the first study showing the strong influence of the individual protein balance to the degree to which the isotopic signature of dietary protein was modified in tissue protein of fish. The extrapolation of the trophic level or the reconstruction of the diet of an animal from stable isotope ratios without knowledge of the individual physiological condition and the feeding rate may lead to erroneous results.

  18. Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15N, 13C, and 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Hoatson, G. L.; Holloway, B. C.; Vold, R. L.; Reilly, A. C.

    2003-11-01

    The nitrogen bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is examined with 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests revealed an elastic recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. The NMR results show that nitrogen bonding in this material is consistent with sp2 hybridized nitrogen incorporated in an aromatic carbon environment. The data also indicate that the a-CNx prepared for this study has very low hydrogen content and is hydrophilic. Specifically, analysis of 15N and 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning and 1H NMR experiments suggests that water preferentially protonates nitrogen sites.

  19. Gaps, masses, polarization and relaxation near ν=1/2, 1/4: calculations and interpretation of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, R.

    2000-03-01

    Recent experiments have determined the magnetic fields B^c at which gapped quantum Hall states jump from one quantized value of polarization P to another[1- 3] and for gapless states, the B^c's for saturation of P, [3], and the temperature dependence of P [4-5], and 1/T_1[4]. New questions arise: why is m_p, the polarization mass, so different from and m_a, the activation mass? At T>0, which should be used? Are CF's free ? I answer them using the hamiltonian theory of Composite Fermions (CF) [6-7], focusing ν=p/(2ps+ 1). This theory encodes in a hamiltonian ( of unusual form) the binding of electrons to vortices to form CF [8-9]. I compute ma near ν=1/2 and 1/4, using Zhang-Das Sarma's v(q)=2 π e^2 e^-qΛ/q (where Λ measures sample thickness), and B^c for transition from one quantized value of P to the next. I find, as Park and Jain [10] did, that the energy differences can be fit to a free fermions of mass mp though the underlying theory is interacting. I show how rotational invariance and d=2 are behind this. This tells us not to attempt to fit all data to free-field form. I compare my Hartree-Fock B^c (at T = 0); and P and 1/T1 at T>0, to experiments, taking L as a free parameter for each sample, fitting the theory to one data point. This single parameter is able to subsume the effects of interaction, disorder, and LL mixing. 1. R.R. Du, A.S. Yeh, H.L. Stormer, D.C. Tsui, L.N. Pfeifer and K.W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett., 75, 3926, (1995). 2. A.S. Yeh, H.L. Stormer, D.C. Tsui, L.N. Pfeifer, K.W. Baldwin and K.W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 592, (1998.) 3. I.V. Kukushkin, K.V. Klitzing and K. Eberl, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3 665, (1999.) 4. A.E. Dementyev, N.N. Kuzma, P. Khandelwal, S.E. Barrett, L.N. Pfeifer, and K. W. West, cond-mat/9907280. 5. S.Melinte, N. Freytag, M. Horvatic, C. Berthier, L.P. Levy, V. Bayot and M. Shayegan, cond-mat/9908098. 6. R. Shankar and G. Murthy, Phys.Rev. Lett. 79, 4437,(1997). G. Murthy and R. Shankar, in ``Composite Fermions", Editor

  20. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  1. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  2. Sources and transformations of N in reclaimed coastal tidelands: evidence from soil δ15N data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jin-Hyeob; Choi, Woo-Jung; Lim, Sang-Sun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Lee, Sang-Mo; Chang, Scott X.; Jung, Jae-Woon; Yoon, Kwang-Sik; Choi, Soo-Myung

    2008-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of saturated soil extracts (ECe) in three reclaimed tideland (RTL) soils on the west coast of Korea decreased with time since reclamation, indicating natural desalinization through leaching of salts by precipitation water. Soil N concentration increased with decreasing ECe. With the increase in soil N concentration, the δ15N decreased, likely caused by the input of 15N-depleted N sources. As N2-fixing plant species were found in the oldest RTL, atmospheric N2 fixation likely contributed to the increase in soil N concentration in the oldest RTL. Negative δ15N (-7.1 to -2.0‰) of total inorganic N (NH4 ++NO3 -) and published data on N deposition near the study area indicate that atmospheric N deposition might be another source of N in the RTLs. Meanwhile, the consistently negative δ15N of soil NO3 - excluded N input from chemical fertilizer through groundwater flow as a potential N source, since NO3 - in groundwater generally have a positive δ15N. The patterns of δ15N of NH4 + (+2.3 to +5.1‰) and NO3 - (-9.2 to -5.0‰) suggested that nitrification was an active process that caused 15N enrichment in NH4 + but denitrification was probably minimal which would otherwise have caused 15N enrichment in NO3 -. A quantitative approach on N budget would provide a better understanding of soil N dynamics in the studied RTLs.

  3. Increased Plant Uptake of Nitrogen from 15N Depleted Fertilizer Using Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The techniques of 15N isotope have been very useful for determining the behavior and fate of N in soil, including the use efficiency of applied N fertilizers by plants. Our objective in this study was to use 15N isotope techniques to demonstrate that a model plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGP...

  4. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  5. δ 15 N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural abundance δ15N of ecosystems integrates nitrogen (N) inputs and losses, and thus reflects factors that control the long-term development of ecosystem N balances. We here report N and carbon (C) content of forest vegetation and soils, and associated δ15N, across nine Doug...

  6. Over 20% (15)N Hyperpolarization in Under One Minute for Metronidazole, an Antibiotic and Hypoxia Probe.

    PubMed

    Barskiy, Danila A; Shchepin, Roman V; Coffey, Aaron M; Theis, Thomas; Warren, Warren S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-07-01

    Direct NMR hyperpolarization of naturally abundant (15)N sites in metronidazole is demonstrated using SABRE-SHEATH (Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange in SHield Enables Alignment Transfer to Heteronuclei). In only a few tens of seconds, nuclear spin polarization P(15)N of up to ∼24% is achieved using parahydrogen with 80% para fraction corresponding to P(15)N ≈ 32% if ∼100% parahydrogen were employed (which would translate to a signal enhancement of ∼0.1-million-fold at 9.4 T). In addition to this demonstration on the directly binding (15)N site (using J(2)H-(15)N), we also hyperpolarized more distant (15)N sites in metronidazole using longer-range spin-spin couplings (J(4)H-(15)N and J(5)H-(15)N). Taken together, these results significantly expand the range of molecular structures and sites amenable to hyperpolarization via low-cost parahydrogen-based methods. In particular, hyperpolarized nitroimidazole and its derivatives have powerful potential applications such as direct in vivo imaging of mechanisms of action or hypoxia sensing. PMID:27321159

  7. The 15N isotope effect in Escherichia coli: a neutron can make the difference.

    PubMed

    Filiou, Michaela D; Varadarajulu, Jeeva; Teplytska, Larysa; Reckow, Stefan; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W

    2012-11-01

    Several techniques based on stable isotope labeling are used for quantitative MS. These include stable isotope metabolic labeling methods for cells in culture as well as live organisms with the assumption that the stable isotope has no effect on the proteome. Here, we investigate the (15) N isotope effect on Escherichia coli cultures that were grown in either unlabeled ((14) N) or (15) N-labeled media by LC-ESI-MS/MS-based relative protein quantification. Consistent protein expression level differences and altered growth rates were observed between (14) N and (15) N-labeled cultures. Furthermore, targeted metabolite analyses revealed altered metabolite levels between (14) N and (15) N-labeled bacteria. Our data demonstrate for the first time that the introduction of the (15) N isotope affects protein and metabolite levels in E. coli and underline the importance of implementing controls for unbiased protein quantification using stable isotope labeling techniques. PMID:22887715

  8. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  9. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in an arid ecosystem measured by sup 15 N natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Plants dependent on nitrogen fixation have an {sup 15}N abundance similar to the atmosphere, while non-nitrogen fixing plants usually are enriched in {sup 15}N and are similar to soil nitrogen values. The natural abundance of {sup 15}N in leaf tissues and soils was determined to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation by several legumes and actinorhizal species in the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research area in central New Mexico. Comparison of {delta}{sup 15}N values for the legume Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) to adjacent Atriplex canascens (fourwing saltbush) indicated that P. glandulosa obtained 66% of its nitrogen by fixation. The legume Hoffmanseggia jamesii was found to be utilizing soil nitrogen. The {delta}{sup 15}N values for the actinorhizal plants, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Cercocarpus montanus, while below values for soil nitrogen, did not differ from associated non-fixing plants.

  10. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15 N over long-term forest succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven; Tepley, Alan J.; Compton, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession towards old-growth are thought to increase nitrogen (N) availability and N loss, which should increase soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across 800 years of forest succession in a topographically complex montane landscape influenced by human logging and wildfire. In contrast to expectations, we found that disturbance caused declines in surface mineral soil δ15N values, both in logged forests measured 40–50 years after disturbance, and in unlogged forests disturbed by severe wildfire within the last 200 years. Both symbiotic N fixation and N transfers from disturbed vegetation and detritus could lower soil δ15N values after disturbance. A more important role for symbiotic N fixation is suggested by lower soil δ15N values in slow-successional sites with slow canopy closure, which favors early-successional N fixers. Soil δ15N values increased only marginally throughout 800 years of succession, reflecting soil N uptake by vegetation and strong overall N retention. Although post-disturbance N inputs lowered surface soil δ15N values, steady-state mass balance calculations suggest that wildfire combustion of vegetation and detritus can dominate long-term N loss and increase whole-ecosystem δ15N. On steeper topography, declining soil δ15N values highlight erosion and accelerated soil turnover as an additional abiotic control on N balances. We conclude for N-limited montane forests that soil δ15N and N availability are less influenced by nitrate leaching and denitrification loss than by interactions between disturbance, N fixation, and erosion.

  11. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Thorn, K A; Kennedy, K R

    2002-09-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined. PMID:12322752

  12. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Kennedy, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined.

  13. Indirect Measurement of {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}){sup 12}C and {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N. Applications to the AGB Star Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tumino, A.; Tribble, R.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Banu, A.; Fu, C.; Goldberg, V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.

    2008-04-06

    The Trojan Horse Method has been recently applied to the study of reactions involved in fluorine nucleosynthesis inside AGB stars. Fluorine abundance is important since it allows to constrain mixing models from the comparison of the observed fluorine abundances with the ones predicted by models. Anyway direct measurements of the cross section do not extend down to the Gamow peak, which is the astrophysically relevant energy region. In particular the study focuses on the {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}){sup 12}C and the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reactions which can influence fluorine yield as they are part of {sup 19}F production/destruction network.

  14. 15N Content Reflects Development of Mycorrhizae and Nitrogen Dynamics During Primary Succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Jumpponen, A.

    2004-05-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous symbionts on terrestrial plants that are particularly important for plant nitrogen nutrition. 15N content appears to be a useful marker of the mycorrhizal role in plant nitrogen supply because of an apparent fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from mycorrhizal fungi to host plants. Because plants developing during primary succession are gradually colonized by mycorrhizal fungi, such situations provide good opportunities to study interactions between mycorrhizal colonization and plant 15N content. Here, we present results of a study of nitrogen isotope patterns in ecosystem components during the first 100 years of ecosystem development after glacial retreat, and compare those patterns with those on adjacent mature terrain. Soils in primary succession were depleted in 15N relative to nitrogen-fixing plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants generally colonized by ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, or arbuscular fungi showed similar 15N content very early in succession (-4 to -6‰ ), corresponding to low colonization levels of all plant species. Subsequent colonization of evergreen plants by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid fungi led to a 5-6‰ decline in 15N content, indicating transfer of 15N-depleted N from fungi to plants. The values recorded (-10 to -14‰ ) are among the lowest yet observed in vascular plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi did not decline in 15N content. Most ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi were similar in 15N content in early succession (-1 to -3‰ ), with the notable exception of ectomycorrhizal fungi suspected of proteolytic capabilities, which were 15N enriched relative to all other fungi. 15N contents in both plants and soil from the mature site were 5‰ greater than in recently exposed sites. We conclude that 1) the primary nitrogen source to this ecosystem must be atmospheric deposition, 2) low plant 15N content generally corresponds with greater

  15. Climate-Dependence of Plant-Soil 15N/14N Interactions Across Tropical Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Sigman, D. M.; Hedin, L. O.

    2005-12-01

    In most areas of the world, the 15N/14N of bulk soils is higher than that of plant leaves, and the isotopic signatures of these two ecosystem N pools progressively diverge with increasing rainfall. However, both the cause for this isotopic trend and its implications for understanding interactions between climate and N cycles are largely unknown. We report 15N/14N measurements of nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N in soil extracts from a highly constrained rainfall sequence in Hawaii, across which this trend in ecosystem 15N/14N is captured, to examine the competing explanations for plant-soil 15N/14N uncouplings. While the isotopic influences of microbial transfers of N between nitrate and ammonium pools and plant-mycorrhizae interactions have been posited in plant-soil 15N/14N relationships, our data did not support an important role for either of these mechanisms. Instead, preferential regeneration of 14N during the breakdown of DON to ammonium explains why the 15N/14N of plants is lower than that of bulk soils. Fractionation at this step leads to two isotopically distinct N subcycles in each forest, a lower-15N/14N subcycle composed of ammonium, nitrate, and bulk plant biomass N that `spins' rapidly and a higher-15N/14N subcycle composed of bulk soil N and DON that is much less dynamic. The increased difference between soil and plant 15N/14N is due to changes in the impacts of nitrification and denitrification on the 15N/14N of ammonium and nitrate, coupled with a switch from nitrate to ammonium uptake by plants under the wettest conditions. For instance, the particularly large (~6 per mil) 15N/14N difference between plants and soils in the wettest sites is due to the lack of 15N-enrichment of ammonium by nitrification coupled with plant dependence on ammonium uptake only. Our results highlight the importance of interactions between DON breakdown, ecosystem N recycling, and gaseous N losses in the explaining the interactions between the 15N signatures of

  16. Hyperpolarized 13C urea relaxation mechanism reveals renal changes in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stokholm Nørlinger, Thomas; Christoffer Hansen, David; Qi, Haiyun; Mose Nielsen, Per; Bonde Bertelsen, Lotte; Henrik Ardenkjaer‐Larsen, Jan; Stødkilde Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to assess a novel 13C radial fast spin echo golden ratio single shot method for interrogating early renal changes in the diabetic kidney, using hyperpolarized (HP) [13C,15N2]urea as a T2 relaxation based contrast bio‐probe. Methods A novel HP 13C MR contrast experiment was conducted in a group of streptozotocin type‐1 diabetic rat model and age matched controls. Results A significantly different relaxation time (P = 0.004) was found in the diabetic kidney (0.49 ± 0.03 s) compared with the controls (0.64 ± 0.02 s) and secondly, a strong correlation between the blood oxygen saturation level and the relaxation times were observed in the healthy controls. Conclusion HP [13C,15N2]urea apparent T2 mapping may be a useful for interrogating local renal pO2 status and renal tissue alterations. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. Magn Reson Med 75:515–518, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:26584247

  17. Assignment of the sup 1 H and sup 15 N NMR spectra of Rhodobacter capsulatus ferrocytochrome c sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gooley, P.R.; Caffrey, M.S.; Cusanovich, M.A.; MacKenzie, N.E. )

    1990-03-06

    The peptide resonances of the {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of ferrocytochrome c{sub 2} from Rhodobacter capsulatus are sequentially assigned by a combination of 2D {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N spectroscopy, the latter performed on {sup 15}N-enriched protein. Short-range nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data show {alpha}-helices from residues 3-17, 55-65, 69-88, and 103-115. Within the latter two {alpha}-helices, there are three single 3{sub 10} turns, 70-72, 76-78, and 107-109. In addition {alpha}H-NH{sub i+1} and {alpha}H-NH{sub i+2} NOEs indicate that the N-terminal helix (3-17) is distorted. Compared to horse or tuna cytochrome c and cytochrome c{sub 2} of Rhodospirillium rubrum, there is a 6-residue insertion at residues 23-29 in R. capsulatus cytochrome c{sub 2}. The NOE data show that this insertion forms a loop, probably an {Omega} loop. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation experiments are used to follow NH exchange over a period of 40 h. As the 2D spectra are acquired in short time periods (30 min), rates for intermediate exchanging protons can be measured. Comparison of the NH exchange data for the N-terminal helix of cytochrome c{sub 2} of R. capsulatus with the highly homologous horse heart cytochrome c shows that this helix is less stable in cytochrome c{sub 2}.

  18. ESR lineshape and {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals – Joint analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, D.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.; Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpała, A.; Oglodek, I.; Moscicki, J.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.

    2013-12-28

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d{sub 16} containing {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz–20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the {sup 1}H relaxation of the solvent. The {sup 1}H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin–nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  19. Ammonia 15N/14N Isotope Ratio in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.R.; Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, M. H.; Owen, T. C; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Data from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer has been used to derive the N-15/N-14 isotope ratio in ammonia at Jupiter. Although the mass spectral interference from the water contribution to 18 amu makes an accurate derivation of the (N-15)H3/(N-14)H3 ratio difficult from measurements of the singly ionized signals at 18 and 17 amu, this interference is not present in the doubly charged 8.5 and 9.0 amu signals from (N-14)H3++ and (N-15)H3++ respectively. Although the count rate from the 9 amu signal is low during the direct sampling of the atmosphere, the ammonia signal was considerably enhanced during the first enrichment cell (EC1) experiment that measured gas sampled between 0.8 and 2.8 bar. Count rates at 9 amu in the EC1 experiment reach 60/second and measure ammonia sampled from 0.88 to 2.8 bar. In the EC1 measurements the 8.5 amu signal is not measured directly, but can be calculated from the ammonia contribution to 17 amu and the ratio of NH3 ions of a double to single charged observed during a high resolution mass scan taken near the end of the descent. The high resolution scan gives this ratio from ammonia sampled much deeper in the atmosphere. These results are described and compared with Infrared Space Observatory-Short Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-SWS) observations that give this ratio at 400 mbar.

  20. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles. PMID:25621737

  1. Steroselective synthesis and application of L-( sup 15 N) amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J. ); Lodwig, S.N. . Div. of Science)

    1991-01-01

    We have developed two general approaches to the stereoselective synthesis of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-labeled amino acids. First, labeled serine, biosynthesized using the methylotrophic bacterium M. extorquens AM1, serves as a chiral precursor for the synthesis of other amino acids. For example, pyridoxal phosphate enzymes can be used for the conversion of L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)serine to L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tyrosine, L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tryptophan, and L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)cysteine. In the second approach, developed by Oppolzer and Tamura, an electrophilic amination'' reagent, 1-chloro-1-nitrosocyclohexane, was used to convert chiral enolates into L-{alpha}-amino acids. We prepared 1-chloro-1-({sup 15}N) nitrosocyclohexane and used it to aminate chiral enolates to produce L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)amino acids. The stereoselectivity of this scheme using the Oppolzer sultam chiral auxiliary is remarkable, producing enantiomer ratios of 200 to 1. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Production of 15N-depleted biomass during cyanobacterial N2-fixation at high Fe concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Junium, Christopher K.; Canfield, Donald E.; House, Christopher H.

    2008-09-01

    In this study we examine the effects of varying Fe, Mo, and P concentrations on δ15N fractionation during N2 fixation in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis. We show that when grown in Fe-enriched media ([Fe] ≥ 50 nM), this organism produces biomass up to 3‰ lower in δ15N than when grown in Fe-limited media ([Fe] < 50 nM). A compilation of our data with previous measurements of δ15N in N2-fixing cyanobacteria reveals a general trend toward the production of more 15N-depleted biomass at higher Fe concentrations. We discuss our results in the context of negative δ15N values preserved in Archean and some Phanerozoic sediments, generally attributed to the production of marine organic matter with low δ15N by N2 fixation (and potentially NH4+ regeneration) during periods of fluctuating nutrient dynamics. We suggest that enhanced Fe availability during periods of widespread ocean anoxia can further stimulate the production of 15N-depleted biomass by N2-fixing organisms, contributing to the isotopic record.

  3. Radiative p 15N Capture in the Region of Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-06-01

    Within the framework of the modified potential cluster model with classification of orbital states according to the Young schemes, the possibility of describing experimental data for the astrophysical S-factor of p 15N radiative capture at energies from 50 to 1500 keV is considered. It is shown that on the basis of M1 and E1 transitions from various p 15N scattering states to the ground state of the 16O nucleus in the p 15N channel it is entirely possible to successfully explain the overall behavior of the S-factor in the considered energy region in the presence of two resonances.

  4. Nitrogen dynamics in a Western Boundary Upwelling System (Cabo Frio, Brazil) based on δ15N-nitrate and δ15N of sinking particle signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, L.; Belem, A. L.; Venancio, I.; Duarte, C.; Chiara, S. D.; Albuquerque, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    To improve the efficiency of upwelling to control nitrogen dynamic in the ocean, better understanding of the occurring processes is necessary. This research explores δ15N of nitrate and sinking particles on a western boundary upwelling System (Cabo Frio, Brazil). The Continental Shelf of southeastern Brazil is dominated by the oligotrophic Brazil Current, whose instabilities promote the coastal upwelling of South Atlantic Central Water (SACW), and consequently increases of primary productivity. The coastal upwelling system plays an important role in the nitrogen dynamics on the Cabo Frio Upwelling System (CFUS). However, the interactions between biological induced processes, including biological N-fixation and nitrate inputs from upwelled waters in CFUS still have not been well explored. Then, this study aims clarify N-dynamics on CFUS based on a cross-shelf approach. δ15N-nitrate was characterized for each water masses present on the shelf (South Atlantic Central Water, Tropical Water and Coastal Water) and associated with physicochemical parameters (T/S, nutrients), as well as the δ15N of sinking particles at different depths (from surface to the bottom water). Samples were collected in a time interval of 1 month during ~4 years (2011 to 2014). Cross-shelf gradients of nitrogen species concentration (ammonium + nitrite + nitrate) and stable isotopes were observed. The δ15N of nitrate and sinking particles were interpreted according to the prevailing processes of the N-transformations. Considering the region as N-limited (N:P < 16), processes as biological N-fixation seems to be dominant on oligotrophic Tropical Waters. Coastal upwelled SACW showed δ15N-nitrate signature within the global average of deep ocean (5-6‰) characterizing the inner and mid-shelf conditions, where the input of new nitrate from upwelling is rapidly used by organisms in the euphotic zone without any fractionation. On the other hands, the dominance of N-limited Tropical Waters on the

  5. Carbon-rich Presolar Grains from Massive Stars: Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N Ratios and the Mystery of 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.

  6. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  7. Ner protein of phage Mu: Assignments using {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strzelecka, T.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    The Ner protein is a small (74-amino acid) DNA-binding protein that regulates a switch between the lysogenic and lytic stages of phage Mu. It inhibits expression of the C repressor gene and down-regulates its own expression. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled protein provided most of the backbone and some of the sidechain proton assignments. The secondary structure determination using two-dimensional NOESY experiments showed that Ner consists of five {alpha}-helices. However, because most of the sidechain protons could not be assigned, the full structure was not determined. Using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled Ner and a set of three-dimensional experiments, we were able to assign all of the backbone and 98% of the sidechain protons. In particular, the CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH experiments were used to sequentially assign the C{alpha} and C{beta} resonances; the HCCH-CTOCSY and HCCH-COSY were used to assign sidechain carbon and proton resonances.

  8. Theoretical and experimental (15)N NMR study of enamine-imine tautomerism of 4-trifluoromethyl[b]benzo-1,4-diazepine system.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Valentin A; Samultsev, Dmitry O; Rulev, Alexander Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-12-01

    The tautomeric structure of 4-trifluoromethyl[b]benzo-1,4-diazepine system in solution has been evaluated by means of the calculation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts of individual tautomers in comparison with the averaged experimental shifts to show that the enamine-imine equilibrium is entirely shifted toward the imine form. The adequacy of the theoretical level used for the computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts in this case has been verified based on the benchmark calculations in the series of the push-pull and captodative enamines together with related azomethynes, which demonstrated a good to excellent agreement with experiment. PMID:26290420

  9. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  10. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  11. Sources of δ15N variability in sinking particulate nitrogen in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Enrique; Thunell, Robert; Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Lorenzoni, Laura; Tappa, Eric; Troccoli, Luis; Astor, Yrene; Varela, Ramón

    2013-09-01

    Ten years of monthly observations of the δ15N of sinking particulate nitrogen (δ15N-PN (in ‰ versus atmospheric N2)=[(15N/14N)sample/(15N/14N)standard)-1]1000) in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, confirm that the basin's bottom sediments store information about nitrogen dynamics related to seasonal and interannual variability in regional surface ocean processes. During the upwelling period of the southern Caribbean Sea (February-April), the δ15N-PN is similar to that of the thermocline nitrate (˜3.5‰). This nitrate is imported into the Cariaco Basin with Subtropical Underwater (SUW), which wells up near the coast. Thus, particles generated by phytoplankton photosynthesis during this productive period bear a sub-tropical North Atlantic isotopic imprint of N2 fixation (low compared to the global average of nitrate δ15N≈5‰). During the non-upwelling period when surface waters are stratified (September-November), the δ15N-PN is also 3.5-4.0‰, and reflects a mixture of local N2 fixation within the mixed layer, inputs of terrigenous organic matter and SUW nitrate consumption by phytoplankton below the mixed layer, which most likely exerts the strongest control on the δ15N-PN signal during this time. In the transition periods of May-July and December-January, the δ15N-PN increases to 4.5-6.5‰. This coincides with maxima of continental material fluxes (terrestrial PON δ15N is >6‰) into the Cariaco Basin. The δ15N signal in the sediments of the Cariaco Basin thus provides information about the relative strength of the local coastal upwelling, the relative input of continental material via river runoff, and local N2 fixation. The findings contribute to interpretations of the basin's paleoclimatic nitrogen cycle variations based on observations of the sedimentary δ15N record at this location.

  12. 15N fractionation in star-forming regions and Solar System objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirström, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, Gilles; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.

    2015-08-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristine molecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N/15N ~ 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N/15N < 100.The coherent 15N enrichment in comets from different formation zones suggests that these isotopic enhancements are remnants of the interstellar chemistry in the natal molecular cloud core and the outer protosolar nebula. Indeed, early chemical models of gas-phase ion-molecule nitrogen fractionation showed that HCN and HNC (nitriles) can hold significant 15N enrichments in cold dark clouds where CO is depleted onto dust grains. In addition, 15N fractionation in nitriles and amines (NH2, NH3) follow different chemical pathways. More recently we have shown that once the spin-state dependence in rates of reactions with H2 is included in the models, amines can either be enhanced or depleted in 15N, depending on the core’s evolutionary stage. Observed 15N fractionation in amines and nitriles therefore cannot be expected to be the same, instead their ratio is a potential chemical clock.Observations of molecular isotope ratios in dark cores are challenging. Limited published results in general show higher 15N/14N ratios in HCN and HNC than ammonia, but more measurements are necessary to confirm these trends. We will present recent results from our ongoing observing campaign of 14N/15N isotopic ratios in HCN, HNC and NH3 in dense cores and protostars which seem consistent with significant fractionation in nitriles as compared to other molecules in each object. The few 14N/15N ratios observed in N2H+ are similar to

  13. 15N techniques and analytical procedures. Indo/U. S. science and technology initiative. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, L.K.; Mosier, A.R.

    1992-05-01

    (15)N technology is used to explore many agricultural research topics, including the movement of nitrates to groundwater, use of fertilizer nitrogen by plants, ways to increase nitrogen fixation, and effects of management practices on denitrification. The publication reviews (15)N procedures and methods for handling and collecting samples, introducing isotopes into plants and soils, and for performing Kjeldahl analyses, isotope dilutions, Rittenberg oxidation conversions for isotope-ration analyses, and automated Dumas isotope-ratio analyses.

  14. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  15. Ecosystem N distribution and δ15N during a century of forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compton, J.E.; Hooker, T.D.; Perakis, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of terrestrial ecosystem nitrogen (N) pools reflect internal processes and input–output balances. Disturbance generally increases N cycling and loss, yet few studies have examined ecosystem δ15N over a disturbance-recovery sequence. We used a chronosequence approach to examine N distribution and δ15N during forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment. Site ages ranged from 10 to 115 years, with similar soils, climate, land-use history, and overstory vegetation (white pine Pinus strobus). Foliar N and δ15N decreased as stands aged, consistent with a progressive tightening of the N cycle during forest regrowth on agricultural lands. Over time, foliar δ15N became more negative, indicating increased fractionation along the mineralization–mycorrhizal–plant uptake pathway. Total ecosystem N was constant across the chronosequence, but substantial internal N redistribution occurred from the mineral soil to plants and litter over 115 years (>25% of ecosystem N or 1,610 kg ha−1). Temporal trends in soil δ15N generally reflected a redistribution of depleted N from the mineral soil to the developing O horizon. Although plants and soil δ15N are coupled over millennial time scales of ecosystem development, our observed divergence between plants and soil suggests that they can be uncoupled during the disturbance-regrowth sequence. The approximate 2‰ decrease in ecosystem δ15N over the century scale suggests significant incorporation of atmospheric N, which was not detected by traditional ecosystem N accounting. Consideration of temporal trends and disturbance legacies can improve our understanding of the influence of broader factors such as climate or N deposition on ecosystem N balances and δ15N.

  16. High Resolution 15N NMR of the 225 K Phase Transition of Ammonia Borane (NH3BH3): Mixed Order-Disorder and Displacive Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Gunaydin-Sen, Ozge; Achey, Randall; Dalal, Nar S.; Stowe, Ashley C.; Autrey, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We report high resolution 15N NMR probing of the solid-solid phase transition of 15N-labeled ammonia borane (NH3BH3) around 225 K. Both the 15N isotropic chemical shift, δiso, and the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1) exhibited strong anomalies around 225 K. The analysis of T1-1 using the Bloembergen-Purcell and Pound model showed that the motional correlation time, τ, increased from about 1 ps to 100 ps while the corresponding Arrhenius activation energy increased from 6 to 13.4 kJ/mol on going through the transition. The observed strong temperature dependence of δiso was interpreted by an extension of the Bayer model. The time scale of the underlying motion was found to be in a reasonable agreement with the T1-1 data. These results imply that the NH3 rotor motion plays a pivotal role in the transition mechanism, and that the transition is of both order-disorder and displacive type. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U. S. Department of Energy Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  17. Zeeman relaxation of MnH (X{sup 7}{Sigma}{sup +}) in collisions with {sup 3}He: Mechanism and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Turpin, F.; Stoecklin, T.; Halvick, Ph.

    2011-03-15

    We present a theoretical study of the Zeeman relaxation of the magnetically trappable lowest field seeking state of MnH ({sup 7{Sigma}}) in collisions with {sup 3}He. We analyze the collisional Zeeman transition mechanism as a function of the final diatomic state and its variation as a function of an applied magnetic field. We show that as a result of this mechanism the levels with {Delta}M{sub j}>2 give negligible contributions to the Zeemam relaxation cross section. We also compare our results to the experimental cross sections obtained from the buffer-gas cooling and magnetic trapping of this molecule and investigate the dependence of the Zeeman relaxation cross section on the accuracy of the three-body interaction at ultralow energies.

  18. Tracking the incorporation of 15N from labeled beech litter into mineral-organic associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, M.; Hatton, P.; Derrien, D.; Lajtha, K.; Zeller, B.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen containing organic compounds are thought to have a role in the complex web of processes that control the turnover time of soil organic matter. The sequential density fractionation technique is increasingly used for the purpose of investigating the association of organic materials with the mineral matrix. Organic materials in the denser fractions (>2.0 kg L-1) typically show 13C NMR signals indicative of carbohydrate and aliphatic structures, an absence of lignin and tannin structures and a narrow C:N ratio, suggesting a microbial origin of organic matter in these fractions. Here we take advantage of a labeling experiment conducted at two different sites in Germany and in France to investigate the incorporation of organic nitrogen into physical fractions of increasing density, representing a proximity gradient to mineral surfaces. 15N labeled beech litter was applied to two acidic forest topsoils 8 and 12 years ago. Although there are differences in the distribution patterns between the two soils, and the majority of the organic nitrogen was recovered in fractions representing organic matter of plant origin and not bound to the mineral matrix, our data clearly show that after a decade, significant amounts of the nitrogen had been incorporated in mineral-organic fractions of supposedly slow turnover. It remains to be shown to which extent the N in the densest fractions was incorporated by soil microbiota and associated with mineral surfaces in organic form or adsorbed to mineral surfaces in inorganic form (NH4+).

  19. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 15N ions by 9Be at 84 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudchik, A. T.; Chercas, K. A.; Kemper, K. W.; Rusek, K.; Rudchik, A. A.; Herashchenko, O. V.; Koshchy, E. I.; Pirnak, Val. M.; Piasecki, E.; Trzcińska, A.; Sakuta, S. B.; Siudak, R.; Strojek, I.; Stolarz, A.; Ilyin, A. P.; Ponkratenko, O. A.; Stepanenko, Yu. M.; Shyrma, Yu. O.; Szczurek, A.; Uleshchenko, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Angular distributions of the 9Be + 15N elastic and inelastic scattering were measured at Elab(15N) = 84 MeV (Ec.m. = 31.5 MeV) for the 0-6.76 MeV states of 9Be and 0-6.32 MeV states of 15N. The data were analyzed within the optical model and coupled-reaction-channels method. The elastic and inelastic scattering, spin reorientations of 9Be in ground and excited states and 15N in excited states as well as the most important one- and two-step transfer reactions were included in the channels-coupling scheme. The parameters of the 9Be + 15N optical potential of Woods-Saxon form as well as deformation parameters of these nuclei were deduced. The analysis showed that the 9Be + 15N pure potential elastic scattering dominates at the forward angles whereas the ground state spin reorientation of 9Be gives a major contribution to the elastic scattering cross sections at the large angles. Contributions from particle transfers are found to be negligible for the present scattering system.

  20. Highly 15N-Enriched Chondritic Clasts in the Isheyevo Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bonal, L; Huss, G R; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-01-14

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment ({delta}{sup 15}N up to +1500{per_thousand}), similar to {delta}{sup 15}N values reported in micron-sized regions (hotspots) of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) of possibly cometary origin and fine-grained matrices of unmetamorphosed chondrites. These {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are commonly attributed to low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in the protosolar molecular cloud or in the outer part of the protoplanetary disk. The nature of the whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment of the metal-rich chondrites is not understood. We report a discovery of a unique type of primitive chondritic clasts in the CH/CB-like meteorite Isheyevo, which provides important constraints on the origin of {sup 15}N anomaly in metal-rich chondrites and nitrogen-isotope fractionation in the Solar System. These clasts contain tiny chondrules and refractory inclusions (5-15 {micro}m in size), and abundant ferromagnesian chondrule fragments (1-50 {micro}m in size) embedded in the partly hydrated, fine-grained matrix material composed of olivines, pyroxenes, poorly-organized aromatic organics, phyllosilicates and other hydrous phases. The mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of chondrules and refractory inclusions in the clasts are similar to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting formation at similar heliocentric distances. In contrast to the previously known extraterrestrial samples, the fine-grained material in the clasts is highly and rather uniformly enriched in {sup 15}N, with bulk {delta}{sup 15}N values ranging between +1000 and +1300{per_thousand}; the {delta}{sup 15}N values in rare hotspots range from +1400 to +4000{per_thousand}. Since fine-grained matrices in the lithic clasts are the only component containing thermally unprocessed (during CAI and chondrule formation or during impact melting) materials that accreted into the metal rich chondrite parent body(ies), the {sup 15}N

  1. NMR relaxation studies of the interaction of thiocyanate with lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Crull, G B; Goff, H M

    1993-05-15

    The interaction of lactoperoxidase, LPO, with its substrate, thiocyanate, SCN-, has been investigated by 13C and 15N NMR relaxation measurements. When 0.1 M SCN-, enriched with either 13C or 15N, was titrated with native ferric lactoperoxidase a large change in the spin-lattice relaxation time of the respective nucleus was observed. In the presence of saturating amounts of CN-, a high affinity ligand for the heme iron, a similar but much smaller change in the relaxation time for SCN- was found. Studies of the rate of carbon relaxation as a function of temperature have shown that thiocyanate is in fast exchange between a site on the enzyme and bulk solution. When LPO in either the absence or presence of CN- was titrated with SCN- a linear increase in the relaxation time was observed. Dissociation constants (Kd values) have been determined from a least-squares analysis of these data. Apparent distances between the heme iron of lactoperoxidase and either the carbon or nitrogen atoms of bound thiocyanate ion have been determined through application of the Solomon-Bloembergen equation. These distances demonstrate that the observed association does not involve iron-thiocyanate coordination, suggesting the possibility of an anion binding site. PMID:8501464

  2. Non-homogeneity of isotopic labelling in 15N gas flux studies: theory, some observations and possible lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Deppe, Marianna; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Gattinger, Andreas; Giesemann, Anette; Krause, Hans-Martin; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika

    2015-04-01

    addressing cases iii. and iv.. Furthermore we present some experimental data illustrating this. These include two data sets from denitrification experiments exhibiting substantial deviations in 15N enrichment between the N pools producing N2 and N2O. Moreover, results from a lab incubation study to quantify NH4+-derived N2O with increasing NH4+ amendment under conditions favouring nitrification are shown, were non-labelled NH4+ was added together with 15N labelled NO3-. Here we found large deviations between the 15N enrichment of NO3- in extracted soil water and the 15N enrichment of the labelled N pool as calculated from N2O isotopologues (Bergsma et al., 2001). We think that this reflects type iv. bias, probably because enrichment of NO3- in anoxic micro-sites was less diluted by non-labelled NO3- from nitrification compared to NO3- in oxic zones. Our data analysis provides a means to overcome bias iv. and thus to obtain correct source apportionment. References: Arah, J.R.M. (1992): Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 56, 795 - 800, 1992. Bergsma, T. et al. (2001): Env. Sci. & Technol. 35(21): 4307-4312. Hauck, R.D., et al.(1958): Soil Science 86, 287 - 291, 1958. Lewicka-Szczebak, D. et al.(2013): Rapid Comm. Mass Spectrom., 27 1548-1558. Müller, C. et al. (2004): Soil Biol. Biochem. 36(4): 619-632. Mulvaney, R.L.(1984):. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 48:690 - 692. Spott, O, et al.. (2006): Rapid Comm. Mass Spectrom., 20: 3267-3274. Spott, O. and C. F. Stange (2007): Rapid Comm. Mass Spectrom., 21: 2398-2406.

  3. Compound-specific δ15N and chlorin preservation in surface sediments of the Peru Margin with implications for ancient bulk δ15N records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junium, Christopher K.; Arthur, Michael A.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the processes that control the preservation of paleoceanographic proxies is of clear importance. Surface sediments from the Peru Margin oxygen-minimum zone are subject to lateral and downslope transport by bottom currents that decrease organic matter (OM) quality. Indicators of bulk OM quality (pyrolysis hydrogen index, pyrolysis S1 + S2 and C/N) demonstrate significant degradation between 150 and 400 m water depth, within the oxygen-minimum zone. Concentrations of the three most abundant chlorins (chlorophyllone, pheophytin and pyropheophytin) decrease from 750 to 150 nmol g TOC-1 from 150 to 400 m water depth though the relative abundances of the chlorins in an individual sample do not change. This suggests that the three chlorins have similar reactivity over the ambient conditions. Values for δ15N of bulk sediments (δ15Nbulk) decrease by 3‰ from the inner shelf to the upper slope (1000 m) but co-occurring compound-specific δ15N values (δ15Nchlorin) do not decrease downslope. The low variability of δ15Nchlorin values supports a single source for the chlorins, and demonstrates the recalcitrance of δ15Nchlorin values despite degradation. This set of observation raises questions about which type of OM fraction best records 'primary' signatures. We assess two possible models to guide our interpretation of these disparate datasets (1) that decreasing δ15Nbulk values are the result of degradation of a 15N-enriched fraction during downslope transport, and that δ15Nchlorin values reflect primary values; (2) that δ15Nbulk values are primary and that chlorins are derived from material transported from upslope. These data reaffirm that in active sedimentary environments such as the Eastern Tropical Pacific, transport of OM can significantly alter bulk geochemical parameters of OM integrity, but the impacts on the δ15N record of bulk sediments and chlorins are less clear, and require more study to be thoroughly understood.

  4. Sewage derive [sup 15]N in the Baltic traced in fucus

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbie, J.E.; Fry, B. ); Larsson, U.; Elmgren, R. )

    1990-01-09

    Himmerfjarden, a fjord-like bay on the eastern shore of the Baltic, receives treated sewage from 250,000 inhabitants. Because the inorganic N in the effluent is enriched in [sup 15]N through denitrification, nitrification, and ammonia volatilization, an analysis of the distribution of [sup 15]N in the Bay tells how far from the source the sewage nitrogen moves. The attached macroalga Fucus vesiculosus was collected in early May from rocky shore at 0-0.5 m depth and the [sup 15]N content of the tips of the fronds analyzed. This N represents uptake and storage during the previous six months and growth during March and April. The [delta][sup 15]N was uniformly high (11-13[per thousand]) in the main body of the Bay within 15 km from the sewage source. Beyond 15 km values decreased with distance to a low of 4.6[per thousand] at 35 km, where the Bay ends and the coastal waters begin. Using the 11-13 and 4.6[per thousand] as endmembers, the percentage of sewage N making up the Fucus at any point may be calculated. The [delta][sub 15]N of particulate organic matter in the offshore Baltic waters was around 0[per thousand] and Fucus had an [delta][sup 15]N about 1.5[per thousand] higher than the POM. From this and other evidence we conclude that there is a belt of coastal water with an elevated [delta][sup 15]N lying along the east coast of the Baltic. This presumably derives from sewage and perhaps from agriculture and is potentially of use as a tracer of coastal zone/pelagic zone interactions.

  5. Nitrogen source tracking with delta(15)N content of coastal wetland plants in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Bruland, Gregory L; MacKenzie, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Inter- and intra-site comparisons of the nitrogen (N) stable isotope composition of wetland plant species have been used to identify sources of N in coastal areas. In this study, we compared delta(15)N values from different herbaceous wetland plants across 34 different coastal wetlands from the five main Hawaiian Islands and investigated relationships of delta(15)N with land use, human population density, and surface water quality parameters (i.e., nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N). The highest delta(15)N values were observed in plants from wetlands on the islands of Oahu (8.7-14.6 per thousand) and Maui (8.9-9.2 per thousand), whereas plants from wetlands on the islands of Kauai, Hawaii, and Molokai had delta(15)N values usually <4 per thousand. The enrichment in delta(15)N values in plant tissues from wetlands on Oahu and Maui was most likely a result of the more developed and densely populated watersheds on these two islands. Urban development within a 1000-m radius and population density were positively correlated to average delta(15)N vegetation values from each wetland site (r = 0.56 and 0.51, respectively; p < 0.001). This suggested that site mean delta(15)N values from mixed stands of wetland plants have potential as indices of N sources in coastal lowland wetlands in Hawaii and that certain sites on Oahu and Maui have experienced significant anthropogenic N loading. This information can be used to monitor future changes in N inputs to coastal wetlands throughout Hawaii and the Pacific. PMID:20048329

  6. EFFECT OF HIGH-ENERGY RESONANCES ON THE {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N REACTION RATE AT AGB AND POST-AGB RELEVANT TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    The {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction is of great importance in several astrophysical scenarios, as it influences the production of key isotopes such as {sup 19}F, {sup 18}O, and {sup 15}N. Fluorine is synthesized in the intershell region of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, together with s-elements, by {alpha} radiative capture on {sup 15}N, which in turn is produced in the {sup 18}O proton-induced destruction. Peculiar {sup 18}O abundances are observed in R-Coronae Borealis stars, having {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O {approx}< 1, hundreds of times smaller than the galactic value. Finally, there is no definite explanation of the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in pre-solar grains formed in the outer layers of AGB stars. Again, such an isotopic ratio is influenced by the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction. In this work, a high accuracy {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction rate is proposed, based on the simultaneous fit of direct measurements and of the results of a new Trojan Horse experiment. Indeed, current determinations are uncertain because of the poor knowledge of the resonance parameters of key levels of {sup 19}F. In particular, we have focused on the study of the broad 660 keV 1/2{sup +} resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level of {sup 19}F. Since {Gamma} {approx} 100-300 keV, it determines the low-energy tail of the resonant contribution to the cross section and dominates the cross section at higher energies. Here, we provide a reaction rate that is a factor of two larger above T {approx} 0.5 10{sup 9} K based on our new improved determination of its resonance parameters, which could strongly influence present-day astrophysical model predictions.

  7. [Responses of Soil and Plant 15N Natural Abundance to Long-term N Addition in an N-Saturated Pinus massoniana Forest in Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-jing; Kang, Rong-hua; Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Jing; Duan, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Increasing N deposition in China will possibly cause N saturation of forest ecosystem, further resulting in a series of serious environmental problems. In order to explore the response of forest ecosystem to N deposition in China, and further evaluate and predict the N status of ecosystem, the 15N natural abundance (delta 15N) of soil and plants was measured in a typical Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest in southwest China to examine the potential use of delta 15N enrichment factor (epsilon(p/s)) as an effective indicator of N status. Long-term high N addition could significantly increase delta 15N of soil and plants, which was suggested by an on-going N fertilizing experiment with NH4NO3 or NaNO3 for 7 years. Meanwhile, delta 15N of soil and plants under NH, deposition was significantly higher than that under NO- deposition, suggesting different responses of ecosystem to different N-forms of deposition. The "N enrichment factor (epsilon(p/s)) had positive correlations with N deposition, N nitrification, and N leaching in the soil water. Linear correlation between "N enrichment factor and N deposition was found for all Masson pine forests investigated in this and previous studies in China, demonstrating that 15N enrichment factor could be used as an indicator of N status. The NH3 emission control should also be carried out accompanying with NOx emission control in the future, because NH4- deposition had significantly greater impact on the forest ecosystem than NO3- deposition with the same equivalence. PMID:26592030

  8. Nitrate reductase 15N discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Aspergillus niger, Pichea angusta, and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Eli; Yarnes, Chris; Toney, Michael D.; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Stable 15N isotopes have been used to examine movement of nitrogen (N) through various pools of the global N cycle. A central reaction in the cycle involves the reduction of nitrate (NO−3) to nitrite (NO−2) catalyzed by nitrate reductase (NR). Discrimination against 15N by NR is a major determinant of isotopic differences among N pools. Here, we measured in vitro 15N discrimination by several NRs purified from plants, fungi, and a bacterium to determine the intrinsic 15N discrimination by the enzyme and to evaluate the validity of measurements made using 15N-enriched NO−3. Observed NR isotope discrimination ranged from 22 to 32‰ (kinetic isotope effects of 1.022–1.032) among the different isozymes at natural abundance 15N (0.37%). As the fractional 15N content of substrate NO−3 increased from natural abundance, the product 15N fraction deviated significantly from that expected based on substrate enrichment and 15N discrimination measured at natural abundance. Additionally, isotopic discrimination by denitrifying bacteria used to reduce NO−3 and NO−2 in some protocols became a greater source of error as 15N enrichment increased. We briefly discuss potential causes of the experimental artifacts with enriched 15N and recommend against the use of highly enriched 15N tracers to study N discrimination in plants or soils. PMID:25071800

  9. Highly 15N-enriched chondritic clasts in the CB/CH-like meteorite Isheyevo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, L.; Huss, G. R.; Krot, A. N.; Nagashima, K.; Ishii, H. A.; Bradley, J. P.

    2010-11-01

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock 15N-enrichments (δ 15N up to 1500‰) among planetary materials. They are also characterized by the absence of interchondrule fine-grained matrix. The only fine-grained material is present as lithic clasts, which experienced extensive aqueous alteration in contrast to the surrounding high-temperature components (chondrules, refractory inclusions, metal grains). Hence, the clasts are foreign objects that were incorporated at a late stage into the final parent body of Isheyevo. Their origin is poorly constrained. Based on mineralogy, petrography, and thermal processing of the aromatic carbonaceous component, different types of clasts have been previously identified in the CB/CH-like chondrite Isheyevo. Here, we focus on the rare lithic clasts characterized by the presence of anhydrous silicates (chondrules, chondrule fragments, and CAIs). Their mineralogy and oxygen isotopic compositions reveal them to be micro-chondrules, fragments of chondrules, and refractory inclusions related to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting accretion in the same region. In contrast to previously studied IDPs or primitive chondritic matrices, the fine-grained material in the clasts we studied is highly and rather uniformly enriched in heavy nitrogen, with bulk δ 15N values ranging between 1000‰ and 1300‰. It is also characterized by the presence of numerous 15N hotspots (δ 15N ranging from 1400‰ to 4000‰). No bulk (δD <-240‰) or localized deuterium enrichments were observed. These clasts have the highest bulk enrichment in heavy nitrogen measured to date in a fine-grained material. They represent a unique material, of asteroidal or cometary origin, in our collection of cosmomaterials. We show that they were 15N-enriched before their incorporation in the final parent body of Isheyevo. They experienced an extensive aqueous alteration that most likely played a role in redistributing 15N over the

  10. Nitrogen Isotopic Ratios in Cometary NH2: Implication for 15N-fractionation in Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuël; Decock, Alice; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arai, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Isotopic ratios in cometary molecules are diagnostic for the physico-chemical conditions where molecules formed and are processed, from the interstellar medium to the solar nebula. Usually temperatures at the molecular formation control the fractionation of the heavier element in molecular species, e.g., D-fractionation in water.In cometary volatiles, the 14N/15N ratios in CN have been well observed (Manfroid et al. 2009, A&A, 503, 613, and reference therein) and is consistent with the ratio in HCN (a most probable parent of CN) measured in few comets (Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2008, ApJ, 679, L49). Those ratios are enriched compared to the proto-solar value by a factor of ~3. In contrast to those Nitriles, there are only few reports on 14N/15N ratios in Ammonia (as Amine) (Rousselot et al. 2014, ApJ, 780, L17; Shinnaka et al. 2014, ApJ, 782, L16). Ammonia (NH3) is usually the most abundant and HCN is the second most abundant N-bearing volatiles in cometary ice. Especially, recent observations of 15NH2 revealed the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 are comparable to those of CN. However, from the viewpoint of theoretical work, the enrichment of 15N in cometary NH3 cannot be reproduced by current chemical network models. Information about the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 of individual comets is needed to understand the formation mechanisms/environments of NH3 in the early solar system.To clarify the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in cometary NH3, we determine the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets individually which include not only Oort cloud comets but also short period comets by using the high-resolution optical spectra of NH2. These spectra were obtained with both the UVES mounted on the VLT in Chile and the HDS on the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii.The derived 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets show high 15N-enrichment compared with the elemental abundances of nitrogen in the Sun by about factor of ~3 and has no large diversity depending on

  11. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ15N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Nelson, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the ‘rivermouth effect’). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  12. Hydrogen Bonds in Crystalline Imidazoles Studied by 15N NMR and ab initio MO Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Masui, Hirotsugu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Hayashi, Shigenobu

    1999-07-01

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonds of the type N-H...N in crystals of imidazole and its 4-substituted and 4,5-disubstituted derivatives were studied by 15N CP/MAS NMR and an ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculation. In the 15N CP/MAS NMR spectrum of each of the imidazole derivatives, two peaks due to the two different functional groups, >NH and =N-, were observed. The value of the 15N isotropic chemical shift for each nitrogen atom depends on both the length of the intermolecular hydrogen bond and the kind of the substituent or substituents. It was found that the difference between the experimen-tal chemical shifts of >NH and =N-varies predominantly with the hydrogen bond length but does not show any systematic dependence on the kind of substituent. The ab initio MO calculations suggest that the hydrogen bond formation influences the 15N isotropic chemical shift predominantly, and that the difference between the 15N isotropic chemical shift of >NH and =N-varies linearly with the hydrogen bond length.

  13. Endogenous and environmental factors influence the dietary fractionation of 13C and 15N in hissing cockroaches Gromphadorhina portentosa.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D

    2008-01-01

    Since DeNiro and Epstein's discovery that the (13)C and (15)N isotopic signatures of animals approximate those of their respective diets, the measurement of stable isotope signatures has become an important tool for ecologists studying the diets of wild animals. This study used Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa) to examine several preexisting hypotheses about the relationship between the isotopic composition of an animal and its diet. Contrary to my predictions, the results revealed that the tissues of adult cockroaches raised for two generations on a diet of known isotopic composition did not demonstrate enrichment of heavy stable isotopes. Moreover, the (15)N signatures of cockroaches were neither influenced by periods of rapid growth (i.e., 300-fold increase in dry body mass over 120 d) nor by imposed periods of starvation lasting up to 80 d. The offspring born to mothers raised on known diets were enriched in (15)N. Diet-switching experiments showed that turnover times of (13)C were highly correlated with age and ranged from 9 to 10 d to 60 to 75 d in subadults and adults, respectively. Adults subjected to diet switches differed from the subadults in that the adults achieved equilibrated isotopic signatures that were shifted approximately 1.0 per thousand toward their respective original diets. Lipid fractions of adult cockroaches averaged 2.9 per thousand more depleted in (13)C than in lipid-free fractions, but no changes in (13)C were observed in aging adults. Exposure to reduced ambient temperature from 33 degrees C to 23 degrees C over 120 d did not influence isotopic signatures of tissues. Overall, the results of this study reveal that different endogenous and exogenous factors can influence the isotopic signatures of cockroaches. These findings reinforce the need to conduct controlled studies to further examine environmental factors that influence the relationships between the isotopic signatures of animals and their diets. PMID

  14. Intrinsic unfoldase/foldase activity of the chaperonin GroEL directly demonstrated using multinuclear relaxation-based NMR

    PubMed Central

    Libich, David S.; Tugarinov, Vitali; Clore, G. Marius

    2015-01-01

    The prototypical chaperonin GroEL assists protein folding through an ATP-dependent encapsulation mechanism. The details of how GroEL folds proteins remain elusive, particularly because encapsulation is not an absolute requirement for successful re/folding. Here we make use of a metastable model protein substrate, comprising a triple mutant of Fyn SH3, to directly demonstrate, by simultaneous analysis of three complementary NMR-based relaxation experiments (lifetime line broadening, dark state exchange saturation transfer, and Carr–Purcell–Meinboom–Gill relaxation dispersion), that apo GroEL accelerates the overall interconversion rate between the native state and a well-defined folding intermediate by about 20-fold, under conditions where the “invisible” GroEL-bound states have occupancies below 1%. This is largely achieved through a 500-fold acceleration in the folded-to-intermediate transition of the protein substrate. Catalysis is modulated by a kinetic deuterium isotope effect that reduces the overall interconversion rate between the GroEL-bound species by about 3-fold, indicative of a significant hydrophobic contribution. The location of the GroEL binding site on the folding intermediate, mapped from 15N, 1HN, and 13Cmethyl relaxation dispersion experiments, is composed of a prominent, surface-exposed hydrophobic patch. PMID:26124125

  15. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  16. Determination of δ18O and δ15N in Nitrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, K.; Böhlke, J.K.; Yoshinari, T.

    1997-01-01

    The analyses of both O and N isotopic compositions of nitrate have many potential applications in studies of nitrate sources and reactions in hydrology, oceanography, and atmospheric chemistry, but simple and precise methods for these analyses have yet to be developed. Testing of a new method involving reaction of potassium nitrate with catalyzed graphite (C + Pd + Au) at 520 °C resulted in quantitative recovery of N and O from nitrate as free CO2, K2CO3, and N2. The δ18O values of nitrate reference materials were obtained by analyzing both the CO2 and K2CO3 from catalyzed graphite combustion. Provisional values of δ18OVSMOW for the internationally distributed KNO3 reference materials IAEA-N3 and USGS-32 were both equal to +22.7 ± 0.5‰. Because the fraction of free CO2 and the isotopic fractionation factor between CO2 and K2CO3 were constant in the combustion products, the δ18O value of KNO3 could be calculated from measurements of the δ18O of free CO2. Thus, δ18OKNO3 = aδ18Ofree CO2 − b, where a and b were equal to 0.9967 and 3.3, respectively, for the specific conditions of the experiments. The catalyzed graphite combustion method can be used to determine δ18O of KNO3 from measurements of δ18O of free CO2 with reproducibility on the order of ±0.2‰ or better if local reference materials are prepared and analyzed with the samples. Reproducibility of δ15N was ±0.1‰ after trace amounts of CO were removed.

  17. Neutron capture cross section of {sup 15}N at stellar energies

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, J.; Schatz, H.; Herndl, H.; Wiescher, M.; Beer, H.; Kaeppeler, F.

    1996-02-01

    The neutron capture rate on {sup 15}N may be of considerable importance for {ital s}-process nucleosynthesis in red giants as well as for the nucleosynthesis in inhomogeneous big bang scenarios. We measured the reaction cross section of {sup 15}N({ital n},{gamma}){sup 16}N at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with a fast cyclic neutron activation technique at laboratory neutron energies of 25, 152, and 370 keV. Direct capture and shell model calculations were performed to interpret the results. The presented reaction rate is 30{endash}50{percent} smaller than the previously used theoretical rates. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  19. General theoretical/computational tool for interpreting NMR spin relaxation in proteins.

    PubMed

    Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Meirovitch, Eva

    2009-10-15

    We developed in recent years the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for analyzing NMR spin relaxation in proteins. SRLS is a two-body coupled rotator model which accounts rigorously for mode-coupling between the global motion of the protein and the local motion of the spin-bearing probe and allows for general properties of the second rank tensors involved. We showed that a general tool of data analysis requires both capabilities. Several important functionalities were missing in our previous implementations of SRLS in data fitting schemes, and in some important cases, the calculations were tedious. Here we present a general implementation which allows for asymmetric local and global diffusion tensors, distinct local ordering and local diffusion frames, and features a rhombic local potential which includes Wigner matrix element terms of ranks 2 and 4. A recently developed hydrodynamics-based approach for calculating global diffusion tensors has been incorporated into the data-fitting scheme. The computational efficiency of the latter has been increased significantly through object-oriented programming within the scope of the C++ programming language, and code parallelization. A convenient graphical user interface is provided. Currently autocorrelated (15)N spin relaxation data can be analyzed effectively. Adaptation to any autocorrelated and cross-correlated relaxation analysis is straightforward. New physical insight is gleaned on largely preserved local structure in solution, even in chain segments which experience slow local motion. Prospects associated with improved dynamic models, and new applications made possible by the current implementation of SRLS, are delineated. PMID:19775101

  20. First results on the incorporation and excretion of 15N from orally administered urea in lactating pony mares.

    PubMed

    Schubert, R; Zander, R; Gruhn, K; Hennig, A

    1991-05-01

    Two lactating pony mares were given oral offers of 20 g 15N urea [95 atom-% 15N-excess (15N')] on 6 subsequent days. About 80% of the consumed 15N' were excreted via urine and faeces, but only about 2% via milk. The 15N' secreted via milk-lysine only amounted to 0.04% of the 15N' intake. The recovery was about 90% in each case. Tissues with active metabolism had an unexpectedly high labelling (greater than 0.3 atom-% 15N'). The low extent of the conversion of oral urea N into milk-lysine speaks against an essential participation of the enteral synthesis in meeting the amino acid requirement of lactating mares. It was already concluded from this results that the determination of the amino acid requirement will be necessary for this group of performance. PMID:1888274

  1. Multi-probe relaxation dispersion measurements increase sensitivity to protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, R Bryn; Oyen, David; Wright, Peter E

    2016-02-17

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion measurements are a valuable tool for the characterization of structural transitions on the micro-millisecond timescale. While the measurement of (15)N relaxation dispersion is now routine, the measurements with alternative nuclei remain limited. Here we report (15)N as well as (1)H R2 relaxation dispersion measurements of the N23PP/S148A "dynamic knockout" mutant of dihydrofolate reductase. The (1)H dispersion measurements are complementary to (15)N data as many additional residues are observed to have dispersive behavior for the (1)H nucleus. Simultaneous fitting of the dispersion profiles for the two nuclei increases the accuracy of exchange parameters determined for individual residues and clustered groups of residues. The different sensitivity of the two nuclei to changes in backbone torsional angles, ring currents, and hydrogen bonding effects provides important insights into the nature of the structural changes that take place during the exchange process. We observe clear evidence of direct and indirect hydrogen bond effects for the (15)N and (1)H chemical shift changes in the active-site, modulation of ring current shielding in the CD-loop and backbone torsional changes in a cluster of residues associated with the C-terminus. This work demonstrates the power of combined (1)H and (15)N probes for the study of backbone dynamics on the micro-millisecond timescale though the analysis of chemical shift changes. PMID:26426424

  2. Composition of free and adherent ruminal bacteria: inaccuracy of the microbial nutrient supply estimates obtained using free bacteria as reference samples and (15)N as the marker.

    PubMed

    González, J; Arroyo, J M; Ouarti, M; Guevara-González, J; Rodríguez, C A; Alvir, M R; Moya, V J; Piquer, O

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that (15)N enrichment of solid-associated bacteria (SAB) may be predicted from the same value in liquid-associated bacteria (LAB). The aims of this study were to confirm this and to measure the error in the nutrient supply from SAB, when LAB are used as the reference sample. For this purpose, the chemical and amino acid (AA) compositions of both the bacterial populations were studied in four experiments carried out on different groups of three rumen cannulated wethers. Diets (one in Experiments 1 and 4 and three in Experiments 2 and 3) had forage-to-concentrate ratios (dry matter (DM) basis) between 2 : 1 and 40 : 60, and were consumed at intake levels between 40 and 75 g DM/kg (BW)(0.75). The bacteria samples were isolated after continuous infusion of ((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) (40, 18, 30 and 25 mg (15)N/day, in Experiments 1 to 4, respectively) for at least 14 days. In all experiments, SAB had consistently higher concentrations of organic matter (826 v. 716 g/kg DM, as average) and total lipids (192 v. 95 g/kg DM, as average) than LAB. Similar CP concentrations of both populations were observed, except a higher concentration in SAB than in LAB in Experiment 3. A consistent (in Experiment 4 only as tendency) higher AA-N/total N ratio (on average 17.5%) was observed in SAB than in LAB. The (15)N enrichment in SAB was systematically lower than in LAB. On the basis of the results of all studies a close relationship was found between the (15)N enrichment in SAB and LAB, which was shown irrespective of experiments. This relationship was established from Experiments 1 and 2 and the above cited previous results (n = 20; P < 0.001; R(2) = 0.996), and then confirmed from the results of Experiments 3 and 4. These relationships between SAB and LAB demonstrate that CP supply from SAB is underevaluated by, on average, 21.2% when LAB are used as the reference. This underevaluation was higher for true protein and even higher for the lipid supply (32

  3. Pathways of nitrogen assimilation in cowpea nodules studied using /sup 15/N/sub 2/ and allopurinol. [Vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, C.A.; Storer, P.J.; Pate, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the presence of 0.5 millimolar allopurinol (4-hydroxypyrazolo (3,4-d)pyrimidine), an inhibitor of NAD:xanthine oxidoreductase (EC 1.2.3.2), intact attached nodules of cowpea (vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita 3) formed (/sup 15/N)xanthine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ at rates equivalent to those of ureide synthesis, confirming the direct assimilation of fixed nitrogen into purines. Xanthine accumulated in nodules and was exported in increasing amounts in xylem of allopurinol-treated plants. Other intermediates of purine oxidation, de novo purine synthesis, and ammonia assimilation did not increase and, over the time course of experiments (4 hours), allopurinol had no effect on nitrogenase (EC 1.87.99.2) activity. Negligible /sup 15/N -labeling of asparagine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ was observed, suggesting that the significant pool (up to 14 micromoles per gram of nodule fresh weight) of this amide in cowpea nodules was not formed directly from fixation but may have accumulated as a consequence of phloem delivery.

  4. The Effect of N Fertilizer Placement on the Fate of Urea-15N and Yield of Winter Wheat in Southeast China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaoming; Wang, Huoyan; Liu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongzhe; Gao, Shuaishuai; Zhou, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    A field micro-plot experiment using nitrogen isotope (15N) labeling was conducted to determine the effects of placement methods (broadcast and band) and N rates (60, 150 and 240 kg ha–1) on the fate of urea-15N in the wheat–soil system in Guangde County of Anhui Province, China. N fertilizer applied in bands increased grain yield by 15% compared with broadcast application. The N fertilizer application rate had a significant effect on grain yield, straw yield and aboveground biomass, as well as on N uptake and N concentration of wheat. The recovery of urea-15N was a little higher for broadcast (34.0–39.0%) than for band treatment (31.2–38.2%). Most of the soil residual N was retained in the 0–20 cm soil layer. At the N rates of 60 and 240 kg ha–1, the residual 15N was higher for band (34.4 and 108.7 kg ha–1, respectively) than for broadcast application (29.6 and 88.4 kg ha–1, respectively). Compared with broadcast treatment, banded placement of N fertilizer decreased the N loss in the wheat–soil system. Band application one time is an alternative N management practice for winter wheat in this region. PMID:27082246

  5. Multinuclear 1H, 13C and 15N NMR study of some substituted 2-amino-4-nitropyridines and their N-oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihia, K.; Kolehmainen, E.; Kauppinen, R.; Lorenc, J.; Puszko, A.

    2002-05-01

    1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments based on pulsed field gradient selected PFG 1H,X (X= 13C and 15N) HMQC and HMBC experiments are reported for three 4-nitropyridine N-oxides and four 4-nitropyridines. It was found that an ortho effect of a methyl group inhibits the deshielding effect of the 4-nitro group and that this effect and the so-called back donation is influenced by electronegativity and position of substituents in the multisubstituted pyridine N-oxides. The shielding effect of N-oxide group is most pronounced in the 15N NMR chemical shifts of the studied compounds. This effect is further modified by methylamino, methylnitramino, 5- or 3-methyl and 4-nitro groups. Among them the 4-nitro group exerts the highest influence on the shielding effect of the N-oxide functionality. Experimental 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shifts and GIAO/DFT theoretical calculations are consistent with each other and supported by the reactivity on nucleophilic substitution, the UV spectral and the dipole moment data.

  6. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  7. Compound-Specific δ15N Amino Acid Measurements in Littoral Mussels in the California Upwelling Ecosystem: A New Approach to Generating Baseline δ15N Isoscapes for Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ15N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ15N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ15N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ15N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼7‰ to ∼12‰, R2 = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ15N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ15N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ15N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with15N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ15N values of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ15N values. We hypothesize δ15NPhe values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ15N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ15NPhe values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ15N values. We propose that δ15NPhe isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ15N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives. PMID:24887109

  8. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  9. Mechanism of rotational relaxation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    A model is presented which describes the characteristic pattern of relaxation of a nonthermal rotational distribution of hydrogen halide, peaked initially at high rotational quantum number J, to a thermal distribution without generating a peak at intermediate J. A method for correcting infrared chemiluminiscence data for modest rotational relaxation is also suggested.

  10. Nitrate Removal in Two Relict Oxbow Urban Wetlands: A 15N Mass-balance Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 15N-tracer method was used to quantify nitrogen (N) removal processes in two relict oxbow wetlands located adjacent to the Minebank Run restored stream reach in Baltimore County (Maryland, USA) during summer 2009 and early spring 2010. A mass-balance approach was used to determ...

  11. Using a Macroalgal δ15N Bioassay to Detect Cruise Ship Waste Water Effluent Inputs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  12. {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 12}C S factor

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, F. C.

    2008-10-15

    Experimental values of the astrophysical S factor for the {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 12}C reaction are available both from direct measurements and from the Trojan horse method. We here use R-matrix formulas to fit these values and to extrapolate to zero energy to obtain values of S(0)

  13. The use of delta(15)N in assessing sewage stress on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Risk, Michael J; Lapointe, Brian E; Sherwood, Owen A; Bedford, Bradley J

    2009-06-01

    While coral reefs decline, scientists argue, and effective strategies to manage land-based pollution lag behind the extent of the problem. There is need for objective, cost-effective, assessment methods. The measurement of stable nitrogen isotope ratios, delta(15)N, in tissues of reef organisms shows promise as an indicator of sewage stress. The choice of target organism will depend upon study purpose, availability, and other considerations such as conservation. Algae are usually plentiful and have been shown faithfully to track sewage input. The organic matrix of bivalve shells can provide time series spanning, perhaps, decades. Gorgonians have been shown to track sewage, and can provide records potentially centuries-long. In areas where baseline data are lacking, which is almost everywhere, delta(15)N in gorgonians can provide information on status and trends. In coral tissue, delta(15)N combined with insoluble residue determination can provide information on both sewage and sediment stress in areas lacking baseline data. In the developed world, delta(15)N provides objective assessment in a field complicated by conflicting opinions. Sample handling and processing are simple and analysis costs are low. This is a method deserving widespread application. PMID:19286230

  14. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  15. Tracing Nitrogen through Landscapes to Coastal Wetlands using d15N of Larval Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to evaluate the use of the nitrogen stable isotope value (d15N) of larval fish as an indicator of incipient anthropogenic nitrogen loading to coastal wetlands in the Great Lakes. We sampled coastal wetlands in five Lake Superior south shore tributaries that had ...

  16. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts. PMID:26590548

  17. δ15N measurement of organic and inorganic substances by EA-IRMS: a speciation-dependent procedure.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Natacha; Rossi, Michel J; Delémont, Olivier; Siegwolf, Rolf T W

    2013-01-01

    Little attention has been paid so far to the influence of the chemical nature of the substance when measuring δ(15)N by elemental analysis (EA)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Although the bulk nitrogen isotope analysis of organic material is not to be questioned, literature from different disciplines using IRMS provides hints that the quantitative conversion of nitrate into nitrogen presents difficulties. We observed abnormal series of δ(15)N values of laboratory standards and nitrates. These unexpected results were shown to be related to the tailing of the nitrogen peak of nitrate-containing compounds. A series of experiments were set up to investigate the cause of this phenomenon, using ammonium nitrate (NH(4)NO(3)) and potassium nitrate (KNO(3)) samples, two organic laboratory standards as well as the international secondary reference materials IAEA-N1, IAEA-N2-two ammonium sulphates [(NH(4))(2)SO(4)]-and IAEA-NO-3, a potassium nitrate. In experiment 1, we used graphite and vanadium pentoxide (V(2)O(5)) as additives to observe if they could enhance the decomposition (combustion) of nitrates. In experiment 2, we tested another elemental analyser configuration including an additional section of reduced copper in order to see whether or not the tailing could originate from an incomplete reduction process. Finally, we modified several parameters of the method and observed their influence on the peak shape, δ(15)N value and nitrogen content in weight percent of nitrogen of the target substances. We found the best results using mere thermal decomposition in helium, under exclusion of any oxygen. We show that the analytical procedure used for organic samples should not be used for nitrates because of their different chemical nature. We present the best performance given one set of sample introduction parameters for the analysis of nitrates, as well as for the ammonium sulphate IAEA-N1 and IAEA-N2 reference materials. We discuss these results considering the

  18. Vertical δ13C and δ15N changes during pedogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunn, Melanie; Spielvogel, Sandra; Wells, Andrew; Condron, Leo; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2015-04-01

    The natural abundance of soil organic matter (SOM) stable C and N isotope ratios are subjected to vertical changes throughout the soil profile. This vertical distribution is a widely reported phenomenon across varieties of ecosystems and constitutes important insights of soil carbon cycling. In most ecosystems, SOM becomes enriched in heavy isotopes by several per mill in the first few centimeters of the topsoil. The enrichment of 13C in SOM with soil depth is attributed to biological and physical-chemical processes in soil e.g., plant physiological impacts, microbial decomposition, sorption and transport processes. Such vertical trends in 13C and 15N abundance have rarely been related to SOM composition during pedogenesis. The aims of our study were to investigate short and long-term δ13C and δ15N depth changes and their interrelations under progressing pedogenesis and ecosystem development. We sampled soils across the well studied fordune progradation Haast-chronosequence, a dune ridge system under super-humid climate at the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island (43° 53' S, 169° 3' E). Soils from 11 sites with five replicates each covered a time span of around 2870 yr of soil development (from Arenosol to Podzol). Vertical changes of δ13C and δ15N values of SOM were investigated in the organic layers and in 1-cm depth intervals of the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. With increasing soil depth SOM became enriched in δ13C by 1.9 ± SE 0.1 o and in δ15N by 6.0 ± 0.4 ‰˙Litter δ13C values slightly decreased with increasing soil age (r = -0.61; p = 0.00) likely due to less efficient assimilation linked to nutrient limitations. Fractionation processes during mycorrhizal transfer appeared to affect δ15N values in the litter. We found a strong decrease of δ15N in the early succession stages ≤ 300 yr B.P. (r = -0.95; p = 0.00). Positive relations of vertical 13C and 15N enrichment with soil age might be related to decomposition and appeared to be

  19. Do Low 15N Values in Paleozoic Epeiric Basins Indicate High Rates of N Fixation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuite, M. L.; Macko, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    As a consequence of the high energetic requirements of dinitrogen (N2) fixation, organic N produced by diazotrophic microorganisms typically exhibits δ15N values similar to atmospheric N2 (approximately 0%). Because the δ15N of organic-rich Paleozoic epeiric basin sediments often has values in the vicinity of 0%, it is frequently asserted that N2 fixation was the primary source of new reactive N for productivity. There are two broad reasons why recourse to widespread and intensive N fixation as the primary source of the organic N is problematic. First, there are substantial physiological and ecological constraints on marine N fixation that limit its extent in modern oceans primarily to open ocean basins. Second, preservation of an unaltered isotopic signature of diazotrophy in underlying sediments is not a likely outcome of oxic and anoxic diagenetic alteration and repeated cycles of mineralization and assimilation. Constraining the sources of reactive N for primary productivity is critical to understanding the N cycle in Paleozoic epeiric seas. In this study we report δ15N values from high organic matter Middle Ordovician through Late Devonian dysoxic and euxinic basinal sediments. We propose a nitrogen isotope mass balance model that incorporates the microbial ecology of a stratified water column and the biochemical stoichiometry of primary production and organic matter diagenesis. Results from the model support our contention that high rates of N fixation over extended time periods were not the cause of depleted nitrogen isotope values in organic-rich Paleozoic basinal sediments. Rather, the depleted values were a consequence of a diminished role for nitrification and subsequent N loss via denitrification and anammox, and the preferential preservation of a substantially 15N-depleted chlorophyll-influenced lipid fraction. The model may be applicable to earlier and later geological periods where high organic matter sediments feature depleted δ15N values.

  20. Evaluating δ(15)N-body size relationships across taxonomic levels using hierarchical models.

    PubMed

    Reum, Jonathan C P; Marshall, Kristin N

    2013-12-01

    Ecologists routinely set out to estimate the trophic position of individuals, populations, and species composing food webs, and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ(15)N) are a widely used proxy for trophic position. Although δ(15)N values are often sampled at the level of individuals, estimates and confidence intervals are frequently sought for aggregations of individuals. If individual δ(15)N values are correlated as an artifact of sampling design (e.g., clustering of samples in space or time) or due to intrinsic groupings (e.g., life history stages, social groups, taxonomy), such estimates may be biased and exhibit overly optimistic confidence intervals. However, these issues can be accommodated using hierarchical modeling methods. Here, we demonstrate how hierarchical models offer an additional quantitative tool for investigating δ(15)N variability and we explicitly evaluate how δ(15)N varies with body size at successively higher levels of taxonomic aggregation in a diverse fish assemblage. The models take advantage of all available data, better account for uncertainty in parameters estimates, may improve inferences on coefficients corresponding to groups with small to moderate sample sizes, and partition variation across model levels, which provides convenient summaries of the 'importance' of each level in terms of unexplained heterogeneity in the data. These methods can easily be applied to diet-based studies of trophic position. Although hierarchical models are well-understood and established tools, their benefits have yet to be fully reaped by stable isotope and food web ecologists. We suggest that hierarchical models can provide a robust framework for conceptualizing and statistically modeling trophic position at multiple levels of aggregation. PMID:23812110

  1. Influence of open ocean nitrogen supply on the skeletal δ15N of modern shallow-water scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen T.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Cohen, Anne L.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Cobb, Kim M.; Erler, Dirk V.; Stolarski, Jarosław; Kitahara, Marcelo V.; Ren, Haojia

    2016-05-01

    The isotopic composition of skeleton-bound organic nitrogen in shallow-water scleractinian corals (hereafter, CS-δ15N) is an emerging tool for studying the marine nitrogen cycle in the past. The CS-δ15N has been shown to reflect the δ15N of nitrogen (N) sources to corals, with most applications to date focusing on the anthropogenic/terrestrial N inputs to reef environments. However, many coral reefs receive their primary N sources from the open ocean, and the CS-δ15N of these corals may provide information on past changes in the open ocean regional and global N cycle. Using a recently developed persulfate/denitrifier-based method, we measured CS-δ15N in modern shallow-water scleractinian corals from 8 sites proximal to the open ocean. At sites with low open ocean surface nitrate concentrations typical of the subtropics and tropics, measured CS-δ15N variation on seasonal and annual timescales is most often less than 2‰. In contrast, a broad range in CS-δ15N (of ∼10‰) is measured across these sites, with a strong correlation between CS-δ15N and the δ15N of the deep nitrate supply to the surface waters near the reefs. While CS-δ15N can be affected by other N sources as well and can vary in response to local reef conditions as well as coral/symbiont physiological changes, this survey indicates that, when considering corals proximal to the open ocean, the δ15N of the subsurface nitrate supply to surface waters drives most of the CS-δ15N variation across the global ocean. Thus, CS-δ15N is a promising proxy for reconstructing the open ocean N cycle in the past.

  2. Ureide assay for measuring nitrogen fixation by nodulated soybean calibrated by sup 15 N methods. [Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Herridge, D.F. ); Peoples, M.B. )

    1990-06-01

    We report experiments to quantify the relationships between the relative abundance of ureide-N in root-bleeding sap, vacuum-extracted sap, and hot water extracts of stems and petioles of nodulated soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv Bragg) and the proportion of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation. Additional experiments examined the effects of plant genotype and strain of rhizobia on these relationships. In each of the five experiments reported, plants of cv Bragg (experiment 1), cv Lincoln (experiments 3, 4, 5), or six cultivars/genotypes (experiment 2) were grown in a sand:vermiculite mixture in large pots in a naturally lit, temperature-controlled glasshouse during summer. Pots were inoculated at sowing with effective Bradyrhizobium japonicum CB 1809 (USDA 136) or with one of 21 different strains of rhizobia. The proportions of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation were determined using {sup 15}N dilution. Results show that assessment of nitrogen fixation by soybean using the ureide technique should now be possible with the standard curves presented, irrespective of genotype or strain of rhizobia occupying the nodules.

  3. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  4. Solution 1H, 15N NMR spectroscopic characterization of substrate-bound, cyanide-inhibited human heme oxygenase: water occupation of the distal cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Syvitski, Ray T; Auclair, Karine; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul; La Mar, Gerd N

    2003-11-01

    A solution NMR spectroscopic study of the cyanide-inhibited, substrate-bound complex of uniformly (15)N-labeled human heme oxygenase, hHO, has led to characterization of the active site with respect to the nature and identity of strong hydrogen bonds and the occupation of ordered water molecules within both the hydrogen bonding network and an aromatic cluster on the distal side. [(1)H-(15)N]-HSQC spectra confirm the functionalities of several key donors in particularly robust H-bonds, and [(1)H-(15)N]HSQC-NOESY spectra lead to the identification of three additional robust H-bonds, as well as the detection of two more relatively strong H-bonds whose identities could not be established. The 3D NMR experiments provided only a modest, but important, extension of assignments because of the loss of key TOCSY cross-peaks due to the line broadening from a dynamic heterogeneity in the active site. Steady-state NOEs upon saturating the water signal locate nine ordered water molecules in the immediate vicinity of the H-bond donors, six of which are readily identified in the crystal structure. The additional three are positioned in available spaces to account for the observed NOEs. (15)N-filtered steady-state NOEs upon saturating the water resonances and (15)N-filtered NOESY spectra demonstrate significant negative NOEs between water molecules and the protons of five aromatic rings. Many of the NOEs can be rationalized by water molecules located in the crystal structure, but strong water NOEs, particularly to the rings of Phe47 and Trp96, demand the presence of at least an additional two immobilized water molecules near these rings. The H-bond network appears to function to order water molecules to provide stabilization for the hydroperoxy intermediate and to serve as a conduit to the active site for the nine protons required per HO turnover. PMID:14583035

  5. Application of unsymmetrical indirect covariance NMR methods to the computation of the (13)C <--> (15)N HSQC-IMPEACH and (13)C <--> (15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectra.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary E; Hilton, Bruce D; Irish, Patrick A; Blinov, Kirill A; Williams, Antony J

    2007-10-01

    Utilization of long-range (1)H--(15)N heteronuclear chemical shift correlation has continually grown in importance since the first applications were reported in 1995. More recently, indirect covariance NMR methods have been introduced followed by the development of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing methods. The latter technique has been shown to allow the calculation of hyphenated 2D NMR data matrices from more readily acquired nonhyphenated 2D NMR spectra. We recently reported the use of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing to combine (1)H--(13)C GHSQC and (1)H--(15)N GHMBC long-range spectra to yield a (13)C--(15)N HSQC-HMBC chemical shift correlation spectrum that could not be acquired in a reasonable period of time without resorting to (15)N-labeled molecules. We now report the unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing of (1)H--(13)C GHMBC and (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectra to afford a (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH spectrum that has the potential to span as many as six to eight bonds. Correlations for carbon resonances long-range coupled to a protonated carbon in the (1)H--(13)C HMBC spectrum are transferred via the long-range (1)H--(15)N coupling pathway in the (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectrum to afford a much broader range of correlation possibilities in the (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectrum. The indole alkaloid vincamine is used as a model compound to illustrate the application of the method. PMID:17729230

  6. Regional patterns of 15N natural abundance in forest ecosystems along a large transect in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Wenping; Yu, Guirui; Fang, Huajun; Liu, Yingchun; Wang, Qiufeng; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Li

    2014-02-01

    The regional determining factors underlying inter- and intra-site variation of 15N natural abundance in foliage, O horizon and mineral soil were investigated in eastern China.15N natural abundance values for these forest ecosystems were in the middle of the range of values previously found for global forest ecosystems. In contrast to commonly reported global patterns, temperate forest ecosystems were significantly more15N-enriched than tropical forest ecosystems, and foliage δ15N was negatively correlated with increasing mean annual temperature and net soil N mineralisation in eastern China. Tight N cycling in forest ecosystems and the use of atmospheric N deposition by trees might underlie the δ15N distribution patterns in eastern China. The existence of mycorrhizal fungi and root distribution profiles in the soil may also influence the15N natural abundance patterns in forest ecosystems of eastern China.

  7. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ15N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Francisca P.; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ15N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ15N and δ13C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ15N values span the entire gradient, soil δ15N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ15N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ15N values.

  8. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ(15)N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Francisca P; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ(15)N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ(15)N and δ(13)C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ(15)N values span the entire gradient, soil δ(15)N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ(15)N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ(15)N values. PMID:26956399

  9. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ15N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Francisca P.; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ15N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ15N and δ13C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ15N values span the entire gradient, soil δ15N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ15N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ15N values. PMID:26956399

  10. Application of the double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference device sensor to micro-tesla 1H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chan Seok; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Seong-Joo; Hwang, Seong-min; Kim, Jin-Mok; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Kwon, Hyukchan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2011-09-01

    We developed an ultra-low field (ULF)-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement system capable of working with a measurement field (Bm) of several micro-tesla and performed basic NMR studies with a double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference device (DROS) instead of conventional dc-SQUIDs. DROS is a SQUID sensor utilizing a relaxation oscillation between a dc-SQUID and a relaxation circuit; the new unit consists of an inductor and a resistor, and is connected in parallel with the SQUID. DROS has a 10 times larger flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient (˜mV/ϕ0) than that of the dc-SQUID, and this large transfer coefficient enables the acquisition of the SQUID signal with a simple flux-locked-loop (FLL) circuit using room temperature pre-amplifiers. The DROS second-order gradiometer showed average field noise of 9.2 μϕ0/√Hz in a magnetically shielded room (MSR). In addition, a current limiter formed of a Josephson junction array was put in a flux-transformer of DROS to prevent excessive currents that can be generated from the high pre-polarization field (Bp). Using this system, we measured an 1H NMR signal in water under 2.8 μT Bm field and reconstructed a one-dimensional MR image from the 1H NMR signal under a gradient field BG of 4.09 nT/mm. In addition, we confirmed that the ULF-NMR system can measure the NMR signal in the presence of metal without any distortion by measuring the NMR signal of a sample wrapped with metal. Lastly, we have measured the scalar J-coupling of trimethylphosphate and were able to confirm a clear doublet NMR signal with the coupling strength J3[P,H] = 10.4 ± 0.8 Hz. Finally, because the existing ULF-NMR/MRI studies were almost all performed with dc-SQUID based systems, we constructed a dc-SQUID-based ULF-NMR system in addition to the DROS based system and compared the characteristics of the two different systems by operating the two systems under identical experimental conditions.

  11. Isotopic variability of cave bears (δ15N, δ13C) across Europe during MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajcarz, Magdalena; Pacher, Martina; Krajcarz, Maciej T.; Laughlan, Lana; Rabeder, Gernot; Sabol, Martin; Wojtal, Piotr; Bocherens, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, the organic fraction of bone, records the isotopic parameters of consumed food for carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). This relationship of isotopic signature between diet and tissue is an important tool for the study of dietary preferences of modern and fossil animal species. Since the first information on the isotopic signature of cave bear was reported, numerous data from Europe have become available. The goal of this work is to track the geographical variation of cave bear collagen isotopic values in Europe during Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (about 60,000-25,000 yr BP). In this study the results of new δ13C and δ15N isotopic analyses of cave bear collagen from four Central-Eastern European sites are presented, as well as a review of all published isotopic data for cave bears of the same period. The main conclusion is a lack of geographical East-West pattern in the variations of δ13C and δ15N values of cave bear collagen. Moreover, no relationship was found between cave bear taxonomy and isotopic composition. The cave bears from Central-Eastern Europe exhibit δ13C and δ15N values near the average of the range of Central, Western and Southern European cave bears. Despite the fact that most cave bear sites follow an altitudinal gradient, separate groups of sites exhibit shift in absolute values of δ13C, what disturbs an altitude-related isotopic pattern. The most distinct groups are: high Alpine sites situated over 1500 m a.s.l. - in terms of δ13C; and two Romanian sites Peştera cu Oase and Urşilor - in case of δ15N. Although the cave bear isotopic signature is driven by altitude, the altitudinal adjustment of isotopic data is not enough to explain the isotopic dissimilarity of these cave bears. The unusually high δ15N signature of mentioned Romanian sites is an isolated case in Europe. Cave bears from relatively closely situated Central-Eastern European sites and other Romanian sites are more similar to Western European than to Romanian

  12. Dynamics of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(15)N nitroxide-propylene glycol system studied by ESR and ESE in liquid and glassy state in temperature range 10-295K.

    PubMed

    Goslar, Janina; Hoffmann, Stanislaw K; Lijewski, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    ESR spectra and electron spin relaxation of nitroxide radical in 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(15)N in propylene glycol were studied at X-band in the temperature range 10-295K. The spin-lattice relaxation in the liquid viscous state determined from the resonance line shape is governed by three mechanisms occurring during isotropic molecular reorientations. In the glassy state below 200K the spin-lattice relaxation, phase relaxation and electron spin echo envelope modulations (ESEEM) were studied by pulse spin echo technique using 2-pulse and 3-pulse induced signals. Electron spin-lattice relaxation is governed by a single non-phonon relaxation process produced by localized oscillators of energy 76cm(-1). Electron spin dephasing is dominated by a molecular motion producing a resonance-type peak in the temperature dependence of the dephasing rate around 120K. The origin of the peak is discussed and a simple method for the peak shape analysis is proposed, which gives the activation energy of a thermally activated motion Ea=7.8kJ/mol and correlation time τ0=10(-8)s. The spin echo amplitude is strongly modulated and FT spectrum contains a doublet of lines centered around the (2)D nuclei Zeeman frequency. The splitting into the doublet is discussed as due to a weak hyperfine coupling of nitroxide unpaired electron with deuterium of reorienting CD3 groups. PMID:27323281

  13. Dynamics of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N nitroxide-propylene glycol system studied by ESR and ESE in liquid and glassy state in temperature range 10-295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goslar, Janina; Hoffmann, Stanislaw K.; Lijewski, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    ESR spectra and electron spin relaxation of nitroxide radical in 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N in propylene glycol were studied at X-band in the temperature range 10-295 K. The spin-lattice relaxation in the liquid viscous state determined from the resonance line shape is governed by three mechanisms occurring during isotropic molecular reorientations. In the glassy state below 200 K the spin-lattice relaxation, phase relaxation and electron spin echo envelope modulations (ESEEM) were studied by pulse spin echo technique using 2-pulse and 3-pulse induced signals. Electron spin-lattice relaxation is governed by a single non-phonon relaxation process produced by localized oscillators of energy 76 cm-1. Electron spin dephasing is dominated by a molecular motion producing a resonance-type peak in the temperature dependence of the dephasing rate around 120 K. The origin of the peak is discussed and a simple method for the peak shape analysis is proposed, which gives the activation energy of a thermally activated motion Ea = 7.8 kJ/mol and correlation time τ0 = 10-8 s. The spin echo amplitude is strongly modulated and FT spectrum contains a doublet of lines centered around the 2D nuclei Zeeman frequency. The splitting into the doublet is discussed as due to a weak hyperfine coupling of nitroxide unpaired electron with deuterium of reorienting CD3 groups.

  14. Dynamics of nanoscale ripple relaxation on alloy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2008-02-01

    As an alloy surface evolves under capillary forces, differing mobilities of the individual components can lead to kinetic alloy decomposition at the surface. In this paper, we address the relaxation of nanoscale sinusoidal ripples on alloy surfaces by considering the effects of both surface and bulk diffusion. In the absence of bulk diffusion, we derive exact analytical expressions for relaxation rates and identify two natural time scales that govern the relaxation dynamics. Bulk diffusion is shown to reduce kinetic surface segregation and enhance relaxation rates, owing to intermixing near the surface. Our results provide a quantitative framework for the interpretation of relaxation experiments on alloy surfaces. PMID:18352033

  15. Assignment strategy for fast relaxing signals: complete aminoacid identification in thulium substituted calbindin D 9K.

    PubMed

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Jiménez, Beatriz; Piccioli, Mario

    2006-02-01

    Paramagnetic proteins generally contain regions with diverse relaxation properties. Nuclei in regions far from the metal center may behave like those in diamagnetic proteins, but those closer to the metal experience rapid relaxation with accompanying line broadening. We have used a set of NMR experiments optimized to capture data from these various concentric regions in assigning the signals from a paramagnetic Calbindin D 9K derivative in which one of the two calcium ions has been replaced by thulium(III). Normal double- and triple-resonance experiments with 1H detection were used in collecting data from nuclei in the diamagnetic-like region; these approaches identified signals from fewer than 50% of the amino acid residues (those with d > 17.5 A from thulium(III)). Paramagnetism-optimized two-dimensional NMR experiments with 1H detection were used in collecting data from nuclei in the next nearer region (d > 15 A). Standard (d > 14 A) and optimized (d > 9 A) 13C direct-detection experiments were used to capture data from nuclei in the next layer. Finally nuclei closest to the metal were detected by one-dimensional 13C (d > 5 A) and one-dimensional 15N data collection (d > 4.2 A). NMR signals were assigned on the basis of through-bond correlations and, for signals closest to the metal, pseudocontact shifts. The latter were determined from chemical shift differences between assigned signals in thulium(III) and lanthanum(III) derivatives of Calbindin D 9K and they were interpreted on the basis of a structural model for the lanthanide-substituted protein. This approach yielded assignments of at least one resonance per amino acid residue, including those in the thulium(III) coordination sphere. PMID:16518694

  16. Interference effects in proton scattering on {sup 15}N nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraeva, E. T.; Zhusupov, M.A.; Imambekov, O.; Krassovitskiy, P. M.

    2010-08-15

    The differential cross section for proton scattering on {sup 15}N nuclei is calculated within Glauber diffraction theory at energies of 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0 GeV. Use is made of the shell-model wave function for the {sup 15}N nucleus. The contribution of single and double collisions to the Glauber operator {Omega} is taken into account. The sensitivity of the differential cross sections to the contributions of scattering on nucleons from different shells, to the parameters of the elementary pN amplitude, and to the energy of projectile protons is investigated. It is shown that the interference between amplitudes corresponding to different collision multiplicities, as well as between the amplitudes for scattering on nucleons from different shells, determines special features of the cross section.

  17. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of phenazopyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Mora-Pérez, Yolanda; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    Phenazopyridine hydrochloride (1), a drug in clinical use for many decades, and some derivatives were studied by one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR methodology. The assignments, combined with DFT calculations, reveal that the preferred protonation site of the drug is the pyridine ring nitrogen atom. The chemoselective acetylation of phenazopyridine (2) and its influence on the polarization of the azo nitrogen atoms were evidenced by the (15)N NMR spectra. Molecular calculations of the phenazopyridines 2-4 show that the pyridine and phenyl groups are oriented in an antiperiplanar conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-b atom and the C-2 amino group preserving the E-azo stereochemistry. PMID:15625718

  18. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of 15N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of 1H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on Nz during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ~1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies. PMID:26253948

  19. Mycorrhizal Fungi Provide Most of the Nitrogen for Symbiotic Arctic Plants: 15N Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, J. E.; Hobbie, E. A.

    2004-12-01

    When soil nitrogen is in short supply, most terrestrial plants form symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizae) in which fine hyphal threads take up soil nitrogen, transport it into plant roots, and in return receive plant sugars. Because the transfer rates are very difficult to measure in nature, ecologists need new tools by which to assess the role of mycorrhizal fungi in carbon and nitrogen cycling. Recent studies indicate that the natural abundance of 15N taken up from the soil by hyphae is changed during transfer of nitrogen to roots; the result is large differences among the natural abundance of 15N in soil, symbiotic plants, and symbiotic fungi that depend on the mass balance of nitrogen in the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Measurements were carried out in acidic tussock tundra at the Toolik Lake LTER site in Arctic Alaska (68\\deg N 149\\deg W). The \\delta15N of soil N was 1.5%, of soil ammonium was 1.5%, of ericoid and ectomycorrhizal plants was -5.0%, and of ectomycorrhizal fungi was 7.0 parts per mille%. The mass balance of the 15N shows that the plants received 61-86% of their nitrogen from the fungal hyphae. These values, when combined with known plant growth rates, reveal that the plants provided 7-16% of their photosynthetic carbon to the fungi for growth and respiration, or about 25% of all carbon allocated to belowground processes. This analytical technique could be readily applied to other nitrogen-limited ecosystems such as many temperate and boreal forests to quantify the importance for terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling of mycorrhizally mediated transfers at the plant-soil interface.

  20. δ15N in the turtle grass from the Mexican Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talavera-Saenz, A.; Sanchez, A.; Ortiz-Hernandez, M.

    2013-05-01

    Nutrient inputs associated with population growth threaten the integrity of coastal ecosystems. To assess the rapid increase in tourism, we compared the δ15N from Thalassia testudinum collected at sites with different levels of tourism development and population to detect the N inputs of wastewater discharge (WD) along the coast of Quintana Roo. The contributions of nitrogen enriched in 15N are directly related to the increase of WD inputs in areas of high tourism development (Nichupte Lagoon in Cancun, >3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.7 million of resident population) and decreased towards Bahia Akumal and Tulum (>3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.15 million of resident population). The δ15N from T. testudinum was significantly lower at Mahahual and Puerto Morelos (about 0.4 million tourists per year in 2007 to 2011 and 0.25 million of resident population) than other the sites. In areas of the lowest development and with tourist activity restricted and small population, such as the Yum Balam Reserve and Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve, the δ15N values were in much higher enrichment that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. Therefore is suggested that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos may be used for baseline isotopic monitoring, over environmental pressure on the reef lagoon ecosystem, where tourist activities and population are growing very slow rate. The anthropogenic N input has the potential to impact, both environmentally and economically, the seagrass meadows and the coral reefs along the coast of Quintana Roo and the Caribbean.

  1. δ15N as a Potential Paleoenvironmental Proxy for Nitrogen Loading in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, H. D.; Andrus, C. F.; Rick, T.; Hines, A.

    2013-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis of Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and other mollusk shells from archaeological sites is a useful means of acquiring paleoenvironmental data. Recently, nitrogen isotopes have been identified as a potential new proxy in these shells. δ15N content in mollusk shells is affected by numerous anthropogenic and natural influences and may be used as an environmental proxy for nitrogen loading conditions. Chesapeake Bay is well known for both historic and modern pollution problems from numerous anthropogenic sources, such as fertilizer runoff, sewage discharge, and densely populated land use and serves as an ideal study location for long-term nitrogen loading processes. Longer records of these processes may be recorded in abundant archaeological remains around the bay, however, little is known about the stability of δ15N and %N in shell material over recent geologic time. In this study, 90 archaeological C. virginica shells were collected by the Smithsonian Institution from the Rhode River Estuary within Chesapeake Bay and range in age from ~150 to 3200 years old. Twenty-two modern C. virginica shells were also collected from nearby beds in the bay. All shell samples were subsampled from the resilifer region of the calcitic shell using a hand-held micro drill and were analyzed using EA-IRMS analysis to determine the potential temporal variability of δ15N and %N as well as creating a baseline for ancient nitrogen conditions in the bay area. Modern POM water samples and C. virginica soft tissues were also analyzed in this study to determine the degree of seasonal variation of δ15N and %N in Chesapeake Bay.

  2. SEARCH FOR AN 80-ms SPONTANEOUS FISSION ACTIVITY IN BOMBARDMENTS OF 249Bk WITH 15N

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.; Fowler, M.; Ghiorso, A.; Leber, R.E.; Nurmia, M.J.; Somerville, L.P.; Williams, K.E.; Hulet, E.K.; Landrum, J.H.; Lougheed, R.W.; Wild, J.F.; Bemis, Jr., C.E.; Silva, R.J.; Eskola, P.

    1980-01-01

    A rotating drum system was used to search for an 80-ms spontaneous fission (sf) activity in the reaction of {sup 15}N with {sup 249}Bk. No such activity was found beyond a cross section limit of 0.3 {+-} 0.3 nb. A sf activity with a half-life of about 20 ms and a formation cross section of 12 nb at 82 MeV was observed. The identity of this activity has not been determined.

  3. Determination of the δ15N of total nitrogen in solids; RSIL lab code 2893

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2893 is to determine the δ(15N/14N), abbreviated as δ15N , of total nitrogen in solid samples. A Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA) is used to convert total nitrogen in a solid sample into N2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines relative difference in the isotope-amount ratios of stable nitrogen isotopes (15N/14N)of the product N2 gas. The combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. Samples are placed in a tin capsule and loaded into the Costech Zero Blank Autosampler of the EA. Under computer control, samples are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where the combustion takes place in a helium atmosphere containing an excess of oxygen gas. Combustion products are transported by a helium carrier through a reduction tube to remove excess oxygen and convert all nitrous oxides into N2 and through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly CO2 and N2, are separated by a gas chromatograph. The gas is then introduced into the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) through a Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) ConFlo II interface, which also is used to inject N2 reference gas and helium for sample dilution. The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus CF-IRMS. It has a universal triple collector, two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle, capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 28, 29, 30, simultaneously. The ion beams from N2 are as follows: m/z 28 = N2 = 14N14N; m/z 29 = N2 = 14N15N primarily; m/z 30 = NO = 14N16O primarily, which is a sign of contamination or incomplete reduction.

  4. Community 15N isoscapes to resolve plant-plant-interactions at the spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Christine; Rascher, Katherine G.; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Isoscapes have greatly improved our ability to understand biogeochemical processes on continental to global scales. However, the isoscapes framework may also have significant potential to resolve the spatial component of within-community interactions. For example, exotic plant invaders often exert strong impacts on ecosystem functioning, particularly regarding water-, carbon- and nutrient-cycles, but the spatial extent of such alterations is largely unknown. Here we show that massive N input by the N2-fixing exotic invasive Acacia longifolia to a Portuguese dune system can be traced using spatially resolved information on native plants' leaf δ15N. We found isotopic signatures of N to differ strongly between the native system (δ15N c. -10 o) and the atmospherically derived N in A. longifolia phyllodes (δ15N c. 0 o). Thus, sources of N for native plants could be readily distinguished. Leaf δ15N of a native, non-fixing species was increasingly enriched the closer the plant grew to the invader, indicating uptake of fixed N provided by A. longifolia. The enrichment was evident far beyond the stands of the invader, demonstrating that A. longifolia affected N budgets of native species up to a distance of 8 m exceeding the margin of the canopy. Furthermore, using the isoscapes approach, we were able to quantify the total area of N enrichment and could thus show that the area affected by invasion was at least 3.5 times larger than the area actually occupied by the invader. However, a native N2-fixing species had no such effects. Thus, downscaling isoscapes to the community level opens new frontiers in quantifying the spatial dimension of functional changes associated with plant invasions. Moreover, considering the feasibility and applicability of this approach, it may provide a promising tool to identify, quantify and monitor different types of functional plant-plant interactions within communities at a spatially explicit scale.

  5. Food webs of two intermittently open estuaries receiving 15N-enriched sewage effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadwen, Wade L.; Arthington, Angela H.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures were used to assess the response of food webs to sewage effluent discharged into two small intermittently open estuaries in northern New South Wales, Australia. One of these systems, Tallows Creek, has a history of direct sewage inputs, whilst the other, Belongil Creek, receives wastewater via an extensive wetland treatment system. The food webs of both systems were driven by algal sources of carbon, reflecting high autotrophic productivity in response to the nutrients entering the system from sewage effluent. All aquatic biota collected from Tallows Creek had significantly enriched δ15N signatures relative to their conspecifics from Belongil Creek, indicating that sewage nitrogen had been assimilated and transferred throughout the Tallows Creek food web. These δ15N values were higher than those reported from studies in permanently open estuaries receiving sewage effluent. We suggest that these enriched signatures and the transfer of nitrogen throughout the entire food web reflect differences in hydrology and associated nitrogen cycling processes between permanently open and intermittently open estuaries. Although all organisms in Tallows Creek were generally 15N-enriched, isotopically light (less 15N-enriched) individuals of estuary perchlet ( Ambassis marianus) and sea mullet ( Mugil cephalus) were also collected. These individuals were most likely recent immigrants into Tallows Creek, as this system had only recently been opened to the ocean. This isotopic discrimination between resident (enriched) and immigrant (significantly less enriched) individuals can provide information on fish movement patterns and the role of heavily polluted intermittently open estuaries in supporting commercially and recreationally valuable estuarine species.

  6. Mechanistic Determination of Nitrogen Removal By Advanced Soil-Based Wastewater Treatment Systems Using 15n Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J.; Loomis, G.; Kalen, D.; Boving, T. B.; Morales, I.; Amador, J.

    2014-12-01

    Current levels of nitrogen removal by onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are inadequate, with release of N from OWTS contributing to environmental N pollution, especially in coastal zones where aquatic ecosystems are sensitive to eutrophication. Current mechanistic understand of N removal are limited and mainly attributed to denitrification in the drainfield. Loss of N from N2O production during nitrification, a sparsely researched topic, may be a significant mechanism in advanced OWTS systems that enhance O2 diffusion by sand filter pre-treatment, shallow placement of infiltrative areas and timed dosing controls to prevent drainfield saturation. Replicate (n=3) intact soil mesocosms were used with 15N isotope to evaluate the effectiveness and mechanisms of N removal in drainfields with a conventional wastewater delivery (pipe-and-stone, P&S) compared to two advanced types of drainfields, pressurized shallow narrow drainfield (SND) and Geomat (GEO), a variation of a SND drainfield. Over the 11 day experiment, dissolved O2 was 1.6 mg/L for P&S and 3.0 mg/L for SND and GEO. Removal of total N was 13.5% for P&S, 4.8% for SND and 5.4% for GEO. 15NH4 labeled nitrogen inputs to drainfields were transformed primarily to 15NO3 in all outputs. Consistent low 15N2O levels were present in P&S, with increasing levels of N2 peaking 48h after 15NH4 injection, suggesting denitrification dominated N removal. By contrast, SND and GEO 15N2O levels rose quickly, peaking 8h after 15NH4 injection, suggesting N loss by nitrification. When the whole system is considered, including sand filter removal, 26 - 27% of total N was removed by the SND and GEO systems, whereas 14% of total N was removed in the P&S system. Our results suggest the SND and GEO systems as a whole are capable of removing a greater mass of N than the P&S system.

  7. Uptake and fate of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in coastal marine biota determined using a stable isotopic tracer, (15)N - [RDX].

    PubMed

    Ballentine, Mark L; Ariyarathna, Thivanka; Smith, Richard W; Cooper, Christopher; Vlahos, Penny; Fallis, Stephen; Groshens, Thomas J; Tobias, Craig

    2016-06-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is globally one of the most commonly used military explosives and environmental contaminant. (15)N labeled RDX was added into a mesocosm containing 9 different coastal marine species in a time series experiment to quantify the uptake of RDX and assess the RDX derived (15)N retention into biota tissue. The (15)N attributed to munitions compounds reached steady state concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 0.67 μg (15)N g dw(-1), the bulk (15)N tissue concentration for all species was 1-2 orders of magnitude higher suggesting a common mechanism or pathway of RDX biotransformation and retention of (15)N. A toxicokinetic model was created that described the (15)N uptake, elimination, and transformation rates. While modeled uptake rates were within previous published values, elimination rates were several orders of magnitude smaller than previous studies ranging from 0.05 to 0.7 days(-1). These small elimination rates were offset by high rates of retention of (15)N previously not measured. Bioconcentration factors and related aqueous:organism ratios of compounds and tracer calculated using different tracer and non-tracer methods yielded a broad range of values (0.35-101.6 mL g(-1)) that were largely method dependent. Despite the method-derived variability, all values were generally low and consistent with little bioaccumulation potential. The use of (15)N labeled RDX in this study indicates four possible explanations for the observed distribution of compounds and tracer; each with unique potential implications for possible toxicological impacts in the coastal marine environment. PMID:27010164

  8. Food webs in Mongolian grasslands: the analysis of 13C and 15N natural abundances.

    PubMed

    Kohzu, Ayato; Iwata, T; Kato, M; Nishikawa, J; Wada, Eitaro; Amartuvshin, N; Namkhaidorj, B; Fujita, N

    2009-09-01

    Overgrazing often lowers species richness and productivity of grassland communities. For Mongolian grassland ecosystems, a lack of detailed information about food-web structures makes it difficult to predict the effects of overgrazing on species diversity and community composition. We analysed the delta13C and delta15N signatures of herbaceous plants, arthropods (grouped by feeding habit), wild and domestic mammals, and humans in central Mongolia to understand the predominant food-web pathways in this grassland ecosystem. The delta13C and delta15N values of mammals showed little variation within species, but varied considerably with slope position for arthropods. The apparent isotopic discrimination between body tissue and hair of mammals was estimated as 2.0 per thousand for delta13C and 2.1 per thousand for delta15N, which was large enough to cause overestimation of the trophic level of mammals if not taken into account when using hair samples to measure isotopic enrichment. PMID:19507080

  9. Spin relaxation in metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, L.

    2011-02-01

    The Elliott theory of spin relaxation in metals and semiconductors is extended to metallic ferromagnets. Our treatment is based on the two-current model of Fert, Campbell, and Jaoul. The d→s electron-scattering process involved in spin relaxation is the inverse of the s→d process responsible for the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). As a result, spin-relaxation rate 1/τsr and AMR Δρ are given by similar formulas, and are in a constant ratio if scattering is by solute atoms. Our treatment applies to nickel- and cobalt-based alloys which do not have spin-up 3d states at the Fermi level. This category includes many of the technologically important magnetic materials. And we show how to modify the theory to apply it to bcc iron-based alloys. We also treat the case of Permalloy Ni80Fe20 at finite temperature or in thin-film form, where several kinds of scatterers exist. Predicted values of 1/τsr and Δρ are plotted versus resistivity of the sample. These predictions are compared to values of 1/τsr and Δρ derived from ferromagnetic-resonance and AMR experiments in Permalloy.

  10. Plant and Soil Natural Abundance delta-15N: Indicators of Nitrogen Cycling in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.; Lovett, G. M.; Weathers, K.; Arthur, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    We examined the potential use of natural abundance 15N of plants and soils as an indicator of forest nitrogen (N) cycling rates within the Catskill Mountains, NY. These watersheds receive among the highest rates of N deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Many studies have shown a link between increased N cycling rates and 15N enrichment of soil and plant pools. Faster rates of N cycling processes, especially nitrification, lead to fractionation of 14/15N, creating N products that are relatively depleted in 15N. This can lead to enrichment of soil pools, as lighter 14N is lost from the system via leaching or denitrification. Plant N pools can become increasingly enriched as they take up 15N-enriched soil N. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across the Catskill Mountains, forests dominated by different tree species appear to vary in the amount of N retained or lost to nearby streams. To determine if plant and soil 15N could be used as indicators of N cycling rates, we collected foliage, wood, litterfall, organic and mineral soil, and fine roots from single species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine roots and soil 15N were highest within sugar maple stands (p<0.05). Sugar maple soils also had the highest rates of net nitrification and N leaching. Therefore, soil 15N appears to correlate with forest N retention and loss. However, 15N enrichment was highest within foliage, litterfall and wood of beech trees (p<0.05). The decoupling between foliage 15N and N cycling, as well as between 15N of foliage and fine roots, illustrates that it may not be possible to use a single plant pool as an indicator of N cycling rates.

  11. A novel method for trapping and analyzing 15N in NO for tracing NO sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ronghua; Mulder, Jan; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    15N isotope tracing is an effective and direct approach to investigate the biological and chemical sources of nitric oxide (NO) in soil. However, NO is highly reactive and rapidly converted to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the presence of ozone. Various chemical conversions of NO to the more stable solutes nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) have been proposed, which allow analysing the 15N abundance without major fractionation. However, NO emissions from soils are usually small, posing major challenges to conversion efficiency and background contamination. Here we present a novel method in which NO is oxidized to NO2- by chromium trioxide (CrO3) prior to conversion to NO2- and NO3- in an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. Immediately following trapping, manganese dioxide (MnO2) and 5M HCl are added to remove excess H2O2, and to adjust the pH to around 6.0-7.0, respectively. The resulting solution can be stored until analysis and is none-toxic, allowing to use a modified denitrifier method (Zhu et al., submitted), where NO2- and NO3- are reduced quantitatively to nitrous oxide (N2O). Optimum NO conversion rates of > 90% even at extremely low initial NO concentration were obtained with 4% H2O2, 0.5 M NaOH, and 0.5 L min-1 gas flow rate. In a laboratory test, using NO gas with different 15N signals produced from unlabelled and labelled NO2-, we found an overall precision of 0.4‰ for unlabelled and 49.7‰ for NO enriched with 1.0 atom% 15N, respectively. This indicates that this method can be used for both natural abundance studies of NO, as well as in labelling studies tracing NO sources. Zhu J, Yu L, Bakken LR, Mørkved PT, Mulder J, Dörsch P. Controlled induction of denitrification in Pseudomonas aureofaciens: a modified denitrifier method for 15N and 18O analysis in NO3- from natural water samples by IRMS. Submitted.

  12. Elucidating the impact of nitrate and labile carbon application on spatial heterogeneity of denitrification by 15N modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Laura; Loick, Nadine; Dixon, Liz; Matthews, Peter; Gilsanz, Claudia; Bol, Roland; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    N2O is considered to be an important GHG with soils representing its major source and accounting for approximately 6% of the current global warming and is also implicated in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. The atmospheric N2O concentration has been increasing since the Industrial Revolution making the understanding of its sources and removal processes very important for development of mitigation strategies. Bergstermann et al. (2011) found evidence of the existence of more than one pool of nitrate undergoing denitrification in a silty clay loam arable soil amended with glucose/nitrate solution. The Rayleigh type model was used to simulate d15N of N2O using process rates and associated fractionation factors, but assumptions for some of the model parameters had to be made due to lack of available data. In this study we carried out 2 incubation experiments in order to parameterise the model. To restrict the volume of soil reached by the amendment, we used blocks containing 3 soil cores that were incubated in one vessel to measure emissions of NO, N2O, N2 and CO2 from a clay grassland soil amended with KNO3 (N) and glucose (C) in three treatments: '1C' only 1 core received N and C (the other 2 received water), '3C' 3 cores received N and C, and 'Control' (received water only). The results showed changes in the d15Nbulk trends after day 6 post amendment application, coinciding with the decrease of N2O fluxes. We also report the results in the 15N site preference (SP) and d18O. We will show the results from the model validation based on this data.

  13. Relationship between β-relaxation and structural stability of lysozyme: Microscopic insight on thermostabilization mechanism by trehalose from Raman spectroscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hédoux, Alain; Paccou, Laurent; Guinet, Yannick

    2014-06-01

    Raman investigations were carried out in the low-frequency and amide I regions on lysozyme aqueous solutions in absence and presence of trehalose. Raman spectroscopy gives the unique opportunity to analyze the protein and solvent dynamics in the low-frequency range while monitoring the unfolding process by capturing the spectrum of the amide I band. From the analysis of the quasielastic intensity, a dynamic change is firstly observed in a highly hydrated protein, around 70 °C, and interpreted in relation with the denaturation mechanism of the protein. The use of heavy water and partly deuterated trehalose gives clear information on protein-trehalose interactions in the native state of lysozyme (at room temperature) and during the thermal denaturation process of lysozyme. At room temperature, it was found that trehalose is preferentially excluded from the protein surface, and has a main effect on the tetrahedral local order of water molecules corresponding to a stiffening of the H-bond network in the solvent. The consequence is a significant reduction of the amplitude of fast relaxational motions, inducing a less marked dynamic transition shifted toward the high temperatures. Upon heating, interaction between trehalose and lysozyme is detected during the solvent penetration within the protein, i.e., while the native globular state softens into a molten globule (MG) state. Addition of trehalose reduces the protein flexibility in the MG state, improving the structural stability of the protein, and inhibiting the protein aggregation.

  14. δ15N patterns of Douglas-fir and red alder riparian forests in the Oregon Coast Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, E.E.; Perakis, S.S.; Hibbs, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    We used naturally occurring stable isotopes of N to compare N dynamics in near-stream and upslope environments along riparian catenas in N-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in the Coast Range of western Oregon. Based on the existing literature, we expected soil δ15N to be enriched closer to streams owing to inputs of isotopically heavy, marine-derived N by spawning salmon, higher rates of denitrification near the stream, or both. However, it has been unclear what effect red alder might have on soil δ15N patterns near streams. We found a consistent −1‰ δ15N signature in red alder foliage, and δ15N of total N in soils under red alder averaged 2.2‰ along sampling transects extending 20 m upslope from the stream. Surprisingly, δ15N of total N in soil under Douglas-fir was progressively depleted nearer to streams, opposite from the pattern expected from N losses by denitrification or N inputs from anadromous salmon. Instead, δ15N of total N in soil under Douglas-fir converged toward soil δ15N values typical of red alder sites. We consider that the historic presence of red alder may have contributed a legacy of lower soil δ15N nearer to streams on sites that are currently dominated by young Douglas-fir forest.

  15. Growth and foliar d15N of a Mojave desert shrub in relation to soil hydrological dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar 15N ratios (del15N), % N, and canopy volumes were measured in the two Mojave Desert dominant shrubs, the evergreen Larrea tridentata and drought deciduous Ambrosia dumosa growing across a geomorphically determined soil mosaic. Across three soils with increasingly strong age-dependent surface...

  16. The fate of 15N-nitrate in mesocosms from five European peatlands differing in long-term nitrogen deposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, K.; Blodau, C.

    2016-02-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition changes the retention, transformation, and fluxes of N in ombrotrophic peatlands. To evaluate such effects we applied a 15N tracer (NH4 15NO3) at a rate of 2.3 g N m-2 yr-1 to mesocosms of five European peatlands with differing long-term N deposition rates for a period of 76 days of dry and 90 days of wet conditions. We determined background N content and moss length growth, and recovered the 15N tracer from the mosses, graminoids, shrubs, the peat, and dissolved N. Background N contents in Sphagnum mosses increased from 5.5 (Degerö Stormyr, deposition < 0.2 g N m-2 yr-1) up to 12.2 mg g-1 (Frölichshaier Sattelmoor, 4.7-6.0 g N m-2 yr-1). In peat from Degerö, nitrate and ammonium concentrations were below 3 mg L-1, whereas up to 30 (nitrate) and 11 mg L-1 (ammonium) was found in peat from Frölichshaier Sattelmoor. Sphagnum mosses (down to 5 cm below surface) generally intercepted large amounts of 15N (0.2-0.35 mg g-1) and retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Similar quantities of the 15N were recovered from the peat, followed by shrubs, graminoids, and the dissolved pool. At the most polluted sites we recovered more 15N from shrubs (up to 12.4 %) and from nitrate and ammonium (up to 0.7 %). However, no impact of N deposition on 15N retention by Sphagnum could be identified and their length growth was highest under high N background deposition. Our experiment suggests that the decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, is likely more modest than previously thought. This conclusion is related to the finding that Sphagnum species can apparently thrive at elevated long-term N deposition rates in European peatlands.

  17. Macroalgae δ15N values in well-mixed estuaries: Indicator of anthropogenic nitrogen input or macroalgae metabolism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Guillou, Gaël; Mornet, Françoise; Richard, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Although nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in macroalgae is widely used as a bioindicator of anthropogenic nitrogen inputs to the coastal zone, recent studies suggest the possible role of macroalgae metabolism in δ15N variability. Simultaneous determinations of δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) along the land-sea continuum, inter-species variability of δ15N and its sensitivity to environmental factors are necessary to confirm the efficiency of macroalgae δ15N in monitoring nitrogen origin in mixed-use watersheds. In this study, δ15N of annual and perennial macroalgae (Ulva sp., Enteromorpha sp., Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus) are compared to δ15N-DIN along the Charente Estuary, after characterizing δ15N of the three main DIN sources (i.e. cultivated area, pasture, sewage treatment plant outlet). During late winter and spring, when human activities produce high DIN inputs, DIN sources exhibit distinct δ15N signals in nitrate (NO) and ammonium (NH): cultivated area (+6.5 ± 0.6‰ and +9.0 ± 11.0‰), pasture (+9.2 ± 1.8‰ and +12.4‰) and sewage treatment plant discharge (+16.9 ± 8.7‰ and +25.4 ± 5.9‰). While sources show distinct δN- in this multiple source catchment, the overall mixture of NO sources - generally >95% DIN - leads to low variations of δN-NO at the mouth of the estuary (+7.7 to +8.4‰). Even if estuarine δN-NO values are not significantly different from pristine continental and oceanic site (+7.3‰ and +7.4‰), macroalgae δ15N values are generally higher at the mouth of the estuary. This highlights high anthropogenic DIN inputs in the estuary, and enhanced contribution of 15N-depleted NH in oceanic waters. Although seasonal variations in δN-NO are low, the same temporal trends in macroalgae δ15N values at estuarine and oceanic sites, and inter-species differences in δ15N values, suggest that macroalgae δ15N values might be modified by the metabolic response of macroalgae to environmental parameters (e

  18. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templer, P.H.; Mack, M.C.; Chapin, F. S., III; Christenson, L.M.; Compton, J.E.; Crook, H.D.; Currie, W.S.; Curtis, C.J.; Dail, D.B.; D'Antonio, C. M.; Emmett, B.A.; Epstein, H.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Gundersen, P.; Hobbie, S.E.; Holland, K.; Hooper, D.U.; Hungate, B.A.; Lamontagne, S.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Osenberg, C.W.; Perakis, S.S.; Schleppi, P.; Schimel, J.; Schmidt, I.K.; Sommerkorn, M.; Spoelstra, J.; Tietema, A.; Wessel, W.W.; Zak, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3–18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C: N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N·ha-1·yr-1 above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer addition.

  19. Enzymatic synthesis of guanine nucleotides labeled with 15N at the 2-amino group of the purine ring.

    PubMed

    Bouhss, A; Sakamoto, H; Palibroda, N; Chiriac, M; Sarfati, R; Smith, J M; Craescu, C T; Bârzu, O

    1995-02-10

    GMP and dGMP labeled with 15N at the 2-amino group of the purine ring was obtained enzymatically from NH4Cl (> 99 at.% 15N) and from IMP or dIMP, respectively, by several reactions involving IMP-dehydrogenase, GMP-synthetase, adenylate kinase, and creatine kinase. The first three enzymes were obtained by overexpression in Escherichia coli of the corresponding genes. The isotope content of the primary amino group of guanine determined by mass spectrometry after acid hydrolysis of nucleotides was found higher than 98 at.% 15N. The proton NMR spectrum of [15N]GMP in solution in the absence of nitrogen decoupling showed a doublet with a coupling constant of 92 Hz. When nitrogen decoupling was used during the acquisition time, the doublet was replaced by a single peak at 6.47 ppm, indicating that the corresponding proton is bound to 15N. PMID:7778777

  20. A 15N-poor isotopic composition for the solar system as shown by Genesis solar wind samples.

    PubMed

    Marty, B; Chaussidon, M; Wiens, R C; Jurewicz, A J G; Burnett, D S

    2011-06-24

    The Genesis mission sampled solar wind ions to document the elemental and isotopic compositions of the Sun and, by inference, of the protosolar nebula. Nitrogen was a key target element because the extent and origin of its isotopic variations in solar system materials remain unknown. Isotopic analysis of a Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator target material shows that implanted solar wind nitrogen has a (15)N/(14)N ratio of 2.18 ± 0.02 × 10(-3) (that is, ≈40% poorer in (15)N relative to terrestrial atmosphere). The (15)N/(14)N ratio of the protosolar nebula was 2.27 ± 0.03 × 10(-3), which is the lowest (15)N/(14)N ratio known for solar system objects. This result demonstrates the extreme nitrogen isotopic heterogeneity of the nascent solar system and accounts for the (15)N-depleted components observed in solar system reservoirs. PMID:21700869

  1. Retrieving nitrogen isotopic signatures from fresh leaf reflectance spectra: disentangling δ15N from biochemical and structural leaf properties

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, Christine; Große-Stoltenberg, André; Lauströ, Verena; Oldeland, Jens; Werner, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Linking remote sensing methodology to stable isotope ecology provides a promising approach to study ecological processes from small to large spatial scales. Here, we show that δ15N can be detected in fresh leaf reflectance spectra of field samples along a spatial gradient of increasing nitrogen input from an N2-fixing invasive species. However, in field data it is unclear whether δ15N directly influences leaf reflectance spectra or if the relationship is based on covariation between δ15N and foliar nitrogen content or other leaf properties. Using a 15N-labeling approach, we experimentally varied δ15N independently of any other leaf properties in three plant species across different leaf developmental and physiological states. δ15N could successfully be modeled by means of partial least squares (PLSs) regressions, using leaf reflectance spectra as predictor variables. PLS models explained 53–73% of the variation in δ15N within species. Several wavelength regions important for predicting δ15N were consistent across species and could furthermore be related to known absorption features of N-containing molecular bonds. By eliminating covariation with other leaf properties as an explanation for the relationship between reflectance and δ15N, our results demonstrate that 15N itself has an inherent effect on leaf reflectance spectra. Thus, our study substantiates the use of spectroscopic measurements to retrieve isotopic signatures for ecological studies and encourages future development. Furthermore, our results highlight the great potential of optical measurements for up-scaling isotope ecology to larger spatial scales. PMID:25983740

  2. Idiosyncratic reality claims, relaxation dispositions, and ABC relaxation theory: happiness, literal christianity, miraculous powers, metaphysics, and the paranormal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan C; Karmin, Aaron D

    2002-12-01

    This study examined idiosyncratic reality claims, that is, irrational or paranormal beliefs often claimed to enhance relaxation and happiness and reduce stress. The Smith Idiosyncratic Reality Claims Inventory and the Smith Relaxation Dispositions Inventory (which measures relaxation and stress dispositions, or enduring states of mind frequently associated with relaxation or stress) were given to 310 junior college student volunteers. Principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation identified five idiosyncratic reality claim factors: belief in Literal Christianity; Magic; Space Aliens: After Death experiences; and Miraculous Powers of Meditation, Prayer, and Belief. No factor correlated with increased relaxation dispositions Peace, Energy, or Joy, or reduced dispositional somatic stress, worry, or negative emotion on the Smith Relaxation Dispositions Inventory. It was concluded that idiosyncratic reality claims may not be associated with reported relaxation, happiness, or stress. In contrast, previous research strongly supported self-affirming beliefs with few paranormal assumptions display such an association. PMID:12578252

  3. Dielectric relaxation time spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paulson, K S; Jouravleva, S; McLeod, C N

    2000-11-01

    A new mathematical method is developed to recover the permittivity relaxation spectrum of living tissue from measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the impedance. Aiming to derive information about electrical properties of living tissue without the prior selection of any impedance model, the procedure calculates the relaxation time distribution. It provides new characteristic independent parameters: time constants, their distribution, and the amplitudes of the associated dispersion. As the beta-dispersion is the most important in the area of electrical impedance spectroscopy of tissue, the paper gives an estimate of the essential frequency range to cover the whole relaxation spectrum in that area. Results are presented from both simulation and known lumped--constant element circuit. PMID:11077745

  4. Localization of 15N uptake in a Tibetan alpine Kobresia pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleuß, Per-Marten; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    The Kobresia Pygmea ecotone covers approximately 450.000 km2 and is of large global and regional importance due several socio-ecological aspects. For instance Kobresia pastures store high amounts of carbon, nitrogen and other nutrients, represent large grazing areas for herbivores, provide a fast regrowth after grazing events and protect against mechanical degradation and soil erosion. However, Kobresia pastures are assumed to be a grazing induced and are accompanied with distinct root mats varying in thickness between 5-30 cm. Yet, less is known about the morphology and the functions of this root mats, especially in the background of a progressing degradation due to changes of climate and management. Thus we aimed to identify the importance of single soil layers for plant nutrition. Accordingly, nitrogen uptake from different soil depths and its remain in above-ground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB) and soil were determined by using a 15N pulse labeling approach during the vegetation period in summer 2012. 15N urea was injected into six different soil depths (0.5 cm, 2.5 cm, 7.5 cm, 12.5 cm, 17.5 cm, 22.5 cm / for each 4 replicates) and plots were sampled 45 days after the labeling. For soil and BGB samples were taken in strict sample intervals of 0-1 cm, 1-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-15 cm, 15-20 cm, 20-25 cm. Results indicate that total recovery (including AGB, BGB and soil) was highest, if tracer was injected into the top 5 cm and subsequently decreased with decreasing injection depth. This is especially the case for the 15N recovery of BGB, which is clearly attributed to the root density and strongly decreased with soil depth. In contrast, the root activity derived from the 15N content of roots increased with soil depth, which is primary associated to a proportionate increase of living roots related to dead roots. However, most 15N was captured in plant biomass (67.5-85.3 % of total recovery), indicating high 15N uptake efficiency possibly due to N limitation

  5. Black Sea nitrogen cycling and the preservation of phytoplankton δ15N signals during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, James M.; Arthur, Michael A.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2012-06-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of bulk, clay-bound, organic, and compound-specific nitrogen were determined for mid to late Holocene Black Sea sediments from a set of box and gravity cores. The data demonstrate that cyanobacterial N2fixation provided ˜55% of phytoplankton-derived N preserved in the top 1-2 cm of the sediments. Prior to widespread agricultural and industrial development in the catchment, N2fixation was more prominent, providing 70-80% of phytoplankton N. Organic and clay-bound nitrogen fractions record different down-coreδ15N trends that reflect phytoplankton and detrital sources, respectively, and in samples with low organic matter content, the clay-bound fraction comprises up to 38% of bulk nitrogen. Compared with bulk samples, pyropheophytina (Pphe a), which is a chlorophyll a (Chl a) degradation product, provides a more accurate record of changing phytoplankton δ15N values during the Holocene. An examination of the δ15NPphe a values in light of published and new estimates of the isotopic difference between biomass and Chl a suggests that most of the preserved Pphe a was derived from eukaryotic algae, not cyanobacteria. We infer from these data that cyanobacterial biomass is rapidly recycled in the photic zone, with 15N-depleted NH4+ released during heterotrophy and assimilated by other phytoplankton. A conceptual model for N2 fixation in the Black Sea is presented, drawing upon water column nutrient and hydrographic data as well as regional climate variability to explain the proposed temporal variability in N2 fixation.

  6. Nitrate Reduction in a Groundwater Microcosm Determined by 15N Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Göran; Annadotter, Heléne

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic groundwater continuous-flow microcosms were designed to study nitrate reduction by the indigenous bacteria in intact saturated soil cores from a sandy aquifer with a concentration of 3.8 mg of NO3−-N liter−1. Traces of 15NO3− were added to filter-sterilized groundwater by using a Darcy flux of 4 cm day−1. Both assimilatory and dissimilatory reduction rates were estimated from analyses of 15N2, 15N2O, 15NH4+, and 15N-labeled protein amino acids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. N2 and N2O were separated on a megabore fused-silica column and quantified by electron impact-selected ion monitoring. NO3− and NH4+ were analyzed as pentafluorobenzoyl amides by multiple-ion monitoring and protein amino acids as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl ester derivatives by negative ion-chemical ionization. The numbers of bacteria and their [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation rates were simultaneously measured. Nitrate was completely reduced in the microcosms at a rate of about 250 ng g−1 day−1. Of this nitrate, 80 to 90% was converted by aerobic denitrification to N2, whereas only 35% was denitrified in the anaerobic microcosm, where more than 50% of NO3− was reduced to NH4+. Assimilatory reduction was recorded only in the aerobic microcosm, where N appeared in alanine in the cells. The nitrate reduction rates estimated for the aquifer material were low in comparison with rates in eutrophic lakes and coastal sediments but sufficiently high to remove nitrate from an uncontaminated aquifer of the kind examined in less than 1 month. PMID:16348048

  7. Inoculation of Bacillus sphaericus UPMB-10 to Young Oil Palm and Measurement of Its Uptake of Fixed Nitrogen Using the 15N Isotope Dilution Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zakry, Fitri Abdul Aziz; Shamsuddin, Zulkifli H.; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Zakaria, Zin Zawawi; Rahim, Anuar Abdul

    2012-01-01

    There are increasing applications of diazotrophic rhizobacteria in the sustainable agriculture system. A field experiment on young immature oil palm was conducted to quantify the uptake of N derived from N2 fixation by the diazotroph Bacillus sphaericus strain UPMB-10, using the 15N isotope dilution method. Eight months after 15N application, young immature oil palms that received 67% of standard N fertilizer application together with B. sphaericus inoculation had significantly lower 15N enrichment than uninoculated palms that received similar N fertilizers. The dilution of labeled N served as a marker for the occurrence of biological N2 fixation. The proportion of N uptake that was derived from the atmosphere was estimated as 63% on the whole plant basis. The inoculation process increased the N and dry matter yields of the palm leaflets and rachis significantly. Field planting of young, immature oil palm in soil inoculated with B. sphaericus UPMB-10 might mitigate inorganic fertilizer-N application through supplementation by biological nitrogen fixation. This could be a new and important source of nitrogen biofertilizer in the early phase of oil palm cultivation in the field. PMID:22446306

  8. A New Tool for NMR Crystallography: Complete (13)C/(15)N Assignment of Organic Molecules at Natural Isotopic Abundance Using DNP-Enhanced Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Märker, Katharina; Pingret, Morgane; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Gasparutto, Didier; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2015-11-01

    NMR crystallography of organic molecules at natural isotopic abundance (NA) strongly relies on the comparison of assigned experimental and computed NMR chemical shifts. However, a broad applicability of this approach is often hampered by the still limited (1)H resolution and/or difficulties in assigning (13)C and (15)N resonances without the use of structure-based chemical shift calculations. As shown here, such difficulties can be overcome by (13)C-(13)C and for the first time (15)N-(13)C correlation experiments, recorded with the help of dynamic nuclear polarization. We present the complete de novo (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment at NA of a self-assembled 2'-deoxyguanosine derivative presenting two different molecules in the asymmetric crystallographic unit cell. This de novo assignment method is exclusively based on aforementioned correlation spectra and is an important addition to the NMR crystallography approach, rendering firstly (1)H assignment straightforward, and being secondly a prerequisite for distance measurements with solid-state NMR. PMID:26485326

  9. Site-Selective Synthesis of (15)N- and (13)C-Enriched Flavin Mononucleotide Coenzyme Isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Neti, Syam Sundar; Poulter, C Dale

    2016-06-17

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is a coenzyme for numerous proteins involved in key cellular and physiological processes. Isotopically labeled flavin is a powerful tool for studying the structure and mechanism of flavoenzyme-catalyzed reactions by a variety of techniques, including NMR, IR, Raman, and mass spectrometry. In this report, we describe the preparation of labeled FMN isotopologues enriched with (15)N and (13)C isotopes at various sites in the pyrazine and pyrimidine rings of the isoalloxazine core of the cofactor from readily available precursors by a five-step chemo-enzymatic synthesis. PMID:27176708

  10. Determination of the δ15N of nitrate in solids; RSIL lab code 2894

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2894 is to determine the δ15N of nitrate (NO3-) in solids. The nitrate fraction of the nitrogen species is dissolved by water (called leaching) and can be analyzed by the bacterial method covered in RSIL lab code 2899. After leaching, the δ15N of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  11. Determination of the δ15N of nitrate in water; RSIL lab code 2899

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2899 is to determine the δ15N of nitrate (NO3-) in water. The δ15N of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of the NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  12. Characterizing the Microstructure of Heparin and Heparan Sulfate using N-sulfoglucosamine 1H and 15N NMR Chemical Shift Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beecher, Consuelo N.; Naggi, Annamaria; Guerrini, Marco; Torri, Giangiacomo; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2014-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) are members of a biologically important group of highly anionic linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Because of their structural complexity, the molecular-level characterization of heparin and HS continues to be a challenge. The work presented herein describes an emerging approach for the analysis of unfractionated and low molecular weight heparins as well as porcine and human-derived HS. This approach utilizes the untapped potential of 15N NMR to characterize these preparations through detection of the NH resonances of N-sulfo-glucosamine residues. The sulfamate group 1H and 15N chemical shifts of six GAG microenvironments were assigned based on the critical comparison of selectively modified heparin derivatives, NMR measurements for a library of heparin-derived oligosaccharide standards, and an in-depth NMR analysis of the low molecular weight heparin enoxaparin through systematic investigation of the chemical exchange properties of NH resonances and residue-specific assignments using the [1H, 15N] HSQC-TOCSY experiment. The sulfamate microenvironments characterized in this study include GlcNS(6S)-UA(2S), ΔUA(2S)-GlcNS(6S), GlcNS(3S)(6S)-UA(2S), GlcNS-UA, GlcNS(6S)-redα, and 1,6-anhydro GlcNS demonstrate the utility of [1H, 15N] HSQC NMR spectra to provide a spectroscopic fingerprint reflecting the composition of intact GAGs and low molecular weight heparin preparations. PMID:23240897

  13. Importance of bacterivory and preferential selection toward diatoms in larvae of Crepidula fornicata (L.) assessed by a dual stable isotope (13C, 15N) labeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Fanny; Riera, Pascal; Jeanthon, Christian; Edmond, Frédérique; Leroux, Cédric; Comtet, Thierry

    2012-05-01

    In Europe, the gastropod Crepidula fornicata is an invasive species characterized by a long reproductive period (from February to November). Thus, its larvae are exposed to variations in available food sources (in terms of quantity and quality). We aimed to investigate if bacteria could contribute to larval food both in presence or absence of phytoplankton, and to compare these results to seasonal variations of bacteria and phytoplankton abundances at a coastal site in the English Channel. First, ingestion of fluorescent beads of 0.5 to 2 μm diameter, showed that larvae were able to ingest particles of typical bacterial size. Then we used a dual stable isotope labeling approach which consisted in labeling a bacterial pelagic community with 15N and a diatom (Chaetoceros gracilis) culture with 13C, and supplying larvae with 15N-labeled bacteria, 13C-labeled diatoms, and both labeled sources. This technique has, to our knowledge, never been applied to invertebrate larvae. After 24 h of experiment, larvae were significantly enriched in all treatments: + 21.5‰ (∆δ13C) when supplied with diatoms, + 1364‰ (∆δ15N) when supplied with bacteria, and + 24‰ (∆δ13C) and + 135‰ (∆δ15N) when supplied with the two mixed sources. These results indicated that bacteria can contribute to the larval nutrition in C. fornicata, even in the presence of phytoplankton. Our results however suggested that larvae of C. fornicata preferentially used diatoms and showed that the supply of free bacteria did not alter the uptake of diatoms. Considering the seasonal variations of bacteria and phytoplankton abundances at the study site, these results suggested that bacteria may constitute a complementary resource for the larvae of C. fornicata when phytoplankton is abundant and may become a substitute resource when phytoplankton is less available. This approach offers promising perspectives to trace food sources and assess nitrogen and carbon fluxes between planktotrophic larvae

  14. Investigating Past Ocean Ecosystem Variability with δ13C and δ15N Records in Long Lived Deep Sea Proteinaceous Corals from the Central Equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, K. W.; Glynn, D. S.; McMahon, K.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Central Tropical Pacific Ocean may experience large, abrupt climate variations on a century to millennial time scale that greatly impact ocean ecosystem structure and function, including primary productivity, plankton community composition, and biogeochemical cycling. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of exported production are valuable proxies for past ocean plankton community composition, trophic structure, and nutrient utilization. However, very few long-term, high-resolution records exist from the tropics, which can establish how millennial climate variability is inherently linked to tropical ecosystem dynamics. Sediment cores are valuable archives of past ocean ecosystem dynamics, but have limited temporal resolution. In contrast, deep-sea proteinaceous corals act as living sediment traps due to direct incorporation of sinking organic matter into their organic skeletons. Since colonies can live for thousands of years, proteinaceous coral archives can significantly extend the length and resolution of δ13C and δ15N records in the open ocean. Here we present three δ13C and δ15N records obtained from the coral species Kulamanamana haumeaae that provide multi-decadal scale resolution δ13C and δ15N records, for the first time extending up to ~2600 years into the past. We observed large-scale oscillations in δ13C and δ15N values on century to millennial time scales that correspond to known major climate events, including the Medieval Climate Anomaly, the Little Ice Age, and the onset of the Industrial Revolution. These records will provide new insights into the variations in plankton community structure and nutrient dynamics in the equatorial pacific linked to long-term climate oscillations.

  15. Substrate stress relaxation regulates cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Gu, Luo; Darnell, Max; Klumpers, Darinka; Bencherif, Sidi A.; Weaver, James C.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Mooney, David J

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular mechanotransduction have converged upon the idea that cells sense extracellular matrix (ECM) elasticity by gauging resistance to the traction forces they exert on the ECM. However, these studies typically utilize purely elastic materials as substrates, whereas physiological ECM are viscoelastic, and exhibit stress relaxation, so that cellular traction forces exerted by cells remodel the ECM. Here we investigate the influence of ECM stress relaxation on cell behavior through computational modeling and cellular experiments. Surprisingly, both our computational model and experiments find that spreading for cells cultured on soft substrates that exhibit stress relaxation is greater than cells spreading on elastic substrates of the same modulus, but similar to that of cells spreading on stiffer elastic substrates. These findings challenge the current view of how cells sense and respond to the ECM. PMID:25695512

  16. Substrate stress relaxation regulates cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Gu, Luo; Darnell, Max; Klumpers, Darinka; Bencherif, Sidi A; Weaver, James C; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Mooney, David J

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular mechanotransduction have converged upon the idea that cells sense extracellular matrix (ECM) elasticity by gauging resistance to the traction forces they exert on the ECM. However, these studies typically utilize purely elastic materials as substrates, whereas physiological ECMs are viscoelastic, and exhibit stress relaxation, so that cellular traction forces exerted by cells remodel the ECM. Here we investigate the influence of ECM stress relaxation on cell behaviour through computational modelling and cellular experiments. Surprisingly, both our computational model and experiments find that spreading for cells cultured on soft substrates that exhibit stress relaxation is greater than cells spreading on elastic substrates of the same modulus, but similar to that of cells spreading on stiffer elastic substrates. These findings challenge the current view of how cells sense and respond to the ECM. PMID:25695512

  17. Plant and soil natural abundance delta (15)N: indicators of relative rates of nitrogen cycling in temperate forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Templer, Pamela H; Arthur, Mary A; Lovett, Gary M; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2007-08-01

    Watersheds within the Catskill Mountains, New York, receive among the highest rates of nitrogen (N) deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across watersheds within the Catskill Mountains, rates of soil N cycling and N retention vary significantly among stands of different tree species. We examined the potential use of delta (15)N of plants and soils as an indicator of relative forest soil N cycling rates. We analyzed the delta (15)N of foliage, litterfall, bole wood, surface litter layer, fine roots and organic soil from single-species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine root and organic soil delta (15)N values were highest within sugar maple stands, which correlated significantly with higher rates of net mineralization and nitrification. Results from this study suggest that fine root and organic soil delta (15)N can be used as an indicator of relative rates of soil N cycling. Although not statistically significant, delta (15)N was highest within foliage, wood and litterfall of beech stands, a tree species associated with intermediate levels of soil N cycling rates and forest N retention. Our results show that belowground delta (15)N values are a better indicator of relative rates of soil N cycling than are aboveground delta (15)N values. PMID:17479293

  18. Analysis of the coexisting pathways for NO and N2O formation in Chernozem using the (15)N-tracer SimKIM-Advanced model.

    PubMed

    Stange, Claus Florian; Spott, Oliver; Russow, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle consists of a variety of microbial processes. These processes often occur simultaneously in soils, but respond differently to local environmental conditions due to process-specific biochemical restrictions (e.g. oxygen levels). Hence, soil nitrogen cycling (e.g. soil N gas production through nitrification and denitrification) is individually affected through these processes, resulting in the complex and highly dynamic behaviour of total soil N turnover. The development and application of methods that facilitate the quantification of individual contributions of coexisting processes is a fundamental prerequisite for (i) understanding the dynamics of soil N turnover and (ii) implementing these processes in ecosystem models. To explain the unexpected results of the triplet tracer experiment (TTE) of Russow et al. (Role of nitrite and nitric oxide in the processes of nitrification and denitrification in soil: results from (15)N tracer experiments. Soil Biol Biochem. 2009;41:785-795) the existing SimKIM model was extended to the SimKIM-Advanced model through the addition of three separate nitrite subpools associated with ammonia oxidation, oxidation of organic nitrogen (Norg), and denitrification, respectively. For the TTE, individual treatments with (15)N ammonium, (15)N nitrate, and (15)N nitrite were conducted under oxic, hypoxic, and anoxic conditions, respectively, to clarify the role of nitric oxide as a denitrification intermediate during N2O formation. Using a split nitrite pool, this analysis model explains the observed differences in the (15)N enrichments in nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) which occurred in dependence on different oxygen concentrations. The change from oxic over hypoxic to anoxic conditions only marginally increased the NO and N2O release rates (1.3-fold). The analysis using the model revealed that, under oxic and hypoxic conditions, Norg-based N2O production was the dominant pathway, contributing to 90 and 50

  19. RELAX: detecting relaxed selection in a phylogenetic framework.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, Joel O; Murrell, Ben; Smith, Martin D; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Scheffler, Konrad

    2015-03-01

    Relaxation of selective strength, manifested as a reduction in the efficiency or intensity of natural selection, can drive evolutionary innovation and presage lineage extinction or loss of function. Mechanisms through which selection can be relaxed range from the removal of an existing selective constraint to a reduction in effective population size. Standard methods for estimating the strength and extent of purifying or positive selection from molecular sequence data are not suitable for detecting relaxed selection, because they lack power and can mistake an increase in the intensity of positive selection for relaxation of both purifying and positive selection. Here, we present a general hypothesis testing framework (RELAX) for detecting relaxed selection in a codon-based phylogenetic framework. Given two subsets of branches in a phylogeny, RELAX can determine whether selective strength was relaxed or intensified in one of these subsets relative to the other. We establish the validity of our test via simulations and show that it can distinguish between increased positive selection and a relaxation of selective strength. We also demonstrate the power of RELAX in a variety of biological scenarios where relaxation of selection has been hypothesized or demonstrated previously. We find that obligate and facultative γ-proteobacteria endosymbionts of insects are under relaxed selection compared with their free-living relatives and obligate endosymbionts are under relaxed selection compared with facultative endosymbionts. Selective strength is also relaxed in asexual Daphnia pulex lineages, compared with sexual lineages. Endogenous, nonfunctional, bornavirus-like elements are found to be under relaxed selection compared with exogenous Borna viruses. Finally, selection on the short-wavelength sensitive, SWS1, opsin genes in echolocating and nonecholocating bats is relaxed only in lineages in which this gene underwent pseudogenization; however, selection on the functional

  20. Relaxation techniques for stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know. February 2013. Available at: nccih.nih.gov/health/stress/relaxation.htm . Accessed September 21, 2015. National Center ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Stress Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  1. Stellar Origins of Extremely 13C- and 15N-enriched Presolar SiC Grains: Novae or Supernovae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Nittler, Larry R.; O'D. Alexander, Conel M.; Wang, Jianhua; Pignatari, Marco; José, Jordi; Nguyen, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Extreme excesses of 13C (12C/13C < 10) and 15N (14N/15N < 20) in rare presolar SiC grains have been considered diagnostic of an origin in classical novae, though an origin in core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) has also been proposed. We report C, N, and Si isotope data for 14 submicron- to micron-sized 13C- and 15N-enriched presolar SiC grains (12C/13C < 16 and 14N/15N < ˜100) from Murchison, and their correlated Mg-Al, S, and Ca-Ti isotope data when available. These grains are enriched in 13C and 15N, but with quite diverse Si isotopic signatures. Four grains with 29,30Si excesses similar to those of type C SiC grains likely came from CCSNe, which experienced explosive H burning occurred during explosions. The independent coexistence of proton- and neutron-capture isotopic signatures in these grains strongly supports heterogeneous H ingestion into the He shell in pre-supernovae. Two of the seven putative nova grains with 30Si excesses and 29Si depletions show lower-than-solar 34S/32S ratios that cannot be explained by classical nova nucleosynthetic models. We discuss these signatures within the CCSN scenario. For the remaining five putative nova grains, both nova and supernova origins are viable because explosive H burning in the two stellar sites could result in quite similar proton-capture isotopic signatures. Three of the grains are sub-type AB grains that are also 13C enriched, but have a range of higher 14N/15N. We found that 15N-enriched AB grains (˜50 < 14N/15N < ˜100) have distinctive isotopic signatures compared to putative nova grains, such as higher 14N/15N, lower 26Al/27Al, and lack of 30Si excess, indicating weaker proton-capture nucleosynthetic environments.

  2. The Contamination of Commercial 15N2 Gas Stocks with 15N–Labeled Nitrate and Ammonium and Consequences for Nitrogen Fixation Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dabundo, Richard; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treibergs, Lija; Tobias, Craig R.; Altabet, Mark A.; Moisander, Pia H.; Granger, Julie

    2014-01-01

    We report on the contamination of commercial 15-nitrogen (15N) N2 gas stocks with 15N-enriched ammonium, nitrate and/or nitrite, and nitrous oxide. 15N2 gas is used to estimate N2 fixation rates from incubations of environmental samples by monitoring the incorporation of isotopically labeled 15N2 into organic matter. However, the microbial assimilation of bioavailable 15N-labeled N2 gas contaminants, nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, is liable to lead to the inflation or false detection of N2 fixation rates. 15N2 gas procured from three major suppliers was analyzed for the presence of these 15N-contaminants. Substantial concentrations of 15N-contaminants were detected in four Sigma-Aldrich 15N2 lecture bottles from two discrete batch syntheses. Per mole of 15N2 gas, 34 to 1900 µmoles of 15N-ammonium, 1.8 to 420 µmoles of 15N-nitrate/nitrite, and ≥21 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide were detected. One 15N2 lecture bottle from Campro Scientific contained ≥11 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide per mole of 15N2 gas, and no detected 15N-nitrate/nitrite at the given experimental 15N2 tracer dilutions. Two Cambridge Isotopes lecture bottles from discrete batch syntheses contained ≥0.81 µmoles 15N-nitrous oxide per mole 15N2, and trace concentrations of 15N-ammonium and 15N-nitrate/nitrite. 15N2 gas equilibrated cultures of the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta confirmed that the 15N-contaminants are assimilable. A finite-differencing model parameterized using oceanic field conditions typical of N2 fixation assays suggests that the degree of detected 15N-ammonium contamination could yield inferred N2 fixation rates ranging from undetectable, <0.01 nmoles N L−1 d−1, to 530 nmoles N L−1 d−1, contingent on experimental conditions. These rates are comparable to, or greater than, N2 fixation rates commonly detected in field assays. These results indicate that past reports of N2 fixation should be interpreted with caution, and demonstrate that the purity of commercial 15N2

  3. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported. PMID:25451865

  4. Oxygen determination in materials by 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Sunitha, Y.; Reddy, G. L. N.; Sukumar, A. A.; Ramana, J. V.; Sarkar, A.; Verma, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents a proton induced γ-ray emission method based on 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction to determine bulk oxygen in materials. The determination involves the measurement of 5.27 MeV γ-rays emitted following the de-excitation of 15N nuclei. A description of the energetics of the reaction is given to provide an insight into the origin of 5.27 MeV γ-rays. In addition, thick target γ-ray yields and the limits of detection are measured to ascertain the analytical potential of the reaction. The thick-target γ-ray yields are measured with a high purity germanium detector and a bismuth germanate detector at 0° as well as 90° angles in 3.0-4.2 MeV proton energy region. The best limit of detection of about 1.3 at.% is achieved at 4.2 MeV proton energy for measurements at 0° as well 90° angles with the bismuth germanate detector while the uncertainty in quantitative analysis is <8%. The reaction has a probing depth of several tens of microns. Interferences can arise from fluorine due to the occurrence of 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction that emits 6-7 MeV γ-rays. The analytical potential of the methodology is demonstrated by determining oxygen in several oxide as well as non-oxide materials.

  5. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  6. Contribution of 19F resonances on 18O( p, α)15N reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmeslem, Meriem; Chafa, Azzedine; Barhoumi, Slimane; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-08-01

    The 18O( p, α)15N reaction influences the isotopes production such as 19F, 18O, and 15N which can be used to test the models of stellar evolution. 19F is synthesized in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Using R-matrix theory we allow new values of resonances parameters in 19F. We show that the most important contribution to the differential and total cross section at low energies, comes from the levels in 19F situated at resonances energies E R =151, 680 and 840 keV with spin and parity 1/2+. The total width of the 680 keV resonance is badly known. So, we have focused on this broad resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level in 19F. We delimit the temperature range in which each resonance contribution to the total reaction rate occurs by analyzing the ratio ( N A < σν> i / N A < σν>). This allowed us to show that the 680 and 840 keV broad resonances strongly dominate the reaction rate over the stellar temperature range T 9=0.02-0.06 and T 9=0.5-5. Finally, these results were compared to NACRE and Iliadis astrophysical compilations.

  7. The coral δ15N record of terrestrial nitrate loading varies with river catchment land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, A.; Watanabe, T.; Tsunogai, U.; Hasegawa, H.; Yamano, H.

    2015-03-01

    We analysed the nitrogen isotopes in two coral cores (δ15Ncoral) from the mouth of the Todoroki River, Ishigaki Island, Japan, to examine whether the δ15Ncoral reflects the run-off of nitrate related to the land use in the river catchment. The two coral cores were used to examine the seasonal variation in δ15Ncoral for 14 years (CORE1; 1993-2007) and the annual variation of δ15Ncoral for 52 years (CORE2; 1958-2010). In CORE1, the 5-month running mean of δ15Ncoral was positively correlated with that of monthly precipitation, excluding all strong precipitation events (>150 mm d-1). In CORE2, the δ15Ncoral mean in the earlier period (1958-1980) was 1.0 ‰ greater than that in the later period (1981-2010). The annual averages of δ15Ncoral are positively correlated with the total precipitation in the rainy season (May-June) for both time periods. The difference in the δ15Ncoral between the earlier and later periods is probably caused by the land use changed from paddy fields with 15N-rich manure to sugar cane fields in the early 1980s. Although some uncertainties still remain regarding the precision of δ15N coral proxy records, this study emphasises the clear potential for their use in reconstructing terrestrial nitrate discharge records from corals.

  8. Protein synthesis in cancer patients with inflammatory response: investigations with [15N]glycine.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D C; Preston, T; Fearon, K C; Burns, H J; Slater, C; Shenkin, A

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that the increase in amino acid flux and derived protein synthesis rates observed in weight-losing cancer patients may contribute to an ongoing negative energy balance. The mediators and tissues responsible for such apparent increased protein synthesis have not been clearly identified. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between protein synthetic rates in whole-body, skeletal muscle, and circulating cortisol concentrations in healthy subjects (n = 6) and cancer patients with evidence of an inflammatory response (n = 6). Protein synthetic rates were measured with a primed continuous 20-h infusion of [15N]glycine. Skeletal muscle was biopsied at laparotomy. Serum cortisol, resting energy expenditure, plasma proteins, nitrogen metabolites in urine, and skeletal muscle free amino acids were also measured. Derived whole-body and skeletal muscle protein synthetic rates in the cancer group were increased significantly (by 70 and 93%, respectively, p < 0.05). Circulating concentrations of cortisol, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein were also significantly increased in the cancer group and indicated the presence of an inflammatory response. However, there was no significant increase in resting energy expenditure. Mechanisms by which apparent increases in whole-body and skeletal protein synthesis do not result in an increase in resting energy expenditure are discussed. We conclude that glycine utilization is increased in cancer patients but that rates of protein synthesis derived from [15N]glycine kinetics may not be valid in such patients. PMID:7919675

  9. Mammalian DNA δ15N exhibits 40‰ intramolecular variation and is unresponsive to dietary protein level

    PubMed Central

    Strable, Maggie S.; Tschanz, Carolyn L.; Varamini, Behzad; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We report the first high precision characterization of molecular and intramolecular δ15N of nucleosides derived from mammalian DNA. The influence of dietary protein level on brain amino acids and deoxyribonucleosides was determined to investigate whether high protein turnover would alter amino acid 15N or 13C. Pregnant guinea pig dams were fed control diets, or high or low levels of dietary protein throughout gestation, and all pups were fed control diets. Cerebellar DNA of offspring was extracted at 2 and 120 days of life, nucleosides isolated and δ15N and δ13C characterized. Mean diet δ15N = 0.45±0.33‰, compared to cerebellar whole tissue and DNA δ15N = +4.1±0.7‰ and −4.5±0.4‰, respectively. Cerebellar deoxythymidine (dT), deoxycytidine (dC), deoxyadenosine (dA), and deoxyguanosine (dG) δ15N were +1.4±0.4, −2.1±0.9, −7.2±0.3, and −10.4±0.5‰, respectively. There were no changes in amino acid or deoxyribonucleoside δ15N due to dietary protein level. Using known metabolic relationships, we developed equations to calculate the intramolecular δ15N originating from aspartate (asp) in purines (pur) or pyrimidines (pyr), glutamine (glu), and glycine (gly) to be δ15NASP-PUR, δ15NASP-PYR, δ15NGLN, and δ15NGLY +11.9±2.3‰, +7.0±2.0‰, −9.1±2.4‰, and −31.8±8.9‰, respectively. A subset of twelve amino acids from food and brain had mean δ15N of 4.3±3.2‰ and 13.8±3.1‰, respectively, and δ15N for gly and asp were 12.6±2.2‰ and 15.2±0.8‰, respectively. A separate isotope tracer study detected no significant turnover of cerebellar DNA in the first six months of life. The large negative δ15N difference between gly and cerebellar purine N at the gly (7) position implies either that there is a major isotope effect during DNA synthesis, or that in utero gly has a different isotope ratio during rapid growth and metabolism than in adult life. Our data show that cerebellar nucleoside intramolecular δ15N vary over more than

  10. Closed-loop 15N measurement of N2O and its isotopomers for real-time greenhouse gas tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaets, Johanna; Mayr, Leopold; Heiling, Maria; Zaman, Mohammad; Resch, Christian; Weltin, Georg; Gruber, Roman; Dercon, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying sources of nitrous oxide is essential to improve understanding of the global N cycle and to develop climate-smart agriculture, as N2O has a global warming potential 300 times higher than CO2. The isotopic signature and the intramolecular distribution (site preference) of 15N are powerful tools to trace N2O, but the application of these methods is limited as conventional methods cannot provide continuous and in situ data. Here we present a method for closed-loop, real time monitoring of the N2O flux, the isotopic signature and the intramolecular distribution of 15N by using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, Los Gatos Research). The developed method was applied to a fertilizer inhibitor experiment, in which N2O emissions were measured on undisturbed soil cores for three weeks. The treatments consisted of enriched urea-N (100 kg urea-N/ha), the same fertilizer combined with the nitrification inhibitor nitrapyrin (375 g/100 kg urea), and control cores. Monitoring the isotopic signature makes it possible to distinguish emissions from soil and fertilizer. Characterization of site preference could additionally provide a tool to identify different microbial processes leading to N2O emissions. Furthermore, the closed-loop approach enables direct measurement on site and does not require removal of CO2 and H2O. Results showed that 75% of total N2O emissions (total=11 346 μg N2O-N/m2) in the fertilized cores originated from fertilizer, while only 55% of total emissions (total=2 450 μg N2ON/m2) stemmed from fertilizer for the cores treated with nitrapyrin. In the controls, N2O derived from soil was only 40% of the size of the corresponding pool from the fertilized cores, pointing towards a priming effect on the microbial community from the fertilizer and demonstrating the bias that could be introduced by relying on non-treated cores to estimate soil emission rates, rather than using the isotopic signature. The site preference increased linearly

  11. Effects of climate on deer bone δ15N and δ13C: Lack of precipitation effects on δ15N for animals consuming low amounts of C 4 plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormie, A. B.; Schwarcz, H. P.

    1996-11-01

    We have examined the relationship of bone collagen δ15N and δ13C to climatic variables, humidity, temperature, and amount of precipitation using fifty-nine specimens of North American white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus) from forty-six different locations. In previous studies of African mammals there was a significant correlation between bone collagen δ15N and local amount of precipitation. Results presented here similarly show an increase in δ15N with decreasing amount of precipitation but only for 25% of the animals, namely those consuming more than 10% C 4 plants. These animals also exhibited a significant correlation between δ13C and temperature which mirrors previous observations for grasses suggesting that these deer consume grasses during times of population and nutrient stress. In contrast, even in dry areas containing high proportions of C 4 grasses, the majority of the deer had consumed low amounts of C 4 plants and these deer did not have δ15N which correlate with amount of precipitation. Only when deer deviated from their normal feeding pattern by consuming C 4 plants or grasses did their δ15N correlate with amount of rainfall. For these animals, consumption of C 4 plants or grasses may signal conditions of water and nutrient stress. An increase in δ15N of bone collagen may result from combined effects from excretion of concentrated urine (to conserve water) and increased internal recycling of nitrogen (to conserve nitrogen).

  12. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry of N- Heptafluorobutyryl Isobutyl Esters of Amino Acids in the Analysis of the Kinetics of [15N]H4+ Assimilation in Lemna minor L

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, David; Myers, Ann C.; Jamieson, Gene

    1981-01-01

    Rapid, sensitive, and selective methods for the determination of the 15N abundance of amino acids in isotopic tracer experiments with plant tissues are described and discussed. Methodology has been directly tested in an analysis of the kinetics of [15N]H4+ assimilation in Lemna minor L. The techniques utilize gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring of major fragments containing the N moiety of N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl esters of amino acids. The ratio of selected ion pairs at the characteristic retention time of each amino acid derivative can be used to calculate 15N abundance with an accuracy of ±1 atom% excess 15N using samples containing as little as 30 picomoles of individual amino acids. Up to 11 individual amino acid derivatives can be selectively monitored in a single chromatogram of 30 minutes. It is suggested that these techniques will be useful in situations where the small quantities of N available for analysis have hitherto hindered the use of 15N-labeled precursors. PMID:16662074

  13. Paleoenvironmental implications of taxonomic variation among δ15N values of chloropigments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, Meytal B.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Robinson, Rebecca S.; Qin, Yelun; Saito, Mark A.; Pearson, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Natural variations in the ratios of nitrogen isotopes in biomass reflect variations in nutrient sources utilized for growth. In order to use δ15N values of chloropigments of photosynthetic organisms to determine the corresponding δ15N values of biomass – and by extension, surface waters – the isotopic offset between chlorophyll and biomass must be constrained. Here we examine this offset in various geologically-relevant taxa, grown using nutrient sources that may approximate ocean conditions at different times in Earth’s history. Phytoplankton in this study include cyanobacteria (diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic), eukaryotic algae (red and green), and anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (Proteobacteria), as well as environmental samples from sulfidic lake water. Cultures were grown using N2, NO3−, and NH4+ as nitrogen sources, and were examined under different light regimes and growth conditions. We find surprisingly high variability in the isotopic difference (δ15Nbiomass − δ15Nchloropigment) for prokaryotes, with average values for species ranging from −12.2‰ to +11.7‰. We define this difference as εpor, a term that encompasses diagenetic porphyrins and chlorins, as well as chlorophyll. Negative values of εpor reflect chloropigments that are 15N-enriched relative to biomass. Notably, this enrichment appears to occur only in cyanobacteria. The average value of εpor for freshwater cyanobacterial species is −9.8 ± 1.8‰, while for marine cyanobacteria it is −0.9 ± 1.3‰. These isotopic effects group environmentally but not phylogenetically, e.g., εpor values for freshwater Chroococcales resemble those of freshwater Nostocales but differ from those of marine Chroococcales. Our measured values of εpor for eukaryotic algae (range = 4.7–8.7‰) are similar to previous reports for pure cultures. For all taxa studied, values of εpor do not depend on the type of nitrogen substrate used for growth. The observed

  14. Sample Artefacts in δ15N and δ18O of Nitrate in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, A.; Norman, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrate is one of the major inorganic anions in aerosols. Recently nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in nitrates have been used to trace sources and chemical processes in the atmosphere. High volume samplers are used in order to gain enough material for isotope analysis, but artefacts can occur when measuring with this technique. Besides retaining NO3 from aerosol, gaseous HNO3 can be absorbed on the filter increasing the reported values of nitrate reported. Alternatively; when elevated temperatures are present in the atmosphere, nitrate is volatized in the form of NH3NO3 which would lead to an underestimation of nitrogen on the filter [Schaap et al., 2004]. The artefacts from high volume sampling may cause inaccuracies in the reported isotope values due to isotope fractionation or different initial isotope values between gaseous HNO3 and particulate nitrate. High volume samplers were deployed on board a ship in the summer of 2003 jointly with the Canadian Surface Ocean - Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS). A quartz filter was positioned on a high volume sampler. A cellulose acetate filter treated with potassium carbonate and glycerol was placed underneath the quartz filter. The cellulose acetate filter is designed to catch sticky gaseous (such as SO2) but was also found to catch a nitrogen gas species (most probable HNO3 and/or NH3NO3). Analysis of isotopic composition of nitrate for both nitrogen and oxygen was carried out on selected samples by the denitrifier method. Values ranged between -4 and +1‰ for δ15N and between +49 and +66‰ for δ18O for quartz filter. The nitrogen gas species had ranges between -11 and -0‰ for δ15N and between +44 and +62‰ for δ18O. Average differences between the aerosol (caught on the quartz filter) and the nitrogen gas species (on the cellulose acetate filter) were 3±4 ‰ for δ15N and 10±7 ‰ for δ18O. These values are examined to find insights in possible fractionation in the nitrate collection method currently used in

  15. Rapid and accurate calculation of protein 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Neal, Stephen; Nip, Alex M; Zhang, Haiyan; Wishart, David S

    2003-07-01

    A computer program (SHIFTX) is described which rapidly and accurately calculates the diamagnetic 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts of both backbone and sidechain atoms in proteins. The program uses a hybrid predictive approach that employs pre-calculated, empirically derived chemical shift hypersurfaces in combination with classical or semi-classical equations (for ring current, electric field, hydrogen bond and solvent effects) to calculate 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts from atomic coordinates. The chemical shift hypersurfaces capture dihedral angle, sidechain orientation, secondary structure and nearest neighbor effects that cannot easily be translated to analytical formulae or predicted via classical means. The chemical shift hypersurfaces were generated using a database of IUPAC-referenced protein chemical shifts--RefDB (Zhang et al., 2003), and a corresponding set of high resolution (<2.1 A) X-ray structures. Data mining techniques were used to extract the largest pairwise contributors (from a list of approximately 20 derived geometric, sequential and structural parameters) to generate the necessary hypersurfaces. SHIFTX is rapid (<1 CPU second for a complete shift calculation of 100 residues) and accurate. Overall, the program was able to attain a correlation coefficient (r) between observed and calculated shifts of 0.911 (1Halpha), 0.980 (13Calpha), 0.996 (13Cbeta), 0.863 (13CO), 0.909 (15N), 0.741 (1HN), and 0.907 (sidechain 1H) with RMS errors of 0.23, 0.98, 1.10, 1.16, 2.43, 0.49, and 0.30 ppm, respectively on test data sets. We further show that the agreement between observed and SHIFTX calculated chemical shifts can be an extremely sensitive measure of the quality of protein structures. Our results suggest that if NMR-derived structures could be refined using heteronuclear chemical shifts calculated by SHIFTX, their precision could approach that of the highest resolution X-ray structures. SHIFTX is freely available as a web server at http

  16. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using 15N isotopic tracer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct 15N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the 15N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. 15N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. 15N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  17. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using {sup 15}N isotopic tracer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-09-25

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct {sup 15}N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the {sup 15}N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. {sup 15}N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. {sup 15}N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  18. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  19. Design and Operation of a Continuous 13C and 15N Labeling Chamber for Uniform or Differential, Metabolic and Structural, Plant Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M. Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O or 2H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation1-4. From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage5-7. The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing 13C and 15N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%13C and 6.7 atom%15N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%13C and 0.56 atom%15N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water residual components

  20. Relaxation Theory for Rural Youth. Research Bulletin No. 46.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    This document synthesizes research findings to formulate a theory to guide relaxation training in educational settings, particularly rural schools. Young people experience many intense life events that require coping skills or relaxation. Family-related stress factors include instability in the home, lack of a support system, conflicting values,…

  1. Soft Sphere Suspensions: Flow and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workamp, Marcel; Dijksman, Joshua A.

    We experimentally study the role of particle elasticity on the rheology of soft sphere suspensions. Experiments consist of custom designed particles with tuneable stiffness. These particles allow us to probe the role of elastic timescales, relaxation and anisotropy in a custom 3D printed shear cell. We find robust rheological features, such as a flow instability, that are not well captured by existing models for suspension flows. In addition, we find relaxation effects after shear even in the absence of shear or thermal fluctuations. We aim to integrate these findings in the emerging unified framework for structured fluids.

  2. Magnetic relaxation of high spin magnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nie

    The magnetic relaxation phenomena in Mn12 and the physics underlining these experiment results are investigated in this dissertation. We give a review on currently available theories to account for the spin or paramagnetic relaxation occurring in this system. Density matrix formalism is used to investigate the general problem of a system interacting with a bath of thermal equilibrium phonons, which gives a set of rate equations. Numerical solutions to the rate equations are also carried out. Finally comparisons between the theory and the experimentals are made to show the merits and deficiencies of the theoretical approach that we have adopted.

  3. Variation in foliar [sup 15]N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr. )

    1993-10-01

    Spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance ([sigma][sup 15]N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N[sub 2]-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O[sub 1]-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar [sup 15]N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil. 34 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Species specific and environment induced variation of δ13C and δ15N in alpine plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Körner, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signals in plant tissues integrate plant-environment interactions over long periods. In this study, we hypothesized that humid alpine life conditions are narrowing the scope for significant deviations from common carbon, water and nitrogen relations as captured by stable isotope signals. We explored the variation in δ13C and δ15N in 32 plant species from tissue type to ecosystem scale across a suite of locations at c. Two thousand five hundred meter elevation in the Swiss Alps. Foliar δ13C and δ15N varied among species by about 3–4‰ and 7–8‰ respectively. However, there was no overall difference in means of δ13C and δ15N for species sampled in different plant communities or when bulk plant dry matter harvests of different plant communities were compared. δ13C was found to be highly species specific, so that the ranking among species was mostly maintained across 11 habitats. However, δ15N varied significantly from place to place in all species (a range of 2.7‰) except in Fabaceae (Trifolium alpinum) and Juncaceae (Luzula lutea). There was also a substantial variation among individuals of the same species collected next to each other. No difference was found in foliar δ15N of non-legumes, which were either collected next to or away from the most common legume, T. alpinum. δ15N data place Cyperaceae and Juncaceae, just like Fabaceae, in a low discrimination category, well separated from other families. Soil δ15N was higher than in plants and increased with soil depth. The results indicate a high functional diversity in alpine plants that is similar to that reported for low elevation plants. We conclude that the surprisingly high variation in δ13C and δ15N signals in the studied high elevation plants is largely species specific (genetic) and insensitive to obvious environmental cues. PMID:26097487

  5. Dielectric Relaxation of Hexadeutero Dimethylsulfoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betting, H.; Stockhausen, M.

    1999-11-01

    The dielectric relaxation parameters of the title substance (DMSO-d6) in its pure liquid state are determined from meas-urements up to 72 GHz at 20°C in comparison to protonated DMSO. While the relaxation strengths do not differ, the relax-ation time of DMSO-d 6 is significantly longer (21.3 ps) than that of DMSO (19.5 ps).

  6. Complementary constraints from carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes on the glacial ocean's soft-tissue biological pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional, process-based model of the ocean's carbon and nitrogen cycles, including 13C and 15N isotopes, is used to explore effects of idealized changes in the soft-tissue biological pump. Results are presented from one preindustrial control run (piCtrl) and six simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with increasing values of the spatially constant maximum phytoplankton growth rate μmax, which accelerates biological nutrient utilization mimicking iron fertilization. The default LGM simulation, without increasing μmax and with a shallower and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and increased sea ice cover, leads to 280 Pg more respired organic carbon (Corg) storage in the deep ocean with respect to piCtrl. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the colder glacial thermocline increase, which reduces water column denitrification and, with delay, nitrogen fixation, thus increasing the ocean's fixed nitrogen inventory and decreasing δ15NNO3 almost everywhere. This simulation already fits sediment reconstructions of carbon and nitrogen isotopes relatively well, but it overestimates deep ocean δ13CDIC and underestimates δ15NNO3 at high latitudes. Increasing μmax enhances Corg and lowers deep ocean δ13CDIC, improving the agreement with sediment data. In the model's Antarctic and North Pacific Oceans modest increases in μmax result in higher δ15NNO3 due to enhanced local nutrient utilization, improving the agreement with reconstructions there. Models with moderately increased μmax fit both isotope data best, whereas large increases in nutrient utilization are inconsistent with nitrogen isotopes although they still fit the carbon isotopes reasonably well. The best fitting models reproduce major features of the glacial δ13CDIC, δ15N, and oxygen reconstructions while simulating increased Corg by 510-670 Pg compared with the preindustrial ocean. These results are consistent with the idea that the soft-tissue pump was more efficient

  7. Secondary Structure, Backbone Dynamics, and Structural Topology of Phospholamban and Its Phosphorylated and Arg9Cys-Mutated Forms in Phospholipid Bilayers Utilizing 13C and 15N Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLB) is a membrane protein that regulates heart muscle relaxation rates via interactions with the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA). When PLB is phosphorylated or Arg9Cys (R9C) is mutated, inhibition of SERCA is relieved. 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy is utilized to investigate conformational changes of PLB upon phosphorylation and R9C mutation. 13C=O NMR spectra of the cytoplasmic domain reveal two α-helical structural components with population changes upon phosphorylation and R9C mutation. The appearance of an unstructured component is observed on domain Ib. 15N NMR spectra indicate an increase in backbone dynamics of the cytoplasmic domain. Wild-type PLB (WT-PLB), Ser16-phosphorylated PLB (P-PLB), and R9C-mutated PLB (R9C-PLB) all have a very dynamic domain Ib, and the transmembrane domain has an immobile component. 15N NMR spectra indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of R9C-PLB adopts an orientation similar to P-PLB and shifts away from the membrane surface. Domain Ib (Leu28) of P-PLB and R9C-PLB loses the alignment. The R9C-PLB adopts a conformation similar to P-PLB with a population shift to a more extended and disordered state. The NMR data suggest the more extended and disordered forms of PLB may relate to inhibition relief. PMID:24511878

  8. /sup 15/N and /sup 13/C NMR determination of methionine metabolism in developing soybean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, G.T. III; Garbow, J.R.; Schaefer, J.

    1987-03-01

    The metabolism of D- and L-methionine by immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max, L. cv Elf) grown in culture has been investigated using solid-state /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance. D-Methionine is taken up by the cotyledons and converted to an amide, most likely by N-malonylation. About 16% of the L-methionine taken up is incorporated intact into protein, and 25% remains as soluble methionine. Almost two-thirds of the L-methionine that enters the cotyledons is degraded. The largest percentage of this is used in transmethylation of the carboxyl groups of pectin. Methionine is not extensively converted to polyamines. The authors attribute the stimulation of growth of the cotyledons by exogenous methionine to the bypassing of a rate-limiting methyl-transfer step in the synthesis of methionine itself, and subsequently of pectins and proteins.

  9. (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR studies on albendazole and cyclodextrin albendazole complexes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M João G; García, A; Leonardi, D; Salomon, Claudio J; Lamas, M Celina; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-06-01

    (13)C and (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were recorded from albendazole (ABZ) and from ABZ:β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:methyl-β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and ABZ:citrate-β-cyclodextrin, which were prepared by the spray-drying technique. ABZ signals were typical of a crystalline solid for the pure drug and of an amorphous compound obtained from ABZ:cyclodextrin samples. Relevant spectral differences were correlated with chemical interaction between ABZ and cyclodextrins. The number and type of complexes revealed a strong dependence on the cyclodextrin group substituent. Solid-state NMR data were consistent with the presence of stable inclusion complexes. PMID:25843843

  10. Determination of 15N/14N and 13C/12C in Solid and Aqueous Cyanides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of nitrogen and carbon in cyanide compounds can be determined by combusting aliquots in sealed tubes to form N2 gas and CO2 gas and analyzing the gases by mass spectrometry. Free cyanide (CN-aq + HCNaq) in simple solutions can also be analyzed by first precipitating the cyanide as copper(II) ferrocyanide and then combusting the precipitate. Reproducibility is ??0.5??? or better for both ??15N and ??13C. If empirical corrections are made on the basis of carbon yields, the reproducibility of ??13C can be improved to ??0.2???. The analytical methods described herein are sufficiently accurate and precise to apply stable isotope techniques to problems of cyanide degradation in natural waters and industrial process solutions.

  11. A 115-year δ15N record of cumulative nitrogen pollution in California serpentine grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallano, D.; Zavaleta, E. S.

    2010-12-01

    Until the 1980s, California’s biodiverse serpentine grasslands were threatened primarily by development and protected by reserve creation. However, nitrogen (N) fertilization due to increasing fossil fuel emissions in the expanding Bay Area is thought to be contributing to rapid, recent invasion of these ecosystems by exotic annual grasses that are displacing rare and endemic serpentine species. Documenting the cumulative effects of N deposition in this ecosystem can direct policy and management actions to mitigate the role of N deposition in its transformation. Natural abundance stable isotopes of N in vegetation have been increasingly used as bio-indicators of N deposition patterns and subsequent changes to plant N cycling and assimilation. However, the long-term record of atmospheric reactive N enrichment and the resulting changes in ecosystem N dynamics have yet to be adequately reconstructed in many ecosystems. Museum archives of vascular plant tissue are valuable sources of materials to reconstruct temporal and spatial isotopic patterns of N inputs to ecosystems. Here, we present N stable isotope data from archived and current specimens of an endemic California serpentine grassland species, leather oak (Quercus durata), since 1895 across the greater San Francisco Bay region. We measured spatial and temporal trends in stable isotope composition (δ15N and δ13C) and concentration (%N and %C) of historical and current samples of leather oak leaves from sites within the Bay Area, impacted by increasing development, and sites northeast of the Bay Area, with significantly lower rates of urbanization and industrialization. Specifically, we sampled dry museum and fresh leaf specimens from serpentine sites within Lake (n=27) and Santa Clara (n=30) counties dating from 1895 to 2010. Leaf δ15N values were stable from 1895 to the 1950s and then decreased strongly throughout the last 50 years as fossil fuel emissions rapidly increased in the Bay Area, indicating that

  12. Using dual-bacterial denitrification to improve δ15N determinations of nitrates containing mass-independent 17O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Casciotti, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterial denitrification method for isotopic analysis of nitrate using N2O generated from Pseudomonas aureofaciens may overestimate ??15N values by as much as 1-2??? for samples containing atmospheric nitrate because of mass-independent 17O variations in such samples. By analyzing such samples for ??15N and ??18O using the denitrifier Pseudomonas chlororaphis, one obtains nearly correct ??15N values because oxygen in N 2O generated by P. chlororaphis is primarily derived from H 2O. The difference between the apparent ??15N value determined with P. aureofaciens and that determined with P. chlororaphis, assuming mass-dependent oxygen isotopic fractionation, reflects the amount of mass-independent 17O in a nitrate sample. By interspersing nitrate isotopic reference materials having substantially different ?? 18O values with samples, one can normalize oxygen isotope ratios and determine the fractions of oxygen in N2O derived from the nitrate and from water with each denitrifier. This information can be used to improve ??15N values of nitrates having excess 17O. The same analyses also yield estimates of the magnitude of 17O excess in the nitrate (expressed as ??17O) that may be useful in some environmental studies. The 1-?? uncertainties of ??15N, ??18O and ??17O measurements are ??0.2, ??0.3 and ??5???, respectively. Copyright ?? 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Cryptic or day-to-day parts of the riverbed N cycle - new challenges for 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimmer, Mark; Ouyang, Liao; Lansdown, Katrina

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) not only changed our understanding of the nitrogen cycle in aquatic ecosystems but it also undermined some of the key 15N techniques used to study it. Reformulations of principle equations and the development of new 15N2 and 15N2O techniques enabled the simultaneous quantification of N2 production by anammox and denitrification in mainly soft, cohesive sediments where redox gradients are clearly defined and solute exchanged governed by diffusion. At the heart of the application of 15N, for the quantification of natural 14N cycling, is the key assumption that the respective pools of 15N and 14N are evenly mixed and that both are cycled without bias towards each other. Recent evidence, however, from a variety of aquatic ecosystems, suggests that this may not be the case. For example, organic N may be oxidised directly to N2 gas without ever mixing with the inorganic pool or inorganic intermediates (e.g. nitrite) are 'shunted' internally and also fail to mix evenly with the applied tracer pool. Our most recent work in permeable, oxic gravel riverbeds presents some particular challenges to the application of 15N. In these systems, a tight coupling between aerobic nitrification and anaerobic N2 production - in the presence of 100

  14. Investigating patterns of symbiotic nitrogen fixation during vegetation change from grassland to woodland using fine scale δ(15) N measurements.

    PubMed

    Soper, Fiona M; Boutton, Thomas W; Sparks, Jed P

    2015-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in woody plants is often investigated using foliar measurements of δ(15) N and is of particular interest in ecosystems experiencing increases in BNF due to woody plant encroachment. We sampled δ(15) N along the entire N uptake pathway including soil solution, xylem sap and foliage to (1) test assumptions inherent to the use of foliar δ(15) N as a proxy for BNF; (2) determine whether seasonal divergences occur between δ(15) Nxylem sap and δ(15) Nsoil inorganic N that could be used to infer variation in BNF; and (3) assess patterns of δ(15) N with tree age as indicators of shifting BNF or N cycling. Measurements of woody N-fixing Prosopis glandulosa and paired reference non-fixing Zanthoxylum fagara at three seasonal time points showed that δ(15) Nsoil inorganic N varied temporally and spatially between species. Fractionation between xylem and foliar δ(15) N was consistently opposite in direction between species and varied on average by 2.4‰. Accounting for these sources of variation caused percent nitrogen derived from fixation values for Prosopis to vary by up to ∼70%. Soil-xylem δ(15) N separation varied temporally and increased with Prosopis age, suggesting seasonal variation in N cycling and BNF and potential long-term increases in BNF not apparent through foliar sampling alone. PMID:24890575

  15. 15N/14N variations in Cretaceous Atlantic sedimentary sequences: implication for past changes in marine nitrogen biogeochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    At two locations in the Atlantic Ocean (DSDP Sites 367 and 530) early to middle Cretaceous organic-carbon-rich beds ("black shales") were found to have significantly lower ??15N values (lower 15N/14N ratios) than adjacent organic-carbon-poor beds (white limestones or green claystones). While these lithologies are of marine origin, the black strata in particular have ??15N values that are significantly lower than those previously found in the marine sediment record and most contemporary marine nitrogen pools. In contrast, black, organic-carbon-rich beds at a third site (DSDP Site 603) contain predominantly terrestrial organic matter and have C- and N-isotopic compositions similar to organic matter of modern terrestrial origin. The recurring 15N depletion in the marine-derived Cretaceous sequences prove that the nitrogen they contain is the end result of an episodic and atypical biogeochemistry. Existing isotopic and other data indicate that the low 15N relative abundance is the consequence of pelagic rather than post-depositional processes. Reduced ocean circulation, increased denitrification, and, hence, reduced euphotic zone nitrate availability may have led to Cretaceous phytoplankton assemblages that were periodically dominated by N2-fixing blue-green algae, a possible source of this sediment 15N-depletion. Lack of parallel isotopic shifts in Cretaceous terrestrially-derived nitrogen (Site 603) argues that the above change in nitrogen cycling during this period did not extend beyond the marine environment. ?? 1987.

  16. Afforestation impacts microbial biomass and its natural (13)C and (15)N abundance in soil aggregates in central China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-10-15

    We investigated soil microbial biomass and its natural abundance of δ(13)C and δ(15)N in aggregates (>2000μm, 250-2000μm, 53-250μm and <53μm) of afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) soils, adjacent croplands and open area (i.e., control) in the Danjiangkou Reservoir area of central China. The afforested soils averaged higher microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) levels in all aggregates than in open area and cropland, with higher microbial biomass in micro-aggregates (<250μm) than in macro-aggregates (>2000μm). The δ(13)C of soil microbial biomass was more enriched in woodland soils than in other land use types, while δ(15)N of soil microbial biomass was more enriched compared with that of organic soil in all land use types. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N of microbial biomass were positively correlated with the δ(13)C and δ(15)N of organic soil across aggregates and land use types, whereas the (13)C and (15)N enrichment of microbial biomass exhibited linear decreases with the corresponding C:N ratio of organic soil. Our results suggest that shifts in the natural (13)C and (15)N abundance of microbial biomass reflect changes in the stabilization and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby imply that afforestation can greatly impact SOM accumulation over the long-term. PMID:27285796

  17. Lineshape-based polarimetry of dynamically-polarized 15N2O in solid-state mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Håkansson, P.; Pourfathi, M.; Ghosh, R. K.; Kara, H.; Kadlecek, S. J.; Pileio, G.; Levitt, M. H.; Rizi, R. R.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of 15N2O, known for its long-lived singlet-state order at low magnetic field, is demonstrated in organic solvent/trityl mixtures at ∼1.5 K and 5 T. Both 15N polarization and intermolecular dipolar broadening are strongly affected by the sample's thermal history, indicating spontaneous formation of N2O clusters. In situ 15N NMR reveals four distinct powder-pattern spectra, attributed to the chemical-shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors of the two 15N nuclei, further split by the intramolecular dipolar coupling between their magnetic moments. 15N polarization is estimated by fitting the free-induction decay (FID) signals to the analytical model of four single-quantum transitions. This analysis implies (10.2±2.2)% polarization after 37 h of DNP, and provides a direct, instantaneous probe of the absolute 15N polarization, without a need for time-consuming referencing to a thermal-equilibrium NMR signal.

  18. Relaxation in Physical Education Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coville, Claudia A.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical framework for incorporating relaxation instruction in the physical education curriculum is presented based on the assumption that relaxation is a muscular-skeletal skill benefitting general motor skill acquisition. Theoretical principles, a definition of relaxation, and an analysis of stages of skill development are also used in the…

  19. Relaxation phenomena in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciortino, F.; Tartaglia, P.

    1997-02-01

    In this article we discuss how the assumptions of self-similarity imposed on the distribution of independently relaxing modes, as well as on their amplitude and characteristic times, manifest in the global relaxation phenomena. We also review recent applications of such approach to the description of relaxation phenomena in microemulsions and molecular glasses.

  20. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  1. Regional, seasonal and interspecific variation in 15N and 13C in sympatric mouse lemurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotondranary, S. Jacques; Struck, Ulrich; Knoblauch, Christian; Ganzhorn, Jörg U.

    2011-11-01

    Madagascar provides some of the rare examples where two or more primate species of the same genus and with seemingly identical niche requirements occur in sympatry. If congeneric primate species co-occur in other parts of the world, they differ in size in a way that is consistent with Hutchinson's rule for coexisting species, or they occupy different ecological niches. In some areas of Madagascar, mouse lemurs do not follow these "rules" and thus seem to violate one of the principles of community ecology. In order to understand the mechanisms that allow coexistence of sympatric congeneric species without obvious niche differentiation, we studied food composition of two identical sized omnivorous mouse lemur species, Microcebus griseorufus and M. murinus with the help of stable isotope analyses ( δ 15N and δ 13C). The two species are closely related sister species. During the rich season, when food seems abundant, the two species do not differ in their nitrogen isotope composition, indicating that the two species occupy the same trophic level. But they differ in their δ 13C values, indicating that M. griseorufus feeds more on C4 and CAM (Crassulacean-acid-metabolism) plants than M. murinus. During the lean season, M. murinus has lower δ 15N values, indicating that the two species feed at different trophic levels during times of food shortage. Hybrids between the two species showed intermediate food composition. The results reflect subtle differences in foraging or metabolic adaptations that are difficult to quantify by traditional observations but that represent possibilities to allow coexistence of species.

  2. Intraskeletal isotopic compositions (δ(13) C, δ(15) N) of bone collagen: nonpathological and pathological variation.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Karyn C; White, Christine D; Longstaffe, Fred J; von Heyking, Kristin; McGlynn, George; Grupe, Gisela; Rühli, Frank J

    2014-04-01

    Paleodiet research traditionally interprets differences in collagen isotopic compositions (δ(13) C, δ(15) N) as indicators of dietary distinction even though physiological processes likely play some role in creating variation. This research investigates the degree to which bone collagen δ(13) C and δ(15) N values normally vary within the skeleton and examines the influence of several diseases common to ancient populations on these isotopic compositions. The samples derive from two medieval German cemeteries and one Swiss reference collection and include examples of metabolic disease (rickets/osteomalacia), degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis), trauma (fracture), infection (osteomyelitis), and inflammation (periostitis). A separate subset of visibly nonpathological skeletal elements from the German collections established normal intraindividual variation. For each disease type, tests compared bone lesion samples to those near and distant to the lesions sites. Results show that normal (nonpathological) skeletons exhibit limited intraskeletal variation in carbon- and nitrogen-isotope ratios, suggesting that sampling of distinct elements is appropriate for paleodiet studies. In contrast, individuals with osteomyelitis, healed fractures, and osteoarthritis exhibit significant intraskeletal differences in isotope values, depending on whether one is comparing lesions to near or to distant sites. Skeletons with periostitis result in significant intraskeletal differences in nitrogen isotope values only, while those with rickets/osteomalacia do not exhibit significant intraskeletal differences. Based on these results, we suggest that paleodiet researchers avoid sampling collagen at or close to lesion sites because the isotope values may be reflecting both altered metabolic processes and differences in diet relative to others in the population. PMID:24374993

  3. δ15N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, S.S.; Sinkhorn, E.R.; Compton, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Biogeochemical theory emphasizes nitrogen (N) limitation and the many factors that can restrict N accumulation in temperate forests, yet lacks a working model of conditions that can promote naturally high N accumulation. We used a dynamic simulation model of ecosystem N and δ15N to evaluate which combination of N input and loss pathways could produce a range of high ecosystem N contents characteristic of forests in the Oregon Coast Range. Total ecosystem N at nine study sites ranged from 8,788 to 22,667 kg ha−1 and carbon (C) ranged from 188 to 460 Mg ha−1, with highest values near the coast. Ecosystem δ15N displayed a curvilinear relationship with ecosystem N content, and largely reflected mineral soil, which accounted for 96–98% of total ecosystem N. Model simulations of ecosystem N balances parameterized with field rates of N leaching required long-term average N inputs that exceed atmospheric deposition and asymbiotic and epiphytic N2-fixation, and that were consistent with cycles of post-fire N2-fixation by early-successional red alder. Soil water δ15NO3 − patterns suggested a shift in relative N losses from denitrification to nitrate leaching as N accumulated, and simulations identified nitrate leaching as the primary N loss pathway that constrains maximum N accumulation. Whereas current theory emphasizes constraints on biological N2-fixation and disturbance-mediated N losses as factors that limit N accumulation in temperate forests, our results suggest that wildfire can foster substantial long-term N accumulation in ecosystems that are colonized by symbiotic N2-fixing vegetation.

  4. A pipeline for 15N metabolic labeling and phosphoproteome analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, Benjamin B; Burch, Heather L; Sussman, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Within the past two decades, the biological application of mass spectrometric technology has seen great advances in terms of innovations in hardware, software, and reagents. Concurrently, the burgeoning field of proteomics has followed closely (Yates et al., Annu Rev Biomed Eng 11:49-79, 2009)-and with it, importantly, the ability to globally assay altered levels of posttranslational modifications in response to a variety of stimuli. Though many posttranslational modifications have been described, a major focus of these efforts has been protein-level phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues (Schreiber et al., Proteomics 8:4416-4432, 2008). The desire to examine changes across signal transduction cascades and networks in their entirety using a single mass spectrometric analysis accounts for this push-namely, preservation and enrichment of the transient yet informative phosphoryl side group. Analyzing global changes in phosphorylation allows inferences surrounding cascades/networks as a whole to be made. Towards this same end, much work has explored ways to permit quantitation and combine experimental samples such that more than one replicate or experimental condition can be identically processed and analyzed, cutting down on experimental and instrument variability, in addition to instrument run time. One such technique that has emerged is metabolic labeling (Gouw et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 9:11-24, 2010), wherein biological samples are labeled in living cells with nonradioactive heavy isotopes such as (15)N or (13)C. Since metabolic labeling in living organisms allows one to combine the material to be processed at the earliest possible step, before the tissue is homogenized, it provides a unique and excellent method for comparing experimental samples in a high-throughput, reproducible fashion with minimal technical variability. This chapter describes a pipeline used for labeling living Arabidopsis thaliana plants with nitrogen-15 ((15)N) and how

  5. Search for d3/2 single particle strength in 15N in Unbound Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertin, C. E.; Caussyn, D. D.; Crisp, A. M.; Keeley, N.; Kemper, K. W.; Momotyuk, O.; Roeder, B. T.; Volya, A.

    2013-10-01

    The population of states in the nucleus 15N provides the opportunity to investigate both single particle and cluster structures in the 1p and 2s1d shells. Single, two, three and four particle transfer reactions selectively excite states in 15N thus providing a way to explore current nuclear structure models. Narrow structures are observed in the various transfer reactions up to at least 20 MeV in excitation well above the neutron (10.8 MeV) and proton (10.2 MeV) separation energies. In the present work new results for the reaction 14N(d,p) are presented that explore possible single particle strengths up to 18 MeV in excitation. The beam energies used in the present work were between 10.5 and 16 MeV. An early work with a beam energy of 8 MeV clearly populated strong sharp levels at 10.07 and 11.23 MeV and the present work confirms their existence. In addition, very weak broader levels are populated at 12.13 and 12.5 MeV but no other structures are found experimentally at higher excitation energies. The results of shell model calculations that include the 1p and 2s1d shells will be presented. The centroid energies for the 1d5/2 and 2s1/2 single particle strength have been obtained through comparison with FRESCO calculations. This work was supported by the NSF, DOE and Florida State University.

  6. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    SciTech Connect

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutions to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution

  7. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutionsmore » to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution« less

  8. Relaxation time measurements by an electronic method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brousseau, R.; Vanier, J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a simple electronic system that permits the direct measurement of time constants of decaying signals. The system was used in connection with relaxation experiments on hydrogen and rubidium masers and was found to operate well. The use of a computing counter in the systems gives the possibility of making averages on several experiments and obtaining the standard deviation of the results from the mean. The program for the computing counter is given.

  9. MILLIMETER-WAVE OBSERVATIONS OF CN AND HNC AND THEIR {sup 15}N ISOTOPOLOGUES: A NEW EVALUATION OF THE {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N RATIO ACROSS THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Adande, G. R.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    The N = 1 {yields} 0 transitions of CN and C{sup 15}N (X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}), as well as the J = 1 {yields} 0 lines of HN{sup 13}C and H{sup 15}NC, have been observed toward 11 molecular clouds using the new 3 mm ALMA-type receiver of the 12 m telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory. These sources span a wide range of distances from the Galactic center and are all regions of star formation. From these observations, {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios have been determined using two independent methods. First, the measurements of C{sup 14}N and C{sup 15}N were directly compared to establish this ratio, correcting for high opacities when needed, as indicated by the nitrogen hyperfine intensities. Second, the ratio was calculated from the quantity [HN{sup 13}C]/[H{sup 15}NC], determined from the HNC data, and then scaled by {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios previously established, i.e., the so-called double isotope method. Values from both methods are in reasonable agreement, and fall in the range {approx}120-400, somewhat lower than previous {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios derived from HCN. The ratios exhibit a distinct positive gradient with distance from the Galactic center, following the relationship{sup 14}N/{sup 15}N = 21.1 (5.2) kpc{sup -1} D{sub GC} + 123.8 (37.1). This gradient is consistent with predictions of Galactic chemical evolution models in which {sup 15}N has a secondary origin in novae, while primary and secondary sources exist for {sup 14}N. The local interstellar medium value was found to be {sup 4}N/{sup 15}N = 290 {+-} 40, in agreement with the ratio found in nearby diffuse clouds and close to the value of 272 found in Earth's atmosphere.

  10. Effect of body size and body mass on δ 13 C and δ 15 N in coastal fishes and cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, C.; Máguas, C.; Cabral, H. N.; Costa, M. J.

    2011-11-01

    Carbon and nitrogen isotopes have been widely used in the investigation of trophic relations, energy pathways, trophic levels and migrations, under the assumption that δ 13C is independent of body size and that variation in δ 15N occurs exclusively due to ontogenetic changes in diet and not body size increase per se. However, several studies have shown that these assumptions are uncertain. Data from food-webs containing an important number of species lack theoretical support on these assumptions because very few species have been tested for δ 13C and δ 15N variation in captivity. However, if sampling comprises a wide range of body sizes from various species, the variation of δ 13C and δ 15N with body size can be investigated. While correlation between body size and δ 13C and δ 15N can be due to ontogenetic diet shifts, stability in such values throughout the size spectrum can be considered an indication that δ 13C and δ 15N in muscle tissues of such species is independent of body size within that size range, and thus the basic assumptions can be applied in the interpretation of such food webs. The present study investigated the variation in muscle δ 13C and δ 15N with body size and body mass of coastal fishes and cephalopods. It was concluded that muscle δ 13C and δ 15N did not vary with body size or mass for all bony fishes with only one exception, the dragonet Callionymus lyra. Muscle δ 13C and δ 15N also did not vary with body size or mass in cartilaginous fishes and cephalopods, meaning that body size/mass per se have no effect on δ 13C or δ 15N, for most species analysed and within the size ranges sampled. The assumption that δ 13C is independent of body size and that variation in δ 15N is not affected by body size increase per se was upheld for most organisms and can be applied to the coastal food web studied taking into account that C. lyra is an exception.

  11. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Melts of Unlinked Ring Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Scott T.; Newhall, Jillian D.

    2010-11-01

    Stress relaxation in unlinked ring polymer melts poses an important challenge to our theoretical understanding of entangled polymer dynamics. Recent experiments on entangled unlinked ring melts show power-law stress relaxation with no hint of a rubbery plateau, usually the hallmark of entangled polymers. Here we present a theory for stress relaxation in rings analogous to the successful approach for star polymers. We augment our theory with mesoscale Monte Carlo dynamics simulations of equivalent “lattice animal” configurations. We find a stress relaxation function G(t)˜t-α with α≈1/2 consistent with experiment, emerging ultimately from the disparate relaxation times of more- and less-central portions of ring conformations.

  12. 15N-labeled tRNA. Identification of 4-thiouridine in Escherichia coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2 by 1H-15N two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffey, R H; Davis, D R; Yamaizumi, Z; Nishimura, S; Hawkins, B L; Poulter, C D

    1986-09-15

    Uridine is uniquely conserved at position 8 in elongator tRNAs and binds to A14 to form a reversed Hoogsteen base pair which folds the dihydrouridine loop back into the core of the L-shaped molecule. On the basis of 1H NMR studies, Hurd and co-workers (Hurd, R. E., Robillard, G. T., and Reid, B. R. (1977) Biochemistry 16, 2095-2100) concluded that the interaction between positions 8 and 14 is absent in Escherichia coli tRNAs with only 3 base pairs in the dihydrouridine stem. We have taken advantage of the unique 15N chemical shift of N3 in thiouridine to identify 1H and 15N resonances for the imino units of S4U8 and s4U9 in E. coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2. Model studies with chloroform-soluble derivatives of uridine and 4-thiouridine show that the chemical shifts of the protons in the imino moieties move downfield from 7.9 to 14.4 ppm and from 9.1 to 15.7 ppm, respectively; whereas, the corresponding 15N chemical shifts move downfield from 157.5 to 162.5 ppm and from 175.5 to 180.1 ppm upon hydrogen bonding to 5'-O-acetyl-2',3'-isopropylidene adenosine. The large difference in 15N chemical shifts for U and s4U allows one to unambiguously identify s4U imino resonances by 15N NMR spectroscopy. E. coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2 were selectively enriched with 15N at N3 of all uridines and modified uridines. Two-dimensional 1H-15N chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy revealed that both tRNAs have resonances with 1H and 15N chemical shifts characteristic of s4UA pairs. The 1H shift is approximately 1 ppm upfield from the typical s4U8 resonance at 14.8 ppm, presumably as a result of local diamagnetic anisotropies. An additional s4U resonance with 1H and 15N shifts typical of interaction of a bound water or a sugar hydroxyl group with s4U9 was discovered in the spectrum of tRNATyr2. Our NMR results for tRNAs with 3-base pair dihydrouridine stems suggest that these molecules have an U8A14 tertiary interaction similar to that found in tRNAs with 4-base pair dihydrouridine

  13. sup 15 N NMR study on cyanide (C sup 15 N sup minus ) complex of cytochrome P-450 sub cam. Effects of d-camphor and putidaredoxin on the iron-ligand structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Iizuka, Tetsutaro ); Makino, Ryu; Ishimura, Yuzuru ); Morishima, Isao )

    1989-11-27

    The cyanide (C{sup 15}N{sup {minus}}) complex of Pseudomonas putida cytochrome P-450 (P-450{sub cam}) exhibited well-resolved and hyperfine-shifted {sup 15}N NMR resonances arising from the iron-bound C{sup 15}N{sup {minus}} at 423 and 500 ppm in the absence and presence of the substrate, d-camphor, respectively. The values were smaller than those for cyanide complexes of myoglobin and hemoglobin ({approx} 1000 ppm) but fell into the same range as those for the cyanide complexes of peroxidases ({approx} 500 ppm). The {sup 15}N shift values of P-450{sub cam} were not incompatible with the existence of anionic ligand, such as cysteinyl thiolate anion, at the fifth coordination site of heme iron. The difference in the {sup 15}N chemical shift values between camphor-free and bound enzymes was inferred by the increase in the steric constraint to the Fe-C-N bond upon substrate binding.

  14. Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients from the {sup 15}N({sup 3}He,d){sup 16}O Reaction and the Astrophysical Factor for the {sup 15}N(p,{gamma}){sup 16}O Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Burjan, V.; Bem, P.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J.; Novak, J.; Piskor, S.; Simeckova, E.; Vincour, J.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Tumino, A.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Plunkett, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2008-05-12

    The angular distributions of the {sup 15}N({sup 3}He,d){sup 16}O reaction were measured with the aim to determine the direct capture rate of the astrophysical reaction {sup 15}N(p, {gamma}){sup 16}O by deducing asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANC). The {sup 15}N(p,{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction is a part of the CNO cycle having importance in the nucleosynthesis of the N and O isotopes. The measurement was carried out on the cyclotron U120M of NPI CAS at the energy 25.74 MeV of {sup 3}He ions in a gas chamber containing the high purity {sup 15}N isotope. The preliminary results of corresponding spectroscopic factors and ANC's were used for the estimation of the S-factor for the direct capture {sup 15}N(p,{gamma}){sup 16}O. Using the widths of the resonances E{sub R} = 312 and 962 keV, the total S-factor was determined within the framework of the R-matrix approach.

  15. Structure effects in the 15N(n ,γ )16N radiative capture reaction from the Coulomb dissociation of 16N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, Shubhchintak, Chatterjee, R.

    2015-10-01

    Background: The 15N(n ,γ )16N reaction plays an important role in red giant stars and also in inhomogeneous big bang nucleosynthesis. However, there are controversies regarding spectroscopic factors of the four low-lying states of 16N, which have direct bearing on the total direct capture cross section and also on the reaction rate. Direct measurements of the capture cross section at low energies are scarce and available only at three energies below 500 keV. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to calculate the 15N(n ,γ )16N radiative capture cross section and its subsequent reaction rate by an indirect method and in that process investigate the effects of spectroscopic factors of different levels of 16N to the cross section. Method: A fully quantum mechanical Coulomb breakup theory under the aegis of post-form distorted wave Born approximation is used to calculate the Coulomb breakup of 16N on Pb at 100 MeV/u . This is then related to the photodisintegration cross section of 16N(γ ,n )15N and subsequently invoking the principle of detailed balance, the 15N(n ,γ )16N capture cross section is calculated. Results: The nonresonant capture cross section is calculated with spectroscopic factors from the shell model and those extracted (including uncertainties) from two recent experiments. The data seem to favor a more single particle nature for the low-lying states of 16N. The total neutron capture rate is also calculated by summing up nonresonant and resonant (significant only at temperatures greater than 1 GK) contributions and comparison is made with other charged particle capture rates. In the typical temperature range of 0.1 -1.2 GK, almost all the contributions to the reaction rate come from capture cross sections below 0.25 MeV. Conclusion: We have attempted to resolve the discrepancy in the spectroscopic factors of low-lying 16N levels and conclude that it would certainly be useful to perform a Coulomb dissociation experiment to find the low energy capture

  16. Trophic ecology of the supralittoral rocky shore (Roscoff, France): A dual stable isotope (δ 13C, δ 15N) and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurand, Sandrine; Riera, Pascal

    2006-07-01

    The present study investigates the trophic transfers on the upper littoral rocky shore (i.e. the supralittoral zone together with the upper midlittoral and adlittoral) of northern Brittany. The population mainly consists of four invertebrate species: the littorinids Littorina saxatilis and Melarhaphe neritoides, the isopod Ligia oceanica and the insect Petrobius maritimus. The utilisation of food sources available to these grazers was examined in a laboratory microcosm feeding experiment and a field study using stable isotopes (δ 13C, δ 15N). The results indicated that although Ligia oceanica preferentially occurs in the supralittoral zone, its trophic subsidies originate mostly from the adlittoral and lower intertidal zones. The stable isotope data also suggested that adlittoral terrestrial organic material may be the major food source of Petrobius maritimus. δ 15N of Littorina saxatilis indicated a highly variable diet consisting of supralittoral lichens, midlittoral macroalgae and other food sources (e.g. microalgae). Both feeding experiments and stable isotope data show that only Melarhaphe neritoides has a clearly identifiable diet based on a mixture of lichens, mostly Verrucaria maura and Caloplaca marina, as estimated by an isotopic mixing model. Hence, the food web of this intertidal zone appears largely based on trophic subsidies from other habitats (i.e. upper and lower intertidal zones).

  17. Spatial Patterns of Plant δ13C and δ15N Along a Topoedaphic Gradient in a Subtropical Savanna Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, E.; Boutton, T. W.; Liu, F.; Wu, B.; Archer, S. R.

    2005-12-01

    δ13C and δ15N values of plants are powerful tools in physiological ecology, ecosystem science, and global biogeochemistry, yet we know relatively little about their variation and controls at the landscape scale. In this study, we investigated landscape-scale spatial variations in the foliar isotopic composition of 3 woody plant species across a 308 m topoedaphic gradient, along which soil texture and plant resources (water and nitrogen availability) varied from upland (86 m) to lowland (84 m) portions of the landscape. The study was conducted in a subtropical savanna at the La Copita Research Area, approximately 60 km west of Corpus Christi, TX. Foliar δ13C, δ15N, leaf nitrogen concentration ([N]), and specific leaf area (SLA) were measured on all individuals of Prosopis glandulosa, Condalia hookeri, and Zanthoxylum fagara present within a belt transect 308 m long x 12 m wide. Soil texture, available soil moisture, and total N were measured at 1 m intervals along the center-line of the belt transect. Clay content, available soil moisture, and soil total N were all negatively correlated with elevation along the transect. Leaf δ13C and δ15N values for all 3 species increased by 1-4 o/oo with decreasing elevation along the transect. Contrary to theory and previous studies, δ13C values were highest where soil water was most available, suggesting that some other variable could be overriding or interacting with water availability. Foliar [N] appeared to exert the strongest control over landscape-level variation, and was positively correlated with δ13C of all species (R 2 = 0.58, p<0.0001). Since leaf [N] is positively related to photosynthetic capacity, plants with high [N] are likely to have low Ci/Ca ratios and therefore higher δ13C values. δ15N values of Zanthoxylum and Condalia were positively correlated with leaf [N] and soil water availability; however, these relationships were absent for Prosopis, an N-fixing tree legume. We speculate that the

  18. Elucidating the trophodynamics of four coral reef fishes of the Solomon Islands using δ15N and δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, N. D. W.; Sweeting, C. J.; Polunin, N. V. C.

    2010-09-01

    Size-related diet shifts are important characteristics of fish trophodynamics. Here, body size-related changes in muscle δ15N and δ13C of four coral reef fishes, Acanthurus nigrofuscus (herbivore), Chaetodon lunulatus (corallivore) , Chromis xanthura (planktivore) and Plectropomus leopardus (piscivore) were investigated at two locations in the Solomon Islands. All four species occupied distinct isotopic niches and the concurrent δ13C' values of C. xanthura and P. leopardus suggested a common planktonic production source. Size-related shifts in δ15N, and thus trophic level, were observed in C. xanthura, C. lunulatus and P. leopardus, and these trends varied between location, indicating spatial differences in trophic ecology. A literature review of tropical fishes revealed that positive δ15N-size trends are common while negative δ15N-size trends are rare. Size-δ15N trends fall into approximately equal groups representing size-based feeding within a food chain, and that associated with a basal resource shift and occurs in conjunction with changes in production source, indicated by δ13C. The review also revealed large scale differences in isotope-size trends and this, combined with small scale location differences noted earlier, highlights a high degree of plasticity in the reef fishes studied. This suggests that trophic size analysis of reef fishes would provide a productive avenue to identify species potentially vulnerable to reef impacts as a result of constrained trophic behaviour.

  19. Range expansion of the jumbo squid in the NE Pacific: δ15N decrypts multiple origins, migration and habitat use.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I; Ballance, Lisa T; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Coincident with climate shifts and anthropogenic perturbations, the highly voracious jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas reached unprecedented northern latitudes along the NE Pacific margin post 1997-98. The physical or biological drivers of this expansion, as well as its ecological consequences remain unknown. Here, novel analysis from both bulk tissues and individual amino acids (Phenylalanine; Phe and Glutamic acid; Glu) in both gladii and muscle of D. gigas captured in the Northern California Current System (NCCS) documents for the first time multiple geographic origins and migration. Phe δ(15)N values, a proxy for habitat baseline δ(15)N values, confirm at least three different geographic origins that were initially detected by highly variable bulk δ(15)N values in gladii for squid at small sizes (<30 cm gladii length). In contrast, bulk δ(15)N values from gladii of large squid (>60 cm) converged, indicating feeding in a common ecosystem. The strong latitudinal gradient in Phe δ(15)N values from composite muscle samples further confirmed residency at a point in time for large squid in the NCCS. These results contrast with previous ideas, and indicate that small squid are highly migratory, move into the NCCS from two or more distinct geographic origins, and use this ecosystem mainly for feeding. These results represent the first direct information on the origins, immigration and habitat use of this key "invasive" predator in the NCCS, with wide implications for understanding both the mechanisms of periodic D. gigas population range expansions, and effects on ecosystem trophic structure. PMID:23527242

  20. Sources of nitrate in the Arno River waters: Constraints from d15N and d18O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nisi, Barbara; Vaselli, Orlando; Buccianti, Antonella; Silva, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Running waters in anthropogenically affected areas are susceptible to nitrate contamination. Source identification is a fundamental step for the development of effective remediation. Previous studies pointed to pollution by nitrogen-bearing contaminants in the Arno Basin. In this paper, eleven surface water samples have been analysed for main and trace components and 15N/14N and 18O/16O ratios, with the aim of identifying for the first time the origin of nitrate in the Arno River Basin so that further investigations can appropriately be designed. d18O(NO3)and d15N(NO3) values have allowed to hypothesise the main sources of nitrate, as follows: i) mineralized fertilizer, ii) soil-organic nitrogen, iii) manure and septic waste. The anomalously high d15N and d18O values in the Chiana (d15N=24.9‰ and d18O=15.5‰) and Usciana tributaries (d15N=30.1‰ and d18O=7.2‰) show a low probability of belonging to the same population as that of the other samples and can be related to denitrification process of nitrate from animal waste/sewage and/or an industrial process (e.g. tanneries).

  1. The time correlation function perspective of NMR relaxation in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Yury E.; Meirovitch, Eva

    2013-08-01

    We applied over a decade ago the two-body coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach to NMR relaxation in proteins. One rotator is the globally moving protein and the other rotator is the locally moving probe (spin-bearing moiety, typically the 15N-1H bond). So far we applied SRLS to 15N-H relaxation from seven different proteins within the scope of the commonly used data-fitting paradigm. Here, we solve the SRLS Smoluchowski equation using typical best-fit parameters as input, to obtain the corresponding generic time correlation functions (TCFs). The following new information is obtained. For actual rhombic local ordering and main ordering axis pointing along C_{i - 1}^α - C_i^α, the measurable TCF is dominated by the (K,K') = (-2,2), (2,2), and (0,2) components (K is the order of the rank 2 local ordering tensor), determined largely by the local motion. Global diffusion axiality affects the analysis significantly when the ratio between the parallel and perpendicular components exceeds approximately 1.5. Local diffusion axiality has a large and intricate effect on the analysis. Mode-coupling becomes important when the ratio between the global and local motional rates falls below 0.01. The traditional method of analysis - model-free (MF) - represents a simple limit of SRLS. The conditions under which the MF and SRLS TCFs are the same are specified. The validity ranges of wobble-in-a-cone and rotation on the surface of a cone as local motions are determined. The evolution of the intricate Smoluchowski operator from the simple diffusion operator for a sphere reorienting in isotropic medium is delineated. This highlights the fact that SRLS is an extension of the established stochastic theories for treating restricted motions. This study lays the groundwork for TCF-based comparison between mesoscopic SRLS and atomistic molecular dynamics.

  2. 15N labeled brain enables quantification of proteome and phosphoproteome in cultured primary neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lujian; Sando, Richard C.; Farnum, John B.; Vanderklish, Peter W.; Maximov, Anton; Yates, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Terminally differentiated primary cells represent a valuable in vitro model to study signaling events associated within a specific tissue. Quantitative proteomic methods using metabolic labeling in primary cells encounter labeling efficiency issues hindering the use of these cells. Here we developed a method to quantify the proteome and phosphoproteome of cultured neurons using 15N labeled brain tissue as an internal standard, and applied this method to determine how an inhibitor of an excitatory neural transmitter receptor, phencyclidine (PCP), affects the global phosphoproteome of cortical neurons. We identified over 10,000 phosphopeptides and made accurate quantitative measurements of the neuronal phosphoproteome after neuronal inhibition. We show that short PCP treatments lead to changes in phosphorylation for 7% of neuronal phosphopeptides and that prolonged PCP treatment alters the total levels of several proteins essential for synaptic transmission and plasticity and leads to a massive reduction in the synaptic strength of inhibitory synapses. The results provide valuable insights into the dynamics of molecular networks implicated in PCP-mediated NMDA receptor inhibition and sensorimotor deficits. PMID:22070516

  3. Use of a {sup 15}N isotope dilution method to assess contaminant effects on soil nitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Nason, G.E.; Dinwoodie, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Ecologically relevant bioassays are needed to assess effects of contaminants on soil processes such as decomposition and nutrient cycling. This study was conducted to assess the potential of a soil-based nitrification bioassay. Soil samples adjusted to 0.03 MPa moisture content were amended with 0.1, 1.0, 10 and 100 mg kg{sup {minus}1} PCP or PCB, and 0.05, 0.5, 5 and 50 mg kg{sup {minus}1} Hg and preincubated for 7 days. A 2-d incubation was then started by addition of 10 mg kg{sup {minus}1} {sup 15}NO{sub 3}-N. Diethyl ether used as a carrier for PCP addition had little effect on inorganic nitrogen concentrations during the incubation. Net nitrogen mineralization and nitrification were unaffected by PCB. Higher amendment levels of both PCP and Hg resulted in increases in ammonium concentrations and decreases in net nitrification. {sup 15}N-nitrate pool dilution was sensitive to contamination and showed some gross nitrification was occurring even when net nitrification had ceased. Recoveries of Hg and PCB at the end of the study were greater than 90%. Recovery of PCP was 5%. Incubations carried out under sterile and non-sterile conditions indicated that both sorption and biological degradation were factors in the low PCP recovery.

  4. Tracing sewage water by 15N in a mangrove ecosystem to test its bioremediation ability.

    PubMed

    Lambs, Luc; Léopold, Audrey; Zeller, Bernd; Herteman, Mélanie; Fromard, Francois

    2011-10-15

    Mangrove forests could be a simple and effective alternative to conventional sewage treatment, particularly for island communities given its low cost and low maintenance. Due to their high adaptation capacity, these plants are able to tolerate and bioremediate the high levels of nutrients and pollutants found in sewage water. This solution could be applied to small tropical islands with high population density such as Mayotte in the Indian Ocean. This paper reports on a trial by stable isotopic (15)N tracing of such a bioremediation process on pre-treated wastewater near the village of Malamani, in the middle of the large coastal mangrove in the bay near Chirongui. The first results show a boost in the mangrove growth, but a longer period of observation is needed to confirm the beneficial effects, and also to clarify the role of the local crab population, whose engineering activities play an important part in the ecosystem. The exact denitrification process is not yet understood, and the mass balance equation also reveals loss of nitrogen-containing compounds, which needs to be analyzed more closely. PMID:21913255

  5. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds. PMID:19685922

  6. Qualitative Study of Substituent Effects on NMR 15N and 17O Chemical Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Rubén H.; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Bustamante, Manuel G.; Pasqualini, Enrique E.; Melo, Juan I.; Tormena, Cláudio F.

    2009-08-01

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-β substituent effects on both 15N and 17O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and σ-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  7. Relaxing music for anxiety control.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dave; Polman, Remco; McGregor, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of relaxing music for anxiety control. Undergraduate students (N=84) were instructed to imagine themselves in an anxiety producing situation while listening to a selection of 30 music compositions. For each composition, level of relaxation, the factors that either enhanced or detracted from its relaxing potential and the emotional labels attached were assessed. Participants were also asked to state which music components (e.g., tempo, melody) were most conducive to relaxation. Additional information was obtained through the use of a focus group of 6 undergraduate music students. This paper presents details on the characteristics of relaxing-music for anxiety control and emotional labels attached to the relaxing compositions. Furthermore, an importance value has been attached to each of the music components under scrutiny, thus providing an indication of which music components should receive greatest attention when selecting music for anxiety control. PMID:22097099

  8. Towards interpreting nitrate-δ15N records in ice cores in terms of nitrogen oxide sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, M. G.; Buffen, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrate preserved in ice cores offers unique potential for reconstructing past contributions of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO and NO2) to the atmosphere. Sources of NOx imprint a nitrogen stable isotopic (δ15N) signature, which can be conserved during subsequent oxidation to form nitrate. Major sources of NOx include fossil fuels combustion, biomass burning, microbial processes in soils, and lightning, and thus a quantitative tracer of emissions would help detail connections between the atmosphere, the biosphere, and climate. Unfortunately, the δ15N signatures of most NOx sources are not yet well enough constrained to allow for quantitative partitioning, though new methodology for directly collecting NOx for isotopic analysis is promising (Fibiger and Hastings, A43D-0265, AGU 2010). Still, a growing network of ice core δ15N records may offer insight into source signatures, as different sources are important to different regions of the world. For example, a 300-year ice core record of nitrate-δ15N from Summit, Greenland shows a clear and significant 12% (vs. N2) decrease since the Preindustrial that reflects emissions from fossil fuel combustion and/or soils related to changing agricultural practices in North America and Europe. Over the same time period, Antarctic ice cores show no such trend in δ15N. This would be consistent with previous work suggesting that biomass burning and/or stratospheric intrusion of NOx produced from N2O oxidation are dominant sources for nitrate formation at high southern latitudes. In comparison to the polar records, nitrate in tropical ice cores should represent more significant inputs from lightning, microbial processes in soils, and biomass burning. This may be reflected in new results from a high-elevation site in the Peruvian Andes that shows strong seasonal δ15N cycles of up to 15% (vs. N2). We compare and contrast these records in an effort to evaluate the contribution of NOx sources to nitrate over

  9. [Effect of fertilization depth on 15N-urea absorption, utilization and loss in dwarf apple trees].

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Chen, Qian; Xu, Hai-gang; Ji, Meng-meng; Jiang, Han; Jiang, Yuan-mao

    2015-03-01

    Five-year-old 'Fuji'3/M26/M. hupehensis Rehd. seedlings were treated by 15N tracer to study the effects of fertilization depth (0, 20 and 40 cm) on 15N-urea absorption, distribution, utilization and loss in soil. The results showed that the plant leaf area, chlorophyll content and total N of apple leaves in 20 cm treatment were obviously higher than 0 cm and 40 cm treatments. The 15N derived from fertilizer (Ndff) in different organs of apple plant under different depths were significantly different, and the Ndff was the highest in roots at the full-bloom stage, and then in perennial branches. During the shoot rapid-growing and flower bud differentiation stage, the Ndff of new organs higher than that of the storage organs, and the Ndff of different organs were high level at fruit rapid-expanding stage, and the Ndff of fruit was the highest. The distribution ratio of 15N at fruit maturity stage was significantly different under fertilization depths, and that of the vegetative and repro- ductive organs of 20 cm treatment were obviously higher than 0 cm and 40 cm treatments, but that of the storage organs of 20 cm treatment was lower than 0 cm and 40 cm treatments. At fruit maturity stage, 15N utilization rate of apple plant of 20 cm treatment was 24.0%, which was obviously higher than 0 cm (14.1%) and 40 cm (7.6%) treatments, and 15N loss rate was 54.0%, which was obviously lower than 0 cm (67.8%) and 40 cm (63.5%) treatments. With the increase of fertilization depths, the N residue in soil increased sharply. PMID:26211056

  10. Choice of dietary protein of vegetarians and omnivores is reflected in their hair protein 13C and 15N abundance.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Boeing, Heiner; Metges, Cornelia C

    2005-01-01

    Stable isotopic (15N, 13C) composition of tissues depends on isotopic pattern of food sources. We investigated whether the isotopic compositions of human hair protein and amino acids reflect the habitual dietary protein intake. Hair samples were analyzed from 100 omnivores (selected randomly out of the 1987-1988 German nutrition survey VERA), and from 15 ovo-lacto-vegetarians (OLV), and from 6 vegans recruited separately. Hair bulk and amino acid specific isotopic compositions were analyzed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS and GC/C/IRMS, respectively) and the results were correlated with data of the 7 day dietary records. Hair bulk 15N and 13C abundances clearly reflect the particular eating habits. Vegans can be distinguished from OLV and both are significantly distinct from omnivores in both 15N and 13C abundances. 15N and 13C abundances rose with a higher proportion of animal to total protein intake (PAPI). Individual proportions of animal protein consumption (IPAP) were calculated using isotopic abundances and a linear regression model using animal protein consumption data of vegans (PAPI = 0) and omnivores (mean PAPI = 0.639). IPAP values positively correlated with the intake of protein, meat, meat products, and animal protein. Distinct patterns for hair amino acid specific 15N and 13C abundances were measured but with lower resolution between food preference groups compared with bulk values. In conclusion, hair 13C and 15N values both reflected the extent of animal protein consumption. Bulk isotopic abundance of hair can be tested for future use in the validation of dietary assessment methods. PMID:15880664

  11. Renormalized reaction and relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2016-06-01

    Impact of the non-equilibrium on the reaction and relaxation rates (called as generalized relaxation rates - GRR), for the spatially inhomogeneous gas mixture is considered. Discarding the assumption that the 'chemical' part of the collisional integral is a small correction to non-reactive part, the expression for the zero-order GRR is derived. They are represented as a renormalization of the traditional reaction and relaxation rates, which means mixing of all corresponding processes. Thus all reactions and relaxation processes are entangled.

  12. Quantifying nitrate retention processes in a riparian buffer zone using the natural abundance of 15N in NO3-.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Karel; Boeckx, Pascal; Van Cleemput, Oswald; Hofman, Georges

    2003-01-01

    Quantifying the relative importance of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention in riparian zones may lead to methods optimising the construction of riparian zones for water pollution control. The natural abundance of 15N in NO3- has been shown to be an interesting tool for providing insights into the NO3- retention processes occurring in riparian zones. In this study, 15N isotope fractionation (variation in delta15N of the residual NO3-) due to denitrification and due to plant uptake was measured in anaerobic soil slurries at different temperatures (5, 10 and 15 degrees C) and in hydroponic systems with different plant species (Lolium perenne L., Urtica dioica L. and Epilobium hirsutum L.). It was found that temperature had no significant effect on isotope fractionation during denitrification, which resulted in a 15N enrichment factor epsilonD of -22.5 +/- 0.6 per thousand. On the other hand, nitrate uptake by plants resulted in 15N isotope fractionation, but was independent of plant species, leading to a 15N enrichment factor epsilonP of -4.4 +/- 0.3 per thousand. By relating these two laboratory-defined enrichment factors to a field enrichment factor for groundwater nitrate retention during the growing season (epsilonR = -15.5 +/- 1.0 per thousand ), the contribution of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention could be calculated. The relative importance of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention in the riparian buffer zone was 49 and 51% during spring, 53 and 47% during summer, and 75 and 25% during autumn. During wintertime, high micropore dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and low redox potentials due to decomposition of the highly productive riparian vegetation probably resulted in a higher denitrification rate and favoured other nitrate retention processes such as nitrate immobilisation or dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). This could have biased the 15N

  13. Application of 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to the determination of the stability of aryl nitrogen mustards.

    PubMed

    Wilman, D E; Palmer, B D; Denny, W A

    1995-06-01

    An excellent correlation has been shown to exist between the 15N NMR chemical shifts of a series of aryl nitrogen mustards and the Hammett constant, sigma, which is much improved by the use of sigma-. These chemical shifts also correlate well with the hydrolysis rates of the compounds in 50% aqueous acetone at 66 degrees C and their alkylation of 4-(4'-nitrobenzyl)pyridine under similar conditions. Thus 15N NMR is a straightforward and material-conserving method for estimating the relative stabilities of aryl nitrogen mustards. PMID:7783158

  14. Compound specific amino acid δ15N in marine sediments: A new approach for studies of the marine nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Fabian C.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Crusius, John; Casso, Michael A.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-10-01

    The nitrogen (N) isotopic composition (δ15N) of bulk sedimentary N (δ15Nbulk) is a common tool for studying past biogeochemical cycling in the paleoceanographic record. Empirical evidence suggests that natural fluctuations in the δ15N of surface nutrient N are reflected in the δ15N of exported planktonic biomass and in sedimentary δ15Nbulk. However, δ15Nbulk is an analysis of total combustible sedimentary N, and therefore also includes mixtures of N sources and/or selective removal or preservation of N-containing compounds. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analyses of individual amino acids (δ15NAA) are novel measurements with the potential to decouple δ15N changes in nutrient N from trophic effects, two main processes that can influence δ15Nbulk records. As a proof of concept study to examine how δ15NAA can be applied in marine sedimentary systems, we compare the δ15NAA signatures of surface and sinking POM sources with shallow surface sediments from the Santa Barbara Basin, a sub-oxic depositional environmental that exhibits excellent preservation of sedimentary organic matter. Our results demonstrate that δ15NAA signatures of both planktonic biomass and sinking POM are well preserved in such surface sediments. However, we also observed an unexpected inverse correlation between δ15N value of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe; the best AA proxy for N isotopic value at the base of the food web) and calculated trophic position. We used a simple N isotope mass balance model to confirm that over long time scales, δ15NPhe values should in fact be directly dependent on shifts in ecosystem trophic position. While this result may appear incongruent with current applications of δ15NAA in food webs, it is consistent with expectations that paleoarchives will integrate N dynamics over much longer timescales. We therefore propose that for paleoceanographic applications, key δ15NAA parameters are ecosystem trophic position, which determines relative partitioning of 15N

  15. Nitrogen mineralization from selected /sup 15/N-labelled crop residues and humus as affected by inorganic nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of cover crops or crop residues as a source of N to succeeding crops has become a matter of increasing importance for economic and environmental reason. Greenhouse and field studies were conducted to determine the N contribution of four /sup 15/N labelled crop residues, rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), crimson clover (Trifolium encarnatum L.), and hairy vetch (Vicia sativa L.), to successive crops and to evaluate the effect of different organic (ON) and inorganic N (IN) combinations on mineralization of the above residues. Total /sup 15/N recovery from the residues ranged from 51% to 85% and 4% to 74% for the greenhouse and field studies, respectively.

  16. In vivo activity of glutaminase in the brain of hyperammonaemic rats measured by 15N nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, K; Ross, B D

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo activity of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) was measured in the brain of hyperammonaemic rat by 15N n.m.r. Brain glutamine was 15N-enriched by intravenous infusion of 15NH4+ until the concentration of [5-15N]glutamine reached 6.1 mumol/g. Further glutamine synthesis was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, and the infusate was changed to 14NH4+ during observation of decrease in brain [5-15N]glutamine due to PAG and other glutamine utilization pathways. Progressive decrease in brain [5-15N]glutamine, PAG-catalysed production of 15NH4+ and its subsequent assimilation into glutamate by glutamate dehydrogenase were monitored in vivo by 15N n.m.r. Brain [5-15N]glutamine (15N enrichment of 0.35-0.50) decreased at a rate of 1.2 mumol/h per g of brain. The in vivo PAG activity, determined from the observed rate and the quantity of 15NH4+ produced and subsequently assimilated into glutamate and aspartate, was 0.9-1.3 mumol/h per g. This activity is less than 1.1% of the reported activity in vitro measured in rat brain homogenate at a 10 mM concentration of the activator Pi. Inhibition by ammonia (brain level 1.4 mumol/g) alone does not account for the observed low activity in vivo. The result strongly suggests that, in intact brain, PAG activity is maintained at a low level by a suboptimal in situ concentration of Pi and the strong inhibitory effect of glutamate. The observed PAG activity in vivo is lower than the reported in vivo activity of glutamate decarboxylase which converts glutamate into gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). The result suggests that PAG-catalysed hydrolysis of glutamine is not the sole provider of glutamate used for GABA synthesis. PMID:7826349

  17. Relaxing music counters heightened consolidation of emotional memory.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Nikki S; Wong, Wendy Wing; Velik, Lauren

    2012-02-01

    Emotional events tend to be retained more strongly than other everyday occurrences, a phenomenon partially regulated by the neuromodulatory effects of arousal. Two experiments demonstrated the use of relaxing music as a means of reducing arousal levels, thereby challenging heightened long-term recall of an emotional story. In Experiment 1, participants (N=84) viewed a slideshow, during which they listened to either an emotional or neutral narration, and were exposed to relaxing or no music. Retention was tested 1 week later via a forced choice recognition test. Retention for both the emotional content (Phase 2 of the story) and material presented immediately after the emotional content (Phase 3) was enhanced, when compared with retention for the neutral story. Relaxing music prevented the enhancement for material presented after the emotional content (Phase 3). Experiment 2 (N=159) provided further support to the neuromodulatory effect of music by post-event presentation of both relaxing music and non-relaxing auditory stimuli (arousing music/background sound). Free recall of the story was assessed immediately afterwards and 1 week later. Relaxing music significantly reduced recall of the emotional story (Phase 2). The findings provide further insight into the capacity of relaxing music to attenuate the strength of emotional memory, offering support for the therapeutic use of music for such purposes. PMID:22207009

  18. Correlation of transverse relaxation time with structure of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Gregory B.; Meerovich, Victor M.; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L.

    2016-09-01

    Transverse spin-spin relaxation of liquids entrapped in nanocavities with different orientational order is theoretically investigated. Based on the bivariate normal distribution of nanocavities directions, we have calculated the anisotropy of the transverse relaxation time for biological systems, such as collagenous tissues, articular cartilage, and tendon. In the framework of the considered model, the dipole-dipole interaction is determined by a single coupling constant. The calculation results for the transverse relaxation time explain the angular dependence observed in MRI experiments with biological objects. The good agreement with the experimental data is obtained by adjustment of only one parameter which characterizes the disorder in fiber orientations. The relaxation time is correlated with the degree of ordering in biological tissues. Thus, microstructure of the tissues can be revealed from the measurement of relaxation time anisotropy. The clinical significance of the correlation, especially in the detection of damage must be evaluated in a large prospective clinical trials.

  19. Ingestion of caustic hair relaxer: is endoscopy necessary?

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; Eisenbeis, J F

    1997-07-01

    Hair relaxer, a commercially available alkaline product, is commonly the offending agent in caustic ingestion. These patients often experience oral cavity and facial burns; however, no clinically significant esophageal injuries have been reported. Therefore, we questioned the therapeutic and economic efficacy of the "standard treatment protocol" that includes hospitalization and endoscopic evaluation. Twenty-six patients over a 7-year period presented to our institution having ingested hair relaxer. Presenting signs and symptoms, esophageal findings, and cost of the standard treatment protocol were reviewed. Also, we analyzed the caustic potential and current packaging of hair relaxer. Our findings support modifications in the standard treatment protocol for hair relaxer ingestion including elimination of hospitalization and endoscopy in most patients. We also question compliance with childproof packaging laws and suggest avenues for prevention of hair relaxer ingestion. PMID:9217127

  20. Comet Bursting Through Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Comets may be excited and occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation states for a large fraction of their lifetimes. Many comet nuclei have been identified or are suspected to occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation [Belton 2005, etc.] as well as have evolving rotation rates [Belton 2011, etc.]. Comet orbits drive these rotation states through cycles of excitation due to surface jets and relaxation due to time variable internal stresses that dissipate energy in the anelastic comet interior. Furthermore, relaxation from complex rotation can increase the loads along the symmetry axis of prolate comets. These loads stretch the body along the symmetry axis and may be the cause of the characteristic ``bowling pin’’ shape and eventually may lead to failure. This is an alternative model for comet bursting. Each cycle deposits only a small amount of energy and stress along the axis, but this process is repeated every orbit during which jets are activated. Our model for the evolution of comet nuclei includes torques due to a number of discrete jets located on the surface based on Neishtadt et al. [2002]. The model also includes internal dissipation using an approach developed by Sharma et al. [2005] and Vokrouhlicky et al. [2009]. These equations are averaged over the instantaneous spin state and the heliocentric orbit so the long-term evolution of the comet can be determined. We determine that even after the inclusion of internal dissipation there still exist non-principal axis equilibrium states for certain jet geometries. For ranges of dissipation factors and jet geometries, prolate comets are found to occupy states that have time variable internal loads over long time periods. These periodic loadings along the symmetry axis may lead to ``necking’’ as the body extends along the axis to release the stress and eventually disruption.

  1. The first synthesis of [9,Amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2}]adenine and {beta}- 2{prime}-Deoxy-[9,Amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2}]adenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Orji, C.C.; Silks, L.A. III

    1995-12-31

    {beta}-2{prime}-Deoxy-[9, Amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2}] Adenosine has been constructed in 4 steps from commercially available 5-amino-4,6-dichloropyrimidine and {sup 15}NH{sub 3}. The reactions have been scaled provide grams quantities of labeled nucleoside.

  2. Global modeling of the 15N216O line positions within the framework of the polyad model of effective Hamiltonian and a room temperature 15N216O line list

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashkun, S. A.; Perevalov, V. I.; Liu, A.-W.; Hu, S.-M.

    2016-05-01

    The global modeling of 15N216O line positions in the 4-12,516 cm-1 region has been performed using the polyad model of effective Hamiltonian. The effective Hamiltonian parameters were fitted to the line positions collected from an exhaustive review of the literature. The dimensionless weighted standard deviation of the fit is 1.31. The fitted set of 109 parameters allowed reproducing more than 18,000 measured line positions with an RMS value of 0.001 cm-1. A line list was calculated for a reference temperature 296 K, natural abundance (1.32×10-5), and an intensity cutoff 10-30 cm/molecule. The line list is based on the fitted set of the effective Hamiltonian parameters for 15N216O obtained in this work and the effective dipole moment parameters of the 15N216O and 14N216O isotopologues. Accurate values of the 15N216O total partition function are also given.

  3. Nitrogen isotope exchange between NO and NO2 and its implications for δ15N variations in tropospheric NOx and atmospheric nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Wendell W.; Simonini, Damian S.; Michalski, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) isotope exchange between nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been previously suggested to influence N stable isotope compositions (δ15N) of these molecules. However, there is disagreement in the magnitude of the N isotopic fractionation (αNO2>/NO) resulting from this exchange process between previous experimental and theoretical studies. To this end, we measured αNO2>/NO associated with this exchange reaction at various temperatures. Our results indicate αNO2>/NO to be 1.0403 ± 0.0015, 1.0356 ± 0.0015, and 1.0336 ± 0.0014 at 278 K, 297 K, and 310 K, respectively. These measured values are within experimental error of the values we calculated using a modified version of the Bigeleisen-Mayer equation corrected for accurate zero-point energies, indicating an agreement between experiment and theory. Modeling of this exchange reaction demonstrates that δ15N-NO2 may exhibit a diurnal and seasonal profile if N isotopic equilibrium is achieved.

  4. Effects of Boron Nutrition and Water Stress on Nitrogen Fixation, Seed δ15N and δ13C Dynamics, and Seed Composition in Soybean Cultivars Differing in Maturities

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Mengistu, Alemu

    2015-01-01

    Therefore, the objective of the current research was to investigate the effects of foliar B nutrition on seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars under water stress conditions. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted using different maturity group (MG) cultivars. Plants were well-watered with no foliar B (W − B), well-watered with foliar B (W + B), water-stressed with no foliar B (WS − B), and water-stressed with foliar B (WS + B). Foliar B was applied at rate of 0.45 kg·ha−1 and was applied twice at flowering and at seed-fill stages. The results showed that seed protein, sucrose, fructose, and glucose were higher in W + B treatment than in W − B, WS + B, and WS − B. The increase in protein in W + B resulted in lower seed oil, and the increase of oleic in WS − B or WS + B resulted in lower linolenic acid. Foliar B resulted in higher nitrogen fixation and water stress resulted in seed δ15N and δ13C alteration. Increased stachyose indicated possible physiological and metabolic changes in carbon and nitrogen pathways and their sources under water stress. This research is beneficial to growers for fertilizer management and seed quality and to breeders to use 15N/14N and 13C/12C ratios and stachyose to select for drought tolerance soybean. PMID:25667936

  5. Stretched Exponential relaxation in pure Se glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Ravindren, S.; Boolchand, P.

    A universal feature of glasses is the stretched exponential relaxation, f (t) = exp[ - t / τ ] β . The model of diffusion of excitations to randomly distributed traps in a glass by Phillips1 yields the stretched exponent β = d[d +2] where d, the effective dimensionality. We have measured the enthalpy of relaxation ΔHnr (tw) at Tg of Se glass in modulated DSC experiments as glasses age at 300K and find β = 0.43(2) for tw in the 0 relaxation is a narrowing of the glass transition width from 7.1°C to 1.4°C, and the ΔHnr term increasing from 0.21 cal/gm to 0.92 cal/gm. In bulk GexSe100-x glasses as x increases to 20%, the length of the polymeric Sen chains between the Ge-crosslinks decreases to n = 2. and the striking relaxation effects nearly vanish. J.C. Phillips, Rep.Prog.Phys. 59 , 1133 (1996). Supported by NSF Grant DMR 08-53957.

  6. Relaxation time of 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hayian

    2004-10-01

    The next generation of searches for the neutron electric dipole moment using ultra cold neutrons will use polarized ^3He as a co-magnetometer. The first such experiment has been proposed, with a goal of improving the current limit on the neutron EDM by two orders of magnitude. This experiment requires a systematic study of the properties of polarized ^3He at cryogenic temperatures under actual experimental conditions. These experimental conditions include polarized ^3He mixed in a bath of superfluid ^4He in low magnetic field and held in an acrylic cell which is coated with deuterated TetraphenylButadiene . Parts of these systematic studies will be done at Duke University using a newly built, novel refillable double cell ^3 He polarizer based on spin exchange optical pumping with Rubidium vapor. The polarimetry for this apparatus is done with a NMR polarimeter using the adiabatic fast passage method. An alternate polarimeter using free induction decay method is also being built. This apparatus is being used to study the relaxation time and other critical properties of polarized ^3He at temperatures ranging from 2.3 - 4.2 K, under simulated experimental conditions. We will present details about this novel polarizer and show preliminary results of our measurements.

  7. Sensitivity enhancement using paramagnetic relaxation in MAS solid-state NMR of perdeuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linser, Rasmus; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Diehl, Anne; Reif, Bernd

    2007-12-01

    Previously, Ishii et al., could show that chelated paramagnetic ions can be employed to significantly decrease the recycle delay of a MAS solid-state NMR experiment [N.P. Wickramasinghe, M. Kotecha, A. Samoson, J. Past, Y. Ishii, Sensitivity enhancement in C-13 solid-state NMR of protein microcrystals by use of paramagnetic metal ions for optimizing H-1 T-1 relaxation, J. Magn. Reson. 184 (2007) 350-356]. Application of the method is limited to very robust samples, for which sample stability is not compromised by RF induced heating. In addition, probe integrity might be perturbed in standard MAS PRE experiments due to the use of very short duty cycles. We show that these deleterious effects can be avoided if perdeuterated proteins are employed that have been re-crystallized from D 2O:H 2O = 9:1 containing buffer solutions. The experiments are demonstrated using the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin as a model system. The labeling scheme allows to record proton detected 1H, 15N correlation spectra with very high resolution in the absence of heteronuclear dipolar decoupling. Cu-edta as a doping reagent yields a reduction of the recycle delay by up to a factor of 15. In particular, we find that the 1H T1 for the bulk H N magnetization is reduced from 4.4 s to 0.3 s if the Cu-edta concentration is increased from 0 mM to 250 mM. Possible perturbations like chemical shift changes or line broadening due to the paramagnetic chelate complex are minimal. No degradation of our samples was observed in the course of the experiments.

  8. Relaxation strategies for patients during dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Patient stress and anxiety are common preoperatively and during dermatologic procedures and surgeries. Stress and anxiety can occasionally interfere with performance of procedures or surgery and can induce hemodynamic instability, such as elevated blood pressure or syncope, as well as producing considerable discomfort for some patients. Detection of excess stress and anxiety in patients can allow the opportunity for corrective or palliative measures. Slower breathing, biofeedback, progressive muscular relaxation, guided imagery, hypnosis, meditation and music can help calm and rebalance the patient's autonomic nervous system and immune functioning. Handheld miniaturized heart rate variability biofeedback devices are now available. The relaxation response can easily be taught. Guided imagery can be recorded or live. Live rapid induction hypnosis followed by deepening and then self-guided imagery requires no experience on the part of the patient but does require training and experience on the part of a provider. Recorded hypnosis inductions may also be used. Meditation generally requires more prior experience and training, but is useful when the patient already is skilled in it. Live, guided meditation or meditation recordings may be used. Relaxing recorded music from speakers or headphones or live performance music may also be employed to ease discomfort and improve the patient's attitude for dermatologic procedures and surgeries. PMID:20677535

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Magnetohydrodynamics of Plasma Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    This monograph on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation in plasmas by Ortolani and Schnack occupies a fascinating niche in the plasma physics literature. It is rare in the complex and often technically sophisticated subject of plasma physics to be able to isolate a topic and deal with it comprehensively in a mere 180 pages. Furthermore, it brings a refreshingly original and personal approach to the treatment of plasma relaxation, synthesizing the experiences of the two authors to produce a very readable account of phenomena appearing in such diverse situations as laboratory reversed field pinches (RFPs) and the solar corona. Its novelty lies in that, while it does acknowledge the seminal Taylor theory of relaxation as a general guide, it emphasizes the role of large scale numerical MHD simulations in developing a picture for the relaxation phenomena observed in experiment and nature. Nevertheless, the volume has some minor shortcomings: a tendency to repetitiveness and some omissions that prevent it being entirely self-contained. The monograph is divided into nine chapters, with the first a readable, `chatty', introduction to the physics and phenomena of relaxation discussed in the later chapters. Chapter 2 develops the tools for describing relaxation processes, namely the resistive MHD model, leading to a discussion of resistive instabilities and the stability properties of RFPs. This chapter demonstrates the authors' confessed desire to avoid mathematical detail with a rather simplified discussion of Δ' and magnetic islands; it also sets the stage for their own belief, or thesis, that numerical simulation of the non-linear consequences of the MHD model is the best approach to explaining the physics of relaxation. Nevertheless, in Chapter 3 they provide a reasonably good account and critique of one analytic approach that is available, and which is the commonly accepted picture for relaxation in pinches - the Taylor relaxation theory based on the conservation of

  10. Using macroalgal δ15N bioassay to detect cruise ship waste water effluent inputs in Skagway, AK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  11. Insight on RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus strains using 13C and 15N kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Anat; Ronen, Zeev; Gelman, Faina

    2013-01-01

    The explosive Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is known to be degraded aerobically by various isolates of the Rhodococcus species, with denitration being the key step, mediated by Cytochrome P450. Our study aimed at gaining insight into the RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus species and comparing isotope effects associated with RDX degradation by distinct Rhodococcus strains. For these purposes, enrichment in (13)C and (15)N isotopes throughout RDX denitration was studied for three distinct Rhodococcus strains, isolated from soil and groundwater in an RDX-contaminated site. The observable (15)N enrichment throughout the reaction, together with minor (13)C enrichment, suggests that N-N bond cleavage is likely to be the key rate-limiting step in the reaction. The similarity in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect between the three tested strains suggests that either isotope-masking effects are negligible, or are of a similar extent for all tested strains. The lack of variability in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect allows the interpretation of environmental studies with greater confidence. PMID:23215036

  12. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Verma, Deepshikha; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2016-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a 150-residue long calmodulin-like calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6), as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization. PMID:26377206

  13. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  14. Stable isotope (13C, 15N and 34S) analysis of the hair of modern humans and their domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Bol, Roland; Pflieger, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Relationships between dietary status and recent migration were examined by delta(13)C, delta(15)N and delta(34)S analysis of hair samples from 43 modern humans living in a rural community in SW England. The isotopic content of 38 'local' hair samples was compared with that of five recently arrived individuals (from Canada, Chile, Germany and the USA). Hair samples from domestic animals (i.e. mainly cats, dogs, cows and horses) were analysed to examine the difference in delta(13)C, delta(15)N and delta(34)S values between herbivores and carnivores. Generally, modern human hair data from the triple stable isotope (delta(13)C, delta(15)N and delta(34)S) provided enough information to confirm the dietary status and origin of the individual subjects. The dietary intake was generally reflected in the animal hair delta(15)N and delta(13)C values, i.e. highest in the carnivores (cats). However, a non-local origin of food sources given to domesticated omnivores (i.e. dogs) was suggested by their hair delta(34)S values. PMID:12442295

  15. Plant community change mediates the response of foliar delta15N to CO2 enrichment in mesic grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may change the isotopic signature of plant N by altering plant and microbial processes involved in the N cycle. Isotope fractionation theory and limited experimental evidence indicate that CO2 may increase leaf delta15N by increasing plant community productivity,...

  16. STATISTICAL ESTIMATES OF VARIANCE FOR 15N ISOTOPE DILUTION MEASUREMENTS OF GROSS RATES OF NITROGEN CYCLE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been fifty years since Kirkham and Bartholmew (1954) presented the conceptual framework and derived the mathematical equations that formed the basis of the now commonly employed method of 15N isotope dilution. Although many advances in methodology and analysis have been ma...

  17. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with {sup 15}N solid-state NMR shift tensor data

    SciTech Connect

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K.; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T.

    2015-11-21

    The {sup 15}N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated {sup 15}N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2–3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X–Y and X–H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of {sup 15}N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved {sup 1}H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental {sup 15}N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than {sup 13}C tensors due to nitrogen’s greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  18. Chemoselective detection and discrimination of carbonyl-containing compounds in metabolite mixtures by 1H-detected 15N NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Arumugam, Sengodagounder; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Higashi, Richard M.; Laulhé, Sébastien; Nantz, Michael H.; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectra of mixtures of metabolites extracted from cells or tissues are extremely complex, reflecting the large number of compounds that are present over a wide range of concentrations. Although multidimensional NMR can greatly improve resolution as well as improve reliability of compound assignments, lower abundance metabolites often remain hidden. We have developed a carbonyl selective aminooxy probe that specifically reacts with free keto and aldehyde functions, but not carboxylates. By incorporating 15N in the aminooxy functional group, 15N-edited NMR was used to select exclusively those metabolites that contain a free carbonyl function while all other metabolites are rejected. Here we demonstrate that the chemical shifts of the aminooxy adducts of ketones and aldehydes are very different, which can be used to discriminate between aldoses and ketoses for example. Utilizing the 2 or 3 bond 15N-1H couplings, the 15N-edited NMR analysis was optimized first with authentic standards and then applied to an extract of the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. More than 30 carbonyl containing compounds at NMR detectable levels, 6 of which we have assigned by reference to our database. As the aminooxy probe contains a permanently charged quaternary ammonium group, the adducts are also optimized for detection by mass spectrometry. Thus, this sample preparation technique provides a better link between the two structural determination tools, thereby paving the way to faster and more reliable identification of both known and unknown metabolites directly in crude biological extracts. PMID:25616249

  19. Variation in hair δ13C and δ15N values in long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) from Singapore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schillaci, Michael A.; Castellini, J. Margaret; Stricker, Craig A.; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Lee, Benjamin P.Y.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the primatology literature on stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) has focused on African and New World species, with comparatively little research published on Asian primates. Here we present hair δ13C and δ15N isotope values for a sample of 33 long-tailed macaques from Singapore. We evaluate the suggestion by a previous researcher that forest degradation and biodiversity loss in Singapore have led to a decline in macaque trophic level. The results of our analysis indicated significant spatial variability in δ13C but not δ15N. The range of variation in δ13C was consistent with a diet based on C3 resources, with one group exhibiting low values consistent with a closed canopy environment. Relative to other macaque species from Europe and Asia, the macaques from Singapore exhibited a low mean δ13C value but mid-range mean δ15N value. Previous research suggesting a decline in macaque trophic level is not supported by the results of our study.

  20. Diatom-bound 15N/14N: New support for enhanced nutrient consumption in the ice age subantarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Rebecca S.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Difiore, Peter J.; Rohde, Melissa M.; Mashiotta, Tracy A.; Lea, David W.

    2005-09-01

    Diatom-bound 15N/14N was used to reconstruct the glacial nutrient status of the Subantarctic Zone in the Southern Ocean. Down-core records from both the Pacific and Indian sectors show δ15N of 5 to 6‰ during the Last Glacial Maximum and a decrease, coincident with the glacial termination, to values as low as 2‰. The effect of either diatom assemblage or physiological change on the diatom-bound 15N/14N is unknown and cannot yet be ruled out as a possible explanation for the observed change. However, the consistency between Indian and Pacific sector records and with other paleoceanographic data suggests that the glacial-interglacial difference in diatom-bound 15N/14N was driven by higher consumption of nitrate in the subantarctic surface during the last ice age. Such a change in nutrient consumption may have resulted from atmospheric iron fertilization and/or decreased glacial mixed layer depths associated with sea ice melting. Enhanced nutrient consumption in the glacial subantarctic would have worked to lower the concentration of CO2 in the ice age atmosphere. It also would have reduced the preformed nutrient content of the low-latitude thermocline, leading to decreases in low-latitude productivity, suboxia, and denitrification.

  1. First Experimental Measurement of the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N Reaction at Astrophysical Energies

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Goldberg, V.; Tribble, R.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Sereville, N. de; Tumino, A.

    2010-11-24

    The {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reactions are of primary importance in several as-trophysical scenarios, including nucleosynthesis inside Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. They are also key reactions to understand exotic systems such as R-Coronae Borealis stars and novae. Thus, the measurement of their cross sections in the low energy region can be crucial to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions, because the resonance parameters are poorly determined. The Trojan Horse Method, in its newly developed form particularly suited to investigate low-energy resonances, has been applied to the {sup 2}H({sup 18}O,{alpha}{sup 15}N)n and {sup 2}H({sup 17}O,{alpha}{sup 14}N)n reactions to deduce the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N cross sections at low energies. Resonances in the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N excitation functions have been studied and the resonance parameters deduced.

  2. Development of a method for in situ measurement of denitrification in aquifers using 15N tracer tests and membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Flessa, H.; Walther, W.; Duijnisveld, W. H. M.

    2009-04-01

    In NO3- contaminated aquifers containing reduced compounds like organic carbon or sulfides, denitrification is an intense process. Its characterization is of interest because NO3- consump-tion improves water quality and N2O production can cause emission of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. Spatial distribution of NO3- and N2 produced by denitrification in groundwa-ter (excess N2) reflects the NO3- input as well as cumulative denitrification during aquifer pas-sage. Reaction progress (RP) at a given location, i.e. the relative consumption by denitrifica-tion of the NO3- that had been leached to the aquifers, characterizes the stage of the denitrifi-cation process. RP can be derived from the ratio between accumulated gaseous denitrification products and initial NO3- concentrations. The amount and spatial distribution of reduced com-pounds within denitrifying aquifers is not well known. Recent findings from parallel investi-gations on in situ denitrification and reactive compounds suggests that single-well 15N tracer tests might be suitable to characterize the stock of reduced compounds in aquifers (Konrad 2007). The overall objective of our studies is measure the spatial dynamics of denitrification within two sandy aquifers in northern Germany. This includes measurement of the actually occurring denitrification process. Moreover we want to determine the long-term denitrification potential which is governed by the stock of reactive material. Here we present a new approach for in situ-measurement of denitrification at monitoring wells using a combination of 15N-tracer push-pull experiments with in situ analysis of 15N-labled N2 and N2O using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS). We will present first results from a laboratory test with aquifer mesocosms using the MIMS method. In this test we supplemented aquifer material of two depths (2 and 7 m below surface) of a drinking water catchment in Northwest Germany with K15NO3 solution. After tracer application we

  3. The Titan 14N/ 15N and 12C/ 13C isotopic ratios in HCN from Cassini/CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Nixon, Conor A.

    2007-11-01

    We report the detection of H 13CN and HC 15N in mid-infrared spectra recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini, along with the determination of the 12C/ 13C and 14N/ 15N isotopic ratios. We analyzed two sets of limb spectra recorded near 13-15° S (Tb flyby) and 83° N (T4 flyby) at 0.5 cm -1 resolution. The spectral range 1210-1310 cm -1 was used to retrieve the temperature profile in the range 145-490 km at 13° S and 165-300 km at 83° N. These two temperature profiles were then incorporated in the atmospheric model to retrieve the abundance profile of H 12C 14N, H 13CN and HC 15N from their bands at 713, 706 and 711 cm -1, respectively. The HCN abundance profile was retrieved in the range 90-460 km at 15° S and 165-305 km at 83° N. There is no evidence for vertical variations of the isotopic ratios. Constraining the isotopic abundance profiles to be proportional to the HCN one, we find C12/C13=89-18+22 at 15° S, and 68-12+16 at 83° N, two values that are statistically consistent. A combination of these results yields a 12C/ 13C value equal to 75±12. This global result, as well as the 15° S one, envelop the value in Titan's methane ( 82.3±1) [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779-784] measured at 10° S and is slightly lower than the terrestrial inorganic standard value (89). The 14N/ 15N isotopic ratio is found equal to 56-13+16 at 15° S and 56-9+10 at 83° N. Combining the two values yields 14N/ 15N = 56 ± 8, which corresponds to an enrichment in 15N of about 4.9 compared with the terrestrial ratio. These results agree with the values obtained from previous ground-based millimeter observations [Hidayat, T., Marten, A., Bézard, B., Gautier, D., Owen, T., Matthews, H.E., Paubert, G., 1997. Icarus 126, 170-182; Marten, A., Hidayat, T., Biraud, Y., Moreno, R., 2002. Icarus 158, 532-544]. The 15N/ 14N ratio found in HCN is ˜3 times higher than in N 2 [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779

  4. Nitrogen Dynamics in Stream Wood Samples Incubated with [14C]Lignocellulose and Potassium [15N]Nitrate †

    PubMed Central

    Aumen, Nicholas G.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Gregory, Stan V.

    1985-01-01

    Surface wood samples obtained from a Douglas fir log (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in a Pacific Northwest stream were incubated in vitro with [14C]lignocellulose in a defined mineral salts medium supplemented with 10 mg of N liter−1 of 15N-labeled NO3− (50 atom% 15N). Evolution of 14CO2, distribution and isotopic dilution of 15N, filtrate N concentrations, and the rates of denitrification, N2 fixation, and respiration were measured at 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation. The organic N content of the lignocellulose-wood sample mixture had increased from 132 μg of N to a maximum of 231 μg of N per treatment after 6 days of incubation. Rates of [14C]lignocellulose decomposition were greatest during the first 6 days and then began to decline over the remaining 12 days. Total CO2 evolution was also highest at day 6 and declined steadily over the remaining duration of the incubation. Filtrate NH4+-N increased from background levels to a final value of 57 μg of N per treatment. Filtrate NO3− N completely disappeared by day 6, and organic N showed a slight decline between days 12 and 18. The majority of the 15N that could be recovered appeared in the particulate organic fraction by day 6 (41 μg of N), and the filtrate NH4+ N fraction contained 11 μg of 15N by day 18. The 15N enrichment values of the filtrate NH4+ and the inorganic N associated with the particulate fraction had increased to approximately 20 atom% 15N by 18 days of incubation, whereas the particulate organic fraction reached its highest enrichment by day 6. Measurements of N2 fixation and denitrification indicated an insignificant gain or loss of N from the experimental system by these processes. The data show that woody debris in stream ecosystems might function as a rapid and efficient sink for exogenous N, resulting in stimulation of wood decomposition and subsequent activation of other N cycling processes. PMID:16346785

  5. Measuring denitrification after grassland renewal and grassland conversion to cropland by using the 15N gas-flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchen, Caroline; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Flessa, Heinz; Giesemann, Anette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    Denitrification, the reduction of oxidized forms of inorganic N to N2O and N2 is an important pathway of gaseous nitrogen losses. Measuring denitrification, especially the reduction of N2O to N2, expressed in the product ratio (N2O/(N2O + N2)), is rather difficult and hence rarely performed under field conditions. But using the 15N gas-flux method allows determining N transformation processes in their natural environment. In order to develop effective climate mitigation strategies understanding the N2O source is essential. We used the 15N gas-flux method to determine N2O and N2 emissions following grassland renewal and conversion techniques. Therefore we selected three different treatments: control (C), mechanical grassland renovation (GR) (autumn 2013) and grassland conversion to maize (GM) (spring 2014) from field plot trials on two different sites (Histic Gleysoil and Plaggic Anthrosol) near Oldenburg, Lower Saxony, Germany. We applied 15N labeled KNO3- (60 atom. % 15N) at a rate equivalent to common farming practices (150 kg N*ha-1) using needle injection of fertilizer solution in three different depths (10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm) for homogeneous soil labeling up to 30 cm in microplots. During the first 10 days after application (May 2014) gas flux measurements from closed chambers were performed every second day and then weekly following a period of 8 weeks. Gas samples were analyzed for δ15N of N2 and N2O by IRMS according to Lewicka-Szczebak et al. (2013). Concentration and 15N enrichment of NO3- in soil water was determined on weekly samples using the SPIN-MAS technique (Stange et al. 2007). Fluxes of N2 and N2O evolved from the 15N labeled soil nitrogen pool were calculated using the equations of Spott et al. (2006). Peak events of N2 and N2O emissions occurred during the first 10 days of measurement, showing differences in soil types, as well as treatment variations. N2 fluxes up to 178 g*ha-1*day-1 and N2O fluxes up to 280 g*ha-1*day-1 were measured on the

  6. Trophic guilds of generalist feeders in soil animal communities as indicated by stable isotope analysis (15N/14N).

    PubMed

    Oelbermann, K; Scheu, S

    2010-10-01

    We investigated if the commonly used aggregation of organisms into trophic guilds, such as detritivores and predators, in fact represent distinct trophic levels. Soil arthropods of a forest-meadow transect were ascribed a priori to trophic guilds (herbivores, detritivores, predators and necrovores), which are often used as an equivalent to trophic levels. We analysed natural variations in 15N/14N ratios of the animals in order to investigate the trophic similarity of organisms within (a priori defined) trophic guilds. Using trophic guilds as an equivalent to trophic level, the assumed stepwise enrichment of 15N by 3.4 per thousand per trophic level did not apply to detritivores; they were only enriched in 15N by on average 1.5 per thousand compared to litter materials. Predators on average were enriched in 15N by 3.5 per thousand compared to detritivores. Within detritvores and predators delta15N signatures varied markedly, indicating that these trophic guilds are dominated by generalist feeders which form a gradient of organisms feeding on different resources. The results indicate that commonly used trophic guilds, in particular detritivores and predators, do not represent trophic levels but consist of subguilds, i.e. subsets of organisms differing in resource utilization. In particular, in soil and litter food webs where trophic level omnivory is common, the use of distinct trophic levels may be inappropriate. Guilds of species delineated by natural variations of stable isotope ratios are assumed to more adequately represent the structure of litter and soil food webs allowing a more detailed understanding of their functioning. PMID:20109270

  7. Retrospective characterization of ontogenetic shifts in killer whale diets via δ13C and δ15N analysis of teeth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsome, Seth D.; Etnier, Michael A.; Monson, Daniel H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolically inert, accretionary structures such as the dentin growth layers in teeth provide a life history record of individual diet with near-annual resolution. We constructed ontogenetic δ13C and δ15N profiles by analyzing tooth dentin growth layers from 13 individual killer whales Orcinus orca collected in the eastern northeast Pacific Ocean between 1961 and 2003. The individuals sampled were 6 to 52 yr old, representing 2 ecotypes—resident and transient—collected across ~25° of latitude. The average isotopic values of transient individuals (n = 10) are consistent with a reliance on mammalian prey, while the average isotopic values of residents (n = 3) are consistent with piscivory. Regardless of ecotype, most individuals show a decrease in δ15N values of ~2.5‰ through the first 3 yr of life, roughly equivalent to a decrease of one trophic level. We interpret this as evidence of gradual weaning, after which, ontogenetic shifts in isotopic values are highly variable. A few individuals (n = 2) maintained relatively stable δ15N and δ13C values throughout the remainder of their lives, whereas δ15N values of most (n = 11) increased by ~1.5‰, suggestive of an ontogenetic increase in trophic level. Significant differences in mean δ13C and δ15N values among transients collected off California suggest that individuality in prey preferences may be prevalent within this ecotype. Our approach provides retrospective individual life history and dietary information that cannot be obtained through traditional field observations of free-ranging and elusive species such as killer whales, including unique historic ecological information that pre-dates modern studies. By providing insights into individual diet composition, stable isotope analysis of teeth and/or bones may be the only means of evaluating a number of hypothesized historical dietary shifts in killer whales of the northeast Pacific Ocean

  8. Retrospective characterization of ontogenetic shifts in killer whale diets via δ13C and δ15N analysis of teeth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsome, Seth D.; Etnier, Michael A.; Monson, Daniel H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolically inert, accretionary structures such as the dentin growth layers in teeth provide a life history record of individual diet with near-annual resolution. We constructed ontogenetic ??13C and ??15N profiles by analyzing tooth dentin growth layers from 13 individual killer whales Orcinus orca collected in the eastern northeast Pacific Ocean between 1961 and 2003. The individuals sampled were 6 to 52 yr old, representing 2 ecotypes-resident and transient - collected across ???25?? of latitude. The average isotopic values of transient individuals (n = 10) are consistent with a reliance on mammalian prey, while the average isotopic values of residents (n = 3) are consistent with piscivory. Regardless of ecotype, most individuals show a decrease in ??15N values of ???2.5% through the first 3 yr of life, roughly equivalent to a decrease of one trophic level. We interpret this as evidence of gradual weaning, after which, ontogenetic shifts in isotopic values are highly variable. A few individuals (n = 2) maintained relatively stable ??15N and ??13C values throughout the remainder of their lives, whereas ??15N values of most (n = 11) increased by ???1.5%, suggestive of an ontogenetic increase in trophic level. Significant differences in mean ??13C and ??15N values among transients collected off California suggest that individuality in prey preferences may be prevalent within this ecotype. Our approach provides retrospective individual life history and dietary information that cannot be obtained through traditional field observations of free-ranging and elusive species such as killer whales, including unique historic ecological information that pre-dates modern studies. By providing insights into individual diet composition, stable isotope analysis of teeth and/or bones may be the only means of evaluating a number of hypothesized historical dietary shifts in killer whales of the northeast Pacific Ocean. ?? Inter-Research 2009.

  9. Range Expansion of the Jumbo Squid in the NE Pacific: δ15N Decrypts Multiple Origins, Migration and Habitat Use

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I.; Ballance, Lisa T.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Coincident with climate shifts and anthropogenic perturbations, the highly voracious jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas reached unprecedented northern latitudes along the NE Pacific margin post 1997–98. The physical or biological drivers of this expansion, as well as its ecological consequences remain unknown. Here, novel analysis from both bulk tissues and individual amino acids (Phenylalanine; Phe and Glutamic acid; Glu) in both gladii and muscle of D. gigas captured in the Northern California Current System (NCCS) documents for the first time multiple geographic origins and migration. Phe δ15N values, a proxy for habitat baseline δ15N values, confirm at least three different geographic origins that were initially detected by highly variable bulk δ15N values in gladii for squid at small sizes (<30 cm gladii length). In contrast, bulk δ15N values from gladii of large squid (>60 cm) converged, indicating feeding in a common ecosystem. The strong latitudinal gradient in Phe δ15N values from composite muscle samples further confirmed residency at a point in time for large squid in the NCCS. These results contrast with previous ideas, and indicate that small squid are highly migratory, move into the NCCS from two or more distinct geographic origins, and use this ecosystem mainly for feeding. These results represent the first direct information on the origins, immigration and habitat use of this key “invasive” predator in the NCCS, with wide implications for understanding both the mechanisms of periodic D. gigas population range expansions, and effects on ecosystem trophic structure. PMID:23527242

  10. (15)N methodologies for quantifying the response of N2-fixing associations to elevated [CO2]: A review.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Phillip M; Lam, Shu K; Chen, Deli

    2016-11-15

    Methodologies based on (15)N enrichment (E) and (15)N natural abundance (NA) have been used to obtain quantitative estimates of the response of biological N2 fixation (BNF) of legumes (woody, grain and forage) and actinorhizal plants grown in artificial media or in soil exposed to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide e[CO2] for extended periods of time, in growth rooms, greenhouses, open top chambers or free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facilities. (15)N2 has also been used to quantify the response of endophytic and free-living diazotrophs to e[CO2]. The primary criterion of response was the proportional dependence of the N2-fixing system on the atmosphere as a source of N. i.e. the symbiotic dependence (Patm). The unique feature of (15)N-based methods is their ability to provide time-integrated and yield-independent estimates of Patm. In studies conducted in artificial media or in soil using the E methodology there was either no response or a positive response of Patm to e[CO2]. The interpretation of results obtained in artificial media or with (15)N2 is straight forward, not being subject to the assumptions on which the E and NA soil-cultured methods are based. A variety of methods have been used to estimate isotopic fractionation attendant on the NA technique, the so-called 'B value', which attaches a degree of uncertainty to the results obtained. Using the NA technique, a suite of responses of Patm to e[CO2] has been published, from positive to neutral to sometimes negative effects. Several factors which interact with the response of N2-fixing species to e[CO2] were identified. PMID:27424117

  11. Oceanic δ15N biogeography: a novel top-down approach to examine nutrient dynamics in the equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, B. S.; Fry, B.; Popp, B. N.; Allain, V.; Olson, R.; Galvan, F.

    2010-12-01

    By mapping the δ15N and δ13C values of three top-level pelagic predators, yellowfin (Thunnus albacares), bigeye (T. obesus), and skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) tuna throughout the equatorial Pacific Ocean, we demonstrated systematic geographic isotopic variation (up to ~12‰ for the δ15N values) that reflect nutrient dynamics that occur at the base of the food web. Remarkably the variation observed in the δ15N values of the tunas is geographically similar to δ15N values previously reported in surface particulate organic matter and deep-sea sediments in the tropical Pacific. We discuss the mechanisms occurring at the base of the food web that could produce the spatial variability observed in tropical tuna δ15N values. We present a simple Rayleigh fractionation model that can explain much of the spatial structure. We also discuss the temporal stability in the isotopic compositions at the base and top of the food web. Overall, this nitrogen isotope cartography or “isoscapes” suggests nitrogen is tightly retained in the marine food web, up to the top predators, and that the uptake of nitrate from the equatorial upwelling zone, denitrification in the oxygen minimum zones, and nitrogen fixation at the base of the food web play major roles in the observed geographical variation. In addition to providing insight into the nutrient dynamics of the open ocean, these predator isoscapes can begin to be used to characterize regional residency in tropical tunas, which is important for the successful management of tuna fisheries.

  12. Quantum Chemical Calculations of Amide-15N Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors for a Membrane-Bound Cytochrome b5

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining amide-15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors from biomolecules and understanding their variation for structural and dynamics studies using solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy and also by quantum chemical calculations. Due to the difficulties associated with the measurement of CSA tensors from membrane proteins, NMR-based structural studies heavily relied on the CSA tensors determined from model systems, typically single crystals of model peptides. In the present study, the principal components of backbone amide-15N CSA tensor have been determined using density functional theory for a 16.7-kDa membrane-bound paramagnetic heme containing protein, cytochrome b5 (cytb5). All the calculations were performed by taking residues within 5Å distance from the backbone amide-15N nucleus of interest. The calculated amide-15N CSA spans agree less well with our solution NMR data determined for an effective internuclear distance rN-H = 1.023 Å and a constant angle β = 18° that the least shielded component (δ11) makes with the N-H bond. The variation of amide-15N CSA span obtained using quantum chemical calculations is found to be smaller than that obtained from solution NMR measurements, whereas the trends of the variations are found to be in close agreement. We believe that the results reported in this study will be useful in studying the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and heme-containing proteins, and also membrane-bound protein-protein complexes such as cytochromes-b5-P450. PMID:23268659

  13. Some puzzles about logarithmic relaxations and a few possible resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pollak, M.

    2014-08-20

    Three subjects are examined in connection with the relaxation of an electron glass. 1. In most cases the experimental decay time τ is found to relate to a history of the system rather than to the time it takes to reach equilibrium. The reason is that in a non-ergodic system equilibrium cannot be reached in any experiment but the knowledge of an equilibrium property is essential in evaluating the time to reach it. 2. An alternative theory is proposed for the interpretation of aging experiments. The proposed theory is deemed to better represent the physics and is more in keeping with the relaxation theory. 3. A current relaxation theory for the electron glass fails to take into account a certain renewal process during the evolution of the relaxation, namely the possibility of fast transitions following a slow transition. Ramifications of such a neglect are explored.

  14. Nuclear-spin-lattice relaxation in rhenium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitropoulos, C.; Bucher, J.P.; Borsa, F.; Corti, M.

    1989-04-01

    Nuclear-spin-lattice relaxation measurements are presented for /sup 187/Re in Re metal as a function of temperature. The relaxation transition probabilities were extracted from the nuclear magnetization recovery curves both in high magnetic field (H/sub 0/ = 8 T) nuclear-magnetic-resonance experiments and in nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (H/sub 0/ = 0) experiments. It is found that the dominant relaxation mechanisms is due to magnetic rather then quadrupolar hyperfine interaction with W/sub M/ = 1.32 T. The data are analyzed in terms of the electronic structure of Re metal. The analysis confirms that Re is a ''weakly enhanced'' transition metal with a nuclear relaxation rate dominated by the s-contact hyperfine interaction.

  15. Dynamics in supercooled polyalcohols: Primary and secondary relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döß, A.; Paluch, M.; Sillescu, H.; Hinze, G.

    2002-10-01

    We have studied details of the molecular dynamics in a series of pure polyalcohols by means of dielectric spectroscopy and 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). From glycerol to threitol, xylitol and sorbitol a systematic change in the dynamics of the primary and secondary relaxation is found. With increasing molecular weight and fragility an increase in the width of the α-peak is observed. Details of the molecular reorientation process responsible for the α-relaxation were exploited by two-dimensional NMR experiments. It is found that in the same sequence of polyalcohols the appearance of the secondary relaxation changes gradually from a wing type scen