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Sample records for 15n relaxation rates

  1. A study on the influence of fast amide exchange on the accuracy of (15)N relaxation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Jurt, Simon; Zerbe, Oliver

    2012-12-01

    (15)N relaxation rates of amide moieties provide insight both into global as well as local backbone dynamics of peptides and proteins. As the differences in the relaxation rates in general are small, their accurate determination is of prime importance. One potential source of error is fast amide exchange. It is well known that in its presence the effects of saturation transfer and H/D exchange may result in erroneous apparent relaxation rates R (1) and R (2). Here, the extent of these errors is rigorously examined. Theoretical considerations reveal that even when saturation effects are absent, H/D exchange will easily result in significant deviations from the true values. In particular overestimations of up to 10 % in R (1) and up to 5 % in R (2) are observed. An alternative scheme for fitting the relaxation data to the corresponding exponentials is presented that in the best cases not only delivers more accurate relaxation rates but also allows extracting estimates for the exchange rates. The theoretical computations were tested and verified for the case of ubiquitin.

  2. Separation of Anisotropy and Exchange Broadening Using 15N CSA- 15N- 1H Dipole-Dipole Relaxation Cross-Correlation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Christian; Holak, Tad A.

    2000-08-01

    Based on the measurement of cross-correlation rates between 15N CSA and 15N-1H dipole-dipole relaxation we propose a procedure for separating exchange contributions to transverse relaxation rates (R2 = 1/T2) from effects caused by anisotropic rotational diffusion of the protein molecule. This approach determines the influence of anisotropy and chemical exchange processes independently and therefore circumvents difficulties associated with the currently standard use of T1/T2 ratios to determine the rotational diffusion tensor. We find from computer simulations that, in the presence of even small amounts of internal flexibility, fitting T1/T2 ratios tends to underestimate the anisotropy of overall tumbling. An additional problem exists when the N-H bond vector directions are not distributed homogeneously over the surface of a unit sphere, such as in helix bundles or β-sheets. Such a case was found in segment 4 of the gelation factor (ABP 120), an F-actin cross-linking protein, in which the diffusion tensor cannot be calculated from T1/T2 ratios. The 15N CSA tensor of the residues for this β-sheet protein was found to vary even within secondary structure elements. The use of a common value for the whole protein molecule therefore might be an oversimplification. Using our approach it is immediately apparent that no exchange broadening exists for segment 4 although strongly reduced T2 relaxation times for several residues could be mistaken as indications for exchange processes.

  3. Proton-decoupled CPMG: a better experiment for measuring (15)N R2 relaxation in disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2014-04-01

    (15)N R2 relaxation is one of the most informative experiments for characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Small changes in nitrogen R2 rates are often used to determine how IDPs respond to various biologically relevant perturbations such as point mutations, posttranslational modifications and weak ligand interactions. However collecting high-quality (15)N relaxation data can be difficult. Of necessity, the samples of IDPs are often prepared with low protein concentration and the measurement time can be limited because of rapid sample degradation. Furthermore, due to hardware limitations standard experiments such as (15)N spin-lock and CPMG can sample the relaxation decay only to ca. 150ms. This is much shorter than (15)N T2 times in disordered proteins at or near physiological temperature. As a result, the sampling of relaxation decay profiles in these experiments is suboptimal, which further lowers the precision of the measurements. Here we report a new implementation of the proton-decoupled (PD) CPMG experiment which allows one to sample (15)N R2 relaxation decay up to ca. 0.5-1s. The new experiment has been validated through comparison with the well-established spin-lock measurement. Using dilute samples of denatured ubiquitin, we have demonstrated that PD-CPMG produces up to 3-fold improvement in the precision of the data. It is expected that for intrinsically disordered proteins the gains may be even more substantial. We have also shown that this sequence has a number of favorable properties: (i) the spectra are recorded with narrow linewidth in nitrogen dimension; (ii) (15)N offset correction is small and easy to calculate; (iii) the experiment is immune to various spurious effects arising from solvent exchange; (iv) the results are stable with respect to pulse miscalibration and rf field inhomogeneity; (v) with minimal change, the pulse sequence can also be used to measure R2 relaxation of (15)N(ε) spins in arginine side chains. We

  4. Proton-decoupled CPMG: A better experiment for measuring 15N R2 relaxation in disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuwen, Tairan; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R.

    2014-04-01

    15N R2 relaxation is one of the most informative experiments for characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Small changes in nitrogen R2 rates are often used to determine how IDPs respond to various biologically relevant perturbations such as point mutations, posttranslational modifications and weak ligand interactions. However collecting high-quality 15N relaxation data can be difficult. Of necessity, the samples of IDPs are often prepared with low protein concentration and the measurement time can be limited because of rapid sample degradation. Furthermore, due to hardware limitations standard experiments such as 15N spin-lock and CPMG can sample the relaxation decay only to ca. 150 ms. This is much shorter than 15N T2 times in disordered proteins at or near physiological temperature. As a result, the sampling of relaxation decay profiles in these experiments is suboptimal, which further lowers the precision of the measurements. Here we report a new implementation of the proton-decoupled (PD) CPMG experiment which allows one to sample 15N R2 relaxation decay up to ca. 0.5-1 s. The new experiment has been validated through comparison with the well-established spin-lock measurement. Using dilute samples of denatured ubiquitin, we have demonstrated that PD-CPMG produces up to 3-fold improvement in the precision of the data. It is expected that for intrinsically disordered proteins the gains may be even more substantial. We have also shown that this sequence has a number of favorable properties: (i) the spectra are recorded with narrow linewidth in nitrogen dimension; (ii) 15N offset correction is small and easy to calculate; (iii) the experiment is immune to various spurious effects arising from solvent exchange; (iv) the results are stable with respect to pulse miscalibration and rf field inhomogeneity; (v) with minimal change, the pulse sequence can also be used to measure R2 relaxation of 15Nε spins in arginine side chains. We anticipate that

  5. Application of rate equations to ELDOR and saturation recovery experiments on 14N: 15N spin-label pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun-Jie; Hyde, James S.

    Rate equations describing the time dependence of population differences of the five allowed transitions in an 14N 15N spin-label pair problem are set up. Included in the formulation are the three Heisenberg exchange rate constants and different nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates, electron spin-lattice relaxation rates, and populations for the 14N and 15N moieties. Using matrix algebra, stationary and time-dependent solutions are obtained in a unified theoretical framework. The calculations apply to stationary and pulse electron-electron double resonance and to saturation-recovery ESR. Particular emphasis is placed on short pulse initial excitation, where the transverse relaxation processes are sufficiently slow that only the population difference of the irradiated transition departs significantly from Boltzmann equilibrium during the excitation.

  6. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented.

  7. Simple and accurate determination of global tau(R) in proteins using (13)C or (15)N relaxation data.

    PubMed

    Mispelter, J; Izadi-Pruneyre, N; Quiniou, E; Adjadj, E

    2000-03-01

    In the study of protein dynamics by (13)C or (15)N relaxation measurements different models from the Lipari-Szabo formalism are used in order to determine the motion parameters. The global rotational correlation time tau(R) of the molecule must be estimated prior to the analysis. In this Communication, the authors propose a new approach in determining an accurate value for tau(R) in order to realize the best fit of R(2) for the whole sequence of the protein, regardless of the different type of motions atoms may experience. The method first determines the highly structured regions of the sequence. For each corresponding site, the Lipari-Szabo parameters are calculated for R(1) and NOE, using an arbitrary value for tau(R). The chi(2) for R(2), summed over the selected sites, shows a clear minimum, as a function of tau(R). This minimum is used to better estimate a proper value for tau(R).

  8. Contribution of 19F resonances on 18O( p, α)15N reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmeslem, Meriem; Chafa, Azzedine; Barhoumi, Slimane; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-08-01

    The 18O( p, α)15N reaction influences the isotopes production such as 19F, 18O, and 15N which can be used to test the models of stellar evolution. 19F is synthesized in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Using R-matrix theory we allow new values of resonances parameters in 19F. We show that the most important contribution to the differential and total cross section at low energies, comes from the levels in 19F situated at resonances energies E R =151, 680 and 840 keV with spin and parity 1/2+. The total width of the 680 keV resonance is badly known. So, we have focused on this broad resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level in 19F. We delimit the temperature range in which each resonance contribution to the total reaction rate occurs by analyzing the ratio ( N A < σν> i / N A < σν>). This allowed us to show that the 680 and 840 keV broad resonances strongly dominate the reaction rate over the stellar temperature range T 9=0.02-0.06 and T 9=0.5-5. Finally, these results were compared to NACRE and Iliadis astrophysical compilations.

  9. Simultaneous quantification of depolymerization and mineralization rates by a novel 15N tracing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Björsne, Anna-Karin; Bodé, Samuel; Klemedtsson, Leif; Boeckx, Pascal; Rütting, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    The depolymerization of soil organic matter, such as proteins and (oligo-)peptides, into monomers (e.g. amino acids) is currently considered to be the rate-limiting step for nitrogen (N) availability in terrestrial ecosystems. The mineralization of free amino acids (FAAs), liberated by the depolymerization of peptides, is an important fraction of the total mineralization of organic N. Hence, the accurate assessment of peptide depolymerization and FAA mineralization rates is important in order to gain a better process-based understanding of the soil N cycle. In this paper, we present an extended numerical 15N tracing model Ntrace, which incorporates the FAA pool and related N processes in order to provide a more robust and simultaneous quantification of depolymerization and gross mineralization rates of FAAs and soil organic N. We discuss analytical and numerical approaches for two forest soils, suggest improvements of the experimental work for future studies, and conclude that (i) when about half of all depolymerized peptide N is directly mineralized, FAA mineralization can be as important a rate-limiting step for total gross N mineralization as peptide depolymerization rate; (ii) gross FAA mineralization and FAA immobilization rates can be used to develop FAA use efficiency (NUEFAA), which can reveal microbial N or carbon (C) limitation.

  10. SRLS analysis of 15N relaxation from bacteriophage T4 lysozyme: a tensorial perspective that features domain motion.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Eva

    2012-05-31

    Bacteriophage T4L lysozyme (T4L) comprises two domains connected by a helical linker. Several methods detected ns domain motion associated with the binding of the peptidoglycan substrate. An ESR study of nitroxide-labeled T4L, based on the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach, detected ns local motion involving the nitroxide and the helix housing it. (15)N−H spin relaxation data from T4L acquired at magnetic fields of 11.7 and 18.8 T, and 298 K, were analyzed previously with the model-free (MF) method. The results did not detect domain motion. SRLS is the generalization of MF. Here, we apply it to the same data analyzed previously with MF. The restricted local N−H motion is described in terms of tilted axial local ordering (S) and local diffusion (D(2)) tensors; dynamical coupling to the global tumbling is accounted for. We find that D(2,⊥) is 1.62 × 10(7) (1.56 × 10(7)) s(−1) for the N-terminal (C-terminal) domain. This dynamic mode represents domain motion. For the linker D(2,⊥) is the same as the rate of global tumbling, given by (1.46 ± 0.04) × 10(7) s(−1). D(2,∥) is 1.3 × 10(9), 1.8 × 10(9) and 5.3 × 10(9) s(−1) for the N-terminal domain, the C-terminal domain, and the linker, respectively. This dynamic mode represents N−H bond vector fluctuations. The principal axis of D(2) is virtually parallel to the N−H bond. The order parameter, S(0)(2), is 0.910 ± 0.046 for most N−H bonds. The principal axis of S is tilted from the C(i−1)(α) −C(i)(α) axis by −2° to 6° for the N-, and C-terminal domains, and by 2.5° for the linker. The tensorial-perspective-based and mode-coupling-based SRLS picture provides new insights into the structural dynamics of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme.

  11. Relaxation processes in administered-rate pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Arnold, Michael R.

    2000-10-01

    We show how the theory of anelasticity unifies the observed dynamics and proposed models of administered-rate products. This theory yields a straightforward approach to rate model construction that we illustrate by simulating the observed relaxation dynamics of two administered rate products. We also demonstrate how the use of this formalism leads to a natural definition of market friction.

  12. Analysis of internal motions of interleukin-13 variant associated with severe bronchial asthma using {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Takeda, Chika; Kuroki, Ryota; Izuhara, Kenji; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi . E-mail: ueda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-22

    The single nucleotide polymorphism interleukin-13 (IL-13) R110Q is associated with severe bronchial asthma because its lower affinity leads to the augmentation of local IL-13 concentration, resulting in an increase in the signal transduction via IL-13R. Since the mutation site does not directly bind to IL-13R{alpha}2, we carried out NMR relaxation analyses of the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q in order to examine whether the R110Q mutation affects the internal motions in IL-13 molecules. The results showed that the internal motion in the micro- to millisecond time scale on helix D, which is suggested to be important for the interaction between IL-13 and IL-13R{alpha}2, is increased in IL-13-R110Q compared with that in the wild-type IL-13. It therefore appears that the difference in the internal motions on helix D between the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q may be involved in their affinity differences with IL-13R{alpha}2.

  13. Polar Versus Non-polar Local Ordering at Mobile Sites in Proteins: Slowly Relaxing Local Structure Analysis of (15)N Relaxation in the Third Immunoglobulin-Binding Domain of Streptococcal Protein G.

    PubMed

    Tchaicheeyan, Oren; Meirovitch, Eva

    2016-01-28

    We developed recently the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for studying restricted motions in proteins by NMR. The spatial restrictions have been described by potentials comprising the traditional L = 2, K = 0, 2 spherical harmonics. However, the latter are associated with non-polar ordering whereas protein-anchored probes experience polar ordering, described by odd-L spherical harmonics. Here we extend the SRLS potential to include the L = 1, K = 0, 1 spherical harmonics and analyze (15)N-(1)H relaxation from the third immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB3) with the polar L = 1 potential (coefficients c0(1) and c1(1)) or the non-polar L = 2 potential (coefficients c0(2) and c2(2)). Strong potentials, with ⟨c0(1)⟩ ∼ 60 for L = 1 and ⟨c0(2)⟩ ∼ 20 for L = 2 (in units of kBT), are detected. In the α-helix of GB3 the coefficients of the rhombic terms are c1(1) ∼ c2(2) ∼ 0; in the preceding (following) chain segment they are ⟨c1(1)⟩ ∼ 6 for L = 1 and ⟨c2(2)⟩ ∼ 14 for L = 2 (⟨c1(1)⟩ ∼ 3 for L = 1 and ⟨c2(2)⟩ ∼ 7 for L = 2). The local diffusion rate, D2, lies in the 5 × 10(9)-1 × 10(11) s(-1) range; it is generally larger for L = 1. The main ordering axis deviates moderately from the N-H bond. Corresponding L = 1 and L = 2 potentials and probability density functions are illustrated for residues A26 of the α-helix, Y3 of the β1-strand, and L12 of the β1/β2 loop; they differ considerably. Polar/orientational ordering is shown to be associated with GB3 binding to its cognate Fab fragment. The polarity of the local ordering is clearly an important factor.

  14. Nitrogen Transformations in Wetland Soil Cores Measured by (sup15)N Isotope Pairing and Dilution at Four Infiltration Rates

    PubMed Central

    Stepanauskas, R.; Davidsson, E. T.; Leonardson, L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of water infiltration rate (IR) on nitrogen cycling in a saturated wetland soil was investigated by applying a (sup15)N isotope dilution and pairing method. Water containing [(sup15)N]nitrate was infiltrated through 10-cm-long cores of sieved and homogenized soil at rates of 72, 168, 267, and 638 mm day(sup-1). Then the frequencies of (sup30)N(inf2), (sup29)N(inf2), (sup15)NO(inf3)(sup-), and (sup15)NH(inf4)(sup+) in the outflow water were measured. This method allowed simultaneous determination of nitrification, coupled and uncoupled denitrification, and nitrate assimilation rates. From 3% (at the highest IR) to 95% (at the lowest IR) of nitrate was removed from the water, mainly by denitrification. The nitrate removal was compensated for by the net release of ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen. Lower oxygen concentrations in the soil at lower IRs led to a sharper decrease in the nitrification rate than in the ammonification rate, and, consequently, more ammonium leaked from the soil. The decreasing organic-carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (from 12.8 to 5.1) and the increasing light A(inf250)/A(inf365) ratio (from 4.5 to 5.2) indicated an increasing bioavailability of the outflowing dissolved organic matter with increasing IR. The efflux of nitrous oxide was also very sensitive to IR and increased severalfold when a zone of low oxygen concentration was close to the outlet of the soil cores. N(inf2)O then constituted 8% of the total gaseous N lost from the soil. PMID:16535352

  15. Oak loss increases foliar nitrogen, δ(15)N and growth rates of Betula lenta in a northern temperate deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Falxa-Raymond, Nancy; Patterson, Angelica E; Schuster, William S F; Griffin, Kevin L

    2012-09-01

    Oak forests dominate much of the eastern USA, but their future is uncertain due to a number of threats and widespread failure of oak regeneration. A sudden loss of oaks (Quercus spp.) could be accompanied by major changes in forest nitrogen (N) cycles with important implications for plant nutrient uptake and tree species composition. In this study, we measured the changes in N use and growth rates of black birch trees (Betula lenta L.) following oak girdling at the Black Rock Forest in southeastern New York, USA. Data were collected from nine experimental plots composed of three treatments: 100% oaks girdled (OG), 50% oaks girdled (O50) and control (C). Foliar N concentration and foliar (15)N abundance increased significantly in the oak-girdled plots relative to the control, indicating that the loss of oaks significantly altered N cycling dynamics. As mineralization and nitrification rates increase following oak loss, black birch trees increase N absorption as indicated by higher foliar N content and increased growth rates. Foliar N concentration increased by 15.5% in the O50 and 30.6% in the OG plots relative to the control, while O50 and OG plots were enriched in (15)N by 1.08‰ and 3.33‰, respectively (P < 0.0001). A 641% increase in black birch growth rates in OG plots suggests that this species is able to respond to additional N availability and/or increased light availability. The loss of oaks and subsequent increase in black birch productivity may have a lasting impact on ecosystem form and function.

  16. Development and application of 15N-tracer substances for measuring the whole-body protein turnover rates in the human, especially in neonates: a review.

    PubMed

    Wutzke, Klaus D

    2012-06-01

    Our research group of the Children's Hospital of the University of Rostock (Rostock group) has long-time experience in (15)N-labelling and in using yeast protein and its hydrolysates for tracer kinetic studies to evaluate parameters of the whole-body protein metabolism in premature infants. The particular advantage of applying an economically convenient, highly (15)N-enriched, and completely labelled yeast protein for evaluating protein turnover rates is the fact that the (15)N dose is spread among all proteinogenic amino acids. The absorption has been improved by hydrolysing [(15)N]yeast protein with thermitase into a mixture of amino acids, dipeptides and tripeptides so that faecal analysis becomes unnecessary when determining turnover rates. The review shows that, in contrast to the application of single (15)N-labelled amino acids with resulting overestimation of protein turnover rates, the (15)N-labelled yeast protein thermitase hydrolysate represents the amino acid metabolism more closely without causing amino acid imbalances. The (15)N-labelled yeast protein thermitase hydrolysate leads to the estimation of reliable protein turnover rates, particularly in premature infants.

  17. 3D NMR Experiments for Measuring 15N Relaxation Data of Large Proteins: Application to the 44 kDa Ectodomain of SIV gp41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, Michael; Kaufman, Joshua; Stahl, Stephen J.; Wingfield, Paul T.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Clore, G. Marius

    1998-12-01

    A suite of 3D NMR experiments for measuring15N-{1H} NOE,15NT1, and15NT1ρvalues in large proteins, uniformly labeled with15N and13C, is presented. These experiments are designed for proteins that exhibit extensive spectral overlap in the 2D1H-15N HSQC spectrum. The pulse sequences are readily applicable to perdeuterated samples, which increases the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, thereby permitting the characterization of protein dynamics to be extended to larger protein systems. Application of the pulse sequences is demonstrated on a perdeuterated13C/15N-labeled sample of the 44 kDa ectodomain of SIV gp41.

  18. Heavy water and 15N labeling with NanoSIMS analysis reveals growth-rate dependent metabolic heterogeneity in chemostats

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Green-Saxena, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    To measure single cell microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns in environmental systems, we employ a new technique using stable isotope labeling of microbial populations with heavy water (a passive tracer) and 15N ammonium in combination with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry. We demonstrate simultaneous NanoSIMS analysis of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen at high spatial and mass resolution, and report calibration data linking single cell isotopic compositions to the corresponding bulk isotopic equivalents for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show that heavy water is capable of quantifying in situ single cell microbial activities ranging from generational time scales of minutes to years, with only light isotopic incorporation (∼0.1 atom % 2H). Applying this approach to study the rates of fatty acid biosynthesis by single cells of S. aureus growing at different rates in chemostat culture (∼6 hours, 1 day and 2 week generation times), we observe the greatest anabolic activity diversity in the slowest growing populations. By using heavy water to constrain cellular growth activity, we can further infer the relative contributions of ammonium vs. amino acid assimilation to the cellular nitrogen pool. The approach described here can be applied to disentangle individual cell activities even in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:25655651

  19. STATISTICAL ESTIMATES OF VARIANCE FOR 15N ISOTOPE DILUTION MEASUREMENTS OF GROSS RATES OF NITROGEN CYCLE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been fifty years since Kirkham and Bartholmew (1954) presented the conceptual framework and derived the mathematical equations that formed the basis of the now commonly employed method of 15N isotope dilution. Although many advances in methodology and analysis have been ma...

  20. Backbone dynamics of a biologically active human FGF-1 monomer, complexed to a hexasaccharide heparin-analogue, by 15N NMR relaxation methods.

    PubMed

    Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Fayos, Rosa; Angulo, Jesús; Ojeda, Rafael; Martín-Pastor, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Lozano, Rosa; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2006-08-01

    The binding site and backbone dynamics of a bioactive complex formed by the acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and a specifically designed heparin hexasaccharide has been investigated by HSQC and relaxation NMR methods. The comparison of the relaxation data for the free and bound states has allowed showing that the complex is monomeric, and still induces mutagenesis, and that the protein backbone presents reduced motion in different timescale in its bound state, except in certain points that are involved in the interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR).

  1. NMR relaxation rate and the libron energy of solid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugawara, K.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    By taking the rotational relaxation of orthohydrogen (o-H2) in solid hydrogen into account, the authors have theoretically investigated the longitudinal NMR spin lattice relaxation rate of o-H2. The rate is characterized by an anomalous maximum, as a function of temperature, at temperatures close to the mean libron energy of o-H2. Application of the theory for o-H2 concentrations between 42% and 75% reveals a nearly concentration-independent mean libron energy equivalent to about 1 K. This qualitatively and quantitatively contradicts the conclusions of other theories, but agrees with recent experiments.

  2. The fate of 15N-nitrate in mesocosms from five European peatlands differing in long-term nitrogen deposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, K.; Blodau, C.

    2016-02-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition changes the retention, transformation, and fluxes of N in ombrotrophic peatlands. To evaluate such effects we applied a 15N tracer (NH4 15NO3) at a rate of 2.3 g N m-2 yr-1 to mesocosms of five European peatlands with differing long-term N deposition rates for a period of 76 days of dry and 90 days of wet conditions. We determined background N content and moss length growth, and recovered the 15N tracer from the mosses, graminoids, shrubs, the peat, and dissolved N. Background N contents in Sphagnum mosses increased from 5.5 (Degerö Stormyr, deposition < 0.2 g N m-2 yr-1) up to 12.2 mg g-1 (Frölichshaier Sattelmoor, 4.7-6.0 g N m-2 yr-1). In peat from Degerö, nitrate and ammonium concentrations were below 3 mg L-1, whereas up to 30 (nitrate) and 11 mg L-1 (ammonium) was found in peat from Frölichshaier Sattelmoor. Sphagnum mosses (down to 5 cm below surface) generally intercepted large amounts of 15N (0.2-0.35 mg g-1) and retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Similar quantities of the 15N were recovered from the peat, followed by shrubs, graminoids, and the dissolved pool. At the most polluted sites we recovered more 15N from shrubs (up to 12.4 %) and from nitrate and ammonium (up to 0.7 %). However, no impact of N deposition on 15N retention by Sphagnum could be identified and their length growth was highest under high N background deposition. Our experiment suggests that the decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, is likely more modest than previously thought. This conclusion is related to the finding that Sphagnum species can apparently thrive at elevated long-term N deposition rates in European peatlands.

  3. Large spin relaxation rates in trapped submerged-shell atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Colin B.; Au, Yat Shan; Doret, S. Charles; Doyle, John M.; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2010-01-15

    Spin relaxation due to atom-atom collisions is measured for magnetically trapped erbium and thulium atoms at a temperature near 500 mK. The rate constants for Er-Er and Tm-Tm collisions are 3.0x10{sup -10} and 1.1x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, respectively, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than those observed for highly magnetic S-state atoms. This is strong evidence for an additional, dominant, spin relaxation mechanism, electronic interaction anisotropy, in collisions between these 'submerged-shell,' Lnot =0 atoms. These large spin relaxation rates imply that evaporative cooling of these atoms in a magnetic trap will be highly inefficient.

  4. Correlated and uncorrelated heart rate fluctuations during relaxing visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papasimakis, N.; Pallikari, F.

    2010-05-01

    The heart rate variability (HRV) of healthy subjects practicing relaxing visualization is studied by use of three multiscale analysis techniques: the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), the entropy in natural time (ENT) and the average wavelet (AWC) coefficient. The scaling exponent of normal interbeat interval increments exhibits characteristics of the presence of long-range correlations. During relaxing visualization the HRV dynamics change in the sense that two new features emerge independent of each other: a respiration-induced periodicity that often dominates the HRV at short scales (<40 interbeat intervals) and the decrease of the scaling exponent at longer scales (40-512 interbeat intervals). In certain cases, the scaling exponent during relaxing visualization indicates the breakdown of long-range correlations. These characteristics have been previously seen in the HRV dynamics during non-REM sleep.

  5. Structure and backbone dynamics of vanadate-bound PRL-3: comparison of 15N nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation profiles of free and vanadate-bound PRL-3.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ki-Woong; Kang, Dong-Il; Lee, Eunjung; Shin, Areum; Jin, Bonghwan; Park, Young-Guen; Lee, Chung-Kyoung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jeon, Young Ho; Kim, Eunice Eunkyeong; Kim, Yangmee

    2014-07-29

    Phosphatases of regenerating liver (PRLs) constitute a novel class of small, prenylated phosphatases with oncogenic activity. PRL-3 is particularly important in cancer metastasis and represents a potential therapeutic target. The flexibility of the WPD loop as well as the P-loop of protein tyrosine phosphatases is closely related to their catalytic activity. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we studied the structure of vanadate-bound PRL-3, which was generated by addition of sodium orthovanadate to PRL-3. The WPD loop of free PRL-3 extended outside of the active site, forming an open conformation, whereas that of vanadate-bound PRL-3 was directed into the active site by a large movement, resulting in a closed conformation. We suggest that vanadate binding induced structural changes in the WPD loop, P-loop, helices α4-α6, and the polybasic region. Compared to free PRL-3, vanadate-bound PRL-3 has a longer α4 helix, where the catalytic R110 residue coordinates with vanadate in the active site. In addition, the hydrophobic cavity formed by helices α4-α6 with a depth of 14-15 Å can accommodate a farnesyl chain at the truncated prenylation motif of PRL-3, i.e., from R169 to M173. Conformational exchange data suggested that the WPD loop moves between open and closed conformations with a closing rate constant k(close) of 7 s(-1). This intrinsic loop flexibility of PRL-3 may be related to their catalytic rate and may play a role in substrate recognition.

  6. CPMG relaxation rate dispersion in dipole fields around capillaries.

    PubMed

    Kurz, F T; Kampf, T; Buschle, L R; Heiland, S; Schlemmer, H-P; Bendszus, M; Ziener, C H

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rates for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences increase with inter-echo time in presence of microscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities due to nuclear spin diffusion. For a weak field approximation that includes diffusion effects, the CPMG relaxation rate shift for proton diffusion around capillaries in muscle tissue can be expressed in terms of a frequency correlation function and the inter-echo time. The present work provides an analytical expression for the local relaxation rate shift that is dependent on local blood volume fraction, diffusion coefficient, capillary radius, susceptibility difference and inter-echo time. Asymptotic regions of the model are in agreement with previous modeling results of Brooks et al., Luz et al. and Ziener et al. In comparison with simulation data, the model shows an equal or better accuracy than established approximations. Also, model behavior coincides with experimental data for rat heart and skeletal muscle. The present work provides analytical tools to extract sub-voxel information about uniform capillary networks that can be used to study capillary organization or micro-circulatory remodeling.

  7. NMR spin relaxation rates in the Heisenberg bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Tiago; Curro, Nicholas; Scalettar, Richard; Paiva, Thereza; Dos Santos, Raimundo R.

    One of the striking features of heavy fermions is the fact that in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition these systems exhibit the breakdown of Fermi-liquid behavior and superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) expirements play an important role in the study of these phenomena. Measurements of NMR spin relaxation rates and Knight shift, for instance, can be used to probe the electronic spin susceptibility of these systems. Here we studied the NMR response of the Heisenberg bilayer model. In this model, it is well known that the increase of the interplane coupling between the planes, Jperp, supresses the antiferromagnetic order at a quantum critical point (QCP). We use stochastic series expansion (SSE) and the maximum-entropy analytic continuation method to calculate the NMR spin lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 and the spin echo decay 1 /T2 G as function of Jperp. The spin echo decay, T2 G increases for small Jperp, due to the increase of the order parameter, and then vanishes abruptly in the QCP. The effects of Jperp dilution disorder in the QCP and the relaxation rates are also discussed. This research was supported by the NNSA Grant Number DE-NA 0002908, and Ciência sem fronteiras program/CNPQ.

  8. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  9. Determining degradation and synthesis rates of arabidopsis proteins using the kinetics of progressive 15N labeling of two-dimensional gel-separated protein spots.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J; Solheim, Cory; Whelan, James; Millar, A Harvey

    2012-06-01

    The growth and development of plant tissues is associated with an ordered succession of cellular processes that are reflected in the appearance and disappearance of proteins. The control of the kinetics of protein turnover is central to how plants can rapidly and specifically alter protein abundance and thus molecular function in response to environmental or developmental cues. However, the processes of turnover are largely hidden during periods of apparent steady-state protein abundance, and even when proteins accumulate it is unclear whether enhanced synthesis or decreased degradation is responsible. We have used a (15)N labeling strategy with inorganic nitrogen sources coupled to a two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional IEF/SDS-PAGE gel spots to define the rate of protein synthesis (K(S)) and degradation (K(D)) of Arabidopsis cell culture proteins. Through analysis of MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectra from 120 protein spots, we were able to quantify K(S) and K(D) for 84 proteins across six functional groups and observe over 65-fold variation in protein degradation rates. K(S) and K(D) correlate with functional roles of the proteins in the cell and the time in the cell culture cycle. This approach is based on progressive (15)N labeling that is innocuous for the plant cells and, because it can be used to target analysis of proteins through the use of specific gel spots, it has broad applicability.

  10. Determining Degradation and Synthesis Rates of Arabidopsis Proteins Using the Kinetics of Progressive 15N Labeling of Two-dimensional Gel-separated Protein Spots*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J.; Solheim, Cory; Whelan, James; Millar, A. Harvey

    2012-01-01

    The growth and development of plant tissues is associated with an ordered succession of cellular processes that are reflected in the appearance and disappearance of proteins. The control of the kinetics of protein turnover is central to how plants can rapidly and specifically alter protein abundance and thus molecular function in response to environmental or developmental cues. However, the processes of turnover are largely hidden during periods of apparent steady-state protein abundance, and even when proteins accumulate it is unclear whether enhanced synthesis or decreased degradation is responsible. We have used a 15N labeling strategy with inorganic nitrogen sources coupled to a two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional IEF/SDS-PAGE gel spots to define the rate of protein synthesis (KS) and degradation (KD) of Arabidopsis cell culture proteins. Through analysis of MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectra from 120 protein spots, we were able to quantify KS and KD for 84 proteins across six functional groups and observe over 65-fold variation in protein degradation rates. KS and KD correlate with functional roles of the proteins in the cell and the time in the cell culture cycle. This approach is based on progressive 15N labeling that is innocuous for the plant cells and, because it can be used to target analysis of proteins through the use of specific gel spots, it has broad applicability. PMID:22215636

  11. The structural plasticity of heparan sulfate NA-domains and hence their role in mediating multivalent interactions is confirmed by high-accuracy 15N-NMR relaxation studies

    PubMed Central

    Mobli, Mehdi; Nilsson, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Considering the biological importance of heparan sulfate (HS) and the significant activity of its highly-sulfated regions (S-domains), the paucity of known functions for the non-sulfated NA-domains is somewhat puzzling. It has been suggested that chain dynamics within the NA-domains are the key to their functional role in HS. In this study, we investigate this hypothesis using state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at multiple frequencies. To resolve the problem of severe overlap in 1H-NMR spectra of repetitive polysaccharides from proteoglycans, we have prepared oligosaccharides with the chemical structure of HS NA-domains containing the 15N nucleus, which has enough chemical shift dispersion to probe the central residues of octasaccharides at atomic resolution using 600 MHz NMR. By performing NMR relaxation experiments at three magnetic-field strengths, high quality data on internal dynamics and rotational diffusion was obtained. Furthermore, translational diffusion could also be measured by NMR using pulse field gradients. These experimental data were used, in concert with molecular dynamics simulations, to provide information on local molecular shape, greatly aiding our relaxation analyses. Our results, which are more accurate than those presented previously, confirm the higher flexibility of the NA-domains as compared with reported data on S-domains. It is proposed that this flexibility has two functional roles. First, it confers a greater area of interaction from the anchoring point on the core protein for the bioactive S-domains. Secondly, it allows multiple interactions along the same HS chain that are dynamically independent of each other. Electronic Supplementary Material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10719-007-9081-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18080183

  12. The AGB star nucleosynthesis in the light of the recent 17O ( p ,α)14N and 18O ( p ,α)15N reaction rate determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-02-01

    Presolar grains form in the cold and dusty envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. These solides, once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of low temeperature H-burning in stars. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the 17O ( p ,α)14N and 18O ( p ,α)15N reactions. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O ( p ,α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. The new estimates of the reaction rates have been introduced into calculations of AGB star nucleosynthesis and the results have been compared with geochemical analysis of "presolar" grains to determine their impact on astrophysical environments.

  13. An alternative theory on relaxation rates in cuprate superconductors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Nie; Miley, George H

    2009-01-14

    Transport properties of high transition temperature (high-T(c)) superconductors apparently demonstrate two distinct relaxation rates in the normal state. We propose that this superficial inconsistence can be resolved with an effective carrier (quasiparticle) density n almost linear in temperature T. Experimental evidence both for and against this explanation is analyzed and we conclude that this offers a clear yet promising scenario. Band structure calculation was utilized to determine the Fermi surface topology of the cuprate superconductor versus doping. The results demonstrate that an electron-like portion of the Fermi surface exists in a wide range of doping levels even for a p-type superconductor, exemplified by La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO(4-δ) (LSCO). Such electron-like segments have also been confirmed in recent photoemission electron spectroscopy. The Coulomb interaction between electron-like and hole-like quasiparticles then forms a bound state, similar to that of an exciton. As a result the number of charge carriers upon cooling temperature is decreased. A quantum mechanical calculation of scattering cross section demonstrates that a T(2) relaxation rate is born out of an electron-hole collision process. Above the pseudogap temperature T(*) the normal state of high-T(c) cuprates is close to a two-component Fermi liquid. It, however, assumes non-Fermi-liquid behavior below T(*).

  14. The effect of relaxing massage on heart rate and heart rate variability in purebred Arabian racehorses.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Sylwester; Janczarek, Iwona; Kędzierski, Witold; Stachurska, Anna; Wilk, Izabela

    2016-09-04

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of relaxing massage on the heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in young racehorses during their first racing season. In the study, 72 Purebred Arabian racehorses were included. The study was implemented during the full race season. The horses from control and experimental groups were included in regular race training 6 days a week. The horses from the experimental group were additionally subject to the relaxing massage 3 days a week during the whole study. HR and HRV were assumed as indicators of the emotional state of the horses. The measurements were taken six times, every 4-5 weeks. The HRV parameters were measured at rest, during grooming and saddling the horse and during warm-up walking under a rider. The changes of the parameters throughout the season suggest that the relaxing massage may be effectively used to make the racehorses more relaxed and calm. Moreover, the horses from the experimental group had better race performance records.

  15. The influence of motor cortical stimulus intensity on the relaxation rate of human lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Chris J; Bredius, Marlous S; Molenaar, Joery P; Gandevia, Simon C

    2013-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows an in vivo assessment of the rate of muscle relaxation during a voluntary contraction. It is unknown if this method can be applied to lower limb muscles, and the effect of stimulus intensity on relaxation rate has not been investigated in any muscle group. The present study sought to address these unknowns. A secondary aim was to test the sensitivity of the method to a change in muscle length by comparing the relaxation rate of the plantar flexor muscles with the gastrocnemius at short and long lengths. Seven subjects performed 21 maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs) of the dorsiflexors (DF) and plantar flexors with a knee angle of either 90° or 180° (PF90 and PF180, respectively). TMS intensity ranged from 40 to 100% stimulator output in intervals of 10%. Relaxation rates increased with stimulus intensity but were equivalent to maximal output at 50 (DF and PF90) or 60% (PF180). MVC torque was greater, and the rate of relaxation was faster for PF180 compared to PF90. The main findings are that TMS can be used to measure relaxation rates of lower limb muscles, and these rates are robust provided the stimulus intensity is above a critical threshold. The dependency of plantar flexor relaxation rate on the length of the fast-twitch gastrocnemius fibers reinforces published temperature and fatigue data which show that the method is sensitive to the contractile properties of the muscle fibers which are actively contributing to torque production.

  16. Accurate determination of rates from non-uniformly sampled relaxation data.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Matthew A; Wand, A Joshua

    2016-08-01

    The application of non-uniform sampling (NUS) to relaxation experiments traditionally used to characterize the fast internal motion of proteins is quantitatively examined. Experimentally acquired Poisson-gap sampled data reconstructed with iterative soft thresholding are compared to regular sequentially sampled (RSS) data. Using ubiquitin as a model system, it is shown that 25 % sampling is sufficient for the determination of quantitatively accurate relaxation rates. When the sampling density is fixed at 25 %, the accuracy of rates is shown to increase sharply with the total number of sampled points until eventually converging near the inherent reproducibility of the experiment. Perhaps contrary to some expectations, it is found that accurate peak height reconstruction is not required for the determination of accurate rates. Instead, inaccuracies in rates arise from inconsistencies in reconstruction across the relaxation series that primarily manifest as a non-linearity in the recovered peak height. This indicates that the performance of an NUS relaxation experiment cannot be predicted from comparison of peak heights using a single RSS reference spectrum. The generality of these findings was assessed using three alternative reconstruction algorithms, eight different relaxation measurements, and three additional proteins that exhibit varying degrees of spectral complexity. From these data, it is revealed that non-linearity in peak height reconstruction across the relaxation series is strongly correlated with errors in NUS-derived relaxation rates. Importantly, it is shown that this correlation can be exploited to reliably predict the performance of an NUS-relaxation experiment by using three or more RSS reference planes from the relaxation series. The RSS reference time points can also serve to provide estimates of the uncertainty of the sampled intensity, which for a typical relaxation times series incurs no penalty in total acquisition time.

  17. Relaxation rates of low-field gas-phase ^129Xe storage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limes, Mark; Saam, Brian

    2010-10-01

    A study of longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates T1 of ^129Xe and Xe-N2 mixtures in a magnetic field of 3.8 mT is presented. In this regime, intrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the intramolecular spin-rotation interaction due to persistent xenon dimers, a mechanism that can be quelled by introducing large amounts of N2 into the storage cell. Extrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the wall-relaxation rate, which is the primary quantity of interest for the various low-field storage cells and coatings that we have tested. Previous group work has shown that extremely long gas-phase relaxation times T1 can be obtained, but only at large magnetic fields and low xenon densities. The current work is motivated by the practical benefits of retaining hyperpolarized ^129Xe for extended periods of time in a small magnetic field.

  18. A predictive model for the temperature relaxation rate in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Daligault, Jerome; Dimonte, Guy

    2008-01-01

    We present and validate a simple model for the electron-ion temperature relaxation rate in plasmas that applies over a wide range of plasma temperatures and densities, including weakly-coupled, non-degenerate as well as strongly-coupled, degenerate plasmas. Electron degeneracy and static correlation effects between electrons and ions are shown to play a cumulative role that, at low temperature, lead to relaxation rates a few times smaller than when these effects are neglected. We predict the evolution of the relaxation in dense hydrogen plasmas from the fully degenerate to the non-degenerate limit.

  19. The Effect of Parasite Infection on Stable Isotope Turnover Rates of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S in Multiple Tissues of Eurasian Perch Perca fluviatilis

    PubMed Central

    Yohannes, Elizabeth; Grimm, Claudia; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of commercially and ecologically important fish can improve understanding of life-history and trophic ecology. However, accurate interpretation of stable isotope values requires knowledge of tissue-specific isotopic turnover that will help to describe differences in the isotopic composition of tissues and diet. We performed a diet-switch experiment using captive-reared parasite-free Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and wild caught specimens of the same species, infected with the pike tapeworm Triaenophorus nodulosus living in host liver tissue. We hypothesize that metabolic processes related to infection status play a major role in isotopic turnover and examined the influence of parasite infection on isotopic turn-over rate of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and sulphur (δ34S) in liver, blood and muscle. The δ15N and δ13C turnovers were fastest in liver tissues, followed by blood and muscle. In infected fish, liver and blood δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were similar. However, in infected fish, liver and blood δ13C turnover was faster than that of δ15N. Moreover, in infected subjects, liver δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were three to five times faster than in livers of uninfected subjects (isotopic half-life of ca.3-4 days compared to 16 and 10 days, respectively). Blood δ34S turnover rate were about twice faster in non-infected individuals implying that parasite infection could retard the turnover rate of δ34S and sulphur containing amino acids. Slower turnover rate of essential amino acid could probably decrease individual immune function. These indicate potential hidden costs of chronic and persistent infections that may have accumulated adverse effects and might eventually impair life-history fitness. For the first time, we were able to shift the isotope values of parasites encapsulated in the liver by changing the dietary source of the host. We also report variability in isotopic turnover rates between tissues, elements and

  20. The Effect of Parasite Infection on Stable Isotope Turnover Rates of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S in Multiple Tissues of Eurasian Perch Perca fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Elizabeth; Grimm, Claudia; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of commercially and ecologically important fish can improve understanding of life-history and trophic ecology. However, accurate interpretation of stable isotope values requires knowledge of tissue-specific isotopic turnover that will help to describe differences in the isotopic composition of tissues and diet. We performed a diet-switch experiment using captive-reared parasite-free Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and wild caught specimens of the same species, infected with the pike tapeworm Triaenophorus nodulosus living in host liver tissue. We hypothesize that metabolic processes related to infection status play a major role in isotopic turnover and examined the influence of parasite infection on isotopic turn-over rate of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and sulphur (δ34S) in liver, blood and muscle. The δ15N and δ13C turnovers were fastest in liver tissues, followed by blood and muscle. In infected fish, liver and blood δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were similar. However, in infected fish, liver and blood δ13C turnover was faster than that of δ15N. Moreover, in infected subjects, liver δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were three to five times faster than in livers of uninfected subjects (isotopic half-life of ca.3-4 days compared to 16 and 10 days, respectively). Blood δ34S turnover rate were about twice faster in non-infected individuals implying that parasite infection could retard the turnover rate of δ34S and sulphur containing amino acids. Slower turnover rate of essential amino acid could probably decrease individual immune function. These indicate potential hidden costs of chronic and persistent infections that may have accumulated adverse effects and might eventually impair life-history fitness. For the first time, we were able to shift the isotope values of parasites encapsulated in the liver by changing the dietary source of the host. We also report variability in isotopic turnover rates between tissues, elements and

  1. Quantifying the rates of relaxation of binary mixtures of amorphous pharmaceuticals with isothermal calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Alem, Naziha; Beezer, Anthony E; Gaisford, Simon

    2010-10-31

    While the use of isothermal calorimetry to quantify the rate of relaxation of one-phase amorphous pharmaceuticals, through application of models, is well documented, the resolution of the models to detect and quantify relaxation in systems containing two independent amorphous phases is not known. Addressing this knowledge gap is the focus of this work. Two fitting models were tested; the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts model (KWW) and the modified-stretch exponential (MSE). The ability of each model to resolve relaxation processes in binary systems was determined with simulated calorimetric data. It was found that as long as the relaxation time constants of the relaxation processes were with 10(3) of each other, the models could determine that two events were occurring and could quantify the correct reaction parameters of each. With greater differences in the time constants, the faster process always dominates the data and the resolving power of the models is lost. Real calorimetric data were then obtained for two binary amorphous systems (sucrose-lactose and sucrose-indomethacin mixtures). The relaxation behaviour of all the single components was characterised as they relaxed individually to provide reference data. The ability of the KWW model to recover the expected relaxation parameters for two component data was impaired because of their inherently noisy nature. The MSE model reasonably recovered the expected parameters for each component for the sucrose-indomethacin system but not for the sucrose-lactose system, which may indicate a possible interaction in that case.

  2. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI -dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We , are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We , the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI -dependent.

  3. Spatio-temporal attributes of left ventricular pressure decay rate during isovolumic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Erina; Kovács, Sándor J

    2012-03-01

    Global left ventricular (LV) isovolumic relaxation rate has been characterized: 1) via the time constant of isovolumic relaxation τ or 2) via the logistic time constant τ(L). An alternate kinematic method, characterizes isovolumic relaxation (IVR) in accordance with Newton's Second Law. The model's parameters, stiffness E(k), and damping/relaxation μ result from best fit of model-predicted pressure to in vivo data. All three models (exponential, logistic, and kinematic) characterize global relaxation in terms of pressure decay rates. However, IVR is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. Apical and basal LV wall segments untwist at different times and rates, and transmural strain and strain rates differ due to the helically variable pitch of myocytes and sheets. Accordingly, we hypothesized that the exponential model (τ) or kinematic model (μ and E(k)) parameters will elucidate the spatiotemporal variation of IVR rate. Left ventricular pressures in 20 subjects were recorded using a high-fidelity, multipressure transducer (3 cm apart) catheter. Simultaneous, dual-channel pressure data was plotted in the pressure phase-plane (dP/dt vs. P) and τ, μ, and E(k) were computed in 1631 beats (average: 82 beats per subject). Tau differed significantly between the two channels (P < 0.05) in 16 of 20 subjects, whereas μ and E(k) differed significantly (P < 0.05) in all 20 subjects. These results show that quantifying the relaxation rate from data recorded at a single location has limitations. Moreover, kinematic model based analysis allows characterization of restoring (recoil) forces and resistive (crossbridge uncoupling) forces during IVR and their spatio-temporal dependence, thereby elucidating the relative roles of stiffness vs. relaxation as IVR rate determinants.

  4. Using Paramagnetism to Slow Down Nuclear Relaxation in Protein NMR.

    PubMed

    Orton, Henry W; Kuprov, Ilya; Loh, Choy-Theng; Otting, Gottfried

    2016-12-01

    Paramagnetic metal ions accelerate nuclear spin relaxation; this effect is widely used for distance measurement and called paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). Theoretical predictions established that, under special circumstances, it is also possible to achieve a reduction in nuclear relaxation rates (negative PRE). This situation would occur if the mechanism of nuclear relaxation in the diamagnetic state is counterbalanced by a paramagnetic relaxation mechanism caused by the metal ion. Here we report the first experimental evidence for such a cross-correlation effect. Using a uniformly (15)N-labeled mutant of calbindin D9k loaded with either Tm(3+) or Tb(3+), reduced R1 and R2 relaxation rates of backbone (15)N spins were observed compared with the diamagnetic reference (the same protein loaded with Y(3+)). The effect arises from the compensation of the chemical shift anisotropy tensor by the anisotropic dipolar shielding generated by the unpaired electron spin.

  5. Low-Dimensional Nanoparticle Clustering in Polymer Micelles and Their Transverse Relaxivity Rates

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Robert J.; Meng, Xin; Zhang, Peijun; Park, So-Jung

    2015-01-01

    One- or two-dimensional arrays of iron oxide nanoparticles were formed in colloidal assemblies of amphiphilic polymers. Electron tomography imaging revealed that nanoparticles are arranged into one-dimensional strings in magneto-micelles or two-dimensional sheets in magneto-core/shell assemblies. The distinct directional assembly behavior was attributed to the interparticle interaction relative to the nanoparticle–polymer interaction, which was modulated by varying the cosolvent used for the solution phase self-assembly. Magneto-core/shell assemblies with varying structural parameters were formed with a range of different sized as-synthesized nanoparticles. The transverse magnetic relaxivity rates (r2) of a series of different assemblies were determined to examine the effect of nanoparticle arrangement on the magnetic relaxivity for their potential applications in MRI. The results indicated that the assembly structure of nanoparticles in polymer micelles significantly affects the r2 of surrounding water, providing a way to control magnetic relaxivity. PMID:23731021

  6. Probing Hydronium Ion Histidine NH Exchange Rate Constants in the M2 Channel via Indirect Observation of Dipolar-Dephased (15)N Signals in Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Miao, Yimin; Qin, Huajun; Cross, Timothy A

    2016-12-14

    Water-protein chemical exchange in membrane-bound proteins is an important parameter for understanding how proteins interact with their aqueous environment, but has been difficult to observe in membrane-bound biological systems. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of probing specific water-protein chemical exchange in membrane-bound proteins in solid-state MAS NMR. By spin-locking the (1)H magnetization along the magic angle, the (1)H spin diffusion is suppressed such that a water-protein chemical exchange process can be monitored indirectly by dipolar-dephased (15)N signals through polarization transfer from (1)H. In the example of the Influenza A full length M2 protein, the buildup of dipolar-dephased (15)N signals from the tetrad of His37 side chains have been observed as a function of spin-lock time. This confirms that hydronium ions are in exchange with protons in the His37 NH bonds at the heart of the M2 proton conduction mechanism, with an exchange rate constant of ∼1750 s(-1) for pH 6.2 at -10 °C.

  7. Potentiation increases peak twitch torque by enhancing rates of torque development and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Froyd, Christian; Beltrami, Fernando Gabe; Jensen, Jørgen; Noakes, Timothy David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the extent to which potentiation changes in response to an isometric maximal voluntary contraction. Eleven physically active subjects participated in two separate studies. Single stimulus of electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve was used to measure torque at rest in unpotentiated quadriceps muscles (study 1 and 2), and potentiated quadriceps muscles torque in a 10 min period after a 5 s isometric maximal voluntary contraction of the quadriceps muscles (study 1). Additionally, potentiated quadriceps muscles torque was measured every min after a further 10 maximal voluntary contractions repeated every min (study 2). Electrical stimulation repeated several times without previous maximal voluntary contraction showed similar peak twitch torque. Peak twitch torque 4 s after a 5 s maximal voluntary contraction increased by 45±13% (study 1) and by 56±10% (study 2), the rate of torque development by 53±13% and 82±29%, and the rate of relaxation by 50±17% and 59±22%, respectively, but potentiation was lost already two min after a 5 s maximal voluntary contraction. There was a tendency for peak twitch torque to increase for the first five repeated maximal voluntary contractions, suggesting increased potentiation with additional maximal voluntary contractions. Correlations for peak twitch torque vs the rate of torque development and for the rate of relaxation were r(2)= 0.94 and r(2)=0.97. The correlation between peak twitch torque, the rate of torque development and the rate of relaxation suggests that potentiation is due to instantaneous changes in skeletal muscle contractility and relaxation.

  8. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-28

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1} of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R{sub 1} vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S–I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole {sup 14}N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of {sup 27}Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  9. RKKY oscillations in the spin relaxation rates of atomic-scale nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, F.; Fernández-Rossier, J.

    2017-02-01

    Exchange interactions with itinerant electrons are known to act as a relaxation mechanism for individual local spins. The same exchange interactions induce the so-called RKKY indirect exchange interaction between two otherwise decoupled local spins. Here, we show that both the spin relaxation and the RKKY coupling can be seen as the dissipative and reactive response to the coupling of the local spins with the itinerant electrons. We thereby predict that the spin relaxation rates of magnetic nanostructures of exchanged coupled local spins, such as nanoengineered spin chains, have an oscillatory dependence on kFd , where kF is the Fermi wave number and d is the interspin distance, very much like the celebrated oscillations in the RKKY interaction. We demonstrate that both T1 and T2 can be enhanced or suppressed, compared to the single-spin limit, depending on the interplay between the Fermi surface and the nanostructure geometrical arrangement. Our results open a route to engineer spin relaxation and decoherence in atomically designed spin structures.

  10. Postearthquake relaxation after the 2004 M6 Parkfield, California, earthquake and rate-and-state friction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Langbein, J.

    2008-01-01

    An unusually complete set of measurements (including rapid rate GPS over the first 10 days) of postseismic deformation is available at 12 continuous GPS stations located close to the epicenter of the 2004 M6.0 Parkfield earthquake. The principal component modes for the relaxation of the ensemble of those 12 GPS stations were determined. The first mode alone furnishes an adequate approximation to the data. Thus, the relaxation at all stations can be represented by the product of a common temporal function and distinct amplitudes for each component (north or east) of relaxation at each station. The distribution in space of the amplitudes indicates that the relaxation is dominantly strike slip. The temporal function, which spans times from about 5 min to 900 days postearthquake, can be fit by a superposition of three creep terms, each of the form ??l loge(1 + t/??l), with characteristic times ??, = 4.06, 0.11, and 0.0001 days. It seems likely that what is actually involved is a broad spectrum of characteristic times, the individual components of which arise from afterslip on different fault patches. Perfettini and Avouac (2004) have shown that an individual creep term can be explained by the spring-slider model with rate-dependent (no state variable) friction. The observed temporal function can also be explained using a single spring-slider model (i.e., single fault patch) that includes rate-and-state-dependent friction, a single-state variable, and either of the two commonly used (aging and slip) state evolution laws. In the latter fits, the rate-and-state friction parameter b is negative.

  11. Group epitope mapping considering relaxation of the ligand (GEM-CRL): Including longitudinal relaxation rates in the analysis of saturation transfer difference (STD) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Sebastian; Patel, Mitul K.; Errey, James C.; Davis, Benjamin G.; Jones, Jonathan A.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.

    2010-03-01

    In the application of saturation transfer difference (STD) experiments to the study of protein-ligand interactions, the relaxation of the ligand is one of the major influences on the experimentally observed STD factors, making interpretation of these difficult when attempting to define a group epitope map (GEM). In this paper, we describe a simplification of the relaxation matrix that may be applied under specified experimental conditions, which results in a simplified equation reflecting the directly transferred magnetisation rate from the protein onto the ligand, defined as the summation over the whole protein of the protein-ligand cross-relaxation multiplied by with the fractional saturation of the protein protons. In this, the relaxation of the ligand is accounted for implicitly by inclusion of the experimentally determined longitudinal relaxation rates. The conditions under which this "group epitope mapping considering relaxation of the ligand" (GEM-CRL) can be applied were tested on a theoretical model system, which demonstrated only minor deviations from that predicted by the full relaxation matrix calculations (CORCEMA-ST) [7]. Furthermore, CORCEMA-ST calculations of two protein-saccharide complexes (Jacalin and TreR) with known crystal structures were performed and compared with experimental GEM-CRL data. It could be shown that the GEM-CRL methodology is superior to the classical group epitope mapping approach currently used for defining ligand-protein proximities. GEM-CRL is also useful for the interpretation of CORCEMA-ST results, because the transferred magnetisation rate provides an additional parameter for the comparison between measured and calculated values. The independence of this parameter from the above mentioned factors can thereby enhance the value of CORCEMA-ST calculations.

  12. Effects of water concentration in the coating solution on the wall relaxation rate of octadecyltrichlorosilane coated rubidium vapor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guiying; Wei, Lihua; Wang, Meiling; Zhao, Kaifeng

    2015-01-28

    High quality anti-relaxation surface coatings for atomic vapor cells are essential for the preservation of atomic spin coherence and the enhancement of measurement sensitivity. In this paper, we studied the effects of water concentration in octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) coating solution on the relaxation rate and its reproducibility of OTS coated Rubidium vapor cells. We found that appropriate water concentration can improve the anti-relaxation performance of OTS coated cells.

  13. Estimation of free copper ion concentrations in blood serum using T1 relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blicharska, Barbara; Witek, Magdalena; Fornal, Maria; MacKay, Alex L.

    2008-09-01

    The water proton relaxation rate constant R1 = 1/ T1 (at 60 MHz) of blood serum is substantially increased by the presence of free Cu 2+ ions at concentrations above normal physiological levels. Addition of chelating agents to serum containing paramagnetic Cu 2+ nulls this effect. This was demonstrated by looking at the effect of adding a chelating agent—D-penicillamine (D-PEN) to CuSO 4 and CuCl 2 aqueous solutions as well as to rabbit blood serum. We propose that the measurement of water proton spin-lattice relaxation rate constants before and after chelation may be used as an alternative approach for monitoring the presence of free copper ions in blood serum. This method may be used in the diagnosis of some diseases (leukaemia, liver diseases and particularly Wilson's disease) because, in contrast to conventional methods like spectrophotometry which records the total number of both bound and free ions, the proton relaxation technique is sensitive solely to free paramagnetic ions dissolved in blood serum. The change in R1 upon chelation was found to be less than 0.06 s -1 for serum from healthy subjects but greater than 0.06 s -1 for serum from untreated Wilson's patients.

  14. Carbon-13 chemical shift anisotropy in DNA bases from field dependence of solution NMR relaxation rates.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jinfa; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2006-03-01

    Knowledge of (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) in nucleotide bases is important for the interpretation of solution-state NMR relaxation data in terms of local dynamic properties of DNA and RNA. Accurate knowledge of the CSA becomes particularly important at high magnetic fields, prerequisite for adequate spectral resolution in larger oligonucleotides. Measurement of (13)C relaxation rates of protonated carbons in the bases of the so-called Dickerson dodecamer, d(CGCGAATTCGCG)(2), at 500 and 800 MHz (1)H frequency, together with the previously characterized structure and diffusion tensor yields CSA values for C5 in C, C6 in C and T, C8 in A and G, and C2 in A that are closest to values previously reported on the basis of solid-state FIREMAT NMR measurements, and mostly larger than values obtained by in vacuo DFT calculations. Owing to the noncollinearity of dipolar and CSA interactions, interpretation of the NMR relaxation rates is particularly sensitive to anisotropy of rotational diffusion, and use of isotropic diffusion models can result in considerable errors.

  15. Strain Rate Dependence of Compressive Yield and Relaxation in DGEBA Epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechederra, Gabriel K.; Reprogle, Riley C.; Clarkson, Caitlyn M.; McCoy, John D.; Kropka, Jamie M.; Long, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanical response in uniaxial compression of two diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxies were studied. These were 828DEA (Epon 828 cured with diethanolamine (DEA)) and 828T403 (Epon 828 cured with Jeffamine T-403). Two types of uniaxial compression tests were performed: A) constant strain rate compression and B) constant strain rate compression followed by a constant strain relaxation. The peak (yield) stress was analyzed as a function of strain rate from Eyring theory for activation volume. Runs at different temperatures permitted the construction of a mastercurve, and the resulting shift factors resulted in an activation energy. Strain and hold tests were performed for a low strain rate where a peak stress was lacking and for a higher strain rate where the peak stress was apparent. Relaxation from strains at different places along the stress-strain curve was tracked and compared. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  17. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    DOE PAGES

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  18. Relaxation rates in the Maxwellian collision model and its variable hard sphere surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The variable hard sphere and related models have proven to be accurate and computationally convenient replacements for the inverse power law model of classical kinetic theory in DSMC calculations. We provide theoretical support for this success by comparing the relaxation rates in the linearized Boltzmann equation for the Maxwellian model with those of its variable hard sphere surrogate. We demonstrate that the linearized collision operators for these two models agree closely under well defined and broadly applicable conditions and show some implications of this agreement for time dependent solutions of the linearized Boltzmann equation.

  19. The AGB star nucleosynthesis in the light of the recent {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reaction rate determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-02-24

    Presolar grains form in the cold and dusty envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. These solides, once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of low temeperature H-burning in stars. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reactions. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel. The new estimates of the reaction rates have been introduced into calculations of AGB star nucleosynthesis and the results have been compared with geochemical analysis of 'presolar' grains to determine their impact on astrophysical environments.

  20. Extracting the Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation Rate from Ion Stopping Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Paul E.; Frenje, Johan A.; Benedict, Lorin X.

    2016-10-01

    Direct measurement of i-e equilibration rates at ICF-relevant conditions is a big challenge, as it is difficult to differentiate from other sinks and sources of energy, such as heat conduction and pdV work. Another method is to use information from ion stopping experiments. Such experiments at the OMEGA laser have made precision energy loss measurements of fusion products at these conditions. Combined with the multimonochromatic x-ray imager technique, which gives temporally and spatially resolved electron temperature and density, we have a robust stopping experiment. We propose to use such stopping measurements to assess the i-e temperature relaxation rate, since both processes involve energy exchange between electrons and ions. We require that the fusion products are 1) much faster than the thermal ions so that i-i collisions are negligible compared to i-e collisions and 2) slower than the thermal electrons so that the stopping obeys a linear friction law. Then the Coulomb logarithms associated with ion stopping and i-e temperature relaxation rate are identical and a measurement of the former provides the latter. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Determination of 15N chemical shift anisotropy from a membrane-bound protein by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Ahuja, Shivani; Pichumani, Kumar; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-06-21

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors are essential in the structural and dynamic studies of proteins using NMR spectroscopy. Results from relaxation studies in biomolecular solution and solid-state NMR experiments on aligned samples are routinely interpreted using well-characterized CSA tensors determined from model compounds. Since CSA tensors, particularly the (15)N CSA, highly depend on a number of parameters including secondary structure, electrostatic interaction, and the amino acid sequence, there is a need for accurately determined CSA tensors from proteins. In this study, we report the backbone amide-(15)N CSA tensors for a 16.7-kDa membrane-bound and paramagnetic-heme containing protein, rabbit Cytochrome b(5) (cytb(5)), determined using the (15)N CSA/(15)N-(1)H dipolar transverse cross-correlation rates. The mean values of (15)N CSA determined for residues in helical, sheet, and turn regions are -187.9, -166.0, and -161.1 ppm, respectively, with an overall average value of -171.7 ppm. While the average CSA value determined from this study is in good agreement with previous solution NMR experiments on small globular proteins, the CSA value determined for residues in helical conformation is slightly larger, which may be attributed to the paramagnetic effect from Fe(III) of the heme unit in cytb(5). However, like in previous solution NMR studies, the CSA values reported in this study are larger than the values measured from solid-state NMR experiments. We believe that the CSA parameters reported in this study will be useful in determining the structure, dynamics, and orientation of proteins, including membrane proteins, using NMR spectroscopy.

  2. Effect of the cross-relaxation rate on the transverse radiation dynamics of a wide-aperture laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zaikin, A P; Molevich, N E

    2004-08-31

    The effect of a finite polarisation relaxation time on the transverse structure of the optical field of a wide-aperture laser is considered. The conditions are found for the emergence of periodic autowaves for positive and negative frequency detuning. These conditions are shown to depend strongly on the cross-relaxation rate. It is established that the dynamics of finite-aperture lasers at high cross-relaxation rates is satisfactorily described by simplified models in which the polarisation is adiabatically eliminated. (lasers)

  3. Rate calculations for the simultaneous vibrational relaxation and dissociation of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, David A.; Varghese, Philip L.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data on vibrational relaxation and dissociation rates in highly nonequilibrium gases are scarce. Recently there have been several attempts at generating these rates by direct calculation of inelastic collision cross-sections. Some issues that need to be considered if such calculations are to be used as a basis for analysis and design are examined. In particular, the following are examined: (1) collinear vs 3D scattering models, (2) accurate intermolecular potentials, (3) closed channels and acceleration schemes, (4) thermal averaging and thermal rates, and (5) code validation. It has been necessary to confront these issues during the course of N2-N2 and N2-N inelastic cross-section calculations.

  4. The nuclear spin relaxation rate for clean quasi-two-dimensional superconductors in the vicinity of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biéri, J. B.; Lederer, P.

    1996-04-01

    We calculate the nuclear spin relaxation rate of clean quasi-two-dimensional (2D) superconductors with s-wave pairing in high magnetic fields using the BCS model and the Brandt, Pesch and Tewordt approximation for the single-particle propagator. The calculation is valid in the vicinity of 0953-8984/8/15/011/img2. Thermal fluctuations of vortices are not taken into account. We evaluate numerically our results in the case of high-0953-8984/8/15/011/img3 materials and organic superconductors. In a perpendicular field the Hebel - Slichter coherence peak is suppressed depending on the variation of the quasi-particle lifetime below 0953-8984/8/15/011/img3. We also describe the magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin relaxation rate. Using the experimentally determined value of the quasi-particle lifetime, the model reproduces the experimental initial variations of 0953-8984/8/15/011/img5 versus 0953-8984/8/15/011/img6 at different magnetic fields. However, the Hebel - Slichter peak is conserved in the low-field limit, or when the applied magnetic field is parallel to the superconducting planes.

  5. The Effect of Tungsten and Niobium on the Stress Relaxation Rates of Disk Alloy CH98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic transports will probably have higher pressure ratios which will require nickel-base superalloy disks with 1300 to 1400 F temperature capability. Several advanced disk alloys are being developed to fill this need. One of these, CH98, is a promising candidate for gas turbine engines and is being studied in NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program. For large disks, residual stresses generated during quenching from solution heat treatment are often reduced by a stabilization heat treatment, in which the disk is heated to 1500 to 1600 F for several hours followed by a static air cool. The reduction in residual stress levels lessens distortion during machining of disks. However, previous work on CH98 has indicated that stabilization treatments decrease creep capability. Additions of the refractory elements tungsten and niobium improve tensile and creep properties after stabilization, while maintaining good crack growth resistance at elevated temperatures. As the additions of refractory elements increase creep capability, they might also effect stress relaxation rates and therefore the reduction in residual stress levels obtained for a given stabilization treatment. To answer this question, the stress relaxation rates of CH98 with and without tungsten and niobium additions are compared in this paper for temperatures and times generally employed in stabilization treatments on modern disk alloys.

  6. Relaxation rates for inverse power law particle interactions and their variable hard sphere surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that collision models based on an assumed intermolecular potential (IPL, LJ, ...) can be successfully replaced by simplified surrogates (VHS, VSS, VS, ...) in DSMC calculations. But these surrogates only reproduce certain gross properties of the molecular model, for example, the temperature dependence of the viscosity; they do not approximate, and even mis-state, the details of the particle interactions. The success of the simplified models in problems at finite Knudsen number, where the Navier-Stokes approximation is not valid, may therefore seem surprising. To understand this success in a very special case, we showed that the first seven relaxation rates of the linearized Boltzmann equation for Maxwellian molecules are well approximated by the corresponding relaxation rates of its VHS surrogate. We will show that this analysis can be extended in somewhat less generality to IPL interactions, and to some extent to more realistic models including LJ. We believe that this analysis can help address the more general problem of identifying the properties of the collision model that dominate the predictions of the Boltzmann equation.

  7. Calculation of energy relaxation rates of fast particles by phonons in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prange, Micah; Campbell, Luke; Wu, Dangxin; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the temperature-dependent exchange of energy between a classical charged point-particle and the phonons of a crystalline material. The phonons, which are computed using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) methods, interact with the moving particle via the Coulomb interaction between the density induced in the material by phonon excitation and the charge of the classical particle. Energy relaxation rates are computed using time-dependent perturbation theory. The method, which is applicable wherever DFPT is, is illustrated with results for several important scintillators whose performance is affected by electron thermalization. We discuss the influence of the form assumed for quasiparticle dispersion on theoretical estimates of electron cooling rates. This research was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of DNN R&D, of the DOE. PNNL is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute under Contract DE-AC0576RL01830.

  8. Temperature dependence of the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate for spin-1/2 chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coira, E.; Barmettler, P.; Giamarchi, T.; Kollath, C.

    2016-10-01

    We use recent developments in the framework of a time-dependent matrix product state method to compute the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rate 1 /T1 for spin-1/2 chains under magnetic field and for different Hamiltonians (XXX, XXZ, isotropically dimerized). We compute numerically the temperature dependence of the 1 /T1 . We consider both gapped and gapless phases, and also the proximity of quantum critical points. At temperatures much lower than the typical exchange energy scale, our results are in excellent agreement with analytical results, such as the ones derived from the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) theory and bosonization, which are valid in this regime. We also cover the regime for which the temperature T is comparable to the exchange coupling. In this case analytical theories are not appropriate, but this regime is relevant for various new compounds with exchange couplings in the range of tens of Kelvin. For the gapped phases, either the fully polarized phase for spin chains or the low-magnetic-field phase for the dimerized systems, we find an exponential decrease in Δ /(kBT ) of the relaxation time and can compute the gap Δ . Close to the quantum critical point our results are in good agreement with the scaling behavior based on the existence of free excitations.

  9. Diffusion dependence of proton NMR relaxation rates in the presence of ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Michael; Hammel, P. Chris

    2009-03-01

    Ferritin is the predominant iron-storage protein in living organisms. It may serve as an indicator of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Measuring brain ferritin concentration non-invasively via MRI could enable better diagnoses and treatments of such diseases. Quantitative MRI determination of the ferritin concentration requires an understanding of the NMR relaxation mechanisms of hydrogen protons in the presence of ferritin. In aqueous solutions, ferritin enhances the transverse relaxation rate (R2) of the protons. This is thought to occur due to a diffusive mechanism, where protons diffusing near ferritin pass through a region of elevated magnetic field, and a chemical exchange mechanism, where protons bind to the protein for a period of time, experiencing an even higher magnetic field. These two mechanisms exhibit different dependencies on the self-diffusion coefficient of the protons. By adding glycerol to aqueous solutions, we control the self-diffusion of protons. We measure the R2 of protons in ferritin-containing binary mixtures of water and glycerol using CPMG sequences, and compare the experimental results to theoretical predictions of diffusion dependence in order to distinguish the relative importance of the mechanisms.

  10. Theoretical simulation of carrier capture and relaxation rates in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yunhu; Zhang, Guoping; Guo, Ling; Qi, Guoqun; Li, Xiaoming

    2014-06-14

    Based on Auger scattering mechanism, carrier-carrier scattering dynamics between the two-dimensional carrier reservoir (also called wetting layer, i.e., WL) and the confined quantum dot ground and first excited state in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD-SOAs) are investigated theoretically in this paper. The scattering rates for independent electron and hole densities are calculated. The results show an ultra-fast carrier capture (relaxation) rate up to 1 ps{sup −1}, and there is a complex dependence of the Coulomb scattering rates on the WL electron and hole densities. In addition, due to the different effective mass and the level distribution, the scattering rates for electron and hole are very different. Finally, in order to provide a direction to control (increase or decrease) the input current in realistic QD-SOA systems, a simple method is proposed to determine the trends of the carrier recovery rates with the WL carrier densities in the vicinity of the steady-state.

  11. Relaxation rates in the Maxwellian collision model and its variable hard sphere surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The variable hard sphere and related models have proven to be accurate and computationally convenient replacements for the inverse power law model of classical kinetic theory in direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. We attempt to provide theoretical support for this remarkable success by comparing the relaxation rates in the linearized Boltzmann equation for the Maxwellian collision model with those of its variable hard sphere surrogate. The comparison demonstrates that the linearized collision operator with variable hard sphere interactions can accurately approximate the linearized collision operator with Maxwellian inverse power law interactions under well-defined and broadly applicable conditions. Extensions of the analysis to the general inverse power law model and to more realistic intermolecular potentials are briefly discussed.

  12. Effects of vorticity and impurity on NMR relaxation rate in chiral p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kenta K.; Ichioka, Masanori; Onari, Seiichiro

    2016-11-01

    In order to study site-selective NMR in chiral p-wave superconductors, we calculate local nuclear relaxation rate T1-1 in the vortex lattice state by Eilenberger theory with and without non-magnetic impurity scattering in the Born limit and unitary limit. The local T1-1 in the NMR resonance line shape is different between two chiral states p±, depending on whether the chirality is parallel or anti-parallel to the vorticity. In the p--wave, anomalous suppression of local T1-1 occurs around the vortex core due to the negative coherence term coming from odd-frequency s-wave Cooper pair induced around the vortex. We especially examine the site dependence of the anomalous suppression of local T1-1, including the applied magnetic field dependence and the impurity effects.

  13. Nuclear magnetic relaxation rates of unconventional superconductivity in doped topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yuki; Ota, Yukihiro

    2016-10-01

    We study the temperature dependence of nuclear magnetic relaxation (NMR) rates to detect unconventional superconductivity in doped topological insulators, such as M (=Cu ,Nb,Sr) xBi2Se3 and Sn1 -xInxTe . The Hebel-Slichter coherence effect below a critical temperature Tc depends on the superconducting states predicted by a minimal model of doped topological insulators. In a nodal anisotropic topological state similar to the ABM phase in 3He, the NMR rate has a conventional s -wave-like coherence peak below Tc. In contrast, in a fully-gapped isotropic topological superconducting state, this rate below Tc exhibits an antipeak profile. Moreover, in a twofold in-plane anisotropic topological superconducting state, there is no coherence effect, which is similar to that in a chiral p -wave state. We also claim in a model of CuxBi2Se3 that a signal of the fully-gapped odd-parity state is attainable from the change of the antipeak behavior depending on doping level. Thus, we reveal that the NMR rates shed light on unconventional superconductivity in doped topological insulators.

  14. Nuclear relaxation rates in the herbertsmithite kagome antiferromagnets ZnCu3(OH) 6Cl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Nicholas E.; Imai, Takashi; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2016-10-01

    Local spectral functions and nuclear magnetic relaxation (NMR) rates, 1 /T1 , for the spin-half Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the Kagome lattice are calculated using the Moriyas Gaussian approximation, as well as through an extrapolation of multiple frequency moments. The temperature dependence of the calculated rates is compared with the oxygen 1 /T1 NMR data in Herbertsmithite. We find that the Gaussian approximation for 1 /T1 shows behavior qualitatively similar to experiments with a sharp drop in rates at low temperatures, consistent with a spin-gapped behavior. However, this approximation significantly underestimates the magnitude of 1 /T1 even at room temperature. Rates obtained from extrapolation of multiple frequency moments give very good agreement with the room temperature NMR data with J =195 ±20 K and hyperfine couplings determined independently from other measurements. The use of multiple frequency moments also leads to additional low-frequency weight in the local structure factors. The convergence of our calculations with higher-frequency moments breaks down at low temperatures, suggesting the existence of longer-range dynamic correlations in the system despite the very short range static correlations.

  15. Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain eliminates force-dependent changes in relaxation rates in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J R; Diffee, G M; Huang, X P; Moss, R L

    1998-01-01

    The rate of relaxation from steady-state force in rabbit psoas fiber bundles was examined before and after phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). Relaxation was initiated using diazo-2, a photolabile Ca2+ chelator that has low Ca2+ binding affinity (K(Ca) = 4.5 x 10(5) M(-1)) before photolysis and high affinity (K(Ca) = 1.3 x 10(7) M(-1)) after photolysis. Before phosphorylating RLC, the half-times for relaxation initiated from 0.27 +/- 0.02, 0.51 +/- 0.03, and 0.61 +/- 0.03 Po were 90 +/- 6, 140 +/- 6, and 182 +/- 9 ms, respectively. After phosphorylation of RLC, the half-times for relaxation from 0.36 +/- 0.03 Po, 0.59 +/- 0.03 Po, and 0.65 +/- 0.02 Po were 197 +/- 35 ms, 184 +/- 35 ms, and 179 +/- 22 ms. This slowing of relaxation rates from steady-state forces less than 0.50 Po was also observed when bundles of fibers were bathed with N-ethylmaleimide-modified myosin S-1, a strongly binding cross-bridge derivative of S1. These results suggest that phosphorylation of RLC slows relaxation, most likely by slowing the apparent rate of transition of cross-bridges from strongly bound (force-generating) to weakly bound (non-force-generating) states, and reduces or eliminates Ca2+ and cross-bridge activation-dependent changes in relaxation rates. PMID:9449336

  16. Application of a unified deformation-rate law to stress relaxation of AISI Type 316 stainless steel. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A unified deformation rate law is presented and its use at describing stress-relaxation in cladding material is examined. An equation is derived based on the classical theory of rate processes for type 316 stainless steel (the reference fuel-cladding material). In this framework, a strain-rate law is evolved from the concept that plastic deformation is controlled by the rate at which dislocations move past obstacles by thermal activation.

  17. Theory and experimental results of transfer-NOE experiments. 1. The influence of the off rate versus cross-relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippens, R. M.; Cerf, C.; Hallenga, K.

    The theory of the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect is presented in the framework of an extended relaxation matrix representation. This matrix representation allows a coherent description of all one- and two-dimensional experiments. We present analytical solutions for the buildup of magnetization in the 2D transfer-NOE experiment, for all ratios of the off rate k to the cross-relaxation rates R involved. We show that systematic deviations in distance determination occur when the off rate becomes comparable to or smaller than the relaxation rates. Experimental results on the peptide/protein system oxytocin/neurophysin confirming this analysis are presented. The importance of residual mobility in the bound ligand, as demonstrated by the experimental data, is also discussed.

  18. Lyman-α photodesorption from CO2(ice) at 75 K: role of CO2 vibrational relaxation on desorption rate.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chunqing; Yates, John T

    2013-04-21

    The photodesorption of CO2 from CO2(ice) at 75 K when irradiated by Lyman-α light is strongly mediated by vibrational relaxation of highly vibrationally excited molecules produced from the electronically excited CO2 state. A vibrationally hot molecule can either relax (major process) in the ice or desorb (minor process). We find that isotopically pure CO2 ices photodesorb least efficiently due to efficient vibrational tuning between molecules in the ice. Isotopically impure CO2 ices are more poorly vibrationally relaxed and hence photodesorb more efficiently. Mixed CO2-Xe ices are still more efficiently photodesorbed due to the dilution of CO2, which further reduces the rate of vibrational relaxation. Resonant interactions as well as phonon-assisted interactions contribute to vibrational relaxation efficiency in ices, and inversely to photodesorption efficiency. The vibrational lifetime of hot CO2 in its ice at 75 K is of order of 10(-15) s. These results indicate that under astronomical conditions, the rate of photodesorption will depend inversely on the rate of vibrational quenching in the ice, which is dependent on the abundance and distance of like oscillators from each other in the ice. In rather isotopically pure ices, the minority isotopic species will photodesorb more rapidly.

  19. Measurement of longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation rates using the ground-state Hanle effect

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, N.; Weis, A.

    2011-11-15

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the resonant circularly-polarized-light-induced Hanle effect in the ground state of Cs vapor atoms in a paraffin-coated cell. The effect manifests itself as a narrow resonance (centered at B=0) in the dependence of the optical transmission coefficient of the vapor on the magnitude of an external magnetic field B(vector sign). We develop a theoretical model that yields an algebraic expression for the shape of these resonances for arbitrary field orientations and arbitrary angular momenta of the states coupled by the exciting light, provided that the light power is kept sufficiently small. An experimental procedure for assessing the range of validity of the model is given. Experiments were carried out on the laser-driven Cs D{sub 1} transition both in longitudinal and transverse field geometries, and the observed line shapes of the corresponding bright and dark resonances give an excellent confirmation of the model predictions. The method is applied for determining the intrinsic longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of the vector magnetization in the vapor and their dependence on light power.

  20. The effect of magnetically induced linear aggregates on proton transverse relaxation rates of aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saville, Steven L; Woodward, Robert C; House, Michael J; Tokarev, Alexander; Hammers, Jacob; Qi, Bin; Shaw, Jeremy; Saunders, Martin; Varsani, Rahi R; St Pierre, Tim G; Mefford, O Thompson

    2013-03-07

    It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R(2), is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. It is widely known that chain formation occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. In this work we examine the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles. A series of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying stabilizing ligand brush lengths were synthesized. These systems were characterized with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dark-field optical microscopy, and proton transverse relaxation rate measurements. The dark field optical microscopy and R(2) measurements were made in similar magnetic fields over the same time scale so as to correlate the reduction of the transverse relaxivity with the formation of linear aggregates. Our results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal arrangement of the system in a magnetic field, producing differences in the rate and size of chain formation, and hence systematic changes in transverse relaxation rates over time. With increasing ligand brush length, attractive inter-particle interactions are reduced, which results in slower aggregate formation and shorter linear aggregate length. These results have implications for the stabilization, characterization and potentially the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticle systems used in biomedical applications.

  1. An in vivo study of the orientation-dependent and independent components of transverse relaxation rates in white matter.

    PubMed

    Gil, Rita; Khabipova, Diana; Zwiers, Marcel; Hilbert, Tom; Kober, Tobias; Marques, José P

    2016-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides information that allows the estimation of white-matter (WM) fibre orientation and distribution, but it does not provide information about myelin density, fibre concentration or fibre size within each voxel. On the other hand, quantitative relaxation contrasts (like the apparent transverse relaxation, R2∗) offer iron and myelin-related contrast, but their dependence on the orientation of microstructure with respect to the applied magnetic field, B0 , is often neglected. The aim of this work was to combine the fibre orientation information retrieved from the DWI acquisition and the sensitivity to microstructural information from quantitative relaxation parameters. The in vivo measured quantitative transverse relaxation maps (R2 and R2∗) were decomposed into their orientation-dependent and independent components, using the DWI fibre orientation information as prior knowledge. The analysis focused on major WM fibre bundles such as the forceps major (FMj), forceps minor (FMn), cingulum (CG) and corticospinal tracts (CST). The orientation-dependent R2 parameters, despite their small size (0-1.5 Hz), showed higher variability across different fibre populations, while those derived from R2∗, although larger (3.1-4.5 Hz), were mostly bundle-independent. With this article, we have, for the first time, attempted the in vivo characterization of the orientation-(in)dependent components of the transverse relaxation rates and demonstrated that the orientation of WM fibres influences both R2 and R2∗ contrasts.

  2. Using Nice-Ohvms Lineshapes to Study Relaxation Rates and Transition Dipole Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (NICE-OHVMS) is a successful technique that we have developed to sensitively, precisely, and accurately record transitions of molecular ions. It has been used exclusively as a method for precise transition frequency measurement via saturation and fitting of the resultant Lamb dips. NICE-OHVMS has been employed to improve the uncertainties on H_3^+, CH_5^+, HeH^+, and OH^+, reducing the transition frequency uncertainties by two orders of magnitude. Because NICE-OHVMS is a saturation technique, this provides a unique opportunity to access information about the ratio of the transition dipole moment to the relaxation rate of the transition. This can be done in two ways, either through comparison of Lamb dip depth to the transition profile or comparison of the absorption intensity and dispersion intensity. Due to the complexity of the modulation scheme, there are many parameters that affect the apparent intensity of the recorded lineshape. A complete understanding of the lineshape is required to make the measurements of interest. Here we present a model that accounts for the heterodyne modulation and velocity modulation, assuming that the fundamental lineshape is represented by a Voigt profile. Fits to data are made and interpreted in order to extract the saturation parameter. K.N. Crabtree et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 551, 1 (2012). J.N. Hodges et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 164201 (2013). A.J. Perry et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 317, 71 (2015). A.J. Perry et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 101101 (2014). C.R. Marcus et al., Astrophys. J. 817, 138 (2016).

  3. Effects of diaphragmatic control on the assessment of sniff nasal inspiratory pressure and maximum relaxation rate

    PubMed Central

    Benício, Kadja; Dias, Fernando A. L.; Gualdi, Lucien P.; Aliverti, Andrea; Resqueti, Vanessa R.; Fregonezi, Guilherme A. F.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of diaphragmatic activation control (diaphC) on Sniff Nasal-Inspiratory Pressure (SNIP) and Maximum Relaxation Rate of inspiratory muscles (MRR) in healthy subjects. METHOD: Twenty subjects (9 male; age: 23 (SD=2.9) years; BMI: 23.8 (SD=3) kg/m2; FEV1/FVC: 0.9 (SD=0.1)] performed 5 sniff maneuvers in two different moments: with or without instruction on diaphC. Before the first maneuver, a brief explanation was given to the subjects on how to perform the sniff test. For sniff test with diaphC, subjects were instructed to perform intense diaphragm activation. The best SNIP and MRR values were used for analysis. MRR was calculated as the ratio of first derivative of pressure over time (dP/dtmax) and were normalized by dividing it by peak pressure (SNIP) from the same maneuver. RESULTS: SNIP values were significantly different in maneuvers with and without diaphC [without diaphC: -100 (SD=27.1) cmH2O/ with diaphC: -72.8 (SD=22.3) cmH2O; p<0.0001], normalized MRR values were not statistically different [without diaphC: -9.7 (SD=2.6); with diaphC: -8.9 (SD=1.5); p=0.19]. Without diaphC, 40% of the sample did not reach the appropriate sniff criteria found in the literature. CONCLUSION: Diaphragmatic control performed during SNIP test influences obtained inspiratory pressure, being lower when diaphC is performed. However, there was no influence on normalized MRR. PMID:26578254

  4. Determination of transverse relaxation rates in systems with scalar-coupled spins: The role of antiphase coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Takuya F.; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-12-01

    Homogeneous line-widths that arise from transverse relaxation tend to be masked by B0 field inhomogeneity and by multiplets due to homonuclear J-couplings. Besides well-known spin-locking sequences that lead to signals that decay with a rate R1ρ without any modulations, alternative experiments allow one to determine the transverse relaxation rates R2 in systems with scalar-coupled spins. We evaluate three recent strategies by experiment and simulation: (i) moderate-amplitude SITCOM-CPMG sequences (Dittmer and Bodenhausen, 2006 [2]), (ii) multiple-quantum filtered (MQF) sequences (Barrère et al., 2011 [4]) and (iii) PROJECT sequences (Aguilar et al., 2012 [5]). Experiments where the J-evolution is suppressed by spin-locking measure the pure relaxation rate R2(Ix) of an in-phase component. Experiments based on J-refocusing yield a mixture of in-phase rates R2(Ix) and antiphase rates R2(2IySz), where the latter are usually faster than the former. Moderate-amplitude SITCOM-CPMG and PROJECT methods can be applied to systems with many coupled spins, but applications of MQF sequences are limited to two-spin systems since modulations in larger systems can only partly be suppressed.

  5. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    PubMed Central

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies. PMID:28281640

  6. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  7. Enhancement and degradation of the R2* relaxation rate resulting from the encapsulation of magnetic particles with hydrophilic coatings.

    PubMed

    de Haan, Hendrick W; Paquet, Chantal

    2011-12-01

    The effects of including a hydrophilic coating around the particles are studied across a wide range of particle sizes by performing Monte Carlo simulations of protons diffusing through a system of magnetic particles. A physically realistic methodology of implementing the coating by cross boundary jump scaling and transition probabilities at the coating surface is developed. Using this formulation, the coating has three distinct impacts on the relaxation rate: an enhancement at small particle sizes, a degradation at intermediate particle sizes, and no effect at large particles sizes. These varied effects are reconciled with the underlying dephasing mechanisms by using the concept of a full dephasing zone to present a physical picture of the dephasing process with and without the coating for all sizes. The enhancement at small particle sizes is studied systemically to demonstrate the existence of an optimal ratio of diffusion coefficients inside/outside the coating to achieve maximal increase in the relaxation rate.

  8. Accuracy of rate estimation using relaxed-clock models with a critical focus on the early metazoan radiation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simon Y W; Phillips, Matthew J; Drummond, Alexei J; Cooper, Alan

    2005-05-01

    In recent years, a number of phylogenetic methods have been developed for estimating molecular rates and divergence dates under models that relax the molecular clock constraint by allowing rate change throughout the tree. These methods are being used with increasing frequency, but there have been few studies into their accuracy. We tested the accuracy of several relaxed-clock methods (penalized likelihood and Bayesian inference using various models of rate change) using nucleotide sequences simulated on a nine-taxon tree. When the sequences evolved with a constant rate, the methods were able to infer rates accurately, but estimates were more precise when a molecular clock was assumed. When the sequences evolved under a model of auto-correlated rate change, rates were accurately estimated using penalized likelihood and by Bayesian inference using lognormal and exponential models of rate change, while other models did not perform as well. When the sequences evolved under a model of uncorrelated rate change, only Bayesian inference using an exponential rate model performed well. Collectively, the results provide a strong recommendation for using the exponential model of rate change if a conservative approach to divergence time estimation is required. A case study is presented in which we use a simulation-based approach to examine the hypothesis of elevated rates in the Cambrian period, and it is found that these high rate estimates might be an artifact of the rate estimation method. If this bias is present, then the ages of metazoan divergences would be systematically underestimated. The results of this study have implications for studies of molecular rates and divergence dates.

  9. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin–lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C). PMID:28067292

  10. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin–lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C).

  11. Pharmacologic and Hemodynamic Influences on the Rate of Isovolumic Left Ventricular Relaxation in the Normal Conscious Dog

    PubMed Central

    Karliner, Joel S.; Lewinter, Martin M.; Mahler, Felix; Engler, Robert; O'Rourke, Robert A.

    1977-01-01

    We studied the effects of acute pharmacologic and hemodynamic interventions on isovolumic left ventricular relaxation in 19 conscious dogs using micromanometer tip catheters. Isoproterenol (11 studies) augmented peak rate of rise of left ventricular pressure [(+) dP/dt] by 1,275±227 (SE) mm Hg/s (P < 0.001) and dP/dt at an isopressure point of 35 mm Hg during isovolumic relaxation [(−) dP/dt35] by 435±80 mm Hg/s (P < 0.001). Peak (−) dP/dt decreased by 467±89 mm Hg/s (P < 0.002). The time constant, T, derived from the logarithmic fall of pressure during isovolumic relaxation, shortened from 20±2.8 to 14.9±1.8 ms (P < 0.003). Calcium (11 studies) increased peak (+) dP/dt and (−) dP/dt35 (both P < 0.0001); peak (−) dP/dt was unchanged. T shortened from 20.4±1.8 to 17.3±1.5 ms (P < 0.002). Volume (13 studies) did not affect either dP/dt or T. Phenylephrine (13 studies) augmented peak (−) dP/dt, but reduced (−) dP/dt35 (both P < 0.01); T lengthened from 22.1±1.5 to 32.5±1.5 ms (P < 0.01). In 15 studies, rapid atrial pacing increased peak (+) dP/dt and (−) dP/dt35 (both P < 0.01). In the first post-pacing beat, peak (−) dP/dt and (−) dP/dt35 decreased (both P < 0.01), although peak (+) dP/dt increased further. T paralleled values of (−) dP/dt35. In five dogs, beta adrenergic blockade had no significant effect on any variable after calcium, volume, or phenylephrine infusion or during or after atrial pacing when the pre-and post-propranolol states were compared. We conclude that positive inotropic interventions augment both left ventricular contraction and relaxation. The changes in isovolumic relaxation are independent of alterations in sympathetic tone produced by beta-adrenergic blockade. Peak (−) dP/dt may not be a valid measure of left ventricular relaxation rate during acute alterations in inotropic state or afterload. PMID:893662

  12. Disproportional plastome-wide increase of substitution rates and relaxed purifying selection in genes of carnivorous Lentibulariaceae.

    PubMed

    Wicke, Susann; Schäferhoff, Bastian; dePamphilis, Claude W; Müller, Kai F

    2014-03-01

    Carnivorous Lentibulariaceae exhibit the most sophisticated implementation of the carnivorous syndrome in plants. Their unusual lifestyle coincides with distinct genomic peculiarities such as the smallest angiosperm nuclear genomes and extremely high nucleotide substitution rates across all genomic compartments. Here, we report the complete plastid genomes from each of the three genera Pinguicula, Utricularia, and Genlisea, and investigate plastome-wide changes in their molecular evolution as the carnivorous syndrome unfolds. We observe a size reduction by up to 9% mostly due to the independent loss of genes for the plastid NAD(P)H dehydrogenase and altered proportions of plastid repeat DNA, as well as a significant plastome-wide increase of substitution rates and microstructural changes. Protein-coding genes across all gene classes show a disproportional elevation of nonsynonymous substitutions, particularly in Utricularia and Genlisea. Significant relaxation of purifying selection relative to noncarnivores occurs in the plastid-encoded fraction of the photosynthesis ATP synthase complex, the photosystem I, and in several other photosynthesis and metabolic genes. Shifts in selective regimes also affect housekeeping genes including the plastid-encoded polymerase, for which evidence for relaxed purifying selection was found once during the transition to carnivory, and a second time during the diversification of the family. Lentibulariaceae significantly exhibit enhanced rates of nucleotide substitution in most of the 130 noncoding regions. Various factors may underlie the observed patterns of relaxation of purifying selection and substitution rate increases, such as reduced net photosynthesis rates, alternative paths of nutrient uptake (including organic carbon), and impaired DNA repair mechanisms.

  13. Changes in muscle strength, relaxation rate and fatiguability during the human menstrual cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, R; Niclos, B B; Rutherford, O M

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of the different phases of the menstrual cycle on skeletal muscle strength, contractile properties and fatiguability was investigated in ten young, healthy females. Results were compared with a similar group on the combined (non-phasic) oral contraceptive pill (OC). Cycle phases were divided into the early and mid-follicular, mid-cycle (ovulatory) and mid- and late luteal. Cycle phases were estimated from the first day of the menstrual bleed. 2. Subjects were studied weekly through two complete cycles. Measurements included quadriceps and handgrip maximum voluntary isometric force and the relaxation times, force-frequency relationship and fatigue index of the quadriceps during percutaneous stimulation at a range of frequencies from 1 to 100 Hz. 3. In the women not taking the OC there was a significant increase of about 11% in quadriceps and handgrip strength at mid-cycle compared with both the follicular and luteal phases. Accompanying the increases in strength there was a significant slowing of relaxation and increase in fatiguability at mid-cycle. No changes in any parameter were found in the women taking the OC. 4. The changes in muscle function at mid-cycle may be due to the increase in oestrogen that occurs prior to ovulation. PMID:8735711

  14. Transient absorption and photocurrent microscopy show that hot electron supercollisions describe the rate-limiting relaxation step in graphene.

    PubMed

    Graham, Matt W; Shi, Su-Fei; Wang, Zenghui; Ralph, Daniel C; Park, Jiwoong; McEuen, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Using transient absorption (TA) microscopy as a hot electron thermometer, we show that disorder-assisted acoustic-phonon supercollisions (SCs) best describe the rate-limiting relaxation step in graphene over a wide range of lattice temperatures (Tl = 5-300 K), Fermi energies (E(F) = ± 0.35 eV), and optical probe energies (~0.3-1.1 eV). Comparison with simultaneously collected transient photocurrent, an independent hot electron thermometer, confirms that the rate-limiting optical and electrical response in graphene are best described by the SC-heat dissipation rate model, H = A(T(e)(3) - T(l)(3)). Our data further show that the electron cooling rate in substrate-supported graphene is twice as fast as in suspended graphene sheets, consistent with SC model prediction for disorder.

  15. Vibrational energy relaxation of isotopically labeled amide I modes in cytochrome c: theoretical investigation of vibrational energy relaxation rates and pathways.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Hiroshi; Straub, John E

    2007-10-18

    With use of a time-dependent perturbation theory, vibrational energy relaxation (VER) of isotopically labeled amide I modes in cytochrome c solvated with water is investigated. Contributions to the VER are decomposed into two contributions from the protein and water. The VER pathways are visualized by using radial and angular excitation functions for resonant normal modes. Key differences of VER among different amide I modes are demonstrated, leading to a detailed picture of the spatial anisotropy of the VER. The results support the experimental observation that amide I modes in proteins relax with subpicosecond time scales, while the relaxation mechanism turns out to be sensitive to the environment of the amide I mode.

  16. Nutrient Status and δ15N Values in Leaves and Soils: A Cross-Biome Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, J. R.; Schuur, E. A.; Turner, B. L.; Wright, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Stable nitrogen (N) isotope ratios (δ15N) are often assumed to provide an integrated measure of multiple nitrogen cycling processes. For instance, shifts in the bioavailability of soil N forms are thought to alter plant δ15N values. Demonstrating this relationship is important as ecosystems undergo anthropogenic disturbances. We evaluated patterns and implied mechanisms of the N cycle using ecosystem δ15N values from 16 plots in boreal black spruce (Picea mariana) forest and lowland wet tropical forest. Fertilizer N and phosphorus (P) was applied annually for five and 11 years prior to measurement of ecosystem δ15N values. Full sun canopy foliage and soil extractable nitrate, ammonium, and dissolved organic N (DON) were sampled in fertilized and control plots and analyzed for δ15N. In boreal forest, N fertilization reduced DON concentrations and caused a depletion of δ15N in foliage and fungal sporocarps. Of four species occurring in all plots in the tropical forest, one (Alseis blackiana) had increased foliar δ15N values following N fertilization, one (Tetragastris panamensis) had increased foliar δ15N values following P fertilization, and one (Oenocarpus mapora) had increased foliar δ15N following N+P fertilization. Surprisingly, soil nitrate in the boreal forest became substantially 15N-enriched under P fertilization, whereas nitrate in the tropical forest soil was enriched only under N or N+P fertilization. Collectively, nitrate enrichment is likely due to enhanced rates of soil denitrification as evidenced by elevated resin extractable soil nitrate concentrations and close correlations between δ15N and δ18O values. On average, foliar δ15N in tropical trees corresponded well with δ15N in soil nitrate in control and P fertilized plots, but was 2-3% more enriched than DON under N and N+P fertilization. In boreal forests, N and N+P fertilization increased foliar N concentration and δ15N values indicating substantial use of applied fertilizer. Taken

  17. How does relaxing the algorithm for autism affect DSM-V prevalence rates?

    PubMed

    Matson, Johnny L; Hattier, Megan A; Williams, Lindsey W

    2012-08-01

    Although it is still unclear what causes autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), over time researchers and clinicians have become more precise with detecting and diagnosing ASD. Many diagnoses, however, are based on the criteria established within the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM); thus, any change in these diagnostic criteria can have a great effect upon children with ASD and their families. It is predicted that the prevalence of ASD diagnoses will dramatically decrease with the adoption of the proposed DSM-5 criteria in 2013. The aim of this current study was to inspect the changes in prevalence first using a diagnostic criteria set which was modified slightly from the DSM-5 criteria (Modified-1 criteria) and again using a set of criteria which was relaxed even a bit more (Modified-2 criteria). Modified-1 resulted in 33.77 % fewer toddlers being diagnosed with ASD compared to the DSM-IV, while Modified-2 resulted in only a 17.98 % decrease in ASD diagnoses. Children diagnosed with the DSM-5 criteria exhibited the greatest levels of autism symptomatology, but the Mod-1, Mod-2, and DSM-IV groups still demonstrated significant impairments. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. Relaxation of the CH stretch in liquid CHBr3: Solvent effects and decay rates using classical nonequilibrium simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Sai G.; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2006-12-01

    This article addresses two questions regarding the decay of the CH stretch in liquid CHBr3. The first is whether the initial steps of the relaxation primarily involve energy redistribution within the excited molecule alone. Gas phase quantum mechanical and classical calculations are performed to examine the role of the solvent in this process. At the fundamental excitation level, it is found that CH stretch decay is, in fact, strongly solvent driven. The second question is on the applicability of a fully classical approach to the calculation of CH stretch condensed phase decay rates. To this end, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed. The results are compared with quantum mechanical rates computed previously. The two methods are found to be in fair agreement with each other. However, care must be exercised in the interpretation of the classical results.

  19. Strain Rate and Stress Relaxation Effects on Pressuremeter Testing in Clays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    CHARACTERISTICS OF KAOLINITE AND GROUND SILICA 245 APPENDIX E COMPUTER PROGRAMS ....................... 248 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 iv LIST OF TABLES Table Page 3.1 A...Comparison of Three Types of Boundary Conditions in a Multiaxial Cubical Test Apparatus ................... 37 3.2 Properties of the Kaolinite and Kaolin...to 0.01 %/min Versus Strain Rate for Kaolinite Clay ................... 102 4.3 Shear Strength Normalized with Respect to 0.01 %/min Versus Strain Rate

  20. T1 Relaxation Rate (R1) Indicates Nonlinear Mn Accumulation in Brain Tissue of Welders With Low-Level Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Flynn, Michael R.; Du, Guangwei; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Fry, Rebecca; Herring, Amy H.; Van Buren, Eric; Van Buren, Scott; Smeester, Lisa; Kong, Lan; Yang, Qing; Mailman, Richard B.; Huang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Although the essential element manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic at high doses, the effects of lower exposure are unclear. MRI T1-weighted (TIW) imaging has been used to estimate brain Mn exposure via the pallidal index (PI), defined as the T1W intensity ratio in the globus pallidus (GP) versus frontal white matter (FWM). PI may not, however, be sensitive to Mn in GP because Mn also may accumulate in FWM. This study explored: (1) whether T1 relaxation rate (R1) could quantify brain Mn accumulation more sensitively; and (2) the dose-response relationship between estimated Mn exposure and T1 relaxation rate (R1). Thirty-five active welders and 30 controls were studied. Occupational questionnaires were used to estimate hours welding in the past 90 days (HrsW) and lifetime measures of Mn exposure. T1W imaging and T1-measurement were utilized to generate PI and R1 values in brain regions of interest (ROIs). PI did not show a significant association with any measure of Mn and/or welding-related exposure. Conversely, in several ROIs, R1 showed a nonlinear relationship to HrsW, with R1 signal increasing only after a critical exposure was reached. The GP had the greatest rate of Mn accumulation. Welders with higher exposure showed significantly higher R1 compared either with controls or with welders with lower exposure. Our data are additional evidence that Mn accumulation can be assessed more sensitively by R1 than by PI. Moreover, the nonlinear relationship between welding exposure and Mn brain accumulation should be considered in future studies and policies. PMID:25953701

  1. The Effect of Maternal Relaxation Training on Reactivity of Non-Stress Test, Basal Fetal Heart Rate, and Number of Fetal Heart Accelerations: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzade, Marzieh; Rafiee, Bahare; Asadi, Nasrin; Zare, Najaf

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relaxation-training, as an anxiety-reducer intervention, plays an important role in fetal health. The present study aimed to analyze the effect of maternal relaxation on stress test (NST), basal fetal heart rate, and number of fetal heart accelerations. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 84 pregnant women were randomly divided into two groups of teaching relaxation and control groups in 2012. In the intervention group, 60-90 minute classes were held every week lasting for 4 weeks. Besides, home practice charts were given to the mothers and researchers controlled the home practices by phone calls every week. The control group received routine prenatal care. In the 4th week, NST was performed in the intervention group 30 minutes before and after the 4th session. In the control group, NST was done in the 4th week. The quantitative variables in the two groups were compared through ANOVA and Chi-square test. Results: The results of paired t-test showed that relaxation could improve the NST results (P=0.01). Mean and standard deviation of basal fetal heart rate was 138.95±8.18 before the intervention and 133.07±6.9 after the intervention. Paired t-test also showed that relaxation reduced the basal fetal heart rate (P=0.001). Mean and standard deviation of the number of fetal heart accelerations was 1.5±0.8 before the intervention and 2.2±0.9 after it. The results of paired t-test also showed that relaxation increased the number of fetal heart accelerations (P=0.001). Conclusions: Relaxation could improve the NST results, reduce the basal fetal heart rate, and increase the number of fetal heart accelerations. Therefore, relaxation is recommended during pregnancy. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2012072810418N1 PMID:25553334

  2. Hole-interface optical phonon relaxation rates with valence band-mixing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Hoi

    2004-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the hole-interface optical phonon scattering rates for a InGaAs-AlGaAs quantum well structure, taking into account the valence-band mixing. The dispersion relation and the electrostatic potentials for interface optical phonon modes are obtained based on the macroscopic dielectric continuum model. For the hole dispersion relation, the Luttinger-Kohn Hamiltonian is used. The hole-interface optical phonon interaction is evaluated by the Fermi's golden rule taking into account the Bloch overlap factor. Our results show that the hole-interface phonon scattering rates within the parabolic band approximation are different from those including valence band mixing effects. Especially, in the low energy region, the hole-interface phonon scattering rates within the parabolic band approximation are overestimated very significantly.

  3. Effects of prestrain, rate of prestrain, and temperature on the stress-relaxation behavior of eutectic Sn-3.5Ag solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, H.; Subramanian, K. N.

    2003-11-01

    Stress-relaxation studies on eutectic Sn-Ag solder (Sn-3.5Ag in wt.%) joints were carried out at various temperatures after imposing different amounts and rates of simple shear strain. Stress-relaxation parameters were evaluated by subjecting geometrically realistic solder joints with a nominal joint thickness of ˜100 µm and a 1 mm × 1 mm solder-joint area. The peak shear stress during preloading and residual shear stress resulting from stress relaxation were higher at the low-temperature extremes than those at high-temperature extremes. Also, those values increased with increasing simple shear strain and the rate of simple shear strain imposed prior to the stress-relaxation events. The relaxation stress is insensitive to simple shear strain at 150°C, but at lower temperatures, a faster rate of simple shear strain causes a higher relaxed-stress value. The resulting deformation structures observed from the solder-joint side surfaces were also strongly affected by these parameters. At high temperature, grain-boundary sliding effects were commonly observed. At low temperature, intense shear bands dominated, and no grain-boundary sliding effects were observed.

  4. Heart rate and heart rate variability in panic, social anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and generalized anxiety disorders at baseline and in response to relaxation and hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    Pittig, Andre; Arch, Joanna J; Lam, Chi W R; Craske, Michelle G

    2013-01-01

    It remains unclear if diminished high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) can be found across anxiety disorders. HF-HRV and heart rate (HR) were examined in panic (PD), generalized anxiety (GAD), social anxiety (SAD), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) relative to healthy controls at baseline and during anxiety stressors. All disorders evidenced diminished baseline HF-HRV relative to controls. Baseline HRV differences were maintained throughout relaxation. For hyperventilation, PD and GAD demonstrated greater HR than controls. Psychotropic medication did not account for HF-HRV differences except in OCD. Age and sex evidenced multiple main effects. Findings suggest that low baseline HF-HRV represents a common index for inhibitory deficits across PD, GAD, and SAD, which is consistent with the notion of autonomic inflexibility in anxiety disorders. Elevated HR responses to hyperventilation, however, are specific to PD and GAD.

  5. Effective rotational correlation times of proteins from NMR relaxation interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghan; Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effective rotational correlation times, τc, for the modulation of anisotropic spin-spin interactions in macromolecules subject to Brownian motion in solution is of key interest for the practice of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. The value of τc enables an estimate of the NMR spin relaxation rates, and indicates possible aggregation of the macromolecular species. This paper reports a novel NMR pulse scheme, [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT, which is based on transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy and permits to determine τc for 15N- 1H bonds without interference from dipole-dipole coupling of the amide proton with remote protons. [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT is highly efficient since only a series of one-dimensional NMR spectra need to be recorded. Its use is suggested for a quick estimate of the rotational correlation time, to monitor sample quality and to determine optimal parameters for complex multidimensional NMR experiments. Practical applications are illustrated with the 110 kDa 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase from Staphylococcus aureus, the uniformly 15N-labeled Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) in 60 kDa mixed OmpX/DHPC micelles with approximately 90 molecules of unlabeled 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), and the 16 kDa pheromone-binding protein from Bombyx mori, which cover a wide range of correlation times.

  6. NOTE: Detection limits for ferrimagnetic particle concentrations using magnetic resonance imaging based proton transverse relaxation rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoe, H.; Chua-anusorn, W.; St. Pierre, T. G.; Dobson, J.

    2003-03-01

    A clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was used to measure proton transverse relaxation rates (R2) in agar gels with varying concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in a field strength of 1.5 T. The nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation of ferric and ferrous ions in the presence of either dextran or polyvinyl alcohol. The method of preparation resulted in loosely packed clusters (dextran) or branched chains (polyvinyl alcohol) of particles containing of the order of 600 and 400 particles, respectively. For both methods of particle preparation, concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron in agar gel less than 0.01 mg ml-1 had no measurable effect on the value of R2 for the gel. The results indicate that MRI-based R2 measurements using 1.5 T clinical scanners are not quite sensitive enough to detect the very low concentrations of nanoparticulate biogenic magnetite reported in human brain tissue.

  7. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  8. What does the muon spin-relaxation rate measure in 4f paramagnets with strong crystal fields and weak inter-site correlations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmas de Réotier, P.; Yaouanc, A.; Bonville, P.

    1996-07-01

    We investigate the physical meaning of the longitudinal muon spin-relaxation rate 0953-8984/8/27/020/img6 measured for a paramagnet at temperatures high with respect to the magnetic phase transition temperature. The depolarization rate 0953-8984/8/27/020/img6 is shown to be a function of the relaxation rates of the quasi-elastic and inelastic magnetic excitations. Using this analysis, we consider recently published 0953-8984/8/27/020/img8 data recorded on the strongly correlated electron systems CeNiSn and 0953-8984/8/27/020/img9.

  9. Is meditation always relaxing? Investigating heart rate, heart rate variability, experienced effort and likeability during training of three types of meditation.

    PubMed

    Lumma, Anna-Lena; Kok, Bethany E; Singer, Tania

    2015-07-01

    Meditation is often associated with a relaxed state of the body. However, meditation can also be regarded as a type of mental task and training, associated with mental effort and physiological arousal. The cardiovascular effects of meditation may vary depending on the type of meditation, degree of mental effort, and amount of training. In the current study we assessed heart rate (HR), high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) and subjective ratings of effort and likeability during three types of meditation varying in their cognitive and attentional requirements, namely breathing meditation, loving-kindness meditation and observing-thoughts meditation. In the context of the ReSource project, a one-year longitudinal mental training study, participants practiced each meditation exercise on a daily basis for 3 months. As expected HR and effort were higher during loving-kindness meditation and observing-thoughts meditation compared to breathing meditation. With training over time HR and likeability increased, while HF-HRV and the subjective experience of effort decreased. The increase in HR and decrease in HF-HRV over training was higher for loving-kindness meditation and observing-thoughts meditation compared to breathing meditation. In contrast to implicit beliefs that meditation is always relaxing and associated with low arousal, the current results show that core meditations aiming at improving compassion and meta-cognitive skills require effort and are associated with physiological arousal compared to breathing meditation. Overall these findings can be useful in making more specific suggestions about which type of meditation is most adaptive for a given context and population.

  10. Second order rate constants for intramolecular conversions: Application to gas-phase NMR relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Lazaar, K. I.

    1983-09-01

    The usually quoted expression for the second order rate constant, for a unimolecular reaction at the low pressure limit, is valid only for strictly irreversible processes. Its application to isomerization reactions (which are to some extent reversible) is demonstrably in error; corrected expressions have been published. Attention is directed to intramolecular conversions over low barriers, for which the inappropriateness of the unidirectional expression becomes obvious. For such isomerizations we propose a model which incorporates only operationally observable states, so that an essential conceptual ambiguity is avoided. Use of this model is illustrated for the syn⇄anti conversions of methyl nitrite, derived from a gas phase NMR coalescence curve (Mc:Tc). The present data suggest that during isomerization the alkyl nitrites may not be completely ergodic on a time scale of 10-9 s. A regional phase-space model is proposed which has the appropriate formalism to account for this behavior.

  11. Effects of aging and sex on voluntary activation and peak relaxation rate of human elbow flexors studied with motor cortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Joery P; McNeil, Chris J; Bredius, Marlous S; Gandevia, Simon C

    2013-08-01

    Data are equivocal on whether voluntary activation is preserved or decreased in old compared to young adults. Further, data are scant on the effect of age on the rate of muscle relaxation when the muscle is contracting voluntarily. Assessment of both measures with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) yields information which cannot be obtained with traditional peripheral nerve stimulation. Hence, voluntary activation and peak relaxation rate of the elbow flexors were assessed with TMS during repeated maximal efforts in 30 men and 28 women between the ages of 22-84 years. Voluntary activation was similar for the two sexes (P = 0.154) and was not affected by age in men (96.2 ± 2.7 %; P = 0.887) or women (95.1 ± 3.0 %; P = 0.546). Men had a significantly faster peak rate of relaxation than women in absolute units (-880.0 ± 223.2 vs. -360.2 ± 78.5 Nm/ s, respectively; P < 0.001) and when normalized to subject strength (-12.5 ± 2.1 vs. -8.7 ± 1.0 s(-1), respectively; P < 0.001). Absolute and normalized relaxation rates slowed with age in men (P = 0.002 and P = 0.006, respectively), but not women (P = 0.142 and P = 0.950, respectively). Across the age range studied, all subjects, regardless of age or sex, were able to achieve high voluntary activation scores for the elbow flexors (~95 %). In contrast, peak relaxation rate was markedly faster in men than women and slowed with age in men but not women. Normalization of relaxation rates to strength did not affect the influence of age or sex.

  12. An approximate analytical expression for the nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation rate of half-integer spins in liquids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation process of half-integer spins in liquid samples is known to exhibit multi-exponential behaviors. Within the framework of Redfield's relaxation theory, exact analytical expressions for describing such a process exist only for spin-3/2 nuclei. As a result, analyses of nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with spin >3/2 must rely on numerical diagonalization of the Redfield relaxation matrix over the entire motional range. In this work we propose an approximate analytical expression that can be used to analyze nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data of any half-integer spin in liquids over the entire motional range. The proposed equation yields results that are in excellent agreement with the exact numerical calculations.

  13. Plant and Soil Natural Abundance delta-15N: Indicators of Nitrogen Cycling in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.; Lovett, G. M.; Weathers, K.; Arthur, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    We examined the potential use of natural abundance 15N of plants and soils as an indicator of forest nitrogen (N) cycling rates within the Catskill Mountains, NY. These watersheds receive among the highest rates of N deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Many studies have shown a link between increased N cycling rates and 15N enrichment of soil and plant pools. Faster rates of N cycling processes, especially nitrification, lead to fractionation of 14/15N, creating N products that are relatively depleted in 15N. This can lead to enrichment of soil pools, as lighter 14N is lost from the system via leaching or denitrification. Plant N pools can become increasingly enriched as they take up 15N-enriched soil N. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across the Catskill Mountains, forests dominated by different tree species appear to vary in the amount of N retained or lost to nearby streams. To determine if plant and soil 15N could be used as indicators of N cycling rates, we collected foliage, wood, litterfall, organic and mineral soil, and fine roots from single species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine roots and soil 15N were highest within sugar maple stands (p<0.05). Sugar maple soils also had the highest rates of net nitrification and N leaching. Therefore, soil 15N appears to correlate with forest N retention and loss. However, 15N enrichment was highest within foliage, litterfall and wood of beech trees (p<0.05). The decoupling between foliage 15N and N cycling, as well as between 15N of foliage and fine roots, illustrates that it may not be possible to use a single plant pool as an indicator of N cycling rates.

  14. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear relaxation is a sensitive monitor of rotational dynamics in spin-label EPR. It also contributes competing saturation transfer pathways in T1-exchange spectroscopy, and the determination of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in site-directed spin labelling. A survey shows that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate Wn commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for (14)N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised (14)N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b=Wn/(2We), preserves the expressions used for CW-EPR, whilst rendering them consistent with expressions for saturation recovery rates in pulsed EPR. Furthermore, values routinely quoted for nuclear relaxation times that are deduced from EPR spectral diffusion rates in (14)N-nitroxyl spin labels do not accord with conventional analysis of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for (14)N-relaxation: T1n=1/Wn. Results are compared and contrasted with those for the two-level (15)N-nitroxide system.

  15. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear relaxation is a sensitive monitor of rotational dynamics in spin-label EPR. It also contributes competing saturation transfer pathways in T1-exchange spectroscopy, and the determination of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in site-directed spin labelling. A survey shows that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate Wn commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for 14N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised 14N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b = Wn/(2We), preserves the expressions used for CW-EPR, whilst rendering them consistent with expressions for saturation recovery rates in pulsed EPR. Furthermore, values routinely quoted for nuclear relaxation times that are deduced from EPR spectral diffusion rates in 14N-nitroxyl spin labels do not accord with conventional analysis of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for 14N-relaxation: T1n = 1/Wn. Results are compared and contrasted with those for the two-level 15N-nitroxide system.

  16. Use of a high-Tc SQUID-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer in magnetically unshielded environments to discriminate tumors in rats, by characterizing the longitudinal relaxation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.-W.; Chen, H.-H.; Yang, H.-C.; Horng, H.-E.; Liao, S.-H.; Chieh, J.-J.; Yang, S. Y.

    2012-06-01

    This study uses a sensitive, high-Tc SQUID-detected nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer in magnetically unshielded environments to discriminate liver tumors in rats, by characterizing the longitudinal relaxation rate, T1-1. The high-Tc SQUID-based spectrometer has a spectral line width of 0.9Hz in low magnetic fields. It was found that relaxation rate for tumor tissues is (3.6 ± 0.02) s-1 and the relaxation rate for normal tissues is (7.7 ± 0.02) s-1. The difference in the longitudinal relaxation rates suggests that water structures around the DNA of cancer cells are different from those of normal tissues. The optimized detection sensitivity for the established system is 0.21 g at the present stage. It is concluded that T1-1 can be used to distinguish cancerous tissues from normal tissues. The high-Tc, SQUID-detected NMR and MRI in magnetically unshielded environments may also be useful for discriminating other tumors.

  17. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  18. The influence of voice volume, pitch, and speech rate on progressive relaxation training: application of methods from speech pathology and audiology.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Glenn E; Larkin, Kevin T

    2006-06-01

    Vocal characteristics of therapists, including voice volume, pitch and timbre of speech, and rate of speech have been hypothesized to facilitate the therapeutic process, particularly during procedures like progressive relaxation training (PRT). Very little empirical work, however, has examined the relation between vocal characteristics and treatment process or outcome. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of vocal characteristics during a single session of PRT applying technological innovations devised for speech pathology and audiology settings for evaluating therapist's vocal characteristics. Forty-eight high anxious young adult women were randomly assigned to one of four conditions for training: PRT with the recommended therapist voice (RV) that decreased in tone, volume, and rate across the session, PRT with conversational therapist voice during the session (CV), a credible treatment control called systematic self-relaxation (SR), or no treatment control (NT). All subjects participated in a single PRT session during which heart rate, EMG, self-report measures of tension (SRT) and anxiety, and treatment credibility ratings were obtained. Results revealed significant reductions in SRT, self-reported anxiety, and heart rate for participants in all groups. Only the RV group displayed significant reductions in EMG when compared with the other three groups. Participants in the RV group also rated the therapist's voice as "more facilitating" of relaxation when compared to the CV group. These results suggest that methods employed for evaluating the quality of vocal characteristics in speech and audiology clinics may be useful for evaluating the quality of therapist's voice when conducting PRT.

  19. Dynamics of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N nitroxide-propylene glycol system studied by ESR and ESE in liquid and glassy state in temperature range 10-295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goslar, Janina; Hoffmann, Stanislaw K.; Lijewski, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    ESR spectra and electron spin relaxation of nitroxide radical in 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N in propylene glycol were studied at X-band in the temperature range 10-295 K. The spin-lattice relaxation in the liquid viscous state determined from the resonance line shape is governed by three mechanisms occurring during isotropic molecular reorientations. In the glassy state below 200 K the spin-lattice relaxation, phase relaxation and electron spin echo envelope modulations (ESEEM) were studied by pulse spin echo technique using 2-pulse and 3-pulse induced signals. Electron spin-lattice relaxation is governed by a single non-phonon relaxation process produced by localized oscillators of energy 76 cm-1. Electron spin dephasing is dominated by a molecular motion producing a resonance-type peak in the temperature dependence of the dephasing rate around 120 K. The origin of the peak is discussed and a simple method for the peak shape analysis is proposed, which gives the activation energy of a thermally activated motion Ea = 7.8 kJ/mol and correlation time τ0 = 10-8 s. The spin echo amplitude is strongly modulated and FT spectrum contains a doublet of lines centered around the 2D nuclei Zeeman frequency. The splitting into the doublet is discussed as due to a weak hyperfine coupling of nitroxide unpaired electron with deuterium of reorienting CD3 groups.

  20. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: influence of electron spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Kubica, A; Kowalewski, J; Rössler, E A; Moscicki, J

    2013-03-28

    The work presents a theory of nuclear ((1)H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of (15)N and (14)N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)]. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The (1)H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the (1)H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against (1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(15)N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(14)N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both (14)N and (15)N systems and explains the features of (1)H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  1. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: Influence of electron spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-03-01

    The work presents a theory of nuclear (1H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of 15N and 14N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The 1H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the 1H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-14N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both 14N and 15N systems and explains the features of 1H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  2. Measurement of the hot electron mean free path and the momentum relaxation rate in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Suntrup, Donald J.; Gupta, Geetak; Li, Haoran; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2014-12-29

    We present a method for measuring the mean free path and extracting the momentum relaxation time of hot electrons in GaN using the hot electron transistor (HET). In this device, electrons are injected over a high energy emitter barrier into the base where they experience quasi-ballistic transport well above the conduction band edge. After traversing the base, high energy electrons either surmount the base-collector barrier and become collector current or reflect off the barrier and become base current. We fabricate HETs with various base thicknesses and measure the common emitter transfer ratio (α) for each device. The mean free path is extracted by fitting α to a decaying exponential as a function of base width and the relaxation time is computed using a suitable injection velocity. For devices with an injection energy of ∼1 eV, we measure a hot electron mean free path of 14 nm and calculate a momentum relaxation time of 16 fs. These values are in agreement with theoretical calculations where longitudinal optical phonon scattering is the dominant momentum relaxation mechanism.

  3. Pseudo-Jahn-Teller and relaxation-rate analyses of a model for the hydride ion at the E' 4 center in alpha quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, M.; Manov, A.

    1988-02-01

    Calculated cluster data on the energy vs hydride-ion displacement for the E' 4 center, as reported by Isoya, Weil, and Halliburton, are re-analyzed in terms of the Pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect. Realistic values are obtained of the vibronic-mixing parameters giving credibility to our interpretation. Relaxation rates are computed of hydrogen transfer between two opposite off-center sites.

  4. Nonlogarithmic magnetization relaxation at the initial time intervals and magnetic field dependence of the flux creep rate in Bi2Sr2Ca(sub I)Cu2Ox single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moshchalcov, V. V.; Zhukov, A. A.; Kuznetzov, V. D.; Metlushko, V. V.; Leonyuk, L. I.

    1990-01-01

    At the initial time intervals, preceding the thermally activated flux creep regime, fast nonlogarithmic relaxation is found. The fully magnetic moment Pm(t) relaxation curve is shown. The magnetic measurements were made using SQUID-magnetometer. Two different relaxation regimes exist. The nonlogarithmic relaxation for the initial time intervals may be related to the viscous Abrikosov vortices flow with j is greater than j(sub c) for high enough temperature T and magnetic field induction B. This assumption correlates with Pm(t) measurements. The characteristic time t(sub O) separating two different relaxation regimes decreases as temperature and magnetic field are lowered. The logarithmic magnetization relaxation curves Pm(t) for fixed temperature and different external magnetic field inductions B are given. The relaxation rate dependence on magnetic field, R(B) = dPm(B, T sub O)/d(1nt) has a sharp maximum which is similar to that found for R(T) temperature dependences. The maximum shifts to lower fields as temperature goes up. The observed sharp maximum is related to a topological transition in shielding critical current distribution and, consequently, in Abrikosov vortices density. The nonlogarithmic magnetization relaxation for the initial time intervals is found. This fast relaxation has almost an exponentional character. The sharp relaxation rate R(B) maximum is observed. This maximum corresponds to a topological transition in Abrikosov vortices distribution.

  5. 15N NMR of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Goba, Inguna; Liepinsh, Edvards

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we describe the characteristic (15)N and (1)HN NMR chemical shifts and (1)J((15)N-(1)H) coupling constants of various symmetrically and unsymmetrically substituted 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives. The NMR chemical shifts and coupling constants are discussed in terms of their relationship to structural features such as character and position of the substituent in heterocycle, N-alkyl substitution, nitrogen lone pair delocalization within the conjugated system, and steric effects.

  6. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in MAS solid-state NMR provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanoseconds-to-milliseconds (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear (13C, 15N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radio-frequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins has been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely (i) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR), and (ii) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e. proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable, and that this cross-correlated relaxation rate constant depends on ns-ms motions, and can thus itself provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin-diffusion attenuates this cross-correlated relaxation, due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and the present manuscript reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  7. δ15N Value Does Not Reflect Fasting in Mysticetes

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Alex; Giménez, Joan; Gómez–Campos, Encarna; Cardona, Luís; Borrell, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    The finding that tissue δ15N values increase with protein catabolism has led researchers to apply this value to gauge nutritive condition in vertebrates. However, its application to marine mammals has in most occasions failed. We investigated the relationship between δ15N values and the fattening/fasting cycle in a model species, the fin whale, a migratory capital breeder that experiences severe seasonal variation in body condition. We analyzed two tissues providing complementary insights: one with isotopic turnover (muscle) and one that keeps a permanent record of variations in isotopic values (baleen plates). In both tissues δ15N values increased with intensive feeding but decreased with fasting, thus contradicting the pattern previously anticipated. The apparent inconsistency during fasting is explained by the fact that a) individuals migrate between different isotopic isoscapes, b) starvation may not trigger significant negative nitrogen balance, and c) excretion drops and elimination of 15N-depleted urine is minimized. Conversely, when intensive feeding is resumed in the northern grounds, protein anabolism and excretion start again, triggering 15N enrichment. It can be concluded that in whales and other mammals that accrue massive depots of lipids as energetic reserves and which have limited access to drinking water, the δ15N value is not affected by fasting and therefore cannot be used as an indicatior of nutritive condition. PMID:24651388

  8. Long-term 15N tracking from biological N fixation across different plant and humus components of the boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroniz-Crespo, Maria; Jones, David L.; Zackrisson, Olle; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2014-05-01

    Biological N2 fixation by cyanobacteria associated with feather mosses is an important cog in the nitrogen (N) cycle of boreal forests; still, our understanding of the turnover and fate of N fixed by this association remains greatly incomplete. The 15N signature of plants and soil serves as a powerful tool to explore N dynamics in forest ecosystems. In particular, in the present study we aimed to investigate the contribution of N2 fixation to δ15N signatures of plants and humus component of the boreal forest. Here we present results from a long-term (7 years) tacking of labelled 15N2 across the humus layer, seedlings of the tree species Pinus sylvestris, two common dwarf shrub species (Empetrum hermaphroditum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and the feather moss Pleurozium schreibery. The enriched experiment was conducted in 2005 in a natural boreal forest in northern Sweden. Two different treatments (10% 15N2 headspace enrichment and control) were setup in nine different plots (0.5 x 0.5 m) within the forest. We observed a significant reduction of δ15N signature of the 15N-enriched moss that could be explained by a growth dilution effect. Nevertheless, after 5 years since 15N2 enrichment some of the label 15N was still detected on the moss and in particular in the dead tissue. We could not detect a clear transfer of the labelled 15N2 from the moss-cyanobacteria system to other components of the ecosystem. However, we found consistence relationship through time between increments of δ15N signature of some of the forest components in plots which exhibited higher N fixation rates in the moss. In particular, changes in natural abundance δ15N that could be associated with N fixation were more apparent in the humus layer, the dwarf shrub Vaccinium vitis-idaea and the pine seedlings when comparing across plots and years.

  9. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant.

    PubMed

    Fenilli, Tatiele A B; Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O S; Trivelin, Paulo C O; Dourado-Neto, Durval

    2007-12-01

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry.

  10. Delta15N values of tropical savanna and monsoon forest species reflect root specialisations and soil nitrogen status.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S; Stewart, G R

    2003-03-01

    A large number of herbaceous and woody plants from tropical woodland, savanna, and monsoon forest were analysed to determine the impact of environmental factors (nutrient and water availability, fire) and biological factors (microbial associations, systematics) on plant delta(15)N values. Foliar delta(15)N values of herbaceous and woody species were not related to growth form or phenology, but a strong relationship existed between mycorrhizal status and plant delta(15)N. In woodland and savanna, woody species with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) associations and putative N(2)-fixing species with ECM/arbuscular (AM) associations had lowest foliar delta(15)N values (1.0-0.6 per thousand ), AM species had mostly intermediate delta(15)N values (average +0.6 per thousand ), while non-mycorrhizal Proteaceae had highest delta(15)N values (+2.9 to +4.1 per thousand ). Similar differences in foliar delta(15)N were observed between AM (average 0.1 and 0.2 per thousand ) and non-mycorrhizal (average +0.8 and +0.3 per thousand ) herbaceous species in woodland and savanna. Leguminous savanna species had significantly higher leaf N contents (1.8-2.5% N) than non-fixing species (0.9-1.2% N) indicating substantial N acquisition via N(2) fixation. Monsoon forest species had similar leaf N contents (average 2.4% N) and positive delta(15)N values (+0.9 to +2.4 per thousand ). Soil nitrification and plant NO(3)(-) use was substantially higher in monsoon forest than in woodland or savanna. In the studied communities, higher soil N content and nitrification rates were associated with more positive soil delta(15)N and plant delta(15)N. In support of this notion, Ficus, a high NO(3)(-) using taxa associated with NO(3)(-) rich sites in the savanna, had the highest delta(15)N values of all AM species in the savanna. delta(15)N of xylem sap was examined as a tool for studying plant delta(15)N relations. delta(15)N of xylem sap varied seasonally and between differently aged Acacia and other savanna

  11. [Characteristics of urea 15N absorption, allocation, and utilization by sweet-cherry (Prunus avium L.)].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Xia; Jiang, Yuan-Mao; Peng, Fu-Tian; Gao, Xiang-Bin; Liu, Bing-Hua; Wang, Hai-Yun; Zhao, Lin

    2008-03-01

    With five-year old 'Zaodaguo' sweet-cherry (Prunus avium L.) as test material, this paper studied the characteristics of its urea 15N absorption, allocation, and utilization when applied before bud-break. The results showed that the Ndff of different organs increased gradually with time, and was higher in fine roots and storage organs at full-blooming stage. At fruit core-hardening stage, the Ndff of long shoots and leaves increased quickly, reaching to 0.72% and 0.59% , respectively. From fruit core-hardening to harvesting stage, the Ndff of fruit had a rapid increase, with the peak (1.78%) at harvesting stage. After harvest, the Ndff of neonatal organs increased slowly while that of storage organs increased quickly. At full-blooming stage, the absorbed 15N in roots was firstly allocated to storage organs, with the highest allocation rate (54.91%) in large roots. At fruit core-hardening stage, the allocation rate in fine roots and storage organs decreased from 85.43% to 55.11%, while that in neonatal branches and leaves increased to 44.89%. At harvesting stage, the allocation rate in different organs had no significant change, but after harvest, the absorbed 15N had a rapid translocation to storage organs, and the allocation rate in fine roots and storage organs reached the highest (72.26%) at flower bud differentiation stage. The 15N allocation rate in neonatal branches and leaves at flower bud differentiation stage was decreased by 19.31%, compared with that at harvesting stage. From full-blooming to flower bud differentiation stage, the utilization rate of urea 15N was increasing, and reached the peak (16.86%) at flower bud differentiation stage.

  12. Phenylalanine δ15N in Paleo Archives as a New Proxy for δ15N of Exported Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M.; Batista, F. C.; Vokhshoori, N. L.; Brown, J. T.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ravelo, A. C.; Sherwood, O.

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of individual amino acids (CSI-AA) is emerging as a powerful new tool for studying the paleo nitrogen cycle. Because most detrital organic nitrogen is composed of amino acids, CSI-AA can reveal the mechanistic basis for organic nitrogen diagenesis, preserve a record of past food web structure, and potentially reconstruct the δ15N values of past nitrate and primary production. Within the commonly measured amino acids, the δ15N value of phenylalanine (Phe) appears uniquely promising as a new proxy that reflects the nitrogen isotopic value of the original source. Phe δ15N values remain almost unchanged with trophic transfer through food webs, and also during at least the initial stages of organic matter degradation. Here we synthesize results from both bio-archives and recent sediments, which together suggest that at least in Holocene archives the Phe δ15N value does in fact record the average inorganic nitrogen δ15N value at the base of planktonic food webs. However, several important unknowns also remain. These include the extent of variation in amino acid isotopic fractionation patterns in phylogenetically distinct algal groups. The stability of Phe δ15N values in older sediments where organic matter has undergone extensive diagenesis is also an important research area, which may ultimately establish the temporal limit for application of this approach to study past geological epochs. Together, however, results to date suggest that of Phe δ15N values in paleo archives represent a novel molecular-level proxy which is not tied to any specific organism or group, but rather can provide an integrated estimate of δ15N value of exported primary production.

  13. A new method to track seed dispersal and recruitment using 15N isotope enrichment.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Tomás A; Tewksbury, Joshua J; Martínez Del Río, Carlos

    2009-12-01

    Seed dispersal has a powerful influence on population dynamics, genetic structuring, evolutionary rates, and community ecology. Yet, patterns of seed dispersal are difficult to measure due to methodological shortcomings in tracking dispersed seeds from sources of interest. Here we introduce a new method to track seed dispersal: stable isotope enrichment. It consists of leaf-feeding plants with sprays of 15N-urea during the flowering stage such that seeds developed after applications are isotopically enriched. We conducted a greenhouse experiment with Solanum americanum and two field experiments with wild Capsicum annuum in southern Arizona, USA, to field-validate the method. First, we show that plants sprayed with 15N-urea reliably produce isotopically enriched progeny, and that delta 15N (i.e., the isotopic ratio) of seeds and seedlings is a linear function of the 15N-urea concentration sprayed on mothers. We demonstrate that three urea dosages can be used to distinctly enrich plants and unambiguously differentiate their offspring after seeds are dispersed by birds. We found that, with high urea dosages, the resulting delta 15N values in seedlings are 10(3) - 10(4) times higher than the delta 15N values of normal plants. This feature allows tracking not only where seeds arrive, but in locations where seeds germinate and recruit, because delta 15N enrichment is detectable in seedlings that have increased in mass by at least two orders of magnitude before fading to normal delta 15N values. Last, we tested a mixing model to analyze seed samples in bulk. We used the delta 15N values of batches (i.e., combined seedlings or seeds captured in seed traps) to estimate the number of enriched seeds coming from isotopically enriched plants in the field. We confirm that isotope enrichment, combined with batch-sampling, is a cheap, reliable, and user-friendly method for bulk-processing seeds and is thus excellent for the detection of rare dispersal events. This method could

  14. Solvent effects on 15N NMR coordination shifts.

    PubMed

    Kleinmaier, Roland; Arenz, Sven; Karim, Alavi; Carlsson, Anna-Carin C; Erdélyi, Máté

    2013-01-01

    (15)N NMR chemical shift became a broadly utilized tool for characterization of complex structures and comparison of their properties. Despite the lack of systematic studies, the influence of solvent on the nitrogen coordination shift, Δ(15)N(coord), was hitherto claimed to be negligible. Herein, we report the dramatic impact of the local environment and in particular that of the interplay between solvent and substituents on Δ(15)N(coord). The comparative study of CDCl(3) and CD(3)CN solutions of silver(I)-bis(pyridine) and silver(I)-bis(pyridylethynyl)benzene complexes revealed the strong solvent dependence of their (15)N NMR chemical shift, with a solvent dependent variation of up to 40 ppm for one and the same complex. The primary influence of the effect of substituent and counter ion on the (15)N NMR chemical shifts is rationalized by corroborating Density-Functional Theory (nor discrete Fourier transform) calculations on the B3LYP/6-311 + G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. Cooperative effects have to be taken into account for a comprehensive description of the coordination shift and thus the structure of silver complexes in solution. Our results demonstrate that interpretation of Δ(15)N(coord) in terms of coordination strength must always consider the solvent and counter ion. The comparable magnitude of Δ(15)N(coord) for reported transition metal complexes makes the principal findings most likely general for a broad scale of complexes of nitrogen donor ligands, which are in frequent use in modern organometallic chemistry.

  15. Rate constants of quenching and vibrational relaxation in the OH({{A}^{2}}{{ \\Sigma }^{+}},v=0,1 ), manifold with various colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, L. M.; Gatti, N.; Dilecce, G.; Scotoni, M.; Tosi, P.

    2017-03-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is intensively used for the detection of OH in many atmospheric pressure discharge devices. At this pressure, a quantitative knowledge of the collision phenomena in the upper excited state is critical. Here we report the measurement at T  =  300 K of a set of rate constants of electronic quenching and vibrational relaxation of the OH≤ft({{A}2}{{ Σ }+},{{v}\\prime}=0,1\\right) electronic state, by collision with N2, O2, H2O, CO2, CO, H2, D2, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6. These are the main gases in applications like plasma medicine, hydrocarbons reforming and CO2 conversion. Available literature data are revisited, and new data are added, mostly relevant to {{v}\\prime}=1 quenching and vibrational relaxation.

  16. Relaxed heaps

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, J.R. ); Gabow, H.N.; Shrairman, R. ); Tarjan, R.E. )

    1988-11-01

    The relaxed heap is a priority queue data structure that achieves the same amortized time bounds as the Fibonacci heap - a sequence of m decrease key and n delete min operations takes time O(m + n log n). A variant of relaxed heaps achieves similar bounds in the worst case - O(1) time for decrease key and O(log n) for delete min. Relaxed heaps give a processor-efficient parallel implementation of Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, and hence other algorithms in network optimization. A relaxed heap is a type of binomial queue that allows heap order to be violated.

  17. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templer, P.H.; Mack, M.C.; Chapin, F. S.; Christenson, L.M.; Compton, J.E.; Crook, H.D.; Currie, W.S.; Curtis, C.J.; Dail, D.B.; D'Antonio, C. M.; Emmett, B.A.; Epstein, H.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Gundersen, P.; Hobbie, S.E.; Holland, K.; Hooper, D.U.; Hungate, B.A.; Lamontagne, S.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Osenberg, C.W.; Perakis, S.S.; Schleppi, P.; Schimel, J.; Schmidt, I.K.; Sommerkorn, M.; Spoelstra, J.; Tietema, A.; Wessel, W.W.; Zak, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3–18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C: N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N·ha-1·yr-1 above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer addition.

  18. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies.

    PubMed

    Templer, P H; Mack, M C; Chapin, F S; Christenson, L M; Compton, J E; Crook, H D; Currie, W S; Curtis, C J; Dail, D B; D'Antonio, C M; Emmett, B A; Epstein, H E; Goodale, C L; Gundersen, P; Hobbie, S E; Holland, K; Hooper, D U; Hungate, B A; Lamontagne, S; Nadelhoffer, K J; Osenberg, C W; Perakis, S S; Schleppi, P; Schimel, J; Schmidt, I K; Sommerkorn, M; Spoelstra, J; Tietema, A; Wessel, W W; Zak, D R

    2012-08-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (< 1 week after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3-18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C:N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1) above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer

  19. Nonlinear infrared generation in alkali metal vapors: Steady state susceptibilities and dynamic behavior. Effective relaxation rates and preliminary Raman gain predictions for the Cs system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    Effective relaxation rates for atomic cesium pumped by doubled Alexandrite radiation are presented. Laser radiation levels are 8S 1/2 and 9S 1/2; resonance levels 3 = 8P 1/2 and 8P 1/2, respectively. In addition, Raman gain is represented in two graphs which plot chi per atom (10 to the -13 power) at Raman peak versus the infrared wave number per centimeter and the corresponding doubled Alexandrite wave number. One graph covers resonance level 8P, the other 9P; in both cases cesium is pumped with a peak pulse height of 0.5 MW in a 200 micron diameter spot size.

  20. Importance of Nitrate Attenuation In A Small Wetland Following Forest Harvest: 18O/16O, 15N/14N in nitrate and 15N/14N) in vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoelstra, J.; Schiff, S. L.; Semkin, R. G.; Jeffries, D. S.; Elgood, R. J.

    2004-05-01

    Forest harvest can result in elevated nitrate concentrations in streams and groundwater affecting forest regeneration and downstream aquatic ecosystems. Turkey Lakes Watershed, located near Sault Ste Marie, Ontario (TLW), exhibits relatively high nitrate export due to naturally high rates of nitrification. During a forest harvest experiment at the TLW, stable isotope techniques were used to investigate nitrate attenuation in an intermediate position natural wetland receiving high concentrations of nitrate following forest clear-cutting. Isotopic analysis of nitrate (18O/16O, 15N/14N) and vegetation (15N/14N) demonstrated that denitrification and plant uptake of nitrate resulted in significantly lower nitrate concentrations in wetland outflow compared to incoming stream water and groundwater. The 0.2-hectare forested swamp, too small to show up on standard topographic maps, retained 65 to 100 percent of upgradient nitrate inputs, elevated due to increased nitrification in soils. The 15N/14N enrichment factor associated with nitrate attenuation in wetland surface water was lower than observed during denitrification in groundwaters, suggesting that denitrification proceeded to completion in some areas of the wetland. Even small, shallow, carbon rich pockets of organic matter in topographic depressions can significantly affect biogeochemical fluxes of C, N, S and Ca. Future forest management practices designed to recognize and preserve small wetlands could significantly reduce the potentially detrimental effects of forest harvest on aquatic systems.

  1. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  2. Heterotrophic 15N2 Fixation and Distribution of Newly Fixed Nitrogen in a Rice-Flooded Soil System 1

    PubMed Central

    Eskew, David L.; Eaglesham, Allan R. J.; App, A. A.

    1981-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants growing in pots of flooded soil were exposed to a 15N2-enriched atmosphere for 3 to 13 days in a gas-tight chamber. The floodwater and soil surface were shaded with a black cloth to reduce the activity of phototrophic N2-fixing micro-organisms. The highest 15N enrichments were consistently observed in the roots, although the total quantity of 15N incorporated into the soil was much greater. The rate of 15N incorporation into roots was much higher at the heading than at the tillering stage of growth. Definite enrichments were also found in the basal node and in the lower outer leaf sheath fractions after 3 days of exposure at the heading stage. Thirteen days was the shortest time period in which definite 15N enrichment was observed in the leaves and panicle. When plants were exposed to 15N2 for 13 days just before heading and then allowed to mature in a normal atmosphere, 11.3% of the total 15N in the system was found in the panicles, 2.3% in the roots, and 80.7% in the subsurface soil. These results provide direct evidence of heterotrophic N2 fixation associated with rice roots and the flooded soil and demonstrate that part of the newly fixed N is available to the plant. PMID:16661887

  3. 14N15N detectability in Pluto’s atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, Kandis Lea; Gladstone, G. R.; Heays, A. N.; Gibson, S. T.; Lewis, B. R.; Stark, G.

    2013-11-01

    Based on the vapor pressure behavior of Pluto’s surface ices, Pluto’s atmosphere is expected to be predominantly composed of N2 gas. Measurement of the N2 isotopologue 15N/14N ratio within Pluto’s atmosphere would provide important clues to the evolution of Pluto’s atmosphere from the time of formation to its present state. The most straightforward way of determining the N2 isotopologue 15N/14N ratio in Pluto’s atmosphere is via spectroscopic observation of the 14N15N gas species. Recent calculations of the 80-100 nm absorption behavior of the 14N2 and 14N15N isotopologues by Heays et al. (Heays, A.N. et al. [2011]. J. Chem. Phys. 135, 244301), Lewis et al. (Lewis, B.R., Heays, A.N., Gibson, S.T., Lefebvre-Brion, H., Lefebvre, R. [2008]. J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164306); Lewis et al. (Lewis, B.R., Gibson, S.T., Zhang, W., Lefebvre-Brion, H., Robbe, J.-M. [2005]. J. Chem. Phys. 122, 144302), and Haverd et al. (Haverd, V.E., Lewis, B.R., Gibson, S.T., Stark, G. [2005]. J. Chem. Phys. 123, 214304) show that the peak magnitudes of the 14N2 and 14N15N absorption bandhead cross-sections are similar, but the locations of the bandhead peaks are offset in wavelength by ∼0.05-0.1 nm. These offsets make the segregation of the 14N2 and 14N15N absorption signatures possible. We use the most recent N2 isotopologue absorption cross-section calculations and the atmospheric density profiles resulting from photochemical models developed by Krasnopolsky and Cruickshank (Krasnopolsky, V.A., Cruickshank, D.P. [1999]. J. Geophys. Res. 104, 21979-21996) to predict the level of solar light that will be transmitted through Pluto’s atmosphere as a function of altitude during a Pluto solar occultation. We characterize the detectability of the isotopic absorption signature per altitude assuming 14N15N concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 2% of the 14N2 density and instrumental spectral resolutions ranging from 0.01 to 0.3 nm. Our simulations indicate that optical depth of unity is

  4. Foliar δ15N is affected by foliar nitrogen uptake, soil nitrogen, and mycorrhizae along a nitrogen deposition gradient.

    PubMed

    Vallano, Dena M; Sparks, Jed P

    2013-05-01

    Foliar nitrogen isotope (δ(15)N) composition patterns have been linked to soil N, mycorrhizal fractionation, and within-plant fractionations. However, few studies have examined the potential importance of the direct foliar uptake of gaseous reactive N on foliar δ(15)N. Using an experimental set-up in which the rate of mycorrhizal infection was reduced using a fungicide, we examined the influence of mycorrhizae on foliar δ(15)N in potted red maple (Acer rubrum) seedlings along a regional N deposition gradient in New York State. Mycorrhizal associations altered foliar δ(15)N values in red maple seedlings from 0.06 to 0.74 ‰ across sites. At the same sites, we explored the predictive roles of direct foliar N uptake, soil δ(15)N, and mycorrhizae on foliar δ(15)N in adult stands of A. rubrum, American beech (Fagus grandifolia), black birch (Betula lenta), and red oak (Quercus rubra). Multiple regression analysis indicated that ambient atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentration explained 0, 69, 23, and 45 % of the variation in foliar δ(15)N in American beech, red maple, red oak, and black birch, respectively, after accounting for the influence of soil δ(15)N. There was no correlation between foliar δ(13)C and foliar %N with increasing atmospheric NO2 concentration in most species. Our findings suggest that total canopy uptake, and likely direct foliar N uptake, of pollution-derived atmospheric N deposition may significantly impact foliar δ(15)N in several dominant species occurring in temperate forest ecosystems.

  5. Diffusion technique for 15N and inorganic N analysis of low-N aqueous solutions and Kjeldahl digests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui Rui; Dittert, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    Diffusion of ammonia is a common sample preparation method for the stable isotope analysis of inorganic nitrogen in aqueous solution. Classical diffusion methods usually require 6-12 days of diffusion and often focus on (15)N/(14)N analysis only. More recent studies have discussed whether complete N recovery was necessary for the precise analysis of stable N isotope ratios. In this paper we present a newly revised diffusion technique that allows correct and simultaneous determination of total N and (15)N at% from aqueous solutions and Kjeldahl digests, with N concentrations down to sub-0.5-mg N L(-1) levels, and it is tested under different conditions of (15)N isotope labelling. With the modification described, the diffusion time was reduced to 72 h, while the ratios of measured and expected (15)N at% were greater than 99% and the simultaneous recovery of total N was >95%. Analysis of soil microbial biomass N and its (15)N/(14)N ratio is one of the most important applications of this diffusion technique. An experiment with soil extracts spiked with (15)N-labelled yeast showed that predigestion was necessary to prevent serious N loss during Kjeldahl digestion of aqueous samples (i.e. soil extracts). The whole method of soil microbial biomass N preparation for (15)N/(14)N analysis included chloroform fumigation, predigestion, Kjeldahl digestion and diffusion. An experiment with soil spiked with (15)N-labelled yeast was carried out to evaluate the method. Results showed a highly significant correlation of recovered and added N, with the same recovery rate (0.21) of both total N and (15)N. A k(N) value of 0.25 was obtained based on the data. In conclusion, the diffusion method works for soil extracts and microbial biomass N determination and hence could be useful in many types of soil/water studies.

  6. Stepwise enrichment of 15N along food chains: Further evidence and the relation between δ 15N and animal age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masao; Wada, Eitaro

    1984-05-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrogen was measured in marine and fresh-water animals from the East China Sea, The Bering Sea, Lake Ashinoko and Usujiri intertidal zone. Primary producers, showed average δ15Nversus atmospheric nitrogen of +5.0%. (+3.4 to +7.5) in the Bering Sea and Lake Ashinoko, and +6.8%. (+6.0 to +7.6) in Usujiri intertidal zone. Blue green algae from the East China Sea show an average -0.55%. (-0.8 to +1.2). All consumers, Zooplankton, fish and bird exhibited Stepwise enrichment of 15N with increasing trophic level. The 15N enrichment at a single feeding process ranged from +1.3 to +5.3 averaging +3.4 ± 1.1%.. This isotopic fractionation seems to be independent of habitat. The effect of age in animals was obtained by analyzing two marine mussels. The soft tissue nitrogen showed +2.0%. enrichment relative to that of primary producers, and the magnitude was almost constant with shell ages ranging from 0 to 8 years. A similar 15N enrichment occurs in all Molluscs, Crustaceans, Insecta, Amphibia, Fish, Ave and Mammal species regardless of the difference in the form of excreted nitrogen and in laboratory cultured fish, brine shrimp and mice (+2.9 to +4.9%.). The excreted ammonia from guppy was sufficiently light to balance the concentration of 15N to animal body.

  7. Relaxing music prevents stress-induced increases in subjective anxiety, systolic blood pressure, and heart rate in healthy males and females.

    PubMed

    Knight, W E; Rickard PhD, N S

    2001-01-01

    Previous research suggests that while subjective anxiety is reduced by relaxing music, the effect of music on physiological stress indices is less consistent. In the current study, the effect of relaxing music on participants' subjective and physiological response to stress was explored, with attention paid to methodological factors and mediating variables that might have contributed to inconsistencies in previous studies. Undergraduate students (43 females & 44 males) were exposed to a cognitive stressor task involving preparation for an oral presentation either in the presence of Pachelbel's Canon in D major, or in silence. Measures of subjective anxiety, heart rate, blood pressure, cortisol, and salivary IgA were obtained during rest and after presentation of the stressor. The stressor caused significant increases in subjective anxiety, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure in male and female controls. These stress-induced increases were each prevented by exposure to music, and this effect was independent of gender. Music also enhanced baseline salivary IgA levels in the absence of any stress-induced effects. These findings provide experimental support for claims that music is an effective anxiolytic treatment, the robustness of which is demonstrated by retention of the effect in the presence of a range of potentially mediating variables.

  8. Isotopic analysis of bulk, LMW, and HMW DON d15N indicates recycled nitrogen release from marine DON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, A. N.; Sigman, D. M.; Lipschultz, F.; Kustka, A.; Capone, D. G.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) concentration and stable isotope ratio (d15N) measurements were made on bulk and size fractionated surface ocean dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) samples collected in the oligotrophic North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The bulk DON concentration in the upper 100 m is similar between the North Atlantic and North Pacific, between 4.5 and 5.0 uM, but the average d15N of bulk DON is significantly different, 3.9 per mil vs. air in the North Atlantic and 4.7 per mil in the North Pacific. The d15N of both bulk and HMW DON from the western tropical North Atlantic are similar to previous measurements, ~4.0 to 4.5 per mil. We report the first measurements of LMW DON d15N, which is consistently lower than HMW DON d15N. Neither the concentration nor d15N of bulk or size-fractionated DON varied with in situ N2 fixation rate, although significant variation in bulk and LMW DON d15N was observed between January and July of the same year in the western tropical North Atlantic. We propose a conceptual model to explain 1) the elevated d15N of bulk DON relative to other surface ocean N pools and fluxes, 2) the elevation of HMW DON d15N relative to LMW DON d15N, and 3) the inter-basin difference in the d15N of bulk DON. In this model, DON is produced from suspended particulate organic nitrogen (PON) without isotope fractionation because the conversion from PON to DON largely does not involve N-bearing bonds. In contrast, deamination and amide hydrolysis, with N isotope effects of 3 to 10 per mil, are major mechanisms by which DON is converted to ammonia and/or to other simple N compounds (e.g., amino acids). Thus these N-specific DON loss reactions result in an elevated d15N of residual DON relative to the parent DON and therefore also to the PON source. Moreover, the ammonium and simple organic N compounds released by microbial DON degradation are efficiently reassimilated back into the PON pool, as an integral part of the regenerated N cycle that further lowers the d15N

  9. Calculation of the expected zero-field muon relaxation rate in the geometrically frustrated rare earth pyrochlore Gd(2)Sn(2)O(7) antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    McClarty, P A; Cosman, J N; Del Maestro, A G; Gingras, M J P

    2011-04-27

    The magnetic insulator Gd(2)Sn(2)O(7) is one of many geometrically frustrated magnetic materials known to exhibit a nonzero muon spin polarization relaxation rate, λ(T), down to the lowest temperature (T) studied. Such behaviour is typically interpreted as signalling the presence of persistent spin dynamics (PSD) of the host material. In the case of Gd(2)Sn(2)O(7), such PSD comes as a surprise since magnetic specific heat measurements suggest conventional gapped magnons, which would naively lead to an exponentially vanishing λ(T) as T → 0. In contrast to most materials that display PSD, the ordered phase of Gd(2)Sn(2)O(7) is well characterized and both the nature and the magnitude of the interactions have been inferred from the magnetic structure and the temperature dependence of the magnetic specific heat. Based on this understanding, the temperature dependence of the muon spin polarization relaxation through the scattering of spin waves (magnons) is calculated. The result explicitly shows that, despite the unusual extensive number of weakly dispersive (gapped) excitations characterizing Gd(2)Sn(2)O(7), a remnant of the zero modes of the parent frustrated pyrochlore Heisenberg antiferromagnet, the temperature dependence of the calculated λ(T) differs dramatically from the experimental one. Indeed, the calculation conforms to the naive expectation of an exponential collapse of λ(T) at temperatures below ∼ 0.7 K. This result, for the first time, illustrates crisply and quantitatively the paradox that presents itself with the pervasive occurrence of PSD in highly frustrated magnetic systems as evinced by muon spin relaxation measurements.

  10. Marking Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) With Rubidium or 15N.

    PubMed

    Klick, J; Yang, W Q; Bruck, D J

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) has caused significant economic damage to berry and stone fruit production regions. Markers that are systemic in plants and easily transferred to target organisms are needed to track D. suzukii exploitation of host resources and trophic interactions. High and low concentrations of the trace element, rubidium (Rb), and the stable isotope, 15N, were tested to mark D. suzukii larvae feeding on fruits of enriched strawberry plants grown in containers under greenhouse conditions. Fly marker content and proportion of flies marked 1, 7, and 14 d after emergence from enriched fruits and fly dry mass were analyzed. Nearly 100% of the flies analyzed 14 d after emerging from 15N-enriched plants were marked, whereas only 30-75% and 0-3% were marked 14 d after emerging from high and low Rb concentration plants, respectively. Rapid Rb decay, strong 15N persistence, and the economics of using these markers in the field to elucidate D. suzukii pest ecology are discussed.

  11. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported.

  12. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  13. Phonon suppression of the coherence peak in nuclear spin relaxation rate in strong coupling superconductor TIMo 6Se 7.5. Comparison with high- Tc superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshio, Kitaoka; Shigeki, Ohsugi; Kunisuke, Asayama; Tsukio, Ohtani

    1992-03-01

    The phonon suppression effect on the coherence peak just below Tc in the nuclear spin relaxation rate {1}/{T 1} has been investigated by 205Tl NMR of a Chevrel phase superconductor TlMO 6Se 7.5 with Tc = 12.2 K. The lack of a coherence peak of 205( {1}/{T 1) } is demonstrated in a strong coupling superconductor TlMo 6Se 7.5 while the exponential decrease of {1}/{T 1} is confirmed over four orders of magnitude below 0.8 Tc (10 K) with 2 Δ=4.5 kBTc. As argued by Allen and Rainer, the strong electron-phonon decay channels open to excitation cause the unexpectedly strong damping of the quasi-particles in all dynamical properties, being the origin of the depression of the coherence peak. From a comparison with an s-wave model in which the quasi-particle damping is taken into account, it is reinforced that the unusual relaxation behavior observed in high- Tc cuprates, i.e. a power-lawT-dependence with no coherence peak below Tc cannot be accounted for by the conventional theory of the superconductivity and/or the model based on “s-wave” paring.

  14. Measurement of sample temperatures under magic-angle spinning from the chemical shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate of 79Br in KBr powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determination of sample temperatures in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) can be problematic, particularly because frictional heating and heating by radio-frequency irradiation can make the internal sample temperature significantly different from the temperature outside the MAS rotor. This paper demonstrates the use of 79Br chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation rates in KBr powder as temperature-dependent parameters for the determination of internal sample temperatures. Advantages of this method include high signal-to-noise, proximity of the 79Br NMR frequency to that of 13C, applicability from 20 K to 320 K or higher, and simultaneity with adjustment of the MAS axis direction. We show that spin-lattice relaxation in KBr is driven by a quadrupolar mechanism. We demonstrate a simple approach to including KBr powder in hydrated samples, such as biological membrane samples, hydrated amyloid fibrils, and hydrated microcrystalline proteins, that allows direct assessment of the effects of frictional and radio-frequency heating under experimentally relevant conditions.

  15. Novel labeling technique illustrates transfer of 15N2 from Sphagnum moss to vascular plants via diazotrophic nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Vile, M. A.; Wieder, R.

    2013-12-01

    We used 15N2 gas to trace nitrogen (N) from biological N2-fixation to vascular plant uptake in an Alberta bog in order to determine if neighboring bog plants acquire recently fixed N from diazotrophs associating with Sphagnum mosses. Recent evidence indicates high rates of N2-fixation in Sphagnum mosses of Alberta bogs (Vile et al. 2013). Our previous work has shown that mosses can assimilate fixed N from associated diazotrophs as evidenced by the high N content of mosses despite minimal inputs from atmospheric deposition, retranslocation, and N mineralization. Therefore, the potential exists for vascular plants to obtain N from ';leaky' tissues of live mosses, however, this phenomenon has not been tested previously. Here we document the potential for relatively rapid transfer to vascular plants of N fixed by Sphagnum moss-associated diazotrophs. We utilized the novel approach of incubating mosses in 15N2 to allow the process of diazotrophic N2-fixation to mechanistically provide the 15N label, which is subsequently transferred to Sphagnum mosses. The potential for vascular bog natives to tap this N was assessed by planting the vascular plants in the labeled moss. Sphagnum mosses (upper 3 cm of live plants) were incubated in the presence of 98 atom % 15N2 gas for 48 hours. Two vascular plants common to Alberta bogs; Picea mariana and Vaccinium oxycoccus were then placed in the labeled mosses, where the mosses served as the substrate. Tissue samples from these plants were collected at three time points during the incubation; prior to 15N2 exposure (to determine natural abundance 15N), and at one and two months after 15N2 exposure. Roots and leaves were separated and run separately on a mass spectrometer to determine 15N concentrations. Sphagnum moss capitula obtained N from N2-fixation (δ15N of -2.43 × 0.40, 122.76 × 23.78, 224.92 × 68.37, 143.74 × 54.38 prior to, immediately after, and at 1 and 2 months after exposure to 15N2, respectively). Nitrogen was

  16. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  17. Magnetic field induced anisotropy of 139La spin-lattice relaxation rates in stripe ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    DOE PAGES

    S. -H. Baek; Gu, G. D.; Utz, Y.; ...

    2015-10-26

    We report 139La nuclear magnetic resonance studies performed on a La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 single crystal. The data show that the structural phase transitions (high-temperature tetragonal → low-temperature orthorhombic → low-temperature tetragonal phase) are of the displacive type in this material. The 139La spin-lattice relaxation rate T–11 sharply upturns at the charge-ordering temperature TCO = 54 K, indicating that charge order triggers the slowing down of spin fluctuations. Detailed temperature and field dependencies of the T–11 below the spin-ordering temperature TSO=40 K reveal the development of enhanced spin fluctuations in the spin-ordered state for H ∥ [001], which are completely suppressed for largemore » fields along the CuO2 planes. Lastly, our results shed light on the unusual spin fluctuations in the charge and spin stripe ordered lanthanum cuprates.« less

  18. (15)N investigation of nitrogen released from tobacco-waste to be utilized by maize crop.

    PubMed

    Karaman, M Rüştü; Brohi, A Reşit; Inal, Ali; Aydeniz, Akgün

    2004-12-01

    The (15)N study aimed to estimate the portion of nitrogen released from tobacco-waste to be utilized by maize crop. Tobacco-waste at the levels of 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 g pot(-1) and ((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) as nitrogen fertilizer labelled with 5 at.% exc. at the levels of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 mg N pot(-1) together with a basal dressing of some nutrients were added to pots with Pioneer maize variety. After the harvest, dry matter yield was recorded and (15)N determinations and calculations were made. Tobacco-waste had a positive effect on the growth and on the nitrogen uptake of maize crop. Increasing the rates of tobacco-waste increased the dry matter yield of maize crop from 4.64 g pot(-1) (at control) to 7.22 g pot(-1) (at the tobacco-waste treatment of 8 g pot(-1)). The values of (15)N in the plant derived from nitrogenous fertilizer also increased with increasing nitrogen fertilizer levels, whereas they decreased from 0.427 % to 0.249 % with increasing tobacco-waste treatments from 0 to 8 g pot(-1), respectively. The average values of per cent nitrogen derived from nitrogenous fertilizer (Ndff) varied from 4.32 % to 7.95 % at the rates of 4-16 mg N pot(-1), respec-tively. However, Ndff decreased from 8.54 % to 4.99 % with increasing tobacco-waste treatments from 0 to 8 g pot(-1), respectively. Per cent nitrogen derived from tobacco-waste (Ndft) increased from 21.8 % to 38.5 % with increasing tobacco-waste treatments from 2 to 8 g pot(-1), respectively. The results have revealed that (15)N tracer technique was confidently used for the investigation of nitrogen levels released from tobacco-waste as organic waste to be utilized by maize crop.

  19. Mycorrhizal Fungi Provide Most of the Nitrogen for Symbiotic Arctic Plants: 15N Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, J. E.; Hobbie, E. A.

    2004-12-01

    When soil nitrogen is in short supply, most terrestrial plants form symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizae) in which fine hyphal threads take up soil nitrogen, transport it into plant roots, and in return receive plant sugars. Because the transfer rates are very difficult to measure in nature, ecologists need new tools by which to assess the role of mycorrhizal fungi in carbon and nitrogen cycling. Recent studies indicate that the natural abundance of 15N taken up from the soil by hyphae is changed during transfer of nitrogen to roots; the result is large differences among the natural abundance of 15N in soil, symbiotic plants, and symbiotic fungi that depend on the mass balance of nitrogen in the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Measurements were carried out in acidic tussock tundra at the Toolik Lake LTER site in Arctic Alaska (68\\deg N 149\\deg W). The \\delta15N of soil N was 1.5%, of soil ammonium was 1.5%, of ericoid and ectomycorrhizal plants was -5.0%, and of ectomycorrhizal fungi was 7.0 parts per mille%. The mass balance of the 15N shows that the plants received 61-86% of their nitrogen from the fungal hyphae. These values, when combined with known plant growth rates, reveal that the plants provided 7-16% of their photosynthetic carbon to the fungi for growth and respiration, or about 25% of all carbon allocated to belowground processes. This analytical technique could be readily applied to other nitrogen-limited ecosystems such as many temperate and boreal forests to quantify the importance for terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling of mycorrhizally mediated transfers at the plant-soil interface.

  20. Simple approach for the preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water for nitrogen fixation assessments: evaluation, application and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Klawonn, Isabell; Lavik, Gaute; Böning, Philipp; Marchant, Hannah K.; Dekaezemacker, Julien; Mohr, Wiebke; Ploug, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings revealed that the commonly used 15N2 tracer assay for the determination of dinitrogen (N2) fixation can underestimate the activity of aquatic N2-fixing organisms. Therefore, a modification to the method using pre-prepared 15−15N2-enriched water was proposed. Here, we present a rigorous assessment and outline a simple procedure for the preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water. We recommend to fill sterile-filtered water into serum bottles and to add 15−15N2 gas to the water in amounts exceeding the standard N2 solubility, followed by vigorous agitation (vortex mixing ≥ 5 min). Optionally, water can be degassed at low-pressure (≥950 mbar) for 10 min prior to the 15−15N2 gas addition to indirectly enhance the 15−15N2 concentration. This preparation of 15−15N2-enriched water can be done within 1 h using standard laboratory equipment. The final 15N-atom% excess was 5% after replacing 2–5% of the incubation volume with 15−15N2-enriched water. Notably, the addition of 15−15N2-enriched water can alter levels of trace elements in the incubation water due to the contact of 15−15N2-enriched water with glass, plastic and rubber ware. In our tests, levels of trace elements (Fe, P, Mn, Mo, Cu, Zn) increased by up to 0.1 nmol L−1 in the final incubation volume, which may bias rate measurements in regions where N2 fixation is limited by trace elements. For these regions, we tested an alternative way to enrich water with 15−15N2. The 15−15N2 was injected as a bubble directly to the incubation water, followed by gentle shaking. Immediately thereafter, the bubble was replaced with water to stop the 15−15N2 equilibration. This approach achieved a 15N-atom% excess of 6.6 ± 1.7% when adding 2 mL 15−15N2 per liter of incubation water. The herein presented methodological tests offer guidelines for the 15N2 tracer assay and thus, are crucial to circumvent methodological draw-backs for future N2 fixation assessments. PMID:26300853

  1. Direct measurement of dipole-dipole/CSA cross-correlated relaxation by a constant-time experiment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yizhou; Prestegard, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Relaxation rates in NMR are usually measured by intensity modulation as a function of a relaxation delay during which the relaxation mechanism of interest is effective. Other mechanisms are often suppressed during the relaxation delay by pulse sequences which eliminate their effects, or cancel their effects when two data sets with appropriate combinations of relaxation rate effects are added. Cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) involving dipole-dipole and CSA interactions differ from auto-correlated relaxation (ACR) in that the signs of contributions can be changed by inverting the state of one spin involved in the dipole-dipole interaction. This property has been exploited previously using CPMG sequences to refocus CCR while ACR evolves. Here we report a new pulse scheme that instead eliminates intensity modulation by ACR and thus allows direct measurement of CCR. The sequence uses a constant time relaxation period for which the contribution of ACR does not change. An inversion pulse is applied at various points in the sequence to effect a decay that depends on CCR only. A 2-D experiment is also described in which chemical shift evolution in the indirect dimension can share the same constant period. This improves sensitivity by avoiding the addition of a separate indirect dimension acquisition time. We illustrate the measurement of residue specific CCR rates on the non-myristoylated yeast ARF1 protein and compare the results to those obtained following the conventional method of measuring the decay rates of the slow and fast-relaxing 15N doublets. The performances of the two methods are also quantitatively evaluated by simulation. The analysis shows that the shared constant-time CCR (SCT-CCR) method significantly improves sensitivity. PMID:18406649

  2. A Kinetic Signature for Parallel Pathways: Conformational Selection and Induced Fit. Links and Disconnects between Observed Relaxation Rates and Fractional Equilibrium Flux under Pseudo-First-Order Conditions.

    PubMed

    Galburt, Eric A; Rammohan, Jayan

    2016-12-20

    Molecular association plays a ubiquitous role in biochemistry and is often accompanied by conformational exchange in one or both binding partners. Traditionally, two limiting mechanisms are considered for the association of two molecules. In a conformational selection (CS) mechanism, a ligand preferentially binds to a subset of conformations in its binding partner. In contrast, an induced fit (IF) mechanism describes the ligand-dependent isomerization of the binding partner in which binding occurs prior to conformational exchange. Measurements of the ligand concentration dependence of observed rates of relaxation are commonly used to probe whether CS or IF is taking place. Here we consider a four-state thermodynamic cycle subject to detailed balance and demonstrate the existence of a relatively unexplored class of kinetic signatures where an initial decrease in the observed rate is followed by a subsequent increase under pseudo-first-order conditions. We elucidate regions of rate space necessary to generate a nonmonotonic observed rate and show that, under certain conditions, the position of the minimum of the observed rate correlates with a transition in equilibrium flux between CS and IF pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrate that monotonic trends in the observed rate can occur when both CS and IF mechanisms are taking place, suggesting that caution must be taken not to overinterpret monotonic trends as evidence of the absence of either CS or IF. Lastly, we conclude that a nonmonotonic kinetic signature is uniquely unambiguous in the sense that when this trend is observed, one may conclude that both CS and IF mechanistic paths are utilized.

  3. Electrical control of phonon-mediated spin relaxation rate in semiconductor quantum dots: Rashba versus Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Sanjay; Melnik, Roderick; Bonilla, Luis L.

    2013-06-01

    In symmetric quantum dots (QDs), it is well known that the spin hot spot (i.e., the cusplike structure due to the presence of degeneracy near the level or anticrossing point) is present for the pure Rashba case but is absent for the pure Dresselhaus case [Bulaev and Loss, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.076805 95, 076805 (2005)]. Since the Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling dominates over the Rashba spin-orbit coupling in GaAs and GaSb QDs, it is important to find the exact location of the spin hot spot or the cusplike structure even for the pure Dresselhaus case. In this paper, we present analytical and numerical results that show that the spin hot spot can also be seen for the pure Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling case by inducing large anisotropy through external gates. At or nearby the spin hot spot, the spin transition rate increases and the decoherence time decreases by several orders of magnitude compared to the case with no spin hot spot. Thus one should avoid such locations when designing QD spin based transistors for possible implementation in quantum logic gates, solid-state quantum computing, and quantum information processing. It is also possible to extract the exact experimental data [Amasha, MacLean, Radu, Zumbühl, Kastner, Hanson, and Gossard, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.046803 100, 046803 (2008] for the phonon mediated spin-flip rates from our developed theoretical model.

  4. 15N and 13C NMR Determination of Allantoin Metabolism in Developing Soybean Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Coker, George T.; Schaefer, Jacob

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of allantoin by immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max L. cv Elf) grown in culture was investigated using solid state 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance. All of the nitrogens of allantoin were incorporated into protein in a manner similar to that of each other and to the amide nitrogen of glutamine. The C-2 of allantoin was not incorporated into cellular material; presumably it was lost as CO2. About 50% of the C-5 of allantoin was incorporated into cellular material as a methylene carbon; the other 50% was presumably also lost as CO2. The 13C-15N bonds of [5-13C;1-15N] and [2-13C;1,3-15N]allantoin were broken prior to the incorporation of the nitrogens into protein. These data are consistent with allantoin's degradation to two molecules of urea and one two-carbon fragment. Cotyledons grown on allantoin as a source of nitrogen accumulated 21% of the nitrogen of cotyledons grown on glutamine. Only 50% of the nitrogen of the degraded allantoin was incorporated into the cotyledon as organic nitrogen; the other 50% was recovered as NH4+ in the media in which the cotyledons had been grown. The latter results suggests that the lower accumulation of nitrogen by cotyledons grown on allantoin was in part due to failure to assimilate NH4+ produced from allantoin. The seed coats had a higher activity of glutamine synthetase and a higher rate of allantoin degradation than cotyledons indicating that seed coats play an important role in the assimilation and degradation of allantoin. PMID:16663995

  5. δ15N in the turtle grass from the Mexican Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talavera-Saenz, A.; Sanchez, A.; Ortiz-Hernandez, M.

    2013-05-01

    Nutrient inputs associated with population growth threaten the integrity of coastal ecosystems. To assess the rapid increase in tourism, we compared the δ15N from Thalassia testudinum collected at sites with different levels of tourism development and population to detect the N inputs of wastewater discharge (WD) along the coast of Quintana Roo. The contributions of nitrogen enriched in 15N are directly related to the increase of WD inputs in areas of high tourism development (Nichupte Lagoon in Cancun, >3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.7 million of resident population) and decreased towards Bahia Akumal and Tulum (>3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.15 million of resident population). The δ15N from T. testudinum was significantly lower at Mahahual and Puerto Morelos (about 0.4 million tourists per year in 2007 to 2011 and 0.25 million of resident population) than other the sites. In areas of the lowest development and with tourist activity restricted and small population, such as the Yum Balam Reserve and Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve, the δ15N values were in much higher enrichment that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. Therefore is suggested that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos may be used for baseline isotopic monitoring, over environmental pressure on the reef lagoon ecosystem, where tourist activities and population are growing very slow rate. The anthropogenic N input has the potential to impact, both environmentally and economically, the seagrass meadows and the coral reefs along the coast of Quintana Roo and the Caribbean.

  6. A novel method for trapping and analyzing 15N in NO for tracing NO sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ronghua; Mulder, Jan; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    15N isotope tracing is an effective and direct approach to investigate the biological and chemical sources of nitric oxide (NO) in soil. However, NO is highly reactive and rapidly converted to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the presence of ozone. Various chemical conversions of NO to the more stable solutes nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) have been proposed, which allow analysing the 15N abundance without major fractionation. However, NO emissions from soils are usually small, posing major challenges to conversion efficiency and background contamination. Here we present a novel method in which NO is oxidized to NO2- by chromium trioxide (CrO3) prior to conversion to NO2- and NO3- in an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. Immediately following trapping, manganese dioxide (MnO2) and 5M HCl are added to remove excess H2O2, and to adjust the pH to around 6.0-7.0, respectively. The resulting solution can be stored until analysis and is none-toxic, allowing to use a modified denitrifier method (Zhu et al., submitted), where NO2- and NO3- are reduced quantitatively to nitrous oxide (N2O). Optimum NO conversion rates of > 90% even at extremely low initial NO concentration were obtained with 4% H2O2, 0.5 M NaOH, and 0.5 L min-1 gas flow rate. In a laboratory test, using NO gas with different 15N signals produced from unlabelled and labelled NO2-, we found an overall precision of 0.4‰ for unlabelled and 49.7‰ for NO enriched with 1.0 atom% 15N, respectively. This indicates that this method can be used for both natural abundance studies of NO, as well as in labelling studies tracing NO sources. Zhu J, Yu L, Bakken LR, Mørkved PT, Mulder J, Dörsch P. Controlled induction of denitrification in Pseudomonas aureofaciens: a modified denitrifier method for 15N and 18O analysis in NO3- from natural water samples by IRMS. Submitted.

  7. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  8. The Effects of Dissolved Oxygen upon Amide Proton Relaxation and Chemical Shift in a Perdeuterated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Tobias S.; Campbell, Iain D.; Boyd, Jonathan

    2002-08-01

    The effects of dissolved molecular oxygen upon amide proton ( 1H N) longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and chemical shifts were studied for a small protein domain, the second type 2 module of fibronectin ( 2F2)—isotopically enriched to 99% 2H, 98% 15N. Longitudinal relaxation rate enhancements, R O 2( 1H N), of individual backbone 1H N nuclei varied up to 14 fold between a degassed and oxygenated (1 bar) solution, indicating that the oxygen distribution within the protein is inhomogeneous. On average, smaller relaxation rate enhancements were observed for 1H N nuclei associated with the core of the protein compared to 1H N nuclei closer to the surface, suggesting restricted oxygen accessibility to some regions. In agreement with an O 2- 1H N hyperfine interaction in the extreme narrowing limit, the 1H N transverse relaxation rates showed no significant change, up to an oxygen pressure of 9.5 bar (the maximum pressure used in this study). For most 1H N resonances, small Δδ O 2( 1H N) hyperfine chemical shifts could be detected between oxygen pressures of 1 bar and 9.5 bar.

  9. The effects of sex, tissue type, and dietary components on stable isotope discrimination factors (Δ13C and Δ15N) in mammalian omnivores.

    PubMed

    Kurle, Carolyn M; Koch, Paul L; Tershy, Bernie R; Croll, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    We tested the effects of sex, tissue, and diet on stable isotope discrimination factors (Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N) for six tissues from rats fed four diets with varied C and N sources, but comparable protein quality and quantity. The Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N values ranged from 1.7-4.1‰ and 0.4-4.3‰, respectively. Females had higher Δ(15)N values than males because males grew larger, whereas Δ(13)C values did not differ between sexes. Differences in Δ(13)C values among tissue types increased with increasing variability in dietary carbon sources. The Δ(15)N values increased with increasing dietary δ(15)N values for all tissues except liver and serum, which have fast stable isotope turnover times, and differences in Δ(15)N values among tissue types decreased with increasing dietary animal protein. Our results demonstrate that variability in dietary sources can affect Δ(13)C values, protein source affects Δ(15)N values even when protein quality and quantity are controlled, and the isotope turnover rate of a tissue can influence the degree to which diet affects Δ(15)N values.

  10. Investigating the Relationship between Transverse Relaxation Rate (R2) and Interecho Time in MagA-Expressing, Iron-Labeled Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey Y; Thompson, R Terry; Prato, Frank S; Goldhawk, Donna E; Gelman, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Reporter gene-based labeling of cells with iron is an emerging method of providing magnetic resonance imaging contrast for long-term cell tracking and monitoring cellular activities. This report investigates 9.4 T nuclear magnetic resonance properties of mammalian cells overexpressing MagA, a putative iron transport protein from magnetotactic bacteria. MagA-expressing MDA-MB-435 cells were cultured in the presence and absence of iron supplementation and compared to the untransfected control. The relationship between the transverse relaxation rate (R2) and interecho time was investigated using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This relationship was analyzed using a model based on water diffusion in weak magnetic field inhomogeneities (Jensen-Chandra model) as well as a fast-exchange model (Luz-Meiboom model). Increases in R2 with increasing interecho time were larger in the iron-supplemented, MagA-expressing cells compared to other cells. The dependence of R2 on interecho time in these iron-supplemented, MagA-expressing cells was better represented by the Jensen-Chandra model compared to the Luz-Meiboom model, whereas the Luz-Meiboom model performed better for the remaining cell types. Our findings provide an estimate of the distance scale of microscopic magnetic field variations in MagA-expressing cells, which is thought to be related to the size of iron-containing vesicles.

  11. Dispersion of Relaxation Rates in the Rotating Frame Under the Action of Spin-Locking Pulses and Diffusion in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Spear, John T.; Zu, Zhongliang; Gore, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A method is described for characterizing magnetically inhomogeneous media and the spatial scales of intrinsic susceptibility variations within samples. The rate of spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, R1ρ, is affected by diffusion effects to a degree that depends on the magnitude of an applied spin-locking field. Appropriate analysis of the dispersion of R1ρ with locking field may be used to characterize susceptibility variations in inhomogeneous tissues. Theory and Methods The contribution of diffusion to R1ρ is quantified by an analytic expression derived by analyzing of the effects of diffusion through periodic variations of magnetic susceptibility and is used to predict the effects of inhomogeneities in simple phantoms. The theory is further applied to imaging to derive parametric images that portray the dimensions of susceptibility inhomogeneities independent of their magnitude. Results Significant dispersion of R1ρ with locking field was predicted and measured experimentally for suspensions of microspheres ranging from 1 to 90 µm in diameter. For scales of practical interest, these dispersion effects occur at much lower locking fields than the range in which chemical exchange effects cause similar dispersion. Conclusion There is good agreement between theory and experiment, and the method has potential for quantitative tissue characterization and functional imaging. PMID:23804212

  12. Spatial Patterns of Plant δ13C and δ15N Along a Topoedaphic Gradient in a Subtropical Savanna Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, E.; Boutton, T. W.; Liu, F.; Wu, B.; Archer, S. R.

    2005-12-01

    relationship between δ15N and leaf [N] and soil water may reflect the fact that plants with high δ15N values occurred on lower-lying portions of the landscape with relatively high N-transformation rates where soil mineral N was both relatively available and 15N-enriched. The lack of variation in δ15N values of Prosopis suggests that it may be somewhat uncoupled from these processes because it is an N-fixer. Results of this study indicate that N-availability plays an important role in landscale scale variation in plant δ13C and δ15N.

  13. Relaxation in quantum glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona Torres, Carlos E.

    The Ising model in transverse field provides the simplest description of a quantum glass. I study two systems that are realizations of the Ising model in transverse field, LiHoxY1-- xF4 and Rb1-- x(NH4)xH2PO 4. In the spin glass LiHoxY1-- xF4, applying a magnetic field Ht transverse to the Ising direction introduces tunneling between the bare Ising eigenstates. In addition, the coupling between the transverse dipolar interaction and the transverse field introduces entanglement or tunable random fields depending on the concentration. By comparing the classical and quantum transitions in LiHo0.198Y0.802F4 and LiHo 0.167Y0.833F4, I characterize the crossover from random field dominated behavior in the 19.8% sample to entanglement dominated behavior in the 16.7% sample. The quantum transition in the 19.8% sample is dominated by the limit on its correlation length caused by the random fields, while the dominant effect in the 16.7% sample is the enhanced tunneling rate introduced by entanglement. The proton glass Rb1--x(NH 4)xH2PO4 relaxes through tunneling of protons in the hydrogen bonds of the crystal, yielding an effective Ising model in transverse field. Since this field cannot be tuned directly, I combine bulk dielectric susceptibility measurements with neutron Compton scattering measurements of the local tunneling potential in two different concentrations, x = 35% and 72%. I find that tunneling drives the fastest relaxation processes at temperatures as high as 20 K and explicitly calculate the tunneling rate from the tunneling potential of the hydrogen bond. Moreover, the structural mechanism for the glassy relaxation allows a real-space picture of the relaxation dynamics to be correlated to the free energy description of aging. I find that the glassy relaxation is driven by the sequential diffusion of defects called Takagi configurations with a classical to quantum crossover in the relaxation at 3 K. I relate the relaxation rate to the quantum action of tunneling

  14. Natural relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  15. Reduced white matter MRI transverse relaxation rate in cognitively normal H63D-HFE human carriers and H67D-HFE mice.

    PubMed

    Meadowcroft, Mark D; Wang, Jianli; Purnell, Carson J; Peters, Douglas G; Eslinger, Paul J; Neely, Elizabeth B; Gill, David J; Vasavada, Megha; Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; Yang, Qing X; Connor, James R

    2016-12-01

    Mutations within the HFE protein gene sequence have been associated with increased risk of developing a number of neurodegenerative disorders. To this effect, an animal model has been created which incorporates the mouse homologue to the human H63D-HFE mutation: the H67D-HFE knock-in mouse. These mice exhibit alterations in iron management proteins, have increased neuronal oxidative stress, and a disruption in cholesterol regulation. However, it remains undetermined how these differences translate to human H63D carriers in regards to white matter (WM) integrity. To this endeavor, MRI transverse relaxation rate (R2) parametrics were employed to test the hypothesis that WM alterations are present in H63D human carriers and are recapitulated in the H67D mice. H63D carriers exhibit widespread reductions in brain R2 compared to non-carriers within white matter association fibers in the brain. Similar R2 decreases within white matter tracts were observed in the H67D mouse brain. Additionally, an exacerbation of age-related R2 decrease is found in the H67D animal model in white matter regions of interest. The decrease in R2 within white matter tracts of both species is speculated to be multifaceted. The R2 changes are hypothesized to be due to alterations in axonal biochemical tissue composition. The R2 changes observed in both the human-H63D and mouse-H67D data suggest that modified white matter myelination is occurring in subjects with HFE mutations, potentially increasing vulnerability to neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Distribution of 15N Among Plant Parts of Nodulating and Nonnodulating Isolines of Soybeans 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Kohl, Daniel H.; Harper, James E.

    1980-01-01

    Differences among plant parts in the natural abundance of 15N are of interest from the point of view of developing a sampling strategy for using 15N measurements to estimate the contribution of symbiotically fixed N to N2 fixing plants, and because they reflect isotopic fractionation associated with degradation, transport, and resynthesis of N-bearing molecules. This paper reports such differences in nodulating and nonnodulating isolines of soybeans (Glycine max [L] (Merrill, variety Harosoy)) grown under several different conditions. Nodules were strikingly enriched in 15N compared to other plant parts (by an average of 8.3‰ excess 15N), and the enrichment increased with time during the growing season. 15N was much more uniformly distributed among other plant parts. Although there were significant differences among other plant parts, the maximum deviation of the 15N abundance of any plant part from that of the entire plant was about 2‰ 15N excess. The 15N abundance of the seed N was most representative of the whole plant. There were significant differences between isolines in the distribution of 15N. The distribution of 15N within plants also varied with experimental conditions. The implications of these results for estimation of N2 fixation from measurements of the natural abundance of 15N are discussed. PMID:16661393

  17. The “Speedy” Synthesis of Atom-Specific 15N Imino/Amido-Labeled RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Christoph; Micura, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous reports on the synthesis of atom-specific 15N-labeled nucleosides exist, fast and facile access to the corresponding phosphoramidites for RNA solid-phase synthesis is still lacking. This situation represents a severe bottleneck for NMR spectroscopic investigations on functional RNAs. Here, we present optimized procedures to speed up the synthesis of 15N(1) adenosine and 15N(1) guanosine amidites, which are the much needed counterparts of the more straightforward-to-achieve 15N(3) uridine and 15N(3) cytidine amidites in order to tap full potential of 1H/15N/15N-COSY experiments for directly monitoring individual Watson–Crick base pairs in RNA. Demonstrated for two preQ1 riboswitch systems, we exemplify a versatile concept for individual base-pair labeling in the analysis of conformationally flexible RNAs when competing structures and conformational dynamics are encountered. PMID:26237536

  18. Estimation of nitric oxide synthase activity via LC-MS/MS determination of 15N3-citrulline in biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Beom Soo; Fung, Ho-Leung; Upadhyay, Mahesh; Shin, Soyoung

    2015-01-01

    Rationale We showed that the metabolite peaks of 15N3-citrulline (15N3-CIT) and 15N3-arginine (15N3-ARG) could be detected when 15N4-ARG was metabolized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in endothelial cells. The usefulness of these metabolites as potential surrogate indices of nitric oxide (NO) generation is evaluated. Methods A hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometric assay (LC-MS/MS) was utilized for the simultaneous analysis of 15N4-ARG, ARG, CIT, 15N3-CIT and 15N3-ARG. 15N3-CIT and 15N3-ARG from impurities of 15N4-ARG were determined and corrected for the calculation of their concentration. 15N4-ARG-derived NO, i.e., 15NO formation was determined by analyzing 15N-nitrite accumulation by another LC-MS/MS assay. Results After EA.hy926 human endothelial cells were challenged with 15N4-ARG for 2 hours, the peak intensities of 15N3-CIT and 15N3-ARG significantly increased with 15N4-ARG concentration and positively correlated with 15N-nitrite production. The estimated Km values were independent of the metabolite (i.e., 15N3-CIT, 15N3-CIT+15N3-ARG or 15N-nitrite) used for calculation. However, after correction for its presence as a chemical contaminant of 15N4-ARG, 15N3-ARG was only a marginal contributor for the estimation of NOS activity. Conclusions These data suggest that the formation of 15N3-CIT can be used as an indicator of NOS activity when 15N4-ARG is used as a substrate. This approach may be superior to the radioactive 14C-CIT method which can be contaminated by 14C-urea, and to the 14N-nitrite method which lacks sensitivity. PMID:26349467

  19. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... level is often dependent on his or her breathing pattern. Therefore, people with chronic lung conditions may ...

  20. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  1. Coupled nitrification-denitrification in sediment of the eastern Bering Sea shelf leads to 15N enrichment of fixed N in shelf waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, J.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Sigman, D. M.; Mordy, C. W.; Morse, Z. M.; Morales, L. V.; Sambrotto, R. N.; Plessen, B.

    2011-11-01

    We studied the nitrogen biogeochemistry of the ice-covered eastern Bering Sea shelf using the isotope ratios (15N/14N and 18O/16O) of NO3- and other N species. The 15N/14N of late winter NO3- on the shelf decreases inshore and is inversely correlated with bottom water [NH4+], consistent with an input of low-15N/14N NO3- from partial nitrification of NH4+ remineralized from the sediments. An inshore 15N/14N increase in total dissolved N (TDN) suggests that (1) the sediment-derived NH4+ is elevated in 15N due to the same partial nitrification that yields the low-15N/14N NO3-, and (2) 15N-deplete NO3- from partial nitrification within the sediments is denitrified to N2. The proportion of newly nitrified NO3- on the shelf, evidenced by an inshore decrease in NO3- 18O/16O, is correlated with the N deficit, further implicating nitrification coupled to denitrification; however, a simple N isotope budget indicates a comparable rate of denitrification supported by diffusion of NO3- into the sediments. The isotopic impact of benthic N loss is further demonstrated by a correlation between the 15N/14N of shelf surface sediment and the N deficit of the overlying water column, both of which increase inshore and northward, as well as by Arctic NO3- isotope data indicating that the fixed N transported through Bering Strait has a 15N/14N higher than is found in the open Bering Sea. The significant net isotope effect of benthic N loss on the Bering shelf, 6-8 ‰, is at odds with previous assumptions regarding the global ocean's N isotope budget.

  2. [15N-flow after in sacco incubation and feeding of sheep and goats with untreated wheat straw or straw treated with 15N horse urine].

    PubMed

    Schubert, R; Flachowsky, G; Bochröder, B

    1994-01-01

    Chopped wheat straw was homogeneously mixed with urine of horses (5.75 gN per 1, 16.88 atom-% 15N-excess) and airtightly stored in plastic containers for 6 months. Three rumen fistulated sheep and goats each were fed with untreated or urine treated straw. Concentrate was added to straw. Untreated and urine treated straw were given in nylon bags and incubated in the rumen of sheep and goats for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. A three compartment exponential function was used to fit the measurements of 15N-excess and 15N-amount of bag content. The curves and the calculated partial Y-values of the three compartments show the inflow and outflow of 15N into or from the bags and allow conclusions about the binding of urine N. Most N of urine was not compactly bound by straw during storage. Primarily microbial N was attached to the straw in the rumen. About 6% of urine N were bound more compact to the straw. Similar curves were calculated for 15N-excess and 15N-amount of nylon bags. The curves allow conclusions about tracer flows without quantitative knowledge. There were no significant differences between animal species.

  3. Soil processes drive seasonal variation in retention of 15N tracers in a deciduous forest catchment.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Christine L; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Weiss, Marissa S; McCalley, K; Sparks, Jed P; Thomas, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal patterns of stream nitrate concentration have long been interpreted as demonstrating the central role of plant uptake in regulating stream nitrogen loss from forested catchments. Soil processes are rarely considered as important drivers of these patterns. We examined seasonal variation in N retention in a deciduous forest using three whole-ecosystem 15N tracer additions: in late April (post-snowmelt, pre-leaf-out), late July (mid-growing- season), and late October (end of leaf-fall). We expected that plant 15N uptake would peak in late spring and midsummer, that immobilization in surface litter and soil would peak the following autumn leaf-fall, and that leaching losses would vary inversely with 15N retention. Similar to most other 15N tracer studies, we found that litter and soils dominated ecosystem retention of added 15N. However, 15N recovery in detrital pools varied tremendously by season, with > 90% retention in spring and autumn and sharply reduced 15N retention in late summer. During spring, over half of the 15N retained in soil occurred within one day in the heavy (mineral-associated) soil fraction. During summer, a large decrease in 15N retention one week after addition coincided with increased losses of 15NO3- to soil leachate and seasonal increases in soil and stream NO3- concentrations, although leaching accounted for only a small fraction of the lost 15N (< 0.2%). Uptake of 15N into roots did not vary by season and accounted for < 4% of each tracer addition. Denitrification or other processes that lead to N gas loss may have consumed the rest. These measurements of 15N movement provide strong evidence for the dominant role of soil processes in regulating seasonal N retention and losses in this catchment and perhaps others with similar soils.

  4. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Measuring denitrification after grassland renewal and grassland conversion to cropland by using the 15N gas-flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchen, Caroline; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Flessa, Heinz; Giesemann, Anette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    Denitrification, the reduction of oxidized forms of inorganic N to N2O and N2 is an important pathway of gaseous nitrogen losses. Measuring denitrification, especially the reduction of N2O to N2, expressed in the product ratio (N2O/(N2O + N2)), is rather difficult and hence rarely performed under field conditions. But using the 15N gas-flux method allows determining N transformation processes in their natural environment. In order to develop effective climate mitigation strategies understanding the N2O source is essential. We used the 15N gas-flux method to determine N2O and N2 emissions following grassland renewal and conversion techniques. Therefore we selected three different treatments: control (C), mechanical grassland renovation (GR) (autumn 2013) and grassland conversion to maize (GM) (spring 2014) from field plot trials on two different sites (Histic Gleysoil and Plaggic Anthrosol) near Oldenburg, Lower Saxony, Germany. We applied 15N labeled KNO3- (60 atom. % 15N) at a rate equivalent to common farming practices (150 kg N*ha-1) using needle injection of fertilizer solution in three different depths (10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm) for homogeneous soil labeling up to 30 cm in microplots. During the first 10 days after application (May 2014) gas flux measurements from closed chambers were performed every second day and then weekly following a period of 8 weeks. Gas samples were analyzed for δ15N of N2 and N2O by IRMS according to Lewicka-Szczebak et al. (2013). Concentration and 15N enrichment of NO3- in soil water was determined on weekly samples using the SPIN-MAS technique (Stange et al. 2007). Fluxes of N2 and N2O evolved from the 15N labeled soil nitrogen pool were calculated using the equations of Spott et al. (2006). Peak events of N2 and N2O emissions occurred during the first 10 days of measurement, showing differences in soil types, as well as treatment variations. N2 fluxes up to 178 g*ha-1*day-1 and N2O fluxes up to 280 g*ha-1*day-1 were measured on the

  6. (15)N CSA tensors and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static (15)N NMR techniques for the determination of the (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and (15)N-(1)H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone (15)N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the (15)N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the (15)N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the "magic sandwich" SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the (15)N-(1)H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples.

  7. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of nitroxyl radicals in temperature ranges that span glassy solutions to low-viscosity liquids.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hideo; Bottle, Steven E; Blinco, James P; Micallef, Aaron S; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-03-01

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation rates, 1/T1, at X-band of nitroxyl radicals (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxyl and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolin-1-oxyl) in glass-forming solvents (decalin, glycerol, 3-methylpentane, o-terphenyl, 1-propanol, sorbitol, sucrose octaacetate, and 1:1 water:glycerol) at temperatures between 100 and 300K were measured by long-pulse saturation recovery to investigate the relaxation processes in slow-to-fast tumbling regimes. A subset of samples was also studied at lower temperatures or at Q-band. Tumbling correlation times were calculated from continuous wave lineshapes. Temperature dependence and isotope substitution (2H and 15N) were used to distinguish the contributions of various processes. Below about 100K relaxation is dominated by the Raman process. At higher temperatures, but below the glass transition temperature, a local mode process makes significant contributions. Above the glass transition temperature, increased rates of molecular tumbling modulate nuclear hyperfine and g anisotropy. The contribution from spin rotation is very small. Relaxation rates at X-band and Q-band are similar. The dependence of 1/T1 on tumbling correlation times fits better with the Cole-Davidson spectral density function than with the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model.

  8. Electron spin lattice relaxation of nitroxyl radicals in temperature ranges that span glassy solutions to low-viscosity liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hideo; Bottle, Steven E.; Blinco, James P.; Micallef, Aaron S.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2008-03-01

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation rates, 1/ T1, at X-band of nitroxyl radicals (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxyl and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolin-1-oxyl) in glass-forming solvents (decalin, glycerol, 3-methylpentane, o-terphenyl, 1-propanol, sorbitol, sucrose octaacetate, and 1:1 water:glycerol) at temperatures between 100 and 300 K were measured by long-pulse saturation recovery to investigate the relaxation processes in slow-to-fast tumbling regimes. A subset of samples was also studied at lower temperatures or at Q-band. Tumbling correlation times were calculated from continuous wave lineshapes. Temperature dependence and isotope substitution ( 2H and 15N) were used to distinguish the contributions of various processes. Below about 100 K relaxation is dominated by the Raman process. At higher temperatures, but below the glass transition temperature, a local mode process makes significant contributions. Above the glass transition temperature, increased rates of molecular tumbling modulate nuclear hyperfine and g anisotropy. The contribution from spin rotation is very small. Relaxation rates at X-band and Q-band are similar. The dependence of 1/ T1 on tumbling correlation times fits better with the Cole-Davidson spectral density function than with the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model.

  9. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  10. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms.

  11. A 115-year δ15N record of cumulative nitrogen pollution in California serpentine grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallano, D.; Zavaleta, E. S.

    2010-12-01

    Until the 1980s, California’s biodiverse serpentine grasslands were threatened primarily by development and protected by reserve creation. However, nitrogen (N) fertilization due to increasing fossil fuel emissions in the expanding Bay Area is thought to be contributing to rapid, recent invasion of these ecosystems by exotic annual grasses that are displacing rare and endemic serpentine species. Documenting the cumulative effects of N deposition in this ecosystem can direct policy and management actions to mitigate the role of N deposition in its transformation. Natural abundance stable isotopes of N in vegetation have been increasingly used as bio-indicators of N deposition patterns and subsequent changes to plant N cycling and assimilation. However, the long-term record of atmospheric reactive N enrichment and the resulting changes in ecosystem N dynamics have yet to be adequately reconstructed in many ecosystems. Museum archives of vascular plant tissue are valuable sources of materials to reconstruct temporal and spatial isotopic patterns of N inputs to ecosystems. Here, we present N stable isotope data from archived and current specimens of an endemic California serpentine grassland species, leather oak (Quercus durata), since 1895 across the greater San Francisco Bay region. We measured spatial and temporal trends in stable isotope composition (δ15N and δ13C) and concentration (%N and %C) of historical and current samples of leather oak leaves from sites within the Bay Area, impacted by increasing development, and sites northeast of the Bay Area, with significantly lower rates of urbanization and industrialization. Specifically, we sampled dry museum and fresh leaf specimens from serpentine sites within Lake (n=27) and Santa Clara (n=30) counties dating from 1895 to 2010. Leaf δ15N values were stable from 1895 to the 1950s and then decreased strongly throughout the last 50 years as fossil fuel emissions rapidly increased in the Bay Area, indicating that

  12. δ15N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Steven S; Sinkhorn, Emily R; Compton, Jana E

    2011-11-01

    Biogeochemical theory emphasizes nitrogen (N) limitation and the many factors that can restrict N accumulation in temperate forests, yet lacks a working model of conditions that can promote naturally high N accumulation. We used a dynamic simulation model of ecosystem N and δ(15)N to evaluate which combination of N input and loss pathways could produce a range of high ecosystem N contents characteristic of forests in the Oregon Coast Range. Total ecosystem N at nine study sites ranged from 8,788 to 22,667 kg ha(-1) and carbon (C) ranged from 188 to 460 Mg ha(-1), with highest values near the coast. Ecosystem δ(15)N displayed a curvilinear relationship with ecosystem N content, and largely reflected mineral soil, which accounted for 96-98% of total ecosystem N. Model simulations of ecosystem N balances parameterized with field rates of N leaching required long-term average N inputs that exceed atmospheric deposition and asymbiotic and epiphytic N(2)-fixation, and that were consistent with cycles of post-fire N(2)-fixation by early-successional red alder. Soil water δ(15)NO(3)(-) patterns suggested a shift in relative N losses from denitrification to nitrate leaching as N accumulated, and simulations identified nitrate leaching as the primary N loss pathway that constrains maximum N accumulation. Whereas current theory emphasizes constraints on biological N(2)-fixation and disturbance-mediated N losses as factors that limit N accumulation in temperate forests, our results suggest that wildfire can foster substantial long-term N accumulation in ecosystems that are colonized by symbiotic N(2)-fixing vegetation.

  13. δ15N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, S.S.; Sinkhorn, E.R.; Compton, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Biogeochemical theory emphasizes nitrogen (N) limitation and the many factors that can restrict N accumulation in temperate forests, yet lacks a working model of conditions that can promote naturally high N accumulation. We used a dynamic simulation model of ecosystem N and δ15N to evaluate which combination of N input and loss pathways could produce a range of high ecosystem N contents characteristic of forests in the Oregon Coast Range. Total ecosystem N at nine study sites ranged from 8,788 to 22,667 kg ha−1 and carbon (C) ranged from 188 to 460 Mg ha−1, with highest values near the coast. Ecosystem δ15N displayed a curvilinear relationship with ecosystem N content, and largely reflected mineral soil, which accounted for 96–98% of total ecosystem N. Model simulations of ecosystem N balances parameterized with field rates of N leaching required long-term average N inputs that exceed atmospheric deposition and asymbiotic and epiphytic N2-fixation, and that were consistent with cycles of post-fire N2-fixation by early-successional red alder. Soil water δ15NO3 − patterns suggested a shift in relative N losses from denitrification to nitrate leaching as N accumulated, and simulations identified nitrate leaching as the primary N loss pathway that constrains maximum N accumulation. Whereas current theory emphasizes constraints on biological N2-fixation and disturbance-mediated N losses as factors that limit N accumulation in temperate forests, our results suggest that wildfire can foster substantial long-term N accumulation in ecosystems that are colonized by symbiotic N2-fixing vegetation.

  14. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: 2. Denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Hall, Robert; Sobota, Daniel; Dodds, Walter; Findlay, Stuart; Grimm, Nancy; Hamilton, Stephen; McDowell, William; O'Brien, Jon; Tank, Jennifer; Ashkenas, Linda; Cooper, Lee W; Dahm, Cliff; Gregory, Stanley; Johnson, Sherri; Meyer, Judy; Peterson, Bruce; Poole, Geoff; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson; Arango, Clay; Beaulieu, Jake; Bernot, Melody; Burgin, Amy; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Helton, Ashley; Johnson, Laura; Niederlehner, Bobbie; Potter, Jody; Sheibley, Rich; Thomas, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field {sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (S{sub Wden}) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N{sub 2} production rates far exceeded N{sub 2}O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling S{sub Wden} were specific discharge (discharge/width) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (U{sub den}) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although U{sub den} increased with increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, the efficiency of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO{sub 3}{sup -} load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration.

  15. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulholland, P.J.; Hall, R.O.; Sobota, D.J.; Dodds, W.K.; Findlay, S.E.G.; Grimm, N. B.; Hamilton, S.K.; McDowell, W.H.; O'Brien, J. M.; Tank, J.L.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Cooper, L.W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Gregory, S.V.; Johnson, S.L.; Meyer, J.L.; Peterson, B.J.; Poole, G.C.; Valett, H.M.; Webster, J.R.; Arango, C.P.; Beaulieu, J.J.; Bernot, M.J.; Burgin, A.J.; Crenshaw, C.L.; Helton, A.M.; Johnson, L.T.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Potter, J.D.; Sheibley, R.W.; Thomasn, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field 15N-NO- 3 tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (SWden) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N2 production rates far exceeded N2O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO-3 removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NHz 4 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling SWden were specific discharge (discharge / width) and NO-3 concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (Uden) and NO- 3 concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although Uden increased with increasing NO- 3 concentration, the efficiency of NO-3 removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO-3 load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO-3 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO-3 concentration. ?? 2009.

  16. Efficient Measurement of 3JN,Cγ and 3JC‧,Cγ Coupling Constants of Aromatic Residues in 13C, 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhr, Frank; Rüterjans, Heinz

    2000-09-01

    An NMR pulse sequence is proposed for the simultaneous determination of side chain χ1 torsion-angle related 3JN,Cγ and 3JC‧,Cγ couplings in aromatic amino acid spin systems. The method is of the quantitative J correlation type and takes advantage of attenuated 15N and 1H transverse relaxation by means of the TROSY principle. Unlike previously developed schemes for the measurement of either of the two coupling types, spectra contain internal reference peaks that are usually recorded in separate experiments. Therefore, the desired information is extracted from a single rather than four data sets. The new method is demonstrated with uniformly 13C/15N labeled Desulfovibrio vulgaris flavodoxin, which contains 14 aromatic out of 147 total amino acid residues.

  17. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in a tropical rainforest: 15N natural abundance measurements supported by experimental isotopic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pons, Thijs L; Perreijn, Kristel; van Kessel, Chris; Werger, Marinus J A

    2007-01-01

    * Leguminous trees are very common in the tropical rainforests of Guyana. Here, species-specific differences in N(2) fixation capability among nodulating legumes growing on different soils and a possible limitation of N(2) fixation by a relatively high nitrogen (N) and low phosphorus (P) availability in the forest were investigated. * Leaves of 17 nodulating species and 17 non-nodulating reference trees were sampled and their delta(15)N values measured. Estimates of N(2) fixation rates were calculated using the (15)N natural abundance method. Pot experiments were conducted on the effect of N and P availability on N(2) fixation using the (15)N-enriched isotope dilution method. * Nine species showed estimates of > 33% leaf N derived from N(2) fixation, while the others had low or undetectable N(2) fixation rates. High N and low P availability reduced N(2) fixation substantially. * The results suggest that a high N and low P availability in the forest limit N(2) fixation. At the forest ecosystem level, N(2) fixation was estimated at c. 6% of total N uptake by the tree community. We conclude that symbiotic N(2) fixation plays an important role in maintaining high amounts of soil available N in undisturbed forest.

  18. Are vascular epiphytes nitrogen or phosphorus limited? A study of plant (15) N fractionation and foliar N : P stoichiometry with the tank bromeliad Vriesea sanguinolenta.

    PubMed

    Wanek, Wolfgang; Zotz, Gerhard

    2011-10-01

    Although there is unambiguous evidence for vascular epiphytic plants to be limited by insufficient water and nutrient supply under natural conditions, it is an open debate whether they are primarily phosphorus (P) or nitrogen (N) limited. Plant (15) N fractionation and foliar N : P stoichiometry of a tank epiphyte (Vriesea sanguinolenta), and its response to combined N-P fertilization, were studied under semi-natural conditions over 334 d to clarify the type of nutrient limitation. Plants collected in the field and experimental plants with limited nutrient supply showed significant plant (15) N fractionation (mean 5‰) and plant N : P ratios of c. 13.5. Higher relative growth rates and declines in plant (15) N fractionation (0.5‰) and in foliar N : P ratios to 8.5 in the high N-P treatment indicated that these epiphytes were P limited in situ. The critical foliar N : P ratio was 10.4, as derived from the breakpoint in the relationship between plant (15) N fractionation and foliar N : P. We interpret the widespread (15) N depletion of vascular epiphytes relative to their host trees as deriving from (15) N fractionation of epiphytes as a result of P limitation. High foliar N : P ratios (> 12) corroborate widespread P limitation (or co-limitation by N and P) of epiphytic bromeliads and, possibly, other epiphyte species.

  19. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei.

  20. δ(15) N from soil to wine in bulk samples and proline.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Mauro; Ziller, Luca; Bertoldi, Daniela; Bontempo, Luana; Larcher, Roberto; Nicolini, Giorgio; Camin, Federica

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of using δ(15) N as an additional isotopic marker able to link wine to its area of origin was investigated. The whole production chain (soil-leaves-grape-wine) was considered. Moreover, the research included evaluation of the effect of the fermentation process, the use of different types of yeast and white and red vinification, the addition of nitrogen adjuvants and ultrasound lysis simulating wine ageing. The δ(15) N of grapes and wine was measured in bulk samples and compounds, specifically in proline, for the first time. Despite isotopic fractionation from soil to wine, the δ(15) N values of leaves, grapes, wine and particularly must and wine proline conserved the variability of δ(15) N in the growing soil. Fermentation and ultrasound treatment did not affect the δ(15) N values of grape must, which was therefore conserved in wine. The addition of inorganic or organic adjuvants was able to influence the δ(15) N of bulk wine, depending on the amount and the difference between the δ(15) N of must and that of the adjuvant. The δ(15) N of wine proline was not influenced by adjuvant addition and is therefore the best marker for tracing the geographical origin of wine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  2. δ 15 N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural abundance δ15N of ecosystems integrates nitrogen (N) inputs and losses, and thus reflects factors that control the long-term development of ecosystem N balances. We here report N and carbon (C) content of forest vegetation and soils, and associated δ15N, across nine Doug...

  3. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  4. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  5. Ntrace a 15N tracing model to analyse gross N transformations and sources of gaseous N emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenically generated reactive nitrogen (N) cascades throughout the global environment ...(Galloway and Cowling, 2002). This reactive N may be lost from ecosystems via leaching, as nitrate (NO3-), or in gaseous forms such as ammonia and nitrous oxide (N2O) and the loss is governed by the N dynamics of the system. Thus, to be rendered environmentally benign NO3- must be reduced to a non-reactive form, dinitrogen (N2) which requires the evaluation of three major biological pathways of NO3- reduction: i) assimilatory NO3- reduction into biomass, ii) dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ (DNRA) and iii) dissimilatory NO3- reduction to N2 (denitrification) ...(Burger and Jackson, 2004). Advanced techniques based on 15N tracing in combination with suitable model analyses are the method of choice to analyse complex N interactions and simultaneous N transformation process. Techniques are based on dilution - enrichment principles and usually rely on the simultaneous labelling of various N pools. The data sets are then analysed by suitable 15N tracing models which allow the individual N transformation rates to be calculated based on realistic kinetic settings. The 15N tracing model Ntrace has been developed to analyse the simultaneously occurring N transformation rates in soil-plant systems and includes submodels for the evaluation of the processes associated with gaseous N emissions. The 15N tracing model and some typical model results will be presented. Literature cited .Burger, M., and Jackson, L. E. (2004). Plant and microbial use and turnover: rapid conversion of nitrate to ammonium in soil with roots. Plant and Soil 266, 289-301. Galloway, J. N., and Cowling, E. B. (2002). Reactive nitrogen and the world: 200 years of change. Ambio 31, 64-71. .

  6. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws) ) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA): normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-04-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and radiofrequency (RF) irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (k(ws) ), with little dependence on bulk water T(1) , T(2) , RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments.

  7. Preparation and characterization of 15N-enriched, size-defined heparan sulfate precursor oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sigulinsky, Crystal; Babu, Ponnusamy; Victor, Xylophone V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    We report the preparation of size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides from Escherichia coli-derived 15N-enriched N-acetylheparosan. Optimized growth conditions of E. coli in minimal media containing 15NH4Cl yielded [15N]N-acetylheparosan on a preparative scale. Depolymerization of [15N]N-acetylheparosan by heparitinase I yielded resolvable, even-numbered oligosaccharides ranging from disaccharide to icosaccharide. Anion-exchange chromatography-assisted fractionation afforded size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides identifiable by ESI-TOFMS. These isotopically labeled oligosaccharides will prove to be valuable research tools for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of heparin and heparan sulfate oligosaccharides and for the study of their structural biology. PMID:19945695

  8. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  9. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in an arid ecosystem measured by sup 15 N natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Plants dependent on nitrogen fixation have an {sup 15}N abundance similar to the atmosphere, while non-nitrogen fixing plants usually are enriched in {sup 15}N and are similar to soil nitrogen values. The natural abundance of {sup 15}N in leaf tissues and soils was determined to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation by several legumes and actinorhizal species in the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research area in central New Mexico. Comparison of {delta}{sup 15}N values for the legume Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) to adjacent Atriplex canascens (fourwing saltbush) indicated that P. glandulosa obtained 66% of its nitrogen by fixation. The legume Hoffmanseggia jamesii was found to be utilizing soil nitrogen. The {delta}{sup 15}N values for the actinorhizal plants, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Cercocarpus montanus, while below values for soil nitrogen, did not differ from associated non-fixing plants.

  10. Compound-specific 15N analysis of amino acids in 15N tracer experiments provide an estimate of newly synthesised soil protein from inorganic and organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charteris, Alice; Michaelides, Katerina; Evershed, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Organic N concentrations far exceed those of inorganic N in most soils and despite much investigation, the composition and cycling of this complex pool of SOM remains poorly understood. A particular problem has been separating more recalcitrant soil organic N from that actively cycling through the soil system; an important consideration in N cycling studies and for the soil's nutrient supplying capacity. The use of 15N-labelled substrates as stable isotope tracers has contributed much to our understanding of the soil system, but the complexity and heterogeneity of soil organic N prevents thorough compound-specific 15N analyses of organic N compounds and makes it difficult to examine any 15N-labelled organic products in any detail. As a result, a significant proportion of previous work has either simply assumed that since the majority of soil N is organic, all of the 15N retained in the soil is organic N (e.g. Sebilo et al., 2013) or subtracted 15N-labelled inorganic compounds from bulk values (e.g. Pilbeam et al., 1997). While the latter approach is more accurate, these methods only provide an estimate of the bulk 15N value of an extremely complex and non-uniformly labelled organic pool. A more detailed approach has been to use microbial biomass extraction (Brookes et al., 1985) and subsequent N isotopic analysis to determine the 15N value of biomass-N, representing the fraction of 15N assimilated by microbes or the 15N cycling through the 'living' or 'active' portion of soil organic N. However, this extraction method can only generate estimates and some lack of confidence in its validity and reliability remains. Here, we present an alternative technique to obtain a measure of the assimilation of an applied 15N substrate by the soil microbial biomass and an estimate of the newly synthesized soil protein, which is representative of the magnitude of the active soil microbial biomass. The technique uses a stable isotope tracer and compound-specific 15N analysis, but

  11. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15 N over long-term forest succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven; Tepley, Alan J.; Compton, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession towards old-growth are thought to increase nitrogen (N) availability and N loss, which should increase soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across 800 years of forest succession in a topographically complex montane landscape influenced by human logging and wildfire. In contrast to expectations, we found that disturbance caused declines in surface mineral soil δ15N values, both in logged forests measured 40–50 years after disturbance, and in unlogged forests disturbed by severe wildfire within the last 200 years. Both symbiotic N fixation and N transfers from disturbed vegetation and detritus could lower soil δ15N values after disturbance. A more important role for symbiotic N fixation is suggested by lower soil δ15N values in slow-successional sites with slow canopy closure, which favors early-successional N fixers. Soil δ15N values increased only marginally throughout 800 years of succession, reflecting soil N uptake by vegetation and strong overall N retention. Although post-disturbance N inputs lowered surface soil δ15N values, steady-state mass balance calculations suggest that wildfire combustion of vegetation and detritus can dominate long-term N loss and increase whole-ecosystem δ15N. On steeper topography, declining soil δ15N values highlight erosion and accelerated soil turnover as an additional abiotic control on N balances. We conclude for N-limited montane forests that soil δ15N and N availability are less influenced by nitrate leaching and denitrification loss than by interactions between disturbance, N fixation, and erosion.

  12. The effect of manuring on cereal and pulse amino acid δ(15)N values.

    PubMed

    Styring, Amy K; Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-06-01

    Amino acid δ(15)N values of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) grains and rachis and broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, grown in manured and unmanured soil at the experimental farm stations of Rothamsted, UK and Bad Lauchstädt, Germany, were determined by GC-C-IRMS. Manuring was found to result in a consistent (15)N-enrichment of cereal grain amino acid δ(15)N values, indicating that manuring did not affect the metabolic routing of nitrogen (N) into cereal grain amino acids. The increase in cereal grain δ(15)N values with manuring is therefore due to a (15)N-enrichment in the δ(15)N value of assimilated inorganic-N. Greater variation was observed in the (15)N-enrichment of rachis amino acids with manuring, possibly due to enhanced sensitivity to changes in growing conditions and higher turnover of N in rachis cells compared to cereal grains. Total amino acid δ(15)N values of manured and unmanured broad beans and peas were very similar, indicating that the legumes assimilated N2 from the atmosphere rather than N from the soil, since there was no evidence for routing of (15)N-enriched manure N into any of the pulse amino acids. Crop amino acid δ(15)N values thus provide insights into the sources of N assimilated by non N2-fixing and N2-fixing crops grown on manured and unmanured soils, and reveal an effect of manure on N metabolism in different crop species and plant parts.

  13. Dielectric relaxation in a protein matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.W.; Boxer, S.G.

    1992-06-25

    The dielectric relaxation of a sperm whale ApoMb-DANCA complex is measured by the fluorescence dynamic Stokes shift method. Emission energy increases with decreasing temperature, suggesting that the relaxation activation energies of the rate-limiting motions either depend on the conformational substrate or different types of protein motions with different frequencies participate in the reaction. Experimental data suggest that there may be relaxations on a scale of <100 ps. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Temperature dependence of the magnetic moment relaxation rate of the organic superconductor x-(BEDT-TFF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl{sub 0.5}Br{sub 0.5}

    SciTech Connect

    Primenko, A.E.; Kuznetsov, V.D.; Metlushko, V.V.; Mendeleev, D.V.; Kushch, N.D.; Yagubskii, E.B.

    1994-06-01

    The authors have investigated relaxation of the residual magnetic moment of x-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl{sub 0.5}Br{sub 0.5}, an organic superconductor, in the temperature range 2.4 to 9.5 K. In these investigations, they observed that the reduced relaxation rate S=d 1n P{sub m}/dt ln t remains constant for T/T{sub c} < 0.7, and then increases rapidly with T. They also determined the temperature dependence of the critical current density in zero magnetic field. In comparing the functions s(T) and J{sub c}(T) for this superconductor with their counterparts for single-crystal high-temperature superconductors, they have found that their behavior is most analogous to that of s(T) and J{sub c}(T) for YBaCuO. Using the relaxation curves, they have calculated the current-voltage characteristics E(J), which are well-described by a power law function of the type E{proportional_to}J{sup n}. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  15. 15N Content Reflects Development of Mycorrhizae and Nitrogen Dynamics During Primary Succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Jumpponen, A.

    2004-05-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous symbionts on terrestrial plants that are particularly important for plant nitrogen nutrition. 15N content appears to be a useful marker of the mycorrhizal role in plant nitrogen supply because of an apparent fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from mycorrhizal fungi to host plants. Because plants developing during primary succession are gradually colonized by mycorrhizal fungi, such situations provide good opportunities to study interactions between mycorrhizal colonization and plant 15N content. Here, we present results of a study of nitrogen isotope patterns in ecosystem components during the first 100 years of ecosystem development after glacial retreat, and compare those patterns with those on adjacent mature terrain. Soils in primary succession were depleted in 15N relative to nitrogen-fixing plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants generally colonized by ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, or arbuscular fungi showed similar 15N content very early in succession (-4 to -6‰ ), corresponding to low colonization levels of all plant species. Subsequent colonization of evergreen plants by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid fungi led to a 5-6‰ decline in 15N content, indicating transfer of 15N-depleted N from fungi to plants. The values recorded (-10 to -14‰ ) are among the lowest yet observed in vascular plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi did not decline in 15N content. Most ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi were similar in 15N content in early succession (-1 to -3‰ ), with the notable exception of ectomycorrhizal fungi suspected of proteolytic capabilities, which were 15N enriched relative to all other fungi. 15N contents in both plants and soil from the mature site were 5‰ greater than in recently exposed sites. We conclude that 1) the primary nitrogen source to this ecosystem must be atmospheric deposition, 2) low plant 15N content generally corresponds with greater

  16. Climate-Dependence of Plant-Soil 15N/14N Interactions Across Tropical Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Sigman, D. M.; Hedin, L. O.

    2005-12-01

    In most areas of the world, the 15N/14N of bulk soils is higher than that of plant leaves, and the isotopic signatures of these two ecosystem N pools progressively diverge with increasing rainfall. However, both the cause for this isotopic trend and its implications for understanding interactions between climate and N cycles are largely unknown. We report 15N/14N measurements of nitrate, ammonium, and total dissolved N in soil extracts from a highly constrained rainfall sequence in Hawaii, across which this trend in ecosystem 15N/14N is captured, to examine the competing explanations for plant-soil 15N/14N uncouplings. While the isotopic influences of microbial transfers of N between nitrate and ammonium pools and plant-mycorrhizae interactions have been posited in plant-soil 15N/14N relationships, our data did not support an important role for either of these mechanisms. Instead, preferential regeneration of 14N during the breakdown of DON to ammonium explains why the 15N/14N of plants is lower than that of bulk soils. Fractionation at this step leads to two isotopically distinct N subcycles in each forest, a lower-15N/14N subcycle composed of ammonium, nitrate, and bulk plant biomass N that `spins' rapidly and a higher-15N/14N subcycle composed of bulk soil N and DON that is much less dynamic. The increased difference between soil and plant 15N/14N is due to changes in the impacts of nitrification and denitrification on the 15N/14N of ammonium and nitrate, coupled with a switch from nitrate to ammonium uptake by plants under the wettest conditions. For instance, the particularly large (~6 per mil) 15N/14N difference between plants and soils in the wettest sites is due to the lack of 15N-enrichment of ammonium by nitrification coupled with plant dependence on ammonium uptake only. Our results highlight the importance of interactions between DON breakdown, ecosystem N recycling, and gaseous N losses in the explaining the interactions between the 15N signatures of

  17. [Absorption and distribution of nitrogen from 15N labelled urea applied at core-hardening stage in winter jujube].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dengchao; Jiang, Yuanmao; Peng, Futian; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Xu; Ju, Xiaotang; Zhang, Fusuo

    2006-01-01

    The study with pot experiment showed that at the rapid-swelling stage of winter jujube fruit, the percent of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff%) was the highest (10.64%) in fine roots, followed by new-growth nutritive organs. The absorbed urea-15N decreased in leaves and deciduous supers, and accumulated preferentially in root systems after harvest. The Ndff% in coarse roots was the highest (3.69%) before budding stage, while that in new-growth organs (new branches, deciduous supers, leaves and flowers) was the highest at full-blooming stage. The urea-15N applied at core-hardening stage mainly allocated in nutritive organs (leaves, deciduous supers, roots) in the first year, with the distribution rate 54.01% in root systems in winter, which was higher than that in branches (45.99%). The 15N stored in main branches changed drastically from post-harvest to budding stage. Main branches could be regarded as the 'target organs' of N storage, while coarse roots were the 'long-term sink' of N storage. The N reserve distributed preferentially in contiguity organs, and the distribution center changed with the growth and development of winter jujube in next spring.

  18. 15N discrimination and the sensitivity of nitrogen fixation to changes in dietary nitrogen in Reticulitermes flavipes (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Meuti, Megan E; Jones, Susan C; Curtis, Peter S

    2010-12-01

    Xylophagous termites possess symbiotic bacteria that fix atmospheric nitrogen (N(2)). Although symbiotic N(2) fixation is central to termite nutrition and ecologically important, it is energetically costly. Using stable isotopes, we tested the hypothesis that symbiotic N(2) fixation would decrease in workers of the eastern subterranean termite, Reticulitermes flavipes Kollar, which were exposed to high nitrogen diets. To calculate the isotope discrimination factor occurring as a result of digestion, Δ(dig), and which occurs as the result of N(2) fixation, Δ(fix), symbiotic N(2) fixation was inhibited via force feeding termites the antibiotic kanamycin. Antibiotic-treated termites and control (N(2)-fixing) termites were exposed to different concentrations of dietary N (0, 0.21, and 0.94% N), their (15)N signatures were obtained, and the percent nitrogen derived from the atmosphere within termite samples was calculated. As we hypothesized, symbiotic N(2) fixation rates were negatively correlated with dietary N, suggesting that high concentrations of dietary N suppressed symbiotic N(2) fixation in R. flavipes. A comparison of the (15)N isotope signatures of antibiotic-treated termites with their food sources demonstrated that Δ(dig) = 2.284‰, and a comparison of the (15)N isotope signatures of antibiotic-treated termites with control termites indicated that Δ(fix) = -1.238‰. These are the first estimates of Δ(dig) for R. flavipes, and the first estimate of Δ(fix) for any N(2)-fixing termite species.

  19. Cysteamine inhibition of (/sup 15/N)-glycine turnover in cystinosis and of glycine cleavage system in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yudkoff, M.; Nissim, I.; Schneider, A.; Segal, S.

    1981-01-01

    In order to clarify the hyperglycinemic effect of cysteamine treatment in children with nephropathic cystinosis, we measured (/sup 15/N)-glycine turnover in three affected patients. Administration of cysteamine lowered the glycine flux and the glycine metabolic clearance rate but did not alter the glycine pool size. Formation of (/sup 15/N)-serine from (/sup 15/N)-glycine was lower in untreated patients than in control subjects and was reduced still further by cysteamine. Studies in vitro with isolated rat liver mitochondria and acetone extracts of mitochondria indicated that even low cysteamine concentrations (0.1 mM) inhibited the glycine cleavage system in both the direction of glycine oxidation and glycine synthesis. Cysteamine was a more potent inhibitor of the glycine cleavage system than any other sulfhydryl containing compound. Although no ill effects of cysteamine treatment were immediately apparent, patients receiving cysteamine should be monitored carefully for the appearance of any neurologic symptoms which might be referable to inhibition of the glycine cleavage system.

  20. Nitrogen Fractionation in Protoplanetary Disks from the H13CN/HC15N Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, V. V.; Öberg, K. I.; Huang, J.; Loomis, R.; Qi, C.

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen fractionation is commonly used to assess the thermal history of solar system volatiles. With ALMA it is for the first time possible to directly measure {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratios in common molecules during the assembly of planetary systems. We present ALMA observations of the {{{H}}}13{CN} and {{HC}}15{{N}} J=3-2 lines at 0.″5 angular resolution, toward a sample of six protoplanetary disks, selected to span a range of stellar and disk structure properties. Adopting a typical {}12{{C}}/{}13{{C}} ratio of 70, we find comet-like {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratios of 80–160 in five of the disks (3 T Tauri and 2 Herbig Ae disks) and lack constraints for one of the T Tauri disks (IM Lup). There are no systematic differences between T Tauri and Herbig Ae disks, or between full and transition disks within the sample. In addition, no correlation is observed between disk-averaged D/H and {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratios in the sample. One of the disks, V4046 Sgr, presents unusually bright HCN isotopologue emission, enabling us to model the radial profiles of {{{H}}}13{CN} and {{HC}}15{{N}}. We find tentative evidence of an increasing {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratio with radius, indicating that selective photodissociation in the inner disk is important in setting the {}14{{N}}/{}15{{N}} ratio during planet formation.

  1. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles.

  2. Steroselective synthesis and application of L-( sup 15 N) amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J. ); Lodwig, S.N. . Div. of Science)

    1991-01-01

    We have developed two general approaches to the stereoselective synthesis of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-labeled amino acids. First, labeled serine, biosynthesized using the methylotrophic bacterium M. extorquens AM1, serves as a chiral precursor for the synthesis of other amino acids. For example, pyridoxal phosphate enzymes can be used for the conversion of L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)serine to L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tyrosine, L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tryptophan, and L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)cysteine. In the second approach, developed by Oppolzer and Tamura, an electrophilic amination'' reagent, 1-chloro-1-nitrosocyclohexane, was used to convert chiral enolates into L-{alpha}-amino acids. We prepared 1-chloro-1-({sup 15}N) nitrosocyclohexane and used it to aminate chiral enolates to produce L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)amino acids. The stereoselectivity of this scheme using the Oppolzer sultam chiral auxiliary is remarkable, producing enantiomer ratios of 200 to 1. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Fate of nitrogen deposition and decomposed nitrogen from litter in a 15N-tracer mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, R.; Perks, M.; Mencuccini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic-derived nitrogen may be a major driver of the 0.6-0.7 Pg y-1 increase in the carbon sink in historically N-limited northern and boreal forests, but the magnitude of its effect is still uncertain. A strong effect depends on the allocation of N to trees, because of their high C:N ratio in woody tissues, and isotope tracer experiments have shown that the majority of 15N tracers applied directly to the soil are lost via leeching or retained in soil pools rather than being acquired by tree root systems. However, ambient anthropogenic inputs of N to these systems are transported in the atmosphere and intercepted by foliage before they reach the soil system, while labelled fertilization experiments also can only explicitly trace the fate of the 15N-tracer from deposition, as opposed to changes in the fate of N from litter, where decomposition rates may be enhanced at low ambient levels of deposition, affecting the availability of N from this pool for tree nutrition. We present initial results from a potted Sitka Spruce mesocosm 15N-tracer experiment where ambient nitrogen deposition was supplemented with a minor (0.4 kg ha-1 y-1) input of additional N, applied to either the soil or the foliage. Either this deposition, or litter in the pots, was enriched in 15N, allowing the fate of the isotope from two different methods of deposition to be compared with that of nitrogen released from the litter under the deposition treatment.

  4. Ammonia 15N/14N Isotope Ratio in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.R.; Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, M. H.; Owen, T. C; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Data from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer has been used to derive the N-15/N-14 isotope ratio in ammonia at Jupiter. Although the mass spectral interference from the water contribution to 18 amu makes an accurate derivation of the (N-15)H3/(N-14)H3 ratio difficult from measurements of the singly ionized signals at 18 and 17 amu, this interference is not present in the doubly charged 8.5 and 9.0 amu signals from (N-14)H3++ and (N-15)H3++ respectively. Although the count rate from the 9 amu signal is low during the direct sampling of the atmosphere, the ammonia signal was considerably enhanced during the first enrichment cell (EC1) experiment that measured gas sampled between 0.8 and 2.8 bar. Count rates at 9 amu in the EC1 experiment reach 60/second and measure ammonia sampled from 0.88 to 2.8 bar. In the EC1 measurements the 8.5 amu signal is not measured directly, but can be calculated from the ammonia contribution to 17 amu and the ratio of NH3 ions of a double to single charged observed during a high resolution mass scan taken near the end of the descent. The high resolution scan gives this ratio from ammonia sampled much deeper in the atmosphere. These results are described and compared with Infrared Space Observatory-Short Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-SWS) observations that give this ratio at 400 mbar.

  5. Nonlinear infrared generation in alkali metal vapors: steady state susceptibilities and dynamic behavior. Effective relaxation rates and preliminary Raman gain predictions for the Cs system. Technical progress report, 1 July-31 December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1986-12-01

    Effective relaxation rates for atomic cesium pumped by doubled Alexandrite radiation are presented. Laser radiation levels are 8S 1/2 and 9S 1/2; resonance levels 3 = 8P 1/2 and 8P 1/2, respectively. In addition, Raman gain is represented in two graphs which plot chi per atom (10 to the -13 power) at Raman peak versus the infrared wave number per centimeter and the corresponding doubled Alexandrite wave number. One graph covers resonance level 8P, the other 9P; in both cases cesium is pumped with a peak pulse height of 0.5 MW in a 200 micron diameter spot size.

  6. A mixed relaxed clock model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  7. A mixed relaxed clock model.

    PubMed

    Lartillot, Nicolas; Phillips, Matthew J; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-19

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

  8. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  9. Carbon-rich Presolar Grains from Massive Stars: Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N Ratios and the Mystery of 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.

  10. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12 C/ 13 C and 14 N/ 15 N ratios and the mystery of 15 N

    DOE PAGES

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; ...

    2015-07-30

    We compared carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. Furthermore, we present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. All of the explosion energies and H concentrations aremore » considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.« less

  11. Paley-Wiener criterion for relaxation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.; Rajagopal, A. K.; Rendell, R. W.; Teitler, S.

    1983-11-01

    It is shown how the Paley-Wiener theorem in Fourier-transform theory can provide the bound for physically acceptable relaxation functions for long times. In principle the linear exponential decay function, and hence also a superposition of linear exponential decay functions, does not provide an acceptable description of relaxation phenomenon although the Paley-Wiener bound can be made to approach arbitrarily close to linear exponential. A class of relaxation functions proposed recently obeys the Paley-Wiener bound. The general necessity for time-dependent relaxation rates is emphasized and discussed.

  12. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  13. Relaxation of liquid bridge after droplets coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiangen; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Guo; Huang, Yingzhou; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the relaxation of liquid bridge after the coalescence of two sessile droplets resting on an organic glass substrate both experimentally and theoretically. The liquid bridge is found to relax to its equilibrium shape via two distinct approaches: damped oscillation relaxation and underdamped relaxation. When the viscosity is low, damped oscillation shows up, in this approach, the liquid bridge undergoes a damped oscillation process until it reaches its stable shape. However, if the viscous effects become significant, underdamped relaxation occurs. In this case, the liquid bridge relaxes to its equilibrium state in a non-periodic decay mode. In depth analysis indicates that the damping rate and oscillation period of damped oscillation are related to an inertial-capillary time scale τc. These experimental results are also testified by our numerical simulations with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  14. Similarities and differences in 13C and 15N stable isotope ratios in two non-lethal tissue types from shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus (Rafinesque, 1820)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeVries, R. J.; Schramm, Harold L.

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that δ13C and δ15N signatures of pectoral spines would provide measures of δ13C and δ15N similar to those obtained from fin clips for adult shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus. Thirty-two shovelnose sturgeon (fork length [FL] = 500–724 mm) were sampled from the lower Mississippi River, USA on 23 February 2013. Isotopic relationships between the two tissue types were analyzed using mixed model analysis of covariance. Tissue types differed significantly for both δ13C (P < 0.01; spine: mean = −23.83, SD = 0.62; fin clip: mean = −25.74, SD = 0.97) and δ15N (P = 0.01; spine: mean = 17.01, SD = 0.51; fin clip: mean = 17.19, SD = 0.62). Neither FL nor the FL × tissue type interaction had significant (P > 0.05) effects on δ13C. Fin clip δ13C values were highly variable and weakly correlated (r = 0.16, P = 0.40) with those from pectoral spines. We found a significant FL-tissue type interaction for δ15N, reflecting increasing δ15N with FL for spines and decreasing δ15N with FL for fin clips. These results indicate that spines are not a substitute for fin clip tissue for measuring δ13C and δ15N for shovelnose sturgeon in the lower Mississippi River, but the two tissues have different turnover rates they may provide complementary information for assessing trophic position at different time scales.

  15. Long-term influence of manure and mineral nitrogen applications on plant and soil 15N and 13C values from the Broadbalk Wheat Experiment.

    PubMed

    Senbayram, Mehmet; Dixon, Liz; Goulding, Keith W T; Bol, Roland

    2008-06-01

    The Broadbalk Wheat Experiment at Rothamsted Research in the UK provides a unique opportunity to investigate the long-term impacts of environmental change and agronomic practices on plants and soils. We examined the influence of manure and mineral fertiliser applications on temporal trends in the stable N ((15)N) and C ((13)C) isotopes of wheat collected during 1968-1979 and 1996-2005, and of soil collected in 1966 and 2000. The soil delta(15)N values in 1966 and 2000 were higher in manure than the mineral N supplied soil; the latter had similar or higher delta(15)N values than non-fertilised soil. The straw delta(15)N values significantly decreased in all N treatments during 1968 to 1979, but not for 1996-2005. The straw delta(15)N values decreased under the highest mineral N supply (192 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)) by 3 per thousand from 1968 to 1979. Mineral N supply significantly increased to straw delta(13)C values in dry years, but not in wet years. Significant correlations existed between wheat straw delta(13)C values with cumulative rainfall (March to June). The cultivar Hereward (grown 1996-2005) was less affected by changes in environmental conditions (i.e. water stress and fertiliser regime) than Cappelle Desprez (1968-1979). We conclude that, in addition to fertiliser type and application rates, water stress and, importantly, plant variety influenced plant delta(13)C and delta(15)N values. Hence, water stress and differential variety response should be considered in plant studies using plant delta(13)C and delta(15)N trends to delineate past or recent environmental or agronomic changes.

  16. Proton-coupled 15N NMR spectra of neutral and protonated ethenoadenosine and ethenocytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Sierzputowska-Gracz, H; Wiewiórowski, M; Kozerski, L; von Philipsborn, W

    1984-01-01

    The 15N chemical shifts and 15N, 1H spin coupling constants were determined in the title compounds using the INEPT pulse sequence and assigned with the aid of selective proton decoupling. The delta/15N/ and J/N, H/ values are discussed in terms of involvement of the imidazole ring created by ethenobridging in the electronic structure of the whole molecule. Both spectral parameters indicate that the diligant nitrogen in this ring is the primary site of protonation in these modified nucleosides. It is concluded that 15N NMR of nucleoside bases can be largely a complementary method to 1H and 13C NMR studies and, in addition, can serve as a direct probe for studies of nitrogen environment in oligomeric fragments of nucleic acids even at moderately strong magnetic fields due to the higher spectral dispersion compared with 1H and 13C NMR spectra. PMID:6473107

  17. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  18. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  19. Improved TROSY-HNCA experiment with suppression of conformational exchange induced relaxation.

    PubMed

    Pervushin, K; Gallius, V; Ritter, C

    2001-10-01

    A general method for improving of the sensitivity of the TROSY-type triple resonance experiments in the presence of conformational exchange-induced (CSX) relaxation is proposed based on the use of CPMG-INEPT (Müller et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1995, 117, 11043-11048) during the N-C polarization transfer periods. Significantly improved sensitivity is demonstrated for the majority of cross-peaks in the new [15N,1H]-TROSY-XY-HNCA experiment, measured with partially folded RNase AS-Protein, with negligible loss of sensitivity for resonances unaffected by CSX relaxation. In addition, a comparison of cross-peak amplitudes in [15N,1N]-TROSY-XY-HNCA and conventional [15N,1H]-TROSY-HNCA spectra provides a quick and sensitive estimation of the CSX relaxation contribution.

  20. Ecosystem N distribution and δ15N during a century of forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compton, J.E.; Hooker, T.D.; Perakis, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of terrestrial ecosystem nitrogen (N) pools reflect internal processes and input–output balances. Disturbance generally increases N cycling and loss, yet few studies have examined ecosystem δ15N over a disturbance-recovery sequence. We used a chronosequence approach to examine N distribution and δ15N during forest regrowth after agricultural abandonment. Site ages ranged from 10 to 115 years, with similar soils, climate, land-use history, and overstory vegetation (white pine Pinus strobus). Foliar N and δ15N decreased as stands aged, consistent with a progressive tightening of the N cycle during forest regrowth on agricultural lands. Over time, foliar δ15N became more negative, indicating increased fractionation along the mineralization–mycorrhizal–plant uptake pathway. Total ecosystem N was constant across the chronosequence, but substantial internal N redistribution occurred from the mineral soil to plants and litter over 115 years (>25% of ecosystem N or 1,610 kg ha−1). Temporal trends in soil δ15N generally reflected a redistribution of depleted N from the mineral soil to the developing O horizon. Although plants and soil δ15N are coupled over millennial time scales of ecosystem development, our observed divergence between plants and soil suggests that they can be uncoupled during the disturbance-regrowth sequence. The approximate 2‰ decrease in ecosystem δ15N over the century scale suggests significant incorporation of atmospheric N, which was not detected by traditional ecosystem N accounting. Consideration of temporal trends and disturbance legacies can improve our understanding of the influence of broader factors such as climate or N deposition on ecosystem N balances and δ15N.

  1. Angular distributions for /sup 16/O(/gamma/,p)/sup 15/N at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.S.; Kinney, E.R.; Matthews, J.L.; Sapp, W.W.; Soos, T.; Owens, R.O.; Turley, R.S.; Pignault, G.

    1988-12-01

    The photoproton knockout reaction on /sup 16/O leaving /sup 15/N in low-lying bound states has been observed over the photon energy range from 196 to 361 MeV. The angular distribution for the reaction populating the ground state of /sup 15/N develops sharp structure as the photon energy is increased but that for population of the excited states is smooth. The results are not explained by existing theoretical models.

  2. Assessing denitrification in groundwater using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N: In situ measurement of a sequential multistep reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; Garabedian, S.P.; Revesz, K.M.; Yoshinari, T.

    2004-01-01

    Denitrification was measured within a nitrate-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N nitrate. The aquifer contained zones of relatively high concentrations of nitrite (up to 77 ??M) and nitrous oxide (up to 143 ??M) and has been the site of previous studies examining ground water denitrification using the acetylene block technique. Small-scale (15-24 m travel distance) tracer tests were conducted by injecting 15N nitrate and bromide as tracers into a depth interval that contained nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and excess nitrogen gas. The timing of the bromide breakthrough curves at down-gradient wells matched peaks in 15N abundance above background for nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gas after more than 40 days of travel. Results were simulated with a one-dimensional transport model using linked reaction kinetics for the individual steps of the denitrification reaction pathway. It was necessary to include within the model spatial variations in background concentrations of all nitrogen oxide species. The model indicated that nitrite production (0.036-0.047 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d -1) was faster than the subsequent denitrification steps (0.013-0.016 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrous oxide and 0.013-0.020 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrogen gas) and that the total rate of reaction was slower than indicated by both acetylene block tracer tests and laboratory incubations. The rate of nitrate removal by denitrification was much slower than the rate of transport, indicating that nitrate would migrate several kilometers down-gradient before being completely consumed.

  3. Nitrogen assimilation and dissimilation by bacteria and benthic microalgae in tidal mudflat sediment in a 15N labeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dähnke, K.; Moneta, A.; Veuger, B.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    In a short-term 15N-labeling experiment, we investigated the changes in relative utilization of reactive nitrogen in tidal flat sediment, focusing on the relative importance of assimilatory versus dissimilatory processes and the role of benthic microalgae therein. 15N-labeled ammonium and nitrate were added separately to homogenized tidal flat sediment, and 15N was subsequently traced into bulk sediment and inorganic nutrients in pore water. Integration of results in an N cycle model allowed us to quantify rates for the major assimilatory and dissimilatory processes in the sediment. Overall, the results indicate that the equilibrium between assimilation and dissimilation in this tidal mudflat is mainly dependent on the nitrogen source: Nitrate is utilized almost exclusively dissimilatory via denitrification, whereas ammonium is rapidly assimilated, with about a quarter of this assimilation due to BMA activity. The major influence of benthic microalgae is on assimilation of ammonium, ceasing BMA activity turns the sediments from a net ammonium sink to a net source. There is little evidence of dissimilative processes like nitrification in undisturbed sediments, but high initial nitrification rates suggest that in a dynamic environment like tidal flats, intense and fast nitrification/denitrification of ammonium is abundant. The driving mechanisms for assimilation or dissimilation accordingly appear to be ruled to a large extent by external physical forcing, with the entire system being capable of rapid shifts following environmental changes. Our combined experimental and model approach reveals that selective removal of labeled compounds takes place for both ammonium and nitrate. Mechanisms remain unclear, but this finding clearly challenges the traditional labeling approach and underscores the need to consider selective uptake in future labeling studies. Ignoring such selective uptake mechanisms will lead to misinterpretation of process rates when these are estimated

  4. Efficient Synthesis of Nicotinamide-1-15N for Ultrafast NMR Hyperpolarization Using Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide (a vitamin B3 amide) is one of the key vitamins as well as a drug for treatment of M. tuberculosis, HIV, cancer, and other diseases. Here, an improved Zincke reaction methodology is presented allowing for straightforward and scalable synthesis of nicotinamide-1-15N with an excellent isotopic purity (98%) and good yield (55%). 15N nuclear spin label in nicotinamide-1-15N can be NMR hyperpolarized in seconds using parahydrogen gas. NMR hyperpolarization using the process of temporary conjugation between parahydrogen and to-be-hyperpolarized biomolecule on hexacoordinate iridium complex via the Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) method significantly increases detection sensitivity (e.g., >20 000-fold for nicotinamide-1-15N at 9.4 T) as has been shown by Theis T. et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404), and hyperpolarized in this fashion, nicotinamide-1-15N can be potentially used to probe metabolic processes in vivo in future studies. Moreover, the presented synthetic methodology utilizes mild reaction conditions, and therefore can also be potentially applied to synthesis of a wide range of 15N-enriched N-heterocycles that can be used as hyperpolarized contrast agents for future in vivo molecular imaging studies. PMID:26999571

  5. Highly 15N-Enriched Chondritic Clasts in the Isheyevo Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bonal, L; Huss, G R; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-01-14

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment ({delta}{sup 15}N up to +1500{per_thousand}), similar to {delta}{sup 15}N values reported in micron-sized regions (hotspots) of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) of possibly cometary origin and fine-grained matrices of unmetamorphosed chondrites. These {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are commonly attributed to low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in the protosolar molecular cloud or in the outer part of the protoplanetary disk. The nature of the whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment of the metal-rich chondrites is not understood. We report a discovery of a unique type of primitive chondritic clasts in the CH/CB-like meteorite Isheyevo, which provides important constraints on the origin of {sup 15}N anomaly in metal-rich chondrites and nitrogen-isotope fractionation in the Solar System. These clasts contain tiny chondrules and refractory inclusions (5-15 {micro}m in size), and abundant ferromagnesian chondrule fragments (1-50 {micro}m in size) embedded in the partly hydrated, fine-grained matrix material composed of olivines, pyroxenes, poorly-organized aromatic organics, phyllosilicates and other hydrous phases. The mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of chondrules and refractory inclusions in the clasts are similar to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting formation at similar heliocentric distances. In contrast to the previously known extraterrestrial samples, the fine-grained material in the clasts is highly and rather uniformly enriched in {sup 15}N, with bulk {delta}{sup 15}N values ranging between +1000 and +1300{per_thousand}; the {delta}{sup 15}N values in rare hotspots range from +1400 to +4000{per_thousand}. Since fine-grained matrices in the lithic clasts are the only component containing thermally unprocessed (during CAI and chondrule formation or during impact melting) materials that accreted into the metal rich chondrite parent body(ies), the {sup 15}N

  6. Measurement of the 20 and 90 keV Resonances in the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N Reaction via the Trojan Horse Method

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tumino, A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Irgaziev, B.; Coc, A.

    2008-10-10

    The {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reaction is of primary importance in several astrophysical scenarios, including fluorine nucleosynthesis inside asymptotic giant branch stars as well as oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. Thus the indirect measurement of the low energy region of the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reaction has been performed to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions. In particular the strength of the 20 and 90 keV resonances has been deduced and the change in the reaction rate evaluated.

  7. What can Δ 15N and Δ 18O isotopes tell us about sources, transport, and fate of nitrate in the Mississippi River Basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglin, W. A.

    2003-12-01

    Water and nutrients, primarily nitrate (NO3) in Mississippi River discharge, affect the size and severity of the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic (depleted dissolved oxygen) zone. Approximately 120 water samples were collected from 16 sites on small streams and 6 sites on large rivers within the Mississippi River Basin in 1997-98 to see if NO3 sources and transformations can be identified using the stable isotopic ratios Δ 15N and Δ 18O. Results from Lagrangian sampling at the large river sites indicate that nitrate mass decreases slightly, while Δ 15N and Δ 18O isotope ratios are unchanged in the 1500 river kilometers between the Upper Mississippi-Ohio River confluence and the Gulf of Mexico. Results also show that Δ 15N and Δ 18O values from small streams draining lands dominated by row crops or livestock tended to be distinct from those dominated by urban or undeveloped land. Mean Δ 15N values at the 16 sites on small streams were most strongly correlated (Pearson's r) with manure production rate (0.64), percent residential land use (-0.45), and urea use rate (0.43). The best multiple linear regression (MLR) model for mean Δ 15N values (r2=0.69) used manure production rate and ammonium nitrate use rate as explanatory variables. Mean Δ 18O values were most strongly correlated with percent wetlands (0.72), mean NO3 concentration (-0.71), and percent residential land use (0.58). The best MLR model for mean Δ 18O values (r2=0.85) used percent residential land use, percent wetlands, and ammonium nitrate use rate as explanatory variables. Mean NO3 concentrations were most strongly correlated with percent row-crops land use (0.84), nitrogen-fertilizer use rate (0.74), and hog-manure production rate (0.66). The best MLR model for mean NO3 concentration (r2=0.85) used percent row-crops land use and percent grain-crops land use as explanatory variables. MLR equations developed from the 16 smaller streams were used to predict mean Δ 15N and Δ 18O values and NO3

  8. Estimate of production of gaseous nitrogen in the human body based on (15)N analysis of breath N2 after administration of [(15)N2]urea.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Peter

    2013-01-01

    After oral administration of [(15)N2]urea (1.5 mmol, 95 atom% (15)N), we found that breath N2 was significantly (15)N-labelled. The result suggests that molecular nitrogen in breath must be partly produced endogenously. Based on a metabolic model, the endogenous N2 production was estimated to be 0.40±0.25 mmol kg(-1) d(-1) or 2.9±1.8 % of the total (urinary and faecal) N excretion in fasted healthy subjects (n=4). In patients infected with Helicobacter pylori (n=5), the endogenous N2 production was increased to 1.24±0.59 mmol kg(-1) d(-1) or 9.0±4.3 % of the total N excretion compared to the healthy controls (p<0.05). We conclude that N balance and gas exchange measurements may be affected by endogenously produced nitrogen, especially in metabolic situations with elevated nitrosation, for instance in oxidative and nitrosative stress-related diseases such as H. pylori infections.

  9. Compound-specific δ15N amino acid measurements in littoral mussels in the California upwelling ecosystem: a new approach to generating baseline δ15N Isoscapes for coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ(15)N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ(15)N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ(15)N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ(15)N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼ 7‰ to ∼ 12‰, R(2) = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ(15)N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ(15)N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ(15)N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with (15)N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ(15)N values of phenylalanine (δ(15)NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ(15)N values. We hypothesize δ(15)N(Phe) values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ(15)N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ(15)N(Phe) values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ(15)N values. We propose that δ(15)N(Phe) isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ(15)N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives.

  10. Changes in soil nitrogen storage and δ15N with woody plant encroachment in a subtropical savanna parkland landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutton, T. W.; Liao, J. D.

    2010-09-01

    Subtropical woodlands dominated by N-fixing tree legumes have largely replaced grasslands in the Rio Grande Plains, southwestern United States, during the past century. To evaluate the impact of this vegetation change on the N cycle, we measured the mass and isotopic composition (δ15N) of N in the soil system of remnant grasslands and woody plant stands ranging in age from 10 to 130 years. Nitrogen accumulated at linear rates following woody encroachment in the litter (0.10-0.14 g N m-2 yr-1), roots (0.63-0.98 g N m-2 yr-1), and soils (0.75-3.50 g N m-2 yr-1), resulting in a 50%-150% increase in N storage in the soil system (0-30 cm) in woody stands older than 60 years. Simultaneous decreases in soil δ15N of up to 2‰ in the upper 30 cm of the profile are consistent with a scenario in which N inputs have exceeded losses following woody encroachment and suggest N accrual was derived from symbiotic N fixation by tree legumes and/or differential atmospheric N deposition to wooded areas. Vertical uplift and lateral transfer of N by the more deeply and intensively rooted woody plants may have contributed to N accumulation in wooded areas, but soil δ15N values are inconsistent with this explanation. N accumulation following woody encroachment may alter soil N availability, species interactions and successional dynamics, flux rates of key trace gases such as NOX and N2O and ecosystem C sequestration. Given the geographic dimensions of woody encroachment, these results may have implications for atmospheric composition and the climate system.

  11. Soil N and 15N variation with time in a California annual grassland ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, D.L.; Amundson, Ronald; Baisden, W. Troy; Kendall, C.; Harden, J.

    2001-01-01

    The %N and ??15N values of soils and plants were measured along a chronosequence spanning 3 to 3000 Ky in a California annual grassland. Total soil N decreased with increasing soil age (1.1 to 0.4 kg N m-2) while the mean ?? 15N values of the soil N increased by several ??? from the youngest to oldest sites (+3.5 to +6.2 ???). The ?? 15N values of plants varied along the gradient, reflecting changing soil N pools and differences in the form of N uptake. The decline in total N storage with time is hypothesized to be due to a shift from N to P limitation with increasing soil age. The general increase in ?? 15N values with time is interpreted using a N mass balance model, and appears to reflect a shift toward an increasing proportional losses of inorganic mineral forms of N (vs. organic forms) with increasing soil age. We develop a quantitative index of this trend (mineral vs. organic forms of N loss) using mass balance considerations and parameters. The %N and ?? 15N values along the California age gradient were compared to the published data for a comparably aged chronosequence in Hawaii. Most striking in this comparison is the observation that the California soil and plant ?? 15N values are several ??? greater than those on comparably aged Hawaiian sites. Multiple explanations are plausible, but assuming the sites have a similar range in ?? 15N values of atmospheric inputs, the isotopic differences suggest that N may be, at least seasonally, in greater excess in the strongly seasonal, semi-arid, California grassland. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Sewage derive [sup 15]N in the Baltic traced in fucus

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbie, J.E.; Fry, B. ); Larsson, U.; Elmgren, R. )

    1990-01-09

    Himmerfjarden, a fjord-like bay on the eastern shore of the Baltic, receives treated sewage from 250,000 inhabitants. Because the inorganic N in the effluent is enriched in [sup 15]N through denitrification, nitrification, and ammonia volatilization, an analysis of the distribution of [sup 15]N in the Bay tells how far from the source the sewage nitrogen moves. The attached macroalga Fucus vesiculosus was collected in early May from rocky shore at 0-0.5 m depth and the [sup 15]N content of the tips of the fronds analyzed. This N represents uptake and storage during the previous six months and growth during March and April. The [delta][sup 15]N was uniformly high (11-13[per thousand]) in the main body of the Bay within 15 km from the sewage source. Beyond 15 km values decreased with distance to a low of 4.6[per thousand] at 35 km, where the Bay ends and the coastal waters begin. Using the 11-13 and 4.6[per thousand] as endmembers, the percentage of sewage N making up the Fucus at any point may be calculated. The [delta][sub 15]N of particulate organic matter in the offshore Baltic waters was around 0[per thousand] and Fucus had an [delta][sup 15]N about 1.5[per thousand] higher than the POM. From this and other evidence we conclude that there is a belt of coastal water with an elevated [delta][sup 15]N lying along the east coast of the Baltic. This presumably derives from sewage and perhaps from agriculture and is potentially of use as a tracer of coastal zone/pelagic zone interactions.

  13. Isotopic discrimination during litter decomposition and delta13C and delta15N soil profiles in a young artificial stand and in an old floodplain forest.

    PubMed

    Gioacchini, Paola; Masia, Andrea; Canaccini, Francesca; Boldreghini, Pietro; Tonon, Giustino

    2006-06-01

    In the present study, rates of litter decomposition and microbial biomass nitrogen were monitored over an 8-month period in a young broadleaf plantation (18 y) and in an old floodplain forest. Moreover, delta13C and delta15N temporal variations within soil profiles were evaluated at both sites. Rates of litter decomposition were higher in spring and autumn than in summer, in both forests. At the end of the observation period the percentage of original litter remaining was not statistically different between the young and the old forest and accounted for 60-70% of the original amount. Microbial biomass nitrogen in the remaining litter and the percentage of litter mass lost during decomposition were positively correlated. The difference in litter quality affected the decomposition rate and also the changes in carbon isotopic composition during the decomposition process. In contrast, 15N isotopic signatures showed a similar trend in the litter of the two forests irrespective of the litter quality. Although delta13Csoil and delta15Nsoil showed considerable temporal variation they increased with depth in the soils of both sites but their seasonal changes did not reflect those of the decomposing litter. Within the same soil horizon, both delta13C and delta15N showed similar seasonal trends in the soils of the two forests, suggesting the involvement of environmental factors acting at regional level, such as soil temperature and rainfall variations, in regulating seasonal delta13C and delta15N soil variations.

  14. The Effect of N Fertilizer Placement on the Fate of Urea-15N and Yield of Winter Wheat in Southeast China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaoming; Wang, Huoyan; Liu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongzhe; Gao, Shuaishuai; Zhou, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    A field micro-plot experiment using nitrogen isotope (15N) labeling was conducted to determine the effects of placement methods (broadcast and band) and N rates (60, 150 and 240 kg ha–1) on the fate of urea-15N in the wheat–soil system in Guangde County of Anhui Province, China. N fertilizer applied in bands increased grain yield by 15% compared with broadcast application. The N fertilizer application rate had a significant effect on grain yield, straw yield and aboveground biomass, as well as on N uptake and N concentration of wheat. The recovery of urea-15N was a little higher for broadcast (34.0–39.0%) than for band treatment (31.2–38.2%). Most of the soil residual N was retained in the 0–20 cm soil layer. At the N rates of 60 and 240 kg ha–1, the residual 15N was higher for band (34.4 and 108.7 kg ha–1, respectively) than for broadcast application (29.6 and 88.4 kg ha–1, respectively). Compared with broadcast treatment, banded placement of N fertilizer decreased the N loss in the wheat–soil system. Band application one time is an alternative N management practice for winter wheat in this region. PMID:27082246

  15. Nitrogen Isotopic Ratios in Cometary NH2: Implication for 15N-fractionation in Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Jehin, Emmanuël; Decock, Alice; Hutsemékers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Arai, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Isotopic ratios in cometary molecules are diagnostic for the physico-chemical conditions where molecules formed and are processed, from the interstellar medium to the solar nebula. Usually temperatures at the molecular formation control the fractionation of the heavier element in molecular species, e.g., D-fractionation in water.In cometary volatiles, the 14N/15N ratios in CN have been well observed (Manfroid et al. 2009, A&A, 503, 613, and reference therein) and is consistent with the ratio in HCN (a most probable parent of CN) measured in few comets (Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2008, ApJ, 679, L49). Those ratios are enriched compared to the proto-solar value by a factor of ~3. In contrast to those Nitriles, there are only few reports on 14N/15N ratios in Ammonia (as Amine) (Rousselot et al. 2014, ApJ, 780, L17; Shinnaka et al. 2014, ApJ, 782, L16). Ammonia (NH3) is usually the most abundant and HCN is the second most abundant N-bearing volatiles in cometary ice. Especially, recent observations of 15NH2 revealed the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 are comparable to those of CN. However, from the viewpoint of theoretical work, the enrichment of 15N in cometary NH3 cannot be reproduced by current chemical network models. Information about the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 of individual comets is needed to understand the formation mechanisms/environments of NH3 in the early solar system.To clarify the diversity of the 14N/15N ratios in cometary NH3, we determine the 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets individually which include not only Oort cloud comets but also short period comets by using the high-resolution optical spectra of NH2. These spectra were obtained with both the UVES mounted on the VLT in Chile and the HDS on the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii.The derived 14N/15N ratios in NH3 for more than ten comets show high 15N-enrichment compared with the elemental abundances of nitrogen in the Sun by about factor of ~3 and has no large diversity depending on

  16. Using a macroalgal δ15N bioassay to detect cruise ship waste water effluent inputs.

    PubMed

    Kaldy, James

    2011-08-01

    Green macroalgae bioassays were used to determine if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in a small harbor. Opportunistic green macroalgae (Ulva spp.) were collected, cultured under nutrient depleted conditions and characterized with regard to N content and δ15N. Samples of algae were used in controlled incubations to evaluate the direction of isotope shift from exposure to CSWWE. Algae samples exposed to CSWWE exhibited an increase of 1-2.5‰ in δ15N values indicating that the CSWWE had an enriched isotope signature. In contrast, algae samples exposed to field conditions exhibited a significant decrease in the observed δ15N indicating that a light N source was used. Isotopically light, riverine nitrogen derived from N2-fixing trees in the watershed may be a N source utilized by algae. These experiments indicate that the δ15N CSWWE signature was not detectable under the CSWWE loading conditions of this experiment.

  17. Stem injection of 15N-NH4NO3 into mature Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis).

    PubMed

    Nair, Richard; Weatherall, Andrew; Perks, Mike; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Stem injection techniques can be used to introduce (15)N into trees to overcome a low variation in natural abundance and label biomass with a distinct (15)N signature, but have tended to target small and young trees, of a variety of species, with little replication. We injected 98 atom% (15)N ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) solution into 13 mature, 9- to 13-m tall edge-profile Sitka spruce trees in order to produce a large quantity of labelled litter, examining the distribution of the isotope throughout the canopy after felling in terms of both total abundance of (15)N and relative distribution of the isotope throughout individual trees. Using a simple mass balance of the canopy alone, based on observed total needle biomass and modelled branch biomass, all of the isotope injected was accounted for, evenly split between needles and branches, but with a high degree of variability both within individual trees, and among trees. Both (15)N abundance and relative within-canopy distribution were biased towards the upper and middle crown in foliage. Recovery of the label in branches was much more variable than in needles, possibly due to differences in nitrogen allocation for both growth and storage, which differ seasonally between foliage and woody biomass.

  18. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ15N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Nelson, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N) dynamics, which is reflected in the δ15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the ‘rivermouth effect’). This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients) will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  19. The agricultural history of human-nitrogen interactions as recorded in ice core δ15N-NO3-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, J. David; Elliott, Emily M.

    2013-04-01

    The advent and industrialization of the Haber Bosch process in the early twentieth century ushered in a new era of reactive nitrogen distributions on Earth. Since the appearance of the first commercial scale Haber Bosch fertilizer plants, fertilizer application rates have greatly increased in the U.S. While the contributions of fertilizer runoff to eutrophication and anoxic dead zones in coastal regions have been well-documented, the potential influences of increased fertilizer applications on air quality and precipitation chemistry are poorly constrained. Here we combine a 255-year record of precipitation nitrate isotopes preserved in a Greenland ice core, historical reconstructions of fertilizer application rates, and field characterization of the isotopic composition of nitrogen oxides produced biogenically in soils, to provide new constraints on the contributions of biogenic emissions to North American NOx inventories. Our results indicate that increases in twentieth century commercial fertilizer use led to large increases in soil NO, a byproduct released during nitrification and denitrification reactions. These large shifts in soil NO production are evidenced by sharp declines in ice core δ15N-NO3- values. Further, these results suggest that biogenic NOx emissions are underestimated by two to four fold in the U.S. NOx emission inventories used to construct global reactive nitrogen budgets. These results demonstrate that nitrate isotopes in ice cores, coupled with newly constrained δ15N-NOx values for NOx emission sources, provide a novel means for estimating contemporary and historic contributions from individual NOx emission sources to deposition.

  20. Nitrate reductase 15N discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Aspergillus niger, Pichea angusta, and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Eli; Yarnes, Chris; Toney, Michael D.; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Stable 15N isotopes have been used to examine movement of nitrogen (N) through various pools of the global N cycle. A central reaction in the cycle involves the reduction of nitrate (NO−3) to nitrite (NO−2) catalyzed by nitrate reductase (NR). Discrimination against 15N by NR is a major determinant of isotopic differences among N pools. Here, we measured in vitro 15N discrimination by several NRs purified from plants, fungi, and a bacterium to determine the intrinsic 15N discrimination by the enzyme and to evaluate the validity of measurements made using 15N-enriched NO−3. Observed NR isotope discrimination ranged from 22 to 32‰ (kinetic isotope effects of 1.022–1.032) among the different isozymes at natural abundance 15N (0.37%). As the fractional 15N content of substrate NO−3 increased from natural abundance, the product 15N fraction deviated significantly from that expected based on substrate enrichment and 15N discrimination measured at natural abundance. Additionally, isotopic discrimination by denitrifying bacteria used to reduce NO−3 and NO−2 in some protocols became a greater source of error as 15N enrichment increased. We briefly discuss potential causes of the experimental artifacts with enriched 15N and recommend against the use of highly enriched 15N tracers to study N discrimination in plants or soils. PMID:25071800

  1. PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION IN CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTALS, PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME , CRYSTAL DEFECTS, QUARTZ, GLASS, STRAIN(MECHANICS), TEMPERATURE, NUCLEAR SPINS, HYDROGEN, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, FLUORIDES, COLOR CENTERS, PHONONS, OXYGEN.

  2. Relationships between soil nitrogen dynamics and natural 15N-abundance in plant foliage from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; Van Miegroet, H. M.

    1994-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that naturally occurring nitrogen (N) isotope ratios in foliage (from plants that do not symbiotically fix atmospheric N{sub 2}) are an indicator of soil N dynamics in forests. Replicate plots were established at eight locations ranging in elevation from 615 to 1670 m in Great Smoky Mountains National Park in eastern Tennessee, U.S.A. The locations selected ranged from N-poor (low-elevation) to N-rich (high-elevation) forest stands. Soils were sampled in June 1992; plants, forest floors, and upper mineral soils were sampled in August 1992. Net N mineralization and net nitrification potentials for surface mineral soils and organic matter layers at each site were determined by aerobic laboratory incubations. Soils and organic layers from high-elevation sites had greater net N mineralization and nitrification potentials than soils from low-elevation sites. There were significant (P {le} 0.05) differences between study sites in soil {sup 15}N abundance. Therefore, we examined correlations between measures of soil N availability and both mean foliar {delta}{sup 15}N values and mean enrichment factors ({var_epsilon}{sub p-s} = {delta}{sup 15}N{sub leaf} - {delta}{sup 15}N{sub soil}). In evergreens, maples, and ferns, mean foliar {delta}{sup 15}N values and mean enrichment factors were positively correlated with net N mineralization and net nitrification potentials in soil. The observed relationships between natural {sup 15}N abundance in plant leaves and soil N availability were explained by a simple model of soil N dynamics. The model predicts how the isotopic composition of plant N is affected by the following factors: (i) varying uptake of soil NH{sub 4}-N and NO{sub 3}-N, (ii) the isotopic composition of different soil N pools, and (iii) relative rates of soil N transformations.

  3. The position dependent 15N enrichment of nitrous oxide in the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Röckmann, T; Kaiser, J; Brenninkmeijer, C A; Brand, W A; Borchers, R; Crowley, J N; Wollenhaupt, M; Crutzen, P J

    2001-01-01

    The position dependent 15N fractionation of nitrous oxide (N2O), which cannot be obtained from mass spectrometric analysis on molecular N2O itself, can be determined with high precision using isotope ratio mass spectrometry on the NO+ fragment that is formed on electron impact in the source of an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Laboratory UV photolysis experiments show that strong position dependent 15N fractionations occur in the photolysis of N2O in the stratosphere, its major atmospheric sink. Measurements on the isotopic composition of stratospheric N2O indeed confirm the presence of strong isotope enrichments, in particular the difference in the fractionation constants for 15N14NO and 14N15NO. The absolute magnitudes of the fractionation constants found in the stratosphere are much smaller, however, than those found in the lab experiments, demonstrating the importance of dynamical and also additional chemical processes like the reaction of N2O with O(1D).

  4. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  5. Determination of γ -ray widths in 15N using nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szücs, T.; Bemmerer, D.; Caciolli, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Massarczyk, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Schwengner, R.; Takács, M. P.; Ur, C. A.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, L.

    2015-07-01

    Background: The stable nucleus 15N is the mirror of 15O, the bottleneck in the hydrogen burning CNO cycle. Most of the 15N level widths below the proton emission threshold are known from just one nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurement, with limited precision in some cases. A recent experiment with the AGATA demonstrator array determined level lifetimes using the Doppler shift attenuation method in 15O. As a reference and for testing the method, level lifetimes in 15N have also been determined in the same experiment. Purpose: The latest compilation of 15N level properties dates back to 1991. The limited precision in some cases in the compilation calls for a new measurement to enable a comparison to the AGATA demonstrator data. The widths of several 15N levels have been studied with the NRF method. Method: The solid nitrogen compounds enriched in 15N have been irradiated with bremsstrahlung. The γ rays following the deexcitation of the excited nuclear levels were detected with four high-purity germanium detectors. Results: Integrated photon-scattering cross sections of 10 levels below the proton emission threshold have been measured. Partial γ -ray widths of ground-state transitions were deduced and compared to the literature. The photon-scattering cross sections of two levels above the proton emission threshold, but still below other particle emission energies have also been measured, and proton resonance strengths and proton widths were deduced. Conclusions: Gamma and proton widths consistent with the literature values were obtained, but with greatly improved precision.

  6. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  7. Reactions, characterization and uptake of ammoxidized kraft lignin labeled with 15N.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, F; Varela, G; Delgado, E; López-Dellamary, F; Zúñiga, V; González, V; Faix, O; Meier, D

    2007-05-01

    Ammoxidation of kraft lignin was carried out in a Parr reactor using (15)NH(3) as the main nitrogen source. Reaction parameters were set up until a total nitrogen content of approximately 13 wt.% in lignin was achieved, in accordance with conditions of previous studies. Analytical tools such as FTIR, Py-GC/MS, and solid state NMR were used in this research. The nature of nitrogen bondings is discussed. The incorporation of the (15)N from ammoxidized lignin was followed in pumpkins (Zucchini cucurbita pepo L.) by means of (15)N emission spectroscopy.

  8. Derivatives of pyrazinecarboxylic acid: 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Wolfgang; Eller, Gernot A; Datterl, Barbara; Habicht, Daniela

    2009-07-01

    NMR spectroscopic studies are undertaken with derivatives of 2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid. Complete and unambiguous assignment of chemical shifts ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N) and coupling constants ((1)H,(1)H; (13)C,(1)H; (15)N,(1)H) is achieved by combined application of various 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques. Unequivocal mapping of (13)C,(1)H spin coupling constants is accomplished by 2D (delta,J) long-range INEPT spectra with selective excitation. Phenomena such as the tautomerism of 3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid are discussed.

  9. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from in situ measurements using push-pull 15N tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Walther, W.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variability of in situ denitrification rates (Dr(in situ)) and their relation to the denitrification capacity in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, 28 push-pull 15N tracer tests for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates were conducted in two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in northern Germany. The 15N analysis of denitrification-derived 15N-labelled N2 and N2O dissolved in water samples collected during the push-pull 15N tracer tests was performed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in the lab and additionally for some tracer tests online in the field with a quadrupole membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS) in order to test the feasibility of on-site real-time 15N analysis. Aquifer material from the same locations and depths as the push-pull injection points was incubated, and the initial and cumulative denitrification after 1 year of incubation (Dcum(365)) as well as the stock of reduced compounds (SRC) was compared with in situ measurements of denitrification. This was done to derive transfer functions suitable to predict Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ). Dr(in situ) ranged from 0 to 51.5 μg N kg-1 d-1. Denitrification rates derived from on-site isotope analysis using MIMS satisfactorily coincided with laboratory analysis by conventional IRMS, thus proving the feasibility of in situ analysis. Dr(in situ) was significantly higher in the sulfidic zone of both aquifers compared to the zone of non-sulfidic aquifer material. Overall, regressions between the Dcum(365) and SRC of the tested aquifer material with Dr(in situ) exhibited only a modest linear correlation for the full data set. However, the predictability of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ) data clearly increased for aquifer samples from the zone of NO3--bearing groundwater. In the NO3--free aquifer zone, a lag phase of denitrification after NO3- injections was observed, which confounded the

  10. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from in situ measurements using push-pull 15N tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Walther, W.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variability of in situ denitrification rates (Dr(in situ)) and their relation to the denitrification capacity in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, 28 push-pull 15N tracer tests for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates were conducted in two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in Northern Germany. The 15N analysis of denitrification derived 15N labelled N2 and N2O dissolved in water samples collected during the push-pull 15N tracer tests was performed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in the lab and additionally for some tracer tests online in the field with a quadrupole membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS), in order to test the feasibility of on-site real-time 15N analysis. Aquifer material from the same locations and depths as the push-pull injection points was incubated and the initial and cumulative denitrification after one year of incubation (Dcum(365)) as well as the stock of reduced compounds (SRC) was compared with in situ measurements of denitrification. This was done to derive transfer functions suitable to predict Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ). Dr(in situ) ranged from 0 to 51.5 μg N kg-1 d-1. Denitrification rates derived from on-site isotope analysis using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry satisfactorily coincided with laboratory analysis by conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry, thus proving the feasibility of in situ analysis. Dr(in situ) was significantly higher in the sulphidic zone of both aquifers compared to the zone of non-sulphidic aquifer material. Overall, regressions between the Dcum(365) and SRC of the tested aquifer material with Dr(in situ) exhibited only a modest linear correlation for the full data set. But the predictability of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ) data clearly increased for aquifer samples from the zone of NO3--bearing groundwater. In the NO3--free aquifer zone a lag phase of denitrification after NO3

  11. Nitrogen retention across a gradient of 15N additions to an unpolluted temperate forest soil in Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Compton, J.E.; Hedin, L.O.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated nitrogen (N) inputs can drive nonlinear changes in N cycling, retention, and loss in forest ecosystems. Nitrogen processing in soils is critical to understanding these changes, since soils typically are the largest N sink in forests. To elucidate soil mechanisms that underlie shifts in N cycling across a wide gradient of N supply, we added 15NH415NO3 at nine treatment levels ranging in geometric sequence from 0.2 kg to 640 kg NA? ha-1A? yr-1 to an unpolluted old-growth temperate forest in southern Chile. We recovered roughly half of tracers in 0-25 cm of soil, primarily in the surface 10 cm. Low to moderate rates of N supply failed to stimulate N leaching, which suggests that most unrecovered 15N was transferred from soils to unmeasured sinks above ground. However, soil solution losses of nitrate increased sharply at inputs > 160 kg NA? ha-1A? yr-1, corresponding to a threshold of elevated soil N availability and declining 15N retention in soil. Soil organic matter (15N in soils at the highest N inputs and may explain a substantial fraction of the 'missing N' often reported in studies of fates of N inputs to forests. Contrary to expectations, N additions did not stimulate gross N cycling, potential nitrification, or ammonium oxidizer populations. Our results indicate that the nonlinearity in N retention and loss resulted directly from excessive N supply relative to sinks, independent of plant-soil-microbial feedbacks. However, N additions did induce a sharp decrease in microbial biomass C:N that is predicted by N saturation theory, and which could increase long-term N storage in soil organic matter by lowering the critical C:N ratio for net N mineralization. All measured sinks accumulated 15N tracers across the full gradient of N supply, suggesting that short-term nonlinearity in N retention resulted from saturation of uptake kinetics, not uptake capacity, in plant, soil, and microbial pools.

  12. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  13. In situ x-ray scattering study on the evolution of Ge island morphology and relaxation for low growth rate: Advanced transition to superdomes

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, M.-I.; Holy, V.

    2009-07-15

    The kinetics of the growth of Ge superdomes and their facets on Si(001) surfaces are analyzed as a function of deposited Ge thickness for different growth temperatures and at a low growth rate by in situ grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering in combination with in situ grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. At a low growth rate, intermixing is found to be enhanced and superdomes are formed already at lower coverages than previously reported. In addition, we observe that at the dome-to-superdome transition, a large amount of material is transferred into dislocated islands, either by dome coalescence or by anomalous coarsening. Once dislocated islands are formed, island coalescence is a rare event and introduction of dislocations is preferred. The superdome growth is thus stabilized by the insertion of dislocations during growth.

  14. The degree of urbanization across the globe is not reflected in the δ(15)N of seagrass leaves.

    PubMed

    Christiaen, Bart; Bernard, Rebecca J; Mortazavi, Behzad; Cebrian, Just; Ortmann, Alice C

    2014-06-30

    Many studies show that seagrass δ(15)N ratios increase with the amount of urbanization in coastal watersheds. However, there is little information on the relationship between urbanization and seagrass δ(15)N ratios on a global scale. We performed a meta-analysis on seagrass samples from 79 independent locations to test if seagrass δ(15)N ratios correlate with patterns of population density and fertilizer use within a radius of 10-200 km around the sample locations. Our results show that seagrass δ(15)N ratios are more influenced by intergeneric and latitudinal differences than the degree of urbanization or the amount of fertilizer used in nearby watersheds. The positive correlation between seagrass δ(15)N ratios and latitude hints at an underlying pattern in discrimination or a latitudinal gradient in the (15)N isotopic signature of nitrogen assimilated by the plants. The actual mechanisms responsible for the correlation between δ(15)N and latitude remain unknown.

  15. Relaxation of magnetotail plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.

    1987-01-01

    A quasi-thermodynamic model is presented for the relaxation of magnetotail plasmas during substorms, followed by quiet times. It is proposed that the plasma relaxes to a state of low-potential energy subject to a small number of global constraints. The constraints are exactly preserved by all ideal motions and, approximately, by a wide class of motions of the plasma undergoing magnetic reconnection. A variational principle which minimizes the free energy predicts the relaxed state. Exact, two-dimensional solutions of the relaxed state are obtained. A universal feature of the exact solutions is a chain of magnetic islands along the tail axis. Sufficient conditions for the stability of relaxed states are obtained from the second variation of the free-energy functional.

  16. Metabolic labeling with stable isotope nitrogen (15N) to follow amino acid and protein turnover of three plastid proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The length of time that a protein remains available to perform its function is significantly influenced by its turnover rate. Knowing the turnover rate of proteins involved in different processes is important to determining how long a function might progress even when the stimulus has been removed and no further synthesis of the particular proteins occurs. In this article, we describe the use of 15N-metabolic labeling coupled to GC-MS to follow the turnover of free amino acids and LC-MS/MS to identify and LC-MS to follow the turnover of specific proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Results To achieve the metabolic labeling, the growth medium was formulated with standard Tris acetate phosphate medium (TAP) in which14NH4Cl was replaced with 15NH415NO3 and (14NH4)6Mo7O24.4H2O was replaced with Na2MoO4.2H2O. This medium designated 15N-TAP allowed CC-125 algal cells to grow normally. Mass isotopic distribution revealed successful 15N incorporation into 13 amino acids with approximately 98% labeling efficiency. Tryptic digestion of the 55 kDa SDS-PAGE bands from 14N- and 15N-labeled crude algal protein extracts followed by LC-MS/MS resulted in the identification of 27 proteins. Of these, five displayed peptide sequence confidence levels greater than 95% and protein sequence coverage greater than 25%. These proteins were the RuBisCo large subunit, ATP synthase CF1 alpha and beta subunits, the mitochondrial protein (F1F0 ATP synthase) and the cytosolic protein (S-adenosyl homocysteine hydroxylase). These proteins were present in both labeled and unlabeled samples. Once the newly synthesized 15N-labeled free amino acids and proteins obtained maximum incorporation of the 15N-label, turnover rates were determined after transfer of cells into 14N-TAP medium. The t½ values were determined for the three plastid proteins (RuBisCo, ATP synthase CF1 alpha and beta) by following the reduction of the 15N-fractional abundance over time. Conclusion We describe a more

  17. Production of 15N-labeled α-amanitin in Galerina marginata

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Brandon; Sgambelluri, R. Michael; Angelos, Evan R.; Li, Xuan; Holmes, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    α-Amanitin is the major causal constituent of deadly Amanita mushrooms that account for the majority of fatal mushroom poisonings worldwide. It is also an important biochemical tool for the study of its target, RNA polymerase II. The commercial supply of this bicyclic peptide comes directly from A. phalloides, the death cap mushroom, which is collected from its natural habitat. Isotopically labeled amanitin could be useful for clinical and forensic applications, but α-amanitin has not been chemically synthesized and A. phalloides cannot be cultured on artificial medium. Using Galerina marginata, an unrelated saprobic mushroom that grows and produces α-amanitin in culture, we describe a method for producing 15N-labeled α-amanitin using growth media containing 15N as sole nitrogen source. A key to success was preparing 15N-enriched yeast extract via a novel method designated “glass bead-assisted maturation.” In the presence of the labeled yeast extract and 15N-NH4Cl, α-amanitin was produced with >97% isotope enrichment. The labeled product was confirmed by HPLC, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and NMR. PMID:26100667

  18. Production of (15)N-labeled α-amanitin in Galerina marginata.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; DuBois, Brandon; Sgambelluri, R Michael; Angelos, Evan R; Li, Xuan; Holmes, Daniel; Walton, Jonathan D

    2015-09-01

    α-Amanitin is the major causal constituent of deadly Amanita mushrooms that account for the majority of fatal mushroom poisonings worldwide. It is also an important biochemical tool for the study of its target, RNA polymerase II. The commercial supply of this bicyclic peptide comes from Amanita phalloides, the death cap mushroom, which is collected from the wild. Isotopically labeled amanitin could be useful for clinical and forensic applications, but α-amanitin has not been chemically synthesized and A. phalloides cannot be cultured on artificial medium. Using Galerina marginata, an unrelated saprotrophic mushroom that grows and produces α-amanitin in culture, we describe a method for producing (15)N-labeled α-amanitin using growth media containing (15)N as sole nitrogen source. A key to success was preparing (15)N-enriched yeast extract via a novel method designated "glass bead-assisted maturation." In the presence of the labeled yeast extract and (15)N-NH4Cl, α-amanitin was produced with >97% isotope enrichment. The labeled product was confirmed by HPLC, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and NMR.

  19. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  20. Cold brittleness of corrosion-resistant maraging steel 08Kh15N5D2T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhneva, T. M.

    2012-03-01

    Results of a study of the effect of the method of remelting and of heat treatment modes on the behavior of serial curves of impact toughness and on the position of cold-shortness threshold in steel 08Kh15N5D2T are presented.

  1. Nitrate Removal in Two Relict Oxbow Urban Wetlands: A 15N Mass-balance Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 15N-tracer method was used to quantify nitrogen (N) removal processes in two relict oxbow wetlands located adjacent to the Minebank Run restored stream reach in Baltimore County (Maryland, USA) during summer 2009 and early spring 2010. A mass-balance approach was used to determ...

  2. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  3. Plant delta 15N correlates with the transpiration efficiency of nitrogen acquisition in tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Winter, Klaus; Turner, Benjamin L

    2009-11-01

    Based upon considerations of a theoretical model of (15)N/(14)N fractionation during steady-state nitrate uptake from soil, we hypothesized that, for plants grown in a common soil environment, whole-plant delta(15)N (deltaP) should vary as a function of the transpiration efficiency of nitrogen acquisition (F(N)/v) and the difference between deltaP and root delta(15)N (deltaP - deltaR). We tested these hypotheses with measurements of several tropical tree and liana species. Consistent with theoretical expectations, both F(N)/v and deltaP - deltaR were significant sources of variation in deltaP, and the relationship between deltaP and F(N)/v differed between non-N(2)-fixing and N(2)-fixing species. We interpret the correlation between deltaP and F(N)/v as resulting from variation in mineral nitrogen efflux-to-influx ratios across plasma membranes of root cells. These results provide a simple explanation of variation in delta(15)N of terrestrial plants and have implications for understanding nitrogen cycling in ecosystems.

  4. (15)N natural abundance of non-fixing woody species in the Brazilian dry forest (caatinga).

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Ana Dolores Santiago; de Sa Barretto Sampaio, Everardo Valadares; Menezes, Romulo Simoes Cezar; Tiessen, Holm

    2010-06-01

    Foliar delta(15)N values are useful to calculate N(2) fixation and N losses from ecosystems. However, a definite pattern among vegetation types is not recognised and few data are available for semi-arid areas. We sampled four sites in the Brazilian caatinga, along a water availability gradient. Sites with lower annual rainfall (700 mm) but more uniform distribution (six months) had delta(15)N values of 9.4 and 10.1 per thousand, among the highest already reported, and significantly greater than those (6.5 and 6.3 per thousand) of sites with higher rainfall (800 mm) but less uniform distribution (three months). There were no significant differences at each site among species or between non-fixing legume and non-legume species, in spite of the higher N content of the first group. Therefore, they constitute ideal reference plants in estimations of legume N(2) fixation. The higher values could result from higher losses of (15)N depleted gases or lower losses of enriched (15)N material.

  5. 15N fractionation in star-forming regions and Solar System objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirström, E. S.; Adande, G.; Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.; Cordiner, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    We briefly review what is currently known of 14N/15N ratios in interstellar molecules. We summarize the fractionation ratios measured in HCN, HNC, CN, N2 and NH3, and compare these to theoretical predictions and to the isotopic inventory of cometary volatiles.

  6. Using a Macroalgal δ15N Bioassay to Detect Cruise Ship Waste Water Effluent Inputs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  7. Tracing Nitrogen through Landscapes to Coastal Wetlands using d15N of Larval Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to evaluate the use of the nitrogen stable isotope value (d15N) of larval fish as an indicator of incipient anthropogenic nitrogen loading to coastal wetlands in the Great Lakes. We sampled coastal wetlands in five Lake Superior south shore tributaries that had ...

  8. Compound-Specific δ15N Amino Acid Measurements in Littoral Mussels in the California Upwelling Ecosystem: A New Approach to Generating Baseline δ15N Isoscapes for Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ15N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ15N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ15N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ15N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼7‰ to ∼12‰, R2 = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ15N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ15N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ15N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with15N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ15N values of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ15N values. We hypothesize δ15NPhe values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ15N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ15NPhe values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ15N values. We propose that δ15NPhe isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ15N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives. PMID:24887109

  9. Vertical δ13C and δ15N changes during pedogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunn, Melanie; Spielvogel, Sandra; Wells, Andrew; Condron, Leo; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2015-04-01

    The natural abundance of soil organic matter (SOM) stable C and N isotope ratios are subjected to vertical changes throughout the soil profile. This vertical distribution is a widely reported phenomenon across varieties of ecosystems and constitutes important insights of soil carbon cycling. In most ecosystems, SOM becomes enriched in heavy isotopes by several per mill in the first few centimeters of the topsoil. The enrichment of 13C in SOM with soil depth is attributed to biological and physical-chemical processes in soil e.g., plant physiological impacts, microbial decomposition, sorption and transport processes. Such vertical trends in 13C and 15N abundance have rarely been related to SOM composition during pedogenesis. The aims of our study were to investigate short and long-term δ13C and δ15N depth changes and their interrelations under progressing pedogenesis and ecosystem development. We sampled soils across the well studied fordune progradation Haast-chronosequence, a dune ridge system under super-humid climate at the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island (43° 53' S, 169° 3' E). Soils from 11 sites with five replicates each covered a time span of around 2870 yr of soil development (from Arenosol to Podzol). Vertical changes of δ13C and δ15N values of SOM were investigated in the organic layers and in 1-cm depth intervals of the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. With increasing soil depth SOM became enriched in δ13C by 1.9 ± SE 0.1 o and in δ15N by 6.0 ± 0.4 ‰˙Litter δ13C values slightly decreased with increasing soil age (r = -0.61; p = 0.00) likely due to less efficient assimilation linked to nutrient limitations. Fractionation processes during mycorrhizal transfer appeared to affect δ15N values in the litter. We found a strong decrease of δ15N in the early succession stages ≤ 300 yr B.P. (r = -0.95; p = 0.00). Positive relations of vertical 13C and 15N enrichment with soil age might be related to decomposition and appeared to be

  10. Benchmark Theoretical and Experimental Study on (15)N NMR Shifts of Oxidatively Damaged Guanine.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Šála, Michal; Klepetářová, Blanka; Šebera, Jakub; Fukal, Jiří; Holečková, Veronika; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Nencka, Radim; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2016-02-11

    The (15)N NMR shifts of 9-ethyl-8-oxoguanine (OG) were calculated and measured in liquid DMSO and in crystal. The OG molecule is a model for oxidatively damaged 2'-deoxyguanosine that occurs owing to oxidative stress in cell. The DNA lesion is repaired with human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) base-excision repair enzyme, however, the exact mechanism of excision of damaged nucleobase with hOGG1 is currently unknown. This benchmark study on (15)N NMR shifts of OG aims their accurate structural interpretation and calibration of the calculation protocol utilizable in future studies on mechanism of hOGG1 enzyme. The effects of NMR reference, DFT functional, basis set, solvent, structure, and dynamics on calculated (15)N NMR shifts were first evaluated for OG in crystal to calibrate the best performing calculation method. The effect of large-amplitude motions on (15)N NMR shifts of OG in liquid was calculated employing molecular dynamics. The B3LYP method with Iglo-III basis used for B3LYP optimized geometry with 6-311++G(d,p) basis and including effects of solvent and molecular dynamic was the calculation protocol used for calculation of (15)N NMR shifts of OG. The NMR shift of N9 nitrogen of OG was particularly studied because the atom is involved in an N-glycosidic bond that is cleaved with hOGG1. The change of N9 NMR shift owing to oxidation of 9-ethylguanine (G) measured in liquid was -27.1 ppm. The calculated N9 NMR shift of OG deviated from experiment in crystal and in liquid by 0.45 and 0.65 ppm, respectively. The calculated change of N9 NMR shift owing to notable N9-pyramidalization of OG in one previously found polymorph was 20.53 ppm. We therefore assume that the pyramidal geometry of N9 nitrogen that could occur for damaged DNA within hOGG1 catalytic site might be detectable with (15)N NMR spectroscopy. The calculation protocol can be used for accurate structural interpretation of (15)N NMR shifts of oxidatively damaged guanine DNA residue.

  11. Leaf δ15N as a physiological indicator of the responsiveness of N2-fixing alfalfa plants to elevated [CO2], temperature and low water availability

    PubMed Central

    Ariz, Idoia; Cruz, Cristina; Neves, Tomé; Irigoyen, Juan J.; Garcia-Olaverri, Carmen; Nogués, Salvador; Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro M.; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2015-01-01

    The natural 15N/14N isotope composition (δ15N) of a tissue is a consequence of its N source and N physiological mechanisms in response to the environment. It could potentially be used as a tracer of N metabolism in plants under changing environmental conditions, where primary N metabolism may be complex, and losses and gains of N fluctuate over time. In order to test the utility of δ15N as an indicator of plant N status in N2-fixing plants grown under various environmental conditions, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants were subjected to distinct conditions of [CO2] (400 vs. 700 μmol mol−1), temperature (ambient vs. ambient +4°C) and water availability (fully watered vs. water deficiency—WD). As expected, increased [CO2] and temperature stimulated photosynthetic rates and plant growth, whereas these parameters were negatively affected by WD. The determination of δ15N in leaves, stems, roots, and nodules showed that leaves were the most representative organs of the plant response to increased [CO2] and WD. Depletion of heavier N isotopes in plants grown under higher [CO2] and WD conditions reflected decreased transpiration rates, but could also be related to a higher N demand in leaves, as suggested by the decreased leaf N and total soluble protein (TSP) contents detected at 700 μmol mol−1 [CO2] and WD conditions. In summary, leaf δ15N provides relevant information integrating parameters which condition plant responsiveness (e.g., photosynthesis, TSP, N demand, and water transpiration) to environmental conditions. PMID:26322051

  12. Leaf δ(15)N as a physiological indicator of the responsiveness of N2-fixing alfalfa plants to elevated [CO2], temperature and low water availability.

    PubMed

    Ariz, Idoia; Cruz, Cristina; Neves, Tomé; Irigoyen, Juan J; Garcia-Olaverri, Carmen; Nogués, Salvador; Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro M; Aranjuelo, Iker

    2015-01-01

    The natural (15)N/(14)N isotope composition (δ(15)N) of a tissue is a consequence of its N source and N physiological mechanisms in response to the environment. It could potentially be used as a tracer of N metabolism in plants under changing environmental conditions, where primary N metabolism may be complex, and losses and gains of N fluctuate over time. In order to test the utility of δ(15)N as an indicator of plant N status in N2-fixing plants grown under various environmental conditions, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants were subjected to distinct conditions of [CO2] (400 vs. 700 μmol mol(-1)), temperature (ambient vs. ambient +4°C) and water availability (fully watered vs. water deficiency-WD). As expected, increased [CO2] and temperature stimulated photosynthetic rates and plant growth, whereas these parameters were negatively affected by WD. The determination of δ(15)N in leaves, stems, roots, and nodules showed that leaves were the most representative organs of the plant response to increased [CO2] and WD. Depletion of heavier N isotopes in plants grown under higher [CO2] and WD conditions reflected decreased transpiration rates, but could also be related to a higher N demand in leaves, as suggested by the decreased leaf N and total soluble protein (TSP) contents detected at 700 μmol mol(-1) [CO2] and WD conditions. In summary, leaf δ(15)N provides relevant information integrating parameters which condition plant responsiveness (e.g., photosynthesis, TSP, N demand, and water transpiration) to environmental conditions.

  13. Vibrational energy relaxation in liquid oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, K. F.; Egorov, S. A.; Skinner, J. L.

    1998-09-01

    We consider theoretically the relaxation from the first excited vibrational state to the ground state of oxygen molecules in neat liquid oxygen. The relaxation rate constant is related in the usual way to the Fourier transform of a certain quantum mechanical force-force time-correlation function. A result from Egelstaff allows one instead to relate the rate constant (approximately) to the Fourier transform of a classical force-force time-correlation function. This Fourier transform is then evaluated approximately by calculating three equilibrium averages from a classical molecular dynamics simulation. Our results for the relaxation times (at two different temperatures) are within a factor of 5 of the experimental relaxation times, which are in the ms range.

  14. Pathways of nitrogen assimilation in cowpea nodules studied using /sup 15/N/sub 2/ and allopurinol. [Vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, C.A.; Storer, P.J.; Pate, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the presence of 0.5 millimolar allopurinol (4-hydroxypyrazolo (3,4-d)pyrimidine), an inhibitor of NAD:xanthine oxidoreductase (EC 1.2.3.2), intact attached nodules of cowpea (vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita 3) formed (/sup 15/N)xanthine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ at rates equivalent to those of ureide synthesis, confirming the direct assimilation of fixed nitrogen into purines. Xanthine accumulated in nodules and was exported in increasing amounts in xylem of allopurinol-treated plants. Other intermediates of purine oxidation, de novo purine synthesis, and ammonia assimilation did not increase and, over the time course of experiments (4 hours), allopurinol had no effect on nitrogenase (EC 1.87.99.2) activity. Negligible /sup 15/N -labeling of asparagine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ was observed, suggesting that the significant pool (up to 14 micromoles per gram of nodule fresh weight) of this amide in cowpea nodules was not formed directly from fixation but may have accumulated as a consequence of phloem delivery.

  15. Variable δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors among sharks: implications for trophic position, diet and food web models.

    PubMed

    Olin, Jill A; Hussey, Nigel E; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W; Wintner, Sabine P; Fisk, Aaron T

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆(15)N). As ∆(15)N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆(15)N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆(15)N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆(15)N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ(15)N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆(15)N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ(15)N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆(15)N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆(15)N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 9‰) whereas a ∆(15)N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆(15)N-dietary δ(15)N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆(15)N values that reflect the predators' δ(15)N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a

  16. Variable δ15N Diet-Tissue Discrimination Factors among Sharks: Implications for Trophic Position, Diet and Food Web Models

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Jill A.; Hussey, Nigel E.; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W.; Wintner, Sabine P.; Fisk, Aaron T.

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ15N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆15N). As ∆15N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆15N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆15N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆15N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ15N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆15N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ15N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆15N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆15N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ15N = 9‰) whereas a ∆15N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ15N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆15N-dietary δ15N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆15N values that reflect the predators’ δ15N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a species’ ecological role in their

  17. Influence of open ocean nitrogen supply on the skeletal δ15N of modern shallow-water scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen T.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Cohen, Anne L.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Cobb, Kim M.; Erler, Dirk V.; Stolarski, Jarosław; Kitahara, Marcelo V.; Ren, Haojia

    2016-05-01

    The isotopic composition of skeleton-bound organic nitrogen in shallow-water scleractinian corals (hereafter, CS-δ15N) is an emerging tool for studying the marine nitrogen cycle in the past. The CS-δ15N has been shown to reflect the δ15N of nitrogen (N) sources to corals, with most applications to date focusing on the anthropogenic/terrestrial N inputs to reef environments. However, many coral reefs receive their primary N sources from the open ocean, and the CS-δ15N of these corals may provide information on past changes in the open ocean regional and global N cycle. Using a recently developed persulfate/denitrifier-based method, we measured CS-δ15N in modern shallow-water scleractinian corals from 8 sites proximal to the open ocean. At sites with low open ocean surface nitrate concentrations typical of the subtropics and tropics, measured CS-δ15N variation on seasonal and annual timescales is most often less than 2‰. In contrast, a broad range in CS-δ15N (of ∼10‰) is measured across these sites, with a strong correlation between CS-δ15N and the δ15N of the deep nitrate supply to the surface waters near the reefs. While CS-δ15N can be affected by other N sources as well and can vary in response to local reef conditions as well as coral/symbiont physiological changes, this survey indicates that, when considering corals proximal to the open ocean, the δ15N of the subsurface nitrate supply to surface waters drives most of the CS-δ15N variation across the global ocean. Thus, CS-δ15N is a promising proxy for reconstructing the open ocean N cycle in the past.

  18. Leaf δ15N as an indicator of arbuscular mycorrhizal nitrogen uptake in a coastal-plain forest (restinga forest) at Southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardegan, S. F.; Valadares, R.; Martinelli, L.

    2013-12-01

    Restinga diversity contrasts with a series of adverse environmental conditions that constrain their development, including nutrient limitation. In this sense, the mutualistic symbiosis between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may contribute in nutrient acquisition, including nitrogen. However, this association deeply affects plant nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N), since assimilation processes and biochemical reactions within the fungi may reflect in a delivered product with an isotopic composition about 8 to 10 ‰ lower than that observed at the fungal symbiont per se. Here we assessed if the association with AMF affects δ15N values of plant species from a coastal-plain forest (restinga forest) at Southeastern Brazil. Accordingly, we analyzed the nutritional and isotopic compositions from ecosystem key-compartments (soil, litter and leaves), relating plant δ15N with the colonization rates. The study was carried out in a permanent plot (1 ha) at a coastal-plain forest (restinga forest) at the Serra do Mar State Park, SP, Brazil. Sampled vegetation is characterized by the lack of a well-defined stratification and a rather open canopy. It also comprises trees ranging from 10 to 15-m high. Soils are deep and sandy, being characterized by high acidity, nutrient deficiency and a dense litter cover. We randomly collected five samples (250 mg) from topsoil (0-10 cm) and five to ten leaves from individuals belonging to 16 plant species of high relevance within the site (IVI index). We also collected superficial (0-10 cm depth) fine roots (5 g) and 13 samples (100 g) of fine litter next to the individuals sampled. Soil samples were air-dried, sieved, homogenized and used in the physical-chemical characterization. The remainder was ground to a fine powder to determine nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values. Leaves were dried at 50 °C, finely milled and used for the determination of nitrogen concentrations, C/N ratios and δ15N values. Root samples were

  19. Effect of updated relaxation rate constants on the H2O vibrational level populations and ro-vibrational spectra in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilova, R. O.; Feofilov, A. G.; Kutepov, A. A.; Yankovsky, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper discusses the formation mechanisms of infrared radiation in H2O ro-vibrational bands in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). At these heights and above, the vibrational levels of the molecules involved in radiative transitions are not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) with the surrounding medium, and the biggest uncertainty source in modeling the IR radiation in molecular bands is associated with the corresponding vibrational kinetics model parameters. In this study, we re-analyze available experimental data of Barnes et al. (2004) and Zittel and Masturzo (1991) and update the rate constant of V-V exchange (k) corresponding to the second vibrational number v2 increase by two and the first (or the third) quantum number decrease by one. The estimated values of k for quenching by N2 and O2 are 1.7 × 10-12 and 1.3 × 10-12 cm3 s-1, respectively. These values are about four times larger than the values used in all earlier models of non-LTE populations of vibrational levels and IR radiation in ro-vibrational bands of H2O. We state that using the same k for all processes of vibrational-vibrational energy exchange does not correspond to laboratory experiments and can lead to offsets both in calculating the vibrational level populations and in H2O concentration retrievals from IR spectral radiance. We provide the estimates of these offsets as well as a list of spectral microwindows, in which H2O radiance is sensitive to uncertainty of k.

  20. Field-based measurements of gross N2O production in soils using a 15N2O pool dilution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. H.; Teh, Y.; Silver, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are a major source and sink of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas and catalyst for stratospheric ozone depletion. The controls on soil N2O emissions are poorly understood due to the difficulty in measuring gross N2O production and consumption rates. We tested a 15N2O pool dilution technique for simultaneously measuring gross N2O production and consumption rates from soils in the field. Our study site was a managed grassland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta that exhibited high N2O emissions, averaging 6.4 ± 2.6 mg N m-2 d-1. In the laboratory, gross N2O production and consumption compared well between the 15N2O pool dilution and acetylene inhibition methods whereas the 15NO3- tracer method measured significantly higher rates. In the field, N2O emissions were not significantly affected by increasing chamber headspace concentrations up to 100 ppb 15N2O. The pool dilution model estimates of 14N2O and 15N¬2O concentrations as well as net N2O fluxes fit observed data very well, suggesting that the technique yielded robust estimates of gross N2O production. Gross N2O production rates averaged 8.4 ± 3.2 mg N m-2 d-1 and were most strongly correlated to mineral N concentrations and denitrifying enzyme activity together (R2 = 0.73). Gross N2O consumption rates estimated using the pool dilution technique were 55 ± 1 % less than rates calculated as the difference between gross N2O production rates and net N2O fluxes, possibly due to heterogeneous and/or inadequate 15N2O tracer diffusion to deeper layers in the soil profile. Estimated and calculated gross N2O consumption rates constrained the proportion of produced N2O released to the atmosphere (termed the N2O yield) from 0.70 to 0.84. Gross N2O consumption rates and N2O yields were not strongly correlated to any soil property measured (i.e., soil moisture, pH, DEA, mineral N concentration, soil O2 concentration). Our study demonstrates that the 15N2O pool dilution technique is a valuable tool for

  1. Isotopic variability of cave bears (δ15N, δ13C) across Europe during MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajcarz, Magdalena; Pacher, Martina; Krajcarz, Maciej T.; Laughlan, Lana; Rabeder, Gernot; Sabol, Martin; Wojtal, Piotr; Bocherens, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, the organic fraction of bone, records the isotopic parameters of consumed food for carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). This relationship of isotopic signature between diet and tissue is an important tool for the study of dietary preferences of modern and fossil animal species. Since the first information on the isotopic signature of cave bear was reported, numerous data from Europe have become available. The goal of this work is to track the geographical variation of cave bear collagen isotopic values in Europe during Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (about 60,000-25,000 yr BP). In this study the results of new δ13C and δ15N isotopic analyses of cave bear collagen from four Central-Eastern European sites are presented, as well as a review of all published isotopic data for cave bears of the same period. The main conclusion is a lack of geographical East-West pattern in the variations of δ13C and δ15N values of cave bear collagen. Moreover, no relationship was found between cave bear taxonomy and isotopic composition. The cave bears from Central-Eastern Europe exhibit δ13C and δ15N values near the average of the range of Central, Western and Southern European cave bears. Despite the fact that most cave bear sites follow an altitudinal gradient, separate groups of sites exhibit shift in absolute values of δ13C, what disturbs an altitude-related isotopic pattern. The most distinct groups are: high Alpine sites situated over 1500 m a.s.l. - in terms of δ13C; and two Romanian sites Peştera cu Oase and Urşilor - in case of δ15N. Although the cave bear isotopic signature is driven by altitude, the altitudinal adjustment of isotopic data is not enough to explain the isotopic dissimilarity of these cave bears. The unusually high δ15N signature of mentioned Romanian sites is an isolated case in Europe. Cave bears from relatively closely situated Central-Eastern European sites and other Romanian sites are more similar to Western European than to Romanian

  2. The origin of nitrogen on Jupiter and Saturn from the 15N/14N ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Greathouse, T. K.; Orton, G. S.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Mousis, O.; Sinclair, J. A.; Giles, R. S.

    2014-08-01

    The Texas Echelon cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES), mounted on NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), was used to map mid-infrared ammonia absorption features on both Jupiter and Saturn in February 2013. Ammonia is the principle reservoir of nitrogen on the giant planets, and the ratio of isotopologues (15N/14N) can reveal insights into the molecular carrier (e.g., as N2 or NH3) of nitrogen to the forming protoplanets, and hence the source reservoirs from which these worlds accreted. We targeted two spectral intervals (900 and 960 cm-1) that were relatively clear of terrestrial atmospheric contamination and contained close features of 14NH3 and 15NH3, allowing us to derive the ratio from a single spectrum without ambiguity due to radiometric calibration (the primary source of uncertainty in this study). We present the first ground-based determination of Jupiter’s 15N/14N ratio (in the range from 1.4×10-3 to 2.5×10-3), which is consistent with both previous space-based studies and with the primordial value of the protosolar nebula. On Saturn, we present the first upper limit on the 15N/14N ratio of no larger than 2.0×10-3 for the 900-cm-1 channel and a less stringent requirement that the ratio be no larger than 2.8×10-3 for the 960-cm-1 channel (1σ confidence). Specifically, the data rule out strong 15N-enrichments such as those observed in Titan’s atmosphere and in cometary nitrogen compounds. To the extent possible with ground-based radiometric uncertainties, the saturnian and jovian 15N/14N ratios appear indistinguishable, implying that 15N-enriched ammonia ices could not have been a substantial contributor to the bulk nitrogen inventory of either planet. This result favours accretion of primordial N2 on both planets, either in the gas phase from the solar nebula, or as ices formed at very low temperatures. Finally, spatially-resolved TEXES observations are used to derive zonal contrasts in tropospheric temperatures, phosphine and 14NH3 on both

  3. Relaxation techniques for stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems such as high blood pressure, stomachaches, headaches, anxiety, and depression. Using relaxation techniques can help you feel calm. These exercises can also help you manage stress and ease ...

  4. Relaxation of impact basins on icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of relaxation of very large impact craters on icy satellites is addressed and the extent to which such studies can help place constraints on the nature of such satellite interiors is investigated. Very general calculations aimed at understanding the nature of relaxation of large impact structures, including the directions, relaxation velocities, and stress levels, are presented. The dependence of relaxation on such factors as silicate core size and viscosity gradients in the ice is examined. The general results are used to address whether comparing the current morphology of impact basins to estimates of their original shape will yield an understanding of the thermal and mechanical structure of the interiors of the icy satellites. It is found that the relaxation rates derived from models of satellite interiors can provide constraints on viscous layer thicknesses. High thermal gradients can permit substantial relaxation even in thin viscous layers. Finally, the constraints on the internal structure of Tethys arising from the extremely relaxed state of the Odysseus basin and the existence of Ithaca Chasma are discussed.

  5. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ15N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Francisca P.; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ15N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ15N and δ13C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ15N values span the entire gradient, soil δ15N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ15N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ15N values. PMID:26956399

  6. Shifts in relative tissue delta15N values in snowy egret nestlings with dietary mercury exposure: a marker for increased protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Allen, Patricia L; Romanek, Christopher S; Bryan, A L; Brant, Heather; Jagoe, Charles H

    2005-06-01

    Shifts in tissue nitrogen isotope composition may be a more sensitive general indicator of stress than measurement of high-turnover defensive biomolecules such as metallothionein and glutathione. As a physical resource transmitted along the trophic web, perturbations in protein nitrogen metabolism may also help resolve issues concerning the effects of contaminants on organisms and their consequential hierarchical linkages in ecotoxicology. Snowy egret nestlings (Egretta thula) fed mercury-contaminated diets of constant nitrogen isotope composition exhibited increased relative delta15N values in whole liver (p = 0.0011) and the acid-soluble fraction (ASF) of the liver (p = 0.0005) when compared to nestlings fed a reference diet. When nitrogen isotope data were adjusted for the source term of the diet, liver mercury concentrations corresponded with both whole liver relative 15N enrichment (r2 = 0.79, slope 0.009, p < 0.0001) and relative 15N enrichment in the acid-soluble fraction of the liver (r2 = 0.85, slope 0.026, p < 0.0001). Meanwhile, significant differences were not observed in hepatic levels of the metal-binding peptides metallothionein and glutathione despite a nearly 3-fold difference in liver mercury content. Because increases in tissue delta15N values result from increased rates of protein breakdown relative to synthesis, we propose that the increased relative liver delta15N values reflect a shift in protein metabolism. The relationship between ASF and mercury was significantly stronger (p < 0.0001) than that for whole liver, suggesting that the relationship is driven by an increase in bodily derived amino acids in the acid-soluble, free amino acid pool.

  7. Spatial and temporal variations in stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopic composition of symbiotic scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Nahon, Sarah; Richoux, Nicole B; Kolasinski, Joanna; Desmalades, Martin; Ferrier Pages, Christine; Lecellier, Gael; Planes, Serge; Berteaux Lecellier, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Tropical scleractinian corals are considered autotrophic as they rely mainly on photosynthesis-derived nutrients transferred from their photosymbionts. Corals are also able to capture and ingest suspended particulate organic matter, so heterotrophy can be an important supplementary trophic pathway to optimize coral fitness. The aim of this in situ study was to elucidate the trophic status of 10 coral species under contrasted environmental conditions in a French Polynesian lagoon. Carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopic compositions of coral host tissues and photosymbionts were determined at 3 different fringing reefs during wet and dry seasons. Our results highlighted spatial variability in stable isotopic compositions of both coral host tissues and photosymbionts. Samples from the site with higher level of suspended particulate matter were (13)C-depleted and (15)N-enriched relative to corals and photosymbionts from less turbid sites. However, differences in both δ(13)C and δ(15)N between coral host tissues and their photosymbionts (Δ(host-photosymbionts 13)C and Δ(host-photosymbionts 15)N) were small (0.27 ± 0.76‰ and 1.40 ± 0.90‰, respectively) and similar at all sites, thus indicating no general increases in the heterotrophic pathway. Depleted δ(13)C and enriched δ(15)N values of coral host tissues measured at the most turbid site were explained by changes in isotopic composition of the inorganic nutrients taken up by photosymbionts and also by changes in rate of isotopic fractionation with environmental conditions. Our results also highlighted a lack of significant temporal variations in δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of coral host and photosymbiont tissues and in Δ(host-photosymbionts 13)C and Δ(host-photosymbionts 15)N values. This temporal stability indicated that corals remained principally autotrophic even during the wet season when photosymbiont densities were lower and the concentrations of phytoplankton were higher. Increased coral

  8. Magnetic equivalence of terminal nuclei in the azide anion broken by nuclear spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatowicz, P.; Szymański, S.

    NMR spectra of water solution of sodium azide selectively 15N labelled in the central position were studied using an iterative least-squares method. In agreement with predictions based on Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield nuclear spin relaxation theory, it is demonstrated that quadrupolar relaxation of the magnetically equivalent terminal 14N (spin-1) nuclei in the azide anion renders the J coupling between these nuclei an observable quantity. In isotropic fluids, this seems to be the first experimental evidence of relaxation-broken magnetic equivalence symmetry.

  9. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGES

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; ...

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  10. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of phenazopyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Mora-Pérez, Yolanda; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    Phenazopyridine hydrochloride (1), a drug in clinical use for many decades, and some derivatives were studied by one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR methodology. The assignments, combined with DFT calculations, reveal that the preferred protonation site of the drug is the pyridine ring nitrogen atom. The chemoselective acetylation of phenazopyridine (2) and its influence on the polarization of the azo nitrogen atoms were evidenced by the (15)N NMR spectra. Molecular calculations of the phenazopyridines 2-4 show that the pyridine and phenyl groups are oriented in an antiperiplanar conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-b atom and the C-2 amino group preserving the E-azo stereochemistry.

  11. Community 15N isoscapes to resolve plant-plant-interactions at the spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Christine; Rascher, Katherine G.; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Isoscapes have greatly improved our ability to understand biogeochemical processes on continental to global scales. However, the isoscapes framework may also have significant potential to resolve the spatial component of within-community interactions. For example, exotic plant invaders often exert strong impacts on ecosystem functioning, particularly regarding water-, carbon- and nutrient-cycles, but the spatial extent of such alterations is largely unknown. Here we show that massive N input by the N2-fixing exotic invasive Acacia longifolia to a Portuguese dune system can be traced using spatially resolved information on native plants' leaf δ15N. We found isotopic signatures of N to differ strongly between the native system (δ15N c. -10 o) and the atmospherically derived N in A. longifolia phyllodes (δ15N c. 0 o). Thus, sources of N for native plants could be readily distinguished. Leaf δ15N of a native, non-fixing species was increasingly enriched the closer the plant grew to the invader, indicating uptake of fixed N provided by A. longifolia. The enrichment was evident far beyond the stands of the invader, demonstrating that A. longifolia affected N budgets of native species up to a distance of 8 m exceeding the margin of the canopy. Furthermore, using the isoscapes approach, we were able to quantify the total area of N enrichment and could thus show that the area affected by invasion was at least 3.5 times larger than the area actually occupied by the invader. However, a native N2-fixing species had no such effects. Thus, downscaling isoscapes to the community level opens new frontiers in quantifying the spatial dimension of functional changes associated with plant invasions. Moreover, considering the feasibility and applicability of this approach, it may provide a promising tool to identify, quantify and monitor different types of functional plant-plant interactions within communities at a spatially explicit scale.

  12. Asymmetric Induction by a Nitrogen (14) N/(15) N Isotopomer in Conjunction with Asymmetric Autocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Arimasa; Ozaki, Hanae; Harada, Shunya; Tada, Kyohei; Ayugase, Tomohiro; Ozawa, Hitomi; Kawasaki, Tsuneomi; Soai, Kenso

    2016-12-05

    Chirality arising from isotope substitution, especially with atoms heavier than the hydrogen isotopes, is usually not considered a source of chirality in a chemical reaction. An N(2) ,N(2) ,N(3) ,N(3) -tetramethyl-2,3-butanediamine containing nitrogen ((14) N/(15) N) isotope chirality was synthesized and it was revealed that this isotopically chiral diamine compound acts as a chiral initiator for asymmetric autocatalysis.

  13. Asymmetric Induction by a Nitrogen 14N/15N Isotopomer in Conjunction with Asymmetric Autocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Hanae; Harada, Shunya; Tada, Kyohei; Ayugase, Tomohiro; Ozawa, Hitomi; Kawasaki, Tsuneomi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chirality arising from isotope substitution, especially with atoms heavier than the hydrogen isotopes, is usually not considered a source of chirality in a chemical reaction. An N 2 ,N 2 ,N 3 ,N 3‐tetramethyl‐2,3‐butanediamine containing nitrogen (14N/15N) isotope chirality was synthesized and it was revealed that this isotopically chiral diamine compound acts as a chiral initiator for asymmetric autocatalysis. PMID:27754589

  14. Determination of the δ15N of total nitrogen in solids; RSIL lab code 2893

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2893 is to determine the δ(15N/14N), abbreviated as δ15N , of total nitrogen in solid samples. A Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA) is used to convert total nitrogen in a solid sample into N2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines relative difference in the isotope-amount ratios of stable nitrogen isotopes (15N/14N)of the product N2 gas. The combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. Samples are placed in a tin capsule and loaded into the Costech Zero Blank Autosampler of the EA. Under computer control, samples are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where the combustion takes place in a helium atmosphere containing an excess of oxygen gas. Combustion products are transported by a helium carrier through a reduction tube to remove excess oxygen and convert all nitrous oxides into N2 and through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly CO2 and N2, are separated by a gas chromatograph. The gas is then introduced into the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) through a Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) ConFlo II interface, which also is used to inject N2 reference gas and helium for sample dilution. The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus CF-IRMS. It has a universal triple collector, two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle, capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 28, 29, 30, simultaneously. The ion beams from N2 are as follows: m/z 28 = N2 = 14N14N; m/z 29 = N2 = 14N15N primarily; m/z 30 = NO = 14N16O primarily, which is a sign of contamination or incomplete reduction.

  15. Food webs of two intermittently open estuaries receiving 15N-enriched sewage effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadwen, Wade L.; Arthington, Angela H.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures were used to assess the response of food webs to sewage effluent discharged into two small intermittently open estuaries in northern New South Wales, Australia. One of these systems, Tallows Creek, has a history of direct sewage inputs, whilst the other, Belongil Creek, receives wastewater via an extensive wetland treatment system. The food webs of both systems were driven by algal sources of carbon, reflecting high autotrophic productivity in response to the nutrients entering the system from sewage effluent. All aquatic biota collected from Tallows Creek had significantly enriched δ15N signatures relative to their conspecifics from Belongil Creek, indicating that sewage nitrogen had been assimilated and transferred throughout the Tallows Creek food web. These δ15N values were higher than those reported from studies in permanently open estuaries receiving sewage effluent. We suggest that these enriched signatures and the transfer of nitrogen throughout the entire food web reflect differences in hydrology and associated nitrogen cycling processes between permanently open and intermittently open estuaries. Although all organisms in Tallows Creek were generally 15N-enriched, isotopically light (less 15N-enriched) individuals of estuary perchlet ( Ambassis marianus) and sea mullet ( Mugil cephalus) were also collected. These individuals were most likely recent immigrants into Tallows Creek, as this system had only recently been opened to the ocean. This isotopic discrimination between resident (enriched) and immigrant (significantly less enriched) individuals can provide information on fish movement patterns and the role of heavily polluted intermittently open estuaries in supporting commercially and recreationally valuable estuarine species.

  16. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with (2)H, (13)C and (15)N in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-06-01

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80% can be achieved for (15)N and (13)C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For (2)H,(15)N and (2)H,(13)C,(15)N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73%, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins.

  17. Impact of seaweed beachings on dynamics of δ(15)N isotopic signatures in marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Lemesle, Stéphanie; Mussio, Isabelle; Rusig, Anne-Marie; Menet-Nédélec, Florence; Claquin, Pascal

    2015-08-15

    A fine-scale survey of δ(15)N, δ(13)C, tissue-N in seaweeds was conducted using samples from 17 sampling points at two sites (Grandcamp-Maisy (GM), Courseulles/Mer (COU)) along the French coast of the English Channel in 2012 and 2013. Partial triadic analysis was performed on the parameter data sets and revealed the functioning of three areas: one estuary (EstA) and two rocky areas (GM(∗), COU(∗)). In contrast to oceanic and anthropogenic reference points similar temporal dynamics characterized δ(15)N signatures and N contents at GM(∗) and COU(∗). Nutrient dynamics were similar: the N-concentrations in seawater originated from the River Seine and local coastal rivers while P-concentrations mainly from these local rivers. δ(15)N at GM(∗) were linked to turbidity suggesting inputs of autochthonous organic matter from large-scale summer seaweed beachings made up of a mixture of Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Chlorophyta species. This study highlights the coupling between seaweed beachings and nitrogen sources of intertidal macroalgae.

  18. Denitrification in nitrate-rich streams: Application of N2:Ar and 15N-tracer methods in intact cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, L.K.; Voytek, M.A.; Böhlke, J.K.; Harvey, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rates of benthic denitrification were measured using two techniques, membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), applied to sediment cores from two NO3--rich streams draining agricultural land in the upper Mississippi River Basin. Denitrification was estimated simultaneously from measurements of N 2:Ar (MIMS) and 15N[N2] (IRMS) after the addition of low-level 15NO3- tracer ( 15N:N = 0.03-0.08) in stream water overlying intact sediment cores. Denitrification rates ranged from about 0 to 4400 lmol N??m -2??h-1 in Sugar Creek and from 0 to 1300 ??mol N??m-2??h-1 in Iroquois River, the latter of which possesses greater streamflow discharge and a more homogeneous streambed and water column. Within the uncertainties of the two techniques, there is good agreement between the MIMS and IRMS results, which indicates that the production of N2 by the coupled process of nitrification/denitrification was relatively unimportant and surface-water NO3- was the dominant source of NO3- for benthic denitrification in these streams. Variation in stream NO3- concentration (from about 20 ??mol/L during low discharge to 1000 ??mol/L during high discharge) was a significant control of benthic denitrification rates, judging from the more abundant MIMS data. The interpretation that NO3- concentration directly affects denitrification rate was corroborated by increased rates of denitrification in cores amended with NO 3-. Denitrification in Sugar Creek removed ???11% per day of the instream NO3- in late spring and removed roughly 15-20% in late summer. The fraction of NO3- removed in Iroquois River was less than that of Sugar Creek. Although benthic denitrification rates were relatively high during periods of high stream flow, when NO3 concentrations were also high, the increase in benthic denitrification could not compensate for the much larger increase in stream NO3- fluxes during high flow. Consequently, fractional NO3- losses were relatively low

  19. Paleoenvironmental implications of taxonomic variation among δ 15 N values of chloropigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Meytal B.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Robinson, Rebecca S.; Qin, Yelun; Saito, Mak A.; Pearson, Ann

    2011-11-01

    Natural variations in the ratios of nitrogen isotopes in biomass reflect variations in nutrient sources utilized for growth. In order to use δ 15N values of chloropigments of photosynthetic organisms to determine the corresponding δ 15N values of biomass - and by extension, surface waters - the isotopic offset between chlorophyll and biomass must be constrained. Here we examine this offset in various geologically-relevant taxa, grown using nutrient sources that may approximate ocean conditions at different times in Earth's history. Phytoplankton in this study include cyanobacteria (diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic), eukaryotic algae (red and green), and anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (Proteobacteria), as well as environmental samples from sulfidic lake water. Cultures were grown using N 2, NO 3-, and NH 4+ as nitrogen sources, and were examined under different light regimes and growth conditions. We find surprisingly high variability in the isotopic difference (δ 15N biomass - δ 15N chloropigment) for prokaryotes, with average values for species ranging from -12.2‰ to +11.7‰. We define this difference as ɛpor, a term that encompasses diagenetic porphyrins and chlorins, as well as chlorophyll. Negative values of ɛpor reflect chloropigments that are 15N-enriched relative to biomass. Notably, this enrichment appears to occur only in cyanobacteria. The average value of ɛpor for freshwater cyanobacterial species is -9.8 ± 1.8‰, while for marine cyanobacteria it is -0.9 ± 1.3‰. These isotopic effects group environmentally but not phylogenetically, e.g., ɛpor values for freshwater Chroococcales resemble those of freshwater Nostocales but differ from those of marine Chroococcales. Our measured values of ɛpor for eukaryotic algae (range = 4.7-8.7‰) are similar to previous reports for pure cultures. For all taxa studied, values of ɛpor do not depend on the type of nitrogen substrate used for growth. The observed environmental control of

  20. Foliar retention of 15N-nitrate and 15N-ammonium by red maple (Acer rubrum) and white oak (Quercus alba) leaves from simulated rain

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; Hanson, Paul J

    1990-07-01

    Studies of nitrogen cycling in forests indicate that trees assimilate atmospheric nitrate and ammonium and that differences between atmospheric deposition to the forest canopy and deposition measured in forest throughfall can be attributed to the removal of these ions from rain by tree leaves. Red maple and white oak leaves were exposed to artificial rain solutions (pH 4.1) containing {sup 15}N-labeled nitrate (3.5 {micro}g N/ml) or ammonium (2.2 {micro}g N/ml). At two time intervals after exposure (2 hr and 2 days) an exposed leaf and a control (non-exposed) leaf were removed from replicate seedlings. Based on results from {sup 15}N analysis, most of the nitrate applied to tree leaves was removed by washing with water; the mean per cent removal ({+-} standard error, N = 4) was 87 {+-} 1 and 73 {+-} 4% of the {sup 15}NO-N Applied to red maple and white oak leaves, respectively. Relative retention of {sup 15}NH{sub 4}-N by the leaves was greater than that observed for {sup 15}NO{sub 3}-N. In red maple and white oak leaves, 58 {+-} 9 and 84 {+-} 7% (mean {+-} standard error, N = 4), respectively, of the applied ammonium was not removed by washing treatments. Our results show that the foliar uptake of {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} from simulated rain by deciduous tree leaves is greater than that for {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Greater retention of NH{sub 4}{sup +} than NO{sub 3}{sup -} ions by red maple and white oak leaves from simulated rainfall is consistent with field observations showing a preferential retention of ammonium from rainfall by forest canopies. As nitrogen chemistry and the relative importance of nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere change in response to proposed emission reductions (and possibly climate change), an improved understanding of the fate of airborne nitrogen compounds in forest biogeochemical cycles will be necessary.

  1. Hot Electron Energy Relaxation in Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chia-Hung

    We present experimental results on hot electron relaxation in doped bulk GaAs and quantum wells. Using steady state photoluminescence we measured the electron -LO phonon scattering time for thermalized hot electrons in quantum wells. The results are in good agreement with our theoretical calculation of electron-LO phonon interaction in two dimensional systems. Within random phase approximation, the emitted LO phonons may couple to two dimensional plasmons. Both the screening and phonon reabsorption properties can be drastically changed as a function of electron density, temperature and phonon lifetime. Theoretical energy relaxation rates, including dynamical screening and phonon reabsorption effects, will be presented. For hot electrons with energies well above the LO phonon energy, we developed a two-beam, lock-in technique to measure the energy-resolved cooling rate. In the case of quantum wells, hot electrons relax at a constant rate. For heavily doped bulk GaAs, the relaxation rate is inversely proportional to electron kinetic energy. The new method demonstrates itself as a valuable way to study the fast initial relaxation which would otherwise need femtosecond pulse laser techniques.

  2. Vibrational relaxation of chloroiodomethane in cold argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amber; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2013-10-01

    Electronically exciting the C-I stretch in the molecule chloroiodomethane CH2ClI embedded in a matrix of argon at 12 K can lead to an isomer, iso-chloroiodomethane CH2Cl-I, that features a chlorine iodine bond. By temporally probing the isomer at two different frequencies of 435 nm and 485 nm, multiple timescales for isomerization and vibrational energy relaxation were inferred [T. J. Preston, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 114503 (2011)]. This relaxation is studied theoretically using molecular dynamics by considering 2 and 3 dimensional models. Multiple decay rate constants of the same order of magnitude as the experiment are observed. These decay rate constants are interpreted within the context of the Landau-Teller theory. Sensitivity of the decay rate constants on the bath and system parameters shed more light into the mechanism of vibrational energy relaxation.

  3. Magnetic field induced anisotropy of 139La spin-lattice relaxation rates in stripe ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    SciTech Connect

    S. -H. Baek; Gu, G. D.; Utz, Y.; Hucker, M.; Buchner, B.; Grafe, H. -J.

    2015-10-26

    We report 139La nuclear magnetic resonance studies performed on a La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 single crystal. The data show that the structural phase transitions (high-temperature tetragonal → low-temperature orthorhombic → low-temperature tetragonal phase) are of the displacive type in this material. The 139La spin-lattice relaxation rate T–11 sharply upturns at the charge-ordering temperature TCO = 54 K, indicating that charge order triggers the slowing down of spin fluctuations. Detailed temperature and field dependencies of the T–11 below the spin-ordering temperature TSO=40 K reveal the development of enhanced spin fluctuations in the spin-ordered state for H ∥ [001], which are completely suppressed for large fields along the CuO2 planes. Lastly, our results shed light on the unusual spin fluctuations in the charge and spin stripe ordered lanthanum cuprates.

  4. Early-stage changes in natural (13)C and (15)N abundance and nutrient dynamics during different litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Song, Byeong-Yeol; Lee, Dongho; Bong, Yeon-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Decomposition, nutrient, and isotopic (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) dynamics during 1 year were studied for leaf and twig litters of Pinus densiflora, Castanea crenata, Erigeron annuus, and Miscanthus sinensis growing on a highly weathered soil with constrained nutrient supply using litterbags in a cool temperate region of South Korea. Decay constant (k/year) ranged from 0.58 to 1.29/year, and mass loss ranged from 22.36 to 58.43 % among litter types. The results demonstrate that mass loss and nutrient dynamics of decomposing litter were influenced by the seasonality of mineralization and immobilization processes. In general, most nutrients exhibited alternate phases of rapid mineralization followed by gradual immobilization, except K, which was released throughout the field incubation. At the end of study, among all the nutrients only N and P showed net immobilization. Mobility of different nutrients from decomposing litter as the percentage of initial litter nutrient concentration was in the order of K > Mg > Ca > N ≈ P. The δ(13)C (0.32-6.70 ‰) and δ(15)N (0.74-3.90 ‰) values of residual litters showed nonlinear increase and decrease, respectively compared to initial isotopic values during decomposition. Litter of different functional types and chemical quality converged toward a conservative nutrient use strategy through mechanisms of slow decomposition and slow nutrient mobilization. Our results indicate that litter quality and season, are the most important regulators of litter decomposition in these forests. The results revealed significant relationships between litter decomposition rates and N, C:N ratio and P, and seasonality (temperature). These results and the convergence of different litters towards conservative nutrient use in these nutrient constrained ecosystems imply optimization of litter management because litter removal can have cascading effects on litter decomposition and nutrient availability in these systems.

  5. Elucidating the impact of nitrate and labile carbon application on spatial heterogeneity of denitrification by 15N modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Laura; Loick, Nadine; Dixon, Liz; Matthews, Peter; Gilsanz, Claudia; Bol, Roland; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    N2O is considered to be an important GHG with soils representing its major source and accounting for approximately 6% of the current global warming and is also implicated in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. The atmospheric N2O concentration has been increasing since the Industrial Revolution making the understanding of its sources and removal processes very important for development of mitigation strategies. Bergstermann et al. (2011) found evidence of the existence of more than one pool of nitrate undergoing denitrification in a silty clay loam arable soil amended with glucose/nitrate solution. The Rayleigh type model was used to simulate d15N of N2O using process rates and associated fractionation factors, but assumptions for some of the model parameters had to be made due to lack of available data. In this study we carried out 2 incubation experiments in order to parameterise the model. To restrict the volume of soil reached by the amendment, we used blocks containing 3 soil cores that were incubated in one vessel to measure emissions of NO, N2O, N2 and CO2 from a clay grassland soil amended with KNO3 (N) and glucose (C) in three treatments: '1C' only 1 core received N and C (the other 2 received water), '3C' 3 cores received N and C, and 'Control' (received water only). The results showed changes in the d15Nbulk trends after day 6 post amendment application, coinciding with the decrease of N2O fluxes. We also report the results in the 15N site preference (SP) and d18O. We will show the results from the model validation based on this data.

  6. Kinetic commitment in the catalysis of glutamine synthesis by GS1 from Arabidopsis using (14)N/(15)N and solvent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Mauve, Caroline; Giraud, Nicolas; Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard R A; Antheaume, Ingrid; Tea, Illa; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) catalyzes the production of glutamine from glutamate, ammonium and ATP. Although being essential in plants for N assimilation and recycling, kinetic commitments and transition states of the reaction have not been clearly established yet. Here, we examined (12)C/(13)C, (14)N/(15)N and H2O/D2O isotope effects in Arabidopsis GS1 catalysis and compared to the prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) enzyme. A(14)N/(15)N isotope effect ((15)V/K ≈ 1.015, with respect to substrate NH4(+)) was observed in the prokaryotic enzyme, indicating that ammonium utilization (deprotonation and/or amidation) was partially rate-limiting. In the plant enzyme, the isotope effect was inverse ((15)V/K = 0.965), suggesting that the reaction intermediate is involved in an amidation-deamidation equilibrium favoring (15)N. There was no (12)C/(13)C kinetic isotope effect ((13)V/K = 1.000), suggesting that the amidation step of the catalytic cycle involves a transition state with minimal alteration of overall force constants at the C-5 carbon. Surprisingly, the solvent isotope effect was found to be inverse, that is, with a higher turn-over rate in heavy water ((D)V ≈ 0.5), showing that restructuration of the active site due to displacement of H2O by D2O facilitates the processing of intermediates.

  7. Ultra-Slow Dielectric Relaxation Process in Polyols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yomogida, Yoshiki; Minoguchi, Ayumi; Nozaki, Ryusuke

    2004-04-01

    Dielectric relaxation processes with relaxation times larger than that for the structural α process are reported for glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol and their mixtures for the first time. Appearance of this ultra-slow process depends on cooling rate. More rapid cooling gives larger dielectric relaxation strength. However, relaxation time is not affected by cooling rate and shows non-Arrhenius temperature dependence with correlation to the α process. It can be considered that non-equilibrium dynamic structure causes the ultra-slow process. Scale of such structure would be much larger than that of the region for the cooperative molecular orientations for the α process.

  8. Macroalgae δ15N values in well-mixed estuaries: Indicator of anthropogenic nitrogen input or macroalgae metabolism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Guillou, Gaël; Mornet, Françoise; Richard, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Although nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in macroalgae is widely used as a bioindicator of anthropogenic nitrogen inputs to the coastal zone, recent studies suggest the possible role of macroalgae metabolism in δ15N variability. Simultaneous determinations of δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) along the land-sea continuum, inter-species variability of δ15N and its sensitivity to environmental factors are necessary to confirm the efficiency of macroalgae δ15N in monitoring nitrogen origin in mixed-use watersheds. In this study, δ15N of annual and perennial macroalgae (Ulva sp., Enteromorpha sp., Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus) are compared to δ15N-DIN along the Charente Estuary, after characterizing δ15N of the three main DIN sources (i.e. cultivated area, pasture, sewage treatment plant outlet). During late winter and spring, when human activities produce high DIN inputs, DIN sources exhibit distinct δ15N signals in nitrate (NO) and ammonium (NH): cultivated area (+6.5 ± 0.6‰ and +9.0 ± 11.0‰), pasture (+9.2 ± 1.8‰ and +12.4‰) and sewage treatment plant discharge (+16.9 ± 8.7‰ and +25.4 ± 5.9‰). While sources show distinct δN- in this multiple source catchment, the overall mixture of NO sources - generally >95% DIN - leads to low variations of δN-NO at the mouth of the estuary (+7.7 to +8.4‰). Even if estuarine δN-NO values are not significantly different from pristine continental and oceanic site (+7.3‰ and +7.4‰), macroalgae δ15N values are generally higher at the mouth of the estuary. This highlights high anthropogenic DIN inputs in the estuary, and enhanced contribution of 15N-depleted NH in oceanic waters. Although seasonal variations in δN-NO are low, the same temporal trends in macroalgae δ15N values at estuarine and oceanic sites, and inter-species differences in δ15N values, suggest that macroalgae δ15N values might be modified by the metabolic response of macroalgae to environmental parameters (e

  9. Enrichment of natural (15)N abundance during soil N losses under 20years of continuous cereal cropping.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew R; Dalal, Ram C

    2017-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the enrichment of natural (15)N abundance in soil over time is reflective of historic N cycling and loss, but this process in cropping soils is not yet clear. In this study, we identified an enrichment gradient of natural (15)N abundance during 20-year chronosequence of cereal cropping on Alfisols in southwest Queensland, Australia, that have no history of fertilisation. We demonstrate that the increase in soil (15)N abundance is explained by isotopic fractionation of (15)N during organic N mineralisation and nitrification, which lead to isotopically heavier ammonium retained in the soil and isotopically lighter soil nitrate taken up and removed by seasonal crops during harvest. Here we present a framework for natural (15)N isotopic fractionation co-occurring with N losses during long-term cultivation.

  10. A 15N-poor isotopic composition for the solar system as shown by Genesis solar wind samples.

    PubMed

    Marty, B; Chaussidon, M; Wiens, R C; Jurewicz, A J G; Burnett, D S

    2011-06-24

    The Genesis mission sampled solar wind ions to document the elemental and isotopic compositions of the Sun and, by inference, of the protosolar nebula. Nitrogen was a key target element because the extent and origin of its isotopic variations in solar system materials remain unknown. Isotopic analysis of a Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator target material shows that implanted solar wind nitrogen has a (15)N/(14)N ratio of 2.18 ± 0.02 × 10(-3) (that is, ≈40% poorer in (15)N relative to terrestrial atmosphere). The (15)N/(14)N ratio of the protosolar nebula was 2.27 ± 0.03 × 10(-3), which is the lowest (15)N/(14)N ratio known for solar system objects. This result demonstrates the extreme nitrogen isotopic heterogeneity of the nascent solar system and accounts for the (15)N-depleted components observed in solar system reservoirs.

  11. Localization of 15N uptake in a Tibetan alpine Kobresia pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleuß, Per-Marten; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    The Kobresia Pygmea ecotone covers approximately 450.000 km2 and is of large global and regional importance due several socio-ecological aspects. For instance Kobresia pastures store high amounts of carbon, nitrogen and other nutrients, represent large grazing areas for herbivores, provide a fast regrowth after grazing events and protect against mechanical degradation and soil erosion. However, Kobresia pastures are assumed to be a grazing induced and are accompanied with distinct root mats varying in thickness between 5-30 cm. Yet, less is known about the morphology and the functions of this root mats, especially in the background of a progressing degradation due to changes of climate and management. Thus we aimed to identify the importance of single soil layers for plant nutrition. Accordingly, nitrogen uptake from different soil depths and its remain in above-ground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB) and soil were determined by using a 15N pulse labeling approach during the vegetation period in summer 2012. 15N urea was injected into six different soil depths (0.5 cm, 2.5 cm, 7.5 cm, 12.5 cm, 17.5 cm, 22.5 cm / for each 4 replicates) and plots were sampled 45 days after the labeling. For soil and BGB samples were taken in strict sample intervals of 0-1 cm, 1-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-15 cm, 15-20 cm, 20-25 cm. Results indicate that total recovery (including AGB, BGB and soil) was highest, if tracer was injected into the top 5 cm and subsequently decreased with decreasing injection depth. This is especially the case for the 15N recovery of BGB, which is clearly attributed to the root density and strongly decreased with soil depth. In contrast, the root activity derived from the 15N content of roots increased with soil depth, which is primary associated to a proportionate increase of living roots related to dead roots. However, most 15N was captured in plant biomass (67.5-85.3 % of total recovery), indicating high 15N uptake efficiency possibly due to N limitation

  12. 13C- and 15N-Labeling Strategies Combined with Mass Spectrometry Comprehensively Quantify Phospholipid Dynamics in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Robin; Gafken, Philip R.; Olsen, Carissa Perez

    2015-01-01

    Membranes define cellular and organelle boundaries, a function that is critical to all living systems. Like other biomolecules, membrane lipids are dynamically maintained, but current methods are extremely limited for monitoring lipid dynamics in living animals. We developed novel strategies in C. elegans combining 13C and 15N stable isotopes with mass spectrometry to directly quantify the replenishment rates of the individual fatty acids and intact phospholipids of the membrane. Using multiple measurements of phospholipid dynamics, we found that the phospholipid pools are replaced rapidly and at rates nearly double the turnover measured for neutral lipid populations. In fact, our analysis shows that the majority of membrane lipids are replaced each day. Furthermore, we found that stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs), critical enzymes in polyunsaturated fatty acid production, play an unexpected role in influencing the overall rates of membrane maintenance as SCD depletion affected the turnover of nearly all membrane lipids. Additionally, the compromised membrane maintenance as defined by LC-MS/MS with SCD RNAi resulted in active phospholipid remodeling that we predict is critical to alleviate the impact of reduced membrane maintenance in these animals. Not only have these combined methodologies identified new facets of the impact of SCDs on the membrane, but they also have great potential to reveal many undiscovered regulators of phospholipid metabolism. PMID:26528916

  13. Tracking the flow of bacterially derived 13C and 15N through soil faunal feeding channels.

    PubMed

    Crotty, F V; Blackshaw, R P; Murray, P J

    2011-06-15

    The soil food web has been referred to as a 'black box', a 'poor man's tropical rainforest' and an 'enigma', due to its opacity, diversity and the limited insight into feeding specificity. Here we investigate the flow of C and N through the soil food web as a way to gain understanding of the feeding interactions occurring. A bacterium, Pseudomonas lurida, was introduced to soil cores from two different habitats, a grassland and a woodland with the same soil type, enriched to 99 atom% in (13)C and (15)N, to trace the flow of bacterial C and N through the soil food web. Throughout the experiment the soil remained enriched in (13)C and (15)N. Almost all the invertebrates tested gained C and N enrichment indicative of the labelled bacteria, implying that bacterial feeding is a common mechanism within the soil. Only three groups were significantly enriched in both (13)C and (15)N in both habitats. These were Collembola (Entomobryomorpha), Acari (Oribatida), and Nematoda, indicating that these organisms are consuming the most bacteria within both systems. When the invertebrates were grouped into hypothesised trophic levels, those considered secondary decomposers were gaining the most enrichment across all invertebrates tested. This enrichment was also high in the micro-predators within the soil, implying that their main food source was the secondary decomposers, particularly the Collembola. Using an enriched bacterium to track the trophic transfer between organisms within the soil food web is a novel way of empirically showing that interactions are occurring, which normally cannot be seen.

  14. Control of dipolar relaxation in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquiou, B.; Bismut, G.; Beaufils, Q.; Crubellier, A.; Maréchal, E.; Pedri, P.; Vernac, L.; Gorceix, O.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.

    2010-04-01

    We study dipolar relaxation in both ultracold thermal and Bose-condensed Cr atom gases. We show three different ways to control dipolar relaxation, making use of either a static magnetic field, an oscillatory magnetic field, or an optical lattice to reduce the dimensionality of the gas from three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D). Although dipolar relaxation generally increases as a function of a static magnetic-field intensity, we find a range of nonzero magnetic-field intensities where dipolar relaxation is strongly reduced. We use this resonant reduction to accurately determine the S=6 scattering length of Cr atoms: a6=103±4a0. We compare this new measurement to another new determination of a6, which we perform by analyzing the precise spectroscopy of a Feshbach resonance in d-wave collisions, yielding a6=102.5±0.4a0. These two measurements provide, by far, the most precise determination of a6 to date. We then show that, although dipolar interactions are long-range interactions, dipolar relaxation only involves the incoming partial wave l=0 for large enough magnetic-field intensities, which has interesting consequences on the stability of dipolar Fermi gases. We then study ultracold Cr gases in a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice resulting in a collection of independent 2D gases. We show that dipolar relaxation is modified when the atoms collide in reduced dimensionality at low magnetic-field intensities, and that the corresponding dipolar relaxation rate parameter is reduced by a factor up to 7 compared to the 3D case. Finally, we study dipolar relaxation in the presence of rf oscillating magnetic fields, and we show that both the output channel energy and the transition amplitude can be controlled by means of the rf frequency and Rabi frequency.

  15. Relaxation of hyperpolarized 129 Xe in a deflating polymer bag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Harald E.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2011-09-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging with hyperpolarized (HP) noble gases, data is often acquired during prolonged gas delivery from a storage reservoir. However, little is known about the extent to which relaxation within the reservoir will limit the useful acquisition time. For quantitative characterization, 129Xe relaxation was studied in a bag made of polyvinyl fluoride (Tedlar). Particular emphasis was on wall relaxation, as this mechanism is expected to dominate. The HP 129Xe magnetization dynamics in the deflating bag were accurately described by a model assuming dissolution of Xe in the polymer matrix and dipolar relaxation with neighboring nuclear spins. In particular, the wall relaxation rate changed linearly with the surface-to-volume ratio and exhibited a relaxivity of κ = 0.392 ± 0.008 cm/h, which is in reasonable agreement with κ = 0.331 ± 0.051 cm/h measured in a static Tedlar bag. Estimates for the bulk gas-phase 129Xe relaxation yielded T1bulk=2.55±0.22 h, which is dominated by intrinsic Xe-Xe relaxation, with small additional contributions from magnetic field inhomogeneities and oxygen-induced relaxation. Calculations based on these findings indicate that relaxation may limit HP 129Xe experiments when slow gas delivery rates are employed as, for example, in mouse imaging or vascular infusion experiments.

  16. Capture cross sections of 15N(n, γ)16N at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guang-Wei; Ma, Jun-Bing; Sheng, Zong-Qiang; Shi, Guo-Zhu; Tian, Feng; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Chao

    2016-12-01

    We have reanalyzed reaction cross sections of 16N on a 12C target. The nucleon density distribution of 16N, especially surface density distribution, was extracted using the modified Glauber model. On the basis of dilute surface densities, the 15N(n, γ)16N reaction is discussed within the framework of the direct capture reaction mechanism. The calculations agree quite well with the experimental data. Support given by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11447236, 11505002, 11247001) and Foundation of Anhui University of Science and Technology (11130, 12608)

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 14N/15N isotopic ratio in L1544 (Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Caselli, P.; Leonardo, E.; Dore, L.

    2013-06-01

    The observations towards L1544 were carried out with the IRAM 30m antenna, located at Pico Veleta (Spain) during observing sessions in June 2009 and July 2010. The J=1-0 transition of was observed with the EMIR receiver in the E090 configuration tuned at 90263.8360MHz and using the lower-inner sideband. The hyperfine-free rest frequencies were taken from the most recent laboratory investigation of 15N-dyazenilium species (Dore et al. 2009A&A...496..275D). (6 data files).

  18. Influenza A (H15N4) virus isolation in Western Siberia, Russia.

    PubMed

    Sivay, Mariya V; Baranovich, Tatiana; Marchenko, Vasiliy Y; Sharshov, Kirill A; Govorkova, Elena A; Shestopalov, Aleksander M; Webby, Richard J

    2013-03-01

    The rarely identified influenza A viruses of the H15 hemagglutinin subtype have been isolated exclusively in Australia. Here we report the isolation of an H15N4 influenza A virus (A/teal/Chany/7119/2008) in Western Siberia, Russia. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the internal genes of the A/teal/Chany/7119/2008 strain belong to the Eurasian clade and that the H15 and N4 genes were introduced into the gene pool of circulating endemic avian influenza viruses through reassortment events.

  19. Optical Microscopy Characterization for Borehole U-15n#12 in Support of NCNS Source Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jennifer E.; Sussman, Aviva Joy

    2015-05-22

    Optical microscopy characterization of thin sections from corehole U-15n#12 is part of a larger material characterization effort for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). The SPE program was conducted in Nevada with a series of explosive tests designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves inside Stock quartz monzonite. Optical microscopy analysis includes the following: 1) imaging of full thin sections (scans and mosaic maps); 2) high magnification imaging of petrographic texture (grain size, foliations, fractures, etc.); and 3) measurement of microfracture density.

  20. Uptake of stormwater nitrogen in bioretention systems demonstrated from 15N tracer techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdeshel, D.; Hultine, K. R.; Pomeroy, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Bioretention stormwater management systems are engineered ecosystems that capture urban stormwater in order to reduce the harmful effects of stormwater pollution on receiving waters. Bioretention systems have been shown to be effective at reducing the volume of runoff, and thereby reduce the nutrient loading to receiving waters from urban areas. However, little work has been done to evaluate the treatment processes that are responsible for reductions in effluent nitrogen (N). We hypothesize that the pulses of inorganic nitrogen associated with urban runoff events are captured in the plat tissues within these systems and not adsorbed to the soil media, thus creating a long-term, sustainable treatment approach to reducing the total nutrient loading to receiving waters. Nitrogen treatment performance was tested on two bioretention systems in Salt Lake City, UT: 1) an upland native community that does not require irrigation in semi-arid climates, and 2) a wetland community that requires 250 l of daily irrigation to offset the relatively high evaporative demand in the region. Each cell is sized to treat a 2.5 cm storm from a 140 m2 impervious surface: the area of the bioretention system is 10 m2. To test the N removal performance of each system, runoff events were simulated to represent an average precipitation regime using a synthetic stormwater blend starting in January, 2012. Effluent was collected from an underdrain and analyzed for total nitrogen (TN); mass removal was calculated for each month by subtracting the TN mass added to the garden minus the TN mass that flowed out of the garden. To test the hypothesis that plants assimilate stormwater N, 4 g of 100 atom% 15N NH4NO3 tracer was used as the N source in the synthetic stormwater during the first 2,000 l synthetic storm event in May. This isotopic label was calculated to enrich the total N pool of each garden to 100‰ 15N/14Nair. New growth was harvested from each plant in both cells and analyzed for 15N

  1. Determination of the δ15N of nitrate in water; RSIL lab code 2899

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2899 is to determine the δ15N of nitrate (NO3-) in water. The δ15N of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of the NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  2. Determination of the δ15N of nitrate in solids; RSIL lab code 2894

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2894 is to determine the δ15N of nitrate (NO3-) in solids. The nitrate fraction of the nitrogen species is dissolved by water (called leaching) and can be analyzed by the bacterial method covered in RSIL lab code 2899. After leaching, the δ15N of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  3. Rooting depth distribution and nitrogen acquisition using 15N tracer, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Colleen Iversen

    2016-12-01

    Permafrost thaw and degradation may lead to altered thickness of the active soil layer and a changing distribution of plant-available nutrients throughout the soil, but little is known about the nutrient acquisition strategies of dominant tundra plant species. We conducted an 15N isotope tracer experiment to assess the vertical distribution of nutrient acquisition among three dominant species representing important plant functional types (PFTs) on the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) in Barrow, Alaska. We found that vertical patterns of root distribution and nutrient acquisition varied among plant species, and that root density may not entirely explain patterns of nutrient acquisition for all species.

  4. Off-resonance R1rho relaxation outside of the fast exchange limit: an experimental study of a cavity mutant of T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M; Orekhov, Vladislav Yu; Dahlquist, Frederick W; Kay, Lewis E

    2003-05-01

    An (15)N off-resonance R(1rho) spin relaxation study of an L99A point mutant of T4 lysozyme is presented. Previous CPMG-based relaxation dispersion studies of exchange in this protein have established that the molecule interconverts between a populated ground state and an excited state (3.4%) with an exchange rate constant of 1450 s(-1) at 25 degrees C. It is shown that for the majority of residues in this protein the offset dependence of the R(1rho) relaxation rates cannot be well fit using models which are only valid in the fast exchange regime. In contrast, a recently derived expression by Trott and Palmer (J. Magn. Reson., 154, 157-160, 2002) which is valid over a wider window of exchange than other relations, is shown to fit the data well. Values of (signed) chemical shift differences between exchanging sites have been extracted and are in reasonable agreement with shift differences measured using CPMG methods. A set of simulations is presented which help establish the exchange regimes that are best suited to analysis by off-resonance R(1rho) techniques.

  5. Swelling and Stress Relaxation in Portland Brownstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, I.; Scherer, G.

    2003-04-01

    Portland Brownstone (PB) is an arkose sandstone extensively used in the northeast-ern USA during the nineteenth century. This reddish-brown stone contains a fraction of swelling clays that are thought to contribute to its degradation upon cycles of wet-ting and drying. During drying events, contraction of the drying surface leads to stresses approaching the tensile strength of the stone. However, we have found that the magnitude of these stresses is limited by the ability of the stone to undergo stress relaxation. In this paper we describe novel methods to determine the magnitude of the stresses and the rate at which they develop and relax. We also discuss the influ-ence of surfactants on the magnitude of swelling and the rate of the stress relaxation of PB. The implications of our findings for the understanding of damage due to swelling of clays are discussed.

  6. Rapid, storm-induced changes in the natural abundance of sup 15 N in a planktonic ecosystem, Chesapeake Bay, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, J.P.; McCarthy, J.J. ); Horrigan, S.G. )

    1991-12-01

    Samples of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), particulate nitrogen (PN), and two species of zooplankton were collected during two north-south transects of the Chesapeake Bay in the autumn of 1984 (27-28 September and 3-5 October). During the first transect, the natural abundance of {sup 15}N ({delta} {sup 15}N) in the major dissolved and planktonic pools of nitrogen suggested that the {delta}{sup 15}N of PN was largely determined by isotopic fractionation during uptake of NH{sub 4}{sup +} by phytoplankton. Averaged over the transect as a whole, the {delta}{sup 15}N of the herbivorous calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa was 4.1% higher than that of the PN, while the {delta}{sup 15}N of the carnivorous ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi was 6.4% higher than that of the PN. In the interval between the two transects, storm-induced mixing of the water column resulted in the injection of NH{sub 4}{sup +} into the surface layer of the bay. In combination with ancillary physical, chemical, and biological data, these changes in {delta}{sup 15}N provided estimates of the isotopic fractionation factor for NH{sub 4}{sup +} uptake by phytoplankton ({alpha} = 1.0065-1.0080) as well as the turnover time of nitrogen in Acartia tonsa (6.0-9.6 days). Despite the changes in {delta}{sup 15}N observed during this cruise, the relative distribution of {sup 15}N between trophic levels was preserved: during the second transect, the difference in {delta}{sup 15}N between Acartia tonsa and PN was 3.6%, and the difference in {delta}{sup 15}N between Mnemiopsis leidyi and PN was 7.3%. These results demonstrate that the natural abundance of {sup 15}N can change dramatically on a time scale of days, and that time-series studies of the natural abundance of {sup 15}N can be a useful complement to studies using tracer additions of {sup 15}N to document nitrogen transformations in planktonic ecosystems.

  7. Development of equations to estimate microbial contamination in ruminal incubation residues of forage produced under tropical conditions using 15N as a label.

    PubMed

    Machado, P A S; Valadares Filho, S C; Detmann, E; Santos, S A; Valadares, R F D; Ducatti, C; Rotta, P P; Costa e Silva, L F

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to use (15)N to label microbial cells to allow development of equations for estimating the microbial contamination in ruminal in situ incubation residues of forage produced under tropical conditions. A total of 24 tropical forages were ruminal incubated in 3 steers at 3 separate times. To determine microbial contamination of the incubated residues, ruminal bacteria were labeled with (15)N by continuous intraruminal infusion 60 h before the first incubation and continued until the last day of incubation. Ruminal digesta was collected for the isolation of bacteria before the first infusion of (15)N on adaptation period and after the infusion of (15)N on collection period. To determine the microbial contamination of CP fractions, restricted models were compared with the full model using the model identity test. A value of the corrected fraction "A" was estimated from the corresponding noncorrected fraction by this equation: Corrected "A" fraction (A(CP)C) = 1.99286 + 0.98256 × A" fraction without correction (A(CP)WC). The corrected fraction "B" was estimated from the corresponding noncorrected fraction and from CP, NDF, neutral detergent insoluble protein (NDIP), and indigestible NDF (iNDF) using the equation corrected "B" fraction (B(CP)C) = -17.2181 - 0.0344 × fraction "B" without correction (B(CP)WC) + 0.65433 × CP + 1.03787 × NDF + 2.66010 × NDIP - 0.85979 × iNDF. The corrected degradation rate of "B" fraction (kd)was estimated using the equation corrected degradation rate of "B" fraction (kd(CP)C) = 0.04667 + 0.35139 × degradation rate of "B" fraction without correction (kd(CP)WC) + 0.0020 × CP - 0.00055839 × NDF - 0.00336 × NDIP + 0.00075089 × iNDF. This equation was obtained to estimate the contamination using CP of the feeds: %C = 79.21 × (1 - e(-0.0555t)) × e(-0.0874CP). It was concluded that A and B fractions and kd of CP could be highly biased by microbial CP contamination, and therefore these corrected values

  8. The fates of 15N-labeled fertilizer in a wheat–soil system as influenced by fertilization practice in a loamy soil

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaoming; Wang, Huoyan; Liu, Xiaowei; Lu, Dianjun; Zhou, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate fertilization practice is crucial to achieve maximum wheat grain yield with minimum nitrogen (N) loss. A field 15N micro-plot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of application methods [split application (SA) and band application (BA)] and N rates (60, 150 and 240 kg ha−1) on the wheat grain yield, urea-15N fate and N efficiency in Jiangyan County, China. At high N rates, wheat grain yield was significantly higher for SA than BA treatment, but there was no difference at the lower N rates. Plant N derived from fertilizer was higher in SA than in BA treatment. The high N fertilizer application increased total N uptake by wheat derived from fertilizer, but wheat plant N derived from soil was not affected by the N rate. Fertilizer-N recovery in SA treatment was higher than in BA treatment. Residual N recovery in the 0–80 cm soil layer was 31–51%, which decreased with increasing N rate. The highest N loss was found for BA treatment at the N application of 240 kg ha−1. The one-time BA of N fertilizer, especially for higher N rates, led to reduced wheat grain yield and N efficiency, and increased the N loss. PMID:27713476

  9. The fates of 15N-labeled fertilizer in a wheat–soil system as influenced by fertilization practice in a loamy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoming; Wang, Huoyan; Liu, Xiaowei; Lu, Dianjun; Zhou, Jianmin

    2016-10-01

    Appropriate fertilization practice is crucial to achieve maximum wheat grain yield with minimum nitrogen (N) loss. A field 15N micro-plot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of application methods [split application (SA) and band application (BA)] and N rates (60, 150 and 240 kg ha‑1) on the wheat grain yield, urea-15N fate and N efficiency in Jiangyan County, China. At high N rates, wheat grain yield was significantly higher for SA than BA treatment, but there was no difference at the lower N rates. Plant N derived from fertilizer was higher in SA than in BA treatment. The high N fertilizer application increased total N uptake by wheat derived from fertilizer, but wheat plant N derived from soil was not affected by the N rate. Fertilizer-N recovery in SA treatment was higher than in BA treatment. Residual N recovery in the 0–80 cm soil layer was 31–51%, which decreased with increasing N rate. The highest N loss was found for BA treatment at the N application of 240 kg ha‑1. The one-time BA of N fertilizer, especially for higher N rates, led to reduced wheat grain yield and N efficiency, and increased the N loss.

  10. NMR spin relaxation in proteins: The patterns of motion that dissipate power to the bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Yury E.; Meirovitch, Eva

    2014-04-01

    We developed in recent years the two-body coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for the analysis of NMR relaxation in proteins. The two bodies/rotators are the protein (diffusion tensor D1) and the spin-bearing probe, e.g., the 15N-1H bond (diffusion tensor, D2), coupled by a local potential (u). A Smoluchowski equation is solved to yield the generic time correlation functions (TCFs), which are sums of weighted exponentials (eigenmodes). By Fourier transformation one obtains the generic spectral density functions (SDFs) which underlie the experimental relaxation parameters. The typical paradigm is to characterize structural dynamics in terms of the best-fit values of D1, D2, and u. Additional approaches we pursued employ the SRLS TCFs, SDFs, or eigenmodes as descriptors. In this study we develop yet another perspective. We consider the SDF as function of the angular velocity associated with the fluctuating fields underlying NMR relaxation. A parameter called j-fraction, which represents the relative contribution of eigenmode, i, to a given value of the SDF function at a specific frequency, ω, is defined. j-fraction profiles of the dominant eigenmodes are derived for 0 ≤ ω ≤ 1012 rad/s. They reveal which patterns of motion actuate power dissipation at given ω-values, what are their rates, and what is their relative contribution. Simulations are carried out to determine the effect of timescale separation, D1/D2, axial potential strength, and local diffusion axiality. For D1/D2 ≤ 0.01 and strong local potential of 15 kBT, power is dissipated by global diffusion, renormalized (by the strong potential) local diffusion, and probe diffusion on the surface of a cone (to be called cone diffusion). For D1/D2 = 0.1, power is dissipated by mixed eigenmodes largely of a global-diffusion-type or cone-diffusion-type, and a nearly bare renormalized-local-diffusion eigenmode. For D1/D2 > 0.1, most eigenmodes are of a mixed type. The analysis is

  11. Nitrogen removal in maturation ponds: tracer experiments with 15N-labelled ammonia.

    PubMed

    Camargo Valero, M A; Mara, D D

    2007-01-01

    A primary maturation pond (M1) was spiked with labelled ammonium chloride (15NH4Cl) to track ammonium transformations associated with algal uptake and subsequent sedimentation. Conventional sampling based on grab samples collected from M1 influent, water column and effluent, and processed for unfiltered and filtered TKN, ammonium, nitrite and nitrate, found low total nitrogen removal (8%) and high ammonium nitrogen removal (90%). Stable isotope analysis of 15N from suspended organic and ammonium nitrogen fractions in M1 effluent revealed that labelled ammonium was mainly found in the organic fraction (69% of the 15N recovered), rather than the inorganic fraction (5%). Algal uptake was the predominant pathway for ammonia removal, even though conditions were favourable for ammonia volatilization (8.9 < pH <10.1 units, 15.2 < temperature <18.8 degrees C). Total nitrogen was removed by ammonia volatilization at 15 g N/ha d (3%), organic nitrogen sedimentation at 105 g N/ha d (20%), and in-pond accumulation due to algal uptake at 377 g N/ha d (71%). Algal uptake of ammonium and subsequent sedimentation and retention in the benthic sludge, after partial ammonification of the algal organic nitrogen, is thus likely to be the dominant mechanism for permanent nitrogen removal in maturation ponds during warm summer months in England.

  12. MUSIC in triple-resonance experiments: amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations

    PubMed

    Schubert; Smalla; Schmieder; Oschkinat

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH(2) or XH(3) (X can be (15)N or (13)C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. The coral δ15N record of terrestrial nitrate loading varies with river catchment land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, A.; Watanabe, T.; Tsunogai, U.; Hasegawa, H.; Yamano, H.

    2015-03-01

    We analysed the nitrogen isotopes in two coral cores (δ15Ncoral) from the mouth of the Todoroki River, Ishigaki Island, Japan, to examine whether the δ15Ncoral reflects the run-off of nitrate related to the land use in the river catchment. The two coral cores were used to examine the seasonal variation in δ15Ncoral for 14 years (CORE1; 1993-2007) and the annual variation of δ15Ncoral for 52 years (CORE2; 1958-2010). In CORE1, the 5-month running mean of δ15Ncoral was positively correlated with that of monthly precipitation, excluding all strong precipitation events (>150 mm d-1). In CORE2, the δ15Ncoral mean in the earlier period (1958-1980) was 1.0 ‰ greater than that in the later period (1981-2010). The annual averages of δ15Ncoral are positively correlated with the total precipitation in the rainy season (May-June) for both time periods. The difference in the δ15Ncoral between the earlier and later periods is probably caused by the land use changed from paddy fields with 15N-rich manure to sugar cane fields in the early 1980s. Although some uncertainties still remain regarding the precision of δ15N coral proxy records, this study emphasises the clear potential for their use in reconstructing terrestrial nitrate discharge records from corals.

  14. MUSIC in Triple-Resonance Experiments: Amino Acid Type-Selective 1H- 15N Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Mario; Smalla, Maika; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective 1H-15N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH2 or XH3 (X can be 15N or 13C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains.

  15. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  16. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported.

  17. Stereospecific assignments of glycine in proteins by stereospecific deuteration and {sup 15}N labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Curley, R.W. Jr.; Panigot, M.J.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Stereospecific assignments are important for accurately determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins through the use of multidimensional NMR techniques. It is especially important to stereospecifically assign the glycine {alpha}-protons in proteins because of the potential for different backbone conformations of this residue. These stereospecific assignments are critical for interpreting the {sup 3}J{sub NH,{alpha}H} coupling constants and NOEs involving the glycine {alpha}-protons that determine the conformation of this part of the protein. However, it is often difficult to unambiguously obtain the stereospecific assignments for glycine residues by using only NOE data. In this poster, we present a method for unambiguous, stereospecific assignment of the {alpha}-protons of glycine residues. This method involves synthesis of stereo-specifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gly using a slightly modified procedure originally described by Woodard and coworkers for the stereoselective deuteration of glycine. The stereospecifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gy has been incorporated into recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial systems (FKBP) and mammalian cells (u-PA). Two- and three-dimensional isotope-filtered and isotope-edited NMR experiments were used to obtain the stereospecific assignments of the glycine {alpha}-protons for these proteins.

  18. Oxygen determination in materials by 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Sunitha, Y.; Reddy, G. L. N.; Sukumar, A. A.; Ramana, J. V.; Sarkar, A.; Verma, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents a proton induced γ-ray emission method based on 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction to determine bulk oxygen in materials. The determination involves the measurement of 5.27 MeV γ-rays emitted following the de-excitation of 15N nuclei. A description of the energetics of the reaction is given to provide an insight into the origin of 5.27 MeV γ-rays. In addition, thick target γ-ray yields and the limits of detection are measured to ascertain the analytical potential of the reaction. The thick-target γ-ray yields are measured with a high purity germanium detector and a bismuth germanate detector at 0° as well as 90° angles in 3.0-4.2 MeV proton energy region. The best limit of detection of about 1.3 at.% is achieved at 4.2 MeV proton energy for measurements at 0° as well 90° angles with the bismuth germanate detector while the uncertainty in quantitative analysis is <8%. The reaction has a probing depth of several tens of microns. Interferences can arise from fluorine due to the occurrence of 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction that emits 6-7 MeV γ-rays. The analytical potential of the methodology is demonstrated by determining oxygen in several oxide as well as non-oxide materials.

  19. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  20. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-21

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  1. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  2. The feasibility of using delta15N and delta13C values for discriminating between conventionally and organically fertilized pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Flores, Pilar; Fenoll, José; Hellín, Pilar

    2007-07-11

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine the feasibility of using leaf and fruit delta15N and delta13C values to discriminate between conventionally and organically fertilized peppers, when conventional management involves the application of organic amendment for soil preparation. All of the treatments involved adding horse manure to the soil before applying different rates of synthetic N fertilizers: 0 (T1 and T2), 150 (T3), and 300 kg ha(-1) (T4). The difference between T1 and T2 was that no synthetic fertilizer had been applied to plot T1 during the 5 years prior to the experiment. Significant differences were found in the delta15N values of leaves and fruit from the plants grown under organic or mixed fertilization. The results indicate the possibility of using 15N natural abundance as an indicator of fertilization management. On the other hand, delta13C values did not contribute any additional information for discriminating between the organically and the synthetically and organically fertilized peppers.

  3. Differences in urbanization and degree of marine influence are reflected in delta13C and delta15N of producers and consumers in seagrass habitats of Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ylva S; Fox, Sophia E; Kinney, Erin L; Teichberg, Mirta; Valiela, Ivan

    2010-04-01

    Couplings between land use and marine food webs in tropical systems are poorly understood. We compared land-sea coupling in seven sites around Puerto Rico, differing in the degree of precipitation and urbanization, by measuring delta(13)C and delta(15)N in producers and consumers. delta(15)N values were influenced by human activity: the food web from sites near urbanized centers was on average 1 per thousand heavier in delta(15)N compared to undeveloped sites. This is most likely due to wastewater inputs from septic systems relatively near the shoreline. Changes in delta(13)C were best explained by differences in the degree of marine influence. Where terrestrial inputs from a major river dominated, delta(13)C values were lighter, whereas sites further from land and in locations exposed to oceanic currents had heavier delta(13)C values, characteristic of a marine source of dissolved organic carbon. We found no significant effect of precipitation on connectivity in spite of a twofold difference in annual average rainfall between the north and south coast. The results suggest there is some connectivity between land and sea in Puerto Rico, despite high rates of evaporation relative to precipitation.

  4. Time scales and relaxation dynamics in quantum-dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Erneux, Thomas; Viktorov, Evgeny A.; Mandel, Paul

    2007-08-15

    We analyze a three-variable rate equation model that takes into account carrier capture and Pauli blocking in quantum dot semiconductor lasers. The exponential decay of the relaxation oscillations is analyzed from the linearized equations in terms of three key parameters that control the time scales of the laser. Depending on their relative values, we determine two distinct two-variable reductions of the rate equations in the limit of large capture rates. The first case leads to the rate equations for quantum well lasers, exhibiting relaxation oscillations dynamics. The second case corresponds to dots nearly saturated by the carriers and is characterized by the absence of relaxation oscillations.

  5. δ15N-Size Relationships in River Invertebrate Communities: An Integrated Measure of Food web Structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Cabana, G.

    2005-05-01

    Anthropogenic perturbations can alter the composition and structure of benthic communities in rivers. Here, we examine the use of estimates of fish trophic position measured with stable nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N), and δ15N-size relationships for the invertebrate community, as indicators of food web structure in rivers affected by various anthropogenic disturbances. Results revealed that δ15N-size relationships of invertebrate communities showed a variety of responses, some sites (50%) showing significant increases in δ15N with invertebrate size, whereas others did not. Similarly, the number of trophic levels between invertebrate-eating fish and primary consumers varied greatly among study sites, ranging from 0.6 to 2.2 levels. To investigate whether these estimates of fish trophic position integrated changes in invertebrate community structure, we compared slopes of invertebrate δ15N versus size with slopes of baseline-corrected fish δ15N versus size. Both slopes tended to be correlated, although the relationship was not significant (r2 = 0.26, p = 0.07). This trend suggests, however, that invertebrate-feeding fish trophic position measured with δ15N might reflect overall community structure, and could possibly be used as an easily measured indicator of food chain collapse following anthropogenic perturbations.

  6. Cereal grain, rachis and pulse seed amino acid δ15N values as indicators of plant nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Styring, Amy K; Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Natural abundance δ(15)N values of plant tissue amino acids (AAs) reflect the cycling of N into and within plants, providing an opportunity to better understand environmental and anthropogenic effects on plant metabolism. In this study, the AA δ(15)N values of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) grains and rachis and broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, grown at the experimental farm stations of Rothamsted, UK and Bad Lauchstädt, Germany, were determined by GC-C-IRMS. It was found that the δ(15)N values of cereal grain and rachis AAs could be largely attributed to metabolic pathways involved in their biosynthesis and catabolism. The relative (15)N-enrichment of phenylalanine can be attributed to its involvement in the phenylpropanoid pathway and glutamate has a δ(15)N value which is an average of the other AAs due to its central role in AA-N cycling. The relative AA δ(15)N values of broad bean and pea seeds were very different from one another, providing evidence for differences in the metabolic routing of AAs to the developing seeds in these leguminous plants. This study has shown that AA δ(15)N values relate to known AA biosynthetic pathways in plants and thus have the potential to aid understanding of how various external factors, such as source of assimilated N, influence metabolic cycling of N within plants.

  7. Resonance strengths in the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, Michele; Trompler, Erik; Bemmerer, Daniel; Beyer, Roland; Grosse, Eckart; Hannaske, Roland; Junghans, Arnd R.; Nair, Chithra; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas; Yakorev, Dmitry; Broggini, Carlo; Caciolli, Antonio; Erhard, Martin; Menegazzo, Roberto; Fueloep, Zsolt; Gyuerky, Gyoergy; Szuecs, Tamas; Vezzu, Simone

    2010-05-15

    The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction is the slowest reaction of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle of hydrogen burning in stars. As a consequence, it determines the rate of the cycle. The {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reaction is frequently used in inverse kinematics for hydrogen depth profiling in materials. The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reactions have been studied simultaneously, using titanium nitride targets of natural isotopic composition and a proton beam. The strengths of the resonances at E{sub p} = 1058 keV in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and at E{sub p} = 897 and 430 keV in {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C have been determined with improved precision, relative to the well-known resonance at E{sub p} = 278 keV in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O. The new recommended values are omegagamma=0.353+-0.018, 362+-20, and 21.9+-1.0 eV for their respective strengths. In addition, the branching ratios for the decay of the E{sub p} = 1058 keV resonance in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O have been redetermined. The data reported here should facilitate future studies of off-resonant capture in the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction that are needed for an improved R-matrix extrapolation of the cross section. In addition, the data on the 430 keV resonance in {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C may be useful for hydrogen depth profiling.

  8. Millennial scale oscillations in bulk δ15N and δ13C over the Mid- to Late Holocene seen in proteinaceous corals from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, D. S.; Mccarthy, M. D.; McMahon, K.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    The North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) is the largest continuous ecosystem on this planet and is an important regulator of biogeochemical cycling and carbon sequestration. With evidence of its expansion in a warming climate, it is necessary to develop a more complete understanding of the variability in productivity and nutrient dynamics in this important ecosystem through time. We constructed a long-term, high resolution record of bulk record of stable nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon isotopes (δ13C) from multiple proteinaceous deep sea corals around Hawaii extending back ~5300 years with few gaps. Our data confirms the decreasing trend in δ15N since the Little Ice Age (1850s), which matches previously published results in part attributed to anthropogenic climate change (e.g. Sherwood et al. 2014). However, while the rate of change since the Little Ice Age (δ15N declines ~1‰ over ~150yrs) remains by far the most rapid throughout the longer record, there also appear to be longer-term (near-millennial scale) climatic oscillations of even greater magnitude (δ15N shifts ~1.5-2‰ over ~1000yrs). After removal of the Seuss Effect, δ13C values also declined ~1.5‰ since the Little Ice Age. Furthermore, there also appear to be oscillations in δ13C of ~1-2‰ over millennial timescales. These results reveal the existence of previously unrecognized long-term oscillations in NPSG biogeochemical cycles, which are likely linked to changes in phytoplankton species composition, food web dynamics, and/or variability in source nutrients and productivity possibly caused by changes in climate. This study provides insight into nutrient dynamics in the NPSG over the past five millennia, and offers a historical baseline to better analyze the effects of current anthropogenic climate forcing.

  9. Proteome turnover in the green alga Ostreococcus tauri by time course 15N metabolic labeling mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah F; Munagapati, Vijaya S; Salvo-Chirnside, Eliane; Kerr, Lorraine E; Le Bihan, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Protein synthesis and degradation determine the cellular levels of proteins, and their control hence enables organisms to respond to environmental change. Experimentally, these are little known proteome parameters; however, recently, SILAC-based mass spectrometry studies have begun to quantify turnover in the proteomes of cell lines, yeast, and animals. Here, we present a proteome-scale method to quantify turnover and calculate synthesis and degradation rate constants of individual proteins in autotrophic organisms such as algae and plants. The workflow is based on the automated analysis of partial stable isotope incorporation with (15)N. We applied it in a study of the unicellular pico-alga Ostreococcus tauri and observed high relative turnover in chloroplast-encoded ATPases (0.42-0.58% h(-1)), core photosystem II proteins (0.34-0.51% h(-1)), and RbcL (0.47% h(-1)), while nuclear-encoded RbcS2 is more stable (0.23% h(-1)). Mitochondrial targeted ATPases (0.14-0.16% h(-1)), photosystem antennae (0.09-0.14% h(-1)), and histones (0.07-0.1% h(-1)) were comparatively stable. The calculation of degradation and synthesis rate constants k(deg) and k(syn) confirms RbcL as the bulk contributor to overall protein turnover. This study performed over 144 h of incorporation reveals dynamics of protein complex subunits as well as isoforms targeted to different organelles.

  10. Limitations in detection of 15N incorporation by mass spectrometry in protein-based stable isotope probing (protein-SIP).

    PubMed

    Taubert, Martin; von Bergen, Martin; Seifert, Jana

    2013-05-01

    The method of protein-based stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has previously been shown to allow the modeling of carbon fluxes in microbial communities, thus tackling one of the key questions in microbial ecology. The method allows the analysis of stable isotope distribution in peptides, revealing metabolic activities of the species present in an ecosystem. Besides carbon, an application of protein-SIP with nitrogen is of interest for resolving the nitrogen fluxes in microbial communities. Thus, the sensitivity and reliability of a protein-SIP approach employing (15)N was analyzed. For this, cultivations of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17483 with different ratios of (14)N/(15)N were performed, from 10 % down to 0.1 % (15)N. After incubation leading to complete labeling of biomass, proteins were extracted and separated by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by tryptic digest and UPLC Orbitrap MS/MS analysis. (15)N relative isotope abundance (RIA) was calculated based on isotopic patterns from identified peptides in mass spectra. Proteomics data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000127. The distribution of (15)N RIA values among peptides was analyzed in samples with different (15)N amount, and potential causes for variations within individual samples of either technical or biological origin were investigated. Using a number of 50 peptides, significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in (15)N incorporation were found between samples of different (15)N RIA down to 0.1 %. The study demonstrates that protein-SIP using (15)N is sufficiently sensitive for quantitative investigation of microbial activity in nitrogen cycling processes.

  11. Plant community change mediates the response of foliar δ(15)N to CO 2 enrichment in mesic grasslands.

    PubMed

    Polley, H Wayne; Derner, Justin D; Jackson, Robert B; Gill, Richard A; Procter, Andrew C; Fay, Philip A

    2015-06-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may change the isotopic signature of plant N by altering plant and microbial processes involved in the N cycle. CO2 may increase leaf δ(15)N by increasing plant community productivity, C input to soil, and, ultimately, microbial mineralization of old, (15)N-enriched organic matter. We predicted that CO2 would increase aboveground productivity (ANPP; g biomass m(-2)) and foliar δ(15)N values of two grassland communities in Texas, USA: (1) a pasture dominated by a C4 exotic grass, and (2) assemblages of tallgrass prairie species, the latter grown on clay, sandy loam, and silty clay soils. Grasslands were exposed in separate experiments to a pre-industrial to elevated CO2 gradient for 4 years. CO2 stimulated ANPP of pasture and of prairie assemblages on each of the three soils, but increased leaf δ(15)N only for prairie plants on a silty clay. δ(15)N increased linearly as mineral-associated soil C declined on the silty clay. Mineral-associated C declined as ANPP increased. Structural equation modeling indicted that CO2 increased ANPP partly by favoring a tallgrass (Sorghastrum nutans) over a mid-grass species (Bouteloua curtipendula). CO2 may have increased foliar δ(15)N on the silty clay by reducing fractionation during N uptake and assimilation. However, we interpret the soil-specific, δ(15)N-CO2 response as resulting from increased ANPP that stimulated mineralization from recalcitrant organic matter. By contrast, CO2 favored a forb species (Solanum dimidiatum) with higher δ(15)N than the dominant grass (Bothriochloa ischaemum) in pasture. CO2 enrichment changed grassland δ(15)N by shifting species relative abundances.

  12. Discrimination against 15N among recombinant inbred lines of Phaseolus vulgaris L. contrasting in phosphorus use efficiency for nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Lazali, Mohamed; Bargaz, Adnane; Carlsson, Georg; Ounane, Sidi Mohamed; Drevon, Jean Jacques

    2014-02-15

    Although isotopic discrimination processes during nitrogen (N) transformations influence the outcome of (15)N based quantification of N2 fixation in legumes, little attention has been given to the effects of genotypic variability and environmental constraints such as phosphorus (P) deficiency, on discrimination against (15)N during N2 fixation. In this study, six Phaseolus vulgaris recombinant inbred lines (RILs), i.e. RILs 115, 104, 34 (P deficiency tolerant) and 147, 83, 70 (P deficiency sensitive), were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT899, and hydroaeroponically grown with P-sufficient (250 μmol P plant(-1) week(-1)) versus P-deficient (75 μmol P plant(-1) week(-1)) supply. Two harvests were done at 15 (before nodule functioning) and 42 (flowering stage) days after transplanting. Nodulation, plant biomass, P and N contents, and the ratios of (15)N over total N content ((15)N/Nt) for shoots, roots and nodules were determined. The results showed lower (15)N/Nt in shoots than in roots, both being much lower than in nodules. P deficiency caused a larger decrease in (15)N/Nt in shoots (-0.18%) than in nodules (-0.11%) for all of the genotypes, and the decrease in shoots was greatest for RILs 34 (-0.33%) and 104 (-0.25%). Nodule (15)N/Nt was significantly related to both the quantity of N2 fixed (R(2)=0.96***) and the P content of nodules (R(2)=0.66*). We conclude that the discrimination against (15)N in the legume N2-fixing symbiosis of common bean with R. tropici CIAT899 is affected by P nutrition and plant genotype, and that the (15)N/Nt in nodules may be used to screen for genotypic variation in P use efficiency for N2 fixation.

  13. Conformational flexibility of a human immunoglobulin light chain variable domain by relaxation dispersion nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: implications for protein misfolding and amyloid assembly.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sujoy; Pondaven, Simon P; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2011-07-05

    The conformational flexibility of a human immunoglobulin κIV light-chain variable domain, LEN, which can undergo conversion to amyloid under destabilizing conditions, was investigated at physiological and acidic pH on a residue-specific basis by multidimensional solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Measurements of backbone chemical shifts and amide (15)N longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation rates and steady-state nuclear Overhauser enhancements indicate that, on the whole, LEN retains its native three-dimensional fold and dimeric state at pH 2 and that the protein backbone exhibits limited fast motions on the picosecond to nanosecond time scale. On the other hand, (15)N Carr--Purcell--Meiboom--Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion NMR data show that LEN experiences considerable slower, millisecond time scale dynamics, confined primarily to three contiguous segments of about 5-20 residues and encompassing the N-terminal β-strand and complementarity determining loop regions 2 and 3 in the vicinity of the dimer interface. Quantitative analysis of the CPMG relaxation dispersion data reveals that at physiological pH these slow backbone motions are associated with relatively low excited-state protein conformer populations, in the ~2-4% range. Upon acidification, the minor conformer populations increase significantly, to ~10-15%, with most residues involved in stabilizing interactions across the dimer interface displaying increased flexibility. These findings provide molecular-level insights about partial protein unfolding at low pH and point to the LEN dimer dissociation, initiated by increased conformational flexibility in several well-defined regions, as being one of the important early events leading to amyloid assembly.

  14. High retention of (15) N-labeled nitrogen deposition in a nitrogen saturated old-growth tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Gurmesa, Geshere Abdisa; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Mao, Qinggong; Zhou, Kaijun; Fang, Yunting; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-11-01

    The effects of increased reactive nitrogen (N) deposition in forests depend largely on its fate in the ecosystems. However, our knowledge on the fates of deposited N in tropical forest ecosystems and its retention mechanisms is limited. Here, we report the results from the first whole ecosystem (15) N labeling experiment performed in a N-rich old-growth tropical forest in southern China. We added (15) N tracer monthly as (15) NH4(15) NO3 for 1 year to control plots and to N-fertilized plots (N-plots, receiving additions of 50 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) for 10 years). Tracer recoveries in major ecosystem compartments were quantified 4 months after the last addition. Tracer recoveries in soil solution were monitored monthly to quantify leaching losses. Total tracer recovery in plant and soil (N retention) in the control plots was 72% and similar to those observed in temperate forests. The retention decreased to 52% in the N-plots. Soil was the dominant sink, retaining 37% and 28% of the labeled N input in the control and N-plots, respectively. Leaching below 20 cm was 50 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) in the control plots and was close to the N input (51 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) ), indicating N saturation of the top soil. Nitrogen addition increased N leaching to 73 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) . However, of these only 7 and 23 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) in the control and N-plots, respectively, originated from the labeled N input. Our findings indicate that deposited N, like in temperate forests, is largely incorporated into plant and soil pools in the short term, although the forest is N-saturated, but high cycling rates may later release the N for leaching and/or gaseous loss. Thus, N cycling rates rather than short-term N retention represent the main difference between temperate forests and the studied tropical forest.

  15. Mammalian DNA δ15N exhibits 40‰ intramolecular variation and is unresponsive to dietary protein level

    PubMed Central

    Strable, Maggie S.; Tschanz, Carolyn L.; Varamini, Behzad; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We report the first high precision characterization of molecular and intramolecular δ15N of nucleosides derived from mammalian DNA. The influence of dietary protein level on brain amino acids and deoxyribonucleosides was determined to investigate whether high protein turnover would alter amino acid 15N or 13C. Pregnant guinea pig dams were fed control diets, or high or low levels of dietary protein throughout gestation, and all pups were fed control diets. Cerebellar DNA of offspring was extracted at 2 and 120 days of life, nucleosides isolated and δ15N and δ13C characterized. Mean diet δ15N = 0.45±0.33‰, compared to cerebellar whole tissue and DNA δ15N = +4.1±0.7‰ and −4.5±0.4‰, respectively. Cerebellar deoxythymidine (dT), deoxycytidine (dC), deoxyadenosine (dA), and deoxyguanosine (dG) δ15N were +1.4±0.4, −2.1±0.9, −7.2±0.3, and −10.4±0.5‰, respectively. There were no changes in amino acid or deoxyribonucleoside δ15N due to dietary protein level. Using known metabolic relationships, we developed equations to calculate the intramolecular δ15N originating from aspartate (asp) in purines (pur) or pyrimidines (pyr), glutamine (glu), and glycine (gly) to be δ15NASP-PUR, δ15NASP-PYR, δ15NGLN, and δ15NGLY +11.9±2.3‰, +7.0±2.0‰, −9.1±2.4‰, and −31.8±8.9‰, respectively. A subset of twelve amino acids from food and brain had mean δ15N of 4.3±3.2‰ and 13.8±3.1‰, respectively, and δ15N for gly and asp were 12.6±2.2‰ and 15.2±0.8‰, respectively. A separate isotope tracer study detected no significant turnover of cerebellar DNA in the first six months of life. The large negative δ15N difference between gly and cerebellar purine N at the gly (7) position implies either that there is a major isotope effect during DNA synthesis, or that in utero gly has a different isotope ratio during rapid growth and metabolism than in adult life. Our data show that cerebellar nucleoside intramolecular δ15N vary over more than

  16. Simulating the density of HC15N in the Titan atmosphere with a coupled ion-neutral photochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuitton, V.; Yelle, R. V.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Lavvas, P.; Hörst, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    The 14 N/ 15 N ratio for HCN in the atmosphere of Titan has been measured to be 2 to 3 times as less as the corresponding ratio for N2. Using a coupled ionneutral photochemical model incorporating state-of-the-art chemistry and cross-sections for N2, we show that the difference in the ratio of 14 N/15 N between HCN and N2 can be explained exclusively by the photo-induced isotopic fractionation of 14 N14 N and 14 N 15 N,without any further putative nitrogen input.

  17. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  18. Natural-abundance 15N NMR studies of Turkey ovomucoid third domain. Assignment of peptide 15N resonances to the residues at the reactive site region via proton-detected multiple-quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Polo, Gilberto; Krishnamoorthi, R.; Markley, John L.; Live, David H.; Davis, Donald G.; Cowburn, David

    Heteronuclear two-dimensional 1H{ 15N} multiple-quantum (MQ) spectroscopy has been applied to a protein sample at natural abundance: ovomucoid third domain from turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo), a serine proteinase inhibitor of 56 amino acid residues. Peptide amide 1H NMR assignments obtained by two-dimensional 1H{ 1H} NMR methods (R. Krishnamoorthi and J. L. Markley, unpublished data) led to identification of the corresponding 1H{ 15N} MQ coherence cross peaks. From these, 15N NMR chemical shifts were determined for several specific backbone amide groups of amino acid residues located around the reactive site region of the inhibitor. The results suggest that amide 15N chemical shifts, which are readily obtained in this way, may serve as sensitive probes for conformational studies of proteins.

  19. Backbone 1H, 13C and 15N assignments of YibK and avariant containing a unique cysteine residue at C-terminus in 8 M urea-denatured states [corrected].

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shu-Ju Micky; Mallam, Anna L; Jackson, Sophie E; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2014-10-01

    YibK is a tRNA methyltransferase from Haemophilus influenzae, which forms a stable homodimer in solution and contains a deep trefoil 31 knot encompassing the C-terminal helix that threads through a long loop. It has been a model system for investigating knotted protein folding pathways. Recent data have shown that the polypeptide chain of YibK remains loosely knotted under highly denaturing conditions. Here, we report (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shift assignments for YibK and its variant in the presence of 8 M urea. This work forms the basis for further analysis using NMR techniques such as paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, residual dipolar couplings and spin-relaxation dynamics analysis.

  20. Paleoenvironmental implications of taxonomic variation among δ15N values of chloropigments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, Meytal B.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Robinson, Rebecca S.; Qin, Yelun; Saito, Mark A.; Pearson, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Natural variations in the ratios of nitrogen isotopes in biomass reflect variations in nutrient sources utilized for growth. In order to use δ15N values of chloropigments of photosynthetic organisms to determine the corresponding δ15N values of biomass – and by extension, surface waters – the isotopic offset between chlorophyll and biomass must be constrained. Here we examine this offset in various geologically-relevant taxa, grown using nutrient sources that may approximate ocean conditions at different times in Earth’s history. Phytoplankton in this study include cyanobacteria (diazotrophic and non-diazotrophic), eukaryotic algae (red and green), and anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (Proteobacteria), as well as environmental samples from sulfidic lake water. Cultures were grown using N2, NO3−, and NH4+ as nitrogen sources, and were examined under different light regimes and growth conditions. We find surprisingly high variability in the isotopic difference (δ15Nbiomass − δ15Nchloropigment) for prokaryotes, with average values for species ranging from −12.2‰ to +11.7‰. We define this difference as εpor, a term that encompasses diagenetic porphyrins and chlorins, as well as chlorophyll. Negative values of εpor reflect chloropigments that are 15N-enriched relative to biomass. Notably, this enrichment appears to occur only in cyanobacteria. The average value of εpor for freshwater cyanobacterial species is −9.8 ± 1.8‰, while for marine cyanobacteria it is −0.9 ± 1.3‰. These isotopic effects group environmentally but not phylogenetically, e.g., εpor values for freshwater Chroococcales resemble those of freshwater Nostocales but differ from those of marine Chroococcales. Our measured values of εpor for eukaryotic algae (range = 4.7–8.7‰) are similar to previous reports for pure cultures. For all taxa studied, values of εpor do not depend on the type of nitrogen substrate used for growth. The observed

  1. Ureide Assay for Measuring Nitrogen Fixation by Nodulated Soybean Calibrated by 15N Methods 1

    PubMed Central

    Herridge, David F.; Peoples, Mark B.

    1990-01-01

    We report experiments to quantify the relationships between the relative abundance of ureide-N in root-bleeding sap, vacuum-extracted sap, and hot water extracts of stems and petioles of nodulated soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merrill cv Bragg) and the proportion of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation. Additional experiments examined the effects of plant genotype and strain of rhizobia on these relationships. In each of the five experiments reported, plants of cv Bragg (experiment 1), cv Lincoln (experiments 3, 4, 5), or six cultivars/genotypes (experiment 2) were grown in a sand:vermiculite mixture in large pots in a naturally lit, temperature-controlled glasshouse during summer. Pots were inoculated at sowing with effective Bradyrhizobium japonicum CB1809 (USDA 136) or with one of 21 different strains of rhizobia. The proportions of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation were determined using 15N dilution. In one experiment with CB1809, plants were supplied throughout growth with either N-free nutrients or with nutrients supplemented with 1, 2, 4, or 8 millimolar 15N-nitrate and harvested on eight occasions between V6 and R7 for root-bleeding sap, vacuum-extracted sap, stems (including petioles), and whole plant dry matter. Analyses of the saps and stem extracts for ureides (allantoin plus allantoic acid), α-amino-N, and nitrate, and of dry matter for N and 15N, indicated a positive effect of nitrate supply on concentrations of nitrate in saps and extracts and a negative effect on ureides and on the proportion of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation. The relative abundance of ureide-N in root-bleeding sap, vacuum-extracted sap (100 [ureide-N]/[ureide-N+ α-amino-N + nitrate-N]) and stem extracts (100 [ureide-N]/[ureide-N + nitrate-N]) and the proportion of plant N, derived from nitrogen fixation between successive samplings were highly correlated (r = 0.97-1.00). For each variable, two standard curves were prepared to account for the shifts in the compositions

  2. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  3. Relaxation from particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a "Relaxion" solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  4. Effects of climate on deer bone δ15N and δ13C: Lack of precipitation effects on δ15N for animals consuming low amounts of C 4 plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormie, A. B.; Schwarcz, H. P.

    1996-11-01

    We have examined the relationship of bone collagen δ15N and δ13C to climatic variables, humidity, temperature, and amount of precipitation using fifty-nine specimens of North American white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus) from forty-six different locations. In previous studies of African mammals there was a significant correlation between bone collagen δ15N and local amount of precipitation. Results presented here similarly show an increase in δ15N with decreasing amount of precipitation but only for 25% of the animals, namely those consuming more than 10% C 4 plants. These animals also exhibited a significant correlation between δ13C and temperature which mirrors previous observations for grasses suggesting that these deer consume grasses during times of population and nutrient stress. In contrast, even in dry areas containing high proportions of C 4 grasses, the majority of the deer had consumed low amounts of C 4 plants and these deer did not have δ15N which correlate with amount of precipitation. Only when deer deviated from their normal feeding pattern by consuming C 4 plants or grasses did their δ15N correlate with amount of rainfall. For these animals, consumption of C 4 plants or grasses may signal conditions of water and nutrient stress. An increase in δ15N of bone collagen may result from combined effects from excretion of concentrated urine (to conserve water) and increased internal recycling of nitrogen (to conserve nitrogen).

  5. Fast temperature relaxation model in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    We present a fast model to calculate the temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasmas. The electron-ion interaction-potential is calculated by combining a Yukawa approach and a finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model. We include the internal energy as well as the excess energy of ions using the QEOS model. Comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations and calculations based on an average-atom model are presented. This approach allows the study of the temperature relaxation in a two-temperature electron-ion system in warm and hot dense matter.

  6. Nonlocal and collective relaxation in stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1993-01-01

    The modal response of stellar systems to fluctuations at large scales is presently investigated by means of analytic theory and n-body simulation; the stochastic excitation of these modes is shown to increase the relaxation rate even for a system which is moderately far from instability. The n-body simulations, when designed to suppress relaxation at small scales, clearly show the effects of large-scale fluctuations. It is predicted that large-scale fluctuations will be largest for such marginally bound systems as forming star clusters and associations.

  7. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  8. Incomplete Relaxation between Beats after Myocardial Hypoxia and Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Weisfeldt, Myron L.; Armstrong, Paul; Scully, Hugh E.; Sanders, Charles A.; Daggett, Willard M.

    1974-01-01

    Recovery from hypoxia has been shown to prolong cardiac muscle contraction, particularly the relaxation phase. The present studies were designed to examine whether incomplete relaxation between beats can result from this prolongation of contraction and relaxation in isolated muscle after hypoxia and in the canine heart after both hypoxia and acute ischemia. The relationship between heart rate and the extent of incomplete relaxation is emphasized in view of the known enhancement of the velocity of contraction caused by increasing heart rate. The extent of incomplete relaxation during 10-s periods of pacing at increasing rates was examined before and after hypoxia in isometric cat right ventricular papillary muscle (12-120 beats/min) and in the canine isovolumic left ventricle (120-180 beats/min). Incomplete relaxation was quantified by measuring the difference between the lowest diastolic tension or pressure during pacing and the true resting tension or pressure determined by interruption of pacing at each rate. In eight cat papillary muscles (29°C), there was significantly greater incomplete relaxation 5 min after hypoxia at rates of 96 and 120 beats/min (P < 0.02 vs. before hypoxia). In seven canine isovolumic left ventricles, recovery from hypoxia and higher heart rates also resulted in incomplete relaxation. Incomplete relaxation before hypoxia at a rate of 180 beats/min was 0.8±0.5 cm H2O and at 5 min of recovery from hypoxia was 12.6±3.5 cm H2O (P < 0.01). 12 hearts were subjected to a 1.5-3-min period of acute ischemia and fibrillation. There was significant incomplete relaxation at a rate of 140 beats/min for 5 min after defibrillation and reperfusion. These data indicate that incomplete relaxation is an important determinant of diastolic hemodynamics during recovery from ischemia or hypoxia. The extent of incomplete relaxation appears to be a function of the rate of normalization of the velocity of relaxation and tension development after ischemia or

  9. Experimental and calculated 1H, 13C, 15N NMR spectra of famotidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barańska, M.; Czarniecki, K.; Proniewicz, L. M.

    2001-05-01

    Famotidine, 3-[[[2-[(aminoiminomethyl)amino]-4-thiazolyl]methyl]thio]- N-(aminosulfonyl), is a histamine H 2-receptor blocker that has been used mainly for the treatment of peptic ulcers and the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Its NMR spectra in different solvents were reported earlier; however, detailed interpretation has not been done thus far. In this work, experimental 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectra of famotidine dissolved in DMSO-d 6 are shown. The assignment of observed chemical shifts is based on quantum chemical calculation at the Hartree-Fock/6-31G ∗ level. The geometry optimization of the famotidine molecule with two internal hydrogen bonds, i.e. [N(3)-H(23)⋯N(9) and N(3)⋯H(34)-N(20)], is done by using the B3LYP method with the 6-31G ∗ basis set.

  10. Determination of 15N/14N and 13C/12C in Solid and Aqueous Cyanides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of nitrogen and carbon in cyanide compounds can be determined by combusting aliquots in sealed tubes to form N2 gas and CO2 gas and analyzing the gases by mass spectrometry. Free cyanide (CN-aq + HCNaq) in simple solutions can also be analyzed by first precipitating the cyanide as copper(II) ferrocyanide and then combusting the precipitate. Reproducibility is ??0.5??? or better for both ??15N and ??13C. If empirical corrections are made on the basis of carbon yields, the reproducibility of ??13C can be improved to ??0.2???. The analytical methods described herein are sufficiently accurate and precise to apply stable isotope techniques to problems of cyanide degradation in natural waters and industrial process solutions.

  11. Electron paramagnetic resonance of the N2V- defect in 15N -doped synthetic diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, B. L.; Dale, M. W.; Newton, M. E.; Fisher, D.

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen is the dominant impurity in the majority of natural and synthetic diamonds, and the family of nitrogen vacancy-type (NnV ) defects are crucial in our understanding of defect dynamics in these diamonds. A significant gap is the lack of positive identification of N2V- , the dominant charge state of N2V in diamond that contains a significant concentration of electron donors. In this paper, we employ isotopically-enriched diamond to identify the EPR spectrum associated with 15N2V- and use the derived spin Hamiltonian parameters to identify 14N2V- in a natural isotopic abundance sample. The electronic wave function of the N2V- ground state and previous lack of identification is discussed. The N2V- EPR spectrum intensity is shown to correlate with the H2 optical absorption over an order of magnitude in concentration.

  12. Creating 13C- and 15N-enriched tree leaf litter for decomposition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlavecz, K. A.; Pitz, S.; Chang, C.; Bernard, M.

    2013-12-01

    Labeling plant material with heavy isotopes of carbon and nitrogen can produce a traceable nutrient signal that can be followed into the different trophic levels and decomposer food web. We treated 60 tree saplings with 13C-enriched CO2 gas and 15N-enriched ammonium nitrate over a three-month period to create dually-labeled plant material for future decomposition experiments. The trees included both early (Red maple, Sweetgum, Tulip poplar) and late (American beech, White oak) successional deciduous tree species, and a conifer, White pine. We constructed a 2.4 m × 2.4 m × 2.4 m environmental chamber that was climate-controlled using an air conditioning system. An Arduino microcontroller interfaced with a Vaisala GMP343 CO2 probe maintained a CO2 concentration between 500-520 ppm by controlling a solenoid valve on the CO2 tank regulator. The trees were placed into the chamber in August 2012 and remained until senescence unless they were lost to death or disease. Ammonium nitrate was added twice, in September and October. Leaf samples were collected prior to the start of the experiment and after senescence, whereas root samples were collected only in December. Samples were dried, ground and analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. American beech and White oak had 40% mortality, and 34% of tulip poplar trees were removed because of powdery mildew overgrowth or death. Most tulip poplar trees exhibited a second leaf out following senescence in late September. Nearly 1 kg of litter was produced with tulip poplar representing over half of the total mass. Levels of enrichment varied greatly by species. Beech (-14.2‰) and White oak (-4.8‰) had low levels of enrichment in comparison to early successional species such as Sweetgum (41.7‰) and Tulip poplar (30.7‰ [first leaf fall] and 238.0‰ [second leaf fall]). Leaf enrichment with 15N followed a similar pattern, though it was achieved at a higher level with δ15N values varying from 271.6‰ to 1354.2

  13. The in vivo relaxivity of MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuter, Borys

    1999-11-01

    Post-contrast clinical 1H Magnetic Resonance Images have to date been interpreted with little regard for possible variations in the in-vivo properties of injected magnetic pharmaceuticals (contrast agents), particularly in their relaxivity or ability to alter tissue relaxation rates, T2-1 and T 2-1, per unit concentration. The relaxivities of contrast agents have only rarely been measured in-vivo, measurements usually being performed on excised tissues and at magnetic field strengths lower than used in clinical practice. Some researchers have simply assumed that relaxivities determined in homogeneous tissue phantoms were applicable in-vivo. In this thesis, the relaxivities of two contrast agents, Gd-DTPA and Gd-EOB-DTPA, were measured in simple tissue phantoms and in the kidney and liver of intact, but sacrificed, Wistar rats using a clinical MR scanner with a magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. T1 and T2 were determined from sets of images acquired using a standard clinical spin-echo pulse sequence. The contrast agent concentration in tissue was assessed by radioassay of 153Gd-DTPA or 153Gd-EOB-DTPA, mixed with the normal compound prior to injection. Relaxivity was taken as the slope of a linear regression fit of relaxation rate against Gd concentration. The relaxivities of Gd-EOB-DTPA were similarly determined in normal and biliary- obstructed guinea pigs. Relaxivities in tissue differed significantly from values obtained in simple phantoms. Kidney T1 relaxivity was reduced for both compounds in normal animals. Three days or more of biliary obstruction produced further reductions in kidney T1 relaxivity of Gd-EOB-DTPA, providing strong evidence that disease affects contrast agent relaxivity. Kidney T2 relaxivity was much greater than T1 relaxivity and was also depressed by biliary obstruction. Liver T1 and T 2 relaxivites were increased above phantom values, but were not affected by the biliary obstruction. Water compartmentalisation, macromolecular binding, proton

  14. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using {sup 15}N isotopic tracer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-09-25

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct {sup 15}N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the {sup 15}N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. {sup 15}N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. {sup 15}N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  15. Regional, seasonal and interspecific variation in 15N and 13C in sympatric mouse lemurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotondranary, S. Jacques; Struck, Ulrich; Knoblauch, Christian; Ganzhorn, Jörg U.

    2011-11-01

    Madagascar provides some of the rare examples where two or more primate species of the same genus and with seemingly identical niche requirements occur in sympatry. If congeneric primate species co-occur in other parts of the world, they differ in size in a way that is consistent with Hutchinson's rule for coexisting species, or they occupy different ecological niches. In some areas of Madagascar, mouse lemurs do not follow these "rules" and thus seem to violate one of the principles of community ecology. In order to understand the mechanisms that allow coexistence of sympatric congeneric species without obvious niche differentiation, we studied food composition of two identical sized omnivorous mouse lemur species, Microcebus griseorufus and M. murinus with the help of stable isotope analyses ( δ 15N and δ 13C). The two species are closely related sister species. During the rich season, when food seems abundant, the two species do not differ in their nitrogen isotope composition, indicating that the two species occupy the same trophic level. But they differ in their δ 13C values, indicating that M. griseorufus feeds more on C4 and CAM (Crassulacean-acid-metabolism) plants than M. murinus. During the lean season, M. murinus has lower δ 15N values, indicating that the two species feed at different trophic levels during times of food shortage. Hybrids between the two species showed intermediate food composition. The results reflect subtle differences in foraging or metabolic adaptations that are difficult to quantify by traditional observations but that represent possibilities to allow coexistence of species.

  16. 15N solid-state NMR provides a sensitive probe of oxidized flavin reactive sites.

    PubMed

    Koder, Ronald L; Walsh, Joseph D; Pometun, Maxim S; Dutton, P Leslie; Wittebort, Richard J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2006-11-29

    Flavins are central to the reactivity of a wide variety of enzymes and electron transport proteins. There is great interest in understanding the basis for the different reactivities displayed by flavins in different protein contexts. We propose solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) as a tool for directly observing reactive positions of the flavin ring and thereby obtaining information on their frontier orbitals. We now report the SS-NMR signals of the redox-active nitrogens N1 and N5, as well as that of N3. The chemical shift tensor of N5 is over 720 ppm wide, in accordance with the predictions of theory and our calculations. The signal of N3 can be distinguished on the basis of coupling to 1H absent for N1 and N5, as well as the shift tensor span of only 170 ppm, consistent with N3's lower aromaticity and lack of a nonbonding lone pair. The isotropic shifts and spans of N5 and N1 reflect two opposite extremes of the chemical shift range for "pyridine-type" N's, consistent with their electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical reactivities, respectively. Upon flavin reduction, N5's chemical shift tensor contracts dramatically to a span of less than 110 ppm, and the isotropic chemical shift changes by approximately 300 ppm. Both are consistent with loss of N5's nonbonding lone pair and decreased aromaticity, and illustrate the responsiveness of the 15N chemical shift principal values to electronic structure. Thus. 15N chemical shift principal values promise to be valuable tools for understanding electronic differences that underlie variations in flavin reactivity, as well as the reactivities of other heterocyclic cofactors.

  17. Search for d3/2 single particle strength in 15N in Unbound Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertin, C. E.; Caussyn, D. D.; Crisp, A. M.; Keeley, N.; Kemper, K. W.; Momotyuk, O.; Roeder, B. T.; Volya, A.

    2013-10-01

    The population of states in the nucleus 15N provides the opportunity to investigate both single particle and cluster structures in the 1p and 2s1d shells. Single, two, three and four particle transfer reactions selectively excite states in 15N thus providing a way to explore current nuclear structure models. Narrow structures are observed in the various transfer reactions up to at least 20 MeV in excitation well above the neutron (10.8 MeV) and proton (10.2 MeV) separation energies. In the present work new results for the reaction 14N(d,p) are presented that explore possible single particle strengths up to 18 MeV in excitation. The beam energies used in the present work were between 10.5 and 16 MeV. An early work with a beam energy of 8 MeV clearly populated strong sharp levels at 10.07 and 11.23 MeV and the present work confirms their existence. In addition, very weak broader levels are populated at 12.13 and 12.5 MeV but no other structures are found experimentally at higher excitation energies. The results of shell model calculations that include the 1p and 2s1d shells will be presented. The centroid energies for the 1d5/2 and 2s1/2 single particle strength have been obtained through comparison with FRESCO calculations. This work was supported by the NSF, DOE and Florida State University.

  18. A general relaxation theory of simple liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merilo, M.; Morgan, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    A relatively simple relaxation theory to account for the behavior of liquids under dynamic conditions was proposed. The general dynamical equations are similar in form to the phenomenological relaxation equations used in theories of viscoelasticity, however, they differ in that all the coefficients of the present equations are expressed in terms of thermodynamic and molecular quantities. The theory is based on the concept that flow in a liquid distorts both the radial and the velocity distribution functions, and that relaxation equations describing the return of these functions to their isotropic distributions, characterizing a stationary liquid, can be written. The theory was applied to the problems of steady and oscillatory shear flows and to the propagation of longitudinal waves. In all cases classical results are predicted for strain rates, and an expression for the viscosity of a liquid, simular to the Macedo-Litovitz equation, is obtained.

  19. Species specific and environment induced variation of δ13C and δ15N in alpine plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Körner, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signals in plant tissues integrate plant-environment interactions over long periods. In this study, we hypothesized that humid alpine life conditions are narrowing the scope for significant deviations from common carbon, water and nitrogen relations as captured by stable isotope signals. We explored the variation in δ13C and δ15N in 32 plant species from tissue type to ecosystem scale across a suite of locations at c. Two thousand five hundred meter elevation in the Swiss Alps. Foliar δ13C and δ15N varied among species by about 3–4‰ and 7–8‰ respectively. However, there was no overall difference in means of δ13C and δ15N for species sampled in different plant communities or when bulk plant dry matter harvests of different plant communities were compared. δ13C was found to be highly species specific, so that the ranking among species was mostly maintained across 11 habitats. However, δ15N varied significantly from place to place in all species (a range of 2.7‰) except in Fabaceae (Trifolium alpinum) and Juncaceae (Luzula lutea). There was also a substantial variation among individuals of the same species collected next to each other. No difference was found in foliar δ15N of non-legumes, which were either collected next to or away from the most common legume, T. alpinum. δ15N data place Cyperaceae and Juncaceae, just like Fabaceae, in a low discrimination category, well separated from other families. Soil δ15N was higher than in plants and increased with soil depth. The results indicate a high functional diversity in alpine plants that is similar to that reported for low elevation plants. We conclude that the surprisingly high variation in δ13C and δ15N signals in the studied high elevation plants is largely species specific (genetic) and insensitive to obvious environmental cues. PMID:26097487

  20. Detection of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria by 15N and 13C Incorporation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Erin M.; Young, Lily Y.; McGuinness, Lora M.; Kerkhof, Lee J.

    2010-01-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (15N or 13C labeled) was added to Norfolk Harbor sediments to test whether anaerobic bacteria use TNT for growth. Stable-isotope probing (SIP)-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) detected peaks in the [15N]TNT cultures (60, 163, and 168 bp). The 60-bp peak was also present in the [13C]TNT cultures and was related to Lysobacter taiwanensis. PMID:20081008

  1. A Psychophysiological Comparison of the Effects of Three Relaxation Techniques: Respiratory Manipulation Training, Progressive Muscle Relaxation, and Pleasant Imagery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, David J.

    A within-subjects, three condition design was employed to examine the effects of three relaxation techniques on blood pressures, pulse rates, and self-report measures of relaxation for 12 college students. Respiratory Manipulation Training incorporated instructions to exhale and not to inhale for as long as possible. When breathing could no longer…

  2. Complementary constraints from carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes on the glacial ocean's soft-tissue biological pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional, process-based model of the ocean's carbon and nitrogen cycles, including 13C and 15N isotopes, is used to explore effects of idealized changes in the soft-tissue biological pump. Results are presented from one preindustrial control run (piCtrl) and six simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with increasing values of the spatially constant maximum phytoplankton growth rate μmax, which accelerates biological nutrient utilization mimicking iron fertilization. The default LGM simulation, without increasing μmax and with a shallower and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and increased sea ice cover, leads to 280 Pg more respired organic carbon (Corg) storage in the deep ocean with respect to piCtrl. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the colder glacial thermocline increase, which reduces water column denitrification and, with delay, nitrogen fixation, thus increasing the ocean's fixed nitrogen inventory and decreasing δ15NNO3 almost everywhere. This simulation already fits sediment reconstructions of carbon and nitrogen isotopes relatively well, but it overestimates deep ocean δ13CDIC and underestimates δ15NNO3 at high latitudes. Increasing μmax enhances Corg and lowers deep ocean δ13CDIC, improving the agreement with sediment data. In the model's Antarctic and North Pacific Oceans modest increases in μmax result in higher δ15NNO3 due to enhanced local nutrient utilization, improving the agreement with reconstructions there. Models with moderately increased μmax fit both isotope data best, whereas large increases in nutrient utilization are inconsistent with nitrogen isotopes although they still fit the carbon isotopes reasonably well. The best fitting models reproduce major features of the glacial δ13CDIC, δ15N, and oxygen reconstructions while simulating increased Corg by 510-670 Pg compared with the preindustrial ocean. These results are consistent with the idea that the soft-tissue pump was more efficient

  3. Investigating patterns of symbiotic nitrogen fixation during vegetation change from grassland to woodland using fine scale δ(15) N measurements.

    PubMed

    Soper, Fiona M; Boutton, Thomas W; Sparks, Jed P

    2015-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in woody plants is often investigated using foliar measurements of δ(15) N and is of particular interest in ecosystems experiencing increases in BNF due to woody plant encroachment. We sampled δ(15) N along the entire N uptake pathway including soil solution, xylem sap and foliage to (1) test assumptions inherent to the use of foliar δ(15) N as a proxy for BNF; (2) determine whether seasonal divergences occur between δ(15) Nxylem sap and δ(15) Nsoil inorganic N that could be used to infer variation in BNF; and (3) assess patterns of δ(15) N with tree age as indicators of shifting BNF or N cycling. Measurements of woody N-fixing Prosopis glandulosa and paired reference non-fixing Zanthoxylum fagara at three seasonal time points showed that δ(15) Nsoil inorganic N varied temporally and spatially between species. Fractionation between xylem and foliar δ(15) N was consistently opposite in direction between species and varied on average by 2.4‰. Accounting for these sources of variation caused percent nitrogen derived from fixation values for Prosopis to vary by up to ∼70%. Soil-xylem δ(15) N separation varied temporally and increased with Prosopis age, suggesting seasonal variation in N cycling and BNF and potential long-term increases in BNF not apparent through foliar sampling alone.

  4. 15N/14N variations in Cretaceous Atlantic sedimentary sequences: implication for past changes in marine nitrogen biogeochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    At two locations in the Atlantic Ocean (DSDP Sites 367 and 530) early to middle Cretaceous organic-carbon-rich beds ("black shales") were found to have significantly lower ??15N values (lower 15N/14N ratios) than adjacent organic-carbon-poor beds (white limestones or green claystones). While these lithologies are of marine origin, the black strata in particular have ??15N values that are significantly lower than those previously found in the marine sediment record and most contemporary marine nitrogen pools. In contrast, black, organic-carbon-rich beds at a third site (DSDP Site 603) contain predominantly terrestrial organic matter and have C- and N-isotopic compositions similar to organic matter of modern terrestrial origin. The recurring 15N depletion in the marine-derived Cretaceous sequences prove that the nitrogen they contain is the end result of an episodic and atypical biogeochemistry. Existing isotopic and other data indicate that the low 15N relative abundance is the consequence of pelagic rather than post-depositional processes. Reduced ocean circulation, increased denitrification, and, hence, reduced euphotic zone nitrate availability may have led to Cretaceous phytoplankton assemblages that were periodically dominated by N2-fixing blue-green algae, a possible source of this sediment 15N-depletion. Lack of parallel isotopic shifts in Cretaceous terrestrially-derived nitrogen (Site 603) argues that the above change in nitrogen cycling during this period did not extend beyond the marine environment. ?? 1987.

  5. Cryptic or day-to-day parts of the riverbed N cycle - new challenges for 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimmer, Mark; Ouyang, Liao; Lansdown, Katrina

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) not only changed our understanding of the nitrogen cycle in aquatic ecosystems but it also undermined some of the key 15N techniques used to study it. Reformulations of principle equations and the development of new 15N2 and 15N2O techniques enabled the simultaneous quantification of N2 production by anammox and denitrification in mainly soft, cohesive sediments where redox gradients are clearly defined and solute exchanged governed by diffusion. At the heart of the application of 15N, for the quantification of natural 14N cycling, is the key assumption that the respective pools of 15N and 14N are evenly mixed and that both are cycled without bias towards each other. Recent evidence, however, from a variety of aquatic ecosystems, suggests that this may not be the case. For example, organic N may be oxidised directly to N2 gas without ever mixing with the inorganic pool or inorganic intermediates (e.g. nitrite) are 'shunted' internally and also fail to mix evenly with the applied tracer pool. Our most recent work in permeable, oxic gravel riverbeds presents some particular challenges to the application of 15N. In these systems, a tight coupling between aerobic nitrification and anaerobic N2 production - in the presence of 100

  6. δ15N Values in Crassostrea virginica Shells Provides Early Direct Evidence for Nitrogen Loading to Chesapeake Bay

    PubMed Central

    Black, H. D.; Andrus, C. F. T.; Lambert, W. J.; Rick, T. C.; Gillikin, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    Crassostrea virginica is one of the most common estuarine bivalves in the United States’ east coast and is frequently found in archaeological sites and sub-fossil deposits. Although there have been several sclerochronological studies on stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in the shells of this species, less is known about δ15N values within their shells, which could be a useful paleoenvironmental proxy to assess estuarine nitrogen dynamics. Modern C. virginica samples were collected in Chesapeake Bay for comparison with archaeological shells from nearby sites ranging in age from ~100 to 3,200 years old. Left valves were sampled by milling the hinge area and the resulting powder was analyzed for %N and δ15N values. Comparison of δ15N values between C. virginica shells shows relatively constant values from ~1250 BC to ~1800 AD. After ~1800 AD, there are rapid increases in 15N enrichment in the shells, which continue to increase in value up to the modern shell values. The increase in δ15N values is evidence of early anthropogenic impact in Chesapeake Bay. These results corroborate the observation that coastal nitrogen pollution occurred earlier than the 19th century and support the use of oyster shell δ15N values as a useful environmental proxy. PMID:28281649

  7. δ15N Values in Crassostrea virginica Shells Provides Early Direct Evidence for Nitrogen Loading to Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, H. D.; Andrus, C. F. T.; Lambert, W. J.; Rick, T. C.; Gillikin, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    Crassostrea virginica is one of the most common estuarine bivalves in the United States’ east coast and is frequently found in archaeological sites and sub-fossil deposits. Although there have been several sclerochronological studies on stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in the shells of this species, less is known about δ15N values within their shells, which could be a useful paleoenvironmental proxy to assess estuarine nitrogen dynamics. Modern C. virginica samples were collected in Chesapeake Bay for comparison with archaeological shells from nearby sites ranging in age from ~100 to 3,200 years old. Left valves were sampled by milling the hinge area and the resulting powder was analyzed for %N and δ15N values. Comparison of δ15N values between C. virginica shells shows relatively constant values from ~1250 BC to ~1800 AD. After ~1800 AD, there are rapid increases in 15N enrichment in the shells, which continue to increase in value up to the modern shell values. The increase in δ15N values is evidence of early anthropogenic impact in Chesapeake Bay. These results corroborate the observation that coastal nitrogen pollution occurred earlier than the 19th century and support the use of oyster shell δ15N values as a useful environmental proxy.

  8. 15N Abundance of Nodules as an Indicator of N Metabolism in N2-Fixing Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Georgia; Feldman, Lori; Bryan, Barbara A.; Skeeters, Jerri L.; Kohl, Daniel H.; Amarger, Nöelle; Mariotti, Françoise; Mariotti, André

    1982-01-01

    This paper expands upon previous reports of 15N elevation in nodules (compared to other tissues) of N2-fixing plants. N2-Fixing nodules of Glycine max (soybeans), Vigna unguiculata (cowpea), Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), Phaseolus coccineus (scarlet runner bean), Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite), and Olneya tesota (desert ironwood) were enriched in 15N. Nodules of Vicia faba (fava beans), Arachis hypogaea (peanut), Trifolium pratense (red clover), Pisum sativum (pea), Lathyrus sativus (grass pea), Medicago sativa (alfalfa), and Lupinus mutabilis (South American lupine) were not; nor were the nodules of nine species of N2-fixing nonlegumes. The nitrogen of ineffective nodules of soybeans and cowpeas was not enriched in 15N. Thus, 15N elevation in nodules of these plants depends on active N2-fixation. Results obtained so far on the generality of 15N enrichment in N2-fixing nodules suggest that only the nodules of plants which actively fix N2 and which transport allantoin or allantoic acid exhibit 15N enrichment. PMID:16662517

  9. Using dual-bacterial denitrification to improve δ15N determinations of nitrates containing mass-independent 17O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Casciotti, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterial denitrification method for isotopic analysis of nitrate using N2O generated from Pseudomonas aureofaciens may overestimate ??15N values by as much as 1-2??? for samples containing atmospheric nitrate because of mass-independent 17O variations in such samples. By analyzing such samples for ??15N and ??18O using the denitrifier Pseudomonas chlororaphis, one obtains nearly correct ??15N values because oxygen in N 2O generated by P. chlororaphis is primarily derived from H 2O. The difference between the apparent ??15N value determined with P. aureofaciens and that determined with P. chlororaphis, assuming mass-dependent oxygen isotopic fractionation, reflects the amount of mass-independent 17O in a nitrate sample. By interspersing nitrate isotopic reference materials having substantially different ?? 18O values with samples, one can normalize oxygen isotope ratios and determine the fractions of oxygen in N2O derived from the nitrate and from water with each denitrifier. This information can be used to improve ??15N values of nitrates having excess 17O. The same analyses also yield estimates of the magnitude of 17O excess in the nitrate (expressed as ??17O) that may be useful in some environmental studies. The 1-?? uncertainties of ??15N, ??18O and ??17O measurements are ??0.2, ??0.3 and ??5???, respectively. Copyright ?? 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Mycorrhizal fungi supply nitrogen to host plants in Arctic tundra and boreal forests: 15N is the key signal.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, John E; Hobbie, Erik A; Drossman, Howard; Conte, Maureen; Weber, J C; Shamhart, Julee; Weinrobe, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Symbiotic fungi's role in providing nitrogen to host plants is well-studied in tundra at Toolik Lake, Alaska, but little-studied in the adjoining boreal forest ecosystem. Along a 570 km north-south transect from the Yukon River to the North Slope of Alaska, the 15N content was strongly reduced in ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal plants including Betula, Salix, Picea mariana (P. Mill.) B.S.P., Picea glauca Moench (Voss), and ericaceous plants. Compared with the 15N content of soil, the foliage of nonmycorrhizal plants (Carex and Eriophorum) was unchanged, whereas content of the ectomycorrhizal fungi was very much higher (e.g., Boletaceae, Leccinum and Cortinarius). It is hypothesized that similar processes operate in tundra and boreal forest, both nitrogen-limited ecosystems: (i) mycorrhizal fungi break down soil polymers and take up amino acids or other nitrogen compounds; (ii) mycorrhizal fungi fractionate against 15N during production of transfer compounds; (iii) host plants are accordingly depleted in 15N; and (iv) mycorrhizal fungi are enriched in 15N. Increased N availability for plant roots or decreased light availability to understory plants may have decreased N allocation to mycorrhizal partners and increased delta15N by 3-4 parts per million for southern populations of Vaccinium vitis-idaea L. and Salix. Fungal biomass, measured as ergosterol, correlated strongly with soil organic matter and attained amounts similar to those in temperate forest soils.

  11. Correlation between the synthetic origin of methamphetamine samples and their 15N and 13C stable isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Billault, Isabelle; Courant, Frédérique; Pasquereau, Léo; Derrien, Solène; Robins, Richard J; Naulet, Norbert

    2007-06-12

    The active ingredient of ecstasy, N-methyl-3,4-methyldioxyphenylisopropylamine (MDMA) can be manufactured by a number of easy routes from simple precursors. We have synthesised 45 samples of MDMA following the five most common routes using N-precursors from 12 different origins and three different precursors for the aromatic moiety. The 13C and 15N contents of both the precursors and the MDMA samples derived therefrom were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to an elemental analyser (EA-IRMS). We show that within-pathway correlation between the 15N content of the precursor and that of the derived MDMA can be strong but that no general pattern of correlation can be defined. Rather, it is evident that the delta15N values of MDMA are strongly influenced by a combination of the delta15N values of the source of nitrogen used, the route by which the MDMA is synthesised, and the experimental conditions employed. Multivariate analysis (PCA) based on the delta15N values of the synthetic MDMA and of the delta15N and delta13C values of the N-precursors leads to good discrimination between the majority of the reaction conditions tested.

  12. Closed-loop 15N measurement of N2O and its isotopomers for real-time greenhouse gas tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaets, Johanna; Mayr, Leopold; Heiling, Maria; Zaman, Mohammad; Resch, Christian; Weltin, Georg; Gruber, Roman; Dercon, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying sources of nitrous oxide is essential to improve understanding of the global N cycle and to develop climate-smart agriculture, as N2O has a global warming potential 300 times higher than CO2. The isotopic signature and the intramolecular distribution (site preference) of 15N are powerful tools to trace N2O, but the application of these methods is limited as conventional methods cannot provide continuous and in situ data. Here we present a method for closed-loop, real time monitoring of the N2O flux, the isotopic signature and the intramolecular distribution of 15N by using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, Los Gatos Research). The developed method was applied to a fertilizer inhibitor experiment, in which N2O emissions were measured on undisturbed soil cores for three weeks. The treatments consisted of enriched urea-N (100 kg urea-N/ha), the same fertilizer combined with the nitrification inhibitor nitrapyrin (375 g/100 kg urea), and control cores. Monitoring the isotopic signature makes it possible to distinguish emissions from soil and fertilizer. Characterization of site preference could additionally provide a tool to identify different microbial processes leading to N2O emissions. Furthermore, the closed-loop approach enables direct measurement on site and does not require removal of CO2 and H2O. Results showed that 75% of total N2O emissions (total=11 346 μg N2O-N/m2) in the fertilized cores originated from fertilizer, while only 55% of total emissions (total=2 450 μg N2ON/m2) stemmed from fertilizer for the cores treated with nitrapyrin. In the controls, N2O derived from soil was only 40% of the size of the corresponding pool from the fertilized cores, pointing towards a priming effect on the microbial community from the fertilizer and demonstrating the bias that could be introduced by relying on non-treated cores to estimate soil emission rates, rather than using the isotopic signature. The site preference increased linearly

  13. Analysis of the coexisting pathways for NO and N2O formation in Chernozem using the (15)N-tracer SimKIM-Advanced model.

    PubMed

    Stange, Claus Florian; Spott, Oliver; Russow, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle consists of a variety of microbial processes. These processes often occur simultaneously in soils, but respond differently to local environmental conditions due to process-specific biochemical restrictions (e.g. oxygen levels). Hence, soil nitrogen cycling (e.g. soil N gas production through nitrification and denitrification) is individually affected through these processes, resulting in the complex and highly dynamic behaviour of total soil N turnover. The development and application of methods that facilitate the quantification of individual contributions of coexisting processes is a fundamental prerequisite for (i) understanding the dynamics of soil N turnover and (ii) implementing these processes in ecosystem models. To explain the unexpected results of the triplet tracer experiment (TTE) of Russow et al. (Role of nitrite and nitric oxide in the processes of nitrification and denitrification in soil: results from (15)N tracer experiments. Soil Biol Biochem. 2009;41:785-795) the existing SimKIM model was extended to the SimKIM-Advanced model through the addition of three separate nitrite subpools associated with ammonia oxidation, oxidation of organic nitrogen (Norg), and denitrification, respectively. For the TTE, individual treatments with (15)N ammonium, (15)N nitrate, and (15)N nitrite were conducted under oxic, hypoxic, and anoxic conditions, respectively, to clarify the role of nitric oxide as a denitrification intermediate during N2O formation. Using a split nitrite pool, this analysis model explains the observed differences in the (15)N enrichments in nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) which occurred in dependence on different oxygen concentrations. The change from oxic over hypoxic to anoxic conditions only marginally increased the NO and N2O release rates (1.3-fold). The analysis using the model revealed that, under oxic and hypoxic conditions, Norg-based N2O production was the dominant pathway, contributing to 90 and 50

  14. A δ(15)N assessment of nitrogen deposition for the endangered epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa from a city and an oak forest in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A; Reyes-García, Casandra; de la Barrera, Erick

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition poses a major threat to global biodiversity. Tropical epiphytic plants are especially at risk given their reliance on atmospheric sources of nutrients. The leaf, pseudobulb, and root carbon and nitrogen content, C:N ratio, as well as the nitrogen isotopic composition were studied for individuals of Laelia speciosa from a city and from an oak forest in Mexico. The nitrogen content of leaves was similar between the city and the oak forest, reaching 1.3 ± 0.2 % (dry mass). The δ(15)N of leaves, pseudobulbs, and roots reached 5.6 ± 0.2 ‰ in the city, values found in sites exposed to industrial and vehicular activities. The δ(15)N for plant from the oak forest amounted to -3.1 ± 0.3 ‰, which is similar to values measured from sites with low industrial activities. Some orchids such as Laelia speciosa produce a single pseudobulb per year, i.e., a water and nutrient storage organ, so the interannual nitrogen deposition was studied by considering the ten most recent pseudobulbs for plants from either site formed between 2003 and 2012. The C:N ratio of the ten most recent pseudobulbs from the oak forest, as well as that of the pseudobulbs formed before 2010 for plants in the city were indistinguishable from each other, averaging 132.4 ± 6.5, while it was lower for the two most recent pseudobulbs in the city. The δ(15)N values of pseudobulbs from the oak forest averaged ‒4.4 ± 0.1 ‰ for the entire series. The δ(15)N ranged from 0.1 ± 1.6 ‰ for the oldest pseudobulb to 4.7 ± 0.2 ‰ for the pseudobulb formed in the city from 2008 onwards. Isotopic analysis and the C:N ratio for L. speciosa revealed that rates of nitrogen deposition were higher in the city than in the forest. The δ(15)N values of series of pseudobulbs showed that it is possible to track nitrogen deposition over multiple years.

  15. NMR relaxation rate studies of molecular motions in NaSn, the Laves-phase metal hydride C15-ZrCr(2)H(x) and carbon/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Ronald Dean

    Here I present studies of molecular motions in three very different systems: NaSn, which exhibits motion characteristic of both a superionic conductor and a rotor crystal; C15-ZrCrsb2Hsbx (x < 0.5), a metal hydride which exhibits unusual characteristics in its hydrogen motion; and, finally a study of the relationship between Tsb2 and the degree of cure of carbon/epoxy materials. NaSn is characterized by Nasp+ ions and stable (Snsb4)sp{4-} tetrahedra. At high temperatures NaSn displays a disordered solid phase (alpha-NaSn). The presence of Nasp+ ions suggests that alpha-NaSn may be a superionic conductor (translationally disordered) and the presence of stable Snsb4 tetrahedra suggests it may be a rotor crystal (organizationally disordered). The purpose of this study is to gain better understanding of the motions in alpha-NaSn by monitoring Na and Sn motion using sp{23}Na and sp{119}Sn NMR, respectively. C15-ZrCrsb2Hsbx (x < 0.5) is a Laves phase metal hydride which displays extremely rapid hydrogen motion and a Tsb1 peak which cannot be explained by a model employing a single correlation time for the motion. A model employing a Gaussian distribution of correlation times has been used to successfully fit Tsb1, but the origin of this distribution in a crystalline solid solution is not known. The purpose of this study is to better understand the low temperature hydrogen motions occurring in C15-ZrCrsb2Hsbx by extending the previous NMR measurements using Tsb1p and Tsb1D, experiments which effectively push the relaxation peak to lower temperatures. New techniques for manufacturing carbon/epoxy components are under development which require partial curing of the material. At present, no method for monitoring partial curing exists. Tsb2 is a promising monitor of degree of cure because of its sensitivity to changes rates of molecular motions. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the sensitivity of Tsb2 to changes in molecular motion due to curing, and to find a

  16. MILLIMETER-WAVE OBSERVATIONS OF CN AND HNC AND THEIR {sup 15}N ISOTOPOLOGUES: A NEW EVALUATION OF THE {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N RATIO ACROSS THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Adande, G. R.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    The N = 1 {yields} 0 transitions of CN and C{sup 15}N (X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}), as well as the J = 1 {yields} 0 lines of HN{sup 13}C and H{sup 15}NC, have been observed toward 11 molecular clouds using the new 3 mm ALMA-type receiver of the 12 m telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory. These sources span a wide range of distances from the Galactic center and are all regions of star formation. From these observations, {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios have been determined using two independent methods. First, the measurements of C{sup 14}N and C{sup 15}N were directly compared to establish this ratio, correcting for high opacities when needed, as indicated by the nitrogen hyperfine intensities. Second, the ratio was calculated from the quantity [HN{sup 13}C]/[H{sup 15}NC], determined from the HNC data, and then scaled by {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios previously established, i.e., the so-called double isotope method. Values from both methods are in reasonable agreement, and fall in the range {approx}120-400, somewhat lower than previous {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios derived from HCN. The ratios exhibit a distinct positive gradient with distance from the Galactic center, following the relationship{sup 14}N/{sup 15}N = 21.1 (5.2) kpc{sup -1} D{sub GC} + 123.8 (37.1). This gradient is consistent with predictions of Galactic chemical evolution models in which {sup 15}N has a secondary origin in novae, while primary and secondary sources exist for {sup 14}N. The local interstellar medium value was found to be {sup 4}N/{sup 15}N = 290 {+-} 40, in agreement with the ratio found in nearby diffuse clouds and close to the value of 272 found in Earth's atmosphere.

  17. Stress Relaxation in Tensile Deformation of 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifeng; Li, Jiaojiao; Ding, Wei; Zhao, Shuangjun; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Improved ductility by stress relaxation has been reported in different kinds of steels. The influence of stress relaxation and its parameters on the ductility of 304 stainless steel has not been established so far. Stress relaxation behavior during tensile tests at different strain rates is studied in 304 stainless steel. It is observed that stress relaxation can obviously increase the elongation of 304 stainless steel in all cases. The elongation improvement of interrupted tension reaches to 14.9% compared with monotonic tension at 0.05 s-1. Contradicting with the published results, stress drop during stress relaxation increases with strain at all strain rates. It is related with dislocation motion velocity variation and martensitic transformation.

  18. Application of the 15N gas-flux method for measuring in situ N2 and N2O fluxes due to denitrification in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems and comparison with the acetylene inhibition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgouridis, Fotis; Stott, Andrew; Ullah, Sami

    2016-03-01

    Soil denitrification is considered the most un-constrained process in the global N cycle due to uncertain in situ N2 flux measurements, particularly in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems. 15N tracer approaches can provide in situ measurements of both N2 and N2O simultaneously, but their use has been limited to fertilized agro-ecosystems due to the need for large 15N additions in order to detect 15N2 production against the high atmospheric N2. For 15N-N2 analyses, we have used an "in-house" laboratory designed and manufactured N2 preparation instrument which can be interfaced to any commercial continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The N2 prep unit has gas purification steps and a copper-based reduction furnace, and allows the analysis of small gas injection volumes (4 µL) for 15N-N2 analysis. For the analysis of N2O, an automated Tracegas Preconcentrator (Isoprime Ltd) coupled to an IRMS was used to measure the 15N-N2O (4 mL gas injection volume). Consequently, the coefficient of variation for the determination of isotope ratios for N2 in air and in standard N2O (0.5 ppm) was better than 0.5 %. The 15N gas-flux method was adapted for application in natural and semi-natural land use types (peatlands, forests, and grasslands) by lowering the 15N tracer application rate to 0.04-0.5 kg 15N ha-1. The minimum detectable flux rates were 4 µg N m-2 h-1 and 0.2 ng N m-2 h-1 for the N2 and N2O fluxes respectively. Total denitrification rates measured by the acetylene inhibition technique in the same land use types correlated (r = 0.58) with the denitrification rates measured under the 15N gas-flux method, but were underestimated by a factor of 4, and this was partially attributed to the incomplete inhibition of N2O reduction to N2, under a relatively high soil moisture content, and/or the catalytic NO decomposition in the presence of acetylene. Even though relatively robust for in situ denitrification measurements, methodological

  19. Effect of body size and body mass on δ 13 C and δ 15 N in coastal fishes and cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, C.; Máguas, C.; Cabral, H. N.; Costa, M. J.

    2011-11-01

    Carbon and nitrogen isotopes have been widely used in the investigation of trophic relations, energy pathways, trophic levels and migrations, under the assumption that δ 13C is independent of body size and that variation in δ 15N occurs exclusively due to ontogenetic changes in diet and not body size increase per se. However, several studies have shown that these assumptions are uncertain. Data from food-webs containing an important number of species lack theoretical support on these assumptions because very few species have been tested for δ 13C and δ 15N variation in captivity. However, if sampling comprises a wide range of body sizes from various species, the variation of δ 13C and δ 15N with body size can be investigated. While correlation between body size and δ 13C and δ 15N can be due to ontogenetic diet shifts, stability in such values throughout the size spectrum can be considered an indication that δ 13C and δ 15N in muscle tissues of such species is independent of body size within that size range, and thus the basic assumptions can be applied in the interpretation of such food webs. The present study investigated the variation in muscle δ 13C and δ 15N with body size and body mass of coastal fishes and cephalopods. It was concluded that muscle δ 13C and δ 15N did not vary with body size or mass for all bony fishes with only one exception, the dragonet Callionymus lyra. Muscle δ 13C and δ 15N also did not vary with body size or mass in cartilaginous fishes and cephalopods, meaning that body size/mass per se have no effect on δ 13C or δ 15N, for most species analysed and within the size ranges sampled. The assumption that δ 13C is independent of body size and that variation in δ 15N is not affected by body size increase per se was upheld for most organisms and can be applied to the coastal food web studied taking into account that C. lyra is an exception.

  20. Progressive muscle relaxation, yoga stretching, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Shahyad; Smith, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and yoga stretching (hatha) exercises. Forty participants were randomly divided into two groups and taught PMR or yoga stretching exercises. Both groups practiced once a week for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, practitioners of PMR displayed higher levels of relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement at Week 4 and higher levels of Mental Quiet and Joy as a posttraining aftereffect at Week 5. Contrary to what was hypothesized, groups did not display different levels of R-States Energized or Aware. Results suggest the value of supplementing traditional somatic conceptualizations of relaxation with the psychological approach embodied in ABC relaxation theory. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  1. Analysis of δ15N and δ18O to differentiate NO3- sources in runoff at two watersheds in the Catskill Mountains of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Kendall, Carol

    2002-01-01

    To quantify the movement of atmospheric nitrogen deposition through two forested watersheds in the Catskill Mountains of New York, dual-isotope analysis (δ15N and δ18O) was used to differentiate NO3− derived from precipitation from NO3− derived by microbial nitrification and to quantify the contributions of these sources to NO3− in drainage waters. Samples of stream water, soil water, precipitation, snowmelt, and O-horizon soil were collected during the March and April snowmelt period of 1994 and throughout an 18-month period from August 1995 through February 1997. The mean δ18O-NO3− value of precipitation was +50.5‰, whereas the mean values for stream water and soil water were +17.7‰ and +23.6‰, respectively. The mean δ15N-NO3− of precipitation was −0.2‰, that of soil water was +1.4‰, and that of stream water was +2.3‰; these values showed greater overlap among the three different waters than did the δ18O-NO3− values, indicating that δ15N-NO3− was not as useful for source separation. Soil water δ18O-NO3− values decreased, and δ15N-NO3− values increased, from the O to the B and C horizons, but most of the differences among horizons were not statistically significant. Nitrate derived by nitrification in incubated soil samples had a wide range of δ15N-NO3− values, from +1.5‰ to +16.1‰, whereas δ18O-NO3− values ranged more narrowly, from +13.2‰ to +16.0‰. Values of δ18O-NO3− indicated that NO3− in stream water is mainly derived from nitrification. Only during a high-flow event that exceeded the annual flood was precipitation a major contributor to stream water NO3−. Values of δ18O-NO3− and δ15N-NO3− changed at differing rates as NO3− cycled through these watersheds because δ18O-NO3− values change sharply through the incorporation of oxygen from ambient water and gas during nitrification, whereas δ15N-NO3− values change only incrementally through fractionation during biocycling

  2. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  3. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by 15N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons.

    PubMed

    Live, D H; Cowburn, D; Breslow, E

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, 15N labeling being used to identify specific backbone 15N and 1H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence of hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neurophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of 15N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Application of the 15N-Gas Flux method for measuring in situ N2 and N2O fluxes due to denitrification in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems and comparison with the acetylene inhibition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgouridis, F.; Ullah, S.; Stott, A.

    2015-08-01

    Soil denitrification is considered the most un-constrained process in the global N cycle due to uncertain in situ N2 flux measurements, particularly in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems. 15N tracer approaches can provide in situ measurements of both N2 and N2O simultaneously, but their use has been limited to fertilised agro-ecosystems due to the need for large 15N additions in order to detect 15N2 production against the high atmospheric N2. For 15N-N2 analyses, we have used an "in house" laboratory designed and manufactured N2 preparation instrument which can be interfaced to any commercial continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The N2 prep unit has gas purification steps, a copper based reduction furnace, and allows the analysis of small gas injection volumes (4 μL) for 15N-N2 analysis. For the analysis of N2O, an automated Tracegas Pre-concentrator (Isoprime Ltd) coupled to an IRMS was used to measure the 15N-N2O (4 mL gas injection volume). Consequently, the coefficient of variation for the determination of isotope ratios for N2 in air and in standard N2O (0.5 ppm) was better than 0.5 %. The 15N Gas-Flux method was adapted for application in natural and semi-natural land use types (peatlands, forests and grasslands) by lowering the 15N tracer application rate to 0.04-0.5 kg 15N ha-1. For our chamber design (volume / surface = 8:1) and a 20 h incubation period, the minimum detectable flux rates were 4 μg N m-2 h-1 and 0.2 ng N m-2 h-1 for the N2 and N2O fluxes respectively. The N2 flux ranged between 2.4 and 416.6 μg N m-2 h-1, and the grassland soils showed on average 3 and 14 times higher denitrification rates than the woodland and organic soils respectively. The N2O flux was on average 20 to 200 times lower than the N2 flux, while the denitrification product ratio (N2O/N2 + N2O) was low, ranging between 0.03 and 13 %. Total denitrification rates measured by the acetylene inhibition technique under the same field conditions

  5. Nuclear polarization of /sup 15/N via ion-beam-foil interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Deutch, B.I.; Liu, C.H. II; Lu, F.; Sun, C.; Tan, J.; Tang, G.; Xu, K.; Yang, F.; Ye, H.

    1981-10-01

    The ion beam surface interaction at grazing incidence (IBSIGI) generates highly oriented atomic states, and nuclear spin polarized ions are produced via hf-interactions. Both single and multiple IBSIGI were reported./sup 1/ By single reflection, nuclear polarizations of P/sub I/ = 14% in /sup 14/N(I = 1), and P/sub I/ = 6.8% in /sup 7/Li(I = 3/2) were produced. In this paper, the transmission rather than reflection technique is used. A 600 keV /sup 15/N/sup +/(I = 1/2) beam passed through a foil tilted 60 /sup 0/ with respect to the beam axis, and a perpendicular foil (both made of 20 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ thick carbon). After the first foil, highly oriented atomic states are produced, which result in large circular polarization fractions in the fluorescent radiation. By hf-interaction, the orientation can be transferred from the electronic shell to the nucleus, or vice versa. In the second foil, which is perpendicular, and therefore does not produce any polarization, the interaction does not affect the nuclear spin, but attaches a new unoriented electronic shell to the nucleus. Thus the circular polarization in the fluorescence after the second foil must stem from the transfer of orientation from the nucleus to the electronic shell and is therefore a direct measure of the nuclear spin orientation. To determine the degree of circular polarization, the Stokes parameter S/I is measured. For the multiplet exclamation/sup 5/N II 2s/sup 2/2p3s /sup 3/P--2s/sup 2/2p3p /sup 3/D after a tilted foil the S/I is equal to 8.5 +- 0.8%; after double foils (60 /sup 0/ tilted foil+perpendicular foil), S/I = 1.6 +- 0.4%. From the latter values, the nuclear polarization of /sup 15/N is calculated: P/sub I/ = 10.2%.

  6. [Platanus orientalis foliar N% and delta15 N responses to nitrogen of atmospheric wet deposition in urban area].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Li; Xiao, Hua-Yun; Xiao, Hong-Wei

    2012-04-01

    Leaves of Platanus orientalis were collected since Mar. 2009 till Apr. 2010, in an urban area at Guiyang. After mass of experiments and analysis, we carried out constructing the temporal variation of foliar N% and delta15 N: both higher in Spring/Summer, lower in Autumn, no data of Winter because of leaf abscission. Results showed that foliar N% varied from 1.48% to 5.27%, with an annual average of 3.36%, while the average concentration of total N in rhizospheric soil was 0.29%. The foliar N% rose and fell relative to DIN in rainwater (range from 0.57 mg x L(-1) to 6.74 mg x L(-1)), indicating that the N% content in foliar tissue of plant was approximately proportional to atmospheric N inputs. The range of foliar delta15N were from 4.48 per thousand to 8.39 per thousand, with the average of 6.33 per thousand, much higher than the delta15N-NH4+ of rain water (-19.76 per thousand(-) -10.41 per thousand) and delta15TN of rhizospheric soil (3.19 per thousand +/- 1.04 per thousand). Besides, a good uniform correlation between foliar delta15N and delta15N-NH4+ of rain water were found. As synthesis of two main N sources, the more positive delta15N values of Platanus orientalis can be explained by isotopic fractionation during N uptake and basipetal translocation. These responses of both foliar N% and delta15N to atmospheric nitrogen deposition, revealed the potential value in using vascular leaves as bio-monitors for assessment of N deposition, furthermore, for prevention and control of air pollution in urban ecosystem.

  7. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  8. Tracking the incorporation of 15N from labeled beech litter into mineral-organic associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, M.; Hatton, P.; Derrien, D.; Lajtha, K.; Zeller, B.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen containing organic compounds are thought to have a role in the complex web of processes that control the turnover time of soil organic matter. The sequential density fractionation technique is increasingly used for the purpose of investigating the association of organic materials with the mineral matrix. Organic materials in the denser fractions (>2.0 kg L-1) typically show 13C NMR signals indicative of carbohydrate and aliphatic structures, an absence of lignin and tannin structures and a narrow C:N ratio, suggesting a microbial origin of organic matter in these fractions. Here we take advantage of a labeling experiment conducted at two different sites in Germany and in France to investigate the incorporation of organic nitrogen into physical fractions of increasing density, representing a proximity gradient to mineral surfaces. 15N labeled beech litter was applied to two acidic forest topsoils 8 and 12 years ago. Although there are differences in the distribution patterns between the two soils, and the majority of the organic nitrogen was recovered in fractions representing organic matter of plant origin and not bound to the mineral matrix, our data clearly show that after a decade, significant amounts of the nitrogen had been incorporated in mineral-organic fractions of supposedly slow turnover. It remains to be shown to which extent the N in the densest fractions was incorporated by soil microbiota and associated with mineral surfaces in organic form or adsorbed to mineral surfaces in inorganic form (NH4+).

  9. 15N Solid-State NMR as a Probe of Flavin H-bonding

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dongtao; Koder, Ronald L.; Dutton, P. Leslie; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2011-01-01

    Flavins mediate a wide variety of different chemical reactions in biology. To learn how one cofactor can be made to execute different reactions in different enzymes, we are developing solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to probe the flavin electronic structure, via the 15N chemical shift tensor principal values (δii). We find that SSNMR has superior responsiveness to H-bonds, compared to solution NMR. H-bonding to a model of the flavodoxin active site produced an increase of 10 ppm in the δ11 of N5 although none of the H-bonds directly engage N5, and solution NMR detected only a 4 ppm increase in the isotropic chemical shift (δiso). Moreover SSNMR responded differently to different H-bonding environments as H-bonding with water caused δ11 to decrease by 6 ppm whereas δiso increased by less than 1 ppm. Our density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations reproduce the observations, validating the use of computed electronic structures to understand how H-bonds modulate the flavin’s reactivity. PMID:21619002

  10. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes.

  11. Effects of 15N application frequency on nitrogen uptake efficiency in citrus trees.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Ana; Bañuls, Josefina; Millo, Eduardo Primo; Legaz, Francisco

    2003-12-01

    Two irrigation systems were used to compare nitrogen uptake efficiency in citrus trees and to evaluate the NO3- runoff in "Navelina" orange trees [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] on Carrizo citrange rootstock (Citrus sinensis x Poncirus trifoliata Raf.). These were fertilized with 125 g N as labelled K15NO3 and grown outdoors in containers filled with a sand-loamy soil. Two groups of 3 trees received this N dose either in five equally split applications by a flooding irrigation system or in 66 applications by drip. Trees were harvested at the end of the vegetative cycle (December) and the isotopic ratios of 15N/14N were measured in the soil-plant system. The N uptake efficiency of the whole tree was higher with drip irrigation (75%) than with flooding system (64%). In the 0-90 cm soil profile, the N immobilized in the organic fraction was similar for both irrigation methods (around 13 %), whereas the N retained as NO3- was 1% of the N applied under drip and 10% under flooding. In the last case, most of NO3- remained under root system and it could be lost to leaching either by heavy rainfalls or excessive water applications. These results showed that a drip irrigation system was more efficient for improving water use and N uptake from fertilizer, in addition to potentially reduced leaching losses.

  12. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes. PMID:27678172

  13. Revealing the radiative and non-radiative relaxation rates of the fluorescent dye Atto488 in a λ/2 Fabry-Pérot-resonator by spectral and time resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Alexander; Metzger, Michael; Kern, Andreas M.; Brecht, Marc; Meixner, Alfred J.

    2016-07-01

    Using a Fabry-Pérot-microresonator with controllable cavity lengths in the λ/2-regime, we show the controlled modification of the vibronic relaxation dynamics of a fluorescent dye molecule in the spectral and time domain. By altering the photonic mode density around the fluorophores we are able to shape the fluorescence spectrum and enhance specifically the probability of the radiative transitions from the electronic excited state to distinct vibronic excited states of the electronic ground state. Analysis and correlation of the spectral and time resolved measurements by a theoretical model and a global fitting procedure allows us to reveal quantitatively the spectrally distributed radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics of the respective dye molecule under ambient conditions at the ensemble level.Using a Fabry-Pérot-microresonator with controllable cavity lengths in the λ/2-regime, we show the controlled modification of the vibronic relaxation dynamics of a fluorescent dye molecule in the spectral and time domain. By altering the photonic mode density around the fluorophores we are able to shape the fluorescence spectrum and enhance specifically the probability of the radiative transitions from the electronic excited state to distinct vibronic excited states of the electronic ground state. Analysis and correlation of the spectral and time resolved measurements by a theoretical model and a global fitting procedure allows us to reveal quantitatively the spectrally distributed radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics of the respective dye molecule under ambient conditions at the ensemble level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR02380K

  14. Study of excitation transfer in a flowing helium afterglow pumped with a tuneable dye laser. II - Measurement of the rate coefficient for the rotational relaxation of He2/3p 3Pi-g/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, C. B.; Johnson, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the use of a fast-transient fluorescence technique in the examination of rotational relaxation caused by collisions with neutral helium atoms are discussed. Details regarding the production and detection of reacting species are considered, together with the analytical method used. A dye laser system with 4-methylcoumarin producing a pumping flux in the 4650 A region was employed in the investigations.

  15. STELLAR ORIGINS OF EXTREMELY {sup 13}C- AND {sup 15}N-ENRICHED PRESOLAR SIC GRAINS: NOVAE OR SUPERNOVAE?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nan; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O’D.; Wang, Jianhua; Pignatari, Marco; José, Jordi; Nguyen, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Extreme excesses of {sup 13}C ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C < 10) and {sup 15}N ({sup 14}N/{sup 15}N < 20) in rare presolar SiC grains have been considered diagnostic of an origin in classical novae, though an origin in core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) has also been proposed. We report C, N, and Si isotope data for 14 submicron- to micron-sized {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-enriched presolar SiC grains ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C < 16 and {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N < ∼100) from Murchison, and their correlated Mg–Al, S, and Ca–Ti isotope data when available. These grains are enriched in {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N, but with quite diverse Si isotopic signatures. Four grains with {sup 29,30}Si excesses similar to those of type C SiC grains likely came from CCSNe, which experienced explosive H burning occurred during explosions. The independent coexistence of proton- and neutron-capture isotopic signatures in these grains strongly supports heterogeneous H ingestion into the He shell in pre-supernovae. Two of the seven putative nova grains with {sup 30}Si excesses and {sup 29}Si depletions show lower-than-solar {sup 34}S/{sup 32}S ratios that cannot be explained by classical nova nucleosynthetic models. We discuss these signatures within the CCSN scenario. For the remaining five putative nova grains, both nova and supernova origins are viable because explosive H burning in the two stellar sites could result in quite similar proton-capture isotopic signatures. Three of the grains are sub-type AB grains that are also {sup 13}C enriched, but have a range of higher {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N. We found that {sup 15}N-enriched AB grains (∼50 < {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N < ∼100) have distinctive isotopic signatures compared to putative nova grains, such as higher {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N, lower {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al, and lack of {sup 30}Si excess, indicating weaker proton-capture nucleosynthetic environments.

  16. delta15N and delta13C diet-tissue discrimination factors for large sharks under semi-controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Nigel E; Brush, Jaclyn; McCarthy, Ian D; Fisk, Aaron T

    2010-04-01

    Stable isotopes (delta(15)N and delta(13)C) are being widely applied in ecological research but there has been a call for ecologists to determine species- and tissue-specific diet discrimination factors ((13)C and (15)N) for their study animals. For large sharks stable isotopes may provide an important tool to elucidate aspects of their ecological roles in marine systems, but laboratory based controlled feeding experiments are impractical. By utilizing commercial aquaria, we estimated (15)N and (13)C of muscle, liver, vertebral cartilage and a number of organs of three large sand tiger (Carcharias taurus) and one large lemon shark (Negaprion brevirostris) under a controlled feeding regime. For all sharks mean+/-SD for (15)N and (13)C in lipid extracted muscle using lipid extracted prey data were 2.29 per thousand+/-0.22 and 0.90 per thousand+/-0.33, respectively. The use of non-lipid extracted muscle and prey resulted in very similar (15)N and (13)C values but mixing of lipid and non-lipid extracted data produced variable estimates. Values of (15)N and (13)C in lipid extracted liver and prey were 1.50 per thousand+/-0.54 and 0.22 per thousand+/-1.18, respectively. Non-lipid extracted diet discrimination factors in liver were highly influenced by lipid content and studies that examine stable isotopes in shark liver, and likely any high lipid tissue, should strive to remove lipid effects through standardising C:N ratios, prior to isotope analysis. Mean vertebral cartilage (15)N and (13)C values were 1.45 per thousand+/-0.61 and 3.75 per thousand+/-0.44, respectively. Organ (15)N and (13)C values were more variable among individual sharks but heart tissue was consistently enriched by approximately 1-2.5 per thousand. Minimal variability in muscle and liver delta(15)N and delta(13)C sampled at different intervals along the length of individual sharks and between liver lobes suggests that stable isotope values are consistent within tissues of individual animals. To our

  17. Ultrafast Relaxation in Conjugated Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * EXPERIMENTAL * Samples * Femtosecond experimental apparatus * RESULTS AND DISCUSSION * Poly(phenylacetylenes) * Blue-phase PDA-3BCMU * Red-phase PDA-4BCMU * Blue-phase PDA-DFMP * P3MT * P3DT * PTV * RELAXATION MECHANISMS * Review of the previous works * Symmetry of the lower electronic excited states * Primary relaxation processes * Theoretical studies of nonlinear excitations * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a weakly nondegenerate ground state (poly(phenylacetylene)s) * Dual peak component with power-law decay * Single-peak component with an exponential decay * Hot self-trapped exciton * Transition to the electron-hole threshold * Transition to a biexciton state * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a strongly or moderately nondegenerate ground state * Classifications of polymers * Femtosecond relaxation * Picosecond relaxation * CONCLUSION * Acknowledgments * REFERENCES

  18. Relaxing music for anxiety control.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dave; Polman, Remco; McGregor, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of relaxing music for anxiety control. Undergraduate students (N=84) were instructed to imagine themselves in an anxiety producing situation while listening to a selection of 30 music compositions. For each composition, level of relaxation, the factors that either enhanced or detracted from its relaxing potential and the emotional labels attached were assessed. Participants were also asked to state which music components (e.g., tempo, melody) were most conducive to relaxation. Additional information was obtained through the use of a focus group of 6 undergraduate music students. This paper presents details on the characteristics of relaxing-music for anxiety control and emotional labels attached to the relaxing compositions. Furthermore, an importance value has been attached to each of the music components under scrutiny, thus providing an indication of which music components should receive greatest attention when selecting music for anxiety control.

  19. Desolvation-Driven 100-Fold Slow-down of Tunneling Relaxation Rate in Co(II)-Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets through a Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Wu, Jie-Yi; Huang, Guo-Zhang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Jia, Jian-Hua; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are regarded as a class of promising materials for spintronic and ultrahigh-density storage devices. Tuning the magnetic dynamics of single-molecule magnets is a crucial challenge for chemists. Lanthanide ions are not only highly magnetically anisotropic but also highly sensitive to the changes in the coordination environments. We developed a feasible approach to understand parts of the magneto-structure correlations and propose to regulate the relaxation behaviors via rational design. A series of Co(II)-Dy(III)-Co(II) complexes were obtained using in situ synthesis; in this system of complexes, the relaxation dynamics can be greatly improved, accompanied with desolvation, via single-crystal to single-crystal transformation. The effective energy barrier can be increased from 293 cm-1 (422 K) to 416 cm-1 (600 K), and the tunneling relaxation time can be grown from 8.5 × 10-4 s to 7.4 × 10-2 s. These remarkable improvements are due to the change in the coordination environments of Dy(III) and Co(II). Ab initio calculations were performed to better understand the magnetic dynamics.

  20. Desolvation-Driven 100-Fold Slow-down of Tunneling Relaxation Rate in Co(II)-Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets through a Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Process

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Wu, Jie-Yi; Huang, Guo-Zhang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Jia, Jian-Hua; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are regarded as a class of promising materials for spintronic and ultrahigh-density storage devices. Tuning the magnetic dynamics of single-molecule magnets is a crucial challenge for chemists. Lanthanide ions are not only highly magnetically anisotropic but also highly sensitive to the changes in the coordination environments. We developed a feasible approach to understand parts of the magneto-structure correlations and propose to regulate the relaxation behaviors via rational design. A series of Co(II)-Dy(III)-Co(II) complexes were obtained using in situ synthesis; in this system of complexes, the relaxation dynamics can be greatly improved, accompanied with desolvation, via single-crystal to single-crystal transformation. The effective energy barrier can be increased from 293 cm−1 (422 K) to 416 cm−1 (600 K), and the tunneling relaxation time can be grown from 8.5 × 10−4 s to 7.4 × 10−2 s. These remarkable improvements are due to the change in the coordination environments of Dy(III) and Co(II). Ab initio calculations were performed to better understand the magnetic dynamics. PMID:26573326

  1. Desolvation-Driven 100-Fold Slow-down of Tunneling Relaxation Rate in Co(II)-Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets through a Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Wu, Jie-Yi; Huang, Guo-Zhang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Jia, Jian-Hua; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-11-17

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are regarded as a class of promising materials for spintronic and ultrahigh-density storage devices. Tuning the magnetic dynamics of single-molecule magnets is a crucial challenge for chemists. Lanthanide ions are not only highly magnetically anisotropic but also highly sensitive to the changes in the coordination environments. We developed a feasible approach to understand parts of the magneto-structure correlations and propose to regulate the relaxation behaviors via rational design. A series of Co(II)-Dy(III)-Co(II) complexes were obtained using in situ synthesis; in this system of complexes, the relaxation dynamics can be greatly improved, accompanied with desolvation, via single-crystal to single-crystal transformation. The effective energy barrier can be increased from 293 cm(-1) (422 K) to 416 cm(-1) (600 K), and the tunneling relaxation time can be grown from 8.5 × 10(-4) s to 7.4 × 10(-2) s. These remarkable improvements are due to the change in the coordination environments of Dy(III) and Co(II). Ab initio calculations were performed to better understand the magnetic dynamics.

  2. (15)N natural abundance in plants of the Amazon River floodplain and potential atmospheric N2 fixation.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, L A; Victoria, R L; Trivelin, P C O; Devol, A H; Richey, J E

    1992-07-01

    The(15)N natural abundance values of various Amazon floodplain (várzea) plants was investigated. Samples of young leaf tissues were collected during three different periods of the river hydrography (low water, mid rising water and high water) and during one period in the Madeira River (high water). A large variation of(15)N abundance was observed, both among the different plant types and between the different flood stages. This variation probably, reflected, in part, the highly variable nature of the floodplain, sometimes dry and oxygenated and at other times inundated and anaerobic and, in part, changes in plant nitrogen metabolism. Comparison of the nitrogen isotopic composition of leguminous plants with that of non-leguminous plants showed that, on average, the(15)N abundance was lower in the legumes than non-legumes, suggesting active N-fixation. Also, the(15)N natural abundance in aquatic grasses of the generaPaspalum, was in general, lower than the(15)N abundance of aquatic grasses of the generaEchinochloa. As both of these grasses grow in the same general habitat, it appears thatPaspalum grasses may also be nitrogen fixers.

  3. Exploring the Nitrogen Ingestion of Aphids — A New Method Using Electrical Penetration Graph and 15N Labelling

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, Franziska; Opitz, Sebastian E. W.; Inselsbacher, Erich; Ganeteg, Ulrika; Näsholm, Torgny; Ninkovic, Velemir

    2013-01-01

    Studying plant-aphid interactions is challenging as aphid feeding is a complex process hidden in the plant tissue. Here we propose a combination of two well established methods to study nutrient acquisition by aphids focusing on the uptake of isotopically labelled nitrogen (15N). We combined the Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) technique that allows detailed recording of aphid feeding behaviour and stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to precisely measure the uptake of nitrogen. Bird cherry-oat aphids Rhopalosiphum padi L. (Hemiptera, Aphididae) fed for 24 h on barley plants (Hordeum vulgare L., cultivar Lina, Poaceae) that were cultivated with a 15N enriched nutrient solution. The time aphids fed in the phloem was strongly positive correlated with their 15N uptake. All other single behavioural phases were not correlated with 15N enrichment in the aphids, which corroborates their classification as non-feeding EPG phases. In addition, phloem-feeding and 15N enrichment of aphids was divided into two groups. One group spent only short time in the phloem phase and was unsuccessful in nitrogen acquisition, while the other group displayed longer phloem-feeding phases and was successful in nitrogen acquisition. This suggests that several factors such as the right feeding site, time span of feeding and individual conditions play a role for the aphids to acquire nutrients successfully. The power of this combination of methods for studying plant-aphid interactions is discussed. PMID:24376642

  4. δ 15N Studies of Nitrogen Use by the Red Mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L. in South Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, B.; Bern, A. L.; Ross, M. S.; Meeder, J. F.

    2000-02-01

    To help define nitrogen (N) sources and patterns of N processing in mangrove ecosystems, mangrove leaf nitrogen contents and δ 15N values were assayed in three marshes along the south Florida coast. In each marsh, leaf samples were collected from dwarf mangroves at interior locations and taller mangroves at the ocean fringe. Leaf % N and δ 15N values did not differ consistently between dwarf and tall mangroves, even though there were large variations in δ 15N (18‰ range, -5 to +13‰) and % N (1·2% range, 0·9-2·1%). Highest % N and δ 15N values occurred along the western margin of Biscayne Bay where canals draining agricultural lands deliver high-nitrate waters to fringing mangrove marshes. High mangrove δ 15N values may be good biomonitors of anthropogenic N loading to south Florida estuaries. Lower values likely reflect less anthropogenic N entering the mangrove marshes, as well as differences in plant physiology that occur along the fringe-dwarf gradient.

  5. Exploring the nitrogen ingestion of aphids--a new method using electrical penetration graph and (15)N labelling.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Franziska; Opitz, Sebastian E W; Inselsbacher, Erich; Ganeteg, Ulrika; Näsholm, Torgny; Ninkovic, Velemir

    2013-01-01

    Studying plant-aphid interactions is challenging as aphid feeding is a complex process hidden in the plant tissue. Here we propose a combination of two well established methods to study nutrient acquisition by aphids focusing on the uptake of isotopically labelled nitrogen ((15)N). We combined the Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) technique that allows detailed recording of aphid feeding behaviour and stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to precisely measure the uptake of nitrogen. Bird cherry-oat aphids Rhopalosiphum padi L. (Hemiptera, Aphididae) fed for 24 h on barley plants (Hordeum vulgare L., cultivar Lina, Poaceae) that were cultivated with a (15)N enriched nutrient solution. The time aphids fed in the phloem was strongly positive correlated with their (15)N uptake. All other single behavioural phases were not correlated with (15)N enrichment in the aphids, which corroborates their classification as non-feeding EPG phases. In addition, phloem-feeding and (15)N enrichment of aphids was divided into two groups. One group spent only short time in the phloem phase and was unsuccessful in nitrogen acquisition, while the other group displayed longer phloem-feeding phases and was successful in nitrogen acquisition. This suggests that several factors such as the right feeding site, time span of feeding and individual conditions play a role for the aphids to acquire nutrients successfully. The power of this combination of methods for studying plant-aphid interactions is discussed.

  6. Range expansion of the jumbo squid in the NE Pacific: δ15N decrypts multiple origins, migration and habitat use.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I;