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Sample records for 15n relaxation measurements

  1. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  2. Backbone dynamics of the oligomerization domain of p53 determined from 15N NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Omichinski, J G; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1995-05-01

    The backbone dynamics of the tetrameric p53 oligomerization domain (residues 319-360) have been investigated by two-dimensional inverse detected heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy at 500 and 600 MHz. 15N T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOEs were measured for 39 of 40 non-proline backbone NH vectors at both field strengths. The overall correlation time for the tetramer, calculated from the T1/T2 ratios, was found to be 14.8 ns at 35 degrees C. The correlation times and amplitudes of the internal motions were extracted from the relaxation data using the model-free formalism (Lipari G, Szabo A, 1982, J Am Chem Soc 104:4546-4559). The internal dynamics of the structural core of the p53 oligomerization domain are uniform and fairly rigid, with residues 327-354 exhibiting an average generalized order parameter (S2) of 0.88 +/- 0.08. The N- and C-termini exhibit substantial mobility and are unstructured in the solution structure of p53. Residues located at the N- and C-termini, in the beta-sheet, in the turn between the alpha-helix and beta-sheet, and at the C-terminal end of the alpha-helix display two distinct internal motions that are faster than the overall correlation time. Fast internal motions (< or = 20 ps) are within the extreme narrowing limit and are of uniform amplitude. The slower motions (0.6-2.2 ns) are outside the extreme narrowing limit and vary in amplitude.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663341

  3. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins. PMID:25296323

  4. H/D exchange of a 15N labelled Tau fragment as measured by a simple Relax-EXSY experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Huvent, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2014-12-01

    We present an equilibrium H/D exchange experiment to measure the exchange rates of labile amide protons in intrinsically unfolded proteins. By measuring the contribution of the H/D exchange to the apparent T1 relaxation rates in solvents of different D2O content, we can easily derive the rates of exchange for rapidly exchanging amide protons. The method does not require double isotope labelling, is sensitive, and requires limited fitting of the data. We demonstrate it on a functional fragment of Tau, and provide evidence for the hydrogen bond formation of the phosphate moiety of Ser214 with its own amide proton in the same fragment phosphorylated by the PKA kinase.

  5. Analysis of internal motions of interleukin-13 variant associated with severe bronchial asthma using {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Takeda, Chika; Kuroki, Ryota; Izuhara, Kenji; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi . E-mail: ueda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-22

    The single nucleotide polymorphism interleukin-13 (IL-13) R110Q is associated with severe bronchial asthma because its lower affinity leads to the augmentation of local IL-13 concentration, resulting in an increase in the signal transduction via IL-13R. Since the mutation site does not directly bind to IL-13R{alpha}2, we carried out NMR relaxation analyses of the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q in order to examine whether the R110Q mutation affects the internal motions in IL-13 molecules. The results showed that the internal motion in the micro- to millisecond time scale on helix D, which is suggested to be important for the interaction between IL-13 and IL-13R{alpha}2, is increased in IL-13-R110Q compared with that in the wild-type IL-13. It therefore appears that the difference in the internal motions on helix D between the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q may be involved in their affinity differences with IL-13R{alpha}2.

  6. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  7. THE EFFECTS OF PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION REAGENTS ON 15N SPIN RELAXATION AND THE USE OF GD(DPM)3 AS A NITROGEN-15 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPIN LABEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron-nuclear relaxation times (T(1) sup e's) for (15)N and (13)C in natural abundance are measured for a series of amines of a wide range of pK(a)s using four paramagnetic relaxation reagents that are soluable in organic solutions. Cr(acac)3 and Cr(dpm)3 are seen to affect th...

  8. Slow motions in microcrystalline proteins as observed by MAS-dependent 15N rotating-frame NMR relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; Zinkevich, Tatiana; Reif, Bernd; Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-11-01

    15N NMR relaxation rate R1ρ measurements reveal that a substantial fraction of residues in the microcrystalline chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain protein undergoes dynamics in the μs-ms timescale range. On the basis of a comparison of 2D site-resolved with 1D integrated 15N spectral intensities, we demonstrate that the significant fraction of broad signals in the 2D spectrum exhibits the most pronounced slow mobility. We show that 15N R1ρ's in proton-diluted protein samples are practically free from the coherent spin-spin contribution even at low MAS rates, and thus can be analysed quantitatively. Moderate MAS rates (10-30 kHz) can be more advantageous in comparison with the rates >50-60 kHz when slow dynamics are to be identified and quantified by means of R1ρ experiments.

  9. The effect of noncollinearity of 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA tensors and rotational anisotropy on 15N relaxation, CSA/dipolar cross correlation, and TROSY.

    PubMed

    Fushman, D; Cowburn, D

    1999-02-01

    Current approaches to 15N relaxation in proteins assume that the 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA tensors are collinear. We show theoretically that, when there is significant anisotropy of molecular rotation, different orientations of the two tensors, experimentally observed in proteins, nucleic acids, and small peptides, will result in differences in site-specific correlation functions and spectral densities. The standard treatments of the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation of amide 15N nuclei, of the 15N CSA/15N-1H dipolar cross correlation, and of the TROSY experiment are extended to account for the effect of noncollinearity of the 15N-1H dipolar and 15N CSA (chemical shift anisotropy) tensors. This effect, proportional to the degree of anisotropy of the overall motion, (D parallel/D perpendicular - 1), is sensitive to the relative orientation of the two tensors and to the orientation of the peptide plane with respect to the diffusion coordinate frame. The effect is negligible at small degrees of anisotropy, but is predicted to become significant for D parallel/D perpendicular > or = 1.5, and at high magnetic fields. The effect of noncollinearity of 15N CSA and 15N-1H dipolar interaction is sensitive to both gross (hydrodynamic) properties and atomic-level details of protein structure. Incorporation of this effect into relaxation data analysis is likely to improve both precision and accuracy of the derived characteristics of protein dynamics, especially at high magnetic fields and for molecules with a high degree of anisotropy of the overall motion. The effect will also make TROSY efficiency dependent on local orientation in moderately anisotropic systems. PMID:10070755

  10. Heteronuclear transverse and longitudinal relaxation in AX4 spin systems: Application to 15N relaxations in 15NH4+

    PubMed Central

    Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Hansen, D. Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The equations that describe the time-evolution of transverse and longitudinal 15N magnetisations in tetrahedral ammonium ions, 15NH4+, are derived from the Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield density operator relaxation theory. It is assumed that the relaxation of the spin-states is dominated by (1) the intra-molecular 15N–1H and 1H–1H dipole–dipole interactions and (2) interactions of the ammonium protons with remote spins, which also include the contribution to the relaxations that arise from the exchange of the ammonium protons with the bulk solvent. The dipole–dipole cross-correlated relaxation mechanisms between each of the 15N–1H and 1H–1H interactions are explicitly taken into account in the derivations. An application to 15N-ammonium bound to a 41 kDa domain of the protein DnaK is presented, where a comparison between experiments and simulations show that the ammonium ion rotates rapidly within its binding site with a local correlation time shorter than approximately 1 ns. The theoretical framework provided here forms the basis for further investigations of dynamics of AX4 spin systems, with ammonium ions in solution and bound to proteins of particular interest. PMID:25128779

  11. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Udgaonkar, J B; Hosur, R V

    2000-10-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 degrees C, pH 6.6, using 15N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D [1H]-15N NMR spectroscopy. 15N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R2), and steady-state heteronuclear [1H]-15N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide 15N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times (tau(m)) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motion's cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface may have important implications for remote effects and regulation of the enzyme action. PMID

  12. Isolation and measurement of 15N2 from respiratory gases of animals administered 15N-labeled substances.

    PubMed

    Springer, D L; Reed, D J; Dost, F N

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for collection of metabolic 15N2 from in vitro preparations or intact rats administered 15N-containing compounds. The methods enables routine collection and mass spectrometric measurement of as little as 10 mumol 15N2 respired by a rat over a 24-h period. A device is described that includes either an animal chamber or a tissue reaction vessel in a closed recycling atmosphere, with automatic O2 replenishment and removal of CO2 and water. It is capable of sustaining moderate vacuum and is coupled to a high-vacuum manifold designed to process the contained atmosphere and respiratory gases. The starting atmosphere is an 80:20 mix of sulfur hexafluoride and O2. Recovery of 15N2 gas from the system without an animal present was 101.3 +/- 5.75%. When 15N2 gas was very slowly infused iv into an animal, recovery was 89.1 +/- 5.38%. Use of the method in studies of the fate of [15N]hydrazine in rats indicated that about 15% of the administered hydrazine is rapidly converted to 15N2, followed by slower conversion of an additional 7-10% over the next several hours. PMID:7328697

  13. A 15N CPMG relaxation dispersion experiment more resistant to resonance offset and pulse imperfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Yu, Binhan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili; Yang, Daiwen

    2015-08-01

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is a powerful NMR method to study protein dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. J-coupling, resonance offset, radio frequency field inhomogeneity, and pulse imperfection often introduce systematic errors into the measured transverse relaxation rates. Here we proposed a modified continuous wave decoupling CPMG experiment, which is more unaffected by resonance offset and pulse imperfection. We found that it is unnecessary to match the decoupling field strength with the delay between CPMG refocusing pulses, provided that decoupling field is strong enough. The performance of the scheme proposed here was shown by simulations and further demonstrated experimentally on a fatty acid binding protein.

  14. SRLS analysis of 15N spin relaxation from E. coli ribonuclease HI: the tensorial perspective.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Eva; Shapiro, Yury E; Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino

    2012-01-19

    15N–H relaxation parameters from ribonuclease HI (RNase H), acquired in previous work at magnetic fields of 14.1 and 18.8 T, and at 300 K, are analyzed with the mode-coupling slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach. In accordance with standard theoretical treatments of restricted motions, SRLS approaches N-H bond dynamics from a tensorial perspective. As shown previously, a physically adequate description of this phenomenon has to account for the asymmetry of the local spatial restrictions. So far, we used rhombic local ordering tensors; this is straightforward but computationally demanding. Here, we propose substantiating the asymmetry of the local spatial restrictions in terms of tilted axial local ordering (S) and local diffusion (D2) tensors. Although less straightforward, this description provides physically sound structural and dynamic information and is efficient computationally. We find that the local order parameter, S(0)2, is on average 0.89 (0.84, and may be as small as 0.6) for the secondary structure elements (loops). The main local ordering axis deviates from the C(i-1)α-C(i)α axis by less than 6°. At 300 K, D(2,perpendicular) is virtually the same as the global diffusion rate, D1 = 1.8 × 10(7) s(-1). The correlation time 1/6D(2,parallel) ranges from 3-125 (208-344) ps for the secondary structure elements (loops) and is on average 125 ps for the C-terminal segment. The main local diffusion axis deviates from the N-H bond by less than 2° (10°) for the secondary structure elements (loops). An effective data-fitting protocol, which leads in most cases to unambiguous results with limited uncertainty, has been devised. A physically sound and computationally effective methodology for analyzing 15N relaxation in proteins, that provides a new picture of N–H bond structural dynamics in proteins, has been set forth. PMID:22126306

  15. A (15)N CPMG relaxation dispersion experiment more resistant to resonance offset and pulse imperfection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Yu, Binhan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili; Yang, Daiwen

    2015-08-01

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is a powerful NMR method to study protein dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. J-coupling, resonance offset, radio frequency field inhomogeneity, and pulse imperfection often introduce systematic errors into the measured transverse relaxation rates. Here we proposed a modified continuous wave decoupling CPMG experiment, which is more unaffected by resonance offset and pulse imperfection. We found that it is unnecessary to match the decoupling field strength with the delay between CPMG refocusing pulses, provided that decoupling field is strong enough. The performance of the scheme proposed here was shown by simulations and further demonstrated experimentally on a fatty acid binding protein. PMID:26037134

  16. Effects of ion binding on the backbone dynamics of calbindin D9k determined by 15N NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Akke, M; Skelton, N J; Kördel, J; Palmer, A G; Chazin, W J

    1993-09-21

    The backbone dynamics of apo- and (Cd2+)1-calbindin D9k have been characterized by 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rate constants and steady-state [1H]-15N nuclear Overhauser effects were measured at a magnetic field strength of 11.74 T by two-dimensional, proton-detected heteronuclear NMR experiments using 15N-enriched samples. The relaxation parameters were analyzed using a model-free formalism that characterizes the dynamics of the N-H bond vectors in terms of generalized order parameters and effective correlation times. The data for the apo and (Cd2+)1 states were compared to those for the (Ca2+)2 state [Kördel, J., Skelton, N. J., Akke, M., Palmer, A. G., & Chazin, W. J. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4856-4866] to ascertain the effects on ion ligation on the backbone dynamics of calbindin D9k. The two binding loops respond differently to ligation by metal ions: high-frequency (10(9)-10(12) s-1) fluctuations of the N-terminal ion-binding loop are not affected by ion binding, whereas residues G57, D58, G59, and E60 in the C-terminal ion-binding loop have significantly lower order parameters in the apo state than in the metal-bound states. The dynamical responses of the four helices to binding of ions are much smaller than that for the C-terminal binding loop, with the strongest effect on helix III, which is located between the linker loop and binding site II. Significant fluctuations on slower time scales also were detected in the unoccupied N-terminal ion-binding loop of the apo and (Cd2+)1 states; the apparent rates were greater for the (Cd2+)1 state. These results on the dynamical response to ion binding in calbindin D9k provide insights into the molecular details of the binding process and qualitative evidence for entropic contributions to the cooperative phenomenon of calcium binding for the pathway in which the ion binds first in the C-terminal site. PMID:8373781

  17. Measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy in [(13)C,(15)N] uniformly enriched proteins using CSA amplification.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Ge, Yuwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Mali; Li, Conggang; Gan, Zhehong

    2015-11-01

    Extended chemical shift anisotropy amplification (xCSA) is applied for measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of uniformly labeled proteins under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The amplification sequence consists of a sequence of π-pulses that repetitively interrupt MAS averaging of the CSA interaction. The timing of the pulses is designed to generate amplified spinning sideband manifolds which can be fitted to extract CSA parameters. The (13)C/(13)C homonuclear dipolar interactions are not affected by the π-pulses due to the bilinear nature of the spin operators and are averaged by MAS in the xCSA experiment. These features make the constant evolution-time experiment suitable for measuring CSA of uniformly labeled samples. The incorporation of xCSA with multi-dimensional (13)C/(15)N correlation is demonstrated with a GB1 protein sample as a model system for measuring (13)C/(15)N CSA of all backbone (15)NH, (13)CA and (13)CO sites. PMID:26404770

  18. Efficient and accurate determination of the overall rotational diffusion tensor of a molecule from 15N relaxation data using computer program ROTDIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Olivier; Varadan, Ranjani; Fushman, David

    2004-06-01

    We present a computer program ROTDIF for efficient determination of a complete rotational diffusion tensor of a molecule from NMR relaxation data. The derivation of the rotational diffusion tensor in the case of a fully anisotropic model is based on a six-dimensional search, which could be very time consuming, particularly if a grid search in the Euler angle space is involved. Here, we use an efficient Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm combined with Monte Carlo generation of initial guesses. The result is a dramatic, up to 50-fold improvement in the computational efficiency over the previous approaches [Biochemistry 38 (1999) 10225; J. Magn. Reson. 149 (2001) 214]. This method is demonstrated on a computer-generated and real protein systems. We also address the issue of sensitivity of the diffusion tensor determination from 15N relaxation measurements to experimental errors in the relaxation rates and discuss possible artifacts from applying higher-symmetry tensor model and how to recognize them.

  19. Main chain and side chain dynamics of a heme protein: 15N and 2H NMR relaxation studies of R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c2.

    PubMed

    Flynn, P F; Bieber Urbauer, R J; Zhang, H; Lee, A L; Wand, A J

    2001-06-01

    A detailed characterization of the main chain and side chain dynamics in R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c(2) derived from (2)H NMR relaxation of methyl group resonances is presented. (15)N relaxation measurements confirm earlier results indicating that R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c(2) exhibits minor rotational anisotropy in solution. The current study is focused on the use of deuterium relaxation in side chain methyl groups, which has been shown to provide a detailed and accurate measure of internal dynamics. Results obtained indicate that the side chains of ferrocytochrome c(2) exhibit a wide range of motional amplitudes, but are more rigid than generally found in the interior of nonprosthetic group bearing globular proteins. This unusual rigidity is ascribed to the interactions of the protein with the large heme prosthetic group. This observation has significant implications for the potential of the heme-protein interface to modulate the redox properties of the protein and also points to the need for great precision in the design and engineering of heme proteins. PMID:11380250

  20. Isolation and measurement of /sup 15/N/sub 2/ from respiratory gases of animals administered /sup 15/N-labeled substances

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.L.; Reed, D.J.; Dost, F.N.

    1981-07-01

    A method is described for collection of metabolic /sup 15/N/sub 2/ from in vitro preparations or intact rats administered /sup 15/N-containing compounds. The method enables routine collection and mass spectrometric measurement of as little as 10 ..mu..mol /sup 15/N/sub 2/ respired by a rat over a 24-h period. A device is described that includes either an animal chamber or a tissue reaction vessel in a closed recycling atmosphere, with automatic O/sub 2/ replenishment and removal of CO/sub 2/ and water. It is capable of sustaining moderate vacuum and is coupled to a high-vacuum manifold designed to process the contained atmosphere and respiratory gases. The starting atmosphere is an 80:20 mix of sulfur hexafluoride and O/sub 2/. Recovery of /sup 15/N/sub 2/ gas from the system without an animal present was 101.3 +/- 5.75%. When /sup 15/N/sub 2/ gas was very slowly infused iv into an animal, recovery was 89.1 +/- 5.38%. Use of the method in studies of the fate of (/sup 15/N)hydrazine in rats indicated that about 15% of the administered hydrazine is rapidly converted to /sup 15/N/sub 2/, followed by slower conversion of an additional 7-10% over the next several hours.

  1. Continuous field measurement of N2O isotopologues using FTIR spectroscopy following 15N addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. L.; Griffith, D. W.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Lugg, G.; Lawrie, R.; Macdonald, B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic additions of fertilizer nitrogen (N) have significantly increased the mole fraction of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the troposphere. Tracking the fate of fertilizer N and its transformation to N2O is important to advance knowledge of greenhouse gas emissions from soils. Transport and transformations are frequently studied using 15N labeling experiments, but instruments capable of continuous measurements of 15N-N2O at the surface of soil have only recently come to the fore. Our primary aim was to quantify emissions of N2O and the fraction of 15N emitted as N2O from an agricultural soil following 15N addition using a mobile Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. We set up a short-term field experiment on a coastal floodplain site near Nowra, New South Wales. We deployed an automated chamber system connected to a multi-pass cell (optical pathlength 24 m) and low resolution FTIR spectrometer to measure fluxes of all N2O isotopologues collected from five 0.25 m2 chambers every three hours. We measured N2O fluxes pre and post-application of 15N-labeled substrate as potassium nitrate (KNO3) or urea [CO(NH2)2] to the soil surface. Root mean square uncertainties for all isotopologue measurements were less than 0.3 nmol mol-1 for 1 minute average concentration measurements, and minimum detectable fluxes for each isotopologue were <0.1 ng N m-2 s-1. Emissions of all N2O isotopologues were evident immediately following 15N addition. Emissions of 14N15NO, 15N14NO and 15N15NO isotopologues subsided within 10 d, but 14N14NO fluxes were evident over the entire experiment. The figure provides an overview of the emissions. Cumulative 15N-N2O fluxes (sum of the three 15N isotopologues) per chamber for the 14 days following 15N addition ranged from 1.5 to 10.3 mg 15N-N2O m-2. The chambers were destructively sampled after 2 weeks and 15N analyzed in soil and plant material using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Approximately 1% (range 0.7 - 1.9%) of the total amount of

  2. Slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) analysis of 15N-H relaxation from the prototypical small proteins GB1 and GB3.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Yury E; Meirovitch, Eva

    2012-04-01

    15N-H relaxation parameters from the first (GB1) and third (GB3) immunoglobulin-binding domains of streptococcal protein G were analyzed previously with the traditional model-free (MF) method. These proteins comprise an α-helix and a four-stranded β-sheet. An extensive study of GB1 (GB3) used combined three-field (five-field) data acquired in the 278-323 K range (at 297 K). For successful analysis of the GB3 data, it was necessary to allow for variations in the 15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor and virtually eliminate the local motion. In the case of GB1, the spectral density was parametrized. Here, we analyze these data with the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach, which is the generalization of MF in allowing for general tensorial properties, and accounting for mode-coupling. A standard (featuring constant magnetic tensors) SRLS fitting scheme is used. This analysis accounts for the important asymmetry of the local spatial restrictions; it provides physical order parameters, local diffusion rates, related activation energies, and key features of local geometry. Using data from GB3 we show that the main local ordering axis is C(i-1)(α) - C(i)(α), and the average axial (rhombic) order parameter is -0.457 ± 0.017 (1.156 ± 0.015) for the α-helix and -0.484 ± 0.002 (1.10 ± 0.04) for the rest of the polypeptide chain. The N-H bonds within (outside of) the α-helix reorient locally with an average correlation time, (τ), of 310 (130) ps, as compared to 3.33 ns for the global tumbling. Several N-H bonds in the loops β1/β2, β2/α-helix, and α-helix/β3 have (τ) of 380, 320, and 750 ps, respectively. The distinctive experimental data of the α-helix are due to relatively weak and substantially rhombic local ordering and slow local motion. For GB1, we derive activation energies from local diffusion rates. They are 43.3 ± 7.1 kJ/mol for the β-strands, 24.7 ± 3.9 kJ/mol for the α-helix (and approximately for the loop β3/β4), and 18.9

  3. Indirect Measurement of {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}){sup 12}C and {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N. Applications to the AGB Star Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tumino, A.; Tribble, R.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Banu, A.; Fu, C.; Goldberg, V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.

    2008-04-06

    The Trojan Horse Method has been recently applied to the study of reactions involved in fluorine nucleosynthesis inside AGB stars. Fluorine abundance is important since it allows to constrain mixing models from the comparison of the observed fluorine abundances with the ones predicted by models. Anyway direct measurements of the cross section do not extend down to the Gamow peak, which is the astrophysically relevant energy region. In particular the study focuses on the {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}){sup 12}C and the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reactions which can influence fluorine yield as they are part of {sup 19}F production/destruction network.

  4. The contamination of commercial 15N2 gas stocks with 15N-labeled nitrate and ammonium and consequences for nitrogen fixation measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabundo, Richard; Lehmann, Moritz F; Treibergs, Lija; Tobias, Craig R; Altabet, Mark A; Moisander, Pia H; Granger, Julie

    2014-01-01

    We report on the contamination of commercial 15-nitrogen (15N) N2 gas stocks with 15N-enriched ammonium, nitrate and/or nitrite, and nitrous oxide. 15N2 gas is used to estimate N2 fixation rates from incubations of environmental samples by monitoring the incorporation of isotopically labeled 15N2 into organic matter. However, the microbial assimilation of bioavailable 15N-labeled N2 gas contaminants, nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, is liable to lead to the inflation or false detection of N2 fixation rates. 15N2 gas procured from three major suppliers was analyzed for the presence of these 15N-contaminants. Substantial concentrations of 15N-contaminants were detected in four Sigma-Aldrich 15N2 lecture bottles from two discrete batch syntheses. Per mole of 15N2 gas, 34 to 1900 µmoles of 15N-ammonium, 1.8 to 420 µmoles of 15N-nitrate/nitrite, and ≥21 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide were detected. One 15N2 lecture bottle from Campro Scientific contained ≥11 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide per mole of 15N2 gas, and no detected 15N-nitrate/nitrite at the given experimental 15N2 tracer dilutions. Two Cambridge Isotopes lecture bottles from discrete batch syntheses contained ≥0.81 µmoles 15N-nitrous oxide per mole 15N2, and trace concentrations of 15N-ammonium and 15N-nitrate/nitrite. 15N2 gas equilibrated cultures of the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta confirmed that the 15N-contaminants are assimilable. A finite-differencing model parameterized using oceanic field conditions typical of N2 fixation assays suggests that the degree of detected 15N-ammonium contamination could yield inferred N2 fixation rates ranging from undetectable, <0.01 nmoles N L(-1) d(-1), to 530 nmoles N L(-1) d(-1), contingent on experimental conditions. These rates are comparable to, or greater than, N2 fixation rates commonly detected in field assays. These results indicate that past reports of N2 fixation should be interpreted with caution, and demonstrate that the purity of commercial 15N2

  5. Extension of transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy techniques to allosteric proteins: CO- and paramagnetic fluoromet-hemoglobin [beta (15N-valine)].

    PubMed

    Nocek, J M; Huang, K; Hoffman, B M

    2000-03-14

    We present the first steps in applying transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) techniques to the study of allosterism. Each beta-chain of the hemoglobin (Hb) tetramer has 17 valine residues. We have (15)N-labeled the beta-chain Val residues and detected 16 of the 17 (1)H-(15)N correlation peaks for beta-chain Val of the R state CO-Hb structure by using the TROSY technique. Sequence-specific assignments are suggested, based mainly on analysis of the (1)H pseudocontact-shift increments produced by oxidizing the diamagnetic R state HbCO to the paramagnetic R state fluoromet form. When possible, we support these assignments with sequential nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) information obtained from a two-dimensional [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY-TROSY experiment (NOESY, NOE spectroscopy). We have induced further the R-T conformational change by adding the allosteric effector, inositol hexaphosphate, to the fluoromet-Hb sample. This change induces substantial increments in the (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts, and we discuss the implication of these findings in the context of the tentative sequence assignments. These preliminary results suggest that amide nitrogen and amide proton chemical shifts in a selectively labeled sample are site-specific probes for monitoring the allosteric response of the ensemble-averaged solution structure of Hb. More important, the chemical-shift dispersion obtained is adequate to permit a complete assignment of the backbone (15)N/(13)C resonances upon nonselective labeling. PMID:10716987

  6. Paramagnetic Inversion of the Sign of the Interference Contribution to the Transverse Relaxation of the Imido Protons of the Coordinated Imidazoles in the Uniformly 15N-Labeled Cytochrome c3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Tomoaki; Harada, Erisa; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kawai, Gota; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Akutsu, Hideo

    1998-04-01

    In the spectrum of uniformly15N-labeled cytochromec3, the relative linewidths of the doublet peaks of the15N-coupled imido proton of the coordinated imidazole group were reversed on oxidation. This inversion was explained by the interference relaxation process between the electron-proton dipolar and15N-1H dipolar interactions. The inversion can be used to assign the imido protons of the coordinated imidazole groups in heme proteins.

  7. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  8. SRLS analysis of 15N relaxation from bacteriophage T4 lysozyme: a tensorial perspective that features domain motion.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Eva

    2012-05-31

    Bacteriophage T4L lysozyme (T4L) comprises two domains connected by a helical linker. Several methods detected ns domain motion associated with the binding of the peptidoglycan substrate. An ESR study of nitroxide-labeled T4L, based on the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach, detected ns local motion involving the nitroxide and the helix housing it. (15)N−H spin relaxation data from T4L acquired at magnetic fields of 11.7 and 18.8 T, and 298 K, were analyzed previously with the model-free (MF) method. The results did not detect domain motion. SRLS is the generalization of MF. Here, we apply it to the same data analyzed previously with MF. The restricted local N−H motion is described in terms of tilted axial local ordering (S) and local diffusion (D(2)) tensors; dynamical coupling to the global tumbling is accounted for. We find that D(2,⊥) is 1.62 × 10(7) (1.56 × 10(7)) s(−1) for the N-terminal (C-terminal) domain. This dynamic mode represents domain motion. For the linker D(2,⊥) is the same as the rate of global tumbling, given by (1.46 ± 0.04) × 10(7) s(−1). D(2,∥) is 1.3 × 10(9), 1.8 × 10(9) and 5.3 × 10(9) s(−1) for the N-terminal domain, the C-terminal domain, and the linker, respectively. This dynamic mode represents N−H bond vector fluctuations. The principal axis of D(2) is virtually parallel to the N−H bond. The order parameter, S(0)(2), is 0.910 ± 0.046 for most N−H bonds. The principal axis of S is tilted from the C(i−1)(α) −C(i)(α) axis by −2° to 6° for the N-, and C-terminal domains, and by 2.5° for the linker. The tensorial-perspective-based and mode-coupling-based SRLS picture provides new insights into the structural dynamics of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme. PMID:22568692

  9. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in an arid ecosystem measured by sup 15 N natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Plants dependent on nitrogen fixation have an {sup 15}N abundance similar to the atmosphere, while non-nitrogen fixing plants usually are enriched in {sup 15}N and are similar to soil nitrogen values. The natural abundance of {sup 15}N in leaf tissues and soils was determined to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation by several legumes and actinorhizal species in the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research area in central New Mexico. Comparison of {delta}{sup 15}N values for the legume Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) to adjacent Atriplex canascens (fourwing saltbush) indicated that P. glandulosa obtained 66% of its nitrogen by fixation. The legume Hoffmanseggia jamesii was found to be utilizing soil nitrogen. The {delta}{sup 15}N values for the actinorhizal plants, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Cercocarpus montanus, while below values for soil nitrogen, did not differ from associated non-fixing plants.

  10. Investigating patterns of symbiotic nitrogen fixation during vegetation change from grassland to woodland using fine scale δ(15) N measurements.

    PubMed

    Soper, Fiona M; Boutton, Thomas W; Sparks, Jed P

    2015-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in woody plants is often investigated using foliar measurements of δ(15) N and is of particular interest in ecosystems experiencing increases in BNF due to woody plant encroachment. We sampled δ(15) N along the entire N uptake pathway including soil solution, xylem sap and foliage to (1) test assumptions inherent to the use of foliar δ(15) N as a proxy for BNF; (2) determine whether seasonal divergences occur between δ(15) Nxylem sap and δ(15) Nsoil inorganic N that could be used to infer variation in BNF; and (3) assess patterns of δ(15) N with tree age as indicators of shifting BNF or N cycling. Measurements of woody N-fixing Prosopis glandulosa and paired reference non-fixing Zanthoxylum fagara at three seasonal time points showed that δ(15) Nsoil inorganic N varied temporally and spatially between species. Fractionation between xylem and foliar δ(15) N was consistently opposite in direction between species and varied on average by 2.4‰. Accounting for these sources of variation caused percent nitrogen derived from fixation values for Prosopis to vary by up to ∼70%. Soil-xylem δ(15) N separation varied temporally and increased with Prosopis age, suggesting seasonal variation in N cycling and BNF and potential long-term increases in BNF not apparent through foliar sampling alone. PMID:24890575

  11. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: 2. Denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Hall, Robert; Sobota, Daniel; Dodds, Walter; Findlay, Stuart; Grimm, Nancy; Hamilton, Stephen; McDowell, William; O'Brien, Jon; Tank, Jennifer; Ashkenas, Linda; Cooper, Lee W; Dahm, Cliff; Gregory, Stanley; Johnson, Sherri; Meyer, Judy; Peterson, Bruce; Poole, Geoff; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson; Arango, Clay; Beaulieu, Jake; Bernot, Melody; Burgin, Amy; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Helton, Ashley; Johnson, Laura; Niederlehner, Bobbie; Potter, Jody; Sheibley, Rich; Thomas, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field {sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (S{sub Wden}) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N{sub 2} production rates far exceeded N{sub 2}O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling S{sub Wden} were specific discharge (discharge/width) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (U{sub den}) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although U{sub den} increased with increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, the efficiency of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO{sub 3}{sup -} load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration.

  12. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulholland, P.J.; Hall, R.O., Jr.; Sobota, D.J.; Dodds, W.K.; Findlay, S.E.G.; Grimm, N. B.; Hamilton, S.K.; McDowell, W.H.; O'Brien, J. M.; Tank, J.L.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Cooper, L.W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Gregory, S.V.; Johnson, S.L.; Meyer, J.L.; Peterson, B.J.; Poole, G.C.; Valett, H.M.; Webster, J.R.; Arango, C.P.; Beaulieu, J.J.; Bernot, M.J.; Burgin, A.J.; Crenshaw, C.L.; Helton, A.M.; Johnson, L.T.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Potter, J.D.; Sheibley, R.W.; Thomasn, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field 15N-NO- 3 tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (SWden) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N2 production rates far exceeded N2O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO-3 removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NHz 4 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling SWden were specific discharge (discharge / width) and NO-3 concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (Uden) and NO- 3 concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although Uden increased with increasing NO- 3 concentration, the efficiency of NO-3 removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO-3 load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO-3 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO-3 concentration. ?? 2009.

  13. Multi-probe relaxation dispersion measurements increase sensitivity to protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, R Bryn; Oyen, David; Wright, Peter E

    2016-02-17

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion measurements are a valuable tool for the characterization of structural transitions on the micro-millisecond timescale. While the measurement of (15)N relaxation dispersion is now routine, the measurements with alternative nuclei remain limited. Here we report (15)N as well as (1)H R2 relaxation dispersion measurements of the N23PP/S148A "dynamic knockout" mutant of dihydrofolate reductase. The (1)H dispersion measurements are complementary to (15)N data as many additional residues are observed to have dispersive behavior for the (1)H nucleus. Simultaneous fitting of the dispersion profiles for the two nuclei increases the accuracy of exchange parameters determined for individual residues and clustered groups of residues. The different sensitivity of the two nuclei to changes in backbone torsional angles, ring currents, and hydrogen bonding effects provides important insights into the nature of the structural changes that take place during the exchange process. We observe clear evidence of direct and indirect hydrogen bond effects for the (15)N and (1)H chemical shift changes in the active-site, modulation of ring current shielding in the CD-loop and backbone torsional changes in a cluster of residues associated with the C-terminus. This work demonstrates the power of combined (1)H and (15)N probes for the study of backbone dynamics on the micro-millisecond timescale though the analysis of chemical shift changes. PMID:26426424

  14. In vivo activity of glutaminase in the brain of hyperammonaemic rats measured by 15N nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, K; Ross, B D

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo activity of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) was measured in the brain of hyperammonaemic rat by 15N n.m.r. Brain glutamine was 15N-enriched by intravenous infusion of 15NH4+ until the concentration of [5-15N]glutamine reached 6.1 mumol/g. Further glutamine synthesis was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, and the infusate was changed to 14NH4+ during observation of decrease in brain [5-15N]glutamine due to PAG and other glutamine utilization pathways. Progressive decrease in brain [5-15N]glutamine, PAG-catalysed production of 15NH4+ and its subsequent assimilation into glutamate by glutamate dehydrogenase were monitored in vivo by 15N n.m.r. Brain [5-15N]glutamine (15N enrichment of 0.35-0.50) decreased at a rate of 1.2 mumol/h per g of brain. The in vivo PAG activity, determined from the observed rate and the quantity of 15NH4+ produced and subsequently assimilated into glutamate and aspartate, was 0.9-1.3 mumol/h per g. This activity is less than 1.1% of the reported activity in vitro measured in rat brain homogenate at a 10 mM concentration of the activator Pi. Inhibition by ammonia (brain level 1.4 mumol/g) alone does not account for the observed low activity in vivo. The result strongly suggests that, in intact brain, PAG activity is maintained at a low level by a suboptimal in situ concentration of Pi and the strong inhibitory effect of glutamate. The observed PAG activity in vivo is lower than the reported in vivo activity of glutamate decarboxylase which converts glutamate into gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). The result suggests that PAG-catalysed hydrolysis of glutamine is not the sole provider of glutamate used for GABA synthesis. PMID:7826349

  15. Dynamics of a truncated prion protein, PrP(113-231), from (15)N NMR relaxation: order parameters calculated and slow conformational fluctuations localized to a distinct region.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Denis B D; Jones, Christopher E; Abdelraheim, Salama R; Brazier, Marcus W; Toms, Harold; Brown, David R; Viles, John H

    2009-02-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the misfolding of the prion protein (PrP(C)) from a largely alpha-helical isoform to a beta-sheet rich oligomer (PrP(Sc)). Flexibility of the polypeptide could contribute to the ability of PrP(C) to undergo the conformational rearrangement during PrP(C)-PrP(Sc) interactions, which then leads to the misfolded isoform. We have therefore examined the molecular motions of mouse PrP(C), residues 113-231, in solution, using (15)N NMR relaxation measurements. A truncated fragment has been used to eliminate the effect of the 90-residue unstructured tail of PrP(C) so the dynamics of the structured domain can be studied in isolation. (15)N longitudinal (T(1)) and transverse relaxation (T(2)) times as well as the proton-nitrogen nuclear Overhauser effects have been used to calculate the spectral density at three frequencies, 0, omega(N,) and 0.87omega(H). Spectral densities at each residue indicate various time-scale motions of the main-chain. Even within the structured domain of PrP(C), a diverse range of motions are observed. We find that removal of the tail increases T(2) relaxation times significantly indicating that the tail is responsible for shortening of T(2) times in full-length PrP(C). The truncated fragment of PrP has facilitated the determination of meaningful order parameters (S(2)) from the relaxation data and shows for the first time that all three helices in PrP(C) have similar rigidity. Slow conformational fluctuations of mouse PrP(C) are localized to a distinct region that involves residues 171 and 172. Interestingly, residues 170-175 have been identified as a segment within PrP that will form a steric zipper, believed to be the fundamental amyloid unit. The flexibility within these residues could facilitate the PrP(C)-PrP(Sc) recognition process during fibril elongation. PMID:19173221

  16. Measuring denitrification after grassland renewal and grassland conversion to cropland by using the 15N gas-flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchen, Caroline; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Flessa, Heinz; Giesemann, Anette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    Denitrification, the reduction of oxidized forms of inorganic N to N2O and N2 is an important pathway of gaseous nitrogen losses. Measuring denitrification, especially the reduction of N2O to N2, expressed in the product ratio (N2O/(N2O + N2)), is rather difficult and hence rarely performed under field conditions. But using the 15N gas-flux method allows determining N transformation processes in their natural environment. In order to develop effective climate mitigation strategies understanding the N2O source is essential. We used the 15N gas-flux method to determine N2O and N2 emissions following grassland renewal and conversion techniques. Therefore we selected three different treatments: control (C), mechanical grassland renovation (GR) (autumn 2013) and grassland conversion to maize (GM) (spring 2014) from field plot trials on two different sites (Histic Gleysoil and Plaggic Anthrosol) near Oldenburg, Lower Saxony, Germany. We applied 15N labeled KNO3- (60 atom. % 15N) at a rate equivalent to common farming practices (150 kg N*ha-1) using needle injection of fertilizer solution in three different depths (10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm) for homogeneous soil labeling up to 30 cm in microplots. During the first 10 days after application (May 2014) gas flux measurements from closed chambers were performed every second day and then weekly following a period of 8 weeks. Gas samples were analyzed for δ15N of N2 and N2O by IRMS according to Lewicka-Szczebak et al. (2013). Concentration and 15N enrichment of NO3- in soil water was determined on weekly samples using the SPIN-MAS technique (Stange et al. 2007). Fluxes of N2 and N2O evolved from the 15N labeled soil nitrogen pool were calculated using the equations of Spott et al. (2006). Peak events of N2 and N2O emissions occurred during the first 10 days of measurement, showing differences in soil types, as well as treatment variations. N2 fluxes up to 178 g*ha-1*day-1 and N2O fluxes up to 280 g*ha-1*day-1 were measured on the

  17. Fiber Creep Evaluation by Stress Relaxation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Dicarlo, James A.; Wagner, Timothy

    1991-01-01

    A simple bend stress relaxation (BSR) test has been used to measure the creep related properties of a chemically vapor-deposited SiC fiber. Time, temperature, and strain dependent BSR data were analyzed to ascertain the ability of the stress relaxation results to predict tensile creep as a function of the same parameters. The predictions compared very well to actual creep data obtained by axial measurements, indicating that the BSR test could be used for determining both creep and stress relaxation of polycrystalline ceramic fibers under tensile loading.

  18. First Experimental Measurement of the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N Reaction at Astrophysical Energies

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Goldberg, V.; Tribble, R.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Sereville, N. de; Tumino, A.

    2010-11-24

    The {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reactions are of primary importance in several as-trophysical scenarios, including nucleosynthesis inside Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. They are also key reactions to understand exotic systems such as R-Coronae Borealis stars and novae. Thus, the measurement of their cross sections in the low energy region can be crucial to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions, because the resonance parameters are poorly determined. The Trojan Horse Method, in its newly developed form particularly suited to investigate low-energy resonances, has been applied to the {sup 2}H({sup 18}O,{alpha}{sup 15}N)n and {sup 2}H({sup 17}O,{alpha}{sup 14}N)n reactions to deduce the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N cross sections at low energies. Resonances in the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N excitation functions have been studied and the resonance parameters deduced.

  19. Microsecond protein dynamics measured by 13Calpha rotating-frame spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Patrik; Akke, Mikael

    2005-09-01

    NMR spin relaxation in the rotating frame (R1rho) is a unique method for atomic-resolution characterization of conformational (chemical) exchange processes occurring on the microsecond timescale. We present a rotating-frame 13C(alpha) relaxation dispersion experiment for measuring conformational dynamics in uniformly 13C-labeled proteins. The experiment was validated by using the E140Q mutant of the C-terminal fragment of calmodulin, which exhibits significant conformational exchange between two major conformations, as gauged from previous 15N and 1H relaxation studies. Consistent with previous work, the present 13C(alpha) R1rho experiment detects conformational-exchange dynamics throughout the protein. The average correlation time of =25+/-8 micros is in excellent agreement with those determined previously from 1H and 15N R1rho relaxation data: =19+/-7 and 21+/-3 micros, respectively. The extracted chemical-shift differences between the exchanging states reveal significant fluctuations in dihedral angles within single regions of Ramachandran phi-psi space, that were not identified from the 1H and 15N relaxation data. The present results underscore the advantage of using several types of nuclei to probe exchange dynamics in biomolecules. PMID:16028301

  20. Climbing up the vibrational ladder of HC15N: High-temperature near-infrared emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, A.; Johnson, E.; Hemsing, D.; Rozario, H.; Mellau, Georg Ch.

    2013-11-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) emission spectrum of H12C15N was measured in the 6050-6500 cm-1 range at a resolution of 0.044 cm-1 using an emission setup available at the Justus-Liebig Universität, Giessen, Germany. The rich emission spectrum showing numerous overlapped spectral profiles was analyzed with the spectrum analysis software SyMath running using Mathematica as a platform. This approach allowed us to retrieve the vibrational-rotational constants for 32 bands. Many spectroscopic transitions have been observed for the first time in a lab environment. We quantified four newly observed Coriolis resonances.

  1. Polar Versus Non-polar Local Ordering at Mobile Sites in Proteins: Slowly Relaxing Local Structure Analysis of (15)N Relaxation in the Third Immunoglobulin-Binding Domain of Streptococcal Protein G.

    PubMed

    Tchaicheeyan, Oren; Meirovitch, Eva

    2016-01-28

    We developed recently the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for studying restricted motions in proteins by NMR. The spatial restrictions have been described by potentials comprising the traditional L = 2, K = 0, 2 spherical harmonics. However, the latter are associated with non-polar ordering whereas protein-anchored probes experience polar ordering, described by odd-L spherical harmonics. Here we extend the SRLS potential to include the L = 1, K = 0, 1 spherical harmonics and analyze (15)N-(1)H relaxation from the third immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB3) with the polar L = 1 potential (coefficients c0(1) and c1(1)) or the non-polar L = 2 potential (coefficients c0(2) and c2(2)). Strong potentials, with ⟨c0(1)⟩ ∼ 60 for L = 1 and ⟨c0(2)⟩ ∼ 20 for L = 2 (in units of kBT), are detected. In the α-helix of GB3 the coefficients of the rhombic terms are c1(1) ∼ c2(2) ∼ 0; in the preceding (following) chain segment they are ⟨c1(1)⟩ ∼ 6 for L = 1 and ⟨c2(2)⟩ ∼ 14 for L = 2 (⟨c1(1)⟩ ∼ 3 for L = 1 and ⟨c2(2)⟩ ∼ 7 for L = 2). The local diffusion rate, D2, lies in the 5 × 10(9)-1 × 10(11) s(-1) range; it is generally larger for L = 1. The main ordering axis deviates moderately from the N-H bond. Corresponding L = 1 and L = 2 potentials and probability density functions are illustrated for residues A26 of the α-helix, Y3 of the β1-strand, and L12 of the β1/β2 loop; they differ considerably. Polar/orientational ordering is shown to be associated with GB3 binding to its cognate Fab fragment. The polarity of the local ordering is clearly an important factor. PMID:26731631

  2. Evidence for bias in measured δ15N values of terrestrial and aquatic organic materials due to pre-analysis acid treatment methods.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Chris R; Heaton, Tim H E; Leng, Melanie J; Kendrick, Christopher P; Casford, James S L; Lloyd, Jeremy M

    2011-04-30

    We investigate the effect of acid treatment methods on δ(15)N values from a range of environmental organic materials in the context of the increased application of 'dual-mode' isotope analysis (the simultaneous measurement of δ(13)C and δ(15)N from the same acid-treated sample). Three common methods are compared; (i) untreated samples; (ii) acidification followed by sequential water rinse (rinse method); and (iii) acidification in silver capsules (capsule method). The influence of capsule type (silver and tin) on δ(15)N is also independently assessed (as the capsule and rinse methods combust samples in different capsules; silver and tin, respectively). We find significant differences in δ(15)N values between methods and the precision of any one method varies significantly between sample materials and above the instrument precision (>0.3‰). The δ(15)N values of untreated samples did not produce the most consistent data on all sample materials. In addition, the capsule type appears to influence the measured δ(15)N value of some materials, particularly those combusted only in silver capsules. We also compare the new δ(15)N data with previously published δ(13)C data on the same materials. The response of δ(13)C and δ(15)N within and between methods and sample materials to acidification appears to be relatively disproportionate, which can influence the environmental interpretation of the measured data. In addition, statistical methods used to estimate inorganic nitrogen are shown to be seriously flawed. PMID:21452387

  3. Assessing denitrification in groundwater using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N: In situ measurement of a sequential multistep reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; Garabedian, S.P.; Revesz, K.M.; Yoshinari, T.

    2004-01-01

    Denitrification was measured within a nitrate-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N nitrate. The aquifer contained zones of relatively high concentrations of nitrite (up to 77 ??M) and nitrous oxide (up to 143 ??M) and has been the site of previous studies examining ground water denitrification using the acetylene block technique. Small-scale (15-24 m travel distance) tracer tests were conducted by injecting 15N nitrate and bromide as tracers into a depth interval that contained nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and excess nitrogen gas. The timing of the bromide breakthrough curves at down-gradient wells matched peaks in 15N abundance above background for nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gas after more than 40 days of travel. Results were simulated with a one-dimensional transport model using linked reaction kinetics for the individual steps of the denitrification reaction pathway. It was necessary to include within the model spatial variations in background concentrations of all nitrogen oxide species. The model indicated that nitrite production (0.036-0.047 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d -1) was faster than the subsequent denitrification steps (0.013-0.016 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrous oxide and 0.013-0.020 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrogen gas) and that the total rate of reaction was slower than indicated by both acetylene block tracer tests and laboratory incubations. The rate of nitrate removal by denitrification was much slower than the rate of transport, indicating that nitrate would migrate several kilometers down-gradient before being completely consumed.

  4. Production, Purification, and Characterization of 15N-Labeled DNA Repair Proteins as Internal Standards for Mass Spectrometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jaruga, Pawel; Nelson, Bryant C.; Lowenthal, Mark S.; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Loseva, Olga; Coskun, Erdem; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by a variety of damaging agents, resulting in the formation of a multiplicity of lesions, which are mutagenic and cytotoxic. Unless repaired by DNA repair mechanisms before DNA replication, DNA lesions can lead to genomic instability, which is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Oxidatively induced DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair pathway with the involvement of a plethora of proteins. Cancer tissues develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues by overexpressing DNA repair proteins. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions generated by therapeutic agents before they became toxic is a major mechanism in the development of therapy resistance. Evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker of patient response. Thus, knowledge of DNA–protein expressions in disease-free and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. Our laboratory has developed methodologies that use mass spectrometry with isotope dilution for the measurement of expression of DNA repair proteins in human tissues and cultured cells. For this purpose, full-length 15N-labeled analogs of a number of human DNA repair proteins have been produced and purified to be used as internal standards for positive identification and accurate quantification. This chapter describes in detail the protocols of this work. The use of 15N-labeled proteins as internal standards for the measurement of several DNA repair proteins in vivo is also presented. PMID:26791985

  5. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from in situ measurements using push-pull 15N tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Walther, W.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variability of in situ denitrification rates (Dr(in situ)) and their relation to the denitrification capacity in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, 28 push-pull 15N tracer tests for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates were conducted in two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in northern Germany. The 15N analysis of denitrification-derived 15N-labelled N2 and N2O dissolved in water samples collected during the push-pull 15N tracer tests was performed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in the lab and additionally for some tracer tests online in the field with a quadrupole membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS) in order to test the feasibility of on-site real-time 15N analysis. Aquifer material from the same locations and depths as the push-pull injection points was incubated, and the initial and cumulative denitrification after 1 year of incubation (Dcum(365)) as well as the stock of reduced compounds (SRC) was compared with in situ measurements of denitrification. This was done to derive transfer functions suitable to predict Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ). Dr(in situ) ranged from 0 to 51.5 μg N kg-1 d-1. Denitrification rates derived from on-site isotope analysis using MIMS satisfactorily coincided with laboratory analysis by conventional IRMS, thus proving the feasibility of in situ analysis. Dr(in situ) was significantly higher in the sulfidic zone of both aquifers compared to the zone of non-sulfidic aquifer material. Overall, regressions between the Dcum(365) and SRC of the tested aquifer material with Dr(in situ) exhibited only a modest linear correlation for the full data set. However, the predictability of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ) data clearly increased for aquifer samples from the zone of NO3--bearing groundwater. In the NO3--free aquifer zone, a lag phase of denitrification after NO3- injections was observed, which confounded the

  6. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from in situ measurements using push-pull 15N tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Walther, W.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variability of in situ denitrification rates (Dr(in situ)) and their relation to the denitrification capacity in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, 28 push-pull 15N tracer tests for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates were conducted in two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in Northern Germany. The 15N analysis of denitrification derived 15N labelled N2 and N2O dissolved in water samples collected during the push-pull 15N tracer tests was performed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in the lab and additionally for some tracer tests online in the field with a quadrupole membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS), in order to test the feasibility of on-site real-time 15N analysis. Aquifer material from the same locations and depths as the push-pull injection points was incubated and the initial and cumulative denitrification after one year of incubation (Dcum(365)) as well as the stock of reduced compounds (SRC) was compared with in situ measurements of denitrification. This was done to derive transfer functions suitable to predict Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ). Dr(in situ) ranged from 0 to 51.5 μg N kg-1 d-1. Denitrification rates derived from on-site isotope analysis using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry satisfactorily coincided with laboratory analysis by conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry, thus proving the feasibility of in situ analysis. Dr(in situ) was significantly higher in the sulphidic zone of both aquifers compared to the zone of non-sulphidic aquifer material. Overall, regressions between the Dcum(365) and SRC of the tested aquifer material with Dr(in situ) exhibited only a modest linear correlation for the full data set. But the predictability of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ) data clearly increased for aquifer samples from the zone of NO3--bearing groundwater. In the NO3--free aquifer zone a lag phase of denitrification after NO3

  7. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Total uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Hall, Robert; Tank, Jennifer; Sobota, Daniel; O'Brien, Jon; Webster, Jackson; Valett, H. Maurice; Dodds, Walter; Poole, Geoff; Peterson, Chris G.; Meyer, Judy; McDowell, William; Johnson, Sherri; Hamilton, Stephen; Gregory, Stanley; Grimm, Nancy; Dahm, Cliff; Cooper, Lee W; Ashkenas, Linda; Thomas, Suzanne; Sheibley, Rich; Potter, Jody; Niederlehner, Bobbie; Johnson, Laura; Helton, Ashley; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Burgin, Amy; Bernot, Melody; Beaulieu, Jake; Arango, Clay

    2009-01-01

    We measured uptake length of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -} in 72 streams in eight regions across the United States and Puerto Rico to develop quantitative predictive models on controls of NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake length. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiment II project, we chose nine streams in each region corresponding to natural (reference), suburban-urban, and agricultural land uses. Study streams spanned a range of human land use to maximize variation in NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, geomorphology, and metabolism. We tested a causal model predicting controls on NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake length using structural equation modeling. The model included concomitant measurements of ecosystem metabolism, hydraulic parameters, and nitrogen concentration. We compared this structural equation model to multiple regression models which included additional biotic, catchment, and riparian variables. The structural equation model explained 79% of the variation in log uptake length (S{sub Wtot}). Uptake length increased with specific discharge (Q/w) and increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations, showing a loss in removal efficiency in streams with high NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration. Uptake lengths shortened with increasing gross primary production, suggesting autotrophic assimilation dominated NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal. The fraction of catchment area as agriculture and suburban-urban land use weakly predicted NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake in bivariate regression, and did improve prediction in a set of multiple regression models. Adding land use to the structural equation model showed that land use indirectly affected NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake lengths via directly increasing both gross primary production and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration. Gross primary production shortened S{sub Wtot}, while increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} lengthened S{sub Wtot} resulting in no net effect of land use on NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal.

  8. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Total uptake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.O., Jr.; Tank, J.L.; Sobota, D.J.; Mulholland, P.J.; O'Brien, J. M.; Dodds, W.K.; Webster, J.R.; Valett, H.M.; Poole, G.C.; Peterson, B.J.; Meyer, J.L.; McDowell, W.H.; Johnson, S.L.; Hamilton, S.K.; Grimm, N. B.; Gregory, S.V.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Cooper, L.W.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Thomas, S.M.; Sheibley, R.W.; Potter, J.D.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Johnson, L.T.; Helton, A.M.; Crenshaw, C.M.; Burgin, A.J.; Bernot, M.J.; Beaulieu, J.J.; Arangob, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    We measured uptake length of 15NO-3 in 72 streams in eight regions across the United States and Puerto Rico to develop quantitative predictive models on controls of NO-3 uptake length. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen eXperiment II project, we chose nine streams in each region corresponding to natural (reference), suburban-urban, and agricultural land uses. Study streams spanned a range of human land use to maximize variation in NO-3 concentration, geomorphology, and metabolism. We tested a causal model predicting controls on NO-3 uptake length using structural equation modeling. The model included concomitant measurements of ecosystem metabolism, hydraulic parameters, and nitrogen concentration. We compared this structural equation model to multiple regression models which included additional biotic, catchment, and riparian variables. The structural equation model explained 79% of the variation in log uptake length (S Wtot). Uptake length increased with specific discharge (Q/w) and increasing NO-3 concentrations, showing a loss in removal efficiency in streams with high NO-3 concentration. Uptake lengths shortened with increasing gross primary production, suggesting autotrophic assimilation dominated NO-3 removal. The fraction of catchment area as agriculture and suburban-urban land use weakly predicted NO-3 uptake in bivariate regression, and did improve prediction in a set of multiple regression models. Adding land use to the structural equation model showed that land use indirectly affected NO-3 uptake lengths via directly increasing both gross primary production and NO-3 concentration. Gross primary production shortened SWtot, while increasing NO-3 lengthened SWtot resulting in no net effect of land use on NO- 3 removal. ?? 2009.

  9. Relaxation time measurements by an electronic method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brousseau, R.; Vanier, J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a simple electronic system that permits the direct measurement of time constants of decaying signals. The system was used in connection with relaxation experiments on hydrogen and rubidium masers and was found to operate well. The use of a computing counter in the systems gives the possibility of making averages on several experiments and obtaining the standard deviation of the results from the mean. The program for the computing counter is given.

  10. δ15N measurement of organic and inorganic substances by EA-IRMS: a speciation-dependent procedure.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Natacha; Rossi, Michel J; Delémont, Olivier; Siegwolf, Rolf T W

    2013-01-01

    Little attention has been paid so far to the influence of the chemical nature of the substance when measuring δ(15)N by elemental analysis (EA)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Although the bulk nitrogen isotope analysis of organic material is not to be questioned, literature from different disciplines using IRMS provides hints that the quantitative conversion of nitrate into nitrogen presents difficulties. We observed abnormal series of δ(15)N values of laboratory standards and nitrates. These unexpected results were shown to be related to the tailing of the nitrogen peak of nitrate-containing compounds. A series of experiments were set up to investigate the cause of this phenomenon, using ammonium nitrate (NH(4)NO(3)) and potassium nitrate (KNO(3)) samples, two organic laboratory standards as well as the international secondary reference materials IAEA-N1, IAEA-N2-two ammonium sulphates [(NH(4))(2)SO(4)]-and IAEA-NO-3, a potassium nitrate. In experiment 1, we used graphite and vanadium pentoxide (V(2)O(5)) as additives to observe if they could enhance the decomposition (combustion) of nitrates. In experiment 2, we tested another elemental analyser configuration including an additional section of reduced copper in order to see whether or not the tailing could originate from an incomplete reduction process. Finally, we modified several parameters of the method and observed their influence on the peak shape, δ(15)N value and nitrogen content in weight percent of nitrogen of the target substances. We found the best results using mere thermal decomposition in helium, under exclusion of any oxygen. We show that the analytical procedure used for organic samples should not be used for nitrates because of their different chemical nature. We present the best performance given one set of sample introduction parameters for the analysis of nitrates, as well as for the ammonium sulphate IAEA-N1 and IAEA-N2 reference materials. We discuss these results considering the

  11. Solution NMR Experiment for Measurement of (15)N-(1)H Residual Dipolar Couplings in Large Proteins and Supramolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eletsky, Alexander; Pulavarti, Surya V S R K; Beaumont, Victor; Gollnick, Paul; Szyperski, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) are exquisite probes of protein structure and dynamics. A new solution NMR experiment named 2D SE2 J-TROSY is presented to measure N-H RDCs for proteins and supramolecular complexes in excess of 200 kDa. This enables validation and refinement of their X-ray crystal and solution NMR structures and the characterization of structural and dynamic changes occurring upon complex formation. Accurate N-H RDCs were measured at 750 MHz (1)H resonance frequency for 11-mer 93 kDa (2)H,(15)N-labeled Trp RNA-binding attenuator protein tumbling with a correlation time τc of 120 ns. This is about twice as long as that for the most slowly tumbling system, for which N-H RDCs could be measured, so far, and corresponds to molecular weights of ∼200 kDa at 25 °C. Furthermore, due to the robustness of SE2 J-TROSY with respect to residual (1)H density from exchangeable protons, increased sensitivity at (1)H resonance frequencies around 1 GHz promises to enable N-H RDC measurement for even larger systems. PMID:26293598

  12. Closed-loop 15N measurement of N2O and its isotopomers for real-time greenhouse gas tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaets, Johanna; Mayr, Leopold; Heiling, Maria; Zaman, Mohammad; Resch, Christian; Weltin, Georg; Gruber, Roman; Dercon, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying sources of nitrous oxide is essential to improve understanding of the global N cycle and to develop climate-smart agriculture, as N2O has a global warming potential 300 times higher than CO2. The isotopic signature and the intramolecular distribution (site preference) of 15N are powerful tools to trace N2O, but the application of these methods is limited as conventional methods cannot provide continuous and in situ data. Here we present a method for closed-loop, real time monitoring of the N2O flux, the isotopic signature and the intramolecular distribution of 15N by using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, Los Gatos Research). The developed method was applied to a fertilizer inhibitor experiment, in which N2O emissions were measured on undisturbed soil cores for three weeks. The treatments consisted of enriched urea-N (100 kg urea-N/ha), the same fertilizer combined with the nitrification inhibitor nitrapyrin (375 g/100 kg urea), and control cores. Monitoring the isotopic signature makes it possible to distinguish emissions from soil and fertilizer. Characterization of site preference could additionally provide a tool to identify different microbial processes leading to N2O emissions. Furthermore, the closed-loop approach enables direct measurement on site and does not require removal of CO2 and H2O. Results showed that 75% of total N2O emissions (total=11 346 μg N2O-N/m2) in the fertilized cores originated from fertilizer, while only 55% of total emissions (total=2 450 μg N2ON/m2) stemmed from fertilizer for the cores treated with nitrapyrin. In the controls, N2O derived from soil was only 40% of the size of the corresponding pool from the fertilized cores, pointing towards a priming effect on the microbial community from the fertilizer and demonstrating the bias that could be introduced by relying on non-treated cores to estimate soil emission rates, rather than using the isotopic signature. The site preference increased linearly

  13. Measuring the Longitudinal NMR Relaxation Rates of Fast Relaxing Nuclei Using a Signal Eliminating Relaxation Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Led, Jens J.

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180° inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180° pulses separated by two variable delays, Δ1 and Δ2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  14. Compound-Specific δ15N Amino Acid Measurements in Littoral Mussels in the California Upwelling Ecosystem: A New Approach to Generating Baseline δ15N Isoscapes for Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ15N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ15N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ15N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ15N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼7‰ to ∼12‰, R2 = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ15N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ15N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ15N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with15N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ15N values of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ15N values. We hypothesize δ15NPhe values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ15N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ15NPhe values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ15N values. We propose that δ15NPhe isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ15N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives. PMID:24887109

  15. Relaxation measurements on the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, R E; Lester, H A

    1975-01-01

    In Electrophorus electroplaques, the agonist-induced postsynaptic conductance depends on membrane potential. During steady exposure to agonists, after a voltage step the conductance relaxes on a millisecond time scale, exponentially approaching a new equilibrium value. The relaxation rate constant k is an instantaneous function of voltage, insensitive to the past or present conductance. Two components sum to form k. A concentration-sensitive component increases linearly with agonist concentration and decreases during desensitization or exposure to curare. Thus this component reflects the average frequency at which acetylcholine receptors are opening. The voltage-sensitive component, obtained by extrapolating k to zero agonist concentration, increases at more positive potentials. For acetylcholine, the voltage-sensitive component equals the rate constant for the exponential decay of postsynaptic currents; it thus seems to be the closing rate for active receptors. The voltage-sensitive component has the relative amplitudes acetylcholine less than carbamoylcholine less than decamethonium, and for each agonist equals the closing rate determined from "noise" measurements at neuromuscular junctions. The kinetic data explain several aspects of the steady-state conductance induced by agonists, but shed no light on apparent cooperative effects. PMID:1059136

  16. HN(α/β-COCA-J) Experiment for Measurement of 1JC‧Cα Couplings from Two-Dimensional [15N, 1H] Correlation Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permi, Perttu; Sorsa, Tia; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Annila, Arto

    1999-11-01

    Anew method for measurement of one-bond 13C‧-13Cα scalar and dipolar couplings from a two-dimensional [15N, 1H] correlation spectrum is presented. The experiment is based on multiple-quantum coherence, which is created between nitrogen and carbonyl carbon for simultaneous evolution of 15N chemical shift and coupling between 13C‧ and 13Cα. Optional subspectral editing is provided by the spin-state-selective filters. The residual dipolar dipolar contribution to the 13C‧-13Cα coupling can be measured from these simplified [15N, 1H]-HSQC-like spectra. In this way, without explicit knowledge of carbon assignments, conformational changes of proteins dissolved in dilute liquid crystals can be probed conveniently, e.g., in structure activity relationship by NMR studies. The method is demonstrated with human cardiac troponin C.

  17. Route of tracer administration does not affect ileal endogenous nitrogen recovery measured with the 15N-isotope dilution technique in pigs fed rapidly digestible diets.

    PubMed

    Steendam, C A Carina; Verstegen, Martin W A; Tamminga, Seerp; Boer, Huug; van 't End, Marianne; Verstappen, Berthe; Caine, William R; Visser, G Henk

    2004-11-01

    The (15)N-isotope dilution technique ((15)N-IDT), with either pulse-dose oral administration or continuous i.v. administration of [(15)N]-l-leucine (carotid artery), both at 5 mg/(kg body weight . d), was used to measure ileal (postvalve T-cecum cannula) endogenous nitrogen recovery (ENR) in pigs (9 +/- 0.6 kg). Diets were cornstarch, enzyme-hydrolyzed casein with no (control) or high (4%) content of quebracho extract (Schinopsis spp.) rich in condensed tannins. Blood was sampled from a catheter in the external jugular vein. Mean plasma (15)N-enrichment at d 8-10 was higher (P = 0.0009) after i.v. than after oral administration [0.0356 vs. 0.0379 atom% excess (APE)]. Plasma (15)N-enrichment for i.v. infused pigs was 0.01117 APE higher (P < 0.0001) and for orally dosed pigs 0.0081 APE lower (P < 0.0001) at 11 h postprandial compared with 1 h postprandial. Apparent ileal N digestibility was higher (P < 0.0001) for the control (85.5%) than for the quebracho diet (69.5%). ENR was calculated from the ratio of (15)N-enrichment of plasma and digesta. The ENR for the quebracho diet was approximately 300% higher than for the control diet (6.03 vs. 1.94 g/kg dry matter intake, P < 0.001). The real N digestibility (92.2 +/- 0.4%) was equal for both diets (P = 0.1030) and both tracer methods (P = 0.9730). We concluded that oral administration of [(15)N]leucine provides reasonable estimates of ENR in pigs fed semipurified diets with high or low content of tannins; however, one must be careful in extrapolating this conclusion to studies with other protein sources or feeding frequencies. PMID:15514277

  18. STATISTICAL ESTIMATES OF VARIANCE FOR 15N ISOTOPE DILUTION MEASUREMENTS OF GROSS RATES OF NITROGEN CYCLE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been fifty years since Kirkham and Bartholmew (1954) presented the conceptual framework and derived the mathematical equations that formed the basis of the now commonly employed method of 15N isotope dilution. Although many advances in methodology and analysis have been ma...

  19. Measurement of the /sup 12/C(/sup 3/He, /pi//sup +/)/sup 15/N reaction cross section near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Homolka, J.; Schott, W.; Wagner, W.; Wilhelm, W.; Bent, R.D.; Fatyga, M.; Pollock, R.E.; Saber, M.; Segel, R.E.; Kienle, P.

    1988-12-01

    The pionic fusion reaction /sup 12/C(/sup 3/He,/pi//sup +/)/sup 15/N has been measured at 170.2 and 236.3 MeV bombarding energy using recoil detection. At T/sub <3/He$ = 170.2 MeV the angle-integrated cross section for the population of both the /sup 15/N/sub g.s./ and a broad group of unresolved /sup 15/N excited states between E/sub x/ = 6 and 10 MeV is less than 0.03 nb. At T/sub <3/He$ = 236.3 MeV the total cross section summed over both groups is (0.8 +- 0.2) nb.

  20. Measurement of the 20 and 90 keV resonances in the 18O(p,alpha)15N reaction via the Trojan horse method.

    PubMed

    La Cognata, M; Spitaleri, C; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Irgaziev, B; Tribble, R E; Banu, A; Cherubini, S; Coc, A; Crucillà, V; Goldberg, V Z; Gulino, M; Kiss, G G; Lamia, L; Mrazek, J; Pizzone, R G; Puglia, S M R; Rapisarda, G G; Romano, S; Sergi, M L; Tabacaru, G; Trache, L; Trzaska, W; Tumino, A

    2008-10-10

    The 18O(p,alpha)15N reaction is of primary importance in several astrophysical scenarios, including fluorine nucleosynthesis inside asymptotic giant branch stars as well as oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. Thus the indirect measurement of the low energy region of the 18O(p,alpha)15N reaction has been performed to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions. In particular the strength of the 20 and 90 keV resonances has been deduced and the change in the reaction rate evaluated. PMID:18999593

  1. Measurement of the 20 and 90 keV Resonances in the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N Reaction via the Trojan Horse Method

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tumino, A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Irgaziev, B.; Coc, A.

    2008-10-10

    The {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reaction is of primary importance in several astrophysical scenarios, including fluorine nucleosynthesis inside asymptotic giant branch stars as well as oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. Thus the indirect measurement of the low energy region of the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reaction has been performed to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions. In particular the strength of the 20 and 90 keV resonances has been deduced and the change in the reaction rate evaluated.

  2. Technical Note: Simultaneous measurement of sedimentary N2 and N2O production and new 15N isotope pairing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, T.-C.; Kao, S.-J.

    2013-04-01

    Dinitrogen (N2) and/or nitrous oxide (N2O) are produced through denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or nitrification in sediments, of which entangled processes obfuscate the absolute rate estimation of gaseous nitrogen production from individual pathway. Recently, the classical isotope pairing technique (IPT), the most common 15N-nitrate enrichment method to quantify denitrification, has been modified by different researchers to (1) discriminate relative contribution of N2 production by denitrification from anammox or to (2) provide more accurate denitrification rate by considering both N2O and N2 productions. Both modified methods, however, have deficiencies such as overlooking N2O production in case 1 and neglecting anammox in case 2. In this paper, a new method was developed to refine previous methods. We installed cryogenic traps to pre-concentrate N2 and N2O separately, thus, allowing simultaneous measurement for two gases generated by one sample. The precision is better than 2% for N2 (m/z 28, m/z 29 and m/z 30), and 1.5% for N2O (m/z 44, m/z 45 and m/z 46). Based on the six m/z peaks of the two gases, we further revised IPT formulae to truthfully resolve the production rates of N2 and N2O contributed from 3 specific nitrogen removal processes, i.e. N2 and N2O from denitrification, N2 from anammox and N2O from nitrification. To validate the applicability of our new method, incubation experiments were conducted using sediment cores taken from the Danshuei estuary in Taiwan. We successfully determined the rates of aforementioned nitrogen removal processes. Moreover, N2O yield was as high as 66%, which no doubt would significantly bias previous IPT approaches when N2O was not considered. Our new method not only complements the previous IPT but also provides more comprehensive information to advance our understanding of nitrogen dynamics through the water-sediment interface.

  3. Bomb-pulse 14C analysis combined with 13C and 15N measurements in blood serum from residents of Malmö, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Elisavet; Stenström, Kristina Eriksson; Uvo, Cintia Bertacchi; Nilsson, Peter; Skog, Göran; Mattsson, Sören

    2013-05-01

    The (14)C content of 60 human blood serum samples from residents of Malmö (Sweden) in 1978, obtained from a biobank, has been measured to estimate the accuracy of (14)C bomb-pulse dating. The difference between the date estimated using the Calibomb software and sampling date varied between -3 ± 0.4 and +0.2 ± 0.5 years. The average age deviation of all samples was -1.5 ± 0.7 years, with the delay between production and consumption of foodstuffs being probably the dominating cause. The potential influence of food habits on the (14)C date has been evaluated using stable isotope δ(13)C and δ(15)N analysis and information about the dietary habits of the investigated individuals. Although the group consisting of lacto-ovo vegetarians and vegans (pooled group) was not completely separated from the omnivores in a stable isotopic trophic level diagram, this analysis proved to add valuable information on probable dietary habits. The age deviation of the sampling date from the respective Calibomb date was found strongly correlated with the δ(13)C values, probably due to influence from marine diet components. For the omnivore individuals, there were indications of seasonal effects on δ(13)C and the age deviation. No significant correlation was found between the age deviation and the δ(15)N values of any dietary group. No influence of sex or year of birth was found on neither the (14)C nor the δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of the serum samples. The data were also divided into two groups (omnivores and pooled group), based on the level of δ(15)N in the samples. The consumption of high δ(15)N-valued fish and birds can be responsible for this clustering. PMID:23358598

  4. Dynamic aspects of extracellular loop region as a proton release pathway of bacteriorhodopsin studied by relaxation time measurements by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Izuru; Ohmine, Masato; Tanabe, Junko; Tuzi, Satoru; Saitô, Hazime; Naito, Akira

    2007-12-01

    Local dynamics of interhelical loops in bacteriorhodopsin (bR), the extracellular BC, DE and FG, and cytoplasmic AB and CD loops, and helix B were determined on the basis of a variety of relaxation parameters for the resolved 13C and 15N signals of [1-13C]Tyr-, [15N]Pro- and [1-13C]Val-, [15N]Pro-labeled bR. Rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) filter experiments were used to assign [1-13C]Val-, [15N]Pro signals to the specific residues in bR. The previous assignments of [1-13C]Val-labeled peaks, 172.9 or 171.1 ppm, to Val69 were revised: the assignment of peak, 172.1 ppm, to Val69 was made in view of the additional information of conformation-dependent 15N chemical shifts of Pro bonded to Val in the presence of 13C-15N correlation, although no assignment of peak is feasible for 13C nuclei not bonded to Pro. 13C or 15N spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), spin-spin relaxation times under the condition of CP-MAS (T2), and cross relaxation times (TCH and TNH) for 13C and 15N nuclei and carbon or nitrogen-resolved, 1H spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating flame (1H T1 rho) for the assigned signals were measured in [1-13C]Val-, [15N]Pro-bR. It turned out that V69-P70 in the BC loop in the extracellular side has a rigid beta-sheet in spite of longer loop and possesses large amplitude motions as revealed from 13C and 15N conformation-dependent chemical shifts and T1, T2, 1H T1 rho and cross relaxation times. In addition, breakage of the beta-sheet structure in the BC loop was seen in bacterio-opsin (bO) in the absence of retinal. PMID:18036552

  5. Two new organic reference materials for δ13C and δ15N measurements and a new value for the δ13C of NBS 22 oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Geilmann, Heike; Brand, Willi A.; Bohlke, John Karl

    2003-01-01

    Analytical grade L-glutamic acid is chemically stable and has a C/N mole ratio of 5, which is close to that of many of natural biological materials, such as blood and animal tissue. Two L-glutamic acid reference materials with substantially different 13C and 15N abundances have been prepared for use as organic reference materials for C and N isotopic measurements. USGS40 is analytical grade L-glutamic acid and has a δ13C value of −26.24‰ relative to VPDB and a δ15N value of −4.52‰ relative to N2 in air. USGS41 was prepared by dissolving analytical grade L-glutamic acid with L-glutamic acid enriched in 13C and 15N. USGS41 has a δ13C value of +37.76‰ and a δ15N value of +47.57‰. The δ13C and δ15N values of both materials were measured against the international reference materials NBS 19 calcium carbonate (δ13C = +1.95‰), L-SVEC lithium carbonate (δ13C = −46.48‰), IAEA-N-1 ammonium sulfate (δ15N = 0.43‰), and USGS32 potassium nitrate (δ15N = 180‰) by on-line combustion continuous-flow and off-line dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Both USGS40 and USGS41 are isotopically homogeneous; reproducibility of δ13C is better than 0.13‰, and that of δ15N is better than 0.13‰ in 100-μg amounts. These two isotopic reference materials can be used for (i) calibrating local laboratory reference materials, and (ii) quantifying drift with time, mass-dependent fractionations, and isotope-ratio-scale contraction in the isotopic analysis of various biological materials. Isotopic results presented in this paper yield a δ13C value for NBS 22 oil of −29.91‰, in contrast to the commonly accepted value of −29.78‰ for which off-line blank corrections probably have not been quantified satisfactorily.

  6. {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N dynamic nuclear polarization studies of carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.Z.; Solum, M.S.; Wind, R.A.; Nilsson, B.L.; Peterson, M.A.; Pugmire, R.J.; Grant, D.M.

    2000-05-18

    {sup 15}N NMR experiments, combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), are reported on carbazole doped with the stable free radical 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA). Doping shortens the nuclear relaxation times and provides paramagnetic centers that can be used to enhance the nuclear signal by means of DNP so that {sup 15}N NMR experiments can be done in minutes. The factors were measured in a 1.4 T external field, using both unlabeled and 98% {sup 15}N labeled carbazole with doping levels varying between 0.65 and 5.0 wt {degree} BDPA. A doping level of approximately 1 wt {degree} produced optimal results. DNP enhancement factors of 35 and 930 were obtained for {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N, respectively, making it possible to perform {sup 15}N DNP NMR experiments at the natural abundance level.

  7. 1H and 15N Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Studies of Carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Solum, Mark S.; Wind, Robert A.; Nilsson, Brad L.; Peterson, Matt A.; Pugmire, Ronald J.; Grant, David M.

    2000-01-01

    15N NMR experiments, combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), are reported on carbazole doped with the stable free radical 1,3 bisdiphenylene-2 phenylally1 (BDPA). Doping shortens the nuclear relaxation times and provides paramagnetic centers that can be used to enhance the nuclear signal by means of DNP so that 15 N NMR experiments can be done in minutes. The factors were measured in a 1.4 T external field, using both unlabeled and 98% 15N labeled carbazole with doping levels varying between 0.65 and 5.0 wt % BDPA. A doping level of approximately 1 wt % produced optimal results. DNP enhancement factors of 35 and 930 were obtained for 1H and 15N, respectively making it possible to perform 15N DNP NMR experiments at the natural abundance level.

  8. Ureide assay for measuring nitrogen fixation by nodulated soybean calibrated by sup 15 N methods. [Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Herridge, D.F. ); Peoples, M.B. )

    1990-06-01

    We report experiments to quantify the relationships between the relative abundance of ureide-N in root-bleeding sap, vacuum-extracted sap, and hot water extracts of stems and petioles of nodulated soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv Bragg) and the proportion of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation. Additional experiments examined the effects of plant genotype and strain of rhizobia on these relationships. In each of the five experiments reported, plants of cv Bragg (experiment 1), cv Lincoln (experiments 3, 4, 5), or six cultivars/genotypes (experiment 2) were grown in a sand:vermiculite mixture in large pots in a naturally lit, temperature-controlled glasshouse during summer. Pots were inoculated at sowing with effective Bradyrhizobium japonicum CB 1809 (USDA 136) or with one of 21 different strains of rhizobia. The proportions of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation were determined using {sup 15}N dilution. Results show that assessment of nitrogen fixation by soybean using the ureide technique should now be possible with the standard curves presented, irrespective of genotype or strain of rhizobia occupying the nodules.

  9. The Contamination of Commercial 15N2 Gas Stocks with 15N–Labeled Nitrate and Ammonium and Consequences for Nitrogen Fixation Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dabundo, Richard; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treibergs, Lija; Tobias, Craig R.; Altabet, Mark A.; Moisander, Pia H.; Granger, Julie

    2014-01-01

    We report on the contamination of commercial 15-nitrogen (15N) N2 gas stocks with 15N-enriched ammonium, nitrate and/or nitrite, and nitrous oxide. 15N2 gas is used to estimate N2 fixation rates from incubations of environmental samples by monitoring the incorporation of isotopically labeled 15N2 into organic matter. However, the microbial assimilation of bioavailable 15N-labeled N2 gas contaminants, nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, is liable to lead to the inflation or false detection of N2 fixation rates. 15N2 gas procured from three major suppliers was analyzed for the presence of these 15N-contaminants. Substantial concentrations of 15N-contaminants were detected in four Sigma-Aldrich 15N2 lecture bottles from two discrete batch syntheses. Per mole of 15N2 gas, 34 to 1900 µmoles of 15N-ammonium, 1.8 to 420 µmoles of 15N-nitrate/nitrite, and ≥21 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide were detected. One 15N2 lecture bottle from Campro Scientific contained ≥11 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide per mole of 15N2 gas, and no detected 15N-nitrate/nitrite at the given experimental 15N2 tracer dilutions. Two Cambridge Isotopes lecture bottles from discrete batch syntheses contained ≥0.81 µmoles 15N-nitrous oxide per mole 15N2, and trace concentrations of 15N-ammonium and 15N-nitrate/nitrite. 15N2 gas equilibrated cultures of the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta confirmed that the 15N-contaminants are assimilable. A finite-differencing model parameterized using oceanic field conditions typical of N2 fixation assays suggests that the degree of detected 15N-ammonium contamination could yield inferred N2 fixation rates ranging from undetectable, <0.01 nmoles N L−1 d−1, to 530 nmoles N L−1 d−1, contingent on experimental conditions. These rates are comparable to, or greater than, N2 fixation rates commonly detected in field assays. These results indicate that past reports of N2 fixation should be interpreted with caution, and demonstrate that the purity of commercial 15N2

  10. Marine mammals from northeast Atlantic: relationship between their trophic status as determined by delta13C and delta15N measurements and their trace metal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Das, K; Beans, C; Holsbeek, L; Mauger, G; Berrow, S D; Rogan, E; Bouquegneau, J M

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between trophic position through delta13C and delta15N and trace metal concentrations (Zn, Cd, Cu and Hg) was investigated in the tissues of six marine mammal species from the Northeast Atlantic: striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba, common dolphin, Delphinus delphis, Atlantic white-sided dolphin Lagenorhynchus acutus, harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena, white beaked-dolphin Lagenorhynchus albirostris, grey seal Halichoerus grypus stranded on French Channel and Irish coasts. White-beaked dolphins, harbour porpoises, white-sided dolphins, common and striped dolphins display the same relative and decreasing trophic position, as measured by delta15N values, along both the Irish and French channel coasts, reflecting conservative trophic habits between these two places. Hepatic and renal Cd concentrations were significantly correlated to muscle delta13C and delta15N values while Hg, Zn and Cu did not. These results suggest that Cd accumulation is partly linked to the diet while other factors such as age or body condition might explain Hg, Zn or Cu variability in marine mammals. Combined stable isotope and trace metal analyses appear to be useful tools for the study of marine mammal ecology. PMID:12738219

  11. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  12. Simultaneous measurement of heat capacity and internal relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Mitsuharu

    2016-05-01

    A new steady-state method is proposed to simultaneously measure the heat capacity and internal relaxation time using superimposed constant and square-wave power. This method is appropriate for small sample systems with low thermal conductance. The accuracies of the heat capacity and internal relaxation time are almost the same as those determined using other similar methods, but correction for the effect of internal relaxation on the heat capacity is more flexible. The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity are also simultaneously determined for rod- and slab-shaped samples. We demonstrate the method for small slabs of synthetic silica in the 80-320 K temperature range. PMID:27250459

  13. Method to measure the relaxation rates of molecular levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, J. S.; Mandula, K.; Sorlei, Zsuzsa

    The influence of buffer gases (He and SF6) on vibrational and relaxational rates has been studied. The line shapes (width and amplitude) of the small signal gain of the 119-micron methanol laser line are measured at different methanol vapor and buffer gas pressures using an infrared far-infrared double resonance method. The relaxation rates are calculated using the modified rate equations of the Henningsen-Jensen model.

  14. Development of a method for in situ measurement of denitrification in aquifers using 15N tracer tests and membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Flessa, H.; Walther, W.; Duijnisveld, W. H. M.

    2009-04-01

    In NO3- contaminated aquifers containing reduced compounds like organic carbon or sulfides, denitrification is an intense process. Its characterization is of interest because NO3- consump-tion improves water quality and N2O production can cause emission of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. Spatial distribution of NO3- and N2 produced by denitrification in groundwa-ter (excess N2) reflects the NO3- input as well as cumulative denitrification during aquifer pas-sage. Reaction progress (RP) at a given location, i.e. the relative consumption by denitrifica-tion of the NO3- that had been leached to the aquifers, characterizes the stage of the denitrifi-cation process. RP can be derived from the ratio between accumulated gaseous denitrification products and initial NO3- concentrations. The amount and spatial distribution of reduced com-pounds within denitrifying aquifers is not well known. Recent findings from parallel investi-gations on in situ denitrification and reactive compounds suggests that single-well 15N tracer tests might be suitable to characterize the stock of reduced compounds in aquifers (Konrad 2007). The overall objective of our studies is measure the spatial dynamics of denitrification within two sandy aquifers in northern Germany. This includes measurement of the actually occurring denitrification process. Moreover we want to determine the long-term denitrification potential which is governed by the stock of reactive material. Here we present a new approach for in situ-measurement of denitrification at monitoring wells using a combination of 15N-tracer push-pull experiments with in situ analysis of 15N-labled N2 and N2O using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS). We will present first results from a laboratory test with aquifer mesocosms using the MIMS method. In this test we supplemented aquifer material of two depths (2 and 7 m below surface) of a drinking water catchment in Northwest Germany with K15NO3 solution. After tracer application we

  15. Fast structure-based assignment of 15N HSQC spectra of selectively 15N-labeled paramagnetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Pintacuda, Guido; Keniry, Max A; Huber, Thomas; Park, Ah Young; Dixon, Nicholas E; Otting, Gottfried

    2004-03-10

    A novel strategy for fast NMR resonance assignment of (15)N HSQC spectra of proteins is presented. It requires the structure coordinates of the protein, a paramagnetic center, and one or more residue-selectively (15)N-labeled samples. Comparison of sensitive undecoupled (15)N HSQC spectra recorded of paramagnetic and diamagnetic samples yields data for every cross-peak on pseudocontact shift, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, cross-correlation between Curie-spin and dipole-dipole relaxation, and residual dipolar coupling. Comparison of these four different paramagnetic quantities with predictions from the three-dimensional structure simultaneously yields the resonance assignment and the anisotropy of the susceptibility tensor of the paramagnetic center. The method is demonstrated with the 30 kDa complex between the N-terminal domain of the epsilon subunit and the theta subunit of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III. The program PLATYPUS was developed to perform the assignment, provide a measure of reliability of the assignment, and determine the susceptibility tensor anisotropy. PMID:14995214

  16. Relaxation behavior measuring of transmitted light through ferrofluids film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, X.-D.; Lin, Y.-Q.; Huang, Y.; Bai, L.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, relaxation behavior of transmitted light through thin ferrofluid film under an applied magnetic field is measured. The results show that the intensity of transmitted light through a ferrofluid film increases quickly as soon as an external magnetic field is applied then weakens with time. If uniformity of the field is poor, the transmission of light continuously decreases in a measured duration. Otherwise, the transmission of light will tend increasingly towards a stable value after it decreases to a minimum value while the gradient of the field is low. The relaxation time would increase to an order of some hundreds seconds magnitude and is dependent on the strength of magnetic field and viscosity of the ferrofluids. The field-induced relaxation behaviors of transmitted light through ferrofluids correspond to anisotropic microstructure of the ferrofluids under applied magnetic field.

  17. MRI rotating frame relaxation measurements for articular cartilage assessment

    PubMed Central

    Ellermann, Jutta; Ling, Wen; Nissi, Mikko J.; Arendt, Elizabeth; Carlson, Cathy S.; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    In the present work we introduced two MRI rotating frame relaxation methods, namely adiabatic T1ρ and Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF), along with an inversion-prepared Magnetization Transfer (MT) protocol for assessment of articular cartilage. Given the inherent sensitivity of rotating frame relaxation methods to slow molecular motions that are relevant in cartilage, we hypothesized that adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF would have higher sensitivity to articular cartilage degradation as compared to laboratory frame T2 and MT. To test this hypothesis, a proteoglycan depletion model was used. Relaxation time measurements were performed at 0 and 48 hours in ten bovine patellar specimens, 5 of which were treated with trypsin and 5 untreated controls were stored under identical conditions in isotonic saline for 48 hours. Relaxation times measured at 48 hours were longer than those measured at 0 hours in both groups. The changes in T2 and MT relaxation times after 48 hours were approximately 3 times larger in the trypsin treated specimens as compared to the untreated group, whereas increases of adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF were 4 to 5 fold larger. Overall, these findings demonstrate a higher sensitivity of adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF to the trypsin-induced changes in bovine patellar cartilage as compared to the commonly used T2 and MT. Since adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF are advantageous for human applications as compared to standard continuous-wave T1ρ methods, adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF are promising tools for assessing cartilage degradation in clinical settings. PMID:23993794

  18. Carbonyl carbon transverse relaxation dispersion measurements and ms-micros timescale motion in a protein hydrogen bond network.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Rieko; Baber, James; Louis, John M; Torchia, Dennis A

    2004-06-01

    A constant-time, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) transverse relaxation, R(2), dispersion experiment for carbonyl carbons was designed and executed to detect micros-ms time-scale dynamics of protein backbone carbonyl sites. Because of the large (ca. 55 Hz) C(alpha)-C' J-coupling, the carbonyl signal intensity is strongly modulated as the spacing between CPMG pulses is varied, in uniformly (13)C enriched proteins, unless care is taken to minimize the perturbation of the C(alpha) magnetization by the CPMG pulses. CPMG pulse trains consisting of either a band-selective pulse, such as RE-BURP, or rectangular (with an excitation null in the C(alpha) region of the spectrum) pulses were employed in order to minimize C' signal modulation by C(alpha)-C' J-coupling. The performance of these types of CPMG refocusing pulses was assessed by computer simulation, and by comparing dispersion profiles measured for (1) uniformly [(13)C,(15)N, (2)H] ((2)H at non-labile hydrogen sites) labeled, and (2) uniformly (15)N/selectively-(13)C' labeled samples of HIV-1 protease bound to a potent inhibitor, DMP323. In addition, because the uniformly (13)C/(15)N/(2)H labeled sample was well suited to measure (15)N and (1)H R(2) dispersion as well as (13)C' dispersion, conformational exchange in the inter subunit beta-sheet hydrogen-bond network of the inhibitor-bound protease was elucidated using relaxation dispersion data of all three types of nuclei. PMID:15014232

  19. Relaxation Times of Microemulsion Systems From Electro-Optical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew

    1999-11-01

    Relaxation Times of Microemulsion Systems from Electro-Optical Measurements Matthew Edwards (Spelman College) Relaxation measurements, as determined from electro-optically induced birefringence, have been made on ternary microemulsion systems of AOT, water, and octane. Loci of 22 samples, representing displacements along the 90oil concentration line in the three-component phase diagram, were prepared having weight fractions ranging from 0to AOT+water to 60times, at room temperature, changed by more than an order of magnitude in this phase diagram displacement, going from 2.55x10(-7)at 0The methodology for determing each sample's relaxation time was to fit the raw data of polarized - transmitted laser intensity as a function of time, as generated from using the standard Kerr effect. The raw data sample sets were fitted to within 8exponentially decaying function. The single exponential decay mechanism that is thought to be "effective rotational relaxation." This supports our earlier measurements (1) which indicate clustering of composite droplets within the microemulsion samples following the onset of the applied electric field. 1. Edwards, M.E. et, Physical Review E, 57, No. 797 (1998)

  20. AQUEOUS RELAXATION REAGENTS IN NITROGEN-15 NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron-nuclear relaxation times T(1)supe's for 15N and 13C in natural abundance are measured for a series of amines in aqueous solution using Gd(III) complexes of a series of polyaminocarboxylate ligands as paramagnetic relaxation reagents (PARRs). The PARRs are classified by t...

  1. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Longhua; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  2. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Measurements in Frog Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Edward D.; Homer, Louis D.

    1974-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements are reported for frog muscle as a function of temperature and Larmor frequency. Each T1ρ, T2, and T1 measurement covered a time domain sufficient to identify the average relaxation time for most intracellular water. Using regression analysis the data were fit with a model where intracellular water molecules are exchanging between a large compartment in which mobility is similar to ordinary water and a small compartment in which motion is restricted. The regression results suggest that: the restricted compartment exhibits a distribution of motions skewed toward that of free water; the residence time of water molecules in the restricted compartment is approximately 1 ms; and, the activation entropy for some water molecules in the restricted compartment is negative. PMID:4547668

  3. Precision and sensitivity of the measurement of 15N enrichment in D-alanine from bacterial cell walls using positive/negative ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunlid, A.; Odham, G.; Findlay, R. H.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitive detection of cellular components from specific groups of microbes can be utilized as 'signatures' in the examination of microbial consortia from soils, sediments or biofilms. Utilizing capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and stereospecific derivatizing agents, D-alanine, a component localized in the prokaryotic (bacterial) cell wall, can be detected reproducibly. Enrichments of D-[15N]alanine determined in E. coli grown with [15N]ammonia can be determined with precision at 1.0 atom%. Chemical ionization with methane gas and the detection of negative ions (M - HF)- and (M - F or M + H - HF)- formed from the heptafluorobutyryl D-2 butanol ester of D-alanine allowed as little as 8 pg (90 fmol) to be detected reproducibly. This method can be utilized to define the metabolic activity in terms of 15N incorporation at the level of 10(3)-10(4) cells, as a function of the 15N-14N ratio.

  4. Challenges to the Application of δ15N measurements of the organic fraction of archaeological and fossil mollusk shells to assess paleoenvironmental change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen isotope analysis of the organic fraction of mollusk shells is beginning to be applied to questions of past anthropogenic and natural environmental variation using samples from archaeological and fossil deposits. Fairly extensive proxy validation research has been conducted in the past decade, documenting the relationship between the δ15N of ambient particulate organic matter, mollusk soft tissues, and shell organic matrix. However, comparatively little research has addressed the potential effects of taphonomy and diagenesis on these proxy records. Assessing archaeological samples are especially complex in that humans may have transported and/or cooked shell prior to deposition. Shell δ15N data will be presented from modern and archaeological oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and clam shell (Mercenaria spp.) of various late Holocene ages and late Cretaceous Crassatellites vadosus shells. Archaeological shells show some loss of organic matter over time, yet some Cretaceous shells retain enough matrix to permit δ15N analysis. The Cretaceous samples required concentration of the remaining organic matrix by removing carbonate via acid pretreatment prior to EA-IRMS analysis, but modern and archaeological shells had sufficient organic matrix to permit analysis without acid pretreatment. The δ15N data from the archaeological shells do not display obvious alteration from the loss of organic matrix. The results of cooking experiments performed on modern oyster shells also indicate little alteration of δ15N values, unless the shell was heated to the point of disintegration. While these experiments indicate promise for the application of δ15N analysis of shell organic matter, the results are incomplete and lack ideal control over initial δ15N values in ancient samples used for comparisons. Future research, perhaps focused on compound-specific δ15N analysis and additional controlled experiments on moderns shells, may improve this assessment.

  5. Precise Measurement of Phenylalanine δ15N Values via Elemental Analysis-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Following Purification with High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography: A New Tool for Fine-Scale Paleo-Nitrogen Cycle Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broek, T.; Walker, B. D.; Batista, F. C.; Andreasen, D.; Hill, T. M.; Guilderson, T. P.; McCarthy, M.

    2012-12-01

    Compound specific isotope analysis of individual amino acids (CSI-AA) in organic paleoarchives is emerging as a powerful tool for reconstructing the paleo-nitrogen (N) cycle. Because the δ15N of phenylalanine (Phe) remains almost unchanged with diagenesis or trophic transfer it has been demonstrated to be the most promising AA proxy for the δ15N of primary production. However, the precise measurement of AA δ15N values is currently limited by the standard gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-IRMS) approach. The key problem with this approach is that GC-IRMS δ15N precision (±1‰) is almost an order of magnitude lower than typical bulk δ15N measurements (±0.1‰), posing a significant problem for assessing fine scale changes within paleo-climate records. Additionally, required instrumentation is both expensive, and not widely available. Here we present an offline approach in which Phe is purified via high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), using an analytical scale, mixed-phase column and automated fraction collection. δ13C and δ15N values of the fractions are then determined via standard elemental analysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). We evaluate the precision of this HPLC-EA-IRMS method vs. traditional GC-IRMS for Phe δ15N values of isotopic AA standards and various proteinaceous marine samples (marine coral, sediment, and cyanobacteria). Typical HPLC-EA-IRMS δ15N precision is ±0.1‰ for isotopic AA standards and ±0.5‰ for marine coral, sediment, and cyanobacteria samples compared to ±0.5‰ and ±1.0‰ for AA standards and samples analyzed by GC-IRMS. In order to demonstrate the viability of our approach, we present a comparison of a Phe δ15N record produced from a deep-sea bamboo coral specimen from Monterey Bay, CA, using our offline HPLC-EA-IRMS method vs. standard GC-IRMS. Each method produced equivalent Phe δ15N values within error, however, the HPLC-EA-IRMS method produced Phe δ15N values with over

  6. Energy relaxation in graphene and its measurement with supercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voutilainen, J.; Fay, A.; Häkkinen, P.; Viljas, J. K.; Heikkilä, T. T.; Hakonen, P. J.

    2011-07-01

    We study inelastic energy relaxation in graphene for low energies to find out how electrons scatter with acoustic phonons and other electrons. By coupling the graphene to superconductors, we create a strong dependence of the measured signal, i.e., critical Josephson current, on the electron population on different energy states. Since the relative population of high- and low-energy states is determined by the inelastic scattering processes, the critical current becomes an effective probe for their strength. We argue that the electron-electron interaction is the dominant relaxation method and we estimate a scattering time τe-e=0.1…1 ps at T=500 mK, 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than predicted for normal two-dimensional diffusive systems.

  7. Technical Note: Simultaneous measurement of sedimentary N2 and N2O production and a modified 15N isotope pairing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, T.-C.; Kao, S.-J.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen (N2) and/or nitrous oxide (N2O) are produced through denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or nitrification in sediments, of which entangled processes complicate the absolute rate estimations of gaseous nitrogen production from individual pathways. The classical isotope pairing technique (IPT), the most common 15N nitrate enrichment method to quantify denitrification, has recently been modified by different researchers to (1) discriminate between the N2 produced by denitrification and anammox or to (2) provide a more accurate denitrification rate under considering production of both N2O and N2. In case 1, the revised IPT focused on N2 production being suitable for the environments of a low N2O-to-N2 production ratio, while in case 2, anammox was neglected. This paper develops a modified method to refine previous versions of IPT. Cryogenic traps were installed to separately preconcentrate N2 and N2O, thus allowing for subsequent measurement of the two gases generated in one sample vial. The precision is better than 2% for N2 (m/z 28, m/z 29 and m/z 30), and 1.5% for N2O (m/z 44, m/z 45 and m/z 46). Based on the six m/z peaks of the two gases, the 15N nitrate traceable processes including N2 and N2O from denitrification and N2 from anammox were estimated. Meanwhile, N2O produced by nitrification was estimated via the production rate of unlabeled 44N2O. To validate the applicability of our modified method, incubation experiments were conducted using sediment cores taken from the Danshuei Estuary in Taiwan. Rates of the aforementioned nitrogen removal processes were successfully determined. Moreover, N2O yield was as high as 66%, which would significantly bias previous IPT approaches if N2O was not considered. Our modified method not only complements previous versions of IPT but also provides more comprehensive information to advance our understanding of nitrogen dynamics of the water-sediment interface.

  8. Application of the 15N gas-flux method for measuring in situ N2 and N2O fluxes due to denitrification in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems and comparison with the acetylene inhibition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgouridis, Fotis; Stott, Andrew; Ullah, Sami

    2016-03-01

    Soil denitrification is considered the most un-constrained process in the global N cycle due to uncertain in situ N2 flux measurements, particularly in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems. 15N tracer approaches can provide in situ measurements of both N2 and N2O simultaneously, but their use has been limited to fertilized agro-ecosystems due to the need for large 15N additions in order to detect 15N2 production against the high atmospheric N2. For 15N-N2 analyses, we have used an "in-house" laboratory designed and manufactured N2 preparation instrument which can be interfaced to any commercial continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The N2 prep unit has gas purification steps and a copper-based reduction furnace, and allows the analysis of small gas injection volumes (4 µL) for 15N-N2 analysis. For the analysis of N2O, an automated Tracegas Preconcentrator (Isoprime Ltd) coupled to an IRMS was used to measure the 15N-N2O (4 mL gas injection volume). Consequently, the coefficient of variation for the determination of isotope ratios for N2 in air and in standard N2O (0.5 ppm) was better than 0.5 %. The 15N gas-flux method was adapted for application in natural and semi-natural land use types (peatlands, forests, and grasslands) by lowering the 15N tracer application rate to 0.04-0.5 kg 15N ha-1. The minimum detectable flux rates were 4 µg N m-2 h-1 and 0.2 ng N m-2 h-1 for the N2 and N2O fluxes respectively. Total denitrification rates measured by the acetylene inhibition technique in the same land use types correlated (r = 0.58) with the denitrification rates measured under the 15N gas-flux method, but were underestimated by a factor of 4, and this was partially attributed to the incomplete inhibition of N2O reduction to N2, under a relatively high soil moisture content, and/or the catalytic NO decomposition in the presence of acetylene. Even though relatively robust for in situ denitrification measurements, methodological

  9. Is pre-conditioning required for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates with push-pull 15N-tracer tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, Wolfram; Well, Reinhard

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse NO3 emissions derived from agricultural N surpluses are the main cause of NO3 pollution of aquifers and open water bodies. Denitrification is the key process for the attenuation of this anthropogenic NO3 in groundwater. Knowledge about the spatial variability denitrification rates in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. However, the spatial distribution and intensity of denitrification in aquifers is difficult to predict. But precisely this knowledge is important for an effective implementation of measures for the reduction of agricultural N-surpluses to gain a good chemical status of groundwater bodies. Push-pull tests have proven to be a relatively low-cost instrument to obtain quantitative information about aquifer properties and microbial activities in aquifers. These tests have been already successfully used for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates (Dr(in situ); Well and Myrold, 2002;Konrad, 2007). We conducted 28 push-pull tracer tests in the Großen Kneten (GKA) and the Furberger Feld aquifer (FFA), two Pleistocene sandy aquifers in Lower Saxony (Germany) to measure Dr(in situ) and to derive an estimate on the stock of reactive compounds. In the deeper NO3-free zone of the aquifer, Dr(in situ) was relatively low despite the high abundance of reductants. Our aim was to check whether pre-conditioning by repeated NO3-injections would stimulate indigenous denitrifiers and thus lead to increased reduction rates of NO3 corresponding to the stock of reductants. Pre-conditioning by the injection of the electron acceptor NO3 prior to subsequent push-pull tracer tests with 15N labelled NO3 was performed at 4 depths in the NO3-free groundwater zone in the Fuhrberger Feld aquifer. We compared unconditioned and pre-conditioned in situ denitrification rates with laboratory denitrification rates measured during one year laboratory incubations with corresponding aquifer material (Dr(365)). Our

  10. Application of the 15N-Gas Flux method for measuring in situ N2 and N2O fluxes due to denitrification in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems and comparison with the acetylene inhibition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgouridis, F.; Ullah, S.; Stott, A.

    2015-08-01

    Soil denitrification is considered the most un-constrained process in the global N cycle due to uncertain in situ N2 flux measurements, particularly in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems. 15N tracer approaches can provide in situ measurements of both N2 and N2O simultaneously, but their use has been limited to fertilised agro-ecosystems due to the need for large 15N additions in order to detect 15N2 production against the high atmospheric N2. For 15N-N2 analyses, we have used an "in house" laboratory designed and manufactured N2 preparation instrument which can be interfaced to any commercial continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The N2 prep unit has gas purification steps, a copper based reduction furnace, and allows the analysis of small gas injection volumes (4 μL) for 15N-N2 analysis. For the analysis of N2O, an automated Tracegas Pre-concentrator (Isoprime Ltd) coupled to an IRMS was used to measure the 15N-N2O (4 mL gas injection volume). Consequently, the coefficient of variation for the determination of isotope ratios for N2 in air and in standard N2O (0.5 ppm) was better than 0.5 %. The 15N Gas-Flux method was adapted for application in natural and semi-natural land use types (peatlands, forests and grasslands) by lowering the 15N tracer application rate to 0.04-0.5 kg 15N ha-1. For our chamber design (volume / surface = 8:1) and a 20 h incubation period, the minimum detectable flux rates were 4 μg N m-2 h-1 and 0.2 ng N m-2 h-1 for the N2 and N2O fluxes respectively. The N2 flux ranged between 2.4 and 416.6 μg N m-2 h-1, and the grassland soils showed on average 3 and 14 times higher denitrification rates than the woodland and organic soils respectively. The N2O flux was on average 20 to 200 times lower than the N2 flux, while the denitrification product ratio (N2O/N2 + N2O) was low, ranging between 0.03 and 13 %. Total denitrification rates measured by the acetylene inhibition technique under the same field conditions

  11. Inoculation of Bacillus sphaericus UPMB-10 to Young Oil Palm and Measurement of Its Uptake of Fixed Nitrogen Using the 15N Isotope Dilution Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zakry, Fitri Abdul Aziz; Shamsuddin, Zulkifli H.; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Zakaria, Zin Zawawi; Rahim, Anuar Abdul

    2012-01-01

    There are increasing applications of diazotrophic rhizobacteria in the sustainable agriculture system. A field experiment on young immature oil palm was conducted to quantify the uptake of N derived from N2 fixation by the diazotroph Bacillus sphaericus strain UPMB-10, using the 15N isotope dilution method. Eight months after 15N application, young immature oil palms that received 67% of standard N fertilizer application together with B. sphaericus inoculation had significantly lower 15N enrichment than uninoculated palms that received similar N fertilizers. The dilution of labeled N served as a marker for the occurrence of biological N2 fixation. The proportion of N uptake that was derived from the atmosphere was estimated as 63% on the whole plant basis. The inoculation process increased the N and dry matter yields of the palm leaflets and rachis significantly. Field planting of young, immature oil palm in soil inoculated with B. sphaericus UPMB-10 might mitigate inorganic fertilizer-N application through supplementation by biological nitrogen fixation. This could be a new and important source of nitrogen biofertilizer in the early phase of oil palm cultivation in the field. PMID:22446306

  12. Structure and reactivity of lithium amides. /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies and colligative measurements of lithium diphenylamide and lithium diphenylamide-lithium bromide complex solvated by tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    DePue, J.S.; Collum, D.B.

    1988-08-03

    /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of lithium diphenylamide in THF/hydrocarbon solutions (THF = tetrahydrofuran) detected two different species. /sup 6/Li and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of (/sup 6/Li, /sup 15/N)lithium diphenylamide showed the species observed at low THF concentrations to be a cyclic oligomer. Structural analogies provided strong support for a dimer while colligative measurements at 0/degrees/C indicated the dimer to be di- or trisolvated. On the basis of the observed mass action effects, the species appearing at intermediate THF concentrations is assigned as a contact or solvent-separated ion-paired monomer. Lithium diphenylamide forms a 1:1 adduct with lithium bromide at low THF concentrations. A combination of /sup 6/Li-/sup 15/N double labeling studies and colligative measurements supports a trisolvated cyclic mixed dimer structure. Although detailed spectroscopic studies at elevated THF concentrations were precluded by high fluctionality, the similarity of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts of lithium diphenylamide in the presence and absence of lithium bromide provide indirect evidence that the mixed dimer undergoes a THF concentration dependent dissociation to the monomeric amide and free lithium bromide. 24 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  13. High resolution (13)C MRI with hyperpolarized urea: in vivo T(2) mapping and (15)N labeling effects.

    PubMed

    Reed, Galen D; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J; Hong Shang; Larson, Peder E Z; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-02-01

    (13)C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [(13)C] urea and [(13) C,(15)N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. (15)N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [(13) C,(15) N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [(13)C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [(13)C,(15)N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [(13)C,(15) N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio over [(13)C] urea. PMID:24235273

  14. Measuring Cytokine Concentrations Using Magnetic Spectroscopy of Nanoparticle Brownian Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Shi, Yipeng; Weaver, John

    The magnetic particle spectroscopy is a newly developed non-invasive technique for obtaining information about the nanoparticles' micro environment. In this technique the nanoparticles' magnetization, induced by an alternating magnetic field at various applied frequencies, is processed to analyze rotational freedom of nanoparticles. By analyzing average rotational freedom, it is possible to measure the nanoparticle's relaxation time, and hence get an estimate of the temperature and viscosity of the medium. In molecular concentration sensing, the rotational freedom indicates the number of nanoparticles that are bound by a selected analyte. We have developed microscopic nanoparticles probes to measure the concentration of selected molecules. The nanoparticles are targeted to bind the selected molecule and the resulting reduction in rotational freedom can be quantified remotely. Previously, sensitivity measurements has been reported to be of the factor of 200. However, with our newer perpendicular field setup (US Patent Application Serial No 61/721,378), it possible to sense cytokine concentrations as low as 5 Pico-Molar in-vitro. The excellent sensitivity of this apparatus is due to isolation of the drive field from the signal so the output can be amplified to a higher level. Dartmouth College.

  15. Submillimeter Observations of Titan: Global Measures of Stratospheric Temperature, CO, HCN, HC3N, and the Isotopic Ratios 12C/13C and 14N/15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwell, Mark A.

    2004-11-01

    Interferometric observations of the atmosphere of Titan were performed with the Submillimeter Array on two nights in 2004 February to investigate the global average vertical distributions of several molecular species above the tropopause. Rotational transitions of CO, isomers of HCN, and HC3N were simultaneously recorded. The abundance of CO is determined to be 51+/-4 parts per million (ppm), constant with altitude. The vertical profile of HCN is dependent on the assumed temperature but generally increases from 30 parts per billion at the condensation altitude (~83 km) to 5 ppm at ~300 km. Furthermore, the central core of the HCN emission is strong and can be reproduced only if the upper stratospheric temperature increases with altitude. The isotopic ratios are determined to be 12C/13C=132+/-25 and 14N/15N=94+/-13 assuming the Coustenis & Bézard temperature profile. If the Lellouch temperature profile is assumed, the ratios decrease to 12C/13C=108+/-20 and 14N/15N=72+/-9. The vertical profile of HC3N is consistent with that derived by Marten et al.

  16. Complete fusion of 15N+27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosser, F. W., Jr.; Racca, R. A.; Daneshvar, K.; Geesaman, D. F.; Henning, W.; Kovar, D. G.; Rehm, K. E.; Tabor, S. L.

    1980-05-01

    The total fusion cross section for the system 15N + 27Al has been measured over an energy range 27 MeV<=Elab<=70 MeV by detection of the fusion-evaporation residues. In addition elastic scattering was measured at six energies and fitted by optical model calculations. The fusion cross section for the system saturates at 1150+/-50 mb. The data can be well described by the model of Glas and Mosel, using a reasonable set of parameters. The model of Horn and Ferguson also describes the data well if an appropriate charge radius is used. Comparison is made between these results and the fusion cross sections for 16O + 26Mg and 18O + 24Mg, which lead to the same compound nucleus. The results for 15N + 27Al are quite similar to those for 18O + 24Mg, and the differences between the fusion cross sections for these two systems and those for 16O + 26Mg may be evidence for an entrance channel effect. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 15N+27Al, Elab=27-70 MeV; measured σfusion(E) measured dσdΩ elastic scattering; data fitted with Glas and Mosel model, Horn and Ferguson model.

  17. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of 15N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of 1H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on Nz during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ~1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies. PMID:26253948

  18. Measuring permeability and stress relaxation of young cement paste by beam bending

    SciTech Connect

    Vichit-Vadakan, W.; Scherer, George W

    2003-12-01

    When a saturated rod of a porous material is deflected in three-point bending, two types of time-dependent relaxation processes occur simultaneously: hydrodynamic relaxation, caused by the flow of liquid in the porous body, and viscoelastic (VE) relaxation of the solid network. By measuring the decrease in the force required to sustain a constant deflection, it is possible to obtain the permeability from the hydrodynamic relaxation function, in addition to the VE stress relaxation function of the sample. We report the early-age evolution of permeability, elastic modulus, and stress relaxation function for Type III Portland cement paste with water-cement (w/c) ratios of 0.45, 0.50, and 0.55. The stress relaxation function is shown to preserve its shape during aging; that function is numerically transformed into the creep function.

  19. Complete Measurement of Stable Isotopes in N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O) Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in water is a worldwide environmental problem and source apportionment is critical to managing nitrate pollution. Fractionation caused by physical, chemical and biological processes alters the isotope ratios of nitrates (15N/14N, 18O/16O and 17O/16O) and biochemical nitrification and denitrification impart different intramolecular site preference (15N14NO vs. 14N15NO). Additionally, atmospheric nitrate is anomalously enriched in 17O compared to other nitrate sources. The anomaly (Δ17O) is conserved during fractionation processes, providing a tracer of atmospheric nitrate. All of these effects can be used to apportion nitrate in soil. Current technology for measuring nitrate isotopes is complicated and costly - it involves conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide (N2O), purification, preconcentration and measurement by isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Site specific measurements require a custom IRMS. There is a pressing need to make this measurement simpler and more accessible. Los Gatos Research has developed a next generation mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to quantify all stable isotope ratios of N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O). We present the latest performance data demonstrating the precision and accuracy of the OA-ICOS based measurement. At an N2O concentration of 322 ppb, the analyzer quantifies [N2O], δ15N, δ15Na, δ15Nb, and δ18O with a precision of ±0.05 ppb, ±0.4 ‰, ±0.45 ‰, and ±0.6 ‰, and ±0.8 ‰ respectively (1σ, 100s; 1σ, 1000s for δ18O). Measurements of gas standards demonstrate accuracy better than ±1 ‰ for isotope ratios over a wide dynamic range (200 - 100,000 ppb). The measurement of δ17O requires a higher concentration (1 - 50 ppm), easily obtainable through conversion of nitrates in water. For 10 ppm of N2O, the instrument achieves a δ17O precision of ±0.05 ‰ (1σ, 1000s). This performance is sufficient to quantify atmospheric

  20. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  1. EPR line shifts and line shape changes due to spin exchange of nitroxide-free radicals in liquids 4. Test of a method to measure re-encounter rates in liquids employing 15N and 14N nitroxide spin probes.

    PubMed

    Bales, Barney L; Meyer, Michelle; Smith, Steve; Peric, Miroslav

    2008-03-20

    EPR line shifts due to spin exchange of perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (14N-PDT) in aqueous solutions and the same probe isotopically substituted with 15N (15N-PDT) were measured from 293 to 338 and 287 to 353 K, respectively. Nonlinear least-squares fits of the EPR spectra yielded the resonance fields of the nitrogen hyperfine lines to high precision from which the shifts were deduced. The shifts are described by two terms: one linear and the other quadratic in the electron spin-exchange frequency, omegae. The quadratic term is due to spin exchange that occurs when two spin probes diffuse together and collide. A linear term is predicted for spin exchanges that occur upon re-encounter of the same two probes while they occupy the same "cage" before diffusing apart. The quadratic term has no adjustable parameters, while the linear term has one: the mean time between re-encounters, tauRE. The theory is cast in terms of the spin-exchange-induced line broadening that can be measured from each spectrum independently of the line shifts, thereby removing the explicit dependence of omegae on the temperature and the spin-probe concentration. In this form, theoretically, the value of the linear term is about a factor of 2 larger for 15N-PDT than for 14N-PDT for all temperatures; however, tauRE must be the same. Experimentally, we find that both of these expectations are fulfilled, providing strong support that the linear term is indeed due to re-encounter collisions. Values of tauRE derived from 14N-PDT and 15N-PDT are of the same order of magnitude and show the same trend with temperature as a hydrodynamic estimate based on the Stokes-Einstein equation. PMID:18278887

  2. High Frequency Dynamics in Hemoglobin Measured by Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Ken; Van-Quynh, Alexandra; Bryant, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles for formate, acetate, and water protons are reported for aqueous solutions of hemoglobin singly and doubly labeled with a nitroxide and mercury(II) ion at cysteines at β-93. Using two spin labels, one nuclear and one electron spin, a long intramolecular vector is defined between the two β-93 positions in the protein. The paramagnetic contributions to the observed 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate constant are isolated from the magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles obtained on a dual-magnet apparatus that provides spectral density functions characterizing fluctuations sensed by intermoment dipolar interactions in the time range from the tens of microseconds to ∼1 ps. Both formate and acetate ions are found to bind specifically within 5 Å of the β-93 spin-label position and the relaxation dispersion has inflection points corresponding to correlation times of 30 ps and 4 ns for both ions. The 4-ns motion is identified with exchange of the anions from the site, whereas the 30-ps correlation time is identified with relative motions of the spin label and the bound anion in the protein environment close to β-93. The magnetic field dependence of the paramagnetic contributions in both cases is well described by a simple Lorentzian spectral density function; no peaks in the spectral density function are observed. Therefore, the high frequency motions of the protein monitored by the intramolecular vector defined by the electron and nuclear spin are well characterized by a stationary random function of time. Attempts to examine long vector fluctuations by employing electron spin and nuclear spin double-labeling techniques did not yield unambiguous characterization of the high frequency motions of the vector between β-93 positions on different chains. PMID:15475581

  3. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  4. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  5. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature. PMID:26340435

  6. Measurement of the true transverse nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in the presence of field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.; Gladden, L. F.

    2013-08-01

    A measure of the nuclear spin transverse relaxation time T2, as determined using the nuclear magnetic resonance Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, provides unique information characterizing the microstructure of porous media which are themselves ubiquitous across fields of petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. However, the CPMG measurement is sensitive to diffusion in large magnetic field gradients. Under such conditions an effective relaxation time T_{2,eff} is observed instead, described by a combination of relaxation and diffusion exponents. The relaxation exponent always varies as nte (where n is the number, and te is the temporal separation, of spin echoes). The diffusion exponent varies as nt_e^k, where 1 < k ⩽ 3, although the exact analytic form is often unknown. Here we present a general approach to separating the influence of relaxation and diffusion by utilizing a composite diffusion exponent. Any T_{2,eff} component with a power of k > 1 is removed to provide a measure of the true T2 relaxation time distribution from CPMG data acquired in the presence of a strong background gradient. We apply the technique to discriminate between the effects of relaxation and diffusion in porous media using catalysts and rocks as examples. The method is generally applicable to any CPMG measurements conducted in the presence of a static magnetic field gradient.

  7. Measurement of the Thermal Properties of a Metal Using a Relaxation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, John N.; McMaster, Richard H.

    1975-01-01

    An undergraduate experiment is described which employs a relaxation method for the measurement of the thermal conductivity and specific heat of a metallic sample in a temperature range of 0-100 degrees centigrade. (Author/CP)

  8. (15)N NMR studies of a nitrile-modified nucleoside.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Anne T; Gai, Xin Sonia; Buckwalter, Beth L; Fenlon, Edward E; Brewer, Scott H

    2010-12-30

    Nitrile-modified molecules have proven to be excellent probes of local environments in biomolecules via both vibrational and fluorescence spectroscopy. The utility of the nitrile group as a spectroscopic probe has been expanded here to (15)N NMR spectroscopy by selective (15)N incorporation. The (15)N NMR chemical shift (δ((15)N)) of the (15)N-labeled 5-cyano-2'-deoxyuridine (C(15)NdU, 1a) was found to change from 153.47 to 143.80 ppm in going from THF-d(8) to D(2)O. A 0.81 ppm downfield shift was measured upon formation of a hydrogen-bond-mediated heterodimer between 2,6-diheptanamidopyridine and a silyl ether analogue of 1a in chloroform, and the small intrinsic temperature dependence of δ((15)N) of C(15)NdU was measured as a 0.38 ppm downfield shift from 298 to 338 K. The experiments were complemented with density functional theory calculations exploring the effect of solvation on the (15)N NMR chemical shift. PMID:21126044

  9. 1H NMR relaxation in urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Bacher, Alfred D.; Dybowski, C.

    2007-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times T1 were measured for urea as a function of temperature. An activation energy of 46.3 ± 4.7 kJ/mol was extracted and compared with the range of 38-65 kJ/mol previously reported in the literature as measured by different magnetic resonance techniques. In addition, proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame T1 ρ were measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide acquisition conditions for the 13C and 15N CP/MAS spectra of pure urea in the crystalline phase.

  10. Dielectric relaxation measurement and analysis of restricted water structure in rice kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagihara, Shin; Oyama, Mikio; Inoue, Akio; Asano, Megumi; Sudo, Seiichi; Shinyashiki, Naoki

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric relaxation measurements were performed for rice kernels by time domain reflectometry (TDR) with flat-end coaxial electrodes. Difficulties in good contact between the surfaces of the electrodes and the kernels are eliminated by a TDR set-up with a sample holder for a kernel, and the water content could be evaluated from relaxation curves. Dielectric measurements were performed for rice kernels, rice flour and boiled rice with various water contents, and the water amount and dynamic behaviour of water molecules were explained from restricted dynamics of water molecules and also from the τ-β (relaxation time versus the relaxation-time distribution parameter of the Cole-Cole equation) diagram. In comparison with other aqueous systems, the dynamic structure of water in moist rice is more similar to aqueous dispersion systems than to aqueous solutions.

  11. Interaction of thiocyanate with horseradish peroxidase. 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Modi, S; Behere, D V; Mitra, S

    1989-11-25

    Interaction of thiocyanate with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was investigated by relaxation rate measurements (at 50.68 MHz) of the 15N resonance of thiocyanate nitrogen and by following the hyperfine shifted ring methyl proton resonances (at 500 MHz) of the heme group of SCN-.HRP solutions. At pH 4.0, the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for thiocyanate binding to HRP was deduced to be 158 mM from the relaxation rate measurements. Chemical shift changes of 1- and 8-ring methyl proton resonances in the presence of various amounts of thiocyanate at pH 4.0 yielded KD values of 166 and 136 mM, respectively. From the pH dependence of KD and the 15N resonance line width, it was observed that thiocyanate binds to HRP only under acidic conditions (pH less than 6). The binding was found to be facilitated by protonation of an acid group on the enzyme with pKa 4.0. The pH dependence of the 15N line width as well as the apparent dissociation constant were quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a reaction scheme in which thiocyanate in deprotonated ionic form binds to the enzyme in protonated acidic form. The KD for thiocyanate binding to HRP was also evaluated in the presence of an excess of exogenous substrates such as resorcinol, cyanide, and iodide ions. It was found that the presence of cyanide (which binds to heme iron at the sixth coordination position) and resorcinol did not have any effect on the binding of thiocyanate, indicating that the binding site of the thiocyanate ion is located away from the ferric center as well as from the aromatic donor binding site. The KD in the presence of iodide, however, showed that iodide competes with thiocyanate for binding at the same site. The distance of the bound thiocyanate ion from the ferric center was deduced from the 15N relaxation time measurements and was found to be a 6.8 A. From the distance as well as the change in the chemical shifts and line width of 1- and 8-methyl proton resonances, it is suggested that the

  12. A new system for the simultaneous measurement of δ13C and δ15N by IRMS and radiocarbon by AMS on gaseous samples: Design features and performances of the gas handling interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braione, Eugenia; Maruccio, Lucio; Quarta, Gianluca; D'Elia, Marisa; Calcagnile, Lucio

    2015-10-01

    We present the general design features and preliminary performances of a new system for the simultaneous AMS-14C and IRMS δ13C and δ15N measurements on samples with masses in the μg range. The system consists of an elemental analyzer (EA), a gas splitting unit (GSU), a IRMS system, a gas handling interface (GHI) and a sputtering ion source capable of accepting gaseous samples. A detailed description of the system and of the control software supporting unattended operation are presented together with the first performance tests carried out by analyzing samples with masses ranging from 8 μgC to 2.4 mgC. The performances of the system were tested in term of stability of the ion beam extracted from the ion source, precision and accuracy of the results by comparing the measured isotopic ratios with those expected for reference materials.

  13. Is tau a preload-independent measure of isovolumetric relaxation?

    PubMed

    Varma, S K; Owen, R M; Smucker, M L; Feldman, M D

    1989-12-01

    Several studies have been performed in patients with a variety of myocardial diseases that have identified a prolongation of tau. However, it is not clear whether prolongation of tau represents abnormal myocardial physiology or the effect of excessive load associated with a particular disease process. Accordingly, we evaluate the effect on tau of an isolated decrease in preload induced by inferior vena cava occlusion before the appearance of reflex changes in six patients designated as normal by catheterization criteria. A computer-based digitization routine identified cardiac contractions in all patients early after inferior vena cava occlusion where left ventricular end-diastolic pressure decreased (18.3 +/- 6.3 to 9.3 +/- 5.8, p less than 0.05) while left ventricular systolic pressure (113.3 +/- 13.8 to 111.8 +/- 14.0, p = NS) and heart rate (66.0 +/- 10.0 to 65.9 +/- 10.3, p = NS) did not change. After this alteration in preload, no change in tau from baseline, as calculated by the logarithmic (TL), derivative (TD), or method of Mirsky (T1/2), was noted: TL, 47.4 +/- 6.5 to 44.6 +/- 7.6; TD, 39.3 +/- 8.1 to 39.8 +/- 8.4; T1/2, 33.0 +/- 4.0 to 31.8 +/- 4.6; all p = NS. The baseline pressure extrapolated from isovolumetric relaxation did not change in these preload beats compared with baseline (+4.26 +/- 6.20 to -0.80 +/- 4.87, p = NS). Subsequent beats were identified where left ventricular systolic pressure showed a numeric decrease compared with baseline (113.3 +/- 13.8 to 100.8 +/- 14.3, p = NS) despite no change in heart rate (66.0 +/- 10.0 to 66.8 +/- 10.5, p = NS).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2598435

  14. Interconversion of mechanical and dielectrical relaxation measurements for dicyclohexylmethyl-2-methyl succinate.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Calleja, R; Garcia-Bernabé, A; Sanchis, M J; del Castillo, L F

    2005-11-01

    A comparison between results of dielectrical relaxation and dynamic mechanical spectroscopies is carried out for the alpha-relaxation of the ester dicyclohexyl methyl-2-methyl succinate (DCMMS). The results for the dielectric permittivity and the shear modulus measurements are presented according to the empirical Havriliak-Negami (HN) equation. By using the time-temperature principle a master curve in each case was obtained for several temperatures. The comparative analysis presented here is based on the assumption of a relationship between rotational and shear viscosities. The former one is associated to the dielectrical relaxation, whereas the latter is associated to mechanical relaxation. Both viscosities are not necessarily equal in general, and we assume that the difference between them is an important factor to appropriately compare the dielectrical and mechanical results. PMID:16383609

  15. Relaxation-based distance measurements between a nitroxide and a lanthanide spin label

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, H.; Koch, A.; Maus, V.; Spiess, H. W.; Jeschke, G.

    2008-10-01

    Distance measurements by electron paramagnetic resonance techniques between labels attached to biomacromolecules provide structural information on systems that cannot be crystallized or are too large to be characterized by NMR methods. However, existing techniques are limited in their distance range and sensitivity. It is anticipated by theoretical considerations that these limits could be extended by measuring the enhancement of longitudinal relaxation of a nitroxide label due to a lanthanide complex label at cryogenic temperatures. The relaxivity of the dysprosium complex with the macrocyclic ligand DOTA can be determined without direct measurements of longitudinal relaxation rates of the lanthanide and without recourse to model compounds with well defined distance by analyzing the dependence of relaxation enhancement on either temperature or concentration in homogeneous glassy frozen solutions. Relaxivities determined by the two calibration techniques are in satisfying agreement with each other. Error sources for both techniques are examined. A distance of about 2.7 nm is measured in a model compound of the type nitroxide-spacer-lanthanide complex and is found in good agreement with the distance in a modeled structure. Theoretical considerations suggest that an increase of the upper distance limit requires measurements at lower fields and temperatures.

  16. Prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to livestock trade.

    PubMed

    Hop, G E; Mourits, M C M; Slager, R; Oude Lansink, A G J M; Saatkamp, H W

    2013-05-01

    Compared with the domestic trade in livestock, intra-communal trade across the European Union (EU) is subject to costly, additional veterinary measures. Short-distance transportation just across a border requires more measures than long-distance domestic transportation, while the need for such additional cross-border measures can be questioned. This study examined the prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to trade within the cross-border region of the Netherlands (NL) and Germany (GER); that is, North Rhine Westphalia and Lower Saxony. The study constructed a deterministic spread-sheet cost model to calculate the costs of both routine veterinary measures (standard measures that apply to both domestic and cross-border transport) and additional cross-border measures (extra measures that only apply to cross-border transport) as applied in 2010. This model determined costs by stakeholder, region and livestock sector, and studied the prospects for cost reduction by calculating the costs after the relaxation of additional cross-border measures. The selection criteria for relaxing these measures were (1) a low expected added value on preventing contagious livestock diseases, (2) no expected additional veterinary risks in case of relaxation of measures and (3) reasonable cost-saving possibilities. The total cost of routine veterinary measures and additional cross-border measures for the cross-border region was €22.1 million, 58% (€12.7 million) of which came from additional cross-border measures. Two-thirds of this €12.7 million resulted from the trade in slaughter animals. The main cost items were veterinary checks on animals (twice in the case of slaughter animals), export certification and control of export documentation. Four additional cross-border measures met the selection criteria for relaxation. The relaxation of these measures could save €8.2 million (€5.0 million for NL and €3.2 million for GER) annually

  17. Experimental plant for simultaneous production of (14)N and (15)N by (15)N/(14)N exchange in NO, NO(2)-HNO(3) system under pressure.

    PubMed

    Axente, Damian; Marcu, Cristina; Muresan, Ancuţa; Kaucsar, Martin; Misan, Ioan; Popeneciu, Gabriel; Gligan, Nicolae; Cristea, Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    An experimental study on (14)N and (15)N simultaneous separation using the chemical exchange in NO, NO(2)-HNO(3) system under pressure is presented. The influence of the pressure and of the interstage 10 M HNO(3) flow rate on the separation of (14)N and (15)N was measured on a packed column with product and waste refluxers. At steady state and 1.8 atm (absolute), the isotopic concentration at the bottom of the separation column was 0.563 at% (15)N, and in the top of the column was 0.159 at% (15)N. The height equivalent to a theoretical plate and interstage 10 M HNO(3) flow rate values, obtained in these experimental conditions, allows the separation of (14)N highly depleted of (15)N and of (15)N at 99 at% (15)N concentration. PMID:20582793

  18. Multidimensional dynamic piezoresponse measurements. Unraveling local relaxation behavior in relaxor-ferroelectrics via big data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vasudevan, Rama K.; Zhang, Shujun; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin

    2015-08-19

    Compositional and charge disorder in ferroelectric relaxors lies at the heart of the unusual properties of these systems, such as aging and non-ergodicity, polarization rotations, and a host of temperature and field-driven phase transitions. However, much information about the field-dynamics of the polarization in the prototypical ferroelectric relaxor (1-x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3 (PMN-xPT) remains unprobed at the mesoscopic level. We use a piezoresponse force microscopy-based dynamic multimodal relaxation spectroscopy technique, enabling the study of ferroelectric switching and polarization relaxation at mesoscopic length scales, and carry out measurements on a PMN-0.28PT sample with minimal polishing. Results indicate that beyond a threshold DC bias themore » average relaxation increases as the system attempts to relax to the previous state. Phenomenological fitting reveals the presence of mesoscale heterogeneity in relaxation amplitudes and clearly suggests the presence of two distinct amplitudes. Independent component analysis reveals the presence of a disorder component of the relaxation, which is found to be strongly anti-correlated with the maximum piezoresponse at that location, suggesting smaller disorder effects where the polarization reversal is large and vice versa. The disorder in the relaxation amplitudes is postulated to arise from rhombohedral and field-induced tetragonal phase in the crystal, with each phase associated with its own relaxation amplitude. As a result, these studies highlight the crucial importance of the mixture of ferroelectric phases in the compositions in proximity of the morphotropic phase boundary in governing the local response and further highlight the ability of PFM voltage and time spectroscopies, in conjunction with big-data multivariate analyses, to locally map disorder and correlate it with parameters governing the dynamic behavior.« less

  19. Multidimensional dynamic piezoresponse measurements: Unraveling local relaxation behavior in relaxor-ferroelectrics via big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Rama K.; Zhang, Shujun; Baris Okatan, M.; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin

    2015-08-01

    Compositional and charge disorder in ferroelectric relaxors lies at the heart of the unusual properties of these systems, such as aging and non-ergodicity, polarization rotations, and a host of temperature and field-driven phase transitions. However, much information about the field-dynamics of the polarization in the prototypical ferroelectric relaxor (1-x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3 (PMN-xPT) remains unprobed at the mesoscopic level. Here, we use a piezoresponse force microscopy-based dynamic multimodal relaxation spectroscopy technique, enabling the study of ferroelectric switching and polarization relaxation at mesoscopic length scales, and carry out measurements on a PMN-0.28PT sample with minimal polishing. Results indicate that beyond a threshold DC bias the average relaxation increases as the system attempts to relax to the previous state. Phenomenological fitting reveals the presence of mesoscale heterogeneity in relaxation amplitudes and clearly suggests the presence of two distinct amplitudes. Independent component analysis reveals the presence of a disorder component of the relaxation, which is found to be strongly anti-correlated with the maximum piezoresponse at that location, suggesting smaller disorder effects where the polarization reversal is large and vice versa. The disorder in the relaxation amplitudes is postulated to arise from rhombohedral and field-induced tetragonal phase in the crystal, with each phase associated with its own relaxation amplitude. These studies highlight the crucial importance of the mixture of ferroelectric phases in the compositions in proximity of the morphotropic phase boundary in governing the local response and further highlight the ability of PFM voltage and time spectroscopies, in conjunction with big-data multivariate analyses, to locally map disorder and correlate it with parameters governing the dynamic behavior.

  20. Multidimensional dynamic piezoresponse measurements. Unraveling local relaxation behavior in relaxor-ferroelectrics via big data

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Rama K.; Zhang, Shujun; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin

    2015-08-19

    Compositional and charge disorder in ferroelectric relaxors lies at the heart of the unusual properties of these systems, such as aging and non-ergodicity, polarization rotations, and a host of temperature and field-driven phase transitions. However, much information about the field-dynamics of the polarization in the prototypical ferroelectric relaxor (1-x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3 (PMN-xPT) remains unprobed at the mesoscopic level. We use a piezoresponse force microscopy-based dynamic multimodal relaxation spectroscopy technique, enabling the study of ferroelectric switching and polarization relaxation at mesoscopic length scales, and carry out measurements on a PMN-0.28PT sample with minimal polishing. Results indicate that beyond a threshold DC bias the average relaxation increases as the system attempts to relax to the previous state. Phenomenological fitting reveals the presence of mesoscale heterogeneity in relaxation amplitudes and clearly suggests the presence of two distinct amplitudes. Independent component analysis reveals the presence of a disorder component of the relaxation, which is found to be strongly anti-correlated with the maximum piezoresponse at that location, suggesting smaller disorder effects where the polarization reversal is large and vice versa. The disorder in the relaxation amplitudes is postulated to arise from rhombohedral and field-induced tetragonal phase in the crystal, with each phase associated with its own relaxation amplitude. As a result, these studies highlight the crucial importance of the mixture of ferroelectric phases in the compositions in proximity of the morphotropic phase boundary in governing the local response and further highlight the ability of PFM voltage and time spectroscopies, in conjunction with big-data multivariate analyses, to locally map disorder and correlate it with parameters governing the dynamic behavior.

  1. Femtosecond thermal modulation measurements of electron-phonon relaxation in niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, K.M.; Zhao, X.M.; Siddique, M.; Alfano, R.R. ); Osterman, D.P.; Radparvar, M.; Cunniff, J. )

    1990-05-07

    Thermal modulation measurements using 120 fs/620 nm laser pulses were performed on niobium films. The electron-phonon relaxation time was found to be ultrafast and measured to be 360 fs, and the electron-phonon coupling constant was estimated to be (17{plus minus}3){times}10{sup 17} W m{sup {minus}3} K{sup {minus}1}.

  2. The effects of music relaxation and muscle relaxation techniques on sleep quality and emotional measures among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Blanaru, Monica; Bloch, Boaz; Vadas, Limor; Arnon, Zahi; Ziv, Naomi; Kremer, Ilana; Haimov, Iris

    2012-07-26

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an anxiety disorder with lifetime prevalence of 7.8%, is characterized by symptoms that develop following exposure to traumatic life events and that cause an immediate experience of intense fear, helplessness or horror. PTSD is marked by recurrent nightmares typified by the recall of intrusive experiences and by extended disturbance throughout sleep. Individuals with PTSD respond poorly to drug treatments for insomnia. The disadvantages of drug treatment for insomnia underline the importance of non-pharmacological alternatives. Thus, the present study had three aims: first, to compare the efficiency of two relaxation techniques (muscular relaxation and progressive music relaxation) in alleviating insomnia among individuals with PTSD using both objective and subjective measures of sleep quality; second, to examine whether these two techniques have different effects on psychological indicators of PTSD, such as depression and anxiety; and finally, to examine how initial PTSD symptom severity and baseline emotional measures are related to the efficiency of these two relaxation methods. Thirteen PTSD patients with no other major psychiatric or neurological disorders participated in the study. The study comprised one seven-day running-in, no-treatment period, followed by two seven-day experimental periods. The treatments constituted either music relaxation or muscle relaxation techniques at desired bedtime. These treatments were randomly assigned. During each of these three experimental periods, subjects' sleep was continuously monitored with a wrist actigraph (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc.), and subjects were asked to fill out several questionnaires concerned with a wide spectrum of issues, such as sleep, depression, and anxiety. Analyses revealed a significant increase in objective and subjective sleep efficiency and a significant reduction in depression level following music relaxation. Moreover, following music relaxation, a highly

  3. An automated GC-C-GC-IRMS setup to measure palaeoatmospheric δ13C-CH4, δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O in one ice core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, P.; Buizert, C.; Jenk, T. M.; Sapart, C. J.; Prokopiou, M.; Röckmann, T.; Blunier, T.

    2013-08-01

    Air bubbles in ice core samples represent the only opportunity to study the mixing ratio and isotopic variability of palaeoatmospheric CH4 and N2O. The highest possible precision in isotope measurements is required to maximize the resolving power for CH4 and N2O sink and source reconstructions. We present a new setup to measure δ13C-CH4, δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O isotope ratios in one ice core sample and with one single IRMS instrument, with a precision of 0.09, 0.6 and 0.7‰, respectively, as determined on 0.6-1.6 nmol CH4 and 0.25-0.6 nmol N2O. The isotope ratios are referenced to the VPDB scale (δ13C-CH4), the N2-air scale (δ15N-N2O) and the VSMOW scale (δ18O-N2O). Ice core samples of 200-500 g are melted while the air is constantly extracted to minimize gas dissolution. A helium carrier gas flow transports the sample through the analytical system. We introduce a new gold catalyst to oxidize CO to CO2 in the air sample. CH4 and N2O are then separated from N2, O2, Ar and CO2 before they get pre-concentrated and separated by gas chromatography. A combustion unit is required for δ13C-CH4 analysis, which is equipped with a constant oxygen supply as well as a post-combustion trap and a post-combustion GC column (GC-C-GC-IRMS). The post-combustion trap and the second GC column in the GC-C-GC-IRMS combination prevent Kr and N2O interferences during the isotopic analysis of CH4-derived CO2. These steps increase the time for δ13C-CH4 measurements, which is used to measure δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O first and then δ13C-CH4. The analytical time is adjusted to ensure stable conditions in the ion source before each sample gas enters the IRMS, thereby improving the precision achieved for measurements of CH4 and N2O on the same IRMS. The precision of our measurements is comparable to or better than that of recently published systems. Our setup is calibrated by analysing multiple reference gases that were injected over bubble-free ice samples. We show that our measurements

  4. Cytochrome-P450-Cytochrome-b5 Interaction in a Membrane Environment Changes 15N Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Ahuja, Shivani; Huang, Rui; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    It has been well realized that the dependence of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors on the amino acid sequence, secondary structure, dynamics and electrostatic interactions can be utilized in the structural and dynamic studies of proteins by NMR spectroscopy. In addition, CSA tensors could also be utilized to measure the structural interactions between proteins in a protein-protein complex. To this end, here we report the experimentally measured backbone amide-15N CSA tensors for a membrane-bound 16.7-kDa full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5), in complexation with a 55.8-kDa microsomal rabbit cytochrome P450 2B4 (cytP4502B4). The 15N-CSAs, determined using the 15N CSA/15N-1H dipolar coupling transverse cross-correlated rates, for free cytb5 are compared with that for the cytb5 bound to cytP4502B4. An overall increase in backbone amide-15N transverse cross-correlated rates for the cytb5 residues in the cytb5-cytP450 complex was observed as compared to the free cytb5 residues. Due to fast spin-spin relaxation (T2) and subsequent broadening of the signals in the complex, we were able to measure amide-15N CSAs only for 48 residues of cytb5 as compared to 84 residues of free cytb5. We observed a change in 15N CSA for most residues of cytb5 in the complex, when compared to free cytb5, suggesting a dynamic interaction between the oppositely charged surfaces of anionic cytb5 and cationic cytP450. The mean values of 15N CSA determined for residues in helical, sheet and turn regions of cytb5 in the complex are −184.5, −146.8, and −146.2 ppm, respectively, with an overall average value of −165.5 ppm (excluding the values from residues in more flexible termini). The measured CSA value for residues in helical conformation is slightly larger as compared to previously reported values. This may be attributed to the paramagnetic effect from Fe(III) of the heme in cytb5, which is similar to our previously reported values for the free cytb5. PMID:24107224

  5. Wall relaxation in growing stems: comparison of four species and assessment of measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    This study was carried out to develop improved methods for measuring in-vivo stress relaxation of growing tissues and to compare relaxation in the stems of four different species. When water uptake by growing tissue is prevented, in-vivo stress relaxation occurs because continued wall loosening reduces wall stress and cell turgor pressure. With this procedure one may measure the yield threshold for growth (Y), the turgor pressure in excess of the yield threshold (P-Y), and the physiological wall extensibility (phi). Three relaxation techniques proved useful: "turgor-relaxation", "balance-pressure" and "pressure-block". In the turgor-relaxation method, water is withheld from growing tissue and the reduction in turgor is measured directly with the pressure probe. This technique gives absolute values for P and Y, but requires tissue excision. In the balance-pressure technique, the excised growing region is sealed in a pressure chamber, and the subsequent reduction in water potential is measured as the applied pressure needed to return xylem sap to the cut surface. This method is simple, but only measures (P-Y), not the individual values of P and Y. In the pressure-block technique, the growing tissue is sealed into a pressure chamber, growth is monitored continuously, and just sufficient pressure is applied to the chamber to block growth. The method gives high-resolution kinetics of relaxation and does not require tissue excision, but only measures (P-Y). The three methods gave similar results when applied to the growing stems of pea (Pisum sativum L.), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and zucchini (Curcubita pepo L.) seedlings. Values for (P-Y) averaged between 1.4 and 2.7 bar, depending on species. Yield thresholds averaged between 1.3 and 3.0 bar. Compared with the other methods, relaxation by pressure-block was faster and exhibited dynamic changes in wall-yielding properties. The two pressure-chamber methods were also used to measure

  6. The effects of music relaxation on sleep quality and emotional measures in people living with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Boaz; Reshef, Alon; Vadas, Limor; Haliba, Yamit; Ziv, Naomi; Kremer, Ilana; Haimov, Iris

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of music relaxation on insomnia and emotional measures in people living with schizophrenia. Twenty-four people living with schizophrenia participated in the study. The study involved a 7-day running-in no-treatment period, followed by a 7-day experimental period. Treatment consisted of music relaxation played at bedtime. During each of these periods, participants' sleep was continuously monitored with a wrist actigraph, and participants completed a wide spectrum of questionnaires. Results showed an improvement in sleep latency and sleep efficiency after the music relaxation was played. Likewise, music relaxation was shown to improve participants' total psychopathology score (PANSS) as well as their level of depression. Moreover, a significant correlation was found between reduction in level of situational anxiety and improvement in sleep efficiency. The findings suggest the beneficial effect of music relaxation as a treatment both for insomnia and for emotional measures in people living with schizophrenia. PMID:20635522

  7. An automated setup to measure paleoatmospheric δ13C-CH4, δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O in one ice core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, P.; Buizert, C.; Jenk, T. M.; Sapart, C. J.; Prokopiou, M.; Röckmann, T.; Blunier, T.

    2013-02-01

    Air bubbles in ice core samples represent the only opportunity to study the isotopic variability of paleoatmospheric CH4 and N2O. The highest possible precision in isotope measurements is required to maximize the resolving power for CH4 and N2O sink and source reconstructions. We present a new setup to measure δ13C-CH4, δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O isotope ratios in one ice core sample, with a precision of 0.09‰, 0.6‰ and 0.7‰, respectively, as determined on 0.6-1.6 nmol CH4 and 0.25-0.6 nmol N2O. The isotope ratios are referenced to the VPDB scale (δ13C-CH4), the N2-air scale (δ15N-N2O) and the VSMOW scale (δ18O-N2O). Ice core samples of 200-500 g are melted while the air is constantly extracted to minimize gas dissolution. A helium carrier gas flow transports the sample through the analytical system. A gold catalyst is used to oxidize CO to CO2 in the air sample without affecting the CH4 and N2O sample. CH4 and N2O are then separated from N2, O2, Ar and CO2 before they get pre-concentrated and separated by gas chromatography. While the separated N2O sample is immediately analysed in the mass spectrometer, a combustion unit is required for δ13C-CH4 analysis, which is equipped with a constant oxygen supply as well as a post-combustion trap and a post-combustion GC-column (GC-C-GC-IRMS). The post combustion trap and the second GC column in the GC-C-GC-IRMS combination increase the time for δ13C-CH4 analysis which is used to measure δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O first and then δ13C-CH4. The analytical time is adjusted to ensure stable conditions in the ion-source before each sample gas enters the IRMS, thereby improving the precision achieved for measurements of CH4 and N2O on the same IRMS. After the extraction of the air from the ice core sample, the analysis of CH4 and N2O takes 42 min. The setup is calibrated by analyzing multiple isotope reference gases that were injected over bubble-free-ice samples. We show a comparison of ice core sample measurements for

  8. Relaxation measurements of the persistent photoconductivity in sulfur-doped a-Si:H

    SciTech Connect

    Quicker, D.; Kakalios, J.

    1996-12-31

    The slow relaxation of the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effect in sulfur-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has been measured as a function of temperature and illumination time. The relaxation is found to be thermally activated, with an activation energy which varies with sulfur concentration, while illuminating the film for a longer time leads to a longer relaxation time. A correlation is observed between changes of the photoconductivity during illumination and the magnitude of the PPC effect following illumination. These effects are also observed in compensated a-Si:H, suggesting that the mechanism for the PPC effect is the same in both sulfur-doped a-Si:H and compensated a-Si:H. The presence of donor and compensating acceptor states in sulfur-doped a-Si:H could arise from valence alternation pair sulfur atom defects.

  9. The effect of the recent 17O(p,α)14N and 18O(p,α)15N fusion cross section measurements in the nucleosynthesis of AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the 17O(p,α)14N and 18O(p,α)15N fusion reactions and to extract the strengths of the resonances that more contribute to the reaction rates at astrophysical energies. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O(p,α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. Since, proton-induced fusion reactions on 17O and 18O belong to the CNO cycle network for H-burning in stars, the new estimates of the cross sections have been introduced into calculations of Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star nucleosynthesis to determine their impact on astrophysical environments. Results of nucleosynthesis calculations have been compared with geochemical analysis of "presolar" grains. These solids form in the cold and dusty envelopes that surround AGB stars and once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of fusion reactions in astrophysical environments.

  10. Refining cotton-wick method for 15N plant labelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fustec, Joëlle; Mahieu, Stéphanie

    2010-05-01

    The symbiosis Fabaceae/Rhizobiaceae plays a critical role in the nitrogen cycle. It gives the plant the ability to fix high amounts of atmospheric N. A part of this N can be transferred to the soil via rhizodeposition. The contribution of Fabaceae to the soil N pool is difficult to measure, since it is necessary for assessing N benefits for other crops, for soil biological activity, and for reducing water pollution in sustainable agriculture (Fustec, 2009). The aim of this study was to test and improve the reliability of the 15N cotton-wick method for measuring the soil N derived from plant rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2007). The effects of the concentration of the 15N-urea labelling solution and of the feeding frequency (continuous or pulses) on the assessment of nitrogen rhizodeposition were studied in two greenhouse experiments using the field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and the non-nodulating isoline P2. The plant parts and the soil were prepared for 15N:14N measurements for assessing N rhizodeposition (Mahieu et al., 2009). The fraction of plants' belowground nitrogen allocated to rhizodeposition in both Frisson pea and P2 was 20 to more than 50% higher when plants were labelled continuously than when they were labelled using fortnightly pulses. Our results suggested that when 15N root enrichment was high, nitrogen rhizodeposition was underestimated only for plants that were 15N-fed by fortnightly pulses, and not in plants 15N-fed continuously. This phenomenon was especially observed for plants relying on symbiotic N fixation for N acquisition; it may be linked to the concentration of the labelling solution. In conclusion, N rhizodeposition assessment was strongly influenced by the 15N-feeding frequency and the concentration of the labelling solution. The estimation of N rhizodeposition was more reliable when plants were labelled continuously with a dilute solution of 15N urea. Fustec et al. 2009. Agron. Sustain. Dev., DOI 10.1051/agro/2009003, in press. Mahieu

  11. On-chip Brownian relaxation measurements of magnetic nanobeads in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-06-01

    We present and demonstrate a new method for on-chip Brownian relaxation measurements on magnetic nanobeads in the time domain using magnetoresistive sensors. The beads are being magnetized by the sensor self-field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors and thus no external magnetic fields are needed. First, the method is demonstrated on Brownian relaxation measurements of beads with nominal sizes of 40, 80, 130, and 250 nm. The results are found to compare well to those obtained by an already established measurement technique in the frequency domain. Next, we demonstrate the time and frequency domain methods on Brownian relaxation detection of clustering of streptavidin coated magnetic beads in the presence of different concentrations of biotin-conjugated bovine serum albumin and obtain comparable results. In the time domain, a measurement is carried out in less than 30 s, which is about six times faster than in the frequency domain. This substantial reduction of the measurement time allows for continuous monitoring of the bead dynamics vs. time and opens for time-resolved studies, e.g., of binding kinetics.

  12. Surface NMR measurement of proton relaxation times in medium to coarse-grained sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Shushakov, O A

    1996-01-01

    A surface NMR investigation of groundwater in the geomagnetic field is under study. To detect the surface NMR a wire loop with a diameter of about 100 m, being an antenna for both an exciting field source and the NMR signal receiver, is laid out on the ground. A sinusoidal current pulse with a rectangular envelope is passed through the loop to excite the NMR signal. The carrier frequency of the oscillating current in this pulse is equal to the Larmor frequency of protons in the Earth's magnetic field. The current amplitude is changed up to 200 amps and the pulse duration is fixed and is equal to 40 ms. The exciting pulse is followed by an induction emf signal caused by the Larmor nuclear precession in geomagnetic field. The relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* were measured by the surface NMR for both groundwater in medium to coarse-grained sand at borehole and for bulk water under the ice surface of frozen lake. To determine T1, a longitudinal interference in experiments with repeated pulses was measured. A sequence with equal period between equal excitation pulses was used. The relaxation times T1, T2, measured for bulk water under the ice of the Ob reservoir were 1.0 s and 0.7 s, respectively. To estimate an influence of dissolved oxygen T1 of the same water at the same temperature was measured by lab NMR with and without pumping of oxygen. The relaxation time T1 measured for water in the medium to coarse-grained sand is 0.65 s. The relaxation time T2 estimated by spin echo sequence is found to be equal to 0.15 s. The relaxation time T2* is found to be about 80 ms. This result contradicts published earlier phenomenological correlation between relaxation time T2* and grain size of water-bearing rock. This could be as a result of unsound approach based on grain size or influence of paramagnetic impurities. PMID:8970122

  13. NMR measurement of oil shale magnetic relaxation at high magnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seymour, Joseph D.; Washburn, Kathryn E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at low field is used extensively to provide porosity and pore-size distributions in reservoir rocks. For unconventional resources, due to low porosity and permeability of the samples, much of the signal exists at very short T2 relaxation times. In addition, the organic content of many shales will also produce signal at short relaxation times. Despite recent improvements in low-field technology, limitations still exist that make it difficult to account for all hydrogen-rich constituents in very tight rocks, such as shales. The short pulses and dead times along with stronger gradients available when using high-field NMR equipment provides a more complete measurement of hydrogen-bearing phases due to the ability to probe shorter T2 relaxation times (-5 sec) than can be examined using low-field equipment. Access to these shorter T2 times allows for confirmation of partially resolved peaks observed in low-field NMR data that have been attributed to solid organic phases in oil shales. High-field (300 MHz or 7 T) NMR measurements of spin-spin T2 and spin-lattice T1 magnetic relaxation of raw and artificially matured oil shales have potential to provide data complementary to low field (2 MHz or 0.05T) measurements. Measurements of high-field T2 and T1-T2 correlations are presented. These data can be interpreted in terms of organic matter phases and mineral-bound water known to be present in the shale samples, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and show distributions of hydrogen-bearing phases present in the shales that are similar to those observed in low field measurements.

  14. Magneto-Optical Relaxation Measurements of Functionalized Nanoparticles as a Novel Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Aurich, Konstanze; Glöckl, Gunnar; Nagel, Stefan; Weitschies, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of magneto-optical relaxation signals of magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with biomolecules are a novel biosensing tool. Upon transmission of a laser beam through a nanoparticle suspension in a pulsed magnetic field, the properties of the laser beam change. This can be detected by optical methods. Biomolecular binding events leading to aggregation of nanoparticles are ascertainable by calculating the relaxation time and from this, the hydrodynamic diameters of the involved particles from the optical signal. Interaction between insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and its antibody was utilized for demonstration of the measurement setup applicability as an immunoassay. Furthermore, a formerly developed kinetic model was utilized in order to determine kinetic parameters of the interaction. Beside utilization of the method as an immunoassay it can be applied for the characterization of diverse magnetic nanoparticles regarding their size and size distribution. PMID:22408511

  15. Nuclear relaxation measurements in organic semiconducting polymers for application to organic spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenell, E. F.; Limes, M. E.; Sorte, E. G.; Vardeny, Z. V.; Saam, B.

    2015-01-01

    NMR measurements of spin-lattice relaxation of hydrogen nuclei in two prototype organic semiconducting solids, MEH-PPV and DOO-PPV, were carried out for temperatures between 4.2 K and room temperature, and for applied magnetic fields between 1.25 and 4.7 T. These π -conjugated polymers are of interest for use as the active semiconducting layer in spintronic devices. They typically exhibit weak spin-orbit coupling, and the interaction with inhomogeneous hyperfine fields generated by the nuclear spins plays a significant, if not dominant, role in the spin coherence and spin relaxation of electronic charge carriers. Our studies were conducted on unbiased bulk material with no photo-illumination. The characteristic 1H longitudinal relaxation times in these materials ranges from hundreds of milliseconds to >1000 s, and are predominantly nonmonoexponential. We present the data both in terms of a recovery time, T1 /2, corresponding to 50% recovery of thermal magnetization from saturation and in terms of a "T1 spectrum" produced via a numerical Laplace transform of the time-domain data. The evidence best supports relaxation to paramagnetic centers (radicals) mediated by nuclear spin diffusion as the primary mechanism: the observed relaxation is predominantly nonmonoexponential, and a characteristic T1 minimum as a function of temperature is apparent for both materials somewhere between 77 K and room temperature. The paramagnetic centers may be somewhat-delocalized charge-carrier pairs (i.e., polarons) along the polymer backbone, although the concentration in an unbiased sample (no carrier injection) should be very low. Alternatively, the centers may be localized defects, vacancies, or impurities. Our results may also be used to judge the feasibility of Overhauser-type dynamic nuclear polarization from polarized charge carriers or optically pumped exciton states.

  16. Estimating the contribution of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a magnetic fluid through dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Camargo, L.; Torres-Díaz, I.; Chiu-Lam, A.; Hernández, M.; Rinaldi, C.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate how dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements (DMS) can be used to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation to the dynamic magnetic response of a magnetic fluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles. The method applies to suspensions with particles that respond through Brownian or Néel relaxation and for which the characteristic Brownian and Néel relaxation times are widely separated. First, we illustrate this using magnetic fluids consisting of mixtures of particles that relax solely by the Brownian or Néel mechanisms. Then, it is shown how the same approach can be applied to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a suspension consisting of particles obtained from a single synthesis and whose size distribution straddles the transition from Néel to Brownian relaxation.

  17. Size-Dependent Relaxation Properties of Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Measured Over Seven Decades of Frequency by AC Susceptometry.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, R Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P; Jonasson, Christian; Blomgren, Jakob; Johansson, Christer; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic relaxation is exploited in innovative biomedical applications of magnetic particles such as magnetic particle imaging (MPI), magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and bio-sensing. Relaxation behavior should be optimized to achieve high performance imaging, efficient heating, and good SNR in bio-sensing. Using two AC susceptometers with overlapping frequency ranges, we have measured the relaxation behavior of a series of monodisperse magnetic particles and demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to probe particle relaxation characteristics from a few Hz to 10 MHz, the frequencies relevant for MPI, hyperthermia, and sensing. PMID:25473124

  18. Magneto-optical relaxation measurements for the characterization of biomolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurich, K.; Glöckl, G.; Romanus, E.; Weber, P.; Nagel, S.; Weitschies, W.

    2006-09-01

    Measurements of the magneto-optical relaxation of ferrofluids (MORFF) were applied as a novel homogeneous immunoassay for the investigation of biomolecular interactions. The technique is based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) functionalized with antibodies. The relaxation time of the optical birefringence that occurs when a pulsed magnetic field is applied to the nanoparticle suspension depends on the particle size. This enables the detection of particle aggregates formed after the addition of the antigen coupling partner. MORFF size measurements on the original ferrofluid and its fractions obtained by magnetic fractionation are comparable with results from other methods such as atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. In kinetic studies, the binding properties of five antigens and their polyclonal antibodies were investigated: human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), human immunoglobulin M (hIgM), human Eotaxin (hEotaxin), human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEA), and human insulin (hInsulin). The enlargement of the relaxation time observed during the coupling experiments is expressed in terms of a size distribution function, which includes MNP monomers as well as aggregates. The kinetic process can be described by a model of stepwise polymerization. The kinetic parameters obtained are compared to results of surface plasmon resonance measurements.

  19. NMR shift and relaxation measurements in pulsed high-field magnets up to 58T.

    PubMed

    Kohlrautz, J; Reichardt, S; Green, E L; Kühne, H; Wosnitza, J; Haase, J

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at fields up to 58T in pulsed magnets at the Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory are reported. The challenge to resolve NMR shifts in these time-dependent fields is addressed for the first time, and it is shown that this can indeed be accomplished with high precision with an internal reference. As a result, signal averaging is possible during a single magnetic field pulse, but also for multiple pulses. Thus, even very weak signals can in principle be recorded and their shifts can be determined. In a second set of experiments, the measurement of nuclear relaxation is investigated. Using adiabatic inversion with the inherent time dependence of the magnetic field and small-angle inspection, it is shown that relaxation measurements are possible, as well. The shift experiments were performed with (27)Al NMR on a mixture of aluminum metal and a Linde type A zeolite. For the relaxation studies, (27)Al NMR and (69)Ga NMR on the metals aluminum and gallium were preformed, respectively. PMID:26760950

  20. NMR shift and relaxation measurements in pulsed high-field magnets up to 58 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlrautz, J.; Reichardt, S.; Green, E. L.; Kühne, H.; Wosnitza, J.; Haase, J.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at fields up to 58 T in pulsed magnets at the Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory are reported. The challenge to resolve NMR shifts in these time-dependent fields is addressed for the first time, and it is shown that this can indeed be accomplished with high precision with an internal reference. As a result, signal averaging is possible during a single magnetic field pulse, but also for multiple pulses. Thus, even very weak signals can in principle be recorded and their shifts can be determined. In a second set of experiments, the measurement of nuclear relaxation is investigated. Using adiabatic inversion with the inherent time dependence of the magnetic field and small-angle inspection, it is shown that relaxation measurements are possible, as well. The shift experiments were performed with 27Al NMR on a mixture of aluminum metal and a Linde type A zeolite. For the relaxation studies, 27Al NMR and 69Ga NMR on the metals aluminum and gallium were preformed, respectively.

  1. Picosecond water dynamics adjacent to charged paramagnetic ions measured by magnetic relaxation dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitza, Natasha; Bryant, Robert G.

    2007-03-01

    Measurements of water-proton spin-lattice relaxation rate constants as a function of magnetic field strength [magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD)] in aqueous solutions of paramagnetic solutes reveal a peak in the MRD profile. These previously unobserved peaks require that the time correlation functions describing the water-proton-electron dipolar coupling have a periodic contribution. In aqueous solutions of iron(III) ion the peak corresponds to a frequency of 8.7cm-1, which the authors ascribe to the motion of water participating in the second coordination sphere of the triply charged solute ion. Similar peaks of weaker intensity in the same time range are observed for aqueous solutions of chromium(III) chloride as well as for ion pairs formed by ammonium ion with trioxalatochromate(III) ion. The widths of the dispersion peaks are consistent with a lifetime for the periodic motion in the range of 5ps or longer.

  2. T 1 Relaxation Measurement of Ex-Vivo Breast Cancer Tissues at Ultralow Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Hwang, Seong-min; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lim, Sanghyun; Han, Jae Ho; Yim, Hyunee; Kim, Jang-Hee; Jung, Yong Sik; Kim, Ku Sang

    2015-01-01

    We investigated T1 relaxations of ex-vivo cancer tissues at low magnetic fields in order to check the possibility of achieving a T1 contrast higher than those obtained at high fields. The T1 relaxations of fifteen pairs (normal and cancerous) of breast tissue samples were measured at three magnetic fields, 37, 62, and 122 μT, using our superconducting quantum interference device-based ultralow field nuclear magnetic resonance setup, optimally developed for ex-vivo tissue studies. A signal reconstruction based on Bayesian statistics for noise reduction was exploited to overcome the low signal-to-noise ratio. The ductal and lobular-type tissues did not exhibit meaningful T1 contrast values between normal and cancerous tissues at the three different fields. On the other hand, an enhanced T1 contrast was obtained for the mucinous cancer tissue. PMID:25705658

  3. Vibrational relaxation measurements in an expanding flow using spontaneous Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.P.; Ruffin, S.M.; Gillespie, W.D.; Meyer, S.A. )

    1993-10-01

    Vibrational relaxation of nitrogen in a two-dimensional nozzle flow is studied with spontaneous Raman scattering. An electric arc-driven shock tube operating as a reflected shock tunnel produces stagnation conditions of 5600 K and 100 atm. A 248-nm KrF laser pulse is focused into the nozzle to produce spatially resolved spontaneous Raman spectra. Vibrational population distributions are derived from the spectra for the states v = 0 to v = 8. The experimental results are compared with two theoretical models: (1) the Landau-Teller relaxation model and (2) a numerical solution of the master equations using transition rates derived from Schwartz, Slawsky and Herzfeld (SSH) theory. We have measured a value for the Landau-Teller correction factor (phi) to be 1.0-1.5. 13 refs.

  4. Vibrational relaxation of the bending mode of shock-heated CO2 by laser-absorption measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, D. J.; Bershader, D.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the vibrational relaxation characteristics of shock-heated CO2 using a tuned CO2 laser absorption technique. Absorption-coefficient histories were obtained for a single rotational state in each of the -10 0- and -02 0- levels over the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K, and for 21 rotational states of the -10 0- level at 1000 K. These histories have been combined with translational-rotational temperature histories based on interferometer measurements to calculate vibrational relaxation times for the bending mode. The results verify the mutual equilibrium of the bending and symmetric-stretch modes due to Fermi resonance. The bending mode relaxation times are approximately 10% shorter than predicted from interferometer results using the ratio of specific heats. Furthermore, relaxation times based on measurements of different rotational states at 1000 K show a variation with quantum number J, indicating a possible rotational nonequilibrium during the vibration relaxation process.

  5. Direct Measurement of the Electron Energy Relaxation Dynamics in Metallic Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsolle, Edouard; Rousseau, Alexandre; Lupien, Christian; Reulet, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the dynamical response of thermal noise to an ac excitation in conductors at low temperature. From the frequency dependence of this response function—the (noise) thermal impedance—in the range 1 kHz-1 GHz we obtain direct determinations of the inelastic relaxation times relevant in metallic wires at low temperature: the electron-phonon scattering time and the diffusion time of electrons along the wires. Combining these results with that of resistivity provides a measurement of heat capacity of samples made of thin film. The simplicity and reliability of this technique makes it very promising for future applications in other systems.

  6. Stepwise enrichment of 15N along food chains: Further evidence and the relation between δ 15N and animal age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masao; Wada, Eitaro

    1984-05-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrogen was measured in marine and fresh-water animals from the East China Sea, The Bering Sea, Lake Ashinoko and Usujiri intertidal zone. Primary producers, showed average δ15Nversus atmospheric nitrogen of +5.0%. (+3.4 to +7.5) in the Bering Sea and Lake Ashinoko, and +6.8%. (+6.0 to +7.6) in Usujiri intertidal zone. Blue green algae from the East China Sea show an average -0.55%. (-0.8 to +1.2). All consumers, Zooplankton, fish and bird exhibited Stepwise enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level. The 15N enrichment at a single feeding process ranged from +1.3 to +5.3 averaging +3.4 ± 1.1%.. This isotopic fractionation seems to be independent of habitat. The effect of age in animals was obtained by analyzing two marine mussels. The soft tissue nitrogen showed +2.0%. enrichment relative to that of primary producers, and the magnitude was almost constant with shell ages ranging from 0 to 8 years. A similar 15N enrichment occurs in all Molluscs, Crustaceans, Insecta, Amphibia, Fish, Ave and Mammal species regardless of the difference in the form of excreted nitrogen and in laboratory cultured fish, brine shrimp and mice (+2.9 to +4.9%.). The excreted ammonia from guppy was sufficiently light to balance the concentration of 15N to animal body.

  7. Measurement of cyclotron resonance relaxation time in the two-dimensional electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, I. V. Muravev, V. M.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Belyanin, V. N.

    2014-11-17

    Dependence of cyclotron magneto-plasma mode relaxation time on electron concentration and temperature in the two-dimensional electron system in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells has been studied. Comparative analysis of cyclotron and transport relaxation time has been carried out. It was demonstrated that with the temperature increase transport relaxation time tends to cyclotron relaxation time. It was also shown that cyclotron relaxation time, as opposed to transport relaxation time, has a weak electron density dependence. The cyclotron time can exceed transport relaxation time by an order of magnitude in a low-density range.

  8. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27059012

  9. Binding of thiocyanate to lactoperoxidase: 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, S.; Behere, D.V.; Mitra, S. )

    1989-05-30

    The binding of thiocyanate to lactoperoxidase (LPO) has been investigated by 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy. 1H NMR of LPO shows that the major broad heme methyl proton resonance at about 61 ppm is shifted upfield by addition of the thiocyanate, indicating binding of the thiocyanate to the enzyme. The pH dependence of line width of 15N resonance of SC15N- in the presence of the enzyme has revealed that the binding of the thiocyanate to the enzyme is facilitated by protonation of an ionizable group (with pKa of 6.4), which is presumably distal histidine. Dissociation constants (KD) of SC15N-/LPO, SC15N-/LPO/I-, and SC15N-/LPO/CN- equilibria have been determined by 15N T1 measurements and found to be 90 +/- 5, 173 +/- 20, and 83 +/- 6 mM, respectively. On the basis of these values of KD, it is suggested that the iodide ion inhibits the binding of the thiocyanate but cyanide ion does not. The thiocyanate is shown to bind at the same site of LPO as iodide does, but the binding is considerably weaker and is away from the ferric ion. The distance of 15N of the bound thiocyanate ion from the iron is determined to be 7.2 +/- 0.2 A from the 15N T1 measurements.

  10. Numerical evaluation of subsoil diffusion of (15) N labelled denitrification products during employment of the (15) N gas flux method in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Ruoss, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Common methods for measuring soil denitrification in situ include monitoring the accumulation of 15N labelled N2 and N2O evolved from 15N labelled soil nitrate pool in soil surface chambers. Gas diffusion is considered to be the main accumulation process. Because accumulation of the gases decreases concentration gradients between soil and chamber over time, gas production rates are underestimated if calculated from chamber concentrations. Moreover, concentration gradients to the non-labelled subsoil exist, inevitably causing downward diffusion of 15N labelled denitrification products. A numerical model for simulating gas diffusion in soil was used in order to determine the significance of this source of error. Results show that subsoil diffusion of 15N labelled N2 and N2O - and thus potential underestimation of denitrification derived from chamber fluxes - increases with cover closure time as well as with increasing diffusivity. Simulations based on the range of typical gas diffusivities of unsaturated soils show that the fraction of subsoil diffusion after chamber closure for 1 hour is always significant with values up to >30 % of total production of 15N labelled N2 and N2O. Field experiments for measuring denitrification with the 15N gas flux method were conducted. The ability of the model to predict the time pattern of gas accumulation was evaluated by comparing measured 15N2 concentrations and simulated values.

  11. Measurement of energy relaxation time in a microwave-driven Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guozhu; Wang, Yiwen; Cao, Junyu; Chen, Jian; Ji, Zhengming; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Yu, Yang; Han, Siyuan

    2007-11-01

    The switching current distributions P(I) with different sweep rates are obtained in microwave-driven current-biased Josephson tunnel junctions. We observe the resonant peak caused by microwave-assisted tunneling in P(I). By measuring the magnitude of the microwave resonant peak as a function of the sweep rate, we develop a novel method of extracting the energy relaxation time T1 of the junction. With this simple method, it is determined that T1 of a Nb/AlOx/Nb Josephson junction is approximately 0.5 µs.

  12. Longitudinal rotating frame relaxation time measurements in infarcted mouse myocardium in vivo.

    PubMed

    Musthafa, Haja-Sherief N; Dragneva, Galina; Lottonen, Line; Merentie, Mari; Petrov, Lyubomir; Heikura, Tommi; Ylä-Herttuala, Elias; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Gröhn, Olli; Liimatainen, Timo

    2013-05-01

    Longitudinal relaxation time in the rotating frame (T1ρ) was measured using continuous wave irradiation in normal and infarcted mouse myocardium in vivo. Significant increase in T1ρ was found after 7 days of infarction when compared with reference myocardium or in myocardium before infarction. Cine MRI and histology were performed to verify the severity of infarction. The time course of T1ρ in the infarct fits better with granulation and scar tissue formation than necrosis and edema. The results of the study show that T1ρ could potentially be a noninvasive quantitative marker for tissue remodeling after ischemic damage. PMID:22736543

  13. The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Muncaci, S.; Ardelean, I.; Boboia, S.

    2013-11-13

    In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

  14. The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muncaci, S.; Boboia, S.; Ardelean, I.

    2013-11-01

    In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe2O3) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

  15. Rheometry-on-a-chip: measuring the relaxation time of a viscoelastic liquid through particle migration in microchannel flows.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Francesco; D'Avino, Gaetano; Greco, Francesco; De Santo, Ilaria; Netti, Paolo A; Maffettone, Pier Luca

    2015-02-01

    A novel method to estimate the relaxation time of viscoelastic fluids, down to milliseconds, is here proposed. The adopted technique is based on the particle migration phenomenon occurring when the suspending viscoelastic fluid flows in microfluidic channels. The method is applied to measure the fluid relaxation times of two water-glycerol polymer solutions in an ample range of concentrations. A remarkable improvement in the accuracy of the measure of the relaxation time is found, as compared with experimental data obtained from shear or elongational experiments available in the literature. Good agreement with available theoretical predictions is also found. The proposed method is reliable, handy and does not need a calibration curve, opening an effective way to measure relaxation times of viscoelastic fluids otherwise not easily detectable by conventional techniques. PMID:25435258

  16. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff , that scales like T2,cutoff ∝g - 2 / 3D - 1 / 3 . For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1 /T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1 , for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ2g2 DT23 >102), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1 /T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2 . In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids.

  17. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff , that scales like T2,cutoff ∝g - 2 / 3D - 1 / 3 . For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1 /T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1 , for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ2g2DT23 >102), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1 /T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2 . In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids.

  18. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff, that scales like T2,cutoff∝g(-2/3)D(-1/3). For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1/T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1, for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ(2)g(2)DT2(3)>10(2)), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1/T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2. In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids. PMID:27389638

  19. Soil processes drive seasonal variation in retention of 15N tracers in a deciduous forest catchment.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Christine L; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Weiss, Marissa S; McCalley, K; Sparks, Jed P; Thomas, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal patterns of stream nitrate concentration have long been interpreted as demonstrating the central role of plant uptake in regulating stream nitrogen loss from forested catchments. Soil processes are rarely considered as important drivers of these patterns. We examined seasonal variation in N retention in a deciduous forest using three whole-ecosystem 15N tracer additions: in late April (post-snowmelt, pre-leaf-out), late July (mid-growing- season), and late October (end of leaf-fall). We expected that plant 15N uptake would peak in late spring and midsummer, that immobilization in surface litter and soil would peak the following autumn leaf-fall, and that leaching losses would vary inversely with 15N retention. Similar to most other 15N tracer studies, we found that litter and soils dominated ecosystem retention of added 15N. However, 15N recovery in detrital pools varied tremendously by season, with > 90% retention in spring and autumn and sharply reduced 15N retention in late summer. During spring, over half of the 15N retained in soil occurred within one day in the heavy (mineral-associated) soil fraction. During summer, a large decrease in 15N retention one week after addition coincided with increased losses of 15NO3- to soil leachate and seasonal increases in soil and stream NO3- concentrations, although leaching accounted for only a small fraction of the lost 15N (< 0.2%). Uptake of 15N into roots did not vary by season and accounted for < 4% of each tracer addition. Denitrification or other processes that lead to N gas loss may have consumed the rest. These measurements of 15N movement provide strong evidence for the dominant role of soil processes in regulating seasonal N retention and losses in this catchment and perhaps others with similar soils. PMID:26649387

  20. Relaxation processes of PGPR at the water/oil interface inferred by oscillatory or transient viscoelasticity measurements.

    PubMed

    Marze, Sébastien

    2009-10-20

    The rheological properties of PolyGlycerol PolyRicinoleate (PGPR) at the oil/water interface were studied using a drop-shaped tensiometer. Small deformation oscillations of the drop area allow the measurement of the interfacial viscoelasticity spectrum, that is, the elastic and viscous moduli as a function of frequency. Another way to obtain such a spectrum is to perform a transient relaxation measurement from which the relaxation modulus as a function of time is deduced and interpreted. Several models containing one or more relaxation times were considered, and their resulting spectra were compared to the oscillatory ones. Similar results suggest that one could in principle use oscillatory or transient relaxations indifferently. However, the transient relaxation technique proved to be more adapted for the determination of the relaxation times. At low PGPR concentrations in oil, the behavior is controlled by long relaxation times, whereas short ones take over when approaching and exceeding the saturation interfacial concentration. This was understood as a shift from a diffusion-dominated regime to a rearrangements-dominated regime. PMID:19764774

  1. Flux of organic compounds from grass measured by relaxed eddy accumulation technique.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Marcus; Ek-Olausson, Birgitta; Ljungström, Evert; Langer, Sarka

    2003-12-01

    Fluxes of some Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from grass were measured at a golf course in western Sweden, using the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) technique. The sampling was done by collecting VOC onto adsorbent tubes and the analysis was performed by thermal desorption followed by GC/MS. High emissions were observed after cutting. Transient fluxes of (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate (0.51 microg m(-2) s(-1)), (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol (0.14 microg m(-2) s(-1)) and (Z)-3-hexenal (0.40 microg m(-2) s(-1)) were measured, even at low temperatures. The REA technique requires a relatively large fetch area that is sometimes not available. Therefore, a procedure for correcting measured fluxes from a limited fetch is suggested. PMID:14710940

  2. Nitrate reductase 15N discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Aspergillus niger, Pichea angusta, and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Eli; Yarnes, Chris; Toney, Michael D.; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Stable 15N isotopes have been used to examine movement of nitrogen (N) through various pools of the global N cycle. A central reaction in the cycle involves the reduction of nitrate (NO−3) to nitrite (NO−2) catalyzed by nitrate reductase (NR). Discrimination against 15N by NR is a major determinant of isotopic differences among N pools. Here, we measured in vitro 15N discrimination by several NRs purified from plants, fungi, and a bacterium to determine the intrinsic 15N discrimination by the enzyme and to evaluate the validity of measurements made using 15N-enriched NO−3. Observed NR isotope discrimination ranged from 22 to 32‰ (kinetic isotope effects of 1.022–1.032) among the different isozymes at natural abundance 15N (0.37%). As the fractional 15N content of substrate NO−3 increased from natural abundance, the product 15N fraction deviated significantly from that expected based on substrate enrichment and 15N discrimination measured at natural abundance. Additionally, isotopic discrimination by denitrifying bacteria used to reduce NO−3 and NO−2 in some protocols became a greater source of error as 15N enrichment increased. We briefly discuss potential causes of the experimental artifacts with enriched 15N and recommend against the use of highly enriched 15N tracers to study N discrimination in plants or soils. PMID:25071800

  3. 7Li relaxation time measurements at very low magnetic field by 1H dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghib, Nadir; Grucker, Daniel

    2001-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of water protons was used to measure the relaxation time of lithium at very low magnetic field as a demonstration of the use of DNP for nuclei less abundant than water protons. Lithium (Li+) was chosen because it is an efficient treatment for manic-depressive illness, with an unknown action mechanism. After having recalled the theoretical basis of a three-spin system comprising two nuclei - the water proton of the solvent, the dissolved Li+ ion and the free electron of a free radical - we have developed a transient solution in order to optimize potential biological applications of Li DNP. The three-spin model has allowed computation of all the parameters of the system - the longitudinal relaxation rate per unit of free radical concentration, the dipolar and scalar part of the coupling between the nuclei and the electron, and the maximum signal enhancement achievable for both proton and lithium spins. All these measurements have been obtained solely through the detection of the proton resonance.

  4. A method for measuring the Néel relaxation time in a frozen ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackett, Ronald J.; Thakur, Jagdish; Mosher, Nathaniel; Perkins-Harbin, Emily; Kumon, Ronald E.; Wang, Lihua; Rablau, Corneliu; Vaishnava, Prem P.

    2015-08-01

    We report a novel method of determining the average Néel relaxation time and its temperature dependence by calculating derivatives of the measured time dependence of temperature for a frozen ferrofluid exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The ferrofluid, composed of dextran-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (diameter 13.7 nm ± 4.7 nm), was synthesized via wet chemical precipitation and characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An alternating magnetic field of constant amplitude ( H 0 = 20 kA/m) driven at frequencies of 171 kHz, 232 kHz, and 343 kHz was used to determine the temperature dependent magnetic energy absorption rate in the temperature range from 160 K to 210 K. We found that the specific absorption rate of the ferrofluid decreased monotonically with temperature over this range at the given frequencies. From these measured data, we determined the temperature dependence of the Néel relaxation time and estimate a room-temperature magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant of 40 kJ/m3, in agreement with previously published results.

  5. Public risk perception of relaxation of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) measures in Europe.

    PubMed

    Dressel, K; Perazzini, A; Ru, G; Van Wassenhove, W

    2011-01-01

    The so-called "TSE roadmap" was published by the European Commission on July 15, 2005. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) roadmap suggests relaxation of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle and other animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies measures in the short, medium, and long term. According to the TSE roadmap, "Any relaxation of BSE measures following the scientific assessment should be initiated by an open discussion with all stakeholders and supported by a strong communication strategy" ( European Commission 2005 , 5). Bearing this in mind, a social scientific project was designed to (1) involve different stakeholder groups, governmental risk managers, and their scientific advisors and (2) obtain their perception of the TSE roadmap and of its implications for precautionary consumer protection in five European Union (EU) Member States. This study describes the risk perception and risk management of TSE in Europe as exemplified by the TSE roadmap. The following query guided the international comparative study: How is TSE risk perceived by four interviewed stakeholder groups in five studied countries? The risk perceptions of TSE of risk managers from the ministries in charge in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom, as well as their scientific advisors and stakeholder groups, were determined. The stakeholder groups were from three different areas involved with TSE, including farmers, consumers, and the meat/food industry. The issue to be addressed is roadmapping an adequate instrument for stakeholder involvement and for risk decision making. PMID:22043919

  6. Carboxylated magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents: Relaxation measurements at different field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovszky-Hajdú, Angéla; Tombácz, Etelka; Bányai, István; Babos, Magor; Palkó, András

    2012-09-01

    At the moment the biomedical applications of magnetic fluids are the subject of intensive scientific interest. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized and stabilized in aqueous medium with different carboxylic compounds (citric acid (CA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), and sodium oleate (NaOA)), in order to prepare well stabilized magnetic fluids (MFs). The magnetic nanoparticles can be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as contrast agents. Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements of the above MFs were performed at different field strengths (i.e., 0.47, 1.5 and 9.4 T) to reveal the field strength dependence of their magnetic responses, and to compare them with that of ferucarbotran, a well-known superparamagnetic contrast agent. The measurements showed characteristic differences between the tested magnetic fluids stabilized by carboxylic compounds and ferucarbotran. It is worthy of note that our magnetic fluids have the highest r2 relaxivities at the field strength of 1.5 T, where the most of the MRI works in worldwide.

  7. Finite magnetic relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging: comparison of measurements and ferrohydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavalikar, R.; Hensley, D.; Maldonado-Camargo, L.; Croft, L. R.; Ceron, S.; Goodwill, P. W.; Conolly, S. M.; Rinaldi, C.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging tomographic imaging technology that detects magnetic nanoparticle tracers by exploiting their non-linear magnetization properties. In order to predict the behavior of nanoparticles in an imager, it is possible to use a non-imaging MPI relaxometer or spectrometer to characterize the behavior of nanoparticles in a controlled setting. In this paper we explore the use of ferrohydrodynamic magnetization equations for predicting the response of particles in an MPI relaxometer. These include a magnetization equation developed by Shliomis (Sh) which has a constant relaxation time and a magnetization equation which uses a field-dependent relaxation time developed by Martsenyuk, Raikher and Shliomis (MRSh). We compare the predictions from these models with measurements and with the predictions based on the Langevin function that assumes instantaneous magnetization response of the nanoparticles. The results show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the ferrohydrodynamic models and the measurements without the use of fitting parameters and provide further evidence of the potential of ferrohydrodynamic modeling in MPI.

  8. Amplitudes of protein backbone dynamics and correlated motions in a small alpha/beta protein: correspondence of dipolar coupling and heteronuclear relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2004-08-24

    Backbone residual dipolar coupling (N-H, Calpha-Halpha, N-C', and Calpha-C') data collected in five different media on the B3 IgG binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB3) have been analyzed by simultaneous refinement of the coordinates and optimization of the magnitudes and orientations of the alignment tensors using single and multiple structure representations. We show, using appropriate error analysis, that agreement between observed and calculated dipolar couplings at the level of experimental uncertainty is obtained with a two-structure (N(e) = 2) ensemble representation which represents the simplest equilibrium description of anisotropic motions. The data permit one to determine the magnitude of the anisotropic motions along the four different backbone bond vectors in terms of order parameters. The order parameters, , for the N-H bond vectors are in qualitative agreement with the generalized order parameters, S(2)NH(relaxation), derived from (15)N relaxation measurements, with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. S(2)NH(relaxation) can be regarded as the product of an anisotropic order parameter, corresponding to derived from the residual dipolar couplings, and an axially symmetric order parameter, S(2)NH(axial), corresponding to bond librations which are expected to be essentially uniform along the polypeptide chain. The current data indicate that the average value of S(2)NH(axial) is approximately 0.9. The close correspondence of and S(2)NH(relaxation) indicates that any large-scale displacements from the mean coordinate positions on time scales longer than the rotational correlation time are rare and hence do not perturb the observed dipolar couplings. Analysis of a set of 100 N(e) = 2 ensembles reveals the presence of some long-range correlated motions of N-H and Calpha-Halpha vectors involving residues far apart in the sequence but close together in space. In addition, direct evidence is

  9. Improved accuracy of 15N-1H scalar and residual dipolar couplings from gradient-enhanced IPAP-HSQC experiments on protonated proteins.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2009-03-01

    The presence of dipole-dipole cross-correlated relaxation as well as unresolved E.COSY effects adversely impacts the accuracy of (1)J(NH) splittings measured from gradient-enhanced IPAP-HSQC spectra. For isotropic samples, the size of the systematic errors caused by these effects depends on the values of (2)J(NHalpha), (3)J(NHbeta) and (3)J(HNHalpha). Insertion of band-selective (1)H decoupling pulses in the IPAP-HSQC experiment eliminates these systematic errors and for the protein GB3 yields (1)J(NH) splittings that agree to within a root-mean-square difference of 0.04 Hz with values measured for perdeuterated GB3. Accuracy of the method is also highlighted by a good fit to the GB3 structure of the (1)H-(15)N RDCs extracted from the minute differences in (1)J(NH) splitting measured at 500 and 750 MHz (1)H frequencies, resulting from magnetic susceptibility anisotropy. A nearly complete set of (2)J(NHalpha) couplings was measured in GB3 in order to evaluate whether the impact of cross-correlated relaxation is dominated by the (15)N-(1)H(alpha) or (15)N-(1)H(beta) dipolar interaction. As expected, we find that (2)J(NHalpha) < or = 2 Hz, with values in the alpha-helix (0.86 +/- 0.52 Hz) slightly larger than in beta-sheet (0.66 +/- 0.26 Hz). Results indicate that under isotropic conditions, N-H(N)/N-H(beta) cross-correlated relaxation often dominates. Unresolved E.COSY effects under isotropic conditions involve (3)J(HNHalpha) and J(NHalpha), but when weakly aligned any aliphatic proton proximate to both N and H(N) can contribute. PMID:19205898

  10. Direct Measurement of the Electron Energy Relaxation Dynamics in Metallic Wires.

    PubMed

    Pinsolle, Edouard; Rousseau, Alexandre; Lupien, Christian; Reulet, Bertrand

    2016-06-10

    We present measurements of the dynamical response of thermal noise to an ac excitation in conductors at low temperature. From the frequency dependence of this response function-the (noise) thermal impedance-in the range 1 kHz-1 GHz we obtain direct determinations of the inelastic relaxation times relevant in metallic wires at low temperature: the electron-phonon scattering time and the diffusion time of electrons along the wires. Combining these results with that of resistivity provides a measurement of heat capacity of samples made of thin film. The simplicity and reliability of this technique makes it very promising for future applications in other systems. PMID:27341248

  11. Structure and dynamics of water in tendon from NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Peto, S; Gillis, P; Henri, V P

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation times were measured in collagen tissue when varying the orientation of the fiber with respect to the static field. T1 was found to be only slightly dependent on theta, the fiber-to-field angle, but T2 was very sensitive to the orientation, with a maximum value at the magic angle. The transverse decay curves were multiexponential. Their deconvolution displayed four components; the ones that decayed most slowly were almost independent of theta, but the two fastest ones showed a strong angular dependence that was interpreted with a cross-relaxation model. Quadrupolar dips were visible in the 1/T1 dispersion curves. These dips were independent of theta, so that the magnetization transfer could also be assumed to be independent of the fiber orientation. Finally, each component was assigned to a fraction of protons localized in the macromolecular structure and characterized by particular dynamics. The model of Woessner was applied to the water molecules tightly bound into the macromolecules, which resulted in a dynamical description of this water fraction. This description is compatible with the two-sites model of Ramachandran based on x-ray diffraction and with the extensive studies of Berendsen. However, the important indications obtained from the deconvolution lead to a less static representation of the tissue. PMID:2297563

  12. Theory of the ac spin valve effect: a new method to measure spin relaxation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, Denis; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2012-02-01

    Parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) configurations of FNF junctions have, in a dc regime, different resistivities (RAP>RP), giving rise to the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect, which can be explained within the spin injection drift-diffusion model. We extend the model to include ac phenomena and predict new spin dynamical phenomenon; the resonant amplification and depletion of spin accumulation in the P and AP configurations, respectively. As the major new effect, the spin valve magnetoimpedance of the FNF junction oscillates with the driving ac frequency, which leads to negative GMR effect (|ZAP|<|ZP|). We show that from the spin-valve oscillation periods, measured all electrically in the GHz regime, the spin relaxation times could be extracted without any magnetic field and sample size changes (contrary to other techniques). For thin tunnel junctions the ac signal becomes pure Lorentzian, also enabling one to obtain the spin relaxation time of the N region from the signal width. This work, was published in Physical Review Letters,10, 176604 (2011).

  13. Effect of protein restriction on (15)N transfer from dietary [(15)N]alanine and [(15)N]Spirulina platensis into urea.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, M J; Hoffer, L J

    2001-08-01

    Six normal men consumed a mixed test meal while adapted to high (1.5 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) and low (0.3 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) protein intakes. They completed this protocol twice: when the test meals included 3 mg/kg of [(15)N]alanine ([(15)N]Ala) and when they included 30 mg/kg of intrinsically labeled [(15)N]Spirulina platensis ([(15)N]SPI). Six subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) receiving conventional insulin therapy consumed the test meal with added [(15)N]Ala while adapted to their customary high-protein diet. Protein restriction increased serum alanine, glycine, glutamine, and methionine concentrations and reduced those of leucine. Whether the previous diet was high or low in protein, there was a similar increase in serum alanine, methionine, and branched-chain amino acid concentrations after the test meal and a similar pattern of (15)N enrichment in serum amino acids for a given tracer. When [(15)N]Ala was included in the test meal, (15)N appeared rapidly in serum alanine and glutamine, to a minor degree in leucine and isoleucine, and not at all in other circulating amino acids. With [(15)N]SPI, there was a slow appearance of the label in all serum amino acids analyzed. Despite the different serum amino acid labeling, protein restriction reduced the postmeal transfer of dietary (15)N in [(15)N]Ala or [(15)N]SPI into [(15)N]urea by similar amounts (38 and 43%, respectively, not significant). The response of the subjects with IDDM was similar to that of the normal subjects. Information about adaptive reductions in dietary amino acid catabolism obtained by adding [(15)N]Ala to a test meal appears to be equivalent to that obtained using an intrinsically labeled protein tracer. PMID:11440912

  14. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation: Prospects for real-time NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Field, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in theoretical aspects of spin noise and relaxation and their interrelationship reveal a modified spin density, distinct from the density matrix, as the necessary object to describe fluctuations in spin systems. These fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments and are observed as "spin noise" in the absence of any radio frequency excitation. With the prospect of ultrafast digitization, the role of spin noise in real-time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this article we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin-noise measurement, with attention to real-time properties. PMID:25493776

  15. Estimating Pore Properties from NMR Relaxation Time Measurements in Heterogeneous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunewald, E.; Knight, R.

    2008-12-01

    The link between pore geometry and the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2 is well- established for simple systems but is poorly understood for complex media with heterogeneous pores. Conventional interpretation of NMR relaxation data employs a model of isolated pores in which each hydrogen proton samples only one pore type, and the T2-distribution is directly scaled to estimate a pore-size distribution. During an actual NMR measurement, however, each proton diffuses through a finite volume of the pore network, and so may sample multiple pore types encountered within this diffusion cell. For cases in which heterogeneous pores are strongly coupled by diffusion, the meaning of the T2- distribution is not well understood and further research is required to determine how such measurements should be interpreted. In this study we directly investigate the implications of pore coupling in two groups of laboratory NMR experiments. We conduct two suites of experiments, in which samples are synthesized to exhibit a range of pore coupling strengths using two independent approaches: (a) varying the scale of the diffusion cell and (b) varying the scale over which heterogeneous pores are encountered. In the first set of experiments, we vary the scale of the diffusion cell in silica gels which have a bimodal pore-size distribution comprised of intragrannular micropores and much larger intergrannular pores. The untreated gel exhibits strong pore coupling with a single broad peak observed in the T2-distribution. By treating the gel with varied amounts of paramagnetic iron surface coatings, we decrease the surface relaxation time, T2S, and effectively decrease both the size of the diffusion cell and the degree of pore coupling. As more iron is coated to the grain surfaces, we observe a separation of the broad T2-distribution into two peaks that more accurately represent the true bimodal pore-size distribution. In the second set of experiments, we vary the scale over

  16. Measuring spin relaxation with standard pulse sequences in the singlet-triplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevers, T. L.; McCamey, D. R.

    2015-08-01

    Pulsed electrically and optically-detected magnetic resonance are extremely sensitive to changes in the permutation symmetry of weakly-coupled spin pairs, and are well-suited for investigating devices with a small number of spins. However, the change in observable from conventional electron spin resonance modifies the results of standard inductively-detected pulse sequences which are routinely used to obtain phase coherence and lifetimes. Whilst these effects have been discussed for single-pulse experiments, their role in multi-pulse sequences is less clear. Here, we investigate this effect in Hahn echo and inversion-recovery sequences, and show a second set of narrower echoes are produced that distort measurement outcomes. We demonstrate that phase cycling is able to deconvolve the additional echo signals, allowing spin relaxation times to be reliably extracted.

  17. Microwave Amplitude Modulation Technique to Measure Spin-Lattice (T 1) and Spin-Spin (T 2) Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sushil K.

    The measurement of very short spin-lattice, or longitudinal, relaxation (SLR) times (i.e., 10-10 < T 1 < 10-6 s) is of great importance today for the study of relaxation processes. Recent case studies include, for example, glasses doped with paramagnetic ions (Vergnoux et al., 1996; Zinsou et al., 1996), amorphous Si (dangling bonds) and copper-chromium-tin spinel (Cr3+) (Misra, 1998), and polymer resins doped with rare-earth ions (Pescia et al., 1999a; Pescia et al. 1999b). The ability to measure such fast SLR data on amorphous Si and copper-chromium-tin spinel led to an understanding of the role of exchange interaction in affecting spin-lattice relaxation, while the data on polymer resins doped with rare-earth ions provided evidence of spin-fracton relaxation (Pescia et al., 1999a, b). But such fast SLR times are not measurable by the most commonly used techniques of saturation- and inversion-recovery (Poole, 1982; Alger, 1968), which only measure spin-lattice relaxation times longer than 10-6 s. A summary of relevant experimental data is presented in Table 1.

  18. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  19. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  20. NMR relaxation studies of the interaction of thiocyanate with lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Crull, G B; Goff, H M

    1993-05-15

    The interaction of lactoperoxidase, LPO, with its substrate, thiocyanate, SCN-, has been investigated by 13C and 15N NMR relaxation measurements. When 0.1 M SCN-, enriched with either 13C or 15N, was titrated with native ferric lactoperoxidase a large change in the spin-lattice relaxation time of the respective nucleus was observed. In the presence of saturating amounts of CN-, a high affinity ligand for the heme iron, a similar but much smaller change in the relaxation time for SCN- was found. Studies of the rate of carbon relaxation as a function of temperature have shown that thiocyanate is in fast exchange between a site on the enzyme and bulk solution. When LPO in either the absence or presence of CN- was titrated with SCN- a linear increase in the relaxation time was observed. Dissociation constants (Kd values) have been determined from a least-squares analysis of these data. Apparent distances between the heme iron of lactoperoxidase and either the carbon or nitrogen atoms of bound thiocyanate ion have been determined through application of the Solomon-Bloembergen equation. These distances demonstrate that the observed association does not involve iron-thiocyanate coordination, suggesting the possibility of an anion binding site. PMID:8501464

  1. Direct measurement of the kinetics of volume and enthalpy relaxation of an Au-based bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bünz, J.; Wilde, G.

    2013-12-14

    Structural relaxation of glasses below their glass transition is a well-studied phenomenon that still poses several open issues. With the advent of bulk metallic glasses with exceptionally low glass transition temperatures, new options are available that are based on the experimental assessment of the time dependence of several different thermodynamic quantities by direct measurements with high accuracy. In this contribution the first direct measurement of the isothermal relaxation of the volume and the enthalpy of an Au-based bulk metallic glassformer are reported and discussed with respect of the characteristics describing the underlying processes.

  2. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15 N over long-term forest succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven; Tepley, Alan J.; Compton, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession towards old-growth are thought to increase nitrogen (N) availability and N loss, which should increase soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across 800 years of forest succession in a topographically complex montane landscape influenced by human logging and wildfire. In contrast to expectations, we found that disturbance caused declines in surface mineral soil δ15N values, both in logged forests measured 40–50 years after disturbance, and in unlogged forests disturbed by severe wildfire within the last 200 years. Both symbiotic N fixation and N transfers from disturbed vegetation and detritus could lower soil δ15N values after disturbance. A more important role for symbiotic N fixation is suggested by lower soil δ15N values in slow-successional sites with slow canopy closure, which favors early-successional N fixers. Soil δ15N values increased only marginally throughout 800 years of succession, reflecting soil N uptake by vegetation and strong overall N retention. Although post-disturbance N inputs lowered surface soil δ15N values, steady-state mass balance calculations suggest that wildfire combustion of vegetation and detritus can dominate long-term N loss and increase whole-ecosystem δ15N. On steeper topography, declining soil δ15N values highlight erosion and accelerated soil turnover as an additional abiotic control on N balances. We conclude for N-limited montane forests that soil δ15N and N availability are less influenced by nitrate leaching and denitrification loss than by interactions between disturbance, N fixation, and erosion.

  3. Measuring non-radiative relaxation time of fluorophores with biomedical applications by intensity-modulated laser-induced photoacoustic effect

    PubMed Central

    Soroushian, Behrouz; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-01-01

    Modulated tone-burst light was employed to measure non-radiative relaxation time of fluorophores with biomedical importance through photoacoustic effect. Non-radiative relaxation time was estimated through the frequency dependence of photoacoustic signal amplitude. Experiments were performed on solutions of new indocyanine green (IR-820), which is a near infrared dye and has biomedical applications, in two different solvents (water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)). A 1.5 times slower non-radiative relaxation for the solution of dye in DMSO was observed comparing with the aqueous solution. This result agrees well with general finding that non-radiative relaxation of molecules in triplet state depends on viscosity of solvents in which they are dissolved. Measurements of the non-radiative relaxation time can be used as a new source of contrast mechanism in photoacoustic imaging technique. The proposed method has potential applications such as imaging tissue oxygenation and mapping of other chemophysical differences in microenvironment of exogenous biomarkers. PMID:22025981

  4. Intrinsic spin and momentum relaxation in organic single-crystalline semiconductors probed by ESR and Hall measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurumi, Junto; Häusermann, Roger; Watanabe, Shun; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    Spin and charge momentum relaxation mechanism has been argued among organic semiconductors with various methods, devices, and materials. However, little is known in organic single-crystalline semiconductors because it has been hard to obtain an ideal organic crystal with an excellent crystallinity and controllability required for accurate measurements. By using more than 1-inch sized single crystals which are fabricated via contentious edge-casting method developed by our group, we have successfully demonstrated a simultaneous determination of spin and momentum relaxation time for gate-induced charges of 3,11-didecyldinaphtho[2,3- d:2',3'- d']benzo[1,2- b:4,5- b']dithiophene, by combining electron spin resonance (ESR) and Hall effect measurements. The obtained temperature dependences of spin and momentum relaxation times are in good agreement in terms of power law with a factor of approximately -2. It is concluded that Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism can be dominant at room temperature regime (200 - 300 K). Probing characteristic time scales such as spin-lattice, spin-spin, and momentum relaxation times, demonstrated in the present work, would be a powerful tool to elucidate fundamental spin and charge transport mechanisms. We acknowledge the New Energy and Industrial Technology Developing Organization (NEDO) for financial support.

  5. On resonance phase alternated CWFP sequences for rapid and simultaneous measurement of relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaretto, Tatiana; Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Souza, Andre Alves; deAzevedo, Eduardo Ribeiro; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2015-10-01

    T1 and T2 relaxation times have been frequently used as probes for physical-chemical properties in several time-domain NMR applications (TD-NMR) such as food, polymers and petroleum industries. T2 measurements are usually achieved using the traditional Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence because it is a fast and robust method. On the other hand, the traditional methods for determining T1, i.e., inversion and saturation recovery, are time-consuming, driving several authors to develop rapid 1D and 2D methods to obtain T1 and T2 or T1/T2 ratio. However, these methods usually require sophisticated processing and/or high signal to noise ratio (SNR). This led us to develop simple methods for rapid and simultaneous determination of T1 and T2 using Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) and Carr-Purcell Continuous Wave Free Precession (CP-CWFP) pulse sequences. Nevertheless, a drawback of these sequences is that they require specific adjustment of the frequency offset or the time interval between pulses (Tp). In this paper we present an alternative form of these sequences, named CWFPx-x, CP-CWFPx-x, where a train of π/2 pulses with phases alternated by π enable performing the experiments on-resonance and independently of Tp, when Tp < T2∗. Moreover, a CPMG type sequence with π/2 refocusing pulses shows similar results to CP-CWFP when the pulses are alternated between y and -y axis, CPMG90y-y. In these approaches, the relaxation times are determined using the magnitude of the signals after the first pulse |M0| and in the steady-state |Mss|, as well as the exponential time constant T∗ to reach the steady-state regime, as in conventional CWFP. CP-CWFPx-x shows the highest dynamic range to measure T∗ among CWFP sequences and, therefore, is the best technique to measure T1 and T2 since it is less susceptible to SNR and can be performed for any T1/T2 ratio.

  6. On resonance phase alternated CWFP sequences for rapid and simultaneous measurement of relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Monaretto, Tatiana; Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Souza, Andre Alves; deAzevedo, Eduardo Ribeiro; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2015-10-01

    T1 and T2 relaxation times have been frequently used as probes for physical-chemical properties in several time-domain NMR applications (TD-NMR) such as food, polymers and petroleum industries. T2 measurements are usually achieved using the traditional Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence because it is a fast and robust method. On the other hand, the traditional methods for determining T1, i.e., inversion and saturation recovery, are time-consuming, driving several authors to develop rapid 1D and 2D methods to obtain T1 and T2 or T1/T2 ratio. However, these methods usually require sophisticated processing and/or high signal to noise ratio (SNR). This led us to develop simple methods for rapid and simultaneous determination of T1 and T2 using Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) and Carr-Purcell Continuous Wave Free Precession (CP-CWFP) pulse sequences. Nevertheless, a drawback of these sequences is that they require specific adjustment of the frequency offset or the time interval between pulses (Tp). In this paper we present an alternative form of these sequences, named CWFPx-x, CP-CWFPx-x, where a train of π/2 pulses with phases alternated by π enable performing the experiments on-resonance and independently of Tp, when Tprelaxation times are determined using the magnitude of the signals after the first pulse |M0| and in the steady-state |Mss|, as well as the exponential time constant T(∗) to reach the steady-state regime, as in conventional CWFP. CP-CWFPx-x shows the highest dynamic range to measure T(∗) among CWFP sequences and, therefore, is the best technique to measure T1 and T2 since it is less susceptible to SNR and can be performed for any T1/T2 ratio. PMID:26363504

  7. Magnetic Coupling and Relaxation at Interfaces Measured by Ferromagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Rohan

    (FMRFM). In this thesis I shall demonstrate the use of FMR spectroscopy and FMRFM to study static and dynamic couplings in ferromagnetic materials with emphasis on interfaces. First, I introduce the basic concepts of ferromagnetic resonance and spin wave relaxation. Second, I present the results of using conventional FMR spectroscopy to study the tuneable static effective fields in a ferromagnet, which manifest as anisotropy fields that define the energy landscape and equilibrium direction of the magnetization. Third, I explore both dipolar and exchange couplings between magnetizations which are dynamic in nature, and only manifest when the magnetizations are precessing. Fourth, I demonstrate the use of FMRFM to observe the modification of localized modes in a ferromagnetic film engineered with a lateral interface. Fifth, I describe the design of an FMRFM microscope and management of spurious background effects in an FMRFM experiment. Sixth, I measure relaxation from the localized modes in an insulating ferromagnetic film, which reveal a size-dependent damping effect that was unexpected in an insulating system. This suggests that spin transport from the interface of the localized mode can dictate its relaxation, even in the absence of conduction electrons. Finally, I observe a frequency-independent linewidth broadening contribution that also depends on mode size and this may give a measure of the inhomogeneous fields within a ferromagnetic sample.

  8. Climate-Dependence of Plant-Soil 15N/14N Interactions Across Tropical Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Sigman, D. M.; Hedin, L. O.

    2005-12-01

    In most areas of the world, the 15N/14N of bulk soils is higher than that of plant leaves, and the isotopic signatures of these two ecosystem N pools progressively diverge with increasing rainfall. However, both the cause for this isotopic trend and its implications for understanding interactions between climate and N cycles are largely unknown. We report 15N/14N measurements of nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N in soil extracts from a highly constrained rainfall sequence in Hawaii, across which this trend in ecosystem 15N/14N is captured, to examine the competing explanations for plant-soil 15N/14N uncouplings. While the isotopic influences of microbial transfers of N between nitrate and ammonium pools and plant-mycorrhizae interactions have been posited in plant-soil 15N/14N relationships, our data did not support an important role for either of these mechanisms. Instead, preferential regeneration of 14N during the breakdown of DON to ammonium explains why the 15N/14N of plants is lower than that of bulk soils. Fractionation at this step leads to two isotopically distinct N subcycles in each forest, a lower-15N/14N subcycle composed of ammonium, nitrate, and bulk plant biomass N that `spins' rapidly and a higher-15N/14N subcycle composed of bulk soil N and DON that is much less dynamic. The increased difference between soil and plant 15N/14N is due to changes in the impacts of nitrification and denitrification on the 15N/14N of ammonium and nitrate, coupled with a switch from nitrate to ammonium uptake by plants under the wettest conditions. For instance, the particularly large (~6 per mil) 15N/14N difference between plants and soils in the wettest sites is due to the lack of 15N-enrichment of ammonium by nitrification coupled with plant dependence on ammonium uptake only. Our results highlight the importance of interactions between DON breakdown, ecosystem N recycling, and gaseous N losses in the explaining the interactions between the 15N signatures of

  9. Measuring nanopore size from the spin-lattice relaxation of CF4 gas

    PubMed Central

    Kuethe, Dean O.; Montaño, Rebecca; Pietraß, Tanja

    2007-01-01

    The NMR 19F spin-lattice relaxation time constant T1 for CF4 gas is dominated by spin–rotation interaction, which is mediated by the molecular collision frequency. When confined to pores of approximately the same size or smaller than the bulk gas mean free path, additional collisions of molecules with the pore walls should substantially change T1. To develop a method for measuring the surface/volume ratio S/V by measuring how T1 changes with confinement, we prepared samples of known S/V from fumed silica of known mass-specific surface area and compressed to varying degrees into cylinders of known volume. We then measured T1 for CF4 in these samples at varying pressures, and developed mathematical models for the change in T1 to fit the data. Even though CF4 has a critical temperature below room temperature, we found that its density in pores was greater than that of the bulk gas and that it was necessary to take this absorption into account. We modeled adsorption in two ways, by assuming that the gas condenses on the pore walls, and by assuming that gas in a region near the wall is denser than the bulk gas because of a simplified attractive potential. Both models suggested the same two-parameter formula, to which we added a third parameter to successfully fit the data and thus achieved a rapid, precise way to measure S/V from the increase in T1 due to confinement in pores. PMID:17400493

  10. Oxide growth stress measurements and relaxation mechanisms for alumina scales grown on FeCrAlY: Oxide growth stress measurements and relaxation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P. F.; Specht, E. D.; More, K. L.; Hou, P. Y.

    2012-08-08

    Early-stage tensile stress evolution in α-Al2O3 scales during oxidation of FeCrAlY at 1000, 1050, 1100, and 1200 °C was monitored in situ by use of synchrotron radiation. Tensile stress development as a function of oxidation temperature indicated a dynamic interplay between stress generation and relaxation. An analysis of the time dependence of the data indicated that the observed relaxation of the initial tensile stress in the oxide scales at 1100 and 1200°C is dominated by creep in the α-Al2O3. A thin layer of a (Fe,Cr,Al) oxide was observed at the oxide-gas interface, consistent with a mechanism whereby the conversion of (Fe,Cr,Al)2O3 to α-Al2O3 produces an initial tensile stress in the alumina scale.

  11. A High Frequency Response Relaxed Eddy Accumulation Flux Measurement System for Sampling Short-Lived Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A second-generation relaxed eddy accumulation system was built and tested with the capability to measure vertical biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes at levels as low as 10 µg C m−2 hr−1. The system features a continuous, integrated gas-phase ozo...

  12. Production of 15N-depleted biomass during cyanobacterial N2-fixation at high Fe concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Junium, Christopher K.; Canfield, Donald E.; House, Christopher H.

    2008-09-01

    In this study we examine the effects of varying Fe, Mo, and P concentrations on δ15N fractionation during N2 fixation in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis. We show that when grown in Fe-enriched media ([Fe] ≥ 50 nM), this organism produces biomass up to 3‰ lower in δ15N than when grown in Fe-limited media ([Fe] < 50 nM). A compilation of our data with previous measurements of δ15N in N2-fixing cyanobacteria reveals a general trend toward the production of more 15N-depleted biomass at higher Fe concentrations. We discuss our results in the context of negative δ15N values preserved in Archean and some Phanerozoic sediments, generally attributed to the production of marine organic matter with low δ15N by N2 fixation (and potentially NH4+ regeneration) during periods of fluctuating nutrient dynamics. We suggest that enhanced Fe availability during periods of widespread ocean anoxia can further stimulate the production of 15N-depleted biomass by N2-fixing organisms, contributing to the isotopic record.

  13. Influence of open ocean nitrogen supply on the skeletal δ15N of modern shallow-water scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen T.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Cohen, Anne L.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Cobb, Kim M.; Erler, Dirk V.; Stolarski, Jarosław; Kitahara, Marcelo V.; Ren, Haojia

    2016-05-01

    The isotopic composition of skeleton-bound organic nitrogen in shallow-water scleractinian corals (hereafter, CS-δ15N) is an emerging tool for studying the marine nitrogen cycle in the past. The CS-δ15N has been shown to reflect the δ15N of nitrogen (N) sources to corals, with most applications to date focusing on the anthropogenic/terrestrial N inputs to reef environments. However, many coral reefs receive their primary N sources from the open ocean, and the CS-δ15N of these corals may provide information on past changes in the open ocean regional and global N cycle. Using a recently developed persulfate/denitrifier-based method, we measured CS-δ15N in modern shallow-water scleractinian corals from 8 sites proximal to the open ocean. At sites with low open ocean surface nitrate concentrations typical of the subtropics and tropics, measured CS-δ15N variation on seasonal and annual timescales is most often less than 2‰. In contrast, a broad range in CS-δ15N (of ∼10‰) is measured across these sites, with a strong correlation between CS-δ15N and the δ15N of the deep nitrate supply to the surface waters near the reefs. While CS-δ15N can be affected by other N sources as well and can vary in response to local reef conditions as well as coral/symbiont physiological changes, this survey indicates that, when considering corals proximal to the open ocean, the δ15N of the subsurface nitrate supply to surface waters drives most of the CS-δ15N variation across the global ocean. Thus, CS-δ15N is a promising proxy for reconstructing the open ocean N cycle in the past.

  14. Measurement of the hot electron mean free path and the momentum relaxation rate in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Suntrup, Donald J.; Gupta, Geetak; Li, Haoran; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2014-12-29

    We present a method for measuring the mean free path and extracting the momentum relaxation time of hot electrons in GaN using the hot electron transistor (HET). In this device, electrons are injected over a high energy emitter barrier into the base where they experience quasi-ballistic transport well above the conduction band edge. After traversing the base, high energy electrons either surmount the base-collector barrier and become collector current or reflect off the barrier and become base current. We fabricate HETs with various base thicknesses and measure the common emitter transfer ratio (α) for each device. The mean free path is extracted by fitting α to a decaying exponential as a function of base width and the relaxation time is computed using a suitable injection velocity. For devices with an injection energy of ∼1 eV, we measure a hot electron mean free path of 14 nm and calculate a momentum relaxation time of 16 fs. These values are in agreement with theoretical calculations where longitudinal optical phonon scattering is the dominant momentum relaxation mechanism.

  15. (15)N CSA tensors and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static (15)N NMR techniques for the determination of the (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and (15)N-(1)H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone (15)N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the (15)N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the (15)N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the "magic sandwich" SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the (15)N-(1)H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples. PMID:26367322

  16. Measurement of orientation and alignment moment relaxation by polarization spectroscopy: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Costen, Matthew L; Crichton, Hilary J; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2004-05-01

    A diagrammatic perturbation theory description of one-color polarization spectroscopy (PS) is developed which emphasizes the significance of orientation and alignment tensor moments of the rotational angular momentum, and their collisional evolution. The influences of Doppler motion, velocity-changing collisions, decay of population, orientation and alignment, and nuclear hyperfine depolarization on the calculated PS signal are discussed. Illustrative simulations are presented of the evolution of the PS signal as a function of pump-probe laser delay. These are generated by a Monte Carlo integration of the derived equations for the signal electric field over typical experimental pump and probe laser temporal profiles and velocity distributions for a commonly studied system, the OH A 2Sigma+ -X 2Pi (0,0) band. These predictions are compared with a preliminary set of results obtained in an experimental apparatus designed for one-color polarization spectroscopy using independent pump and probe lasers. Measurements are presented using linearly polarized pump light on the Q1(2.5) transition of the OH A 2Sigma+ -X 2Pi (0,0) band with He as the collision partner. The decay of the experimental PS pump-probe signal is discussed with reference to inelastic collisional population transfer rates in the literature. It is concluded that the collisional depolarization of rotational alignment is rapid, with a rate approximately twice that of population transfer. This is consistent with previous measurements in atmospheric pressure flames. PS is shown to be a viable novel spectroscopic method for determining rotational angular momentum orientation and alignment relaxation rates, which are valuable quantities because they are sensitive probes of the forces involved in inelastic collisions. PMID:15267706

  17. Spin relaxation measurements using first-harmonic out-of-phase absorption EPR signals.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Páli, T; Marsh, D

    1998-09-01

    The dependence on spin-lattice (T1) relaxation of the first-harmonic absorption EPR signal (V'1) detected in phase quadrature with the Zeeman modulation has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally for nitroxide spin labels. Spectral simulations were performed by iterative solution of the Bloch equations that contained explicitly both the modulation and microwave magnetic fields (T. Páli, V. A. Livshits, and D. Marsh, 1996, J. Magn. Reson. B 113, 151-159). It was found that, of the various non-linear EPR displays, the first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal, recorded under conditions of partial saturation of the microwave absorption, is particularly favorable for determining spin-lattice relaxation enhancements because of its superior signal intensity and relative insensitivity to spin-spin (T2) relaxation. By varying the Zeeman modulation frequency it is also possible to tune the optimum sensitivity of the V'1-signal to different ranges of the T1-relaxation time. A Zeeman modulation frequency of 25 kHz appears to be particularly suited to spin label applications. Calibrations are given for the dependence on T1-relaxation time of both the amplitude and the second integral of the V'1-signal recorded under standard conditions. Experiments on different spin labels in solution and in membranes demonstrate the practical usable sensitivity of the V'1-signal, even at modulation frequencies of 25 kHz, and these are used to investigate the dependence on microwave field intensity, in comparison with theoretical predictions. The practicable sensitivity to spin-lattice relaxation enhancements is demonstrated experimentally for a spin-labeled membrane system in the presence of paramagnetic ions. The first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal appears to be the non-linear CW EPR method of choice for determining T1-relaxation enhancements in spin-labeled systems. PMID:9740736

  18. HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH experiment for (1)H(N) and (15)N sequential correlations in ((13)C, (15)N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Goradia, Nishit; Häfner, Sabine; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2015-10-01

    A simple triple resonance NMR experiment that leads to the correlation of the backbone amide resonances of each amino acid residue 'i' with that of residues 'i-1' and 'i+1' in ((13)C, (15)N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is presented. The experimental scheme, {HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH}, exploits the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of (1) J CαN and (2) J CαN couplings to transfer the (15)N x magnetisation from amino acid residue 'i' to adjacent residues via the application of a band-selective (15)N-(13)C(α) heteronuclear cross-polarisation sequence of ~100 ms duration. Employing non-uniform sampling in the indirect dimensions, the efficacy of the approach has been demonstrated by the acquisition of 3D HNN chemical shift correlation spectra of α-synuclein. The experimental performance of the RF pulse sequence has been compared with that of the conventional INEPT-based HN(CA)NH pulse scheme. As the availability of data from both the HCCNH and HNN experiments will make it possible to use the information extracted from one experiment to simplify the analysis of the data of the other and lead to a robust approach for unambiguous backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, a time-saving strategy for the simultaneous collection of HCCNH and HNN data is also described. PMID:26282620

  19. RELFIT: A program for determining prony series fits to measured relaxation data

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    Viscoelastic materials are often characterized in terms of stress relaxation moduli which decay in time. Finite element programs which model viscoelastic materials frequently require that these relaxation functions be defined as an exponential series (i.e., Prony Series) to exploit the numerical advantages of developing recursive equations for evaluating hereditary integrals. Obtaining these data fits can be extremely difficult when the data is spread over many decades in the logarithm of time. RELFIT is a nonlinear optimization program that iteratively determines the Prony series coefficients and relaxation times so as to minimize the least squares error in the data fit. An overview of the code, a description of the required inputs (i.e., users`s instructions), and a demonstration problem are presented.

  20. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ15N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Francisca P.; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ15N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ15N and δ13C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ15N values span the entire gradient, soil δ15N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ15N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ15N values.

  1. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ(15)N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Francisca P; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ(15)N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ(15)N and δ(13)C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ(15)N values span the entire gradient, soil δ(15)N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ(15)N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ(15)N values. PMID:26956399

  2. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ15N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Francisca P.; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ15N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ15N and δ13C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ15N values span the entire gradient, soil δ15N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ15N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ15N values. PMID:26956399

  3. 15N fractionation in star-forming regions and Solar System objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirström, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, Gilles; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.

    2015-08-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristine molecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N/15N ~ 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N/15N < 100.The coherent 15N enrichment in comets from different formation zones suggests that these isotopic enhancements are remnants of the interstellar chemistry in the natal molecular cloud core and the outer protosolar nebula. Indeed, early chemical models of gas-phase ion-molecule nitrogen fractionation showed that HCN and HNC (nitriles) can hold significant 15N enrichments in cold dark clouds where CO is depleted onto dust grains. In addition, 15N fractionation in nitriles and amines (NH2, NH3) follow different chemical pathways. More recently we have shown that once the spin-state dependence in rates of reactions with H2 is included in the models, amines can either be enhanced or depleted in 15N, depending on the core’s evolutionary stage. Observed 15N fractionation in amines and nitriles therefore cannot be expected to be the same, instead their ratio is a potential chemical clock.Observations of molecular isotope ratios in dark cores are challenging. Limited published results in general show higher 15N/14N ratios in HCN and HNC than ammonia, but more measurements are necessary to confirm these trends. We will present recent results from our ongoing observing campaign of 14N/15N isotopic ratios in HCN, HNC and NH3 in dense cores and protostars which seem consistent with significant fractionation in nitriles as compared to other molecules in each object. The few 14N/15N ratios observed in N2H+ are similar to

  4. What can we learn from relaxation measurements of a laser-perturbed atmosphere? A modeling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clericetti, Agostino; Vandenbergh, Hubert; Rossi, Michel J.

    1994-01-01

    The chemical kinetic aspects of a transient increase in OH and HO2 by several orders of magnitude are explored in three model tropospheres. This chemical kinetic modeling effort was undertaken to support the operation of a pump-and-probe LIDAR instrument. A powerful excimer laser pulse perturbs the troposphere after which its relaxation back to steady state is examined by remote sensing, for example by DIAL or LIF. Instead of probing ambient levels of key free radicals, a study of the relaxation kinetics in real time enables chemical mechanistic studies in situ.

  5. A study of the aging of silicone breast implants using 29Si, 1H relaxation and DSC measurements.

    PubMed

    Birkefeld, Anja Britta; Eckert, Hellmut; Pfleiderer, Bettina

    2004-08-01

    In this study 26 previously implanted silicone breast implants from the same manufacturer (Dow Corning) were investigated with two different analytical methods to characterize potential aging processes such as migration of monomer material from the gel and shell to local and distant sites, chemical alterations of the polymer, and infiltration of body compounds such as lipids. (1)H and (29)Si NMR relaxation measurements (spin-lattice, T1, and spin-spin, T2, relaxation times) were used to study the molecular dynamics of polysiloxane chains, both in gels and in shells. In addition, changes in physical properties were monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results of these measurements indicate that NMR relaxation times are influenced by implant generation, implantation time, shell texture and implant status. (1)H T2 values of shells and gels show a tendency to increase with increasing implantation time, indicating higher mobility and possible disintegration of the polymer network of older implants. Furthermore, the data suggest that aging also involves the migration of low cyclic molecular weight (LMW) silicone and linear chain polymer material from the gels into the shells. The high "bleeding" rate of second-generation (G2) implants (implantation period around 1973-1985), exhibiting thin shells is reflected in reduced relaxation times of these devices, most likely due to a loss of low molecular weight fractions from the gels. Moreover, "gel bleeding" also influences the melting behavior observed in DSC studies. Increased shell rigidity (high Tm and Tg) tends to be correlated with longer (29)Si relaxation times of the corresponding gels, suggesting a reduced transfer of LMW silicones and linear chain polymer from the gel to the shell and to the outside. Remarkably, textured implants seem to be less susceptible to degradation processes than implants with thin shells. PMID:15046931

  6. Box-modeling of 15N/14N in mammals.

    PubMed

    Balter, Vincent; Simon, Laurent; Fouillet, Hélène; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2006-03-01

    The 15N/14N signature of animal proteins is now commonly used to understand their physiology and quantify the flows of nutrient in trophic webs. These studies assume that animals are predictably 15N-enriched relative to their food, but the isotopic mechanism which accounts for this enrichment remains unknown. We developed a box model of the nitrogen isotope cycle in mammals in order to predict the 15N/14N ratios of body reservoirs as a function of time, N intake and body mass. Results of modeling show that a combination of kinetic isotope fractionation during the N transfer between amines and equilibrium fractionation related to the reversible conversion of N-amine into ammonia is required to account for the well-established approximately 4 per thousand 15N-enrichment of body proteins relative to the diet. This isotopic enrichment observed in proteins is due to the partial recycling of 15N-enriched urea and the urinary excretion of a fraction of the strongly 15N-depleted ammonia reservoir. For a given body mass and diet delta15N, the isotopic compositions are mainly controlled by the N intake. Increase of the urea turnover combined with a decrease of the N intake lead to calculate a delta15N increase of the proteins, in agreement with the observed increase of collagen delta15N of herbivorous animals with aridity. We further show that the low delta15N collagen values of cave bears cannot be attributed to the dormancy periods as it is commonly thought, but inversely to the hyperphagia behavior. This model highlights the need for experimental investigations performed with large mammals in order to improve our understanding of natural variations of delta15N collagen. PMID:16328553

  7. Measurement of electron spin-lattice relaxation times in radical doped butanol samples at 1 K using the NEDOR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, C.; Herick, J.; Berlin, A.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.

    2012-12-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation time (T1e) of TEMPO- and trityl-doped butanol samples at 2.5 T and temperatures between 0.95 K and 2.17 K was studied by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using the nuclear-electron double resonance (NEDOR) method. This method is based on the idea to measure the NMR lineshift produced by the local field of paramagnetic impurities, whose polarization can be manipulated. This is of technical advantage as measurements can be performed under conditions typically used for the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process - in our case 2.5 T and temperatures around 1 K - where a direct measurement on the electronic spins would be far more complicated to perform. As T1e is a crucial parameter determining the overall efficiency of DNP, the effect of the radical type, its spin concentration, the temperature and the oxygen content on T1e has been investigated. For radical concentrations as used in DNP (several 1019 spins/cm3) the relaxation rate (T1e-1) has shown a linear dependence on the paramagnetic electron concentration for both radicals investigated. Experiments with perdeuterated and ordinary butanol have given no indication for any influence of the host materials isotopes. The measured temperature dependence has shown an exponential characteristic. It is further observed that the oxygen content in the butanol samples has a considerable effect on the electron relaxation time and thus influences the nuclear relaxation time and polarization rate during the DNP. The experiments also show a variation in the NMR linewidth, leading to comparable time constants as determined by the lineshift. NEDOR measurements were also performed on irradiated, crystal grains of 6LiD. These samples exhibited a linewidth behavior similar to that of the cylindrically shaped butanol samples.

  8. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  9. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 15N ions by 9Be at 84 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudchik, A. T.; Chercas, K. A.; Kemper, K. W.; Rusek, K.; Rudchik, A. A.; Herashchenko, O. V.; Koshchy, E. I.; Pirnak, Val. M.; Piasecki, E.; Trzcińska, A.; Sakuta, S. B.; Siudak, R.; Strojek, I.; Stolarz, A.; Ilyin, A. P.; Ponkratenko, O. A.; Stepanenko, Yu. M.; Shyrma, Yu. O.; Szczurek, A.; Uleshchenko, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Angular distributions of the 9Be + 15N elastic and inelastic scattering were measured at Elab(15N) = 84 MeV (Ec.m. = 31.5 MeV) for the 0-6.76 MeV states of 9Be and 0-6.32 MeV states of 15N. The data were analyzed within the optical model and coupled-reaction-channels method. The elastic and inelastic scattering, spin reorientations of 9Be in ground and excited states and 15N in excited states as well as the most important one- and two-step transfer reactions were included in the channels-coupling scheme. The parameters of the 9Be + 15N optical potential of Woods-Saxon form as well as deformation parameters of these nuclei were deduced. The analysis showed that the 9Be + 15N pure potential elastic scattering dominates at the forward angles whereas the ground state spin reorientation of 9Be gives a major contribution to the elastic scattering cross sections at the large angles. Contributions from particle transfers are found to be negligible for the present scattering system.

  10. Compound-specific 15N analysis of amino acids in 15N tracer experiments provide an estimate of newly synthesised soil protein from inorganic and organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, Alice; Michaelides, Katerina; Evershed, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Organic N concentrations far exceed those of inorganic N in most soils and despite much investigation, the composition and cycling of this complex pool of SOM remains poorly understood. A particular problem has been separating more recalcitrant soil organic N from that actively cycling through the soil system; an important consideration in N cycling studies and for the soil's nutrient supplying capacity. The use of 15N-labelled substrates as stable isotope tracers has contributed much to our understanding of the soil system, but the complexity and heterogeneity of soil organic N prevents thorough compound-specific 15N analyses of organic N compounds and makes it difficult to examine any 15N-labelled organic products in any detail. As a result, a significant proportion of previous work has either simply assumed that since the majority of soil N is organic, all of the 15N retained in the soil is organic N (e.g. Sebilo et al., 2013) or subtracted 15N-labelled inorganic compounds from bulk values (e.g. Pilbeam et al., 1997). While the latter approach is more accurate, these methods only provide an estimate of the bulk 15N value of an extremely complex and non-uniformly labelled organic pool. A more detailed approach has been to use microbial biomass extraction (Brookes et al., 1985) and subsequent N isotopic analysis to determine the 15N value of biomass-N, representing the fraction of 15N assimilated by microbes or the 15N cycling through the 'living' or 'active' portion of soil organic N. However, this extraction method can only generate estimates and some lack of confidence in its validity and reliability remains. Here, we present an alternative technique to obtain a measure of the assimilation of an applied 15N substrate by the soil microbial biomass and an estimate of the newly synthesized soil protein, which is representative of the magnitude of the active soil microbial biomass. The technique uses a stable isotope tracer and compound-specific 15N analysis, but

  11. Protein conformational exchange measured by 1H R1ρ relaxation dispersion of methyl groups.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Ulrich; Blissing, Annica T; Hennig, Janosch; Ahlner, Alexandra; Liu, Zhihong; Vogel, Hans J; Akke, Mikael; Lundström, Patrik

    2013-09-01

    Activated dynamics plays a central role in protein function, where transitions between distinct conformations often underlie the switching between active and inactive states. The characteristic time scales of these transitions typically fall in the microsecond to millisecond range, which is amenable to investigations by NMR relaxation dispersion experiments. Processes at the faster end of this range are more challenging to study, because higher RF field strengths are required to achieve refocusing of the exchanging magnetization. Here we describe a rotating-frame relaxation dispersion experiment for (1)H spins in methyl (13)CHD2 groups, which improves the characterization of fast exchange processes. The influence of (1)H-(1)H rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effects (ROE) is shown to be negligible, based on a comparison of R 1ρ relaxation data acquired with tilt angles of 90° and 35°, in which the ROE is maximal and minimal, respectively, and on samples containing different (1)H densities surrounding the monitored methyl groups. The method was applied to ubiquitin and the apo form of calmodulin. We find that ubiquitin does not exhibit any (1)H relaxation dispersion of its methyl groups at 10 or 25 °C. By contrast, calmodulin shows significant conformational exchange of the methionine methyl groups in its C-terminal domain, as previously demonstrated by (1)H and (13)C CPMG experiments. The present R 1ρ experiment extends the relaxation dispersion profile towards higher refocusing frequencies, which improves the definition of the exchange correlation time, compared to previous results. PMID:23904100

  12. New technique for single-scan T1 measurements using solid echoes. [for spin-lattice relaxation time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple technique for single-scan T1 measurements in solids is proposed and analyzed for single exponential spin-lattice relaxation. In this technique, the direct spin heating caused by the sampling process is significantly reduced in comparison with conventional techniques by utilizing the 'solid echo' to refocus the magnetization. The applicability of this technique to both the solid and liquid phases is demonstrated.

  13. Measurement of T1/T2 relaxation times in overlapped regions from homodecoupled 1H singlet signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañar, Laura; Nolis, Pau; Virgili, Albert; Parella, Teodor

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of the HOmodecoupled Band-Selective (HOBS) technique in the conventional Inversion-Recovery and CPMG-based PROJECT experiments is described. The achievement of fully homodecoupled signals allows the distinction of overlapped 1H resonances with small chemical shift differences. It is shown that the corresponding T1 and T2 relaxation times can be individually measured from the resulting singlet lines using conventional exponential curve-fitting methods.

  14. Water 1H relaxation dispersion analysis on a nitroxide radical provides information on the maximal signal enhancement in Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization experiments.

    PubMed

    Bennati, Marina; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo; Türke, Maria-Teresa

    2010-06-14

    Water (1)H relaxation rate measurements of (15)N-(2)H-TEMPONE solutions at temperatures ranging from 298 to 328 K have been performed as a function of magnetic field from 0.00023 to 9.4 T, corresponding to (1)H Larmor frequencies of 0.01 to 400 MHz. The relaxation profiles were analyzed according to the full theory for dipolar and contact relaxation, and used to estimate the coupling factor responsible for observed solution DNP effects. The experimental DNP enhancement at (1)H Larmor frequency of 15 MHz obtained by saturating one of the lines of the (15)N doublet is only ca. 20% lower than the limiting value predicted from the relaxation data, indicating that the experimental DNP setup is nearly optimal, the residual discrepancy arising from incomplete saturation of the other line. PMID:20458388

  15. Growth and foliar d15N of a Mojave desert shrub in relation to soil hydrological dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar 15N ratios (del15N), % N, and canopy volumes were measured in the two Mojave Desert dominant shrubs, the evergreen Larrea tridentata and drought deciduous Ambrosia dumosa growing across a geomorphically determined soil mosaic. Across three soils with increasingly strong age-dependent surface...

  16. Assessment of the time constant of relaxation: insights from simulations and hemodynamic measurements.

    PubMed

    De Mey, S; Thomas, J D; Greenberg, N L; Vandervoort, P M; Verdonck, P R

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this study was to use high-fidelity animal data and numerical simulations to gain more insight into the reliability of the estimated relaxation constant derived from left ventricular pressure decays, assuming a monoexponential model with either a fixed zero or free moving pressure asymptote. Comparison of the experimental data with the results of the simulations demonstrated a trade off between the fixed zero and the free moving asymptote approach. The latter method more closely fits the pressure curves and has the advantage of producing an extra coefficient with potential diagnostic information. On the other hand, this method suffers from larger standard errors on the estimated coefficients. The method with fixed zero asymptote produces values of the time constant of isovolumetric relaxation (tau) within a narrow confidence interval. However, if the pressure curve is actually decaying to a nonzero pressure asymptote, this method results in an inferior fit of the pressure curve and a biased estimation of tau. PMID:11356655

  17. Assessment of the time constant of relaxation: insights from simulations and hemodynamic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Mey, S.; Thomas, J. D.; Greenberg, N. L.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Verdonck, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use high-fidelity animal data and numerical simulations to gain more insight into the reliability of the estimated relaxation constant derived from left ventricular pressure decays, assuming a monoexponential model with either a fixed zero or free moving pressure asymptote. Comparison of the experimental data with the results of the simulations demonstrated a trade off between the fixed zero and the free moving asymptote approach. The latter method more closely fits the pressure curves and has the advantage of producing an extra coefficient with potential diagnostic information. On the other hand, this method suffers from larger standard errors on the estimated coefficients. The method with fixed zero asymptote produces values of the time constant of isovolumetric relaxation (tau) within a narrow confidence interval. However, if the pressure curve is actually decaying to a nonzero pressure asymptote, this method results in an inferior fit of the pressure curve and a biased estimation of tau.

  18. In vivo relaxation time measurements on a murine tumor model--prolongation of T1 after photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y H; Hawk, R M; Ramaprasad, S

    1995-01-01

    RIF tumors implanted on mice feet were investigated for changes in relaxation times (T1 and T2) after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was performed using Photofrin II as the photosensitizer and laser light at 630 nm. A home-built proton solenoid coil in the balanced configuration was used to accommodate the tumors, and the relaxation times were measured before, immediately after, and up to several hours after therapy. Several control experiments were performed untreated tumors, tumors treated with Photofrin II alone, or tumors treated with laser light alone. Significant increases in T1s of water protons were observed after PDT treatment. In all experiments, 31P spectra were recorded before and after the therapy to study the tumor status and to confirm the onset of PDT. These studies show significant prolongation of T1s after the PDT treatment. The spin-spin relaxation measurements, on the other hand, did not show such prolongation in T2 values after PDT treatment. PMID:7739367

  19. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  20. Functional changes in CSF volume estimated using measurement of water T2 relaxation.

    PubMed

    Piechnik, S K; Evans, J; Bary, L H; Wise, R G; Jezzard, P

    2009-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provides hydraulic suspension for the brain. The general concept of bulk CSF production, circulation, and reabsorption is well established, but the mechanisms of momentary CSF volume variation corresponding to vasoreactive changes are far less understood. Nine individuals were studied in a 3T MR scanner with a protocol that included visual stimulation using a 10-Hz reversing checkerboard and administration of a 5% CO(2) mix in air. We acquired PRESS-localized spin-echoes (TR = 12 sec, TE = 26 ms to 1.5 sec) from an 8-mL voxel located in the visual cortex. Echo amplitudes were fitted to a two-compartmental model of relaxation to estimate the partial volume of CSF and the T(2) relaxation times of the tissues. CSF signal contributed 10.7 +/- 3% of the total, with T(2,csf) = 503.0 +/- 64.3 [ms], T(2,brain) = 61.0 +/- 2 [ms]. The relaxation time of tissue increased during physiological stimulation, while the fraction of signal contributed by CSF decreased significantly by 5-6% with visual stimulation (P < 0.03) and by 3% under CO(2) inhalation (P < 0.08). The CSF signal fraction is shown to represent well the volume changes under viable physiological scenarios. In conclusion, CSF plays a significant role in buffering the changes in cerebral blood volume, especially during rapid functional stimuli. PMID:19132756

  1. Distributions of transverse relaxation times for soft-solids measured in strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelcea, R. I.; Fechete, R.; Culea, E.; Demco, D. E.; Blümich, B.

    2009-02-01

    The single-sided NMR-MOUSE sensor that operates in highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields is used to record a CPMG 1H transverse relaxation decay by CPMG echo trains for a series of cross-linked natural rubber samples. Effective transverse relaxation rates 1/ T2,short and 1/ T2,long were determined by a bi-exponential fit. A linear dependence of transverse relaxation rates on cross-link density is observed for medium to large values of cross-link density. As an alternative to multi-exponential fits the possibility to analyze the dynamics of soft polymer network in terms of multi-exponential decays via the inverse Laplace transformation was studied. The transient regime and the effect of the T1/ T2 ratio in inhomogeneous static and radiofrequency magnetic fields on the CPMG decays were studied numerically using a dedicated C++ program to simulate the temporal and spatial dependence of the CPMG response. A correction factor T2/ T2,eff is derived as a function of the T1/ T2 ratio from numerical simulations and compared with earlier results from two different well logging devices. High-resolution T1- T2 correlations maps are obtained by two-dimensional Laplace inversion of CPMG detected saturation recovery curves. The T1- T2 experimental correlations maps were corrected for the T1/ T2 effect using the derived T2/ T2,eff correction factor.

  2. Mechanism of the typical relaxation process at low frequency based on dielectric measurements of water absorbed in porous titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Gang; Li, Chenxi; Hu, Lin

    2016-02-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy is a valuable tool in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science. However, there is still an argument about the typical relaxation process at low frequency, which is always masked by electrode polarization. Low-frequency dielectric measurements of water absorbed in porous titanium dioxide have been performed. The experimental results show that typical polarization at low frequency is caused by space-charge polarization. A model is proposed to explain the experimental results, which indicates that the electric field in the sample is close to 0. An effective circuit is given, and the calculation gives similar dielectric spectra to those measured in experiments, which confirms the physical model.

  3. Droplet relaxation in Hele-Shaw geometry: Application to the measurement of the nematic-isotropic surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Patrick; Poy, Guilhem

    2015-12-01

    Shape measurements after the coalescence of isotropic droplets embedded in a thin sample of a homeotropic nematic phase provides a tool to measure the nematic-isotropic surface tension. In addition, this experiment allows us to check the scaling laws recently given by Brun et al. [P.-T. Brun, M. Nagel, and F. Gallaire, Phys. Rev. E 88, 043009 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.043009] to explain the relaxation of ellipsoidal droplets in a Hele-Shaw cell.

  4. Why is Mineral-Associated Organic Matter Enriched in 15N? Evidence from Grazed Pasture Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, W. T.; Wells, N. S.; Mudge, P. L.; Clough, T. J.; Schipper, L. A.; Ghani, A.; Stevenson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Throughout the scientific literature, measurements across soil depth and density fractions suggest that, with few exceptions, mineral-associated organic matter (OM) has higher δ15N than non-mineral-associated OM. This implies that the δ15N difference between N inputs and mineral-stabilized OM may characterize the microbial processes involved in stabilization and mineral association. Yet current understanding of observed N isotope fractionation in terrestrial ecosystems suggests the large isotope effects are expressed during inorganic N transformations from NH4 to gaseous loss pathways of NH3 volatilization and denitrification. How can the relative importance of N isotope fractionation during OM stabilization versus loss pathways be resolved? We recently examined N isofluxes when a temporary nitrogen excess is created by urine deposition in a New Zealand dairy pasture. We found that the N isotopic composition of volatilized NH3, and NO3 available for leaching or denitrification could not be linked back to the added N using Rayleigh distillation models. Instead, the results imply that the added N was immobilized, and the N available for losses was increasingly derived from mineralization of organic matter during the course of the experiment. These results are consistent with recent evidence of enhanced OM mineralization in urine patches, understanding of N isotope mass balances and long-standing evidence that gross mineralization and immobilization fluxes greatly exceed net mineralization and nitrification, except at very high N saturation. These results suggest that where 15N enrichment occurs due to fractionating loss pathways, the isotope effects are primarily transmitted to immobilized N, forming 15N enriched stabilized OM. This further explains earlier findings that the δ15N of soil OM represents an integrated indicator of losses, reflecting the intensity and duration of pastoral agriculture. We suggest that development of an indicator based on δ15N in

  5. Spin relaxation measurements using first-harmonic out-of-phase absorption EPR signals: rotational motion effects.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Marsh, D

    2000-07-01

    A recent survey of nonlinear continuous-wave (CW) EPR methods revealed that the first-harmonic absorption EPR signal, detected 90 degrees out of phase with respect to the Zeeman modulation (V(1)(')-EPR), is the most appropriate for determining spin-lattice relaxation enhancements of spin labels (V. A. Livshits, T. Páli, and D. Marsh, 1998, J. Magn. Reson. 134, 113-123). The sensitivity of such V(1)(')-EPR spectra to molecular rotational motion is investigated here by spectral simulations for nitroxyl spin labels, over the entire range of rotational correlation times. Determination of the effective spin-lattice relaxation times is less dependent on rotational mobility than for other nonlinear CW EPR methods, especially at a Zeeman modulation frequency of 25 kHz which is particularly appropriate for spin labels. This relative insensitivity to molecular motion further enhances the usefulness of the V(1)(')-EPR method. Calibrations of the out-of-phase to in-phase spectral intensity (and amplitude) ratios are given as a function of spin-lattice relaxation time, for the full range of spin-label rotational correlation times. Experimental measurements on spin labels in the slow, intermediate, and fast motional regimes of molecular rotation are used to test and validate the method. PMID:10873499

  6. Surface-NMR measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a homogeneous sand aquifer in Skive, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbrecker, Jan O.; Behroozmand, Ahmad A.

    2012-12-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (surface NMR) is a geophysical technique used in the exploration of shallow aquifers. It is based on measuring the NMR response of water molecules to excitation by electromagnetic pulses. By increasing the moment of applied pulses, successively deeper regions of an aquifer can be probed. The longitudinal relaxation time T1, determined from the NMR experiment, depends on pore size and can be potentially used to estimate hydraulic conductivity. A novel scheme was recently proposed that was shown theoretically to be more reliable for acquiring surface-NMR T1 data than traditional acquisition. In this proof-of-concept study we provide the first empirical evidence for the superiority of the novel scheme. We chose a survey site close to Skive, Denmark, where proximate boreholes indicate a homogeneous sandy aquifer in the top 30 m. The homogeneous composition implies that the distribution of pore sizes does not vary significantly across the formation. Because pore size is reflected by the T1 relaxation time, we therefore assume that the homogeneous aquifer can be characterized by a single T1 independent of the applied pulse moment (i.e., sampled depth region)—this is the benchmark condition we tested with our surface-NMR measurements. We collected surface-NMR T1 data employing the traditional as well as the novel acquisition scheme at various pulse moments. For each pulse moment we infer a T1 relaxation time based on extensively sampled data (14 delay-time data points). The T1 relaxation times obtained using the novel scheme show a constant value of about 820 ms (± 38 ms) for all pulse moments. In contrast, the T1 relaxation times determined using the traditional scheme vary significantly between 530 and 750 ms with pulse moment, which in an inversion would result in a spatial variation of T1 across the aquifer. The results based on the novel scheme are consistent with a homogeneous aquifer, which we expect based on the borehole

  7. Identification of novel hydrazine metabolites by 15N-NMR.

    PubMed

    Preece, N E; Nicholson, J K; Timbrell, J A

    1991-05-01

    15N-NMR has been used to study the metabolism of hydrazine in rats in vivo. Single doses of [15N2]hydrazine (2.0 mmol/kg: 98.6% g atom) were administered to rats and urine collected for 24 hr over ice. A number of metabolites were detected by 15N-NMR analysis of lyophilized urine. Ammonia was detected as a singlet at 0 ppm and unchanged [15N2]hydrazine was present in the urine detectable as a singlet at 32 ppm. Peaks were observed at 107 and 110 ppm which were identified as being due to the hydrazido nitrogen of acetylhydrazine and diacetylhydrazine, respectively. A resonance at 85 ppm was ascribed to carbazic acid, resulting from reaction of hydrazine with carbon dioxide. A singlet detected at 316 ppm was thought to be due to the hydrazono nitrogen of the pyruvate hydrazone. The resonance at 56 ppm was assigned to 15N-enriched urea, this together with the presence of ammonia indicates that the N-N bond of hydrazine is cleaved in vivo, possibly by N-oxidation, and the resultant ammonia is incorporated into urea. A doublet centred at 150 ppm and a singlet at 294 ppm were assigned to a metabolite which results from cyclization of the 2-oxoglutarate hydrazone. Therefore 15N-NMR spectroscopic analysis of urine has yielded significant new information on the metabolism of hydrazine. PMID:2018564

  8. δ15N Value Does Not Reflect Fasting in Mysticetes

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Alex; Giménez, Joan; Gómez–Campos, Encarna; Cardona, Luís; Borrell, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    The finding that tissue δ15N values increase with protein catabolism has led researchers to apply this value to gauge nutritive condition in vertebrates. However, its application to marine mammals has in most occasions failed. We investigated the relationship between δ15N values and the fattening/fasting cycle in a model species, the fin whale, a migratory capital breeder that experiences severe seasonal variation in body condition. We analyzed two tissues providing complementary insights: one with isotopic turnover (muscle) and one that keeps a permanent record of variations in isotopic values (baleen plates). In both tissues δ15N values increased with intensive feeding but decreased with fasting, thus contradicting the pattern previously anticipated. The apparent inconsistency during fasting is explained by the fact that a) individuals migrate between different isotopic isoscapes, b) starvation may not trigger significant negative nitrogen balance, and c) excretion drops and elimination of 15N-depleted urine is minimized. Conversely, when intensive feeding is resumed in the northern grounds, protein anabolism and excretion start again, triggering 15N enrichment. It can be concluded that in whales and other mammals that accrue massive depots of lipids as energetic reserves and which have limited access to drinking water, the δ15N value is not affected by fasting and therefore cannot be used as an indicatior of nutritive condition. PMID:24651388

  9. Low temperature photoluminescence as a tool to measure strain and relaxation effects in multiple quantum wells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Ouali, Abderrahmane; Yip, Raymond Y.-F.; Brebner, John; Masut, Remo A.

    1997-03-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence studies have been performed on a series of InAs(x)P(1-x)/InP strained-layer multiple quantum wells grown by low pressure metal -organic vapor phase epitaxy. The As content, x, in these samples ranges from 4.426.4at low concentrations and partially-relaxed at the higher end of the range. The temperature and excitation intensity evolution of the spectra and the shape of the transition at low temperature are consistent with the model for the recombination of excitons localized by potential fluctuations [as proposed by Ouadjaout and Marfaing, Phys. Rev. B46, 7908 (1992)]. This has been used to fit precisely the photoluminescence spectra. The evolution of the model parameters allows us to detect the onset of strain relaxation. The results are consistent with detailed structural analyses of these samples performed using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy [R. Y.-F. Yip et al., J. Appl. Phys. (in press)].

  10. Helium-3 relaxation time measurements at low temperatures for the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qiang

    The search for the existence of a nonzero neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) has the potential to reveal new sources of T and CP violation beyond the Standard Model and may have a significant impact on our understanding of the universe. A new experiment aiming at two orders of magnitude improvement (˜ 10--28 e·cm) over the current experimental upper limit has been proposed in the United States. In the experiment, the measurement cell will be made of dTPB-dPS coated acrylic and filled with superfluid 4He at ˜300-500 mK. The measurement of the neutron precession frequency will rely on the spin-dependence of the cross section of the nuclear reaction between polarized neutrons and 3He atoms: n⃗+H3 ⃗e → p + t + 764 keV. Polarized 3He will also be used as a comagnetometer based on the nuclear magnetic resonance technique. The 3He polarization needs to have sufficiently long relaxation time so that little polarization is lost during the measurement period in order to achieve the proposed sensitivity. Understanding the relaxation mechanism of 3He polarization in the measurement cell under the nEDM experimental conditions and maintaining 3He polarization is crucial for the experiment. With the presence of superfluid 4He, 3He relaxation time measurements in a dTPB-dPS coated cylindrical acrylic cell at the temperature of 1.9 K and ˜400 mK have been performed at the Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) on the campus of Duke University. The extracted depolarization probabilities of polarized 3He on the cell surface are on the order of (1 -- 2) x 10--7 at 1.9 K and ˜ 4.7 x 10--7 at ˜400 mK. The extrapolated relaxation time of polarized 3He in the nEDM cell geometry is ˜ 4870 seconds at ˜400 mK, which is sufficiently long for the nEDM experiment and further improvements are anticipated.

  11. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  12. Peculiarities of the relaxation to an invariant probability measure of nonhyperbolic chaotic attractors in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anishchenko, Vadim S.; Vadivasova, Tatjana E.; Kopeikin, Andrey S.; Kurths, Jürgen; Strelkova, Galina I.

    2002-03-01

    We study the relaxation to an invariant probability measure on quasihyperbolic and nonhyperbolic chaotic attractors in the presence of noise. We also compare different characteristics of the rate of mixing and show numerically that the rate of mixing for nonhyperbolic chaotic attractors can significantly change under the influence of noise. A mechanism of the noise influence on mixing is presented, which is associated with the dynamics of the instantaneous phase of chaotic trajectories. We also analyze how the synchronization effect can influence the rate of mixing in a system of two coupled chaotic oscillators.

  13. Highly 15N-enriched chondritic clasts in the CB/CH-like meteorite Isheyevo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, L.; Huss, G. R.; Krot, A. N.; Nagashima, K.; Ishii, H. A.; Bradley, J. P.

    2010-11-01

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock 15N-enrichments (δ 15N up to 1500‰) among planetary materials. They are also characterized by the absence of interchondrule fine-grained matrix. The only fine-grained material is present as lithic clasts, which experienced extensive aqueous alteration in contrast to the surrounding high-temperature components (chondrules, refractory inclusions, metal grains). Hence, the clasts are foreign objects that were incorporated at a late stage into the final parent body of Isheyevo. Their origin is poorly constrained. Based on mineralogy, petrography, and thermal processing of the aromatic carbonaceous component, different types of clasts have been previously identified in the CB/CH-like chondrite Isheyevo. Here, we focus on the rare lithic clasts characterized by the presence of anhydrous silicates (chondrules, chondrule fragments, and CAIs). Their mineralogy and oxygen isotopic compositions reveal them to be micro-chondrules, fragments of chondrules, and refractory inclusions related to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting accretion in the same region. In contrast to previously studied IDPs or primitive chondritic matrices, the fine-grained material in the clasts we studied is highly and rather uniformly enriched in heavy nitrogen, with bulk δ 15N values ranging between 1000‰ and 1300‰. It is also characterized by the presence of numerous 15N hotspots (δ 15N ranging from 1400‰ to 4000‰). No bulk (δD <-240‰) or localized deuterium enrichments were observed. These clasts have the highest bulk enrichment in heavy nitrogen measured to date in a fine-grained material. They represent a unique material, of asteroidal or cometary origin, in our collection of cosmomaterials. We show that they were 15N-enriched before their incorporation in the final parent body of Isheyevo. They experienced an extensive aqueous alteration that most likely played a role in redistributing 15N over the

  14. Nitrogen Isotopic Ratios in Cometary NH2: Implication for 15N-fractionation in Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuël; Decock, Alice; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arai, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Isotopic ratios in cometary molecules are diagnostic for the physico-chemical conditions where molecules formed and are processed, from the interstellar medium to the solar nebula. Usually temperatures at the molecular formation control the fractionation of the heavier element in molecular species, e.g., D-fractionation in water.In cometary volatiles, the 14N/15N ratios in CN have been well observed (Manfroid et al. 2009, A&A, 503, 613, and reference therein) and is consistent with the ratio in HCN (a most probable parent of CN) measured in few comets (Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2008, ApJ, 679, L49). Those ratios are enriched compared to the proto-solar value by a factor of ~3. In contrast to those Nitriles, there are only few reports on 14N/15N ratios in Ammonia (as Amine) (Rousselot et al. 2014, ApJ, 780, L17; Shinnaka et al. 2014, ApJ, 782, L16). Ammonia (NH3) is usually the most abundant and HCN is the second most abundant N-bearing volatiles in cometary ice. Especially, recent observations of 15NH2 revealed the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 are comparable to those of CN. However, from the viewpoint of theoretical work, the enrichment of 15N in cometary NH3 cannot be reproduced by current chemical network models. Information about the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 of individual comets is needed to understand the formation mechanisms/environments of NH3 in the early solar system.To clarify the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in cometary NH3, we determine the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets individually which include not only Oort cloud comets but also short period comets by using the high-resolution optical spectra of NH2. These spectra were obtained with both the UVES mounted on the VLT in Chile and the HDS on the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii.The derived 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets show high 15N-enrichment compared with the elemental abundances of nitrogen in the Sun by about factor of ~3 and has no large diversity depending on

  15. Neutron capture cross section of {sup 15}N at stellar energies

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, J.; Schatz, H.; Herndl, H.; Wiescher, M.; Beer, H.; Kaeppeler, F.

    1996-02-01

    The neutron capture rate on {sup 15}N may be of considerable importance for {ital s}-process nucleosynthesis in red giants as well as for the nucleosynthesis in inhomogeneous big bang scenarios. We measured the reaction cross section of {sup 15}N({ital n},{gamma}){sup 16}N at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with a fast cyclic neutron activation technique at laboratory neutron energies of 25, 152, and 370 keV. Direct capture and shell model calculations were performed to interpret the results. The presented reaction rate is 30{endash}50{percent} smaller than the previously used theoretical rates. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  17. Effects of Four Different Restoration Treatments on the Natural Abundance of 15N Stable Isotopes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Temperton, Vicky M.; Märtin, Lea L. A.; Röder, Daniela; Lücke, Andreas; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    δ15N signals in plant and soil material integrate over a number of biogeochemical processes related to nitrogen (N) and therefore provide information on net effects of multiple processes on N dynamics. In general little is known in many grassland restoration projects on soil–plant N dynamics in relation to the restoration treatments. In particular, δ15N signals may be a useful tool to assess whether abiotic restoration treatments have produced the desired result. In this study we used the range of abiotic and biotic conditions provided by a restoration experiment to assess to whether the restoration treatments and/or plant functional identity and legume neighborhood affected plant δ15N signals. The restoration treatments consisted of hay transfer and topsoil removal, thus representing increasing restoration effort, from no restoration measures, through biotic manipulation to major abiotic manipulation. We measured δ15N and %N in six different plant species (two non-legumes and four legumes) across the restoration treatments. We found that restoration treatments were clearly reflected in δ15N of the non-legume species, with very depleted δ15N associated with low soil N, and our results suggest this may be linked to uptake of ammonium (rather than nitrate). The two non-legume species differed considerably in their δ15N signals, which may be related to the two species forming different kinds of mycorrhizal symbioses. Plant δ15N signals could clearly separate legumes from non-legumes, but our results did not allow for an assessment of legume neighborhood effects on non-legume δ15N signals. We discuss our results in the light of what the δ15N signals may be telling us about plant–soil N dynamics and their potential value as an indicator for N dynamics in restoration. PMID:22645597

  18. Retrieving nitrogen isotopic signatures from fresh leaf reflectance spectra: disentangling δ15N from biochemical and structural leaf properties

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, Christine; Große-Stoltenberg, André; Lauströ, Verena; Oldeland, Jens; Werner, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Linking remote sensing methodology to stable isotope ecology provides a promising approach to study ecological processes from small to large spatial scales. Here, we show that δ15N can be detected in fresh leaf reflectance spectra of field samples along a spatial gradient of increasing nitrogen input from an N2-fixing invasive species. However, in field data it is unclear whether δ15N directly influences leaf reflectance spectra or if the relationship is based on covariation between δ15N and foliar nitrogen content or other leaf properties. Using a 15N-labeling approach, we experimentally varied δ15N independently of any other leaf properties in three plant species across different leaf developmental and physiological states. δ15N could successfully be modeled by means of partial least squares (PLSs) regressions, using leaf reflectance spectra as predictor variables. PLS models explained 53–73% of the variation in δ15N within species. Several wavelength regions important for predicting δ15N were consistent across species and could furthermore be related to known absorption features of N-containing molecular bonds. By eliminating covariation with other leaf properties as an explanation for the relationship between reflectance and δ15N, our results demonstrate that 15N itself has an inherent effect on leaf reflectance spectra. Thus, our study substantiates the use of spectroscopic measurements to retrieve isotopic signatures for ecological studies and encourages future development. Furthermore, our results highlight the great potential of optical measurements for up-scaling isotope ecology to larger spatial scales. PMID:25983740

  19. {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 12}C S factor

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, F. C.

    2008-10-15

    Experimental values of the astrophysical S factor for the {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 12}C reaction are available both from direct measurements and from the Trojan horse method. We here use R-matrix formulas to fit these values and to extrapolate to zero energy to obtain values of S(0)

  20. Relative permittivity measurement during the thrombus formation process using the dielectric relaxation method for various hematocrit values.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yuta; Sapkota, Achyut; Maruyama, Osamu; Kosaka, Ryo; Yamane, Takashi; Takei, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    The relative permittivity ε' and the dielectric loss ε″ for various hematocrit values H for static bovine blood condition have been measured using the dielectric relaxation method to detect thrombosis in real time. The suitable measurement frequency f m ranged within 60 kHz to 1 MHz, and the relaxation frequency of red blood cells (RBCs) f rc was observed to be 2 MHz. In the f m, the temporal change of normalized ε' exhibited a minimum (called as bottom point). The bottom point was observed to be exponentially shortened as H increased. This characteristic of the ε'* minimum is discussed from three viewpoints: during fibrin formation, direct thrombus formation, and rouleaux formation processes. ε'* during the fibrin formation process decreased over time, irrespective of f. However, ε'* in f m during the direct thrombus formation process and during the aggregation formation process increased immediately and rapidly over time. Therefore, the ε'* bottom point in f m might be the indication of micrometer-scale thrombus formation by RBC aggregation due to fibrin formation. PMID:26058831

  1. Adaptation of a speciation sampling cartridge for measuring ammonia flux from cattle feedlots using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K. A.; Ham, J. M.

    Improved measurements of ammonia losses from cattle feedlots are needed to quantify the national NH 3 emissions inventory and evaluate management techniques for reducing emissions. Speciation cartridges composed of glass honeycomb denuders and filter packs were adapted to measure gaseous NH 3 and aerosol NH 4+ fluxes using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). Laboratory testing showed that a cartridge equipped with four honeycomb denuders had a total capture capacity of 1800 μg of NH 3. In the field, a pair of cartridges was deployed adjacent to a sonic anemometer and an open-path gas analyzer on a mobile tower. High-speed valves were attached to the inlets of the cartridges and controlled by a datalogger so that up- and down-moving eddies were independently sampled based on direction of the vertical wind speed and a user-defined deadband. Air flowed continuously through the cartridges even when not sampling by means of a recirculating air handling system. Eddy covariance measurement of CO 2 and H 2O, as measured by the sonic and open-path gas analyzer, were used to determine the relaxation factor needed to compute REA-based fluxes. The REA system was field tested at the Beef Research Unit at Kansas State University in the summer and fall of 2007. Daytime NH 3 emissions ranged between 68 and 127 μg m -2 s -1; fluxes tended to follow a diurnal pattern correlated with latent heat flux. Daily fluxes of NH 3 were between 2.5 and 4.7 g m -2 d -1 and on average represented 38% of fed nitrogen. Aerosol NH 4+ fluxes were negligible compared with NH 3 emissions. An REA system designed around the high-capacity speciation cartridges can be used to measure NH 3 fluxes from cattle feedlots and other strong sources. The system could be adapted to measure fluxes of other gases and aerosols.

  2. Wall Relaxation Measurements of the N2 Ground Vibration States at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, John; Yaney, Perry

    1997-10-01

    Relaxation probabilities, γ, for N_2(X ^1Σ _g^+, v) of v=1 to v=4 or 5 were determined at various pressures between 0.5 and 23 Torr and temperatures within 300 - 360K on pyrex and gold. 50collisions. V=1 γ is on the order of 4x10-4 on pyrex and 5x10-4 for gold, γ is linear with v. Delta γ between v=1 and 2 is about 3 to 6 x10-4 on pyrex, 4 to 8 x10-4 on gold. γ decreases with temperature indicating no activation energy. This can be explained by interaction between gas and adsorbed molecules. Pyrex conditioned in active nitrogen can increase v=1 γ by 60% over that of a neat surface and increase or decrease delta γ by 25%. Experiments are dependent on the exposure history. XPS showed about 10% coverage of nitrogen on pyrex. A dc discharge created vibrational populations and data was obtained with CARS spectroscopy corrected for saturation.(P. P. Yaney and J.W. Parish, Applied Optics, 35, 2659-2664, (1996)) The master equation approach was used to extract γ. Stainless steel, aluminum and titanium data will be presented.

  3. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  4. Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Lena, Rohe

    2013-04-01

    The measurement of denitrification in soils and aquifers is still challenging and often enough associated with considerable experimental effort and high costs. Against this background, the acetylene inhibition technique (AIT) applied in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays is by far the most effective approach. However, this method has been largely criticized, as it is susceptible to underestimate denitrification rates and adds an additional carbon source to the substrates to be investigated. Here we provide evidence that the AIT is not necessarily an inappropriate approach to measure denitrification, that its reliability depends on the drivers governing the process, and that the 15N site preference of N2O (SP) may serve as a tool to assess this reliability. Two laboratory batch experiments were conducted, where sandy aquifer material and a peat soil were incubated as slurries. We established (i) a standard anaerobic treatment by adding KNO3 (10 mg N L-1), (ii) an oxygen treatment by adding KNO3 and O2 (5 mg L-1), and (iii) a glucose treatment by adding KNO3 supplemented with glucose (200 mg C L-1). Both experiments were run under 10 % (v/v) acetylene atmosphere and as 15N tracer treatments using labeled K15NO3 (60 atom % 15N). In the case of the standard anaerobic treatments, we found a very good agreement of denitrification potential obtained by the AIT and 15N tracer methods. SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between -4.8 and 2.6 ‰ which is indicative for N2O production during bacterial denitrification but not for N2O reduction to N2. In contrast, we observed substantial underestimation of denitrification by AIT for the glucose treatments compared to the 15N method, i.e. denitrification was underestimated by 36 % (sandy aquifer material) and 47 % (peat soil). SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between 4.5 and 9.6 ‰, which suggests occurrence of bacterial N2O reduction. In the case of the oxygen

  5. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  6. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts. PMID:26590548

  7. Femtosecond pump-probe measurements of non-radiative relaxation in LiAlO(2):V(3+).

    PubMed

    Wells, Jon-Paul R; Grinberg, Marek; Wynne, Klaas; Han, T P J

    2006-04-26

    We report on time-resolved studies of non-radiative relaxation of V(3+) ions in LiAlO(2) by means of a two-beam, pump-probe saturation experiment performed with the 150 fs pulsed output of a Ti-sapphire laser. Exciting into the vibronically broadened [Formula: see text] transition at 800 nm, a (3)T(1) relaxation time of 199 ps has been measured at 4 K. This value decreases to 82 ps at room temperature, representing a reduction in the lifetime of a factor of 2.5 due to internal-conversion processes. The relative probabilities for non-radiative, phonon-assisted barrier hopping and quantum mechanical tunnelling through the potential barrier to the (3)A(2) ground state have been obtained using Mott's expression, yielding best-fit parameters of W(0) = (5.2 ± 1) × 10(9) Hz and W(1) = (7.5 ± 1) × 10(10) Hz for a potential barrier of E(nr) = 530 ± 50 cm(-1). PMID:21690751

  8. Relaxed Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    Relaxed intensity refers to a professional philosophy, demeanor, and way of life. It is the key to being an effective educational leader. To be successful one must be relaxed, which means managing stress efficiently, having fun, and enjoying work. Intensity allows one to get the job done and accomplish certain tasks or goals. Educational leaders…

  9. Measurement of spin-exchange and relaxation parameters for polarizing {sup 21}Ne with K and Rb

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Rajat K.; Romalis, Michael V.

    2010-04-15

    Hyperpolarized K-{sup 3}He comagnetometers have been used for tests of fundamental physics and inertial rotation sensing. These experiments will demonstrate increased sensitivity if the {sup 3}He buffer gas is replaced with {sup 21}Ne. We measure the parameters necessary to realize implementation of an alkali-metal-{sup 21}Ne comagnetometer for two promising alkali-metal species, Rb and K. The spin-exchange rate constant for K with {sup 21}Ne and Rb with {sup 21}Ne are measured using two different methods. We also make the first measurement of the K-{sup 21}Ne contact spin interaction. Measurements for the Rb-{sup 21}Ne contact spin interaction, as well as the spin-destruction coefficients for {sup 21}Ne with both alkali-metal species are consistent with previous measurements. Additionally the quadrupolar spin-relaxation rate of {sup 21}Ne is measured. Finally, the feasibility of utilizing polarized {sup 21}Ne for operation in a comagnetometer is discussed.

  10. The use of delta(15)N in assessing sewage stress on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Risk, Michael J; Lapointe, Brian E; Sherwood, Owen A; Bedford, Bradley J

    2009-06-01

    While coral reefs decline, scientists argue, and effective strategies to manage land-based pollution lag behind the extent of the problem. There is need for objective, cost-effective, assessment methods. The measurement of stable nitrogen isotope ratios, delta(15)N, in tissues of reef organisms shows promise as an indicator of sewage stress. The choice of target organism will depend upon study purpose, availability, and other considerations such as conservation. Algae are usually plentiful and have been shown faithfully to track sewage input. The organic matrix of bivalve shells can provide time series spanning, perhaps, decades. Gorgonians have been shown to track sewage, and can provide records potentially centuries-long. In areas where baseline data are lacking, which is almost everywhere, delta(15)N in gorgonians can provide information on status and trends. In coral tissue, delta(15)N combined with insoluble residue determination can provide information on both sewage and sediment stress in areas lacking baseline data. In the developed world, delta(15)N provides objective assessment in a field complicated by conflicting opinions. Sample handling and processing are simple and analysis costs are low. This is a method deserving widespread application. PMID:19286230

  11. Quasi-reversible point defect relaxation in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films by in situ electrical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Alexander U.; Yeh, Ted C.; Bruce Buchholz, D.; Chang, Robert P. H.; Mason, Thomas O.

    2013-03-01

    Quasi-reversible oxygen exchange/point defect relaxation in an amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin film was monitored by in situ electrical property measurements (conductivity, Seebeck coefficient) at 200 °C subjected to abrupt changes in oxygen partial pressure (pO2). By subtracting the long-term background decay from the conductivity curves, time-independent conductivity values were obtained at each pO2. From these values, a log-log "Brouwer" plot of conductivity vs. pO2 of approximately -1/2 was obtained, which may indicate co-elimination (filling) of neutral and charged oxygen vacancies. This work demonstrates that Brouwer analysis can be applied to the study of defect structure in amorphous oxide thin films.

  12. Modulated heterodyne light scattering set-up for measuring long relaxation time at small and wide angle

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Nancy; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto

    2012-08-15

    We present a simple, compact, and versatile experimental setup working in the heterodyne detection mode with modulation of the reference beam. The system is implemented with a collection optics based on a unimodal optical fiber coupler. This choice allows the heterodyne to be used in a wide range of scattering angles, even for very small ones, without losing the optical beating. The apparatus can be successfully used to study translational diffusive dynamics of dispersed particles at scattering angles smaller than 5 Degree-Sign and it is suitable for exploring slow relaxation processes in sub-Hertz frequency domain, for example, in glass-forming systems. It is also possible to measure the electrophoretic mobility by applying an electric field into a charged particles solution.

  13. Optical Transient-Grating Measurements of Spin Diffusion andRelaxation in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Christopher P.

    2005-12-15

    Spin diffusion in n-GaAs quantum wells, as measured by our optical transient-grating technique, is strongly suppressed relative to that of charge. Over a broad range of temperatures and dopings, the suppression of Ds relative to Dc agrees quantitatively with the prediction of ''spin Coulomb dra'' theory, which takes into account the exchange of spin in electron-electron collisions. Moreover, the spin-diffusion length, Ls, is a nearly constant 1 micrometer over the same range of T and n, despite Ds's varying by nearly two orders of magnitude. This constancy supports the D'yakonov-Perel'-Kachorovskii model of spin relaxation through interrupted precessional dephasing in the spin-orbit field.

  14. Dielectric Relaxation of Hexadeutero Dimethylsulfoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betting, H.; Stockhausen, M.

    1999-11-01

    The dielectric relaxation parameters of the title substance (DMSO-d6) in its pure liquid state are determined from meas-urements up to 72 GHz at 20°C in comparison to protonated DMSO. While the relaxation strengths do not differ, the relax-ation time of DMSO-d 6 is significantly longer (21.3 ps) than that of DMSO (19.5 ps).

  15. Effects of spin diffusion on electron spin relaxation time measured with a time-resolved microscopic photoluminescence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2015-02-07

    We performed measurements at room temperature for a GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well grown on GaAs(110) using a time-resolved microscopic photoluminescence (micro-PL) technique to find what effects spin diffusion had on the measured electron spin relaxation time, τ{sub s}, and developed a method of estimating the spin diffusion coefficient, D{sub s}, using the measured data and the coupled drift-diffusion equations for spin polarized electrons. The spatial nonuniformities of τ{sub s} and the initial degree of electron spin polarization caused by the pump intensity distribution inside the focal spot were taken into account to explain the dependence of τ{sub s} on the measured spot size, i.e., a longer τ{sub s} for a smaller spot size. We estimated D{sub s} as ∼100 cm{sup 2}/s, which is similar to a value reported in the literature. We also provided a qualitative understanding on how spin diffusion lengthens τ{sub s} in micro-PL measurements.

  16. Ultrafast measurements of vibrational relaxation in the conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jon-Paul R.; Lidzey, David G.; Phillips, P. Jonathan; Carder, Damian A.; Fox, A. Mark

    2004-10-01

    We report the resonant pump-probe measurements used to study the dynamics of molecular vibrations in the conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctlyfluorene) (PFO). Free-electron-laser excited, pump-probe measurements on a drop-cast polymer film yield the lifetime of a series of different infrared active, high frequency vibrational modes at 5K. A general trend of decreasing lifetime with increasing frequency of the vibrational mode seems consistent with an enhanced density of accepting states for high frequency modes. Our measurements provide an insight into the dissipation of energy in conjugated polymers, and have implications for exciton generation and dissociation mechanisms in organic optoelectronic devices.

  17. Relating Measurements of Decaying Postseismic Surface Deformation to Viscoelastic Relaxation: This is no Time for Elsasser Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, E. H.

    2001-12-01

    Techniques for measuring displacements of the Earth's surface have recently advanced to the point where the time-dependence of postseismic deformation (as well as its spatial patterns) can be characterized for large earthquakes. Given the availability of such data (and the promise of increasingly detailed measurements from future earthquakes), describing differences in early postseismic deformation from different rheological profiles of the lithosphere is no longer just a theoretical exercise. If postseismic deformation is due to stress relaxation in a viscoelastic crust or upper mantle layer below an effectively elastic upper crust of known thickness, the viscoelastic layer thickness and viscosity (η ) may be determined independently using temporally detailed displacement observations (i.e., continuous GPS) from one or more locations. A related strategy of modeling postseismic displacements over a single time interval at several measurement points is currently used to estimate these parameters independently (e.g. Pollitz, 2001). For models of an earthquake in an elastic layer of known thickness overlying a viscoelastic halfspace, η /G (Maxwell time, or Tm) is the rate-controlling parameter. In a given location relative to the fault, displacements produced by models with various Maxwell times may all be represented with one curve, provided displacement is plotted against time/Tm. The time-depence of postseismic surface deformation even for this simple model is complicated, but the same complicated response occurs for models with identical Maxwell times. This is not so for earthquake models incorporating viscoelastic layers, however: thicker viscoelastic layers yield faster postseismic velocities early in the earthquake cycle than thinner layers with the same Maxwell time (e.g. Pollitz, 1997; Cohen, 1984). Elsasser time (proportional to η /w, where w is viscoelastic layer thickness) is often posited as a reasonable rate-governing parameter for layered

  18. Measurement of wall relaxation times of polarized Helium-3 in bulk liquid Helium-4 for the neutron electric dipole moment experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Jacob

    The Neutron Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) experiment that will take place at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee will measure the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron with a precision of order 10-28 e-cm, utilizing spin-polarized 3He in bulk liquid 4He to detect neutron precession in a 10 mG magnetic field and 50 kV/cm electric field. Since depolarized 3He will produce a background, relaxation of the polarized 3He, characterized by the probability of depolarization per bounce, Pd, was measured for materials that will be in contact with polarized 3He. Depolarization probabilities were determined from measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time of polarized 3He in bulk liquid 4He inside an acrylic cell coated with the wavelength shifter deuterated tetraphenyl butadiene (d-TPB), which will be used to coat the nEDM measurement cell. Relaxation measurements were also performed while rods, made from plumbing material Torlon and valve bellows material BeCu, were present in the cell. The BeCu was coated with Pyralin resin prior to relaxation measurements, while relaxation measurements were performed both before and after the Torlon rod was coated with Pyralin resin. The depolarization probabilities were found to be Pd-TPBd <1.32x10-7 PBareTorlon d=1.01+/-0.08 x10-6 PCoatedTorlon d=2.5+/-0.1 x10-7 PCoatedBeCu d=7.9+/-0.3 x10-7 The relaxation rates extrapolated from the observed values of Pd for d-TPB, coated Torlon, and coated BeCu in the nEDM apparatus were found to be consistent with design goals.

  19. Spatially resolved measurements of mean spin-spin relaxation time constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechifor, Ruben Emanuel; Romanenko, Konstantin; Marica, Florea; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance measurements of the T2 distribution have become very common and they are a powerful way to probe microporous fluid bearing solids. While the structure of the T2 distribution, and changes in the structure, are often very informative, it is common to reduce the T2 distribution to a mean numeric quantity in order to provide a quantitative interpretation of the distribution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging measurements of the T2 distribution have recently been introduced, but they are time consuming, especially for 2 and 3 spatial dimensions. In this paper we explore a direct MRI measurement of the arithmetic mean of 1/T2, characterizing the distribution by using the initial slope of the spatially resolved T2 decay in a CPMG prepared Centric Scan SPRITE experiment. The methodology is explored with a test phantom sample and realistic petroleum reservoir core plug samples. The arithmetic mean of 1/T2 is related to the harmonic mean of T2. The mean obtained from the early decay is explored through measurements of uniform saturated core plug samples and by comparison to other means determined from the complete T2 distribution. Complementary data were obtained using SE-SPI T2 distribution MRI measurements. The utility of the arithmetic mean 1/T2 is explored through measurements of centrifuged core plug samples where the T2 distribution varies spatially. The harmonic mean T2 obtained from the early decay was employed to estimate the irreducible water saturation for core plug samples.

  20. Spatially resolved measurements of mean spin-spin relaxation time constants.

    PubMed

    Nechifor, Ruben Emanuel; Romanenko, Konstantin; Marica, Florea; Balcom, Bruce J

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance measurements of the T2 distribution have become very common and they are a powerful way to probe microporous fluid bearing solids. While the structure of the T2 distribution, and changes in the structure, are often very informative, it is common to reduce the T2 distribution to a mean numeric quantity in order to provide a quantitative interpretation of the distribution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging measurements of the T2 distribution have recently been introduced, but they are time consuming, especially for 2 and 3 spatial dimensions. In this paper we explore a direct MRI measurement of the arithmetic mean of 1/T2, characterizing the distribution by using the initial slope of the spatially resolved T2 decay in a CPMG prepared Centric Scan SPRITE experiment. The methodology is explored with a test phantom sample and realistic petroleum reservoir core plug samples. The arithmetic mean of 1/T2 is related to the harmonic mean of T2. The mean obtained from the early decay is explored through measurements of uniform saturated core plug samples and by comparison to other means determined from the complete T2 distribution. Complementary data were obtained using SE-SPI T2 distribution MRI measurements. The utility of the arithmetic mean 1/T2 is explored through measurements of centrifuged core plug samples where the T2 distribution varies spatially. The harmonic mean T2 obtained from the early decay was employed to estimate the irreducible water saturation for core plug samples. PMID:24361482

  1. The spatial effect of protein deuteration on nitroxide spin-label relaxation: Implications for EPR distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mkami, Hassane; Ward, Richard; Bowman, Andrew; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Norman, David G.

    2014-11-01

    Pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) coupled with site-directed spin labeling is a powerful technique for the elucidation of protein or nucleic acid, macromolecular structure and interactions. The intrinsic high sensitivity of electron paramagnetic resonance enables measurement on small quantities of bio-macromolecules, however short relaxation times impose a limit on the sensitivity and size of distances that can be measured using this technique. The persistence of the electron spin-echo, in the PELDOR experiment, is one of the most crucial limitations to distance measurement. At a temperature of around 50 K one of the predominant factors affecting persistence of an echo, and as such, the sensitivity and measurable distance between spin labels, is the electron spin echo dephasing time (Tm). It has become normal practice to use deuterated solvents to extend Tm and recently it has been demonstrated that deuteration of the underlying protein significantly extends Tm. Here we examine the spatial effect of segmental deuteration of the underlying protein, and also explore the concentration and temperature dependence of highly deuterated systems.

  2. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  3. A triarylmethyl spin label for long-range distance measurement at physiological temperatures using T1 relaxation enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongyu; Bridges, Michael D.; López, Carlos J.; Rogozhnikova, Olga Yu.; Trukhin, Dmitry V.; Brooks, Evan K.; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J.; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2016-08-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has become an important tool for measuring distances in proteins on the order of a few nm. For this purpose pairs of spin labels, most commonly nitroxides, are site-selectively introduced into the protein. Recent efforts to develop new spin labels are focused on tailoring the intrinsic properties of the label to either extend the upper limit of measurable distances at physiological temperature, or to provide a unique spectral lineshape so that selective pairwise distances can be measured in a protein or complex containing multiple spin label species. Triarylmethyl (TAM) radicals are the foundation for a new class of spin labels that promise to provide both capabilities. Here we report a new methanethiosulfonate derivative of a TAM radical that reacts rapidly and selectively with an engineered cysteine residue to generate a TAM containing side chain (TAM1) in high yield. With a TAM1 residue and Cu2+ bound to an engineered Cu2+ binding site, enhanced T1 relaxation of TAM should enable measurement of interspin distances up to 50 Å at physiological temperature. To achieve favorable TAM1-labeled protein concentrations without aggregation, proteins are tethered to a solid support either site-selectively using an unnatural amino acid or via native lysine residues. The methodology is general and readily extendable to complex systems, including membrane proteins.

  4. Theoretical and experimental study of 15N NMR protonation shifts.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Valentin A; Samultsev, Dmitry O; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study revealed that the nature of the upfield (shielding) protonation effect in 15N NMR originates in the change of the contribution of the sp(2)-hybridized nitrogen lone pair on protonation resulting in a marked shielding of nitrogen of about 100 ppm. On the contrary, for amine-type nitrogen, protonation of the nitrogen lone pair results in the deshielding protonation effect of about 25 ppm, so that the total deshielding protonation effect of about 10 ppm is due to the interplay of the contributions of adjacent natural bond orbitals. A versatile computational scheme for the calculation of 15N NMR chemical shifts of protonated nitrogen species and their neutral precursors is proposed at the density functional theory level taking into account solvent effects within the supermolecule solvation model. PMID:25891386

  5. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported. PMID:24746715

  6. Marking Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) With Rubidium or 15N.

    PubMed

    Klick, J; Yang, W Q; Bruck, D J

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) has caused significant economic damage to berry and stone fruit production regions. Markers that are systemic in plants and easily transferred to target organisms are needed to track D. suzukii exploitation of host resources and trophic interactions. High and low concentrations of the trace element, rubidium (Rb), and the stable isotope, 15N, were tested to mark D. suzukii larvae feeding on fruits of enriched strawberry plants grown in containers under greenhouse conditions. Fly marker content and proportion of flies marked 1, 7, and 14 d after emergence from enriched fruits and fly dry mass were analyzed. Nearly 100% of the flies analyzed 14 d after emerging from 15N-enriched plants were marked, whereas only 30-75% and 0-3% were marked 14 d after emerging from high and low Rb concentration plants, respectively. Rapid Rb decay, strong 15N persistence, and the economics of using these markers in the field to elucidate D. suzukii pest ecology are discussed. PMID:26470275

  7. A sample-saving method for heat capacity measurements on powders using relaxation calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachs, Edgar; Benisek, Artur

    2011-08-01

    An experimental method is described for determining the low-temperature heat capacity (Cp) of mg-sized powder samples using the Quantum Design “Physical Properties Measurement System” (PPMS). The powder is contained in an Al pan as an ∼1 mm thick compressed layer. The sample is not mixed with Apiezon N grease, as compared to other methods. Thus, it is not contaminated and can be used for further study. This is necessary for samples that are only available in tiny amounts. To demonstrate the method various samples, all insulating in nature, were studied including benzoic acid, sapphire and different silicate minerals. The measurements show that the method has an accuracy in Cp to better than 1% at T above 30-50 K and ±3-5% up to ±10% below. The experimental procedure is based on three independent PPMS and three independent differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The DSC Cp data are used to slightly adjust the PPMS Cp data by a factor C. This is done because heat capacities measured with a DSC device are more accurate around ambient T (⩽0.6%) than PPMS values and is possible because the deviation of PPMS heat capacities from reference values is nearly constant between about 50 K and 300 K. The resulting standard entropies agree with published reference values within 0.21% for the silicates, by 0.34% for corundum, and by 0.9% for powdered benzoic acid. The method thus allows entropy determinations on powders with an accuracy of better than 1%. The advantage of our method compared to other experimental techniques is that the sample powder is not contaminated with grease and that heat capacity values show less scatter at high temperatures.

  8. A sample-saving method for heat capacity measurements on powders using relaxation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dachs, Edgar; Benisek, Artur

    2011-08-01

    An experimental method is described for determining the low-temperature heat capacity (C(p)) of mg-sized powder samples using the Quantum Design "Physical Properties Measurement System" (PPMS). The powder is contained in an Al pan as an ∼1 mm thick compressed layer. The sample is not mixed with Apiezon N grease, as compared to other methods. Thus, it is not contaminated and can be used for further study. This is necessary for samples that are only available in tiny amounts. To demonstrate the method various samples, all insulating in nature, were studied including benzoic acid, sapphire and different silicate minerals. The measurements show that the method has an accuracy in C(p) to better than 1% at T above 30-50 K and ±3-5% up to ±10% below. The experimental procedure is based on three independent PPMS and three independent differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The DSC C(p) data are used to slightly adjust the PPMS C(p) data by a factor CpDSC/CpPPMSat298K. This is done because heat capacities measured with a DSC device are more accurate around ambient T (⩽0.6%) than PPMS values and is possible because the deviation of PPMS heat capacities from reference values is nearly constant between about 50 K and 300 K. The resulting standard entropies agree with published reference values within 0.21% for the silicates, by 0.34% for corundum, and by 0.9% for powdered benzoic acid. The method thus allows entropy determinations on powders with an accuracy of better than 1%. The advantage of our method compared to other experimental techniques is that the sample powder is not contaminated with grease and that heat capacity values show less scatter at high temperatures. PMID:21886915

  9. Synthesis of 7-15N-Oroidin and Evaluation of Utility for Biosynthetic Studies of Pyrrole-Imidazole Alkaloids by Microscale1H-15N HSQC and FTMS†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Gang; Morinaka, Brandon I.; Reyes, Jeremy Chris P.; Wolff, Jeremy H.; Romo, Daniel; Molinski, Tadeusz F.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous marine-derived pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids (PIAs), ostensibly derived from the simple precursor oroidin, 1a, have been reported and have garnered intense synthetic interest due to their complex structures and in some cases biological activity; however very little is known regarding their biosynthesis. We describe a concise synthesis of 7-15N-oroidin (1d) from urocanic acid and a direct method for measurement of 15N incorporation by pulse labeling and analysis by 1D 1H-15N HSQC NMR and FTMS. Using a mock pulse labeling experiment, we estimate the limit of detection (LOD) for incorporation of newly biosynthesized PIA by 1D 1H-15N HSQC to be 0.96 μg equivalent of 15N oroidin (2.4 nmole) in a background of 1500 μg unlabeled oroidin (about 1 part per 1600). 7-15N-Oroidin will find utility in biosynthetic feeding experiments with live sponges to provide direct information to clarify the pathways leading to more complex pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids. PMID:20095632

  10. Cerebral glutamine metabolism under hyperammonemia determined in vivo by localized 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cudalbu, Cristina; Lanz, Bernard; Duarte, João MN; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Pilloud, Yves; Mlynárik, Vladimir; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Brain glutamine synthetase (GS) is an integral part of the glutamate–glutamine cycle and occurs in the glial compartment. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allows noninvasive measurements of the concentrations and synthesis rates of metabolites. 15N MRS is an alternative approach to 13C MRS. Incorporation of labeled 15N from ammonia in cerebral glutamine allows to measure several metabolic reactions related to nitrogen metabolism, including the glutamate–glutamine cycle. To measure 15N incorporation into the position 5N of glutamine and position 2N of glutamate and glutamine, we developed a novel 15N pulse sequence to simultaneously detect, for the first time, [5-15N]Gln and [2-15N]Gln+Glu in vivo in the rat brain. In addition, we also measured for the first time in the same experiment localized 1H spectra for a direct measurement of the net glutamine accumulation. Mathematical modeling of 1H and 15N MRS data allowed to reduce the number of assumptions and provided reliable determination of GS (0.30±0.050 μmol/g per minute), apparent neurotransmission (0.26±0.030 μmol/g per minute), glutamate dehydrogenase (0.029±0.002 μmol/g per minute), and net glutamine accumulation (0.033±0.001 μmol/g per minute). These results showed an increase of GS and net glutamine accumulation under hyperammonemia, supporting the concept of their implication in cerebral ammonia detoxification. PMID:22167234

  11. Whole body nitric oxide synthesis in healthy men determined from [15N] arginine-to-[15N]citrulline labeling.

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, L; Beaumier, L; Ajami, A M; Young, V R

    1996-01-01

    The rates of whole body nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, plasma arginine flux, and de novo arginine synthesis and their relationships to urea production, were examined in a total of seven healthy adults receiving an L-amino acid diet for 6 days. NO synthesis was estimated by the rate of conversion of the [15N] guanidino nitrogen of arginine to plasma [15N] ureido citrulline and compared with that based on urinary nitrite (NO2-)/nitrate (NO3-) excretion. Six subjects received on dietary day 7, a 24-hr (12-hr fed/12-hr fasted) primed, constant, intravenous infusion of L-[guanidino-15N2]arginine and [13C]urea. A similar investigation was repeated with three of these subjects, plus an additional subject, in which they received L-[ureido-13C]citrulline, to determine plasma citrulline fluxes. The estimated rates (mean +/- SD) of NO synthesis over a period of 24 hr averaged 0.96 +/- 0.1 mumol .kg-1.hr-1 and 0.95 +/- 0.1 mumol.kg-1.hr-1, for the [15N]citrulline and the nitrite/nitrate methods, respectively. About 15% of the plasma arginine turnover was associated with urea formation and 1.2% with NO formation. De novo arginine synthesis averaged 9.2 +/- 1.4 mumol. kg-1.hr-1, indicating that approximately 11% of the plasma arginine flux originates via conversion of plasma citrulline to arginine. Thus, the fraction of the plasma arginine flux associated with NO and also urea synthesis in healthy humans is small, although the plasma arginine compartment serves as a significant precursor pool (54%) for whole body NO formation. This tracer model should be useful for exploring these metabolic relationships in vivo, under specific pathophysiologic states where the L-arginine-NO pathway might be altered. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8876157

  12. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-01

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach. PMID:20681586

  13. Rapid and accurate measurement of transverse relaxation times using a single shot multi-echo echo-planar imaging sequence.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Damian J; Moore, Rachel J; Marciani, Luca; Gowland, Penny A

    2004-09-01

    Methods for making rapid and accurate measurements and maps of the transverse relaxation time from a single free induction decay (FID) are proposed. The methods use a multi-echo sequence in combination with B1 insensitive (hyperbolic secant or BIREF2b) refocusing pulses and rapid echo-planar imaging techniques. The results were calibrated against a single spin echo echo-planar imaging sequence using a phantom containing a range of CuSO4 concentrations. The mean percentage absolute difference between the multi-echo and single-echo results was 3% for the multi-echo sequence using the hyperbolic secant refocusing pulse, and 7% for the multi-echo sequence using the BIREF2b refocusing pulse, compared to 13% for a multi-echo sequence using a nonselective sinc refocusing pulse. The use of the sequences in vivo has been demonstrated in studies of gastric function, i.e., the measurement of gastric dilution and monitoring of formation of a raft of alginate polysaccharide within the stomach. PMID:15288145

  14. The Impact of the Relaxivity Definition on the Quantitative Measurement of Glycosaminoglycans in Cartilage by MRI dGEMRIC Method

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, ShaoKuan; Xia, Yang

    2009-01-01

    The relaxivities (R-values) of the Gd(DTPA)2− ions in a series of skim-milk solutions at 0–40% milk concentrations were measured using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The R-value was found to be approximately linearly proportional to the concentration of the solid component in the milk solution. Using the R-value at 20% solid component (approximately the solid concentration in bovine nasal cartilage (BNC)), the glycosaminoglycan concentration in BNC can be quantified using the MRI dGEMRIC method without the customary scaling factor of two. This finding is also supported by the measurements using 23Na NMR spectroscopy, 23Na inductively-coupled-plasma (ICP) analysis, and biochemical assay. The choice of the R-value definition in the MRI dGEMRIC method is discussed – and the definition of Gd(DTPA)2− ions as “ millimole per volume of tissue (or milk solution for substitution)” should be used. PMID:19918900

  15. Using dual-bacterial denitrification to improve δ15N determinations of nitrates containing mass-independent 17O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Casciotti, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterial denitrification method for isotopic analysis of nitrate using N2O generated from Pseudomonas aureofaciens may overestimate ??15N values by as much as 1-2??? for samples containing atmospheric nitrate because of mass-independent 17O variations in such samples. By analyzing such samples for ??15N and ??18O using the denitrifier Pseudomonas chlororaphis, one obtains nearly correct ??15N values because oxygen in N 2O generated by P. chlororaphis is primarily derived from H 2O. The difference between the apparent ??15N value determined with P. aureofaciens and that determined with P. chlororaphis, assuming mass-dependent oxygen isotopic fractionation, reflects the amount of mass-independent 17O in a nitrate sample. By interspersing nitrate isotopic reference materials having substantially different ?? 18O values with samples, one can normalize oxygen isotope ratios and determine the fractions of oxygen in N2O derived from the nitrate and from water with each denitrifier. This information can be used to improve ??15N values of nitrates having excess 17O. The same analyses also yield estimates of the magnitude of 17O excess in the nitrate (expressed as ??17O) that may be useful in some environmental studies. The 1-?? uncertainties of ??15N, ??18O and ??17O measurements are ??0.2, ??0.3 and ??5???, respectively. Copyright ?? 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Simple approach for the preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water for nitrogen fixation assessments: evaluation, application and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Klawonn, Isabell; Lavik, Gaute; Böning, Philipp; Marchant, Hannah K.; Dekaezemacker, Julien; Mohr, Wiebke; Ploug, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings revealed that the commonly used 15N2 tracer assay for the determination of dinitrogen (N2) fixation can underestimate the activity of aquatic N2-fixing organisms. Therefore, a modification to the method using pre-prepared 15−15N2-enriched water was proposed. Here, we present a rigorous assessment and outline a simple procedure for the preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water. We recommend to fill sterile-filtered water into serum bottles and to add 15−15N2 gas to the water in amounts exceeding the standard N2 solubility, followed by vigorous agitation (vortex mixing ≥ 5 min). Optionally, water can be degassed at low-pressure (≥950 mbar) for 10 min prior to the 15−15N2 gas addition to indirectly enhance the 15−15N2 concentration. This preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water can be done within 1 h using standard laboratory equipment. The final 15N-atom% excess was 5% after replacing 2–5% of the incubation volume with 15−15N2-enriched water. Notably, the addition of 15−15N2-enriched water can alter levels of trace elements in the incubation water due to the contact of 15−15N2-enriched water with glass, plastic and rubber ware. In our tests, levels of trace elements (Fe, P, Mn, Mo, Cu, Zn) increased by up to 0.1 nmol L−1 in the final incubation volume, which may bias rate measurements in regions where N2 fixation is limited by trace elements. For these regions, we tested an alternative way to enrich water with 15−15N2. The 15−15N2 was injected as a bubble directly to the incubation water, followed by gentle shaking. Immediately thereafter, the bubble was replaced with water to stop the 15−15N2 equilibration. This approach achieved a 15N-atom% excess of 6.6 ± 1.7% when adding 2 mL 15−15N2 per liter of incubation water. The herein presented methodological tests offer guidelines for the 15N2 tracer assay and thus, are crucial to circumvent methodological draw-backs for future N2 fixation assessments. PMID:26300853

  17. Simple approach for the preparation of (15-15)N2-enriched water for nitrogen fixation assessments: evaluation, application and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Klawonn, Isabell; Lavik, Gaute; Böning, Philipp; Marchant, Hannah K; Dekaezemacker, Julien; Mohr, Wiebke; Ploug, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings revealed that the commonly used (15)N2 tracer assay for the determination of dinitrogen (N2) fixation can underestimate the activity of aquatic N2-fixing organisms. Therefore, a modification to the method using pre-prepared (15-15)N2-enriched water was proposed. Here, we present a rigorous assessment and outline a simple procedure for the preparation of (15-15)N2-enriched water. We recommend to fill sterile-filtered water into serum bottles and to add (15-15)N2 gas to the water in amounts exceeding the standard N2 solubility, followed by vigorous agitation (vortex mixing ≥ 5 min). Optionally, water can be degassed at low-pressure (≥950 mbar) for 10 min prior to the (15-15)N2 gas addition to indirectly enhance the (15-15)N2 concentration. This preparation of (15-15)N2-enriched water can be done within 1 h using standard laboratory equipment. The final (15)N-atom% excess was 5% after replacing 2-5% of the incubation volume with (15-15)N2-enriched water. Notably, the addition of (15-15)N2-enriched water can alter levels of trace elements in the incubation water due to the contact of (15-15)N2-enriched water with glass, plastic and rubber ware. In our tests, levels of trace elements (Fe, P, Mn, Mo, Cu, Zn) increased by up to 0.1 nmol L(-1) in the final incubation volume, which may bias rate measurements in regions where N2 fixation is limited by trace elements. For these regions, we tested an alternative way to enrich water with (15-15)N2. The (15-15)N2 was injected as a bubble directly to the incubation water, followed by gentle shaking. Immediately thereafter, the bubble was replaced with water to stop the (15-15)N2 equilibration. This approach achieved a (15)N-atom% excess of 6.6 ± 1.7% when adding 2 mL (15-15)N2 per liter of incubation water. The herein presented methodological tests offer guidelines for the (15)N2 tracer assay and thus, are crucial to circumvent methodological draw-backs for future N2 fixation assessments. PMID:26300853

  18. Optical fiber sensor technique for strain measurement during materials deposition, chemical reaction, and relaxation

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1988-01-21

    Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a strain. Changes in the strain cause changes in the optical path length of the strain fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the strain experienced by the strained one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate strain as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being strained, so that strains generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the strain changes under study. 9 figs.

  19. Measurements of Heme Relaxation and Ligand Recombination in Strong Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Ye, Xiong; Yu, Anchi; Champion, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Heme cooling signals and diatomic ligand recombination kinetics are measured in strong magnetic fields (up to 10 Tesla). We examined diatomic ligand recombination to heme model compounds (NO and CO), myoglobin (NO and O2), and horseradish peroxidase (NO). No magnetic field induced rate changes in any of the samples were observed within the experimental detection limit. However, in the case of CO binding to heme in glycerol and O2 binding to myoglobin, we observe a small magnetic field dependent change in the early time amplitude of the optical response that is assigned to heme cooling. One possibility, consistent with this observation, is that there is a weak magnetic field dependence of the non-radiative branching ratio into the vibrationally hot electronic ground state during CO photolysis. Ancillary studies of the “spin-forbidden” CO binding reaction in a variety of heme compounds in the absence of magnetic field demonstrate a surprisingly wide range for the Arrhenius prefactor. We conclude that CO binding to heme is not always retarded by unfavorable spin selection rules involving a double spin-flip superexchange mechanism. In fact, it appears that the small prefactor (~109s−1) found for CO rebinding to Mb may be anomalous, rather than the general rule for heme-CO rebinding. These results point to unresolved fundamental issues that underlie the theory of heme-ligand photolysis and rebinding. PMID:19588986

  20. A Comparison of GHG Flux Measurements by Relaxed Eddy Accumulation and Eddy Covariance Methods Using FTIR and QCL Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, A. T.; Laborde, M.; Hensen, A.; van den Bulk, P.; Famulari, D.; Griffith, D. W.; Nemitz, E.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation results obtained with a novel system for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) measurements using an Ecotech Spectronus FTIR analyzer (Griffth et al, 2012) will be compared to eddy covariance fluxes using an Aerodyne QCL and a Licor 6262 NDIR analyzer. The REA FTIR system can be easily combined with other standard (e.g. NDIR) analyzers suited for eddy covariance measurements to allow for scaling of the obtained up/down concentration differences with the directly measured fluxes. Furthermore the FTIR system allows for on-line simultaneous high precision concentration measurement of a large number of different gases and even isotope composition, next to the measurement of CO2, CH4 and N2O mixing ratios. The final design goal for the REA FTIR system is an attractive fully automated, low maintenance system for long-term monitoring of Greenhouse Gas fluxes at the hourly time scale and a spatial scale of about 1 km2. During a campaign of four weeks in June 2013 (in the framework of the InGOS EU project) at a grazed grassland site at Easter Bush, Scotland (UK), simultaneous surface flux measurements of N2O and additionally CO2 and CH4 have been performed using our systems and a number of setups from other groups.. Weather conditions during the campaign were excellent and after the application of fertilizer at the field and some rainfall the increased emission of N2O was detected clearly by all systems. Both the eddy covariance and REA methods performed well during the campaign and the measured fluxes compare satisfactorily. In general the resulting fluxes from the FTIR system are lower then the QCL based results. Reasons for these deviations will be discussed together with implications of the results for the design of future REA measurements using the FTIR system. Griffith, D.W.T., N.M. Deutscher, C.G.R. Caldow, G. Kettlewell, M. Riggenbach and S. Hammer, A Fourier transform infrared trace gas analyser for atmospheric applications. Atmospheric Measurement

  1. Variable-temperature measurements of the dielectric relaxation in carbon black loaded epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosseau, C.; Achour, M. E.

    2009-06-01

    Technologically, an understanding of the temperature influence on the transport properties is essential to the study of many random conductor-insulator composites, while fundamentally it is related to a variety of questions in statistical physics, dielectrics, and materials science, to name a few. Variable-temperature measurements of the frequency dependent complex effective permittivity were performed on amine-cured epoxy resins loaded with carbon black (CB). Two series of prepercolative samples differing from the kind of CB particles (Raven 2000 and Raven 5000) mixed in an amine-cured epoxy matrix (diglycidylic ether of bisphenol F) were studied. In this effort to contribute to our understanding of the role of frequency (100 Hz-15 MHz) and temperature (from ambient temperature up to 90 °C) on the complex effective permittivity which describes the linear response of the system to an electromagnetic wave, we investigate these composites with CB loadings below the percolation threshold. Two features are observed. First, our observations cannot be understood in the typical framework of a simple Debye-like dipolar process. In this analysis, we argue that the appearance of the broad temperature and frequency dependent maximum loss can be understood within the heuristic framework proposed by Jonscher which applies to disordered heterogeneous systems. This theoretical framework is consistent with several aspects of the experiments, notably the power-law decays of the real and imaginary parts of the effective permittivity characterized by two fractional exponents m and n. These exponents are both positive and smaller than unity. We further quantified their different temperature variations: while m is strongly decreasing with increasing temperature, n takes a value close to 1. Second, the observed maximum loss frequency found for each CB volume fraction shifts to higher frequencies with increasing temperature and exhibits a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence well

  2. Magnetic field penetration depth of La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4 measured by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kossler, W. J.; Kempton, J. R.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Uemura, Y. J.

    1987-01-01

    Muon-spin-relaxation measurements have been performed on a high-Tc superconductor La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4. In an external transverse magnetic field of 500 G, a magnetic field penetration depth of 2000 A at T = 10 K has been determined from the muon-spin-relaxation rate which increased with decreasing temperature below Tc. From this depth and the Pauli susceptibility, the superconducting carrier density is estimated at 3 x 10 to the 21st per cu cm. The zero-field relaxation rates above and below Tc were equal, which suggests that the superconducting state in this sample is not associated with detectable static magnetic ordering.

  3. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  4. Mycorrhizal Fungi Provide Most of the Nitrogen for Symbiotic Arctic Plants: 15N Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, J. E.; Hobbie, E. A.

    2004-12-01

    When soil nitrogen is in short supply, most terrestrial plants form symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizae) in which fine hyphal threads take up soil nitrogen, transport it into plant roots, and in return receive plant sugars. Because the transfer rates are very difficult to measure in nature, ecologists need new tools by which to assess the role of mycorrhizal fungi in carbon and nitrogen cycling. Recent studies indicate that the natural abundance of 15N taken up from the soil by hyphae is changed during transfer of nitrogen to roots; the result is large differences among the natural abundance of 15N in soil, symbiotic plants, and symbiotic fungi that depend on the mass balance of nitrogen in the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Measurements were carried out in acidic tussock tundra at the Toolik Lake LTER site in Arctic Alaska (68\\deg N 149\\deg W). The \\delta15N of soil N was 1.5%, of soil ammonium was 1.5%, of ericoid and ectomycorrhizal plants was -5.0%, and of ectomycorrhizal fungi was 7.0 parts per mille%. The mass balance of the 15N shows that the plants received 61-86% of their nitrogen from the fungal hyphae. These values, when combined with known plant growth rates, reveal that the plants provided 7-16% of their photosynthetic carbon to the fungi for growth and respiration, or about 25% of all carbon allocated to belowground processes. This analytical technique could be readily applied to other nitrogen-limited ecosystems such as many temperate and boreal forests to quantify the importance for terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling of mycorrhizally mediated transfers at the plant-soil interface.

  5. The vibrational spectra of [ 15N 2]-succinonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengler, O. I.

    2001-07-01

    For the first time, the infrared and Raman spectra of [ 15N 2]-succinonitrile are presented and discussed in detail. Assignments of the vibrational bands of its two rotational conformers gauche and trans, respectively, have been made for both infrared and Raman spectra. The assignments were based on a recent ab-initio force field calculation for succinonitrile, taking into account the vibrational frequencies of other succinonitrile isotopomers. There are differences in the frequencies of the vibrational bands due to the mass increase in the cyanide groups, which have been analysed in depth.

  6. The vibrational spectra of [15N2]-succinonitrile.

    PubMed

    Fengler, O I

    2001-07-01

    For the first time, the infrared and Raman spectra of [15N2]-succinonitrile are presented and discussed in detail. Assignments of the vibrational bands of its two rotational conformers gauche and trans, respectively, have been made for both infrared and Raman spectra. The assignments were based on a recent ab-initio force field calculation for succinonitrile, taking into account the vibrational frequencies of other succinonitrile isotopomers. There are differences in the frequencies of the vibrational bands due to the mass increase in the cyanide groups, which have been analysed in depth. PMID:11471715

  7. 15N NMR chemical shifts in papaverine decomposition products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyrski, Andrzej; Girreser, Ulrich; Hermann, Tadeusz

    2013-03-01

    Papaverine can be easily oxidized to papaverinol, papaveraldine and 2,3,9,10-tetramethoxy-12-oxo-12H-indolo[2,1-a]isoquinolinium chloride. On addition of alkali solution the latter compound forms 2-(2-carboxy-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-6,7-dimethoxyisoquinolinium inner salt. Together with these structures the interesting 13-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3,8,9-tetramethoxy-6a-12a-diazadibenzo[a,g]fluorenylium chloride is discussed, which is formed in the Gadamer-Schulemann reaction of papaverine as a side product. This letter reports the 15N NMR spectra of the above mentioned compounds.

  8. NMR T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements and calculations with translational and rotational components for liquid electrolytes containing LiBF{sub 4} and propylene carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P. M. Voice, A. M. Ward, I. M.

    2013-12-07

    Longitudinal relaxation (T{sub 1}) measurements of {sup 19}F, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 1}H in propylene carbonate/LiBF{sub 4} liquid electrolytes are reported. Comparison of T{sub 1} values with those for the transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) confirm that the measurements are in the high temperature (low correlation time) limit of the T{sub 1} minimum. Using data from pulsed field gradient measurements of self-diffusion coefficients and measurements of solution viscosity measured elsewhere, it is concluded that although in general there are contributions to T{sub 1} from both translational and rotational motions. For the lithium ions, this is mainly translational, and for the fluorine ions mainly rotational.

  9. Long-term measurement of terpenoid flux above a Larix kaempferi forest using a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Tani, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Saigusa, Nobuko; Ueyama, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    Terpenoids emitted from forests contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols and affect the carbon budgets of forest ecosystems. To investigate seasonal variation in terpenoid flux involved in the aerosol formation and carbon budget, we measured the terpenoid flux of a Larix kaempferi forest between May 2011 and May 2012 by using a relaxed eddy accumulation method. Isoprene was emitted from a fern plant species Dryopteris crassirhizoma on the forest floor and monoterpenes from the L. kaempferi. α-Pinene was the dominant compound, but seasonal variation of the monoterpene composition was observed. High isoprene and monoterpene fluxes were observed in July and August. The total monoterpene flux was dependent on temperature, but several unusual high positive fluxes were observed after rain fall events. We found a good correlation between total monoterpene flux and volumetric soil water content (r = 0.88), and used this correlation to estimate monoterpene flux after rain events and calculate annual terpenoid emissions. Annual carbon emission in the form of total monoterpenes plus isoprene was determined to be 0.93% of the net ecosystem exchange. If we do not consider the effect of rain fall, carbon emissions may be underestimated by about 50%. Our results suggest that moisture conditions in the forest soil is a key factor controlling the monoterpene emissions from the forest ecosystem.

  10. Measuring diffusion-relaxation correlation maps using non-uniform field gradients of single-sided NMR devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-11-01

    Single-sided NMR systems are becoming a relevant tool in industry and laboratory environments due to their low cost, low maintenance and capacity to evaluate quantity and quality of hydrogen based materials. The performance of such devices has improved significantly over the last decade, providing increased field homogeneity, field strength and even controlled static field gradients. For a class of these devices, the configuration of the permanent magnets provides a linear variation of the magnetic field and can be used in diffusion measurements. However, magnet design depends directly on its application and, according to the purpose, the field homogeneity may significantly be compromised. This may prevent the determination of diffusion properties of fluids based on the natural inhomogeneity of the field using known techniques. This work introduces a new approach that extends the applicability of diffusion-editing CPMG experiments to NMR devices with highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields, which do not vary linearly in space. Herein, we propose a method to determine a custom diffusion kernel based on the gradient distribution, which can be seen as a signature of each NMR device. This new diffusion kernel is then utilised in the 2D inverse Laplace transform (2D ILT) in order to determine diffusion-relaxation correlation maps of homogeneous multi-phasic fluids. The experiments were performed using NMR MObile Lateral Explore (MOLE), which is a single-sided NMR device designed to maximise the volume at the sweet spot with enhanced depth penetration.

  11. VOC flux measurements using a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation GC-FID system in urban Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Schade, G.; Boedeker, I.

    2008-12-01

    Houston experiences higher ozone production rates than most other major cities in the US, which is related to high anthropogenic VOC emissions from both area/mobile sources (car traffic) and a large number of petrochemical facilities. The EPA forecasts that Houston is likely to still violate the new 8-h NAAQS in 2020. To monitor neighborhood scale pollutant fluxes, we established a tall flux tower installation a few kilometers north of downtown Houston. We measure energy and trace gas fluxes, including VOCs from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in the urban surface layer using eddy covariance and related techniques. Here, we describe a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system combined with a dual-channel GC-FID used for VOC flux measurements, including first results. Ambient air is sampled at approximately 15 L min-1 through a 9.5 mm OD PFA line from 60 m above ground next to a sonic anemometer. Subsamples of this air stream are extracted through an ozone scrubber and pushed into two Teflon bag reservoirs, from which they are transferred to the GC pre-concentration units consisting of carbon-based adsorption traps encapsulated in heater blocks for thermal desorption. We discuss the performance of our system and selected measurement results from the 2008 spring and summer seasons in Houston. We present diurnal variations of the fluxes of the traffic tracers benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) during different study periods. Typical BTEX fluxes ranged from -0.36 to 3.10 mg m-2 h-1 for benzene, and -0.47 to 5.04 mg m-2 h-1 for toluene, and exhibited diurnal cycles with two dominant peaks related to rush-hour traffic. A footprint analysis overlaid onto a geographic information system (GIS) will be presented to reveal the dominant emission sources and patterns in the study area.

  12. Membrane fluidity profiles as deduced by saturation-recovery EPR measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times of spin labels

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Laxman; Feix, Jimmy B.; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2011-01-01

    There are no easily obtainable EPR spectral parameters for lipid spin labels that describe profiles of membrane fluidity. The order parameter, which is most often used as a measure of membrane fluidity, describes the amplitude of wobbling motion of alkyl chains relative to the membrane normal and does not contain explicitly time or velocity. Thus, this parameter can be considered as nondynamic. The spin-lattice relaxation rate (T−11) obtained from saturation-recovery EPR measurements of lipid spin labels in deoxygenated samples depends primarily on the rotational correlation time of the nitroxide moiety within the lipid bilayer. Thus, T−11 can be used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity that reflects local membrane dynamics. T−11 profiles obtained for 1-palmitoyl-2-(n-doxylstearoyl)phosphatidylcholine (n-PC) spin labels in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol are presented in parallel with profiles of the rotational diffusion coefficient, R⊥, obtained from simulation of EPR spectra using Freed's model. These profiles are compared with profiles of the order parameter obtained directly from EPR spectra and with profiles of the order parameter obtained from simulation of EPR spectra. It is shown that T−11 and R⊥ profiles reveal changes in membrane fluidity that depend on the motional properties of the lipid alkyl chain. We find that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect only to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. These effects cannot be differentiated by profiles of the order parameter. All profiles in this study were obtained at X-band (9.5 GHz). PMID:21868272

  13. One-Shot Measurement of Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times in the Off-Resonance Rotating Frame of Reference with Applications to Breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbanks, Ethan Jefferson

    1994-01-01

    Off-resonance spin locking makes use of the novel relaxation time T_{1rho} ^{rm off}, which may be useful in characterizing breast disease. Knowledge of T _{rm 1rho}^{rm off} is essential for optimization of spin -locking imaging methods. The purpose of this work was to develop an optimal imaging technique for in vivo measurement of T_{rm 1rho}^ {rm off}. Measurement of T _{1rho}^{rm off } using conventional methods requires long exam times which are not suitable for patients. Exam time may be shortened by utilizing a one-shot method developed by Look and Locker, making in vivo measurements possible. The imaging method consisted of a 180^circ inversion pulse followed by a series of small-angle alpha pulses to tip a portion of the longitudinal magnetization into the transverse plane for readout. During each relaxation interval (between alpha pulses), a spin-locking pulse was applied off-resonance to achieve T_ {1rho}^{rm off} relaxation. The value of T_{rm 1rho}^{rm off} was then determined using a three-parameter non-linear least-squares fitting procedure. Values of T_ {1rho}^{rm off} were measured for normal and pathologic breast tissues at several resonant offsets. These measurements revealed that image contrast can be manipulated by altering the resonant offset of the spin-locking pulse. Whereas T _1 relaxation times were nearly identical for normal and cancerous tissues, T_{1 rho}^{rm off} relaxation times differed significantly. These results may be useful in improving image contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients from the {sup 15}N({sup 3}He,d){sup 16}O Reaction and the Astrophysical Factor for the {sup 15}N(p,{gamma}){sup 16}O Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Burjan, V.; Bem, P.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J.; Novak, J.; Piskor, S.; Simeckova, E.; Vincour, J.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Tumino, A.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Plunkett, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2008-05-12

    The angular distributions of the {sup 15}N({sup 3}He,d){sup 16}O reaction were measured with the aim to determine the direct capture rate of the astrophysical reaction {sup 15}N(p, {gamma}){sup 16}O by deducing asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANC). The {sup 15}N(p,{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction is a part of the CNO cycle having importance in the nucleosynthesis of the N and O isotopes. The measurement was carried out on the cyclotron U120M of NPI CAS at the energy 25.74 MeV of {sup 3}He ions in a gas chamber containing the high purity {sup 15}N isotope. The preliminary results of corresponding spectroscopic factors and ANC's were used for the estimation of the S-factor for the direct capture {sup 15}N(p,{gamma}){sup 16}O. Using the widths of the resonances E{sub R} = 312 and 962 keV, the total S-factor was determined within the framework of the R-matrix approach.

  15. MILLIMETER-WAVE OBSERVATIONS OF CN AND HNC AND THEIR {sup 15}N ISOTOPOLOGUES: A NEW EVALUATION OF THE {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N RATIO ACROSS THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Adande, G. R.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    The N = 1 {yields} 0 transitions of CN and C{sup 15}N (X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}), as well as the J = 1 {yields} 0 lines of HN{sup 13}C and H{sup 15}NC, have been observed toward 11 molecular clouds using the new 3 mm ALMA-type receiver of the 12 m telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory. These sources span a wide range of distances from the Galactic center and are all regions of star formation. From these observations, {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios have been determined using two independent methods. First, the measurements of C{sup 14}N and C{sup 15}N were directly compared to establish this ratio, correcting for high opacities when needed, as indicated by the nitrogen hyperfine intensities. Second, the ratio was calculated from the quantity [HN{sup 13}C]/[H{sup 15}NC], determined from the HNC data, and then scaled by {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios previously established, i.e., the so-called double isotope method. Values from both methods are in reasonable agreement, and fall in the range {approx}120-400, somewhat lower than previous {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios derived from HCN. The ratios exhibit a distinct positive gradient with distance from the Galactic center, following the relationship{sup 14}N/{sup 15}N = 21.1 (5.2) kpc{sup -1} D{sub GC} + 123.8 (37.1). This gradient is consistent with predictions of Galactic chemical evolution models in which {sup 15}N has a secondary origin in novae, while primary and secondary sources exist for {sup 14}N. The local interstellar medium value was found to be {sup 4}N/{sup 15}N = 290 {+-} 40, in agreement with the ratio found in nearby diffuse clouds and close to the value of 272 found in Earth's atmosphere.

  16. Food webs in Mongolian grasslands: the analysis of 13C and 15N natural abundances.

    PubMed

    Kohzu, Ayato; Iwata, T; Kato, M; Nishikawa, J; Wada, Eitaro; Amartuvshin, N; Namkhaidorj, B; Fujita, N

    2009-09-01

    Overgrazing often lowers species richness and productivity of grassland communities. For Mongolian grassland ecosystems, a lack of detailed information about food-web structures makes it difficult to predict the effects of overgrazing on species diversity and community composition. We analysed the delta13C and delta15N signatures of herbaceous plants, arthropods (grouped by feeding habit), wild and domestic mammals, and humans in central Mongolia to understand the predominant food-web pathways in this grassland ecosystem. The delta13C and delta15N values of mammals showed little variation within species, but varied considerably with slope position for arthropods. The apparent isotopic discrimination between body tissue and hair of mammals was estimated as 2.0 per thousand for delta13C and 2.1 per thousand for delta15N, which was large enough to cause overestimation of the trophic level of mammals if not taken into account when using hair samples to measure isotopic enrichment. PMID:19507080

  17. A dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation system for long-term measurement of mercury flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterwalder, S.; Fritsche, J.; Alewell, C.; Schmutz, M.; Nilsson, M. B.; Jocher, G.; Sommar, J.; Rinne, J.; Bishop, K.

    2016-02-01

    The fate of anthropogenic emissions of mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere is influenced by the exchange of elemental Hg with the earth surface. This exchange holds the key to a better understanding of Hg cycling from local to global scales, which has been difficult to quantify. To advance research about land-atmosphere Hg interactions, we developed a dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system. REA is an established technique for measuring turbulent fluxes of trace gases and aerosol particles in the atmospheric surface layer. Accurate determination of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) fluxes has proven difficult due to technical challenges presented by extremely small concentration differences (typically < 0.5 ng m-3) between updrafts and downdrafts. We present an advanced REA design that uses two inlets and two pairs of gold cartridges for continuous monitoring of GEM fluxes. This setup reduces the major uncertainty created by the sequential sampling in many previous designs. Additionally, the instrument is equipped with a GEM reference gas generator that monitors drift and recovery rates. These innovations facilitate continuous, autonomous measurement of GEM flux. To demonstrate the system performance, we present results from field campaigns in two contrasting environments: an urban setting with a heterogeneous fetch and a boreal peatland during snowmelt. The observed average emission rates were 15 and 3 ng m-2 h-1, respectively. We believe that this dual-inlet, single detector approach is a significant improvement of the REA system for ultra-trace gases and can help to advance our understanding of long-term land-atmosphere GEM exchange.

  18. Determination of the δ15N of total nitrogen in solids; RSIL lab code 2893

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2893 is to determine the δ(15N/14N), abbreviated as δ15N , of total nitrogen in solid samples. A Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA) is used to convert total nitrogen in a solid sample into N2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines relative difference in the isotope-amount ratios of stable nitrogen isotopes (15N/14N)of the product N2 gas. The combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. Samples are placed in a tin capsule and loaded into the Costech Zero Blank Autosampler of the EA. Under computer control, samples are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where the combustion takes place in a helium atmosphere containing an excess of oxygen gas. Combustion products are transported by a helium carrier through a reduction tube to remove excess oxygen and convert all nitrous oxides into N2 and through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly CO2 and N2, are separated by a gas chromatograph. The gas is then introduced into the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) through a Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) ConFlo II interface, which also is used to inject N2 reference gas and helium for sample dilution. The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus CF-IRMS. It has a universal triple collector, two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle, capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 28, 29, 30, simultaneously. The ion beams from N2 are as follows: m/z 28 = N2 = 14N14N; m/z 29 = N2 = 14N15N primarily; m/z 30 = NO = 14N16O primarily, which is a sign of contamination or incomplete reduction.

  19. Relation between Direct Observation of Relaxation and Self-Reported Mindfulness and Relaxation States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hites, Lacey S.; Lundervold, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Forty-four individuals, 18-47 (MN 21.8, SD 5.63) years of age, took part in a study examining the magnitude and direction of the relationship between self-report and direct observation measures of relaxation and mindfulness. The Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS), a valid direct observation measure of relaxation, was used to assess relaxed behavior…

  20. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized 129Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon (129Xe and 131Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe could be increased 2–7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of 129Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm2/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm2/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation.

  1. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized (129)Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of (129)Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon ((129)Xe and (131)Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of (129)Xe could be increased 2-7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of (129)Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm(2)/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm(2)/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  2. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized 129Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon (129Xe and 131Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe could be increased 2–7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of 129Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm2/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm2/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  3. The time correlation function perspective of NMR relaxation in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Yury E.; Meirovitch, Eva

    2013-08-01

    We applied over a decade ago the two-body coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach to NMR relaxation in proteins. One rotator is the globally moving protein and the other rotator is the locally moving probe (spin-bearing moiety, typically the 15N-1H bond). So far we applied SRLS to 15N-H relaxation from seven different proteins within the scope of the commonly used data-fitting paradigm. Here, we solve the SRLS Smoluchowski equation using typical best-fit parameters as input, to obtain the corresponding generic time correlation functions (TCFs). The following new information is obtained. For actual rhombic local ordering and main ordering axis pointing along C_{i - 1}^α - C_i^α, the measurable TCF is dominated by the (K,K') = (-2,2), (2,2), and (0,2) components (K is the order of the rank 2 local ordering tensor), determined largely by the local motion. Global diffusion axiality affects the analysis significantly when the ratio between the parallel and perpendicular components exceeds approximately 1.5. Local diffusion axiality has a large and intricate effect on the analysis. Mode-coupling becomes important when the ratio between the global and local motional rates falls below 0.01. The traditional method of analysis - model-free (MF) - represents a simple limit of SRLS. The conditions under which the MF and SRLS TCFs are the same are specified. The validity ranges of wobble-in-a-cone and rotation on the surface of a cone as local motions are determined. The evolution of the intricate Smoluchowski operator from the simple diffusion operator for a sphere reorienting in isotropic medium is delineated. This highlights the fact that SRLS is an extension of the established stochastic theories for treating restricted motions. This study lays the groundwork for TCF-based comparison between mesoscopic SRLS and atomistic molecular dynamics.

  4. A closer look at the nitrogen next door: 1H-15N NMR methods for glycosaminoglycan structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beni, Szabolcs; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, experimental conditions were presented for the detection of the N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) NHSO3- or sulfamate 1H and 15N NMR resonances of the pharmaceutically and biologically important glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin in aqueous solution. In the present work, we explore further the applicability of nitrogen-bound proton detection to provide structural information for GAGs. Compared to the detection of 15N chemical shifts of aminosugars through long-range couplings using the IMPACT-HNMBC pulse sequence, the more sensitive two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiments provided additional structural data. The IMPACT-HNMBC experiment remains a powerful tool as demonstrated by the spectrum measured for the unsubstituted amine of 3-O-sulfoglucosamine (GlcN(3S)), which cannot be observed with the 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiment due to the fast exchange of the amino group protons with solvent. The 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectrum reported for the mixture of model compounds GlcNS and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrate the broad utility of this approach. Measurements for the synthetic pentasaccharide drug Arixtra® (Fondaparinux sodium) in aqueous solution illustrate the power of this NMR pulse sequence for structural characterization of highly similar N-sulfoglucosamine residues in GAG-derived oligosaccharides.

  5. Compound-specific amino acid δ15N patterns in marine algae: Tracer potential for cyanobacterial vs. eukaryotic organic nitrogen sources in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Matthew D.; Lehman, Jennifer; Kudela, Raphael

    2013-02-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopic analysis of individual amino acids (δ15N-AA) has unique potential to elucidate the complexities of food webs, track heterotrophic transformations, and understand diagenesis of organic nitrogen (ON). While δ15N-AA patterns of autotrophs have been shown to be generally similar, prior work has also suggested that differences may exist between cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae. However, δ15N-AA patterns in differing oceanic algal groups have never been closely examined. The overarching goals of this study were first to establish a more quantitative understanding of algal δ15N-AA patterns, and second to examine whether δ15N-AA patterns have potential as a new tracer for distinguishing prokaryotic vs. eukaryotic N sources. We measured δ15N-AA from prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton cultures and used a complementary set of statistical approaches (simple normalization, regression-derived fractionation factors, and multivariate analyses) to test for variations. A generally similar δ15N-AA pattern was confirmed for all algae, however significant AA-specific variation was also consistently identified between the two groups. The relative δ15N fractionation of Glx (glutamine + glutamic acid combined) vs. total proteinaceous N appeared substantially different, which we hypothesize could be related to differing enzymatic forms. In addition, the several other AA (most notably glycine and leucine) appeared to have strong biomarker potential. Finally, we observed that overall patterns of δ15N values in algae correspond well with the Trophic vs. Source-AA division now commonly used to describe variable AA δ15N changes with trophic transfer, suggesting a common mechanistic basis. Overall, these results show that autotrophic δ15N-AA patterns can differ between major algal evolutionary groupings for many AA. The statistically significant multivariate results represent a first approach for testing ideas about relative eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic

  6. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  7. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for (13)C NMR relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of (15)N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to (13)C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and (13)C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly (13)C-labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions. PMID:27003380

  8. Spatial Patterns of Plant δ13C and δ15N Along a Topoedaphic Gradient in a Subtropical Savanna Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, E.; Boutton, T. W.; Liu, F.; Wu, B.; Archer, S. R.

    2005-12-01

    δ13C and δ15N values of plants are powerful tools in physiological ecology, ecosystem science, and global biogeochemistry, yet we know relatively little about their variation and controls at the landscape scale. In this study, we investigated landscape-scale spatial variations in the foliar isotopic composition of 3 woody plant species across a 308 m topoedaphic gradient, along which soil texture and plant resources (water and nitrogen availability) varied from upland (86 m) to lowland (84 m) portions of the landscape. The study was conducted in a subtropical savanna at the La Copita Research Area, approximately 60 km west of Corpus Christi, TX. Foliar δ13C, δ15N, leaf nitrogen concentration ([N]), and specific leaf area (SLA) were measured on all individuals of Prosopis glandulosa, Condalia hookeri, and Zanthoxylum fagara present within a belt transect 308 m long x 12 m wide. Soil texture, available soil moisture, and total N were measured at 1 m intervals along the center-line of the belt transect. Clay content, available soil moisture, and soil total N were all negatively correlated with elevation along the transect. Leaf δ13C and δ15N values for all 3 species increased by 1-4 o/oo with decreasing elevation along the transect. Contrary to theory and previous studies, δ13C values were highest where soil water was most available, suggesting that some other variable could be overriding or interacting with water availability. Foliar [N] appeared to exert the strongest control over landscape-level variation, and was positively correlated with δ13C of all species (R 2 = 0.58, p<0.0001). Since leaf [N] is positively related to photosynthetic capacity, plants with high [N] are likely to have low Ci/Ca ratios and therefore higher δ13C values. δ15N values of Zanthoxylum and Condalia were positively correlated with leaf [N] and soil water availability; however, these relationships were absent for Prosopis, an N-fixing tree legume. We speculate that the

  9. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  10. Four-year measurement of methane flux over a temperate forest with a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakabe, A.; Kosugi, Y.; Ueyama, M.; Hamotani, K.; Takahashi, K.; Iwata, H.; Itoh, M.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are generally assumed to be an atmospheric methane (CH4) sink (Le Mer and Roger, 2001). However, under Asian monsoon climate, forests are subject to wide spatiotemporal range in soil water status, where forest soils often became water-saturated condition heterogeneously. In such warm and humid conditions, forests may act as a CH4 source and/or sink with considerable spatiotemporal variations. Micrometeorological methods such as eddy covariance (EC) method continuously measure spatially-representative flux at a canopy scale without artificial disturbance. In this study, we measured CH4 fluxes over a temperate forest during four-year period using a CH4 analyzer based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy detection with a relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method (Hamotani et al., 1996, 2001). We revealed the amplitude and seasonal variations of canopy-scale CH4 fluxes. The REA method is the attractive alternative to the EC method to measure trace-gas flux because it allows the use of analyzers with an optimal integration time. We also conducted continuous chamber measurements on forest floor to reveal spatial variations in soil CH4 fluxes and its controlling processes. The observations were made in an evergreen coniferous forest in central Japan. The site has a warm temperate monsoon climate with wet summer. Some wetlands were located in riparian zones along streams within the flux footprint area. For the REA method, the sonic anemometer (SAT-550, Kaijo) was mounted on top of the 29-m-tall tower and air was sampled from just below the sonic anemometer to reservoirs according to the direction of vertical wind velocity (w). After accumulating air for 30 minutes, the air in the reservoirs was pulled into a CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-840, Li-Cor) and a CH4 analyzer (FMA-200, Los Gatos Research). Before entering the analyzers, the sampled air was dried using a gas dryer (PD-50 T-48; Perma Pure Inc.). The REA flux is obtained from the difference in the mean concentrations

  11. Optical Microscopy Characterization for Borehole U-15n#12 in Support of NCNS Source Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jennifer E.; Sussman, Aviva Joy

    2015-05-22

    Optical microscopy characterization of thin sections from corehole U-15n#12 is part of a larger material characterization effort for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). The SPE program was conducted in Nevada with a series of explosive tests designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves inside Stock quartz monzonite. Optical microscopy analysis includes the following: 1) imaging of full thin sections (scans and mosaic maps); 2) high magnification imaging of petrographic texture (grain size, foliations, fractures, etc.); and 3) measurement of microfracture density.

  12. Oxygen determination in materials by 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Sunitha, Y.; Reddy, G. L. N.; Sukumar, A. A.; Ramana, J. V.; Sarkar, A.; Verma, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents a proton induced γ-ray emission method based on 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction to determine bulk oxygen in materials. The determination involves the measurement of 5.27 MeV γ-rays emitted following the de-excitation of 15N nuclei. A description of the energetics of the reaction is given to provide an insight into the origin of 5.27 MeV γ-rays. In addition, thick target γ-ray yields and the limits of detection are measured to ascertain the analytical potential of the reaction. The thick-target γ-ray yields are measured with a high purity germanium detector and a bismuth germanate detector at 0° as well as 90° angles in 3.0-4.2 MeV proton energy region. The best limit of detection of about 1.3 at.% is achieved at 4.2 MeV proton energy for measurements at 0° as well 90° angles with the bismuth germanate detector while the uncertainty in quantitative analysis is <8%. The reaction has a probing depth of several tens of microns. Interferences can arise from fluorine due to the occurrence of 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction that emits 6-7 MeV γ-rays. The analytical potential of the methodology is demonstrated by determining oxygen in several oxide as well as non-oxide materials.

  13. Dielectric relaxation time spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paulson, K S; Jouravleva, S; McLeod, C N

    2000-11-01

    A new mathematical method is developed to recover the permittivity relaxation spectrum of living tissue from measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the impedance. Aiming to derive information about electrical properties of living tissue without the prior selection of any impedance model, the procedure calculates the relaxation time distribution. It provides new characteristic independent parameters: time constants, their distribution, and the amplitudes of the associated dispersion. As the beta-dispersion is the most important in the area of electrical impedance spectroscopy of tissue, the paper gives an estimate of the essential frequency range to cover the whole relaxation spectrum in that area. Results are presented from both simulation and known lumped--constant element circuit. PMID:11077745

  14. New flaxseed orbitides: Detection, sequencing, and (15)N incorporation.

    PubMed

    Okinyo-Owiti, Denis P; Young, Lester; Burnett, Peta-Gaye G; Reaney, Martin J T

    2014-03-01

    Three new orbitides (cyclolinopeptides 17, 18, and 19) were identified in flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) extracts without any form of purification. Their structures were elucidated by a combination of (15) N-labeling experiments and extensive tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI). Putative linear peptide sequences of the new orbitides were used as the query in the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) searches of flax genome database. These searches returned linear sequences for the putative precursors of cyclolinopeptides 17 and 19 among others. Cyclolinopeptide 18 contains MetO (O) and is not directly encoded, but is a product of post-translation modification of the Met present in 17. The identification of precursor proteins in flax mRNA transcripts and DNA sequences confirmed the occurrence and amino acid sequences of these orbitides as [1-9-NαC]-MLKPFFFWI, [1-9-NαC]-OLKPFFFWI, and [1-9-NαC]-GIPPFWLTL for cyclolinopeptides 17, 18, and 19, respectively. PMID:24408479

  15. A 300 MHz and 600 MHz proton NMR study of a 12 base pair restriction fragment: investigation of structure by relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Early, T A; Kearns, D R; Hillen, W; Wells, R D

    1980-01-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of a 12 base pair DNA restriction fragment has been measured at 300 and 600 MHz and resonances from over 70 protons are individually resolved. Relaxation rate measurements have been carried out at 300 MHz and compared with the theoretical predictions obtained using an isotropic rigid rotor model with coordinates derived from a Dreiding model of DNA. The model gives results that are in excellent agreement with experiment for most protons when a 7 nsec rotational correlation time is used, although agreement is improved for certain base protons by using a shorter correlation time for the sugar group, or by increasing the sugar-base interproton distances. A comparison of non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation rates for carbon bound protons indicates that there is extensive spin diffusion even in this short DNA fragment. Examination of the spin-spin relaxation rates for the same type of proton on different base pairs reveals little sequence effect on conformation. PMID:6258152

  16. Interconversion algorithm between mechanical and dielectric relaxation measurements for acetate of cis- and trans-2-phenyl-5-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Bernabé, A.; Lidón-Roger, J. V.; Sanchis, M. J.; Díaz-Calleja, R.; del Castillo, L. F.

    2015-10-01

    The dielectric and mechanical spectroscopies of acetate of cis- and trans-2-phenyl-5-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxane are reported in the frequency domain from 10-2 to 106Hz . This ester has been selected in this study for its predominant α relaxation with regard to the β relaxation, which can be neglected. This study consists of determining an interconversion algorithm between dielectric and mechanical measurements, given by using a relation between rotational and translational complex viscosities. These important viscosities were obtained from measures of the dielectric complex permittivity and by dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively. The definitions of rotational and translational viscosities were evaluated by means of fractional calculus, by using the fit parameters of the Havriliak-Negami empirical model obtained in the dielectric and mechanical characterization of the α relaxation. This interconversion algorithm is a generalization of the break of the Stokes-Einstein-Debye relationship. It uses a power law with an exponent defined as the shape factor, which modifies the translational viscosity. Two others factors are introduced for the interconversion, a shift factor, which displaces the translational viscosity in the frequency domain, and a scale factor, which makes equal values of the two viscosities. In this paper, the shape factor has been identified as the relation between the slopes of the moduli of the complex viscosities at higher frequency. This is interpreted as the degree of kinetic coupling between the molecular rotation and translational movements. Alternatively, another interconversion algorithm has been expressed by means of dielectric and mechanical moduli.

  17. 15N2 formation and fast oxygen isotope exchange during pulsed 15N18O exposure of MnOx/CeO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos

    2014-12-23

    Pulsing 15N18O onto an annealed 1% Mn16Ox/Ce16O2 catalyst resulted in very fast oxygen isotope exchange and 15N2 formation at 295 K. In the 1st 15N18O pulse, due to the presence of large number of surface oxygen defects, extensive 15N218O and 15N2 formations were observed. In subsequent pulses oxygen isotope exchange dominated as a result of highly labile oxygen in the oxide. We gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Vehicle Technologies Program for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  18. Choice of dietary protein of vegetarians and omnivores is reflected in their hair protein 13C and 15N abundance.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Boeing, Heiner; Metges, Cornelia C

    2005-01-01

    Stable isotopic (15N, 13C) composition of tissues depends on isotopic pattern of food sources. We investigated whether the isotopic compositions of human hair protein and amino acids reflect the habitual dietary protein intake. Hair samples were analyzed from 100 omnivores (selected randomly out of the 1987-1988 German nutrition survey VERA), and from 15 ovo-lacto-vegetarians (OLV), and from 6 vegans recruited separately. Hair bulk and amino acid specific isotopic compositions were analyzed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS and GC/C/IRMS, respectively) and the results were correlated with data of the 7 day dietary records. Hair bulk 15N and 13C abundances clearly reflect the particular eating habits. Vegans can be distinguished from OLV and both are significantly distinct from omnivores in both 15N and 13C abundances. 15N and 13C abundances rose with a higher proportion of animal to total protein intake (PAPI). Individual proportions of animal protein consumption (IPAP) were calculated using isotopic abundances and a linear regression model using animal protein consumption data of vegans (PAPI = 0) and omnivores (mean PAPI = 0.639). IPAP values positively correlated with the intake of protein, meat, meat products, and animal protein. Distinct patterns for hair amino acid specific 15N and 13C abundances were measured but with lower resolution between food preference groups compared with bulk values. In conclusion, hair 13C and 15N values both reflected the extent of animal protein consumption. Bulk isotopic abundance of hair can be tested for future use in the validation of dietary assessment methods. PMID:15880664

  19. (15)N in tree rings as a bio-indicator of changing nitrogen cycling in tropical forests: an evaluation at three sites using two sampling methods.

    PubMed

    van der Sleen, Peter; Vlam, Mart; Groenendijk, Peter; Anten, Niels P R; Bongers, Frans; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Hietz, Peter; Pons, Thijs L; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is currently causing a more than twofold increase of reactive nitrogen input over large areas in the tropics. Elevated (15)N abundance (δ(15)N) in the growth rings of some tropical trees has been hypothesized to reflect an increased leaching of (15)N-depleted nitrate from the soil, following anthropogenic nitrogen deposition over the last decades. To find further evidence for altered nitrogen cycling in tropical forests, we measured long-term δ(15)N values in trees from Bolivia, Cameroon, and Thailand. We used two different sampling methods. In the first, wood samples were taken in a conventional way: from the pith to the bark across the stem of 28 large trees (the "radial" method). In the second, δ(15)N values were compared across a fixed diameter (the "fixed-diameter" method). We sampled 400 trees that differed widely in size, but measured δ(15)N in the stem around the same diameter (20 cm dbh) in all trees. As a result, the growth rings formed around this diameter differed in age and allowed a comparison of δ(15)N values over time with an explicit control for potential size-effects on δ(15)N values. We found a significant increase of tree-ring δ(15)N across the stem radius of large trees from Bolivia and Cameroon, but no change in tree-ring δ(15)N values over time was found in any of the study sites when controlling for tree size. This suggests that radial trends of δ(15)N values within trees reflect tree ontogeny (size development). However, for the trees from Cameroon and Thailand, a low statistical power in the fixed-diameter method prevents to conclude this with high certainty. For the trees from Bolivia, statistical power in the fixed-diameter method was high, showing that the temporal trend in tree-ring δ(15)N values in the radial method is primarily caused by tree ontogeny and unlikely by a change in nitrogen cycling. We therefore stress to account for tree size before tree-ring δ(15)N values can be properly

  20. 15N in tree rings as a bio-indicator of changing nitrogen cycling in tropical forests: an evaluation at three sites using two sampling methods

    PubMed Central

    van der Sleen, Peter; Vlam, Mart; Groenendijk, Peter; Anten, Niels P. R.; Bongers, Frans; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Hietz, Peter; Pons, Thijs L.; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is currently causing a more than twofold increase of reactive nitrogen input over large areas in the tropics. Elevated 15N abundance (δ15N) in the growth rings of some tropical trees has been hypothesized to reflect an increased leaching of 15N-depleted nitrate from the soil, following anthropogenic nitrogen deposition over the last decades. To find further evidence for altered nitrogen cycling in tropical forests, we measured long-term δ15N values in trees from Bolivia, Cameroon, and Thailand. We used two different sampling methods. In the first, wood samples were taken in a conventional way: from the pith to the bark across the stem of 28 large trees (the “radial” method). In the second, δ15N values were compared across a fixed diameter (the “fixed-diameter” method). We sampled 400 trees that differed widely in size, but measured δ15N in the stem around the same diameter (20 cm dbh) in all trees. As a result, the growth rings formed around this diameter differed in age and allowed a comparison of δ15N values over time with an explicit control for potential size-effects on δ15N values. We found a significant increase of tree-ring δ15N across the stem radius of large trees from Bolivia and Cameroon, but no change in tree-ring δ15N values over time was found in any of the study sites when controlling for tree size. This suggests that radial trends of δ15N values within trees reflect tree ontogeny (size development). However, for the trees from Cameroon and Thailand, a low statistical power in the fixed-diameter method prevents to conclude this with high certainty. For the trees from Bolivia, statistical power in the fixed-diameter method was high, showing that the temporal trend in tree-ring δ15N values in the radial method is primarily caused by tree ontogeny and unlikely by a change in nitrogen cycling. We therefore stress to account for tree size before tree-ring δ15N values can be properly interpreted. PMID

  1. Nitrate Reduction in a Groundwater Microcosm Determined by 15N Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Göran; Annadotter, Heléne

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic groundwater continuous-flow microcosms were designed to study nitrate reduction by the indigenous bacteria in intact saturated soil cores from a sandy aquifer with a concentration of 3.8 mg of NO3−-N liter−1. Traces of 15NO3− were added to filter-sterilized groundwater by using a Darcy flux of 4 cm day−1. Both assimilatory and dissimilatory reduction rates were estimated from analyses of 15N2, 15N2O, 15NH4+, and 15N-labeled protein amino acids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. N2 and N2O were separated on a megabore fused-silica column and quantified by electron impact-selected ion monitoring. NO3− and NH4+ were analyzed as pentafluorobenzoyl amides by multiple-ion monitoring and protein amino acids as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl ester derivatives by negative ion-chemical ionization. The numbers of bacteria and their [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation rates were simultaneously measured. Nitrate was completely reduced in the microcosms at a rate of about 250 ng g−1 day−1. Of this nitrate, 80 to 90% was converted by aerobic denitrification to N2, whereas only 35% was denitrified in the anaerobic microcosm, where more than 50% of NO3− was reduced to NH4+. Assimilatory reduction was recorded only in the aerobic microcosm, where N appeared in alanine in the cells. The nitrate reduction rates estimated for the aquifer material were low in comparison with rates in eutrophic lakes and coastal sediments but sufficiently high to remove nitrate from an uncontaminated aquifer of the kind examined in less than 1 month. PMID:16348048

  2. Studies with 15N-labeled ammonia and urea in the malnourished child

    PubMed Central

    Read, W. W. C.; McLaren, D. S.; Tchalian, Marie; Nassar, Siham

    1969-01-01

    Investigations using ammonium citrate-15N and urea-15N showed that children in the acute stage of kwashiorkor and marasmus receiving a diet of adequate protein content retained a considerable percentage of the label from both compounds. Excretion of both total 15N and urea-15N was subnormal and elimination was virtually completed 36 hr after administration of the isotope. During recovery from kwashiorkor total 15N excretion had approached normal a month after commencement of rehabilitation. Urea-15N excretion was still slightly subnormal after 3 months. In marasmus urea-15N formed a normal proportion of total 15N excretion after 1 month, although total 15N excretion then was still low. Ammonia nitrogen was retained to a greater extent than urea nitrogen in all cases. As it is known that a considerable amount of urea is degraded to ammonia in the gastrointestinal tract, it seems probable that urea nitrogen became available for use after this degradation. Examination of blood from one marasmic child after feeding ammonia-15N and from another after intravenous injection of urea-15N showed incorporation of the label into blood cells and plasma proteins. This did not occur in well nourished controls. It is concluded that ammonia and urea as sources of nonessential nitrogen may play an important part in protein metabolism in the malnourished child. PMID:5771193

  3. Protein synthesis in cancer patients with inflammatory response: investigations with [15N]glycine.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D C; Preston, T; Fearon, K C; Burns, H J; Slater, C; Shenkin, A

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that the increase in amino acid flux and derived protein synthesis rates observed in weight-losing cancer patients may contribute to an ongoing negative energy balance. The mediators and tissues responsible for such apparent increased protein synthesis have not been clearly identified. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between protein synthetic rates in whole-body, skeletal muscle, and circulating cortisol concentrations in healthy subjects (n = 6) and cancer patients with evidence of an inflammatory response (n = 6). Protein synthetic rates were measured with a primed continuous 20-h infusion of [15N]glycine. Skeletal muscle was biopsied at laparotomy. Serum cortisol, resting energy expenditure, plasma proteins, nitrogen metabolites in urine, and skeletal muscle free amino acids were also measured. Derived whole-body and skeletal muscle protein synthetic rates in the cancer group were increased significantly (by 70 and 93%, respectively, p < 0.05). Circulating concentrations of cortisol, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein were also significantly increased in the cancer group and indicated the presence of an inflammatory response. However, there was no significant increase in resting energy expenditure. Mechanisms by which apparent increases in whole-body and skeletal protein synthesis do not result in an increase in resting energy expenditure are discussed. We conclude that glycine utilization is increased in cancer patients but that rates of protein synthesis derived from [15N]glycine kinetics may not be valid in such patients. PMID:7919675

  4. Quantifying remobilization of pre-existing nitrogen from cuttings to new growth of woody plants using 15N at natural abundance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For measurements of nitrogen isotope composition at natural abundance, carry-over of pre-existing nitrogen remobilized to new plant growth can cause deviation of measured isotope composition (δ15N) from the δ15Nof newly acquired nitrogen. To account for this problem, a two-step approach was proposed to quantify and correct for remobilized nitrogen from vegetative cuttings of Populus balsamifera L. grown with either nitrate (δ15N = 58.5‰) or ammonium (δ15N = −0.96‰). First, the fraction of carry-over nitrogen remaining in the cutting was estimated by isotope mass balance. Then measured δ15N values were adjusted for the fraction of pre-existing nitrogen remobilized to the plant. Results Mean plant δ15N prior to correction was 49‰ and −5.8‰ under nitrate and ammonium, respectively. Plant δ15N was non-linearly correlated to biomass (r2 = 0.331 and 0.249 for nitrate and ammonium, respectively; P < 0.05) where the δ15N of plants with low biomass approached the δ15N of the pre-existing nitrogen. Approximately 50% of cutting nitrogen was not remobilized, irrespective of size. The proportion of carry-over nitrogen in new growth was not different between sources but ranged from less than 1% to 21% and was dependent on plant biomass and, to a lesser degree, the size of the cutting. The δ15N of newly acquired nitrogen averaged 52.7‰ and −6.4‰ for nitrate and ammonium-grown plants, respectively; both lower than their source values, as expected. Since there was a greater difference in δ15N between the carried-over pre-existing and newly assimilated nitrogen where nitrate was the source, the difference between measured δ15N and adjusted δ15N was also greater. There was no significant relationship between biomass and plant δ15N with either ammonium or nitrate after adjusting for carry-over nitrogen. Conclusion Here, we provide evidence of remobilized pre-existing nitrogen influencing δ15N of new growth of P. balsamifera L

  5. Quantifying nitrate retention processes in a riparian buffer zone using the natural abundance of 15N in NO3-.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Karel; Boeckx, Pascal; Van Cleemput, Oswald; Hofman, Georges

    2003-01-01

    Quantifying the relative importance of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention in riparian zones may lead to methods optimising the construction of riparian zones for water pollution control. The natural abundance of 15N in NO3- has been shown to be an interesting tool for providing insights into the NO3- retention processes occurring in riparian zones. In this study, 15N isotope fractionation (variation in delta15N of the residual NO3-) due to denitrification and due to plant uptake was measured in anaerobic soil slurries at different temperatures (5, 10 and 15 degrees C) and in hydroponic systems with different plant species (Lolium perenne L., Urtica dioica L. and Epilobium hirsutum L.). It was found that temperature had no significant effect on isotope fractionation during denitrification, which resulted in a 15N enrichment factor epsilonD of -22.5 +/- 0.6 per thousand. On the other hand, nitrate uptake by plants resulted in 15N isotope fractionation, but was independent of plant species, leading to a 15N enrichment factor epsilonP of -4.4 +/- 0.3 per thousand. By relating these two laboratory-defined enrichment factors to a field enrichment factor for groundwater nitrate retention during the growing season (epsilonR = -15.5 +/- 1.0 per thousand ), the contribution of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention could be calculated. The relative importance of denitrification and plant uptake to groundwater nitrate retention in the riparian buffer zone was 49 and 51% during spring, 53 and 47% during summer, and 75 and 25% during autumn. During wintertime, high micropore dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and low redox potentials due to decomposition of the highly productive riparian vegetation probably resulted in a higher denitrification rate and favoured other nitrate retention processes such as nitrate immobilisation or dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). This could have biased the 15N

  6. Compound specific amino acid δ15N in marine sediments: A new approach for studies of the marine nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Fabian C.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Crusius, John; Casso, Michael A.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-10-01

    The nitrogen (N) isotopic composition (δ15N) of bulk sedimentary N (δ15Nbulk) is a common tool for studying past biogeochemical cycling in the paleoceanographic record. Empirical evidence suggests that natural fluctuations in the δ15N of surface nutrient N are reflected in the δ15N of exported planktonic biomass and in sedimentary δ15Nbulk. However, δ15Nbulk is an analysis of total combustible sedimentary N, and therefore also includes mixtures of N sources and/or selective removal or preservation of N-containing compounds. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analyses of individual amino acids (δ15NAA) are novel measurements with the potential to decouple δ15N changes in nutrient N from trophic effects, two main processes that can influence δ15Nbulk records. As a proof of concept study to examine how δ15NAA can be applied in marine sedimentary systems, we compare the δ15NAA signatures of surface and sinking POM sources with shallow surface sediments from the Santa Barbara Basin, a sub-oxic depositional environmental that exhibits excellent preservation of sedimentary organic matter. Our results demonstrate that δ15NAA signatures of both planktonic biomass and sinking POM are well preserved in such surface sediments. However, we also observed an unexpected inverse correlation between δ15N value of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe; the best AA proxy for N isotopic value at the base of the food web) and calculated trophic position. We used a simple N isotope mass balance model to confirm that over long time scales, δ15NPhe values should in fact be directly dependent on shifts in ecosystem trophic position. While this result may appear incongruent with current applications of δ15NAA in food webs, it is consistent with expectations that paleoarchives will integrate N dynamics over much longer timescales. We therefore propose that for paleoceanographic applications, key δ15NAA parameters are ecosystem trophic position, which determines relative partitioning of 15N

  7. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with {sup 15}N solid-state NMR shift tensor data

    SciTech Connect

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K.; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T.

    2015-11-21

    The {sup 15}N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated {sup 15}N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2–3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X–Y and X–H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of {sup 15}N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved {sup 1}H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental {sup 15}N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than {sup 13}C tensors due to nitrogen’s greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  8. Determination of the δ15N of nitrate in solids; RSIL lab code 2894

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2894 is to determine the δ15N of nitrate (NO3-) in solids. The nitrate fraction of the nitrogen species is dissolved by water (called leaching) and can be analyzed by the bacterial method covered in RSIL lab code 2899. After leaching, the δ15N of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  9. Determination of the δ15N of nitrate in water; RSIL lab code 2899

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2899 is to determine the δ15N of nitrate (NO3-) in water. The δ15N of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of the NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  10. The decrease in Greenland ice-core δ15N of nitrate in the industrial period: influenced by changes in atmospheric acidity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, L.; Cole-Dai, J.; Alexander, B.; Steig, E. J.; Schauer, A. J.; Savarino, J.

    2012-12-01

    Previous study in a central Greenland ice core has revealed a decreasing trend in δ15N of nitrate (δ15N (nitrate)) starting as early as 1850 C.E.. Lake sediment cores from North America show a similar trend in δ15N of total nitrogen starting around 1895 C.E.. The decrease in δ15N has been proposed to be due to the increasing deposition of anthropogenically derived (i.e., fossil fuel combustion) nitrate in the industrial period. However, this interpretation is questioned by measurements of δ15N in NOx and atmospheric nitrate. Here, we present new, annually-resolved records of δ15N (nitrate) and major ion concentrations (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) obtained from two central Greenland ice cores. The results (Figure 1) indicate that the significant decrease in δ15N is coincident with an increase in acidity (H+ concentration estimated based on ionic balance) beginning around 1895 C.E., which is about 50 years earlier than the start of the increase in nitrate concentration (~1945 C.E.) . This observation suggests that it is likely the acidity change, instead of the input of anthropogenic nitrate, triggered the decrease in ice-core δ15N (nitrate). Atmospheric aerosol acidity influences the partitioning of atmospheric nitrate between its gaseous (HNO3) and particulate (p-NO3-) phases, resulting in a depletion of δ15N in HNO3 relative to p-NO3-. If atmospheric nitrate is transported to central Greenland preferentially in its gaseous form (HNO3), which is an open question, a decrease in ice-core δ15N (nitrate) would be expected with an increase in atmospheric acidity. We will examine the relationships between δ15N (nitrate) and the ice-core records of acidity, and HNO3, to discern the processes from changes in atmospheric acidity to the observed variability in ice core δ15N (nitrate) during the Industrial era.igure 1. The annual NO3- (blue curve), H+ (black curve) concentrations, and annual δ15N (nitrate) (red curve, y-axis is reversely

  11. Global modeling of the 15N216O line positions within the framework of the polyad model of effective Hamiltonian and a room temperature 15N216O line list

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashkun, S. A.; Perevalov, V. I.; Liu, A.-W.; Hu, S.-M.

    2016-05-01

    The global modeling of 15N216O line positions in the 4-12,516 cm-1 region has been performed using the polyad model of effective Hamiltonian. The effective Hamiltonian parameters were fitted to the line positions collected from an exhaustive review of the literature. The dimensionless weighted standard deviation of the fit is 1.31. The fitted set of 109 parameters allowed reproducing more than 18,000 measured line positions with an RMS value of 0.001 cm-1. A line list was calculated for a reference temperature 296 K, natural abundance (1.32×10-5), and an intensity cutoff 10-30 cm/molecule. The line list is based on the fitted set of the effective Hamiltonian parameters for 15N216O obtained in this work and the effective dipole moment parameters of the 15N216O and 14N216O isotopologues. Accurate values of the 15N216O total partition function are also given.

  12. Obtaining T1-T2 distribution functions from 1-dimensional T1 and T2 measurements: The pseudo 2-D relaxation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Nathan H.; Röding, Magnus; Galvosas, Petrik; Miklavcic, Stanley J.; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-08-01

    We present the pseudo 2-D relaxation model (P2DRM), a method to estimate multidimensional probability distributions of material parameters from independent 1-D measurements. We illustrate its use on 1-D T1 and T2 relaxation measurements of saturated rock and evaluate it on both simulated and experimental T1-T2 correlation measurement data sets. Results were in excellent agreement with the actual, known 2-D distribution in the case of the simulated data set. In both the simulated and experimental case, the functional relationships between T1 and T2 were in good agreement with the T1-T2 correlation maps from the 2-D inverse Laplace transform of the full 2-D data sets. When a 1-D CPMG experiment is combined with a rapid T1 measurement, the P2DRM provides a double-shot method for obtaining a T1-T2 relationship, with significantly decreased experimental time in comparison to the full T1-T2 correlation measurement.

  13. Obtaining T1-T2 distribution functions from 1-dimensional T1 and T2 measurements: The pseudo 2-D relaxation model.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Nathan H; Röding, Magnus; Galvosas, Petrik; Miklavcic, Stanley J; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-08-01

    We present the pseudo 2-D relaxation model (P2DRM), a method to estimate multidimensional probability distributions of material parameters from independent 1-D measurements. We illustrate its use on 1-D T1 and T2 relaxation measurements of saturated rock and evaluate it on both simulated and experimental T1-T2 correlation measurement data sets. Results were in excellent agreement with the actual, known 2-D distribution in the case of the simulated data set. In both the simulated and experimental case, the functional relationships between T1 and T2 were in good agreement with the T1-T2 correlation maps from the 2-D inverse Laplace transform of the full 2-D data sets. When a 1-D CPMG experiment is combined with a rapid T1 measurement, the P2DRM provides a double-shot method for obtaining a T1-T2 relationship, with significantly decreased experimental time in comparison to the full T1-T2 correlation measurement. PMID:27344611

  14. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems. PMID:25612718

  15. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ˜120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (˜207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (˜70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  16. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  17. Anisotropic collective motion contributes to nuclear spin relaxation in crystalline proteins.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Józef R; Sein, Julien; Blackledge, Martin; Emsley, Lyndon

    2010-02-01

    A model for calculating the influence of anisotropic collective motions on NMR relaxation rates in crystalline proteins is presented. We show that small-amplitude (<10 degrees ) fluctuations may lead to substantial contributions to the (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rates and propose that the effect of domain motions should be included in solid-state NMR analyses of protein dynamics. PMID:19916496

  18. ESR characterization of a novel spin-trapping agent, 15N-labeled N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone, as a nitric oxide donor.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kieko; Yoshioka, Hisashi

    2002-10-01

    We previously found that one of the pharmacological effects of N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) is the release of nitric oxide (NO) under oxidative conditions. However, to confirm this hypothesis in vivo, NO released from PBN must be distinguished from NO produced in biological systems, and therefore we undertook the synthesis of PBN using labeled 15N to identify its corresponding 15NO in vivo. The properties were examined with an ESR spectrometer. To synthesize 15N-PBN, the starting material, ammonium-15N chloride, was converted to 2-amino-15N-2-methylpropane, oxidized to 2-methyl-2-nitropropane-15N, and finally reacted with benzaldehyde to give 15N-PBN. The final product was purified by repeated sublimation. With ferrous sulfate-methyl glucamine dithiocarbamate complex, Fe (MGD)2, as a trapping agent to measure the NO levels of 15N-PBN or 14N-PBN in vitro, the peak intensity of 15NO[Fe(MGD)2] was over 50% stronger than that of 14NO[Fe(MGD)2], and that 15NO and 14NO had the corresponding two-and three line hyperfine structures due to their nuclear spin quantum numbers. Subsequently, the ESR spectrum of 15NO derived from 15N-PBN was significantly different than that of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NO, which was derived from biological cells, and therefore we have demonstrated the possibility to distinguish 15NO from PBN and 14NO generated from cells. These results suggested that 15N-PBN is a useful molecule, not only as a spin-trapping agent, but also as an NO donor to explore the pharmacological mechanisms of PBN in vivo. PMID:12450131

  19. Nutrient regime shift in the western North Atlantic indicated by compound-specific δ15N of deep-sea gorgonian corals.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Owen A; Lehmann, Moritz F; Schubert, Carsten J; Scott, David B; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2011-01-18

    Despite the importance of the nitrogen (N) cycle on marine productivity, little is known about variability in N sources and cycling in the ocean in relation to natural and anthropogenic climate change. Beyond the last few decades of scientific observation, knowledge depends largely on proxy records derived from nitrogen stable isotopes (δ(15)N) preserved in sediments and other bioarchives. Traditional bulk δ(15)N measurements, however, represent the combined influence of N source and subsequent trophic transfers, often confounding environmental interpretation. Recently, compound-specific analysis of individual amino acids (δ(15)N-AA) has been shown as a means to deconvolve trophic level versus N source effects on the δ(15)N variability of bulk organic matter. Here, we demonstrate the first use of δ(15)N-AA in a paleoceanographic study, through analysis of annually secreted growth rings preserved in the organic endoskeletons of deep-sea gorgonian corals. In the Northwest Atlantic off Nova Scotia, coral δ(15)N is correlated with increasing presence of subtropical versus subpolar slope waters over the twentieth century. By using the new δ(15)N-AA approach to control for variable trophic processing, we are able to interpret coral bulk δ(15)N values as a proxy for nitrate source and, hence, slope water source partitioning. We conclude that the persistence of the warm, nutrient-rich regime since the early 1970s is largely unique in the context of the last approximately 1,800 yr. This evidence suggests that nutrient variability in this region is coordinated with recent changes in global climate and underscores the broad potential of δ(15)N-AA for paleoceanographic studies of the marine N cycle. PMID:21199952

  20. Quantum Chemical Calculations of Amide-15N Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors for a Membrane-Bound Cytochrome b5

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining amide-15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors from biomolecules and understanding their variation for structural and dynamics studies using solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy and also by quantum chemical calculations. Due to the difficulties associated with the measurement of CSA tensors from membrane proteins, NMR-based structural studies heavily relied on the CSA tensors determined from model systems, typically single crystals of model peptides. In the present study, the principal components of backbone amide-15N CSA tensor have been determined using density functional theory for a 16.7-kDa membrane-bound paramagnetic heme containing protein, cytochrome b5 (cytb5). All the calculations were performed by taking residues within 5Å distance from the backbone amide-15N nucleus of interest. The calculated amide-15N CSA spans agree less well with our solution NMR data determined for an effective internuclear distance rN-H = 1.023 Å and a constant angle β = 18° that the least shielded component (δ11) makes with the N-H bond. The variation of amide-15N CSA span obtained using quantum chemical calculations is found to be smaller than that obtained from solution NMR measurements, whereas the trends of the variations are found to be in close agreement. We believe that the results reported in this study will be useful in studying the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and heme-containing proteins, and also membrane-bound protein-protein complexes such as cytochromes-b5-P450. PMID:23268659

  1. Nitrogen Dynamics in Stream Wood Samples Incubated with [14C]Lignocellulose and Potassium [15N]Nitrate †

    PubMed Central

    Aumen, Nicholas G.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Gregory, Stan V.

    1985-01-01

    Surface wood samples obtained from a Douglas fir log (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in a Pacific Northwest stream were incubated in vitro with [14C]lignocellulose in a defined mineral salts medium supplemented with 10 mg of N liter−1 of 15N-labeled NO3− (50 atom% 15N). Evolution of 14CO2, distribution and isotopic dilution of 15N, filtrate N concentrations, and the rates of denitrification, N2 fixation, and respiration were measured at 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation. The organic N content of the lignocellulose-wood sample mixture had increased from 132 μg of N to a maximum of 231 μg of N per treatment after 6 days of incubation. Rates of [14C]lignocellulose decomposition were greatest during the first 6 days and then began to decline over the remaining 12 days. Total CO2 evolution was also highest at day 6 and declined steadily over the remaining duration of the incubation. Filtrate NH4+-N increased from background levels to a final value of 57 μg of N per treatment. Filtrate NO3− N completely disappeared by day 6, and organic N showed a slight decline between days 12 and 18. The majority of the 15N that could be recovered appeared in the particulate organic fraction by day 6 (41 μg of N), and the filtrate NH4+ N fraction contained 11 μg of 15N by day 18. The 15N enrichment values of the filtrate NH4+ and the inorganic N associated with the particulate fraction had increased to approximately 20 atom% 15N by 18 days of incubation, whereas the particulate organic fraction reached its highest enrichment by day 6. Measurements of N2 fixation and denitrification indicated an insignificant gain or loss of N from the experimental system by these processes. The data show that woody debris in stream ecosystems might function as a rapid and efficient sink for exogenous N, resulting in stimulation of wood decomposition and subsequent activation of other N cycling processes. PMID:16346785

  2. Paramagnetic ions enable tuning of nuclear relaxation rates and provide long-range structural restraints in solid-state NMR of proteins.

    PubMed

    Nadaud, Philippe S; Helmus, Jonathan J; Kall, Stefanie L; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2009-06-17

    Magic-angle-spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) studies of natively diamagnetic uniformly (13)C,(15)N-enriched proteins, intentionally modified with side chains containing paramagnetic ions, are presented, with the aim of using the concomitant nuclear paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) as a source of long-range structural information. The paramagnetic ions are incorporated at selected sites in the protein as EDTA-metal complexes by introducing a solvent-exposed cysteine residue using site-directed mutagenesis, followed by modification with a thiol-specific reagent, N-[S-(2-pyridylthio)cysteaminyl]EDTA-metal. Here, this approach is demonstrated for the K28C and T53C mutants of B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), modified with EDTA-Mn(2+) and EDTA-Cu(2+) side chains. It is shown that incorporation of paramagnetic moieties, exhibiting different relaxation times and spin quantum numbers, facilitates the convenient modulation of longitudinal (R(1)) and transverse (R(2), R(1rho)) relaxation rates of the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei. Specifically, the EDTA-Mn(2+) side chain generates large distance-dependent transverse relaxation enhancements, analogous to those observed previously in the presence of nitroxide spin labels, while this phenomenon is significantly attenuated for the Cu(2+) center. Both Mn(2+) and Cu(2+) ions cause considerable longitudinal nuclear PREs. The combination of negligible transverse and substantial longitudinal relaxation enhancements obtained with the EDTA-Cu(2+) side chain is especially advantageous, because it enables structural restraints for most sites in the protein to be readily accessed via quantitative, site-resolved measurements of nuclear R(1) rate constants by multidimensional SSNMR methods. This is demonstrated here for backbone amide (15)N nuclei, using methods based on 2D (15)N-(13)C chemical shift correlation spectroscopy. The measured longitudinal PREs are found to be highly

  3. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  4. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  5. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  6. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA=Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the (1)H T1 values were calculated from data collected by (1)H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the (1)H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the (13)C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from (13)C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using (1)H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  7. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  8. Acceleration of Natural-Abundance Solid-State MAS NMR Measurements on Bone by Paramagnetic Relaxation from Gadolinium-DTPA

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  9. The Titan 14N/ 15N and 12C/ 13C isotopic ratios in HCN from Cassini/CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Nixon, Conor A.

    2007-11-01

    We report the detection of H 13CN and HC 15N in mid-infrared spectra recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini, along with the determination of the 12C/ 13C and 14N/ 15N isotopic ratios. We analyzed two sets of limb spectra recorded near 13-15° S (Tb flyby) and 83° N (T4 flyby) at 0.5 cm -1 resolution. The spectral range 1210-1310 cm -1 was used to retrieve the temperature profile in the range 145-490 km at 13° S and 165-300 km at 83° N. These two temperature profiles were then incorporated in the atmospheric model to retrieve the abundance profile of H 12C 14N, H 13CN and HC 15N from their bands at 713, 706 and 711 cm -1, respectively. The HCN abundance profile was retrieved in the range 90-460 km at 15° S and 165-305 km at 83° N. There is no evidence for vertical variations of the isotopic ratios. Constraining the isotopic abundance profiles to be proportional to the HCN one, we find C12/C13=89-18+22 at 15° S, and 68-12+16 at 83° N, two values that are statistically consistent. A combination of these results yields a 12C/ 13C value equal to 75±12. This global result, as well as the 15° S one, envelop the value in Titan's methane ( 82.3±1) [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779-784] measured at 10° S and is slightly lower than the terrestrial inorganic standard value (89). The 14N/ 15N isotopic ratio is found equal to 56-13+16 at 15° S and 56-9+10 at 83° N. Combining the two values yields 14N/ 15N = 56 ± 8, which corresponds to an enrichment in 15N of about 4.9 compared with the terrestrial ratio. These results agree with the values obtained from previous ground-based millimeter observations [Hidayat, T., Marten, A., Bézard, B., Gautier, D., Owen, T., Matthews, H.E., Paubert, G., 1997. Icarus 126, 170-182; Marten, A., Hidayat, T., Biraud, Y., Moreno, R., 2002. Icarus 158, 532-544]. The 15N/ 14N ratio found in HCN is ˜3 times higher than in N 2 [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779

  10. Interconversion algorithm between mechanical and dielectric relaxation measurements for acetate of cis- and trans-2-phenyl-5-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxane.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Bernabé, A; Lidón-Roger, J V; Sanchis, M J; Díaz-Calleja, R; del Castillo, L F

    2015-10-01

    The dielectric and mechanical spectroscopies of acetate of cis- and trans-2-phenyl-5-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxane are reported in the frequency domain from 10(-2) to 10(6)Hz. This ester has been selected in this study for its predominant α relaxation with regard to the β relaxation, which can be neglected. This study consists of determining an interconversion algorithm between dielectric and mechanical measurements, given by using a relation between rotational and translational complex viscosities. These important viscosities were obtained from measures of the dielectric complex permittivity and by dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively. The definitions of rotational and translational viscosities were evaluated by means of fractional calculus, by using the fit parameters of the Havriliak-Negami empirical model obtained in the dielectric and mechanical characterization of the α relaxation. This interconversion algorithm is a generalization of the break of the Stokes-Einstein-Debye relationship. It uses a power law with an exponent defined as the shape factor, which modifies the translational viscosity. Two others factors are introduced for the interconversion, a shift factor, which displaces the translational viscosity in the frequency domain, and a scale factor, which makes equal values of the two viscosities. In this paper, the shape factor has been identified as the relation between the slopes of the moduli of the complex viscosities at higher frequency. This is interpreted as the degree of kinetic coupling between the molecular rotation and translational movements. Alternatively, another interconversion algorithm has been expressed by means of dielectric and mechanical moduli. PMID:26565240

  11. A highly sensitive assay for xanthine oxidoreductase activity using a combination of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine and liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Murase, Takayo; Oka, Mitsuru; Nampei, Mai; Miyachi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we developed a highly sensitive assay for xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) activity utilizing a combination of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine and liquid chromatography (LC)/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (TQMS). In this assay, the amount of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]uric acid (UA) produced by XOR was determined by using LC/TQMS. For this assay, we synthesized [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine as a substrate, [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]UA as an analytical standard, and [(13) C3 ,(15) N3 ]UA as an internal standard. The [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]UA calibration curve obtained using LC/TQMS under the selected reaction monitoring mode was evaluated, and the results indicated good linearity (R(2)  = 0.998, weighting of 1/x(2) ) in the range of 20 to 4000 nM. As a model reaction of less active samples, the XOR activity of serial-diluted mouse plasma was measured. Thereby, the XOR activity of the 1024-fold-diluted mouse plasma was 4.49 ± 0.44 pmol/100 μL/h (mean ± standard deviation, n = 3). This value is comparable to the predicted XOR activity value of healthy human plasma. Hence, this combination method may be used to obtain high-sensitivity measurements required for XOR activity analysis on various organs or human plasma. PMID:27006202

  12. Using δ15N of Chironomidae as an index of nitrogen sources and processing within watersheds as part of EPA's National Aquatic Resource Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, J. R.; Compton, J.; Herlihy, A.; Sobota, D. J.; Stoddard, J.; Weber, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) removal in watersheds is an important regulating ecosystem service that can help reduce N pollution in the nation's waterways. However, processes that remove N such as denitrification are generally determined at point locations. Measures that integrate N processing within watersheds and over time would be particularly useful for assessing the degree of this vital service. Because most N removal processes isotopically enrich the N remaining, δ15N from basal food-chain organisms in aquatic ecosystems can provide information on watershed N processing. As part of EPA's National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS), we measured δ15N of Chironomidae in lakes, rivers and streams because these larval aquatic insects were found in abundance in almost every lake and stream in the U.S. Using information on nitrogen loading to the watershed, and total N concentrations within the water, we assessed when elevated chironomid δ15N would indicate N removal rather than possible enriched sources of N. Chironomid δ15N values ranged from -4 to +20 ‰, and were higher in rivers and streams than in lakes (median = 7.6 ‰ vs. 4.8 ‰, respectively), indicating that N was processed to a greater degree in lotic chironomids than in lentic ones. For both, δ15N increased with watershed-level agricultural land cover and N loading, and decreased as precipitation increased. In rivers and streams with high synthetic N loading, we found lower N concentrations in streams with higher chironomid δ15N values, suggesting greater N removal. At low levels of synthetic N loading, the pattern reversed, and streams with enriched chironomid δ15N had higher N concentrations, suggesting enriched sources such as manure or sewage. Our results indicate that chironomid δ15N values can provide valuable information about watershed-level N inputs and processing for national water quality monitoring efforts.

  13. Differences in iron and manganese concentration may confound the measurement of myelin from R1 and R2 relaxation rates in studies of dysmyelination.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Kimberly L; Al-Ebraheem, Alia; Janik, Rafal; Oakden, Wendy; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Dabrowski, Wojciech; Rola, Radoslaw; Geraki, Kalotina; Farquharson, Michael J; Stanisz, Greg J; Bock, Nicholas A

    2016-07-01

    A model of dysmyelination, the Long Evans Shaker (les) rat, was used to study the contribution of myelin to MR tissue properties in white matter. A large region of white matter was identified in the deep cerebellum and was used for measurements of the MR relaxation rate constants, R1  = 1/T1 and R2  = 1/T2 , at 7 T. In this study, R1 of the les deep cerebellar white matter was found to be 0.55 ± 0.08 s (-1) and R2 was found to be 15 ± 1 s(-1) , revealing significantly lower R1 and R2 in les white matter relative to wild-type (wt: R1  = 0.69 ± 0.05 s(-1) and R2  = 18 ± 1 s(-1) ). These deviated from the expected ΔR1 and ΔR2 values, given a complete lack of myelin in the les white matter, derived from the literature using values of myelin relaxivity, and we suspect that metals could play a significant role. The absolute concentrations of the paramagnetic transition metals iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) were measured by a micro-synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (μSRXRF) technique, with significantly greater Fe and Mn in les white matter than in wt (in units of μg [metal]/g [wet weight tissue]: les: Fe concentration,19 ± 1; Mn concentration, 0.71 ± 0.04; wt: Fe concentration,10 ± 1; Mn concentration, 0.47 ± 0.04). These changes in Fe and Mn could explain the deviations in R1 and R2 from the expected values in white matter. Although it was found that the influence of myelin still dominates R1 and R2 in wt rats, there were non-negligible changes in the contribution of the metals to relaxation. Although there are already problems with the estimation of myelin from R1 and R2 changes in disease models with pathology that also affects the relaxation rate constants, this study points to a specific pitfall in the estimation of changes in myelin in diseases or models with disrupted concentrations of paramagnetic transition metals. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27226282

  14. Relaxation time measurements of bone marrow protons in the calcaneus using a compact MRI system at 0.2 Tesla field strength.

    PubMed

    Tomiha, Sadanori; Iita, Nachiko; Okada, Fumi; Handa, Shinya; Kose, Katsumi

    2008-08-01

    Relaxation times (T(1) and T(2)) of the bone marrow protons and trabecular bone volume fraction (TBVF) in the calcaneus were measured for 100 female volunteers using a compact MRI system at 0.2 T field strength. The speed of sound (SOS) through the calcaneus was measured also for the same subjects using a quantitative ultrasound system. Both relaxation times were found to have positive correlations with age (R = 0.40; P < 0.0001 and R = 0.31; P < 0.002, respectively) and negative correlations with SOS (R = -0.38; P < 0.0001 and R = -0.38; P < 0.0001, respectively). Although TBVF had a fairly high positive correlation with the SOS (R = 0.67), neither T(1) nor T(2) were correlated with TBVF (R = -0.062 and -0.024, respectively). These results suggest that the age dependence of both T(1) and T(2) is caused by the microdynamic properties of the lipid molecules in bone marrow observed using acoustic or elastic modalities. PMID:18666107

  15. Measurements of the methane relaxation times for application to the infrared emission models of the upper atmospheres of outer planets and Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Caldwell, John J.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Burt, Jim A.; Yang, Kuanghua; Delaney, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The 7.8 micrometer emission from the nu(sub 4) band of methane (CH4) is a regularly observed feature in the stratosphere of all the giant planets and Titan. On Jupiter, enhancements in this emission are associated with the infrared hot spots in the auroral zone. Attempts to model this phenomenon in particular, and to understand the role of methane in general, have been hampered in part by a lack of adequate laboratory measurements of the collisional relaxation times for the nu(sub 3) and nu(sub 4) levels over the appropriate temperature range. To provide this needed data, a series of laboratory experiments were initiated. In the experimental arrangement the nu(sub3) band of methane is pumped at 3.3 micrometers using a pulsed infrared source (Nd:YAG/dye laser system equipped with a wave-length extender). The radiative lifetime of the nu(sub 3) level (approximately 37 ms) is much shorter than the nu(sub 4) lifetime (approximately 390 ms); however, a rapid V-V energy transfer rate ensures that the nu(sub 4) level is substantially populated. The photoacoustic technique is used to acquire relaxation rate information. The experiments are performed using a low-temperature, low-pressure cell. Experimental apparatus and technique are described. In addition some of the experimental difficulties associated with making these measurements are discussed and some preliminary results are presented.

  16. Microemulsions with surfactant TX100, cyclohexane, and an ionic liquid investigated by conductance, DLS, FTIR measurements, and study of solvent and rotational relaxation within this microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Rajib; Sarkar, Souravi; Ghatak, Chiranjib; Rao, Vishal Govind; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2010-06-10

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propyl ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide ([N(3111)][Tf(2)N]), were substituted for polar water and formed nonaqueous microemulsions with cyclohexane by the aid of nonionic surfactant TX-100. The phase behavior of the ternary system was investigated, and microregions of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N]-in-cyclohexane (IL/O), bicontinuous, and cyclohexane-in-[N(3111)][Tf(2)N] (O/IL) were identified by traditional electrical conductivity measurements. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed the formation of the IL microemulsions. The FTIR study of O-H stretching band of TX100 also supports this finding. The dynamics of solvent and rotational relaxation have been investigated in [N(3111)][Tf(2)N]/TX100/cyclohexane microemulsions using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool and coumarin 480 (C-480) as a fluorescence probe. The size of the microemulsions increases with gradual addition of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N], which revealed from DLS measurement. This leads to the faster collective motions of cation and anions of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N], which contributes to faster solvent relaxation in microemulsions. PMID:20469906

  17. Cross sections for n+{sup 14}N from an R-matrix analysis of the {sup 15}N system

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.M.; Young, P.G.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program, a new evaluation of the neutron cross sections for {sup 14}N was made for ENDF/B-VI, based at energies below 2.5 MeV on a multichannel R-matrix analysis of reactions in the {sup 15}N system. The types of data used in the analysis, and the resulting cross sections and resonance structure for {sup 15}N are briefly described. The resonant features of the neutron cross sections were especially well determined by including precise, high-resolution neutron total cross section measurements from ORNL. While the new evaluated cross section appear to be significant improvements over the earlier ones, they still need to be tested more extensively against recent measurements of the differential elastic cross section from Oak Ridge.

  18. Simulation of DNA Supercoil Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ivenso, Ikenna D; Lillian, Todd D

    2016-05-24

    Several recent single-molecule experiments observe the response of supercoiled DNA to nicking endonucleases and topoisomerases. Typically in these experiments, indirect measurements of supercoil relaxation are obtained by observing the motion of a large micron-sized bead. The bead, which also serves to manipulate DNA, experiences significant drag and thereby obscures supercoil dynamics. Here we employ our discrete wormlike chain model to bypass experimental limitations and simulate the dynamic response of supercoiled DNA to a single strand nick. From our simulations, we make three major observations. First, extension is a poor dynamic measure of supercoil relaxation; in fact, the linking number relaxes so fast that it cannot have much impact on extension. Second, the rate of linking number relaxation depends upon its initial partitioning into twist and writhe as determined by tension. Third, the extensional response strongly depends upon the initial position of plectonemes. PMID:27224483

  19. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  20. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  1. sup 31 P and sup 1 H NMR studies of the structure of enzyme-bound substrate complexes of lobster muscle arginine kinase: Relaxation measurements with Mn(II) and Co(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarori, G.K.; Ray, B.D.; Rao, B.D.N. )

    1989-11-28

    The paramagnetic effects of Mn(II) and Co(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rates of {sup 31}P nuclei of ATP and ADP and of Mn(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine bound to arginine kinase from lobster tail muscle have been measured. Temperature variation of {sup 31}P relaxation rates in E-MnADP and E-MnATP yields activation energies ({Delta}E) in the range 6-10 kcal/mol. Thus, the {sup 31}P relaxation rates in these complexes are exchange limited and cannot provide structural information. However, the relaxation rates in E-CoADP and E-CoATP exhibit frequency dependence and {Delta}E values in the range 1-2 kcal/mol; i.e., these rates depend upon {sup 31}P-Co(II) distances. These distances were calculated to be in the range 3.2-4.5 {angstrom}, appropriate for direct coordination between Co(II) and the phosphoryl groups. The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine in the E-MnADP-Arg complex was also measured at three frequencies. From the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate an effective {tau}{sub C} of 0.6 ns has also been calculated, which is most likely to be the electron spin relaxation rate ({tau}{sub S1}) for Mn(II) in this complex. The distance estimated on the basis of the reciprocal sixth root of the average relaxation rate of the {delta} protons was 10.9 {plus minus} 0.3 {angstrom}.

  2. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei. PMID:8995843

  3. ESR lineshape and 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals - Joint analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.; Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpała, A.; Oglodek, I.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16 containing 15N and 14N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to 1H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz-20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the 1H relaxation of the solvent. The 1H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  4. Nanoscale heat transport from Ge hut, dome, and relaxed clusters on Si(001) measured by ultrafast electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Frigge, T. Hafke, B.; Tinnemann, V.; Krenzer, B.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.

    2015-02-02

    The thermal transport properties of crystalline nanostructures on Si were studied by ultra-fast surface sensitive time-resolved electron diffraction. Self-organized growth of epitaxial Ge hut, dome, and relaxed clusters was achieved by in-situ deposition of 8 monolayers of Ge on Si(001) at 550 °C under UHV conditions. The thermal response of the three different cluster types subsequent to impulsive heating by fs laser pulses was determined through the Debye-Waller effect. Time resolved spot profile analysis and life-time mapping was employed to distinguish between the thermal response of the different cluster types. While dome clusters are cooling with a time constant of τ = 150 ps, which agrees well with numerical simulations, the smaller hut clusters with a height of 2.3 nm exhibit a cooling time constant of τ = 50 ps, which is a factor of 1.4 slower than expected.

  5. Direct measurement of agonist binding to genetically engineered peptides of the acetylcholine receptor by selective T sub 1 NMR relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Y.; Navon, G. ); Aronheim, A.; Gershoni, J.M. )

    1990-03-13

    Interactions of four ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with genetically engineered peptides have been studied by NMR. A recombinant cholinergic binding site was prepared as a fusion protein between a truncated form of the bacterial protein trpE and a peptide corresponding to the sequence {alpha}184-200 from the Torpedo californica receptor. This construct binds {alpha}-bungarotoxin while the trpE protein alone does not, and thus serves as a negative control. In this study agonist binding to {alpha}184-200 is demonstrated by monitoring the T{sub 1} relaxation of the ligand's protons in the presence and absence of the recombinant binding site. This binding is specific as it can be competed with {alpha}-bungarotoxin. Quantitative analyses of such competitions yielded the concentration of binding sites, which corresponded to 3.3% and 16.5% of the total protein, for partially purified and affinity-purified {alpha}184-200 constructs, respectively. The K{sub D} values for the binding of acetylcholine, nicotine, d-tubocurarine, and gallamine to the affinity-purified construct were 1.4, 1.4, 0.20, and 0.21 mM, respectively, while K{sub D}'s with the nontoxin binding protein were all above 10 mM. Thus, this is a direct demonstration that the toxin binding domain {alpha}184-200 may comprise a major component of the cholinergic agonist site.

  6. Paleoenvironmental implications of taxonomic variation among δ15N values of chloropigments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, Meytal B.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Robinson, Rebecca S.; Qin, Yelun; Saito, Mark A.; Pearson, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Natural variations in the ratios of nitrogen isotopes in biomass reflect variations in nutrient sources utilized for growth. In order to use δ15N values of chloropigments of photosynthetic organisms to determine the corresponding δ15N values of biomass – and by extension, surface waters – the isotopic offset between chlorophyll and biomass must be constrained. Here we examine this offset in various geologically-relevant taxa, grown using nutrient sources that may approximate ocean conditions at different times in Earth’s history. Phytoplankton in this study include cyanobacteria (diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic), eukaryotic algae (red and green), and anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (Proteobacteria), as well as environmental samples from sulfidic lake water. Cultures were grown using N2, NO3−, and NH4+ as nitrogen sources, and were examined under different light regimes and growth conditions. We find surprisingly high variability in the isotopic difference (δ15Nbiomass − δ15Nchloropigment) for prokaryotes, with average values for species ranging from −12.2‰ to +11.7‰. We define this difference as εpor, a term that encompasses diagenetic porphyrins and chlorins, as well as chlorophyll. Negative values of εpor reflect chloropigments that are 15N-enriched relative to biomass. Notably, this enrichment appears to occur only in cyanobacteria. The average value of εpor for freshwater cyanobacterial species is −9.8 ± 1.8‰, while for marine cyanobacteria it is −0.9 ± 1.3‰. These isotopic effects group environmentally but not phylogenetically, e.g., εpor values for freshwater Chroococcales resemble those of freshwater Nostocales but differ from those of marine Chroococcales. Our measured values of εpor for eukaryotic algae (range = 4.7–8.7‰) are similar to previous reports for pure cultures. For all taxa studied, values of εpor do not depend on the type of nitrogen substrate used for growth. The observed

  7. Sample Artefacts in δ15N and δ18O of Nitrate in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, A.; Norman, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrate is one of the major inorganic anions in aerosols. Recently nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in nitrates have been used to trace sources and chemical processes in the atmosphere. High volume samplers are used in order to gain enough material for isotope analysis, but artefacts can occur when measuring with this technique. Besides retaining NO3 from aerosol, gaseous HNO3 can be absorbed on the filter increasing the reported values of nitrate reported. Alternatively; when elevated temperatures are present in the atmosphere, nitrate is volatized in the form of NH3NO3 which would lead to an underestimation of nitrogen on the filter [Schaap et al., 2004]. The artefacts from high volume sampling may cause inaccuracies in the reported isotope values due to isotope fractionation or different initial isotope values between gaseous HNO3 and particulate nitrate. High volume samplers were deployed on board a ship in the summer of 2003 jointly with the Canadian Surface Ocean - Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS). A quartz filter was positioned on a high volume sampler. A cellulose acetate filter treated with potassium carbonate and glycerol was placed underneath the quartz filter. The cellulose acetate filter is designed to catch sticky gaseous (such as SO2) but was also found to catch a nitrogen gas species (most probable HNO3 and/or NH3NO3). Analysis of isotopic composition of nitrate for both nitrogen and oxygen was carried out on selected samples by the denitrifier method. Values ranged between -4 and +1‰ for δ15N and between +49 and +66‰ for δ18O for quartz filter. The nitrogen gas species had ranges between -11 and -0‰ for δ15N and between +44 and +62‰ for δ18O. Average differences between the aerosol (caught on the quartz filter) and the nitrogen gas species (on the cellulose acetate filter) were 3±4 ‰ for δ15N and 10±7 ‰ for δ18O. These values are examined to find insights in possible fractionation in the nitrate collection method currently used in

  8. Rapid and accurate calculation of protein 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Neal, Stephen; Nip, Alex M; Zhang, Haiyan; Wishart, David S

    2003-07-01

    A computer program (SHIFTX) is described which rapidly and accurately calculates the diamagnetic 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts of both backbone and sidechain atoms in proteins. The program uses a hybrid predictive approach that employs pre-calculated, empirically derived chemical shift hypersurfaces in combination with classical or semi-classical equations (for ring current, electric field, hydrogen bond and solvent effects) to calculate 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts from atomic coordinates. The chemical shift hypersurfaces capture dihedral angle, sidechain orientation, secondary structure and nearest neighbor effects that cannot easily be translated to analytical formulae or predicted via classical means. The chemical shift hypersurfaces were generated using a database of IUPAC-referenced protein chemical shifts--RefDB (Zhang et al., 2003), and a corresponding set of high resolution (<2.1 A) X-ray structures. Data mining techniques were used to extract the largest pairwise contributors (from a list of approximately 20 derived geometric, sequential and structural parameters) to generate the necessary hypersurfaces. SHIFTX is rapid (<1 CPU second for a complete shift calculation of 100 residues) and accurate. Overall, the program was able to attain a correlation coefficient (r) between observed and calculated shifts of 0.911 (1Halpha), 0.980 (13Calpha), 0.996 (13Cbeta), 0.863 (13CO), 0.909 (15N), 0.741 (1HN), and 0.907 (sidechain 1H) with RMS errors of 0.23, 0.98, 1.10, 1.16, 2.43, 0.49, and 0.30 ppm, respectively on test data sets. We further show that the agreement between observed and SHIFTX calculated chemical shifts can be an extremely sensitive measure of the quality of protein structures. Our results suggest that if NMR-derived structures could be refined using heteronuclear chemical shifts calculated by SHIFTX, their precision could approach that of the highest resolution X-ray structures. SHIFTX is freely available as a web server at http

  9. Tracing the diet of the monitor lizard Varanus mabitang by stable isotope analyses (δ15N, δ13C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, Ulrich; Altenbach, Alexander; Gaulke, Maren; Glaw, Frank

    2002-09-01

    In this study, we used analyses of stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) to determine the trophic ecology of the monitor lizard Varanus mabitang. Stable isotopes from claws, gut contents, and soft tissues were measured from the type specimen. Samples from Varanus olivaceus, Varanus prasinus, Varanus salvator, the herbivorous agamid lizard Hydrosaurus pustulatus, and some plant matter were included for comparison. Our data show a rapid decrease in δ13C (about10‰) from food plants towards gut contents and soft tissues of herbivorous species. For the varanids, we found a significant linear correlation of decreasing δ13C and increasing δ15N from herbivorous towards carnivorous species. In terms of trophic isotope ecology, the type specimen of V. mabitang is a strict herbivore. Thus it differs significantly in its isotopic composition from the morphologically next closest related species V. olivaceus. The most highly carnivorous species is V. salvator, while δ15N values for V. prasinus and V. olivaceus are intermediate. Claws provide very valuable samples for such measurements, because they can be sampled from living animals without harm. Additionally, their range of variability is relatively small in comparison with measurements from soft tissues.

  10. Simultaneous cross polarization to 13C and 15N with 1H detection at 60 kHz MAS solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe high resolution MAS solid-state NMR experiments that utilize 1H detection with 60 kHz magic angle spinning; simultaneous cross-polarization from 1H to 15N and 13C nuclei; bidirectional cross-polarization between 13C and 15N nuclei; detection of both amide nitrogen and aliphatic carbon 1H; and measurement of both 13C and 15N chemical shifts through multi-dimensional correlation experiments. Three-dimensional experiments correlate amide 1H and alpha 1H selectively with 13C or 15N nuclei in a polypeptide chain. Two separate three-dimensional spectra correlating 1Hα/13Cα/1HN and 1HN/15N/1Hα are recorded simultaneously in a single experiment, demonstrating that a twofold savings in experimental time is potentially achievable. Spectral editing using bidirectional coherence transfer pathways enables simultaneous magnetization transfers between 15N, 13Cα(i) and 13C‧(i-1), facilitating intra- and inter-residue correlations for sequential resonance assignment. Non-uniform sampling is integrated into the experiments, further reducing the length of experimental time.

  11. Contribution of proteolysis and de novo synthesis to alanine production in diabetic rat skeletal muscle: a 15N/1H nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Meynial-Denis, D; Chavaroux, A; Foucat, L; Mignon, M; Prugnaud, J; Bayle, G; Renou, J P; Arnal, M

    1997-10-01

    To assess the role of leucine as a precursor of alanine alpha-amino nitrogen in skeletal muscle during diabetes, extensor digitorum longus muscles from control (n = 7 experiments) and streptozotocin-diabetic rats (n = 8 experiments) were isolated and superfused with [15N]leucine (3 mmol/l) in the presence of glucose (10 mmol/l) for 2 h. Muscle perchloric acid extraction was performed at the end of superfusion in order to quantify newly synthesized alanine by 15N/1H nuclear magnetic resonance. Release of [15N]alanine in the superfusion medium was also measured. The pool of newly synthesized [15N]alanine was significantly increased (approximately 40%) in extensor digitorum longus muscles from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Whereas a significant enhancement of total alanine release from muscle was induced by diabetes (20%), only a slight increase in [15N]alanine release was detectable under our experimental conditions. Consequently, we conclude that streptozotocin-diabetes in growing rats induces in skeletal muscle: 1) an increase in nitrogen exchange between leucine and alanine leading to newly synthesized [15N]alanine; and 2) an increase of total alanine release from muscle originating from both proteolysis and de novo synthesis. PMID:9349596

  12. Sources and transformations of N in reclaimed coastal tidelands: evidence from soil δ15N data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jin-Hyeob; Choi, Woo-Jung; Lim, Sang-Sun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Lee, Sang-Mo; Chang, Scott X.; Jung, Jae-Woon; Yoon, Kwang-Sik; Choi, Soo-Myung

    2008-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of saturated soil extracts (ECe) in three reclaimed tideland (RTL) soils on the west coast of Korea decreased with time since reclamation, indicating natural desalinization through leaching of salts by precipitation water. Soil N concentration increased with decreasing ECe. With the increase in soil N concentration, the δ15N decreased, likely caused by the input of 15N-depleted N sources. As N2-fixing plant species were found in the oldest RTL, atmospheric N2 fixation likely contributed to the increase in soil N concentration in the oldest RTL. Negative δ15N (-7.1 to -2.0‰) of total inorganic N (NH4 ++NO3 -) and published data on N deposition near the study area indicate that atmospheric N deposition might be another source of N in the RTLs. Meanwhile, the consistently negative δ15N of soil NO3 - excluded N input from chemical fertilizer through groundwater flow as a potential N source, since NO3 - in groundwater generally have a positive δ15N. The patterns of δ15N of NH4 + (+2.3 to +5.1‰) and NO3 - (-9.2 to -5.0‰) suggested that nitrification was an active process that caused 15N enrichment in NH4 + but denitrification was probably minimal which would otherwise have caused 15N enrichment in NO3 -. A quantitative approach on N budget would provide a better understanding of soil N dynamics in the studied RTLs.

  13. Increased Plant Uptake of Nitrogen from 15N Depleted Fertilizer Using Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The techniques of 15N isotope have been very useful for determining the behavior and fate of N in soil, including the use efficiency of applied N fertilizers by plants. Our objective in this study was to use 15N isotope techniques to demonstrate that a model plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGP...

  14. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  15. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  16. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  17. δ 15 N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural abundance δ15N of ecosystems integrates nitrogen (N) inputs and losses, and thus reflects factors that control the long-term development of ecosystem N balances. We here report N and carbon (C) content of forest vegetation and soils, and associated δ15N, across nine Doug...

  18. Over 20% (15)N Hyperpolarization in Under One Minute for Metronidazole, an Antibiotic and Hypoxia Probe.

    PubMed

    Barskiy, Danila A; Shchepin, Roman V; Coffey, Aaron M; Theis, Thomas; Warren, Warren S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-07-01

    Direct NMR hyperpolarization of naturally abundant (15)N sites in metronidazole is demonstrated using SABRE-SHEATH (Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange in SHield Enables Alignment Transfer to Heteronuclei). In only a few tens of seconds, nuclear spin polarization P(15)N of up to ∼24% is achieved using parahydrogen with 80% para fraction corresponding to P(15)N ≈ 32% if ∼100% parahydrogen were employed (which would translate to a signal enhancement of ∼0.1-million-fold at 9.4 T). In addition to this demonstration on the directly binding (15)N site (using J(2)H-(15)N), we also hyperpolarized more distant (15)N sites in metronidazole using longer-range spin-spin couplings (J(4)H-(15)N and J(5)H-(15)N). Taken together, these results significantly expand the range of molecular structures and sites amenable to hyperpolarization via low-cost parahydrogen-based methods. In particular, hyperpolarized nitroimidazole and its derivatives have powerful potential applications such as direct in vivo imaging of mechanisms of action or hypoxia sensing. PMID:27321159

  19. Resolving the energy and temperature dependence of C6H6 (∗) collisional relaxation via time-dependent bath temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    West, Niclas A; Winner, Joshua D; Bowersox, Rodney D W; North, Simon W

    2016-07-01

    The relaxation of highly vibrationally excited benzene, generated by 193 nm laser excitation, was studied using the transient rotational-translational temperature rise of the N2 bath, which was measured by proxy using two-line laser induced fluorescence of seeded NO. The resulting experimentally measured time-dependent N2 temperature rises were modeled with MultiWell based simulations of Collisional Energy Transfer (CET) from benzene vibration to N2 rotation-translation. We find that the average energy transferred in benzene deactivating collisions depends linearly on the internal energy of the excited benzene molecules and depends approximately linearly on the N2 bath temperature between 300 K and 600 K. The results are consistent with experimental studies and classical trajectory calculations of CET in similar systems. PMID:27394109

  20. Resolving the energy and temperature dependence of C6H6∗ collisional relaxation via time-dependent bath temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Niclas A.; Winner, Joshua D.; Bowersox, Rodney D. W.; North, Simon W.

    2016-07-01

    The relaxation of highly vibrationally excited benzene, generated by 193 nm laser excitation, was studied using the transient rotational-translational temperature rise of the N2 bath, which was measured by proxy using two-line laser induced fluorescence of seeded NO. The resulting experimentally measured time-dependent N2 temperature rises were modeled with MultiWell based simulations of Collisional Energy Transfer (CET) from benzene vibration to N2 rotation-translation. We find that the average energy transferred in benzene deactivating collisions depends linearly on the internal energy of the excited benzene molecules and depends approximately linearly on the N2 bath temperature between 300 K and 600 K. The results are consistent with experimental studies and classical trajectory calculations of CET in similar systems.

  1. Detection of 15NNH+ in L1544: non-LTE modelling of dyazenilium hyperfine line emission and accurate 14N/15N values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Caselli, P.; Leonardo, E.; Dore, L.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Samples of pristine solar system material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles are highly enriched in 15N. Conspicuous nitrogen isotopic anomalies have also been measured in comets, and the 14N/15N abundance ratio of the Earth is itself higher than the recognised presolar value by almost a factor of two. Low-temperature ion/molecule reactions in the proto-solar nebula have been repeatedly indicated as being responsible for these 15N-enhancements. Aims: We have searched for 15N variants of the N2H+ ion in L1544, a prototypical starless cloud core that is one of the best candidate sources for detection owing to its low central core temperature and high CO depletion. The goal is to evaluate accurate and reliable 14N/15N ratio values for this species in the interstellar gas. Methods: A deep integration of the 15NNH+(1-0) line at 90.4 GHz was obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelling was performed on the J = 1-0 emissions of the parent and 15N-containing dyazenilium ions, using a Bonnor-Ebert sphere as a model for the source. Results: A high-quality fit of the N2H+(1-0) hyperfine spectrum has allowed us to derive a revised value of the N2H+ column density in L1544. Analysis of the observed N15NH+ and 15NNH+ spectra yielded an abundance ratio N(N15NH+)/N(15NNH+) = 1.1 ± 0.3. The obtained 14N/15N isotopic ratio is ~1000 ± 200, suggestive of a sizeable 15N depletion in this molecular ion. Such a result is not consistent with the prediction of the current nitrogen chemical models. Conclusions: Since chemical models predict high 15N fractionation of N2H+, we suggest that 15N14N, or 15N in some other molecular form, tends to deplete onto dust grains. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Full Tables B.1-B.6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http

  2. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  3. The 15N isotope effect in Escherichia coli: a neutron can make the difference.

    PubMed

    Filiou, Michaela D; Varadarajulu, Jeeva; Teplytska, Larysa; Reckow, Stefan; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W

    2012-11-01

    Several techniques based on stable isotope labeling are used for quantitative MS. These include stable isotope metabolic labeling methods for cells in culture as well as live organisms with the assumption that the stable isotope has no effect on the proteome. Here, we investigate the (15) N isotope effect on Escherichia coli cultures that were grown in either unlabeled ((14) N) or (15) N-labeled media by LC-ESI-MS/MS-based relative protein quantification. Consistent protein expression level differences and altered growth rates were observed between (14) N and (15) N-labeled cultures. Furthermore, targeted metabolite analyses revealed altered metabolite levels between (14) N and (15) N-labeled bacteria. Our data demonstrate for the first time that the introduction of the (15) N isotope affects protein and metabolite levels in E. coli and underline the importance of implementing controls for unbiased protein quantification using stable isotope labeling techniques. PMID:22887715

  4. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  5. Flip-angle profile of slice-selective excitation and the measurement of the MR longitudinal relaxation time with steady-state magnetization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jung-Jiin

    2015-08-01

    In MRI, the flip angle (FA) of slice-selective excitation is not uniform across the slice-thickness dimension. This work investigates the effect of the non-uniform FA profile on the accuracy of a commonly-used method for the measurement, in which the T1 value, i.e., the longitudinal relaxation time, is determined from the steady-state signals of an equally-spaced RF pulse train. By using the numerical solutions of the Bloch equation, it is shown that, because of the non-uniform FA profile, the outcome of the T1 measurement depends significantly on T1 of the specimen and on the FA and the inter-pulse spacing τ of the pulse train. A new method to restore the accuracy of the T1 measurement is described. Different from the existing approaches, the new method also removes the FA profile effect for the measurement of the FA, which is normally a part of the T1 measurement. In addition, the new method does not involve theoretical modeling, approximation, or modification to the underlying principle of the T1 measurement. An imaging experiment is performed, which shows that the new method can remove the FA-, the τ-, and the T1-dependence and produce T1 measurements in excellent agreement with the ones obtained from a gold standard method (the inversion-recovery method). PMID:26159799

  6. Flip-angle profile of slice-selective excitation and the measurement of the MR longitudinal relaxation time with steady-state magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jung-Jiin

    2015-08-01

    In MRI, the flip angle (FA) of slice-selective excitation is not uniform across the slice-thickness dimension. This work investigates the effect of the non-uniform FA profile on the accuracy of a commonly-used method for the measurement, in which the T1 value, i.e., the longitudinal relaxation time, is determined from the steady-state signals of an equally-spaced RF pulse train. By using the numerical solutions of the Bloch equation, it is shown that, because of the non-uniform FA profile, the outcome of the T1 measurement depends significantly on T1 of the specimen and on the FA and the inter-pulse spacing τ of the pulse train. A new method to restore the accuracy of the T1 measurement is described. Different from the existing approaches, the new method also removes the FA profile effect for the measurement of the FA, which is normally a part of the T1 measurement. In addition, the new method does not involve theoretical modeling, approximation, or modification to the underlying principle of the T1 measurement. An imaging experiment is performed, which shows that the new method can remove the FA-, the τ-, and the T1-dependence and produce T1 measurements in excellent agreement with the ones obtained from a gold standard method (the inversion-recovery method).

  7. Ammonia 15N/14N Isotope Ratio in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.R.; Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, M. H.; Owen, T. C; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Data from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer has been used to derive the N-15/N-14 isotope ratio in ammonia at Jupiter. Although the mass spectral interference from the water contribution to 18 amu makes an accurate derivation of the (N-15)H3/(N-14)H3 ratio difficult from measurements of the singly ionized signals at 18 and 17 amu, this interference is not present in the doubly charged 8.5 and 9.0 amu signals from (N-14)H3++ and (N-15)H3++ respectively. Although the count rate from the 9 amu signal is low during the direct sampling of the atmosphere, the ammonia signal was considerably enhanced during the first enrichment cell (EC1) experiment that measured gas sampled between 0.8 and 2.8 bar. Count rates at 9 amu in the EC1 experiment reach 60/second and measure ammonia sampled from 0.88 to 2.8 bar. In the EC1 measurements the 8.5 amu signal is not measured directly, but can be calculated from the ammonia contribution to 17 amu and the ratio of NH3 ions of a double to single charged observed during a high resolution mass scan taken near the end of the descent. The high resolution scan gives this ratio from ammonia sampled much deeper in the atmosphere. These results are described and compared with Infrared Space Observatory-Short Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-SWS) observations that give this ratio at 400 mbar.

  8. A cross-shelf gradient in δ15N stable isotope values of krill and pollock indicates seabird foraging patterns in the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Nathan M.; Hoover, Brian A.; Heppell, Scott A.; Kuletz, Kathy J.

    2014-11-01

    Concurrent measurements of predator and prey δ15N isotope values demonstrated that a cross-shelf isotopic gradient can propagate through a marine food web from forage species to top-tier predators and indicate foraging areas at a scale of tens of kilometers. We measured δ13C and δ15N in muscle tissues of thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) and black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), and in whole body tissues of walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) and krill (Thysanoessa spp), sampled across the continental shelf break in the Bering Sea in 2008 and in 2009. We found significant basin-shelf differences at fine scales (<100 km) in δ15N among murres but not kittiwakes, and no such differences in δ13C in either seabird species at that scale. We then quantified the multi-trophic signal and spatial structure of a basin-shelf δ15Nitrogen gradient in the central and southern Bering Sea, and used it to contrast foraging patterns of thick-billed murres and kittiwakes on the open ocean. Seabird muscle δ15N values were compared to baselines created from measurements in krill and pollock tissues sampled concurrently throughout the study area. Krill, pollock, and murre tissues from northern, shallow, shelf habitat (<200 m) were enriched 1-2‰ in δ15N relative to samples taken from deeper habitats (>200 m) to the south and west. Krill δ15N baseline values predicted 35-42% of the variability in murre tissue values. Patterns between kittiwakes and prey were less coherent. The persistence of strong spatial autocorrelation among sample values, and a congruence of geospatial patterns in δ15N among murre and prey tissues, suggest that murres forage repeatedly in specific areas. Murre isotope values showed distinct geospatial stratification, coincident with the spatial distribution of three colonies: St. Paul, St. George, and Bogoslof. This suggests some degree of foraging habitat partitioning among colonies.

  9. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by 13C CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion.

    PubMed

    Hass, Mathias A S; Yilmaz, Ali; Christensen, Hans E M; Led, Jens J

    2009-08-01

    The use of 13C NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically 13C labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for 13C(epsilon1) nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from 15N backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, 13C(epsilon1) dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the 13C(epsilon1) dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains are discussed. PMID:19533375

  10. A 115-year δ15N record of cumulative nitrogen pollution in California serpentine grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallano, D.; Zavaleta, E. S.

    2010-12-01

    Until the 1980s, California’s biodiverse serpentine grasslands were threatened primarily by development and protected by reserve creation. However, nitrogen (N) fertilization due to increasing fossil fuel emissions in the expanding Bay Area is thought to be contributing to rapid, recent invasion of these ecosystems by exotic annual grasses that are displacing rare and endemic serpentine species. Documenting the cumulative effects of N deposition in this ecosystem can direct policy and management actions to mitigate the role of N deposition in its transformation. Natural abundance stable isotopes of N in vegetation have been increasingly used as bio-indicators of N deposition patterns and subsequent changes to plant N cycling and assimilation. However, the long-term record of atmospheric reactive N enrichment and the resulting changes in ecosystem N dynamics have yet to be adequately reconstructed in many ecosystems. Museum archives of vascular plant tissue are valuable sources of materials to reconstruct temporal and spatial isotopic patterns of N inputs to ecosystems. Here, we present N stable isotope data from archived and current specimens of an endemic California serpentine grassland species, leather oak (Quercus durata), since 1895 across the greater San Francisco Bay region. We measured spatial and temporal trends in stable isotope composition (δ15N and δ13C) and concentration (%N and %C) of historical and current samples of leather oak leaves from sites within the Bay Area, impacted by increasing development, and sites northeast of the Bay Area, with significantly lower rates of urbanization and industrialization. Specifically, we sampled dry museum and fresh leaf specimens from serpentine sites within Lake (n=27) and Santa Clara (n=30) counties dating from 1895 to 2010. Leaf δ15N values were stable from 1895 to the 1950s and then decreased strongly throughout the last 50 years as fossil fuel emissions rapidly increased in the Bay Area, indicating that

  11. 15N Content Reflects Development of Mycorrhizae and Nitrogen Dynamics During Primary Succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Jumpponen, A.

    2004-05-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous symbionts on terrestrial plants that are particularly important for plant nitrogen nutrition. 15N content appears to be a useful marker of the mycorrhizal role in plant nitrogen supply because of an apparent fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from mycorrhizal fungi to host plants. Because plants developing during primary succession are gradually colonized by mycorrhizal fungi, such situations provide good opportunities to study interactions between mycorrhizal colonization and plant 15N content. Here, we present results of a study of nitrogen isotope patterns in ecosystem components during the first 100 years of ecosystem development after glacial retreat, and compare those patterns with those on adjacent mature terrain. Soils in primary succession were depleted in 15N relative to nitrogen-fixing plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants generally colonized by ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, or arbuscular fungi showed similar 15N content very early in succession (-4 to -6‰ ), corresponding to low colonization levels of all plant species. Subsequent colonization of evergreen plants by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid fungi led to a 5-6‰ decline in 15N content, indicating transfer of 15N-depleted N from fungi to plants. The values recorded (-10 to -14‰ ) are among the lowest yet observed in vascular plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi did not decline in 15N content. Most ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi were similar in 15N content in early succession (-1 to -3‰ ), with the notable exception of ectomycorrhizal fungi suspected of proteolytic capabilities, which were 15N enriched relative to all other fungi. 15N contents in both plants and soil from the mature site were 5‰ greater than in recently exposed sites. We conclude that 1) the primary nitrogen source to this ecosystem must be atmospheric deposition, 2) low plant 15N content generally corresponds with greater

  12. Reconstruction of the oceanic nitrate inventory in the Pliocene Caribbean Sea: Foraminifera-bound δ15N - A new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, M.; Haug, G. H.; Sigman, D. M.; Ren, H.

    2010-12-01

    The nitrate budget in the low-latitude surface ocean is mainly controlled by the opposing effects of denitrification and nitrate fixation. The state of the global ocean nitrate inventory highly affects primary production, which allows sequestering CO2 into the deep ocean. This may influence climate variability and control warm and cold periods in Earth history. Studies have shown that nitrogen isotopes reflect the nutrient status of the upper water column and therefore can be used as proxy for the state of the ocean’s ‘biological pump’. The nitrate inventory has mostly been reconstructed based on bulk sedimentary N-isotope measurements, which can be affected by syn- and post-sedimentary processes. Promising approaches to circumvent these potential biases are based on measurements of foraminifera-bound δ15N isotopes. In the subtropical and tropical ocean, planktonic foraminifera are a main component of the sinking particle flux. The organic compounds encapsulated within the foraminiferal tests are protected from sedimentary diagenetic processes and record a pristine signal of the nitrate composition of the upper water column. The novel method used in this study employs denitrifying bacteria (Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas aureofaciens) to produce nitrous oxide (N2O), recovered from the nitrate extracted from the organic matter sheltered within the foraminifera shell. The extracted N2O is analyzed for δ15N with a Gas bench II - IRMS and yields results with reproducible isotopic measurements of samples with nitrate concentrations down to 1 μM. Previous data from the investigated site (ODP Leg 165, Site 999A, Caribbean Sea), spanning the last 30’000 yrs using the same method, indicate a systematic difference between glacial and interglacial values. The glacial state is characterized by high δ15N values around ~ 5 ‰ (suggesting less N-fixation) and the interglacial by low δ15N values around ~ 3 ‰ (N-fixation increase). Pliocene data from

  13. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles. PMID:25621737

  14. Steroselective synthesis and application of L-( sup 15 N) amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J. ); Lodwig, S.N. . Div. of Science)

    1991-01-01

    We have developed two general approaches to the stereoselective synthesis of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-labeled amino acids. First, labeled serine, biosynthesized using the methylotrophic bacterium M. extorquens AM1, serves as a chiral precursor for the synthesis of other amino acids. For example, pyridoxal phosphate enzymes can be used for the conversion of L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)serine to L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tyrosine, L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tryptophan, and L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)cysteine. In the second approach, developed by Oppolzer and Tamura, an electrophilic amination'' reagent, 1-chloro-1-nitrosocyclohexane, was used to convert chiral enolates into L-{alpha}-amino acids. We prepared 1-chloro-1-({sup 15}N) nitrosocyclohexane and used it to aminate chiral enolates to produce L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)amino acids. The stereoselectivity of this scheme using the Oppolzer sultam chiral auxiliary is remarkable, producing enantiomer ratios of 200 to 1. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Similarities and differences in 13C and 15N stable isotope ratios in two non-lethal tissue types from shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus (Rafinesque, 1820)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeVries, R. J.; Schramm, Harold L., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that δ13C and δ15N signatures of pectoral spines would provide measures of δ13C and δ15N similar to those obtained from fin clips for adult shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus. Thirty-two shovelnose sturgeon (fork length [FL] = 500–724 mm) were sampled from the lower Mississippi River, USA on 23 February 2013. Isotopic relationships between the two tissue types were analyzed using mixed model analysis of covariance. Tissue types differed significantly for both δ13C (P < 0.01; spine: mean = −23.83, SD = 0.62; fin clip: mean = −25.74, SD = 0.97) and δ15N (P = 0.01; spine: mean = 17.01, SD = 0.51; fin clip: mean = 17.19, SD = 0.62). Neither FL nor the FL × tissue type interaction had significant (P > 0.05) effects on δ13C. Fin clip δ13C values were highly variable and weakly correlated (r = 0.16, P = 0.40) with those from pectoral spines. We found a significant FL-tissue type interaction for δ15N, reflecting increasing δ15N with FL for spines and decreasing δ15N with FL for fin clips. These results indicate that spines are not a substitute for fin clip tissue for measuring δ13C and δ15N for shovelnose sturgeon in the lower Mississippi River, but the two tissues have different turnover rates they may provide complementary information for assessing trophic position at different time scales.

  16. Light-mediated 15N fractionation in Caribbean gorgonian octocorals: implications for pollution monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. M.; Kim, K.; Andras, J. P.; Sparks, J. P.

    2011-09-01

    The stable nitrogen isotope ratio ( δ 15N) of coral tissue is a useful recorder of anthropogenic pollution in tropical marine ecosystems. However, little is known of the natural environmentally induced fractionations that affect our interpretation of coral δ 15N values. In symbiotic scleractinians, light affects metabolic fractionation of N during photosynthesis, which may confound the identification of N pollution between sites of varied depth or turbidity. Given the superiority of octocorals for δ 15N studies, our goal was to quantify the effect of light on gorgonian δ 15N in the context of monitoring N pollution sources. Using field collections, we show that δ 15N declined by 1.4‰ over 20 m depth in two species of gorgonians, the common sea fan, Gorgonia ventalina, and the slimy sea plume, Pseudopterogorgia americana. An 8-week laboratory experiment with P. americana showed that light, not temperature causes this variation, whereby the lowest fractionation of the N source was observed in the highest light treatment. Finally, we used a yearlong reciprocal depth transplant experiment to quantify the time frame over which δ 15N changes in G. ventalina as a function of light regime . Over the year, δ 15N was unchanged and increased slightly in the deep control colonies and shallow colonies transplanted to the deep site, respectively. Within 6 months, colonies transplanted from deep to shallow became enriched by 0.8‰, mirroring the enrichment observed in the shallow controls, which was likely due to the combined effect of an increase in the source δ 15N and reduced fractionation. We conclude that light affects gorgonian δ 15N fractionation and should be considered in sampling designs for N pollution monitoring. However, these fractionations are small relative to differences observed between natural and anthropogenic N sources.

  17. Fate and metabolism of [15N]2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in soil.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Martin; Geyer, Roland; Russow, Rolf; Richnow, Hans H; Kästner, Matthias

    2004-08-01

    The fates of the labels from [14C] and [15N] trinitrotoluene were analyzed in bioreactors under aerobic conditions in soil treated by a fungal bioremediation process with Stropharia rugosoannulata and in control soil. Up to 17.5% of the 15N label had a different fate than the 14C label. Three N-mineralization processes were identified in detailed experiments with [15N]TNT. About 2% of the 15N label was found as NO3- and NH4+, showing simultaneous processes of direct TNT denitration (I) and reduction with cleavage of the amino groups (II). The enrichment of NO2-/NO3- (up to 7.5 atom% 15N abundance) indicates the formation of Meisenheimer complexes with a denitration of [15N]TNT. A 1.4% of the label was found distributed between N2O and N2. However, the 15N enrichment of the N2O (up to 38 atom%) demonstrated that both N atoms were generated from the labeled TNT and clearly indicates a novel formation process (III). We propose, as an explanation, the generation of N2O by cleavage from condensed azoxy metabolites. In addition, 1.7% of the 15N label was detected as biogenic amino acids in the wheat straw containing the fungus. Overall, 60 to 85% of the applied [15N]TNT was degraded and 52 to 64% was found as nonextractable residues in the soil matrix. Three percent was detected as 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene. PMID:15352472

  18. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  19. Radiative p 15N Capture in the Region of Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-06-01

    Within the framework of the modified potential cluster model with classification of orbital states according to the Young schemes, the possibility of describing experimental data for the astrophysical S-factor of p 15N radiative capture at energies from 50 to 1500 keV is considered. It is shown that on the basis of M1 and E1 transitions from various p 15N scattering states to the ground state of the 16O nucleus in the p 15N channel it is entirely possible to successfully explain the overall behavior of the S-factor in the considered energy region in the presence of two resonances.

  20. Assignment of the sup 1 H and sup 15 N NMR spectra of Rhodobacter capsulatus ferrocytochrome c sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gooley, P.R.; Caffrey, M.S.; Cusanovich, M.A.; MacKenzie, N.E. )

    1990-03-06

    The peptide resonances of the {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of ferrocytochrome c{sub 2} from Rhodobacter capsulatus are sequentially assigned by a combination of 2D {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N spectroscopy, the latter performed on {sup 15}N-enriched protein. Short-range nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data show {alpha}-helices from residues 3-17, 55-65, 69-88, and 103-115. Within the latter two {alpha}-helices, there are three single 3{sub 10} turns, 70-72, 76-78, and 107-109. In addition {alpha}H-NH{sub i+1} and {alpha}H-NH{sub i+2} NOEs indicate that the N-terminal helix (3-17) is distorted. Compared to horse or tuna cytochrome c and cytochrome c{sub 2} of Rhodospirillium rubrum, there is a 6-residue insertion at residues 23-29 in R. capsulatus cytochrome c{sub 2}. The NOE data show that this insertion forms a loop, probably an {Omega} loop. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation experiments are used to follow NH exchange over a period of 40 h. As the 2D spectra are acquired in short time periods (30 min), rates for intermediate exchanging protons can be measured. Comparison of the NH exchange data for the N-terminal helix of cytochrome c{sub 2} of R. capsulatus with the highly homologous horse heart cytochrome c shows that this helix is less stable in cytochrome c{sub 2}.

  1. Evaluating mercury biomagnification in fish from a tropical marine environment using stable isotopes (delta13C and delta15N).

    PubMed

    Al-Reasi, Hassan A; Ababneh, Fuad A; Lean, David R

    2007-08-01

    Concentrations of total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) were measured in zooplankton and 13 fish species from a coastal food web of the Gulf of Oman, an arm of the Arabian Sea between Oman and Iran. Stable isotope ratios (delta13C and delta15N) also were determined to track mercury biomagnification. The average concentration of T-Hg in zooplankton was 21 +/- 8.0 ng g(-1) with MeHg accounting 10% of T-Hg. Total mercury levels in fish species ranged from 3.0 ng g(-1) (Sardinella longiceps) to 760 ng g(-1) (Rhizoprionodon acutus) with relatively lower fraction of MeHg (72%) than that found in other studies. The average trophic difference (Deltadelta13C) between zooplankton and planktivorous fish (Selar crumenopthalmus, Rastrelliger kanagurta, and S. longiceps) was higher (3.4 per thousandth) than expected, suggesting that zooplankton may not be the main diet or direct carbon source for these fish species. However, further sampling would be required to compensate for temporal changes in zooplankton and the influence of their lipid content. Trophic position inferred by delta15N and and slopes of the regression equations (log10[T-Hg] = 0.13[delta15N] - 3.57 and log10[MeHg] = 0.14[delta15N] - 3.90) as estimates of biomagnification indicate that biomagnification of T-Hg and MeHg was lower in this tropical ocean compared to what has been observed in arctic and temperate ecosystems and tropical African lakes. The calculated daily intake of methylmercury in the diet of local people through fish consumption was well below the established World Health Organization (WHO) tolerable daily intake threshold for most of the fish species except Euthynnus affinis, Epinephelus epistictus, R. acutus, and Thunnus tonggol, illustrating safe consumption of the commonly consumed fish species. PMID:17702328

  2. Nitrogen dynamics in a Western Boundary Upwelling System (Cabo Frio, Brazil) based on δ15N-nitrate and δ15N of sinking particle signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, L.; Belem, A. L.; Venancio, I.; Duarte, C.; Chiara, S. D.; Albuquerque, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    To improve the efficiency of upwelling to control nitrogen dynamic in the ocean, better understanding of the occurring processes is necessary. This research explores δ15N of nitrate and sinking particles on a western boundary upwelling System (Cabo Frio, Brazil). The Continental Shelf of southeastern Brazil is dominated by the oligotrophic Brazil Current, whose instabilities promote the coastal upwelling of South Atlantic Central Water (SACW), and consequently increases of primary productivity. The coastal upwelling system plays an important role in the nitrogen dynamics on the Cabo Frio Upwelling System (CFUS). However, the interactions between biological induced processes, including biological N-fixation and nitrate inputs from upwelled waters in CFUS still have not been well explored. Then, this study aims clarify N-dynamics on CFUS based on a cross-shelf approach. δ15N-nitrate was characterized for each water masses present on the shelf (South Atlantic Central Water, Tropical Water and Coastal Water) and associated with physicochemical parameters (T/S, nutrients), as well as the δ15N of sinking particles at different depths (from surface to the bottom water). Samples were collected in a time interval of 1 month during ~4 years (2011 to 2014). Cross-shelf gradients of nitrogen species concentration (ammonium + nitrite + nitrate) and stable isotopes were observed. The δ15N of nitrate and sinking particles were interpreted according to the prevailing processes of the N-transformations. Considering the region as N-limited (N:P < 16), processes as biological N-fixation seems to be dominant on oligotrophic Tropical Waters. Coastal upwelled SACW showed δ15N-nitrate signature within the global average of deep ocean (5-6‰) characterizing the inner and mid-shelf conditions, where the input of new nitrate from upwelling is rapidly used by organisms in the euphotic zone without any fractionation. On the other hands, the dominance of N-limited Tropical Waters on the

  3. Carbon-rich Presolar Grains from Massive Stars: Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N Ratios and the Mystery of 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.

  4. WHAT IS THE BEST SURFACE EMG MEASURE OF LUMBAR FLEXION-RELAXATION FOR DISTINGUISHING CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN PATIENTS FROM PAIN-FREE CONTROLS?

    PubMed Central

    Neblett, Randy; Brede, Emily; Mayer, Tom G.; Gatchel, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Lumbar flexion-relaxation (FR) is a well-known phenomenon that can reliably be seen in normal subjects but not in most chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. The purpose of this study was to determine which surface electromyographic (SEMG) measures of FR best distinguish CLBP patients from pain-free control subjects. Standing SEMG and lumbar flexion range of motion (ROM) were also evaluated. Methods A cohort of 218 CLBP patients, who were admitted to a functional restoration program, received a standardized SEMG and ROM assessment during standing trunk flexion and re-extension. An asymptomatic control group of 30 non-patients received an identical assessment. Both groups were compared on eight separate SEMG and three flexion ROM measures. Results A receiver-operating curve (ROC) analysis was used to determine how well each measure distinguished between the CLBP patients and the pain-free control subjects. All SEMG measures of FR performed acceptably. Between 79% and 82% of patients, and 83% and 100% of controls were correctly classified. Standing SEMG performed less well. Gross flexion ROM was the best single classification measure tested, correctly classifying 88% of patients and 83% of controls. A series of discriminant analyses found that certain combinations of SEMG and ROM performed slightly better than gross ROM alone for correctly classifying the two subject groups. Discussion Because all SEMG measures of FR performed acceptably, the determination of which SEMG measure of FR is “best” is largely dependent on one’s specific purpose Additionally, ROM measures were found to be important components of the FR assessment. PMID:23328325

  5. Site-selective measurement of relaxation properties at 980 nm in Er^{3+}-doped congruent and stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandula, Gabor; Kis, Zsolt; Kovacs, Laszlo; Szaller, Zsuzsanna; Krampf, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    A pump-probe-type saturation spectroscopic experiment has been performed at 980 nm to measure the homogeneous linewidth of the ^4I_{11/2}-^4I_{15/2} transition and the lifetime of the ^4I_{11/2} state of erbium embedded into lithium niobate single crystals. There are several non-equivalent Er^{3+}_{Li^+}-V_{Li^+} sites with differently oriented defect structure for charge compensation. These non-equivalent centers differ in their transition energies. Hence, our measurements have been done at two nearby frequencies, addressing groups of erbium ions located at non-equivalent sites. The results are compared with lifetime calculations and measurements found in the literature and with the predictions of our simple model calculation.

  6. Automated, low-temperature dielectric relaxation apparatus for measurement of air-sensitive, corrosive, hygroscopic, powdered samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessonette, Paul W. R.; White, Mary Anne

    1999-07-01

    An automated apparatus for dielectric determinations on solid samples was designed to allow cryogenic measurements on air-sensitive, corrosive, hygroscopic, powdered samples, without determination of sample thickness, provided that it is uniform. A three-terminal design enabled measurements that were not affected by errors due to dimensional changes of the sample or the electrodes with changes in temperature. Meaningful dielectric data could be taken over the frequency range from 20 Hz to 1 MHz and the temperature range from 12 to 360 K. Tests with Teflon and with powdered NH4Cl gave results that were accurate within a few percent when compared with literature values.

  7. Increase of Natural 15N Enrichment of Soybean Nodules with Mean Nodule Mass 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Bryan, Barbara A.; Kohl, Daniel H.

    1984-01-01

    The 15N abundance of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill var Harosoy) nodules is usually greater than it is for other tissues or for atmospheric N2. Results of experiments in which nodules were separated by size show that the magnitude of the 15N enrichment is correlated with nodule mass. The results support the hypothesis that 15N enrichment of nodules results from differential N isotopic fractionation for synthesis of nodule tissue versus synthesis of compounds for export from the nodule. The physiological significance of this hypothesis is that it requires that a substantial fraction of the N for nodule tissue synthesis in 15N-enriched nodules be N recently fixed within the same nodule. PMID:16663917

  8. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  9. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  10. Sources of δ15N variability in sinking particulate nitrogen in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Enrique; Thunell, Robert; Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Lorenzoni, Laura; Tappa, Eric; Troccoli, Luis; Astor, Yrene; Varela, Ramón

    2013-09-01

    Ten years of monthly observations of the δ15N of sinking particulate nitrogen (δ15N-PN (in ‰ versus atmospheric N2)=[(15N/14N)sample/(15N/14N)standard)-1]1000) in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, confirm that the basin's bottom sediments store information about nitrogen dynamics related to seasonal and interannual variability in regional surface ocean processes. During the upwelling period of the southern Caribbean Sea (February-April), the δ15N-PN is similar to that of the thermocline nitrate (˜3.5‰). This nitrate is imported into the Cariaco Basin with Subtropical Underwater (SUW), which wells up near the coast. Thus, particles generated by phytoplankton photosynthesis during this productive period bear a sub-tropical North Atlantic isotopic imprint of N2 fixation (low compared to the global average of nitrate δ15N≈5‰). During the non-upwelling period when surface waters are stratified (September-November), the δ15N-PN is also 3.5-4.0‰, and reflects a mixture of local N2 fixation within the mixed layer, inputs of terrigenous organic matter and SUW nitrate consumption by phytoplankton below the mixed layer, which most likely exerts the strongest control on the δ15N-PN signal during this time. In the transition periods of May-July and December-January, the δ15N-PN increases to 4.5-6.5‰. This coincides with maxima of continental material fluxes (terrestrial PON δ15N is >6‰) into the Cariaco Basin. The δ15N signal in the sediments of the Cariaco Basin thus provides information about the relative strength of the local coastal upwelling, the relative input of continental material via river runoff, and local N2 fixation. The findings contribute to interpretations of the basin's paleoclimatic nitrogen cycle variations based on observations of the sedimentary δ15N record at this location.

  11. 15N techniques and analytical procedures. Indo/U. S. science and technology initiative. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, L.K.; Mosier, A.R.

    1992-05-01

    (15)N technology is used to explore many agricultural research topics, including the movement of nitrates to groundwater, use of fertilizer nitrogen by plants, ways to increase nitrogen fixation, and effects of management practices on denitrification. The publication reviews (15)N procedures and methods for handling and collecting samples, introducing isotopes into plants and soils, and for performing Kjeldahl analyses, isotope dilutions, Rittenberg oxidation conversions for isotope-ration analyses, and automated Dumas isotope-ratio analyses.

  12. Ecosystem N distribution and δ15N during a century of forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compton, J.E.; Hooker, T.D.; Perakis, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of terrestrial ecosystem nitrogen (N) pools reflect internal processes and input–output balances. Disturbance generally increases N cycling and loss, yet few studies have examined ecosystem δ15N over a disturbance-recovery sequence. We used a chronosequence approach to examine N distribution and δ15N during forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment. Site ages ranged from 10 to 115 years, with similar soils, climate, land-use history, and overstory vegetation (white pine Pinus strobus). Foliar N and δ15N decreased as stands aged, consistent with a progressive tightening of the N cycle during forest regrowth on agricultural lands. Over time, foliar δ15N became more negative, indicating increased fractionation along the mineralization–mycorrhizal–plant uptake pathway. Total ecosystem N was constant across the chronosequence, but substantial internal N redistribution occurred from the mineral soil to plants and litter over 115 years (>25% of ecosystem N or 1,610 kg ha−1). Temporal trends in soil δ15N generally reflected a redistribution of depleted N from the mineral soil to the developing O horizon. Although plants and soil δ15N are coupled over millennial time scales of ecosystem development, our observed divergence between plants and soil suggests that they can be uncoupled during the disturbance-regrowth sequence. The approximate 2‰ decrease in ecosystem δ15N over the century scale suggests significant incorporation of atmospheric N, which was not detected by traditional ecosystem N accounting. Consideration of temporal trends and disturbance legacies can improve our understanding of the influence of broader factors such as climate or N deposition on ecosystem N balances and δ15N.

  13. High Resolution 15N NMR of the 225 K Phase Transition of Ammonia Borane (NH3BH3): Mixed Order-Disorder and Displacive Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Gunaydin-Sen, Ozge; Achey, Randall; Dalal, Nar S.; Stowe, Ashley C.; Autrey, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We report high resolution 15N NMR probing of the solid-solid phase transition of 15N-labeled ammonia borane (NH3BH3) around 225 K. Both the 15N isotropic chemical shift, δiso, and the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1) exhibited strong anomalies around 225 K. The analysis of T1-1 using the Bloembergen-Purcell and Pound model showed that the motional correlation time, τ, increased from about 1 ps to 100 ps while the corresponding Arrhenius activation energy increased from 6 to 13.4 kJ/mol on going through the transition. The observed strong temperature dependence of δiso was interpreted by an extension of the Bayer model. The time scale of the underlying motion was found to be in a reasonable agreement with the T1-1 data. These results imply that the NH3 rotor motion plays a pivotal role in the transition mechanism, and that the transition is of both order-disorder and displacive type. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U. S. Department of Energy Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  14. Dielectric relaxation in a protein matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.W.; Boxer, S.G.

    1992-06-25

    The dielectric relaxation of a sperm whale ApoMb-DANCA complex is measured by the fluorescence dynamic Stokes shift method. Emission energy increases with decreasing temperature, suggesting that the relaxation activation energies of the rate-limiting motions either depend on the conformational substrate or different types of protein motions with different frequencies participate in the reaction. Experimental data suggest that there may be relaxations on a scale of <100 ps. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Alternate Forms Reliability of the Behavioral Relaxation Scale: Preliminary Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Dunlap, Angel L.

    2006-01-01

    Alternate forms reliability of the Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS; Poppen,1998), a direct observation measure of relaxed behavior, was examined. A single BRS score, based on long duration observation (5-minute), has been found to be a valid measure of relaxation and is correlated with self-report and some physiological measures. Recently,…

  16. Application of a GC-ECD for measurements of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of peroxyacetyl nitrate using the relaxed eddy accumulation and gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, A.; Foken, T.; Trebs, I.

    2014-02-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) may constitute a significant fraction of reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. Current knowledge about the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of PAN is limited and only few studies have investigated the deposition of PAN to terrestrial ecosystems. We developed a flux measurement system for the determination of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of PAN using both the hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA) method and the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method. The system consists of a modified, commercially available gas chromatograph with electron capture detection (GC-ECD, Meteorologie Consult GmbH, Germany). Sampling was performed by trapping PAN onto two pre-concentration columns; during HREA operation one was used for updraft and one for downdraft events and during MBR operation the two columns allowed simultaneous sampling at two measurement heights. The performance of the PAN flux measurement system was tested at a natural grassland site, using fast response ozone (O3) measurements as a proxy for both methods. The measured PAN fluxes were comparatively small (daytime PAN deposition was on average -0.07 nmol m-2 s-1 and, thus, prone to significant uncertainties. A major challenge in the design of the system was the resolution of the small PAN mixing ratio differences. Consequently, the study focuses on the performance of the analytical unit and a detailed analysis of errors contributing to the overall uncertainty. The error of the PAN mixing ratio differences ranged from 4 to 15 ppt during the MBR and between 18 and 26 ppt during the HREA operation, while during daytime measured PAN mixing ratios were of similar magnitude. Choosing optimal settings for both the MBR and HREA method, the study shows that the HREA method did not have a significant advantage towards the MBR method under well mixed conditions as it was expected.

  17. Application of a GC-ECD for measurements of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of peroxyacetyl nitrate using the relaxed eddy accumulation and gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, A.; Foken, T.; Trebs, I.

    2014-07-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) may constitute a significant fraction of reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. Current knowledge about the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of PAN is limited, and only few studies have investigated the deposition of PAN to terrestrial ecosystems. We developed a flux measurement system for the determination of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of PAN using both the hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA) method and the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method. The system consists of a modified, commercially available gas chromatograph with electron capture detection (GC-ECD, Meteorologie Consult GmbH, Germany). Sampling was performed by trapping PAN onto two pre-concentration columns; during HREA operation one was used for updraft and one for downdraft events, and during MBR operation the two columns allowed simultaneous sampling at two measurement heights. The performance of the PAN flux measurement system was tested at a natural grassland site, using fast-response ozone (O3) measurements as a proxy for both methods. The measured PAN fluxes were comparatively small (daytime PAN deposition was on average -0.07 nmol m-2 s-1) and, thus, prone to significant uncertainties. A major challenge in the design of the system was the resolution of the small PAN mixing ratio differences. Consequently, the study focuses on the performance of the analytical unit and a detailed analysis of errors contributing to the overall uncertainty. The error of the PAN mixing ratio differences ranged from 4 to 15 ppt during the MBR and between 18 and 26 ppt during the HREA operation, while during daytime measured PAN mixing ratios were of similar magnitude. Choosing optimal settings for both the MBR and HREA method, the study shows that the HREA method did not have a significant advantage towards the MBR method under well-mixed conditions as was expected.

  18. Highly 15N-Enriched Chondritic Clasts in the Isheyevo Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bonal, L; Huss, G R; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-01-14

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment ({delta}{sup 15}N up to +1500{per_thousand}), similar to {delta}{sup 15}N values reported in micron-sized regions (hotspots) of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) of possibly cometary origin and fine-grained matrices of unmetamorphosed chondrites. These {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are commonly attributed to low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in the protosolar molecular cloud or in the outer part of the protoplanetary disk. The nature of the whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment of the metal-rich chondrites is not understood. We report a discovery of a unique type of primitive chondritic clasts in the CH/CB-like meteorite Isheyevo, which provides important constraints on the origin of {sup 15}N anomaly in metal-rich chondrites and nitrogen-isotope fractionation in the Solar System. These clasts contain tiny chondrules and refractory inclusions (5-15 {micro}m in size), and abundant ferromagnesian chondrule fragments (1-50 {micro}m in size) embedded in the partly hydrated, fine-grained matrix material composed of olivines, pyroxenes, poorly-organized aromatic organics, phyllosilicates and other hydrous phases. The mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of chondrules and refractory inclusions in the clasts are similar to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting formation at similar heliocentric distances. In contrast to the previously known extraterrestrial samples, the fine-grained material in the clasts is highly and rather uniformly enriched in {sup 15}N, with bulk {delta}{sup 15}N values ranging between +1000 and +1300{per_thousand}; the {delta}{sup 15}N values in rare hotspots range from +1400 to +4000{per_thousand}. Since fine-grained matrices in the lithic clasts are the only component containing thermally unprocessed (during CAI and chondrule formation or during impact melting) materials that accreted into the metal rich chondrite parent body(ies), the {sup 15}N

  19. Non-homogeneity of isotopic labelling in 15N gas flux studies: theory, some observations and possible lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Deppe, Marianna; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Gattinger, Andreas; Giesemann, Anette; Krause, Hans-Martin; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying dinitrogen (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from different soil N pools and processes can be accomplished using the 15N tracer technique but this is subject to four different sources of bias (i. - iv.). This approach includes 15N labelling of selected N pools in soil and subsequent isotope analysis of all relevant N pools as well as of gas samples from enclosures, i.e. mixtures of soil-derived and atmospheric N2 and N2O. Depending on the processes of interest, there may be 15N labelling of one or several N pools, were several labelling treatment are needed in the latter case (e.g. Müller et al., 2004). Measuring pool-derived N2 or N2O has been shown to include two calculation problems, (i.) arising from multiple pools (e.g. Arah, 1992) and (ii.) dealing with the non-random distribution of N2 and N2O mole masses (Hauck et al., 1958). Non-randomness can be solved if m/z 28, 29 and 30 are correctly analysed and the 15N enrichment of one (to distinguish two pools, i.e. soil and atmosphere) or two pools (in case of three pools) is known (Spott & Stange, 2008). Moreover (iii.), NO3- pools generating N2 and N2O via denitrification can be identical or different, e.g. if N2O evolved from higher enriched NO3- in deeper soil was more reduced to N2 compared to N2O evolved from N2O from shallow soil with lower enrichment, or vice versa. Apportioning N2O fluxes to NH4+ (nitrification and/or nitrifier denitrification) and NO3- (denitrification) is often conducted by NO3-labeling, measuring δ15N of emitted N2O and applying mixing equations were the measured 15N enrichment of NH4+and NO3-pool is used. However, this assumes that the average 15N enrichment of NH4+and NO3-in the soil is identical to the enrichment in the active soil domain producing N2 and/or N2O. Violation of this precondition must lead to bias in source apportionment (iv.), but to our knowledge this has not been investigated until now. Here we present conceptual models and model calculations

  20. Mangrove isotopic (δ15N and δ13C) fractionation across a nitrogen vs. phosphorus limitation gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Karen L.; Feller, Ilka C.; Popp, Marianne; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Mangrove islands in Belize are characterized by a unique switching from nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) limitation to tree growth from shoreline to interior. Fertilization has previously shown that Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) fringe trees (5–6 m tall) growing along the shoreline are N limited; dwarf trees (!1.5 m tall) in the forestinterior are P limited; and transition trees (2–4 m tall) are co-limited by both N and P.  Growth patterns paralleled a landward decrease in soil flushing by tides and an increase in bioavailable N, but P availability remained consistently low across the gradient. Stable isotopic composition was measured in R. mangle leaves to aid in explaining this nutrient switching pattern and growth variation. Along control transects, leaf !15N decreased from "0.10‰ (fringe) to #5.38‰ (dwarf). The !15N of N-fertilized trees also varied spatially, but the values were consistently more negative (by $3‰) compared to control trees. Spatial variation in !15N values disappeared when the trees were fertilized with P, and values averaged "0.12‰, similar to that in control fringe trees. Neither variation in source inputs nor microbial fractionation could fully account for the observed patterns in !15N. The results instead suggest that the lower !15N values in transition and dwarf control trees were due to plant fractionation as a consequence of slower growth and lower N demand. P fertilization increased N demand and decreased fractionation. Although leaf !13C was unaffected by fertilization, values increased from fringe (#28.6‰) to transition (#27.9‰) to dwarf (#26.4‰) zones, indicating spatial variation in environmental stresses affecting stomatal conductance or carboxylation. The results thus suggest an interaction of external supply, internal demand, and plant ability to acquire nutrients under different hydro-edaphic conditions that vary across this tree-height gradient. The findings not only aid in understanding

  1. δ(15)N variation in Ulva lactuca as a proxy for anthropogenic nitrogen inputs in coastal areas of Gulf of Gaeta (Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Lucia; Bentivoglio, Flavia; Carlino, Pasquale; Calizza, Edoardo; Rossi, David; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Loreto

    2014-07-15

    We tested the capacity of Ulva lactuca to mark N sources across large marine areas by measuring variation in its δ(15)N at several sites in the Gulf of Gaeta. Comparisons were made with the macroalga Cystoseira amentacea. Variation of δ(15)N values was assessed also in the coastal waters off the Circeo Natural Park, where U. lactuca and C. amentacea were harvested, as these waters are barely influenced by human activities and were used as reference site. A small fragment from each frond was preserved before deployment in order to characterize the initial isotopic values. After 48 h of submersion, U. lactuca was more responsive than C. amentacea to environmental variation and δ(15)N enrichment in the Gulf of Gaeta was observed. The spatial distribution of δ(15)N enrichment indicated that different macro-areas in the Gulf were affected by N inputs from different origins. Comparison of the δ(15)N values of fragments taken from the same transplanted frond avoided bias arising from natural isotopic variability. PMID:24923814

  2. Local structural plasticity of the prion protein. Analysis of NMR relaxation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Viles, J H; Donne, D; Kroon, G; Prusiner, S B; Cohen, F E; Dyson, H J; Wright, P E

    2001-03-01

    A template-assisted conformational change of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) from a predominantly helical structure to an amyloid-type structure with a higher proportion of beta-sheet is thought to be the causative factor in prion diseases. Since flexibility of the polypeptide is likely to contribute to the ability of PrP(C) to undergo the conformational change that leads to the infective state, we have undertaken a comprehensive examination of the dynamics of two recombinant Syrian hamster PrP fragments, PrP(29-231) and PrP(90-231), using (15)N NMR relaxation measurements. The molecular motions of these PrP fragments have been studied in solution using (15)N longitudinal (T(1)) and transverse relaxation (T(2)) measurements as well as [(1)H]-(15)N nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE). These data have been analyzed using both reduced spectral density mapping and the Lipari-Szabo model free formalism. The relaxation properties of the common regions of PrP(29-231) and PrP(90-231) are very similar; both have a relatively inflexible globular domain (residues 128-227) with a highly flexible and largely unstructured N-terminal domain. Residues 29-89 of PrP(29-231), which include the copper-binding octarepeat sequences, are also highly flexible. Analysis of the spectral densities at each residue indicates that even within the structured core of PrP(C), a markedly diverse range of motions is observed, consistent with the inherent plasticity of the protein. The central portions of helices B and C form a relatively rigid core, which is stabilized by the presence of an interhelix disulfide bond. Of the remainder of the globular domain, the parts that are not in direct contact with the rigid region, including helix A, are more flexible. Most significantly, slow conformational fluctuations on a millisecond to microsecond time scale are observed for the small beta-sheet. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the infectious, scrapie form of the protein Pr

  3. 15N labeled brain enables quantification of proteome and phosphoproteome in cultured primary neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lujian; Sando, Richard C.; Farnum, John B.; Vanderklish, Peter W.; Maximov, Anton; Yates, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Terminally differentiated primary cells represent a valuable in vitro model to study signaling events associated within a specific tissue. Quantitative proteomic methods using metabolic labeling in primary cells encounter labeling efficiency issues hindering the use of these cells. Here we developed a method to quantify the proteome and phosphoproteome of cultured neurons using 15N labeled brain tissue as an internal standard, and applied this method to determine how an inhibitor of an excitatory neural transmitter receptor, phencyclidine (PCP), affects the global phosphoproteome of cortical neurons. We identified over 10,000 phosphopeptides and made accurate quantitative measurements of the neuronal phosphoproteome after neuronal inhibition. We show that short PCP treatments lead to changes in phosphorylation for 7% of neuronal phosphopeptides and that prolonged PCP treatment alters the total levels of several proteins essential for synaptic transmission and plasticity and leads to a massive reduction in the synaptic strength of inhibitory synapses. The results provide valuable insights into the dynamics of molecular networks implicated in PCP-mediated NMDA receptor inhibition and sensorimotor deficits. PMID:22070516

  4. Compound-specific δ15N and chlorin preservation in surface sediments of the Peru Margin with implications for ancient bulk δ15N records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junium, Christopher K.; Arthur, Michael A.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the processes that control the preservation of paleoceanographic proxies is of clear importance. Surface sediments from the Peru Margin oxygen-minimum zone are subject to lateral and downslope transport by bottom currents that decrease organic matter (OM) quality. Indicators of bulk OM quality (pyrolysis hydrogen index, pyrolysis S1 + S2 and C/N) demonstrate significant degradation between 150 and 400 m water depth, within the oxygen-minimum zone. Concentrations of the three most abundant chlorins (chlorophyllone, pheophytin and pyropheophytin) decrease from 750 to 150 nmol g TOC-1 from 150 to 400 m water depth though the relative abundances of the chlorins in an individual sample do not change. This suggests that the three chlorins have similar reactivity over the ambient conditions. Values for δ15N of bulk sediments (δ15Nbulk) decrease by 3‰ from the inner shelf to the upper slope (1000 m) but co-occurring compound-specific δ15N values (δ15Nchlorin) do not decrease downslope. The low variability of δ15Nchlorin values supports a single source for the chlorins, and demonstrates the recalcitrance of δ15Nchlorin values despite degradation. This set of observation raises questions about which type of OM fraction best records 'primary' signatures. We assess two possible models to guide our interpretation of these disparate datasets (1) that decreasing δ15Nbulk values are the result of degradation of a 15N-enriched fraction during downslope transport, and that δ15Nchlorin values reflect primary values; (2) that δ15Nbulk values are primary and that chlorins are derived from material transported from upslope. These data reaffirm that in active sedimentary environments such as the Eastern Tropical Pacific, transport of OM can significantly alter bulk geochemical parameters of OM integrity, but the impacts on the δ15N record of bulk sediments and chlorins are less clear, and require more study to be thoroughly understood.

  5. Sewage derive [sup 15]N in the Baltic traced in fucus

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbie, J.E.; Fry, B. ); Larsson, U.; Elmgren, R. )

    1990-01-09

    Himmerfjarden, a fjord-like bay on the eastern shore of the Baltic, receives treated sewage from 250,000 inhabitants. Because the inorganic N in the effluent is enriched in [sup 15]N through denitrification, nitrification, and ammonia volatilization, an analysis of the distribution of [sup 15]N in the Bay tells how far from the source the sewage nitrogen moves. The attached macroalga Fucus vesiculosus was collected in early May from rocky shore at 0-0.5 m depth and the [sup 15]N content of the tips of the fronds analyzed. This N represents uptake and storage during the previous six months and growth during March and April. The [delta][sup 15]N was uniformly high (11-13[per thousand]) in the main body of the Bay within 15 km from the sewage source. Beyond 15 km values decreased with distance to a low of 4.6[per thousand] at 35 km, where the Bay ends and the coastal waters begin. Using the 11-13 and 4.6[per thousand] as endmembers, the percentage of sewage N making up the Fucus at any point may be calculated. The [delta][sub 15]N of particulate organic matter in the offshore Baltic waters was around 0[per thousand] and Fucus had an [delta][sup 15]N about 1.5[per thousand] higher than the POM. From this and other evidence we conclude that there is a belt of coastal water with an elevated [delta][sup 15]N lying along the east coast of the Baltic. This presumably derives from sewage and perhaps from agriculture and is potentially of use as a tracer of coastal zone/pelagic zone interactions.

  6. Nitrogen source tracking with delta(15)N content of coastal wetland plants in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Bruland, Gregory L; MacKenzie, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Inter- and intra-site comparisons of the nitrogen (N) stable isotope composition of wetland plant species have been used to identify sources of N in coastal areas. In this study, we compared delta(15)N values from different herbaceous wetland plants across 34 different coastal wetlands from the five main Hawaiian Islands and investigated relationships of delta(15)N with land use, human population density, and surface water quality parameters (i.e., nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N). The highest delta(15)N values were observed in plants from wetlands on the islands of Oahu (8.7-14.6 per thousand) and Maui (8.9-9.2 per thousand), whereas plants from wetlands on the islands of Kauai, Hawaii, and Molokai had delta(15)N values usually <4 per thousand. The enrichment in delta(15)N values in plant tissues from wetlands on Oahu and Maui was most likely a result of the more developed and densely populated watersheds on these two islands. Urban development within a 1000-m radius and population density were positively correlated to average delta(15)N vegetation values from each wetland site (r = 0.56 and 0.51, respectively; p < 0.001). This suggested that site mean delta(15)N values from mixed stands of wetland plants have potential as indices of N sources in coastal lowland wetlands in Hawaii and that certain sites on Oahu and Maui have experienced significant anthropogenic N loading. This information can be used to monitor future changes in N inputs to coastal wetlands throughout Hawaii and the Pacific. PMID:20048329

  7. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of nitroxyl radicals in temperature ranges that span glassy solutions to low-viscosity liquids.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hideo; Bottle, Steven E; Blinco, James P; Micallef, Aaron S; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-03-01

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation rates, 1/T1, at X-band of nitroxyl radicals (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxyl and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolin-1-oxyl) in glass-forming solvents (decalin, glycerol, 3-methylpentane, o-terphenyl, 1-propanol, sorbitol, sucrose octaacetate, and 1:1 water:glycerol) at temperatures between 100 and 300K were measured by long-pulse saturation recovery to investigate the relaxation processes in slow-to-fast tumbling regimes. A subset of samples was also studied at lower temperatures or at Q-band. Tumbling correlation times were calculated from continuous wave lineshapes. Temperature dependence and isotope substitution (2H and 15N) were used to distinguish the contributions of various processes. Below about 100K relaxation is dominated by the Raman process. At higher temperatures, but below the glass transition temperature, a local mode process makes significant contributions. Above the glass transition temperature, increased rates of molecular tumbling modulate nuclear hyperfine and g anisotropy. The contribution from spin rotation is very small. Relaxation rates at X-band and Q-band are similar. The dependence of 1/T1 on tumbling correlation times fits better with the Cole-Davidson spectral density function than with the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model. PMID:18166493

  8. Improved mass analysis of oligoribonucleotides by 13C, 15N double depletion and electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ying; Schroeder, Kersten; Greenbaum, Nancy L; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Marshall, Alan G

    2004-03-15

    13C, 15N doubly depleted 32-ribonucleotide was synthesized enzymatically by in vitro transcription from nucleoside triphosphates isolated from E. coli grown in a minimal medium containing 12C, 14N-enriched glucose and ammonium sulfate. Following purification and desalting by reversed-phase HPLC, buffer exchange with Microcon YM-3, and ethanol precipitation, electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra revealed greatly enhanced abundance of monoisotopic ions (by a factor of approximately 100) and a narrower isotopic distribution with higher signal-to-noise ratio. The abrupt onset and high magnitude of the monoisotopic species promise to facilitate accurate mass measurement of RNA's. PMID:15018587

  9. Comparing the Influence of Wildfire and Prescribed Burns on Watershed Nitrogen Biogeochemistry Using 15N Natural Abundance in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystem Components

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Kirsten; Kavanagh, Kathleen L.; Koyama, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated differences in the effects of three low-severity spring prescribed burns and four wildfires on nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry in Rocky Mountain headwater watersheds. We compared paired (burned/unburned) watersheds of four wildfires and three spring prescribed burns for three growing seasons post-fire. To better understand fire effects on the entire watershed ecosystem, we measured N concentrations and δ15N in both the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems components, i.e., soil, understory plants in upland and riparian areas, streamwater, and in-stream moss. In addition, we measured nitrate reductase activity in foliage of Spiraea betulifolia, a dominant understory species. We found increases of δ15N and N concentrations in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem N pools after wildfire, but responses were limited to terrestrial N pools after prescribed burns indicating that N transfer from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystem components did not occur in low-severity prescribed burns. Foliar δ15N differed between wildfire and prescribed burn sites; the δ15N of foliage of upland plants was enriched by 2.9 ‰ (difference between burned and unburned watersheds) in the first two years after wildfire, but only 1.3 ‰ after prescribed burns. In-stream moss δ15N in wildfire-burned watersheds was enriched by 1.3 ‰, but there was no response by moss in prescription-burned watersheds, mirroring patterns of streamwater nitrate concentrations. S. betulifolia showed significantly higher nitrate reductase activity two years after wildfires relative to corresponding unburned watersheds, but no such difference was found after prescribed burns. These responses are consistent with less altered N biogeochemistry after prescribed burns relative to wildfire. We concluded that δ15N values in terrestrial and aquatic plants and streamwater nitrate concentrations after fire can be useful indicators of the magnitude and duration of fire effects and the fate of post

  10. Comparing the influence of wildfire and prescribed burns on watershed nitrogen biogeochemistry using 15N natural abundance in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem components.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Kirsten; Kavanagh, Kathleen L; Koyama, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated differences in the effects of three low-severity spring prescribed burns and four wildfires on nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry in Rocky Mountain headwater watersheds. We compared paired (burned/unburned) watersheds of four wildfires and three spring prescribed burns for three growing seasons post-fire. To better understand fire effects on the entire watershed ecosystem, we measured N concentrations and δ15N in both the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems components, i.e., soil, understory plants in upland and riparian areas, streamwater, and in-stream moss. In addition, we measured nitrate reductase activity in foliage of Spiraea betulifolia, a dominant understory species. We found increases of δ15N and N concentrations in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem N pools after wildfire, but responses were limited to terrestrial N pools after prescribed burns indicating that N transfer from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystem components did not occur in low-severity prescribed burns. Foliar δ15N differed between wildfire and prescribed burn sites; the δ15N of foliage of upland plants was enriched by 2.9 ‰ (difference between burned and unburned watersheds) in the first two years after wildfire, but only 1.3 ‰ after prescribed burns. In-stream moss δ15N in wildfire-burned watersheds was enriched by 1.3 ‰, but there was no response by moss in prescription-burned watersheds, mirroring patterns of streamwater nitrate concentrations. S. betulifolia showed significantly higher nitrate reductase activity two years after wildfires relative to corresponding unburned watersheds, but no such difference was found after prescribed burns. These responses are consistent with less altered N biogeochemistry after prescribed burns relative to wildfire. We concluded that δ15N values in terrestrial and aquatic plants and streamwater nitrate concentrations after fire can be useful indicators of the magnitude and duration of fire effects and the fate of post

  11. Relaxation of vibrational degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohn, A.

    Shock tubes were used to measure relaxation times of the degrees of freedom in inelastic collisions of gas molecules. Design and construction of the experimental setup are described. For relaxation time measurements of vibrational degrees of freedom an initial pressure between 0.1 and 1 mbar is found to be optimal, and for dissociation between 1 and 10 mbar. The density gradients in the shock tube flow are measured with four differential laser interferometers and plotted with a transient recorder. A FORTRAN program was developed to determine the relaxation times. This measurement technique does not in general allow the degrees of freedom to be investigated separately.

  12. Differential incorporation of natural spawners vs. artificially planted salmon carcasses in a stream food web: Evidence from delta 15N of juvenile coho salmon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Placement of salmon carcasses is a common restoration technique in Oregon and Washington streams, with the goal of improving food resources and productivity of juvenile salmon. To explore the effectiveness of this restoration technique, we measured the δ15N of juvenile coho salmo...

  13. ESR lineshape and {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals – Joint analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, D.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.; Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpała, A.; Oglodek, I.; Moscicki, J.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.

    2013-12-28

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d{sub 16} containing {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz–20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the {sup 1}H relaxation of the solvent. The {sup 1}H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin–nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  14. Chambers versus Relaxed Eddy Accumulation: an intercomparison study of two methods for short-term measurements of biogenic CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasek, Alina; Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Chmura, Lukasz; Necki, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    The presented work is a part of comprehensive study aimed at thorough characterization of carbon cycle in the urban environment of Krakow, southern Poland. In the framework of this study two independent methods were employed to quantify biogenic CO2 flux in the city: (i) closed chambers, and (ii) Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA). The results of a three-day intensive intercomparison campaign performed in July 2013 and utilizing both measurement methods are reported here. The chamber method is a widely used approach for measurements of gas exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The system implemented in this study consisted of a single chamber operating in a closed-dynamic mode, combined with Vaisala CarboCAP infrared CO2 sensor in a mobile setup. An alternative flux measurement method, covering larger area is represented by REA, which is a modification of the eddy covariance method. It consists of a 3D anemometer (Gill Windmaster Pro) and the system collecting updraft and downdraft samples to 5-litre Tedlar bags. The CO2 mixing ratios in the collected samples are measured by Picarro G2101i analyzer. The setup consists of two sets of bags so that the sampling can be performed continuously with 15-min temporal resolution. A 48-hectares open meadow located close the city center was chosen as a test site for comparison of the two methods of CO2 flux measurements outlined above. In the middle of the meadow a 3-metre high tripod was installed with the anemometer and REA inlet system. For a period of 46 hours the system was measuring net CO2 flux from the surrounding area. A meteorological conditions and intensity of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were also recorded. In the same time, CO2 flux from several points around the REA inlet was measured with the chamber system, resulting in 93 values for both respiration and net CO2 flux. Chamber results show rather homogenous distribution of the soil CO2 flux (the mean value equal to 40.9 ± 2.2 mmol/m2h), with

  15. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ15N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Nelson, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the ‘rivermouth effect’). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  16. Hydrogen Bonds in Crystalline Imidazoles Studied by 15N NMR and ab initio MO Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Masui, Hirotsugu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Hayashi, Shigenobu

    1999-07-01

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonds of the type N-H...N in crystals of imidazole and its 4-substituted and 4,5-disubstituted derivatives were studied by 15N CP/MAS NMR and an ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculation. In the 15N CP/MAS NMR spectrum of each of the imidazole derivatives, two peaks due to the two different functional groups, >NH and =N-, were observed. The value of the 15N isotropic chemical shift for each nitrogen atom depends on both the length of the intermolecular hydrogen bond and the kind of the substituent or substituents. It was found that the difference between the experimen-tal chemical shifts of >NH and =N-varies predominantly with the hydrogen bond length but does not show any systematic dependence on the kind of substituent. The ab initio MO calculations suggest that the hydrogen bond formation influences the 15N isotropic chemical shift predominantly, and that the difference between the 15N isotropic chemical shift of >NH and =N-varies linearly with the hydrogen bond length.

  17. The effect of music relaxation versus progressive muscular relaxation on insomnia in older people and their relationship to personality traits.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Naomi; Rotem, Tomer; Arnon, Zahi; Haimov, Iris

    2008-01-01

    A large percentage of older people suffer from chronic insomnia, affecting many aspects of life quality and well-being. Although insomnia is most often treated with medication, a growing number of studies demonstrate the efficiency of various relaxation techniques. The present study had three aims: first, to compare two relaxation techniques--music relaxation and progressive muscular relaxation--on various objective and subjective measures of sleep quality; second, to examine the effect of these techniques on anxiety and depression; and finally, to explore possible relationships between the efficiency of both techniques and personality variables. Fifteen older adults took part in the study. Following one week of base-line measurements of sleep quality, participants followed one week of music relaxation and one week of progressive muscular relaxation before going to sleep. Order of relaxation techniques was controlled. Results show music relaxation was more efficient in improving sleep. Sleep efficiency was higher after music relaxation than after progressive muscular relaxation. Moreover, anxiety was lower after music relaxation. Progressive muscular relaxation was related to deterioration of sleep quality on subjective measures. Beyond differences between the relaxation techniques, extraverts seemed to benefit more from both music and progressive muscular relaxation. The advantage of non-pharmacological means to treat insomnia, and the importance of taking individual differences into account are discussed. PMID:18959456

  18. EFFECT OF HIGH-ENERGY RESONANCES ON THE {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N REACTION RATE AT AGB AND POST-AGB RELEVANT TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    The {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction is of great importance in several astrophysical scenarios, as it influences the production of key isotopes such as {sup 19}F, {sup 18}O, and {sup 15}N. Fluorine is synthesized in the intershell region of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, together with s-elements, by {alpha} radiative capture on {sup 15}N, which in turn is produced in the {sup 18}O proton-induced destruction. Peculiar {sup 18}O abundances are observed in R-Coronae Borealis stars, having {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O {approx}< 1, hundreds of times smaller than the galactic value. Finally, there is no definite explanation of the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in pre-solar grains formed in the outer layers of AGB stars. Again, such an isotopic ratio is influenced by the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction. In this work, a high accuracy {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction rate is proposed, based on the simultaneous fit of direct measurements and of the results of a new Trojan Horse experiment. Indeed, current determinations are uncertain because of the poor knowledge of the resonance parameters of key levels of {sup 19}F. In particular, we have focused on the study of the broad 660 keV 1/2{sup +} resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level of {sup 19}F. Since {Gamma} {approx} 100-300 keV, it determines the low-energy tail of the resonant contribution to the cross section and dominates the cross section at higher energies. Here, we provide a reaction rate that is a factor of two larger above T {approx} 0.5 10{sup 9} K based on our new improved determination of its resonance parameters, which could strongly influence present-day astrophysical model predictions.

  19. Evidence of entropy-driven bistability through (15)N NMR analysis of a temperature- and solvent-induced, chiroptical switching polycarbodiimide.

    PubMed

    Reuther, James F; Novak, Bruce M

    2013-12-26

    The thermo- and solvo-driven chiroptical switching process observed in specific polycarbodiimides occurs in a concerted fashion with large deviations in specific optical rotation (OR) and CD Cotton effect as a consequence of varying populations of two distinct polymer conformations. These two conformations are clearly visible in the (15)N NMR and IR spectra of the (15)N-labeled poly((15)N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-octadecylcarbodiimide) (Poly-3) and poly((15)N-(1-naphthyl)-(15)N'-octadecylcarbodiimide) (Poly-5). Using van't Hoff analysis, the enthalpies and entropies of switching (ΔHswitching; ΔSswitching) were calculated for both Poly-3 and Poly-5 using the relative integrations of both peaks in the (15)N NMR spectra at different temperatures to measure the populations of each state. The chiroptical switching (i.e., transitioning from state A to state B) was found to be an endothermic process (positive ΔHswitching) for both Poly-3 and Poly-5 in all solvents studied, meaning the conformation correlating with the downfield chemical shift (ca. 148 ppm, state B) is the higher enthalpy state. The compensating factor behind this phenomenon has been determined to be the large increase in entropy in CHCl3 as a result of the switching. Herein, we propose that the increased entropy in the system is a direct consequence of increased disorder in the solvent as the switching occurs. Specifically, the chloroform solvent molecules are very ordered around the polymer chains due to favorable solvent-polymer interactions, but as the switching occurs, these interactions become less favorable and disorder results. The same level of solvent disorder is not achieved in toluene, causing the chiroptical switching process to occur at higher temperatures. PMID:24313274

  20. [Responses of Soil and Plant 15N Natural Abundance to Long-term N Addition in an N-Saturated Pinus massoniana Forest in Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-jing; Kang, Rong-hua; Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Jing; Duan, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Increasing N deposition in China will possibly cause N saturation of forest ecosystem, further resulting in a series of serious environmental problems. In order to explore the response of forest ecosystem to N deposition in China, and further evaluate and predict the N status of ecosystem, the 15N natural abundance (delta 15N) of soil and plants was measured in a typical Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest in southwest China to examine the potential use of delta 15N enrichment factor (epsilon(p/s)) as an effective indicator of N status. Long-term high N addition could significantly increase delta 15N of soil and plants, which was suggested by an on-going N fertilizing experiment with NH4NO3 or NaNO3 for 7 years. Meanwhile, delta 15N of soil and plants under NH, deposition was significantly higher than that under NO- deposition, suggesting different responses of ecosystem to different N-forms of deposition. The "N enrichment factor (epsilon(p/s)) had positive correlations with N deposition, N nitrification, and N leaching in the soil water. Linear correlation between "N enrichment factor and N deposition was found for all Masson pine forests investigated in this and previous studies in China, demonstrating that 15N enrichment factor could be used as an indicator of N status. The NH3 emission control should also be carried out accompanying with NOx emission control in the future, because NH4- deposition had significantly greater impact on the forest ecosystem than NO3- deposition with the same equivalence. PMID:26592030

  1. Determination of δ18O and δ15N in Nitrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, K.; Böhlke, J.K.; Yoshinari, T.

    1997-01-01

    The analyses of both O and N isotopic compositions of nitrate have many potential applications in studies of nitrate sources and reactions in hydrology, oceanography, and atmospheric chemistry, but simple and precise methods for these analyses have yet to be developed. Testing of a new method involving reaction of potassium nitrate with catalyzed graphite (C + Pd + Au) at 520 °C resulted in quantitative recovery of N and O from nitrate as free CO2, K2CO3, and N2. The δ18O values of nitrate reference materials were obtained by analyzing both the CO2 and K2CO3 from catalyzed graphite combustion. Provisional values of δ18OVSMOW for the internationally distributed KNO3 reference materials IAEA-N3 and USGS-32 were both equal to +22.7 ± 0.5‰. Because the fraction of free CO2 and the isotopic fractionation factor between CO2 and K2CO3 were constant in the combustion products, the δ18O value of KNO3 could be calculated from measurements of the δ18O of free CO2. Thus, δ18OKNO3 = aδ18Ofree CO2 − b, where a and b were equal to 0.9967 and 3.3, respectively, for the specific conditions of the experiments. The catalyzed graphite combustion method can be used to determine δ18O of KNO3 from measurements of δ18O of free CO2 with reproducibility on the order of ±0.2‰ or better if local reference materials are prepared and analyzed with the samples. Reproducibility of δ15N was ±0.1‰ after trace amounts of CO were removed.

  2. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  3. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  4. Revision of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction rate and oxygen abundance in H-burning zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caciolli, A.; Mazzocchi, C.; Capogrosso, V.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Elekes, Z.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Lemut, A.; Marta, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Palmerini, S.; Prati, P.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H. P.; Vomiero, A.

    2011-09-01

    Context. The NO cycle takes place in the deepest layer of a H-burning core or shell, when the temperature exceeds T ≃ 30 × 106 K. The O depletion observed in some globular cluster giant stars, always associated with a Na enhancement, may be due to either a deep mixing during the red giant branch (RGB) phase of the star or to the pollution of the primordial gas by an early population of massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, whose chemical composition was modified by the hot bottom burning. In both cases, the NO cycle is responsible for the O depletion. Aims: The activation of this cycle depends on the rate of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction. A precise evaluation of this reaction rate at temperatures as low as experienced in H-burning zones in stellar interiors is mandatory to understand the observed O abundances. Methods: We present a new measurement of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction performed at LUNA covering for the first time the center of mass energy range 70-370 keV, which corresponds to stellar temperatures between 65 × 106 K and 780 × 106 K. This range includes the 15N(p, γ)16O Gamow-peak energy of explosive H-burning taking place in the external layer of a nova and the one of the hot bottom burning (HBB) nucleosynthesis occurring in massive AGB stars. Results: With the present data, we are also able to confirm the result of the previous R-matrix extrapolation. In particular, in the temperature range of astrophysical interest, the new rate is about a factor of 2 smaller than reported in the widely adopted compilation of reaction rates (NACRE or CF88) and the uncertainty is now reduced down to the 10% level.

  5. Endogenous and environmental factors influence the dietary fractionation of 13C and 15N in hissing cockroaches Gromphadorhina portentosa.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D

    2008-01-01

    Since DeNiro and Epstein's discovery that the (13)C and (15)N isotopic signatures of animals approximate those of their respective diets, the measurement of stable isotope signatures has become an important tool for ecologists studying the diets of wild animals. This study used Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa) to examine several preexisting hypotheses about the relationship between the isotopic composition of an animal and its diet. Contrary to my predictions, the results revealed that the tissues of adult cockroaches raised for two generations on a diet of known isotopic composition did not demonstrate enrichment of heavy stable isotopes. Moreover, the (15)N signatures of cockroaches were neither influenced by periods of rapid growth (i.e., 300-fold increase in dry body mass over 120 d) nor by imposed periods of starvation lasting up to 80 d. The offspring born to mothers raised on known diets were enriched in (15)N. Diet-switching experiments showed that turnover times of (13)C were highly correlated with age and ranged from 9 to 10 d to 60 to 75 d in subadults and adults, respectively. Adults subjected to diet switches differed from the subadults in that the adults achieved equilibrated isotopic signatures that were shifted approximately 1.0 per thousand toward their respective original diets. Lipid fractions of adult cockroaches averaged 2.9 per thousand more depleted in (13)C than in lipid-free fractions, but no changes in (13)C were observed in aging adults. Exposure to reduced ambient temperature from 33 degrees C to 23 degrees C over 120 d did not influence isotopic signatures of tissues. Overall, the results of this study reveal that different endogenous and exogenous factors can influence the isotopic signatures of cockroaches. These findings rein