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Sample records for 15o radioactive ion

  1. Study of Nuclear Reactions with 11C and 15O Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongwon

    2007-05-14

    Nuclear reaction study with radioactive ion beams is one of the most exciting research topics in modern nuclear physics. The development of radioactive ion beams has allowed nuclear scientists and engineers to explore many unknown exotic nuclei far from the valley of nuclear stability, and to further our understanding of the evolution of the universe. The recently developed radioactive ion beam facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron is denoted as BEARS and provides 11C, 14O and 15O radioactive ion beams of high quality. These moderate to high intensity, proton-rich radioactive ion beams have been used to explore the properties of unstable nuclei such as 12N and 15F. In this work, the proton capture reaction on 11C has been evaluated via the indirect d(11C, 12N)n transfer reaction using the inverse kinematics method coupled with the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient (ANC) theoretical approach. The total effective 12N → 11C+p ANC is found to be (C eff12N = 1.83 ± 0.27 fm-1. With the high 11C beam intensity available, our experiment showed excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and previous experimental studies. This study also indirectly confirmed that the 11C(p,γ) reaction is a key step in producing CNO nuclei in supermassive low-metallicity stars, bypassing the slow triple alpha process. The newly developed 15O radioactive ion beam at BEARS was used to study the poorly known level widths of 16F via the p(15O,15O)p reaction. Among the nuclei in the A=16, T=1 isobaric triad, many states in 16N and 16O have been well established, but less has been reported on 16F. Four states of 16F below 1 MeV have been identified experimentally: 0-, 1

  2. First application of the Trojan horse method with a radioactive ion beam: Study of the 18F (p,α ) 15O reaction at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; de Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.; Kiss, G.; Bishop, S.; Binh, D. N.

    2015-07-01

    Measurement of nuclear cross sections at astrophysical energies involving unstable species is one of the most challenging tasks in experimental nuclear physics. The use of indirect methods is often unavoidable in this scenario. In this paper the Trojan horse method is applied for the first time to a radioactive ion beam-induced reaction studying the 18F (p ,α )15O process at low energies relevant to astrophysics via the three-body reaction 2H (18F ,α15O ) n . The knowledge of the 18F (p,α ) 15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the nova explosion phenomena. The cross section of this reaction is characterized by the presence of several resonances in 19Ne and possibly interference effects among them. The results reported in literature are not satisfactory and new investigations of the 18F (p,α ) 15O reaction cross section will be useful. In the present work the spin-parity assignments of relevant levels have been discussed and the astrophysical S factor has been extracted considering also interference effects.

  3. Trapping radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-12-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  4. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

    1997-08-12

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

  5. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, Kenneth E.; Weeks, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

  6. Sources of radioactive ions

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    Beams of unstable nuclei can be formed by direct injection of the radioactive atoms into an ion source, or by using the momentum of the primary production beam as the basis for the secondary beam. The effectiveness of this latter mechanism in secondary beam formation, i.e., the quality of the emerging beam (emittance, intensity, energy spread), depends critically on the nuclear reaction kinematics, and on the magnitude of the incident beam energy. When this beam energy significantly exceeds the energies typical of the nuclear reaction process, many of the qualities of the incident beam can be passed on to the secondary beam. Factors affecting secondary beam quality are discussed, along with techniques for isolating and purifying a specific secondary product. The ongoing radioactive beam program at the Bevalac is used as an example, with applications, present performance and plans for improvements.

  7. The migration mechanism of transition metal ions in LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5O4

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Gui-Liang; Qin, Yan; Ren, Yang; Cai, Lu; An, Ke; Amine, Khalil; Chen, Zonghai

    2015-05-12

    The migration of transition metal ions in the oxygen framework was recently proposed to be responsible for the continuous loss of average working potential of high energy density layered–layered composite cathodes for lithium-ion batteries. The potential migration pathway in a model material, LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5O4 spinel, was investigated using in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction and in situ neutron diffraction during the solid state synthesis process. It was found that the migration of transition metal ions among octahedral sites is possible by using tetrahedral vacancies as intermediate sites. It was also suggested that the number of electrons in 3d orbitalsmore » has a significant impact on their mobility in the hosting oxygen framework.« less

  8. Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Status

    SciTech Connect

    Stracener, Daniel W; Beene, James R; Dowling, Darryl T; Juras, Raymond C; Liu, Yuan; Meigs, Martha J; Mendez, II, Anthony J; Mueller, Paul Edward; Sinclair, John William; Tatum, B Alan; Sinclair IV, John W

    2009-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produces high-quality beams of short-lived radioactive isotopes for nuclear science research, and is currently unique worldwide in the ability to provide neutron-rich fission fragment beams post-accelerated to energies above the Coulomb barrier. HRIBF is undergoing a multi-phase upgrade. Phase I (completed 2005) was construction of the High Power Target Laboratory to provide the on-going Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) development program with a venue for testing new targets, ion sources, and radioactive ion beam (RIB) production techniques with high-power beams. Phase II, which is on schedule for completion in September 2009, is the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 (IRIS2), a second RIB production station that will improve facility reliability and accommodate new ion sources, new RIB production targets, and some innovative RIB purification techniques, including laser applications. The Phase III goal is to substantially improve facility performance by replacing or supplementing the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) production accelerator with either a high-power 25-50 MeV electron accelerator or a high-current multi-beam commercial cyclotron. Either upgrade is applicable to R&D on isotope production for medical or other applications.

  9. Radioactive ion beams in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gialanella, L.

    2016-09-01

    Unstable nuclei play a crucial role in the Universe. In this lecture, after a short introduction to the field of Nuclear Astrophysics, few selected cases in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis are discussed to illustrate the importance and peculiarities of processes involving unstable species. Finally, some experimental techniques useful for measurements using radioactive ion beams and the perspectives in this field are presented.

  10. Radioactive Ion Beam Production Capabilities at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Beene, James R; Dowling, Darryl T; Gross, Carl J; Juras, Raymond C; Liu, Yuan; Meigs, Martha J; Mendez, II, Anthony J; Nazarewicz, Witold; Sinclair, John William; Stracener, Daniel W; Tatum, B Alan

    2011-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a national user facility for research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) that has been in routine operation since 1996. It is located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and operated by the ORNL Physics Division. The principal mission of HRIBF is the production of high-quality beams of short-lived radioactive isotopes to support research in nuclear structure physics and nuclear astrophysics. HRIBF is currently unique worldwide in its ability to provide neutron-rich fission fragment beams post-accelerated to energies above the Coulomb barrier for nuclear reactions.

  11. BEARS: Radioactive ion beams at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Guo, F.Q.; Haustein, P.E.

    1998-07-01

    BEARS (Berkeley Experiments with Accelerated Radioactive Species) is an initiative to develop a radioactive ion-beam capability at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The aim is to produce isotopes at an existing medical cyclotron and to accelerate them at the 88 inch Cyclotron. To overcome the 300-meter physical separation of these two accelerators, a carrier-gas transport system will be used. At the terminus of the capillary, the carrier gas will be separated and the isotopes will be injected into the 88 inch Cyclotron`s Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. The first radioactive beams to be developed will include 20-min {sup 11}C and 70-sec {sup 14}O, produced by (p,n) and (p,{alpha}) reactions on low-Z targets. A test program is currently being conducted at the 88 inch Cyclotron to develop the parts of the BEARS system. Preliminary results of these tests lead to projections of initial {sup 11}C beams of up to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} ions/sec and {sup 14}O beams of 3 {times} 10{sup 5} ions/sec.

  12. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Vane, C Randy; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.; Mattolat, C.; Lassen, J.

    2009-01-01

    A resonant ionization laser ion source based on all-solid-state, tunable Ti:Sapphire lasers is being developed for the production of pure radioactive ion beams. It consists of a hot-cavity ion source and three pulsed Ti:Sapphire lasers operating at a 10 kHz pulse repetition rate. Spectroscopic studies are being conducted to develop ionization schemes that lead to ionizing an excited atom through an auto-ionization or a Rydberg state for numerous elements of interest. Three-photon resonant ionization of 12 elements has been recently demonstrated. The overall efficiency of the laser ion source measured for some of these elements ranges from 1 to 40%. The results indicate that Ti:Sapphire lasers could be well suited for laser ion source applications. The time structures of the ions produced by the pulsed lasers are investigated. The information may help to improve the laser ion source performance.

  13. Investigation on preparation and performance of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with different microstructures for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuan; Wang, Zhenbo; Zheng, Lili; Yu, Fuda; Liu, Baosheng; Zhang, Yin; Ke, Ke

    2015-08-24

    The high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is a promising cathode material in next generation of lithium ion batteries. In this study, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with various particle microstructures are prepared by controlling the microstructures of precursors. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel samples with solid, hollow and hierarchical microstructures are prepared with solid MnCO3, hollow MnO2 and hierarchical Mn2O3 as precursor, respectively. The homemade spinel materials are investigated and the results show that the content of Mn(3+) and impurity phase differ much in these three spinel samples obtained under the same calcining and annealing conditions. It is revealed for the first time that an inhomogeneous migration of atoms may introduce Mn(3+) and impurity phase in the spinel. The hierarchical microstructure with the primary particles interconnected is optimal for electrode materials because this microstructure has a higher conductivity between the interconnected primary particles and appropriate specific surface area. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 in this microstructure has the best rate capability and also the best long-term cycling stability.

  14. Investigation on preparation and performance of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with different microstructures for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuan; Wang, Zhenbo; Zheng, Lili; Yu, Fuda; Liu, Baosheng; Zhang, Yin; Ke, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is a promising cathode material in next generation of lithium ion batteries. In this study, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with various particle microstructures are prepared by controlling the microstructures of precursors. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel samples with solid, hollow and hierarchical microstructures are prepared with solid MnCO3, hollow MnO2 and hierarchical Mn2O3 as precursor, respectively. The homemade spinel materials are investigated and the results show that the content of Mn3+ and impurity phase differ much in these three spinel samples obtained under the same calcining and annealing conditions. It is revealed for the first time that an inhomogeneous migration of atoms may introduce Mn3+ and impurity phase in the spinel. The hierarchical microstructure with the primary particles interconnected is optimal for electrode materials because this microstructure has a higher conductivity between the interconnected primary particles and appropriate specific surface area. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 in this microstructure has the best rate capability and also the best long-term cycling stability. PMID:26299774

  15. Ion sources and targets for radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Back, B.B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    A high-intensity ISOL-type radioactive beam facility depends critically on the performance of the target/ion source system. We developed a concept for producing high-intensity secondary beams of fission fragments, such as {sup 132}Sn, using a two-part target and ion source combination. The idea involves stopping a 1000-kW beam of 200-MeV deuterons in a target of Be or U to produce a secondary beam of neutrons. Just behind the neutron production target is a second target, typically a porous form of UC, coupled to an ISOL-type ion source. In December 1994, we tested this concept with 200-MeV deuterons at low intensity in an experiment at the NSCL. The yields of characteristic gamma rays were measured and confirmed our predictions.

  16. Nuclear astrophysics with radioactive ions at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, R.; Altstadt, S.; Göbel, K.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Koloczek, A.; Langer, C.; Plag, R.; Pohl, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Weigand, M.; Adachi, T.; Aksouh, F.; Al-Khalili, J.; AlGarawi, M.; AlGhamdi, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alkhomashi, N.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Andreev, V.; Andrei, B.; Atar, L.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Bacri, C.; Bagchi, S.; Barbieri, C.; Beceiro, S.; Beck, C.; Beinrucker, C.; Belier, G.; Bemmerer, D.; Bendel, M.; Benlliure, J.; Benzoni, G.; Berjillos, R.; Bertini, D.; Bertulani, C.; Bishop, S.; Blasi, N.; Bloch, T.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Bonaccorso, A.; Boretzky, K.; Botvina, A.; Boudard, A.; Boutachkov, P.; Boztosun, I.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Briz Monago, J.; Caamano, M.; Caesar, C.; Camera, F.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkall, J.; Cederwall, B.; Chartier, M.; Chatillon, A.; Cherciu, M.; Chulkov, L.; Coleman-Smith, P.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Crespi, F.; Crespo, R.; Cresswell, J.; Csatlós, M.; Déchery, F.; Davids, B.; Davinson, T.; Derya, V.; Detistov, P.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; DiJulio, D.; Dmitry, S.; Doré, D.; Dueñas, J.; Dupont, E.; Egelhof, P.; Egorova, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Endres, J.; Ershov, S.; Ershova, O.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Fetisov, A.; Fiori, E.; Fomichev, A.; Fonseca, M.; Fraile, L.; Freer, M.; Friese, J.; Borge, M. G.; Galaviz Redondo, D.; Gannon, S.; Garg, U.; Gasparic, I.; Gasques, L.; Gastineau, B.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Ghosh, T.; Gilbert, M.; Glorius, J.; Golubev, P.; Gorshkov, A.; Gourishetty, A.; Grigorenko, L.; Gulyas, J.; Haiduc, M.; Hammache, F.; Harakeh, M.; Hass, M.; Heine, M.; Hennig, A.; Henriques, A.; Herzberg, R.; Holl, M.; Ignatov, A.; Ignatyuk, A.; Ilieva, S.; Ivanov, M.; Iwasa, N.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H.; Jonson, B.; Joshi, P.; Junghans, A.; Jurado, B.; Körner, G.; Kalantar, N.; Kanungo, R.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kezzar, K.; Khan, E.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kiselev, O.; Kogimtzis, M.; Körper, D.; Kräckmann, S.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kratz, J.; Kresan, D.; Krings, T.; Krumbholz, A.; Krupko, S.; Kulessa, R.; Kumar, S.; Kurz, N.; Kuzmin, E.; Labiche, M.; Langanke, K.; Lazarus, I.; Le Bleis, T.; Lederer, C.; Lemasson, A.; Lemmon, R.; Liberati, V.; Litvinov, Y.; Löher, B.; Lopez Herraiz, J.; Münzenberg, G.; Machado, J.; Maev, E.; Mahata, K.; Mancusi, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martinez Perez, M.; Marusov, V.; Mengoni, D.; Million, B.; Morcelle, V.; Moreno, O.; Movsesyan, A.; Nacher, E.; Najafi, M.; Nakamura, T.; Naqvi, F.; Nikolski, E.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Nolan, P.; Novatsky, B.; Nyman, G.; Ornelas, A.; Palit, R.; Pandit, S.; Panin, V.; Paradela, C.; Parkar, V.; Paschalis, S.; Pawłowski, P.; Perea, A.; Pereira, J.; Petrache, C.; Petri, M.; Pickstone, S.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Pivovarov, Y.; Potlog, P.; Prokofiev, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Rauscher, T.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M.; Richter, A.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Rios, A.; Ritter, C.; Rodriguez Frutos, T.; Rodriguez Vignote, J.; Röder, M.; Romig, C.; Rossi, D.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Rout, P.; Roy, S.; Söderström, P.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Sakuta, S.; Salsac, M.; Sampson, J.; Sanchez, J.; Rio Saez, del; Sanchez Rosado, J.; Sanjari, S.; Sarriguren, P.; Sauerwein, A.; Savran, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Scheit, H.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, C.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Schrock, P.; Schwengner, R.; Seddon, D.; Sherrill, B.; Shrivastava, A.; Sidorchuk, S.; Silva, J.; Simon, H.; Simpson, E.; Singh, P.; Slobodan, D.; Sohler, D.; Spieker, M.; Stach, D.; Stan, E.; Stanoiu, M.; Stepantsov, S.; Stevenson, P.; Strieder, F.; Stuhl, L.; Suda, T.; Sümmerer, K.; Streicher, B.; Taieb, J.; Takechi, M.; Tanihata, I.; Taylor, J.; Tengblad, O.; Ter-Akopian, G.; Terashima, S.; Teubig, P.; Thies, R.; Thoennessen, M.; Thomas, T.; Thornhill, J.; Thungstrom, G.; Timar, J.; Togano, Y.; Tomohiro, U.; Tornyi, T.; Tostevin, J.; Townsley, C.; Trautmann, W.; Trivedi, T.; Typel, S.; Uberseder, E.; Udias, J.; Uesaka, T.; Uvarov, L.; Vajta, Z.; Velho, P.; Vikhrov, V.; Volknandt, M.; Volkov, V.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; von Schmid, M.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Wells, D.; Westerberg, L.; Wieland, O.; Wiescher, M.; Wimmer, C.; Wimmer, K.; Winfield, J. S.; Winkel, M.; Woods, P.; Wyss, R.; Yakorev, D.; Yavor, M.; Zamora Cardona, J.; Zartova, I.; Zerguerras, T.; Zgura, M.; Zhdanov, A.; Zhukov, M.; Zieblinski, M.; Zilges, A.; Zuber, K.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleosynthesis of elements beyond iron is dominated by neutron captures in the s and r processes. However, 32 stable, proton-rich isotopes cannot be formed during those processes, because they are shielded from the s-process flow and r-process, β-decay chains. These nuclei are attributed to the p and rp process. For all those processes, current research in nuclear astrophysics addresses the need for more precise reaction data involving radioactive isotopes. Depending on the particular reaction, direct or inverse kinematics, forward or time-reversed direction are investigated to determine or at least to constrain the desired reaction cross sections. The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will offer unique, unprecedented opportunities to investigate many of the important reactions. The high yield of radioactive isotopes, even far away from the valley of stability, allows the investigation of isotopes involved in processes as exotic as the r or rp processes.

  17. Improving the rate capability of high voltage lithium-ion battery cathode material LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 by ruthenium doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiziltas-Yavuz, Nilüfer; Bhaskar, Aiswarya; Dixon, Ditty; Yavuz, Murat; Nikolowski, Kristian; Lu, Li; Eichel, Rüdiger-A.; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2014-12-01

    The citric acid-assisted sol-gel method was used to produce the high-voltage cathodes LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 and LiNi0.4Ru0.05Mn1.5O4 at 800 °C and 1000 °C final calcination temperatures. High resolution powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation, inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses were carried out to characterize the structure, chemical composition and morphology. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies were conducted to confirm Ru doping inside the spinel as well as to compare the oxidation states of transition metals. The formation of an impurity LixNi1-xO in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 powders annealed at high temperatures (T ≥ 800 °C) can be suppressed by partial substitution of Ni2+ by Ru4+ ion. The LiNi0.4Ru0.05Mn1.5O4 powder synthesized at 1000 °C shows the highest performance regarding the rate capability and cycling stability. It has an initial capacity of ∼139 mAh g-1 and capacity retention of 84% after 300 cycles at C/2 charging-discharging rate between 3.5 and 5.0 V. The achievable discharge capacity at 20 C for a charging rate of C/2 is ∼136 mAh g-1 (∼98% of the capacity delivered at C/2). Since the electrode preparation plays a crucial role on parameters like the rate capability, the influence of the mass loading of active materials in the cathode mixture is discussed.

  18. Target Development for Radioactive Ion Beam Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Carter, H. K.; Stracener, D. W.; Bilheux, J. C.; Cizewski, J. A.; Koester, U.

    2004-10-01

    Development of ion beams of short-lived isotopes is crucial for modern nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. For example, ^82Ge,^130+xSn, ^92,94,95Sr beams are of interest but impurities and low intensities have prevented them from being useful. The code HSC-5 [1], with an extensive thermochemical database, predicts which chemical compounds may be transported within the target-ion source. The code also allows us to predict stability of target materials as function of temperature and pressure. So, a number of new targets have been fabricated and tested for use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, based on the ISOL technique. Recent results from off-line and on-line tests at HRIBF and CERN-ISOLDE will be presented. This research was sponsored by the NNSA under Stewardship Science Academic Alliance program through DOE Cooperative Agreement # DE-FC03-3NA00143. [1] HSC Chemistry for Windows - Chemical Reaction and Equilibrium Software with extensive Thermochemical Database, Outokumpu Research Oy, Pori, Finnland

  19. Target Development for Radioactive Ion Beam Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Carter, H. K.; Stracener, D.; Bilheux, J.; Cizewski, J. A.; Koester, U.

    2004-11-01

    Development of ion beams of short-lived isotopes is crucial for modern nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. For example, ^82Ge, ^130+xSn, ^92,94,95Sr beams are of interest but impurities and low intensities have prevented them from being useful. The code HSC-5 [1], with an extensive thermochemical database predicts which chemical compounds may be transported within the target-ion source. The code also allows us to predict stability of target materials as function of temperature and pressure. So, a number of new targets have been fabricated and tested for use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, based on the ISOL technique. Recent results from off-line and on-line tests at HRIBF and CERN-ISOLDE will be presented. This research was sponsored by the NNSA under Stewardship Science Academic Alliance program through DOE Cooperative Agreement # DE-FC03-3NA00143. [1] HSC Chemistry for Windows Chemical Reaction and Equilibrium Software with extensive Thermochemical Database, Outokumpu Research Oy, Pori, Finnland

  20. Titanate-based adsorbents for radioactive ions entrapment from water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjiang; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2013-03-21

    This feature article reviews some titanate-based adsorbents for the removal of radioactive wastes (cations and anions) from water. At the beginning, we discuss the development of the conventional ion-exchangeable titanate powders for the entrapment of radioactive cations, such as crystalline silicotitanate (CST), monosodium titanate (MST), peroxotitanate (PT). Then, we specially emphasize the recent progress in the uptake of radioactive ions by one-dimensional (1D) sodium titanate nanofibers and nanotubes, which includes the synthesis and phase transformation of the 1D nanomaterials, adsorption ability (capacity, selectivity, kinetics, etc.) of radioactive cations and anions, and the structural evolution during the adsorption process.

  1. The production of accelerated radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.

    1993-11-01

    During the last few years, substantial work has been done and interest developed in the scientific opportunities available with accelerated radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for nuclear physics, astrophysics, and applied research. This interest has led to the construction, development, and proposed development of both first- and second-generation RIB facilities in Asia, North America, and Europe; international conferences on RIBs at Berkeley and Louvain-la-Neuve; and many workshops on specific aspects of RIB production and science. This paper provides a discussion of both the projectile fragmentation, PF, and isotope separator on-line, ISOL, approach to RIB production with particular emphasis on the latter approach, which employs a postaccelerator and is most suitable for nuclear structure physics. The existing, under construction, and proposed facilities worldwide are discussed. The paper draws heavily from the CERN ISOLDE work, the North American IsoSpin Laboratory (ISL) study, and the operating first-generation RIB facility at Louvain-la-Neuve, and the first-generation RIB project currently being constructed at ORNL.

  2. Extraction simulations and emittance measurements of a Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility electron beam plasma source for radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, II, Anthony J; Liu, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility HRIBF at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a variety of ion sources used to produce radioactive ion beams RIBs. Of these, the workhorse is an electron beam plasma EBP ion source. The recent addition of a second RIB injector, the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 IRIS2, for the HRIBF tandem accelerator prompted new studies of the optics of the beam extraction from the EBP source. The source was modeled using SIMION V8.0, and results will be presented, including comparison of the emittances as predicted by simulation and as measured at the HRIBF offline ion source test facilities. Also presented will be the impact on phase space shape resulting from extraction optics modifications implemented at IRIS2.

  3. Extraction simulations and emittance measurements of a Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility electron beam plasma source for radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, A. J. II; Liu, Y.

    2010-02-15

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a variety of ion sources used to produce radioactive ion beams (RIBs). Of these, the workhorse is an electron beam plasma (EBP) ion source. The recent addition of a second RIB injector, the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 (IRIS2), for the HRIBF tandem accelerator prompted new studies of the optics of the beam extraction from the EBP source. The source was modeled using SIMION V8.0, and results will be presented, including comparison of the emittances as predicted by simulation and as measured at the HRIBF offline ion source test facilities. Also presented will be the impact on phase space shape resulting from extraction optics modifications implemented at IRIS2.

  4. Extraction Simulations and Emittance Measurements of a Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Electron Beam Plasma Source for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, II, Anthony J; Liu, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a variety of ion sources used to produce radioactive ion beams (RIBs). Of these, the workhorse is an electron beam plasma (EBP) ion source. The recent addition of a second RIB injector, the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 (IRIS2), for the HRIBF tandem accelerator prompted new studies of the optics of the beam extraction from the EBP source. The source was modeled using SIMION V8.0, and results will be presented, including comparison of the emittances as predicted by simulation and as measured at the HRIBF offline ion source test facilities. Also presented will be the impact on phase space shape resulting from extraction optics modifications implemented at IRIS2.

  5. In-trap spectroscopy of charge-bred radioactive ions.

    PubMed

    Lennarz, A; Grossheim, A; Leach, K G; Alanssari, M; Brunner, T; Chaudhuri, A; Chowdhury, U; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; Gallant, A T; Holl, M; Kwiatkowski, A A; Lassen, J; Macdonald, T D; Schultz, B E; Seeraji, S; Simon, M C; Andreoiu, C; Dilling, J; Frekers, D

    2014-08-22

    In this Letter, we introduce the concept of in-trap nuclear decay spectroscopy of highly charged radioactive ions and describe its successful application as a novel spectroscopic tool. This is demonstrated by a measurement of the decay properties of radioactive mass A=124 ions (here, ^{124}In and ^{124}Cs) in the electron-beam ion trap of the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. By subjecting the trapped ions to an intense electron beam, the ions are charge bred to high charge states (i.e., equivalent to the removal of N-shell electrons), and an increase of storage times to the level of minutes without significant ion losses is achieved. The present technique opens the venue for precision spectroscopy of low branching ratios and is being developed in the context of measuring electron-capture branching ratios needed for determining the nuclear ground-state properties of the intermediate odd-odd nuclei in double-beta (ββ) decay.

  6. EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2010-07-01

    The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) {sup 252}Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) {ge} 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 10{sup 7} ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 10{sup 9} ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

  7. EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2010-07-01

    The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) 252Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) >= 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 107 ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 109 ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

  8. EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.; Alessi, J.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2010-07-20

    The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) {sup 252}Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) {ge} 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 10{sup 7} ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 10{sup 9} ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

  9. Fixation of radioactive ions in porous media with ion exchange gels

    DOEpatents

    Mercer, Jr., Basil W.; Godfrey, Wesley L.

    1979-01-01

    A method is provided for fixing radioactive ions in porous media by injecting into the porous media water-soluble organic monomers which are polymerizable to gel structures with ion exchange sites and polymerizing the monomers to form ion exchange gels. The ions and the particles of the porous media are thereby physically fixed in place by the gel structure and, in addition, the ions are chemically fixed by the ion exchange properties of the resulting gel.

  10. Crystallographic origin of cycle decay of the high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel lithium-ion battery electrode.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei Kong; Lu, Cheng-Zhang; Liu, Chia-Erh; Peterson, Vanessa K; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Liao, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Ming

    2016-06-29

    High-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) is considered a potential high-power-density positive electrode for lithium-ion batteries, however, it suffers from capacity decay after extended charge-discharge cycling, severely hindering commercial application. Capacity fade is thought to occur through the significant volume change of the LNMO electrode occurring on cycling, and in this work we use operando neutron powder diffraction to compare the structural evolution of the LNMO electrode in an as-assembled 18650-type battery containing a Li4Ti5O12 negative electrode with that in an identical battery following 1000 cycles at high-current. We reveal that the capacity reduction in the battery post cycling is directly proportional to the reduction in the maximum change of the LNMO lattice parameter during its evolution. This is correlated to a corresponding reduction in the MnO6 octahedral distortion in the spinel structure in the cycled battery. Further, we find that the rate of lattice evolution, which reflects the rate of lithium insertion and removal, is ∼9 and ∼10% slower in the cycled than in the as-assembled battery during the Ni(2+)/Ni(3+) and Ni(3+)/Ni(4+) transitions, respectively.

  11. Crystallographic origin of cycle decay of the high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel lithium-ion battery electrode.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei Kong; Lu, Cheng-Zhang; Liu, Chia-Erh; Peterson, Vanessa K; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Liao, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Ming

    2016-06-29

    High-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) is considered a potential high-power-density positive electrode for lithium-ion batteries, however, it suffers from capacity decay after extended charge-discharge cycling, severely hindering commercial application. Capacity fade is thought to occur through the significant volume change of the LNMO electrode occurring on cycling, and in this work we use operando neutron powder diffraction to compare the structural evolution of the LNMO electrode in an as-assembled 18650-type battery containing a Li4Ti5O12 negative electrode with that in an identical battery following 1000 cycles at high-current. We reveal that the capacity reduction in the battery post cycling is directly proportional to the reduction in the maximum change of the LNMO lattice parameter during its evolution. This is correlated to a corresponding reduction in the MnO6 octahedral distortion in the spinel structure in the cycled battery. Further, we find that the rate of lattice evolution, which reflects the rate of lithium insertion and removal, is ∼9 and ∼10% slower in the cycled than in the as-assembled battery during the Ni(2+)/Ni(3+) and Ni(3+)/Ni(4+) transitions, respectively. PMID:26961230

  12. Physics with energetic radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, W.F.

    1996-12-31

    Beams of short-lived, unstable nuclei have opened new dimensions in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. Such beams also provide key information on reactions that take place in our sun and other stars. Status and prospects of the physics with energetic radioactive beams are summarized.

  13. First results of Trojan horse method using radioactive ion beams: {sup 18}F(p,α) at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Binh, D.; Bishop, S.; Coc, A.; De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.

    2014-05-02

    The abundance of {sup 18}F in Nova explosions is considered to be an important piece of information for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. It is then necessary to study the nuclear processess that both produce and destroy this isotope in Novae. Among these latter reactions, the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O is one of the most important {sup 18}F destruction channels. Here we report on an experiment performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of the University of Tokyo. This was the first experiment that used the Trojan Horse method applied to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction.

  14. Charge breeding simulations for radioactive ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Variale, V.; Raino, A. C.; Clauser, T.

    2012-02-15

    The charge breeding technique is used for radioactive ion beam (RIB) production in order of optimizing the re-acceleration of the radioactive element ions produced by a primary beam in a thick target. Charge breeding is achieved by means of a device capable of increasing the ion charge state from 1+ to a desired value n+. In order to get high intensity RIB, experiments with charge breeding of very high efficiency could be required. To reach this goal, the charge breeding simulation could help to optimize the high charge state production efficiency by finding more proper parameters for the radioactive 1+ ions. In this paper a device based on an electron beam ion source (EBIS) is considered. In order to study that problem, a code already developed for studying the ion selective containment in an EBIS with RF quadrupoles, BRICTEST, has been modified to simulate the ion charge state breeding rate for different 1+ ion injection conditions. Particularly, the charge breeding simulations for an EBIS with a hollow electron beam have been studied.

  15. Insertion of lattice strains into ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel by mechanical stress: A comparison of perfect versus imperfect structures as a cathode for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Naito, Makio

    2016-07-01

    The Ni-doped lithium manganese oxide, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, has received much attention as a cathode active material in high-energy lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). This active material has two different spinel structures depending on the ordering state of the Ni and Mn ions. The ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel has an inferior cathode performance than the disordered phase because of its poor electronic conductivity. However, the ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel possesses the potential advantage of avoiding dissolution of the Mn ion, which is an issue for the disordered spinel. The improvement of cathode performance is important for future applications. Here, we report a unique approach to improve the cathode performance of the ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel. The mechanical treatment using an attrition-type mill successfully inserted lattice strains into the ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel structure without a phase transformation to the disordered phase. The insertion of lattice strains by mechanical stresses provided an increased discharge capacity and a decreased charge transfer resistance. This limited crystal structure modification improved the cathode performance. The present work has the potential for application of the mechanically treated ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel as a cathode for high-energy LIBs.

  16. Nuclear astrophysics at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmon, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    Reactions involving radioactive nuclei play an important role in explosive stellar events such as novae, supernovae, and X-ray bursts. The development of accelerated, proton-rich radioactive ion beams provides a tool for directly studying many of the reactions that fuel explosive hydrogen burning. The experimental nuclear astrophysics program at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is centered on absolute cross section measurements of these reactions with radioactive ion beams. Beams of {sup 17}F and {sup 18}F, important nuclei in the hot-CNO cycle, are currently under development at HRIBF. Progress in the production of intense radioactive fluorine beams is reported. The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been installed at HRIBF as the primary experimental station for nuclear astrophysics experiments. The DRS will be used to measure reactions in inverse kinematics with the techniques of direct recoil detection, delayed-activity recoil detection, and recoil-gamma coincidence measurements. The first astrophysics experiments to be performed at HRIBF, mA the application of the recoil separator in these measurements, are discussed.

  17. Spin Observables in Reactions with Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Urrego Blanco, Juan Pablo

    2007-01-01

    Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with exotic nuclei will provide important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms. We are currently engaged in exploring the use of polarization observables with radioactive ion beams and in the development of a polarized cryogenic target.

  18. Surface stability of spinel MgNi0.5Mn1.5O4 and MgMn2O4 as cathode materials for magnesium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wei; Yin, Guangqiang; Wang, Zhiguo; Fu, Y. Q.

    2016-11-01

    Rechargeable ion batteries based on the intercalation of multivalent ions are attractive due to their high energy density and structural stability. Surface of cathode materials plays an important role for the electrochemical performance of the rechargeable ion batteries. In this work we calculated surface energies of (001), (110) and (111) facets with different terminations in spinel MgMn2O4 and MgNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes. Results showed clearly that atomic reconstruction occurred due to surface relaxation. The surface energies for the (001), (110) and (111) surfaces of the MgNi0.5Mn1.5O4 were 0.08, 0.13 and 0.11 J/m2, respectively, whereas those of the Ni-doped MgMn2O4 showed less dependence on the surface structures.

  19. Contamination analysis of radioactive samples in focused ion beam instruments.

    PubMed

    Evelan, Audrey Ruth; Brey, Richard R

    2013-02-01

    The use of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) instrument's to analyze and prepare samples that are radioactive requires attentiveness to the materials that are dislodged and free inside the chamber. Radioactive sputtered material must be understood even when observed at trace concentrations. Measurements using liquid scintillation counting and high purity germanium detectors were used to evaluate contamination on accessible surfaces inside a focused ion beam chamber that was used in the preparation of samples that were radioactive. The maximum removable contamination found was 0.27 0.4 Bq cm(-2), on the focused ion beam wall with 0.24 0.019 Bq cm(-2) on the door. Although these magnitudes of removable contamination are inconsequential for activation products, these same magnitudes of actinides, for example 239Pu, would represent 3.2% of an Annual Limit of Intake. This might be considered significant if one examines the relatively infrequent use of this device for the preparation of radioactive samples. Predicted activities of sputtered material were found using the software Transport of Ions in Matter, estimating that 0.003% of a radioactive samples activity is released into the FIB chamber. A used secondary electron detector's activity was measured to be 383.7 8.1 Bq. Preferential build-up of sputtered materials due to temperature or static charge gradients was considered. No temperature gradients were observed. Static charge gradients were measured inside the chamber varying between 0.057% below the mean to 34% higher than the mean. However, the magnitudes of contamination measured did not correlate to static charge gradients. Deposition in the chamber appears to have no mechanical cause but rather is sporadic however, measureable. Experience to date has been limited to samples of low activity; nevertheless, contamination inside the chamber was observed. Users should anticipate higher levels of readily dispersible radioactive contamination within the FIB as sample activity

  20. Charge breeding of radioactive ions with EBIS and EBIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenander, F.

    2010-10-01

    A charge state breeder, which transforms externally injected singly charged ions to a higher charge state q+, is an important tool which has applications within atomic, nuclear and even particle physics. The charge breeding concept of radioactive ions has already been demonstrated at REX-ISOLDE/CERN with the use of an Electron beam Ion Source (EBIS) and at several facilities employing Electron Resonance Cyclotron Ion Sources (ECRIS). As will be demonstrated in this paper, EBIS and Electron Beam Ion Traps (EBIT), are well suited for the task as they are capable of delivering clean, highly charged beams within a short transformation time. The increasing demand for highly charged ions of all kind of elements and isotopes, stable and radioactive, to be used for low-energy experiments such as TITAN at TRIUMF and MATS at FAIR, but also for post-acceleration to higher energies, is now pushing the development of the breeders. The next challenge will be to satisfy the needs, for example space-charge capacity, of the second generation radioactive beam facilities presently under construction or in the design stage, such as the MSU re-accelerator (ReA3), SPIRAL2, SPES and later on EURISOL. Radioactive trap facilities will also require high performance breeders geared towards rapid breeding times. The requirements and the critical issues of the breeding concept will be discussed and a review of the different facilities, operational and planned, will be given. The paper does furthermore feature a summary of the extensive breeding experience gained under operational conditions at REX-ISOLDE, including results from dedicated beam cleaning tests, isotope production using in-trap decay, high-current and continuous ion injection into the breeder, and closed-shell breeding.

  1. Expansion of the radioactive ion beam program at Argonne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provides a wide range of stable ion beams and radioactive beams which have contributed to our understanding of nuclear structure and reactions. Until now, most radioactive ion beams at ATLAS were produced in flight using light-ion reactions such as (p, n), (d, n), (d, p), (d,3He), and (3He,n). Within the next few months, the radioactive ion beam program at ATLAS will acquire much extended, new capabilities with the commissioning of a new facility: the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU). CARIBU will supply ion beams of 252Cf fission fragments, which are thermalized in a gas catcher. The singly- and doubly-charged ions extracted from the gas catcher will be mass-separated and either delivered to a low-energy experimental area, or charge bred with a modified ECR source and subsequently reaccelerated by the ATLAS facility. Properties of hundreds of these neutron-rich nuclides will be investigated using ion traps, decay stations, the newly commissioned HELical Orbit Spectrometer (HELIOS), and other available experimental equipment such as Gammasphere and the FMA. HELIOS was constructed to take advantage of rare ion beams, such as those provided by CARIBU, through light-ion transfer reactions in inverse kinematics, and represents a new approach to the study of direct reactions in inverse kinematics which avoids kinematic broadening. Experiments are currently being conducted with HELIOS, and first results with the d(28Si,p) and d(12B,p) reactions have shown excellent energy resolution.

  2. Ion sources for initial use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1993-12-31

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use the 25-MV tandem accelerator for the acceleration of radioactive ion beams to energies appropriate for research in nuclear physics; negative ion beams are, therefore, required for injection into the tandem accelerator. Because charge exchange is an efficient means for converting initially positive ion beams to negative ion beams, both positive and negative ion sources are viable options for use at the facility; the choice of the type of ion source will depend on the overall efficiency for generating the radioactive species of interest. A high-temperature version of the CERN-ISOLDE positive ion source has been selected and a modified version of the source designed and fabricated for initial use at the HRIBF because of its low emittance, relatively high ionization efficiencies and species versatility, and because it has been engineered for remote installation, removal and servicing as required for safe handling in a high-radiation-level ISOL facility. Prototype plasma-sputter negative ion sources and negative surface-ionization sources are also under design consideration for generating negative radioactive ion beams from high-electron-affinity elements. The design features of these sources and expected efficiencies and beam qualities (emittances) will be described in this report.

  3. The Scientific program with RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil)

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Hussein, M. S.; Barioni, A.; Condori, R. Pampa; Morais, M. C.; Alcantara Nunez, J.; Camargo, O. Jr.; Otani, Y.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V.; Benjamim, E. A.; Arazi, A.; Assuncao, M.

    2009-06-03

    The Radioactive Ion Beams Facility (RIBRAS) is in operation since 2004 at the Pelletron Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Sao Paulo and consists of two superconducting solenoids capable of producing low energy secondary beams of light exotic nuclei. Measurements of the elastic scattering, breakup and transfer reactions with radioactive projectiles such as {sup 6}He,{sup 8}Li,{sup 7}Be on several targets have been performed. A review of the research program carried on along the last four years using the RIBRAS facility is presented.

  4. Free-standing LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/carbon nanofiber network film as lightweight and high-power cathode for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Ge, Mingyuan; Rong, Jiepeng; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-05-27

    Lightweight and high-power LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/carbon nanofiber (CNF) network electrodes are developed as a high-voltage cathode for lithium ion batteries. The LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/CNF network electrodes are free-standing and can be used as a cathode without using any binder, carbon black, or metal current collector, and hence the total weight of the electrode is highly reduced while keeping the same areal loading of active materials. Compared with conventional electrodes, the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/CNF network electrodes can yield up to 55% reduction in total weight and 2.2 times enhancement in the weight percentage of active material in the whole electrode. Moreover, the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/carbon nanofiber (CNF) network electrodes showed excellent current rate capability in the large-current test up to 20C (1C = 140 mAh/g), when the conventional electrodes showed almost no capacity at the same condition. Further analysis of polarization resistance confirmed the favorable conductivity from the CNF network compared with the conventional electrode structure. By reducing the weight, increasing the working voltage, and improving the large-current rate capability simultaneously, the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/CNF electrode structure can highly enhance the energy/power density of lithium ion batteries and thus holds great potential to be used with ultrathin, ultralight electronic devices as well as electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles.

  5. Nuclear astrophysics at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    The potential for understanding spectacular stellar explosions such as novae, supernovae, and X-ray bursts will be greatly enhanced by the availability of the low-energy, high-intensity, accelerated beams of proton-rich radioactive nuclei currently being developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These beams will be utilized in absolute cross section measurements of crucial (p, {gamma}) capture reactions in efforts to resolve the substantial qualitative uncertainties in current models of explosive stellar hydrogen burning outbursts. Details of the nuclear astrophysics research program with the unique HRIBF radioactive beams and a dedicated experimental endstation--centered on the Daresbury Recoil Separator--will be presented.

  6. Enhanced rate performance of molybdenum-doped spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode materials for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ting-Feng; Chen, Bin; Zhu, Yan-Rong; Li, Xiao-Ya; Zhu, Rong-Sun

    2014-02-01

    The Mo-doped LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes are successfully synthesized by citric acid-assisted sol-gel method. The result demonstrates that the Mo-doped LiMn1.4Ni0.55Mo0.05O4 cathodes present the improved electrochemical performance over pristine LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4. At the 2 C rate after 80 cycles, the discharge capacities are 68.5 mAh g-1 for the pristine LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material (53.9% of the capacity at 0.1 C), 107.4 mAh g-1 for the LiMn1.425Ni0.5Mo0.05O4 material (82.1% at 0.1 C), and 122.7 mAh g-1 for the LiMn1.4Ni0.55Mo0.05O4 material (90.5% at 0.1 C). Mo-doping is favorable for reducing the electrode polarization, suggesting that Mo-doped LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 electrodes have faster lithium insertion/extraction kinetics during cycling. Mo-doped LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 electrodes show lower charge-transfer resistance and higher lithium diffusion coefficients. In addition, LiMn1.4Ni0.55Mo0.05O4 cathode exhibits the smallest particle size, the lowest charge-transfer resistance and the highest lithium diffusion coefficient among all samples, indicating that it has a high reversibility and good rate capability.

  7. A High-Voltage and High-Capacity Li1+x Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 Cathode Material: From Synthesis to Full Lithium-Ion Cells.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Marilena; Axmann, Peter; Gabrielli, Giulio; Kinyanjui, Michael; Kaiser, Ute; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2016-07-21

    We report Co-free, Li-rich Li1+x Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 (0ion cells. Their tailored morphology allows high density and facile processability for electrode development. In the potential range 2.4-4.9 V, the cathode material of composition Li1.5 Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 shows excellent performance in terms of capacity and cycling stability in half-cells. In addition, for the first time, we demonstrate the application of the high-voltage and high-capacity cathode in full Li-ion cells with graphite anodes with very high cycling stability. The electrochemical performance and low cost of the cathode material, together with the feasibility of a chemical method to obtain Li-rich Li1+x Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 (0ion batteries possible. PMID:27273330

  8. A High-Voltage and High-Capacity Li1+x Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 Cathode Material: From Synthesis to Full Lithium-Ion Cells.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Marilena; Axmann, Peter; Gabrielli, Giulio; Kinyanjui, Michael; Kaiser, Ute; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2016-07-21

    We report Co-free, Li-rich Li1+x Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 (0ion cells. Their tailored morphology allows high density and facile processability for electrode development. In the potential range 2.4-4.9 V, the cathode material of composition Li1.5 Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 shows excellent performance in terms of capacity and cycling stability in half-cells. In addition, for the first time, we demonstrate the application of the high-voltage and high-capacity cathode in full Li-ion cells with graphite anodes with very high cycling stability. The electrochemical performance and low cost of the cathode material, together with the feasibility of a chemical method to obtain Li-rich Li1+x Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 (0ion batteries possible.

  9. Transport of radioactive ions in soil by electrokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, M.F.; Surma, J.E.; Virden, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    An electrokinetic approach is being evaluated for in situ soil remediation at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This approach uses an applied electric field to induce transport of both radioactive and hazardous waste ions in soil. The work discussed in this paper involves the development of a new method to monitor the movement of the radioactive ions within the soil during the electrokinetic process. A closed cell and a gamma counter were used to provide iii situ measurements of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co movement in Hanford soil. Preliminary results show that for an applied potential of 200 V over approximately 200 hr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}60 were transported a distance of 4 to 5 in. The monitoring technique demonstrated the feasibility of using electrokinetics for soil separation applications.

  10. Purification of Radioactive Ion Beams by Photodetachment in a RF Quadrupole Ion Beam Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Lewis, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    A highly efficient method for suppressing isobar contaminants in negative radioactive ion beams by photodetachment is demonstrated. A laser beam having the appropriate photon energy is used to selectively neutralize the contaminants. The efficiency of photodetachment can be substantially improved when the laser-ion interaction takes place inside a radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler. In off-line experiments with ion beams of stable isotopes, more than 99.9% suppression of Co{sup -}, S{sup -}, and O{sup -} ions has been demonstrated while under the identical conditions only 22% reduction in Ni{sup -} and no reduction in Cl{sup -} and F{sup -} ions were observed. This technique is being developed for on-line purification of a number of interesting radioactive beams, such as {sup 56}Ni, {sup 17,18}F, and {sup 33,36}Cl.

  11. The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility of INFN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Spes Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-02-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 40 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  12. The SPES Radioactive-Ion Beam Facility of INFN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.; Calabretta, L.

    2015-11-01

    A new radioactive-ion beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using a UCx direct target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam will be provided by a high-current cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions will be produced by proton-induced fission on a uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes will be re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107-109 pps. The aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high-intensity radioactive-ion beams of neutron-rich nuclei for nuclear physics research, as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radioisotope production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  13. The SPES radioactive ion beam project of INFN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Spes Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2014-07-01

    The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility at INFN-LNL is presently in the construction phase. The facility is based on the Isol (Isotope separation on-line) method with an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.20.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced Uranium fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting Linac at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A = 130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES project is to provide a facility for high intensity radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics research as well as to develop an interdisciplinary research center based on the cyclotron proton beam.

  14. Nuclear Structure Studies with Stable and Radioactive Beams: The SPES radioactive ion beam project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; SPES Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-04-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission on an Uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research centre for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  15. A singly charged ion source for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Suzuki, K.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.

    2016-02-01

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source.

  16. An ion source module for the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, B. Huang, Q.; Tang, B.; Ma, R.; Chen, L.; Ma, Y.

    2014-02-15

    An ion source module is developed for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility. The ion source module is designed to meet the requirements of remote handling. The connection and disconnection of the electricity, cooling and vacuum between the module and peripheral units can be executed without on-site manual work. The primary test of the target ion source has been carried out and a Li{sup +} beam has been extracted. Details of the ion source module and its primary test results are described.

  17. Structural and electrical properties of grain boundaries in Ce 0.85Gd 0.15O 1.925 solid electrolyte modified by addition of transition metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, Wojciech; Suescun, Leopoldo; Świerczek, Konrad; Molenda, Janina

    In this work we present studies on applicability of transition metal additives as sintering and electrical conductivity aids for cerium gadolinium oxide electrolyte. The nanosized Ce 0.85Gd 0.15O 1.925 powder obtained by coprecipitation method was modified with Cr 3+, Fe 3+, Ni 2+ or Cu 2+ ions. Using high-intensity high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction data we have determined that Cr, Fe and Ni ions do not incorporate into the cerium gadolinium oxide surface or bulk when sintered at 1300 °C, but react with Gd ions to form Cr 0.9Gd 0.1O, GdFeO 3 and GdNiO 3 phases, while Cu incorporates in the material up to 0.7 mol% with a significant fraction of remaining material showing poorly crystalline CuO phase. The nanosized Ce 0.85Gd 0.15O 1.925 material shows already improved sintering properties than previous reports but full sintering is not achieved below 1300 °C, however Cr, Fe and mainly Cu impregnation allows full sintering at 1300 °C. 0.5 mol% Ni impregnated material sintered at 1500 °C shows enhanced grain boundary conductivity that probably indicates that Ni incorporates into Ce 0.84Gd 0.15O 1.925 above 1300 °C. The global results indicate, however, that optimization of ceria microstructure is at least of equal importance for sinterability and grain boundary conductivity than impregnation of the material with transition metal ions.

  18. Radiation issues in a radioactive ion decay ring.

    PubMed

    Magistris, M; Silari, M

    2005-01-01

    In a beta-beam facility, a pure beam of electron neutrinos, or their antiparticles, are produced by the decay of fully stripped radioactive ions (6He and 18Ne) circulating in a storage ring. Since the beam is not extracted from the ring, all the particles will eventually be lost somewhere in the machine and thus activate the accelerator components and the surrounding concrete and rock. In particular, as nuclei change their charge in beta-decay, a large part of the particles will be lost in the arcs of the decay ring and mainly irradiate the magnets. The density of inelastic interactions of hadrons in the magnets, concrete and rock and the track-length distribution of secondary hadrons were calculated by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. These values were used to estimate the induced radioactivity in the facility, the dose rates expected in the decay ring and the consequences for the environment.

  19. Radiation protection considerations along a radioactive ion beam transport line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarchiapone, Lucia; Zafiropoulos, Demetre

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the SPES project is to produce accelerated radioactive ion beams for Physics studies at “Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro” (INFN, Italy). This accelerator complex is scheduled to be built by 2016 for an effective operation in 2017. Radioactive species are produced in a uranium carbide target, by the interaction of 200 μA of protons at 40 MeV. All of the ionized species in the 1+ state come out of the target (ISOL method), and pass through a Wien filter for a first selection and an HMRS (high mass resolution spectrometer). Then they are transported by an electrostatic beam line toward a charge state breeder (where the 1+ to n+ multi-ionization takes place) before selection and reacceleration at the already existing superconducting linac. The work concerning dose evaluations, activation calculation, and radiation protection constraints related to the transport of the radioactive ion beam (RIB) from the target to the mass separator will be described in this paper. The FLUKA code has been used as tool for those calculations needing Monte Carlo simulations, in particular for the evaluation of the dose rate due to the presence of the radioactive beam in the selection/interaction points. The time evolution of a radionuclide inventory can be computed online with FLUKA for arbitrary irradiation profiles and decay times. The activity evolution is analytically evaluated through the implementation of the Bateman equations. Furthermore, the generation and transport of decay radiation (limited to gamma, beta- and beta+ emissions) is possible, referring to a dedicated database of decay emissions using mostly information obtained from NNDC, sometimes supplemented with other data and checked for consistency. When the use of Monte Carlo simulations was not feasible, the Bateman equations, or possible simplifications, have been used directly.

  20. Building a LLNL Capability in Radioactive Ion Beam Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L A; Becker, J A; Garrett, P E; Younes, W; Schiller, A

    2002-01-31

    The purpose of this LDRD was to establish a program at LLNL in radioactive ion beam (RIB) experiments that would use these experiments to address a wide range physics issues in both stellar nucleosynthesis and stockpile stewardship radiochemistry. The LDRD was funded for a total of two years (fiscal years 2000 and 2001) and transferred to the Physical Data Research Program in fiscal year 2002. Reactions on unstable nuclei and isomeric states play a central role in the formation of elements in both stars and nuclear devices. However, the abilities of reaction models to predict cross sections on radioactive nuclei are uncertain at best. This can be attributed to the lack of experimental data to guide reaction-modeling efforts. Only the 10% of all bound nuclei that can be formed with stable targets and beams have been accessed and studied. The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) and existing RIB facilities offer an unprecedented opportunity to address many of the outstanding questions in nuclear structure, reactions and astrophysics by enabling the observation of nuclear reactions with radioactive targets and/or beams. The primary goal of this LDRD is to develop three experimental capabilities for use with RIB experiments: (1) Level density and {gamma}-ray strength function measurements using statistical {gamma}-rays. (2) Charged particle-induced cross sections measurements on radioactive nuclei. (3) Neutron-induced cross section measurements on a radioactive target. RIA and RIB based experiments are the new frontier for nuclear physics. The joint DOE/NSF nuclear science advisory committee has named development of a RIA facility in the United States as the highest new construction priority. In addition to addressing the questions presented above, this LDRD has helped to establish a position for LLNL at the forefront of the international nuclear science community.

  1. Development of a radioactive ion beam test stand at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.; Gough, R.A.; Lyneis, C.M.; Vetter, P.; Wutte, D.; Xie, Z.Q.

    1998-10-05

    For the on-line production of a {sup 14}O{sup +} ion beam, an integrated target--transfer line ion source system is now under development at LBNL. {sup 14}O is produced in the form of CO in a high temperature carbon target using a 20 MeV {sup 3}He beam from the LBNL 88'' Cyclotron via the reaction {sup 12}C({sup 3}He,n){sup 14}O. The neutral radioactive CO molecules diffuse through an 8 m room temperature stainless steel line from the target chamber into a cusp ion source. The molecules are dissociated, ionized and extracted at energies of 20 to 30 keV and mass separated with a double focusing bending magnet. The different components of the setup are described. The release and transport efficiency for the CO molecules from the target through the transfer line was measured for various target temperatures. The ion beam transport efficiencies and the off-line ion source efficiencies for Ar, O{sub 2} and CO are presented. Ionization efficiencies of 28% for Ar{sup +}, 1% for CO, 0.7% for O{sup +}, 0.33 for C{sup +} have been measured.

  2. Direct reaction experimental studies with beams of radioactive tin ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L. Ayres, A.; Bey, A.; Burcher, S.; Cartegni, L.; Cerizza, G.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Beene, J. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Liang, J. F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Radford, D. C.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Varner, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at {sup 100}Sn, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at {sup 132}Sn out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich {sup 130}Sn. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of γ rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  3. Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Beams of Radioactive Tin Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.H.; Allmond, James M; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Beene, James R; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Cartegni, L.; Chae, K. Y.; Gade, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Garcia-Ruiz, R.F.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Howard, Meredith E; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Manning, Brett M; Matos, M.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Padgett, S; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Pain, Steven D; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Smith, Michael Scott; Stracener, Daniel W; Stroberg, S.; Tostevin, Jeffrey A; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-01-01

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at Sn-100, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at Sn-132 out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich Sn-130. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of gamma rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  4. Cryogenic molecular separation system for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Suzuki, K.; Nagatsu, K.; Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.

    2015-12-01

    A 11C molecular production/separation system (CMPS) has been developed as part of an isotope separation on line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. In the ISOL system, 11CH4 molecules will be produced by proton irradiation and separated from residual air impurities and impurities produced during the irradiation. The CMPS includes two cryogenic traps to separate specific molecules selectively from impurities by using vapor pressure differences among the molecular species. To investigate the fundamental performance of the CMPS, we performed separation experiments with non-radioactive 12CH4 gases, which can simulate the chemical characteristics of 11CH4 gases. We investigated the separation of CH4 molecules from impurities, which will be present as residual gases and are expected to be difficult to separate because the vapor pressure of air molecules is close to that of CH4. We determined the collection/separation efficiencies of the CMPS for various amounts of air impurities and found desirable operating conditions for the CMPS to be used as a molecular separation device in our ISOL system.

  5. Selection of targets and ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    In this report, the authors describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications. A brief review of present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect fast and efficient diffusion release of the short-lived species is also given.

  6. Morphological Evolution of High-Voltage Spinel LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 Cathode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries: The Critical Effects of Surface Orientations and Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Dong; Qi, Xin; Qiu, Bao; Fang, Jianhui; Kloepsch, Richard; Schumacher, Gerhard; Liu, Zhaoping; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    An evolution panorama of morphology and surface orientation of high-voltage spinel LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 cathode materials synthesized by the combination of the microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique and a postcalcination process is presented. Nanoparticles, octahedral and truncated octahedral particles with different preferential growth of surface orientations are obtained. The structures of different materials are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The influence of various morphologies (including surface orientations and particle size) on kinetic parameters, such as electronic conductivity and Li(+) diffusion coefficients, are investigated as well. Moreover, electrochemical measurements indicate that the morphological differences result in divergent rate capabilities and cycling performances. They reveal that appropriate surface-tailoring can satisfy simultaneously the compatibility of power capability and long cycle life. The morphology design for optimizing Li(+) transport and interfacial stability is very important for high-voltage spinel material. Overall, the crystal chemistry, kinetics and electrochemical performance of the present study on various morphologies of LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 spinel materials have implications for understanding the complex impacts of electrode interface and electrolyte and rational design of rechargeable electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. The outstanding performance of our truncated octahedral LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 materials makes them promising as cathode materials to develop long-life, high energy and high power lithium-ion batteries.

  7. Synthesis of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with secondary plate morphology as cathode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risthaus, Tim; Wang, Jun; Friesen, Alex; Wilken, Andrea; Berghus, Debbie; Winter, Martin; Li, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material has been synthesized by a spray drying process and subsequent solid state reaction. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is given as additive to the spray drying precursor solution and its effects on structural and electrochemical properties are evaluated. By using PVP in the synthesis process, the obtained sample displays a secondary plate morphology which is consisting of densely arranged primary octahedrally shaped particles. The new cathode material has a lesser degree of impurity phases, a higher discharge capacity, a superior rate capability, and a slightly better cycling performance than the sample synthesized without PVP. In more detail, by the use of PVP the ratio of Mn3+ to Mn4+ in the final product decreases from 20.8 to 9.2%. The initial discharge capacity at 0.1 C exhibits an increase of about 14%. The normalized capacity at 20 C is 84.1% instead of 67.0%. A slightly improved cycling performance with the capacity retention increase from 93.8 to 97.9% could be observed as well.

  8. Composition-structure relationships in the Li-ion battery electrode material LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4

    PubMed Central

    Cabana, Jordi; Casas-Cabanas, Montserrat; Omenya, Fredrick O.; Chernova, Natasha A.; Zeng, Dongli; Whittingham, M. Stanley; Grey, Clare P.

    2012-01-01

    A study of the correlations between the stoichiometry, secondary phases and transition metal ordering of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 was undertaken by characterizing samples synthesized at different temperatures. Insight into the composition of the samples was obtained by electron microscopy, neutron diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In turn, analysis of cationic ordering was performed by combining neutron diffraction with Li MAS NMR spectroscopy. Under the conditions chosen for the synthesis, all samples systematically showed an excess of Mn, which was compensated by the formation of a secondary rock salt phase and not via the creation of oxygen vacancies. Local deviations from the ideal 3:1 Mn:Ni ordering were found, even for samples that show the superlattice ordering by diffraction, with different disordered schemes also being possible. The magnetic behavior of the samples was correlated with the deviations from this ideal ordering arrangement. The in-depth crystal-chemical knowledge generated was employed to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the electrochemical behavior of the materials. PMID:23002325

  9. Surface-modified carbon nanotube coating on high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taejin; Lee, Joong Kee; Mun, Junyoung; Choi, Wonchang

    2016-08-01

    Surface-modified carbon nanotubes were utilized as a coating for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) via a mechano-fusion method as a strategy to prevent unfavorable carbothermal reduction. Two types of carbon nanotubes were investigated as coating materials: carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and oxidized carbon nanotubes (OCNTs), which were prepared by a simple re-oxidation process. The samples coated with CNTs or OCNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and elemental analyses. The OCNT-coated LNMO presented a highly enhanced discharge capacity retention (95.5%) and a coulombic efficiency of 99.9% after 80 cycles between 3.5 and 4.9 V (versus Li/Li+), whereas the CNT-coated LNMO exhibited poor retention of 47.2% and a coulombic efficiency of 95.3%. In addition, post-mortem XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis proved that the OCNT coating improved the surface electrochemical stability and rate capability, whereas the CNT coating formed a thick resistive solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film by accelerating the surface side reactions.

  10. Ion source test stand for radioactive beams (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, J. A.; Decrock, P.; Portillo, M.; Mullen, T. P.; Geraci, A. A.; Barlow, T. A.; Greene, J. P.; Gomes, I.; Batson, C. H.; Saremba, S. E.

    1998-02-01

    A test stand for development of ion sources for radioactive beams is currently being commissioned at Argonne. It is located at the Physics Division's Dynamitron accelerator which will be used as a neutron generator with a flux of up to 1011 neutrons per second created by reactions of 4 MeV deuterons on various targets with beam currents of up to 100 μA. The primary targets will be located adjacent to heated secondary targets inside an on-line ion source. With this neutron-generator facility it will be possible to produce radioactive beams of various isotopes, such as 6He, 24Na, and neutron-rich fission fragments. For example, with a secondary target of uranium carbide containing 25 g of natural or depleted uranium the yields of individual isotopes in the target will be about 107/s for isotopes such as 132Sn, 140Xe, and 142Cs, near the peak of the fission distribution. The ion sources to be evaluated will be located within a shielded cave with walls consisting of 30 cm of steel plus 60 cm of concrete to attenuate the prompt neutron radiation by a factor of about 104. Secondary beams of radioactive fission fragments with intensities on the order of 106/s per isotope will be extracted in the 1+ charge state at energies of 20 keV and mass separated with a Danfysik mass separator. Light isotopes, such as 6He and 24Na, can be produced via (n,α) and (n,p) reactions on appropriate target materials. Commissioning began with measurements of fission yields from primary targets of C, Be, BeO, and BN. A surface ionization source which is a variation of the one used in the TRISTAN on-line mass seperator facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been installed and tested with stable Rb and Cs beams. The isotope separator was also commissioned with these beams. The development program will include emittance measurements and source optimization, initially with stable beams, and target-delay-time and release-efficiency measurements for various target/secondary-beam systems.

  11. Status of the ESR and Prospects for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Franzke, B.; Beckert, K.; Groening, L.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.

    2000-12-31

    This contribution presents the status of the Experimental Storage Ring ESR at GSI after nearly 10 years of experiments with electron-cooled primary and secondary heavy ion beams, and discusses possible upgrades for the near future. The major fraction of the ESR beam time was dedicated to atomic spectroscopy experiments with fully stripped or few-electron heavy ions up to uranium. Remarkable nuclear physics results came, so far, mainly from the precise Schottky mass spectrometry with cooled radioactive fragments. The experimental program of a future--very likely modified--ESR aims at nuclear physics experiments with secondary, neutron-rich or neutron-deficient nuclides with lifetimes in the order of 1 s. Luminosities of up to 1{times}10{sup 29} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} for collisions with protons of an internal H{sub 2} target and up to 1{times}10{sup 28} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} for electron-nucleus interactions in the collider mode will be required. These values might b e in reach by improving both the collection efficiency and the cooling speed for the secondary nuclei and by further increasing the primary beam intensity at the heavy ion accelerator complex UNILAC/SIS.

  12. Intravascular brachytherapy with radioactive stents produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, M.-A.; Heise, S.; Schloesser, K.; Schuessler, B.; Schweickert, H.

    2003-05-01

    About 1 million patients are treated for stenosis of coronary arteries by percutaneous balloon angioplasty annually worldwide. In many cases a so called stent is inserted into the vessel to keep it mechanically open. Restenosis is observed in about 20-30% of these cases, which can be treated by irradiating the stented vessel segment. In our approach, we utilized the stent itself as radiation source by ion implanting 32P. Investigations of the surface properties were performed with special emphasis on activity retention. Clinical data of about 400 patients showed radioactive stents can suppress instent restenosis, but a so called edge effect appeared, which can be avoided by the new "drug eluting stents".

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of chemically and electrochemically Li ion extracted Li{sub y}Co{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.G.; Yo, C.H.

    1999-08-05

    The local structure refinements for chemically and electrochemically Li ion extracted Li{sub y}Co{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} compounds have been investigated by Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), the 1s {r_arrow} 3d transition at {approximately} 7,709.9 eV and 1s {r_arrow} 4p transition at {approximately} 7,727.8 eV for the pristine LiCo{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} have shifted effectively to higher energy regions of {approximately} 0.6 eV and {approximately} 2.5 eV for the higher Li ion extraction, respectively, which shows that the average oxidation state of Co ion increases gradually with the extraction. The systematic variations of peak intensities for the 1s {r_arrow} 3d transition and 1s {r_arrow} 4p transition result from Co 3d and 4p orbital mixing by the local structure distortion around Co atoms. In particular, the abrupt decrease of peak intensity for 1s {r_arrow} 4p transition with shakedown process by ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) represents the transfer of the hole state from the oxygen to Co atom and the localization at the Co atomic site as a form of Co{sup IV} ion by structural distortion. The XANES features for the electrochemical extraction have shown that the electrochemical redox reaction is always not reversible in the Li ion extraction/insertion process. From the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) refinement, the interatomic distances of bond pairs decrease for the Li ion extraction. The chemical and electrochemical extractions have a significant effect on Fourier transform (FT) magnitude, which decreases linearly with the extraction. Since single and multiple scatterings with Co atoms have predominantly contributed to the FT magnitudes, the systematic decrease of FT magnitude is closely related to the static disorder of two different oxidative Co{sup III} and Co{sup IV} ions. This fact is consistent with the increase of the Debye-Waller factor for each

  14. Poly(methyl methacrylate-acrylonitrile-ethyl acrylate) terpolymer based gel electrolyte for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode of high voltage lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ping; Liao, Youhao; Xie, Huili; Chen, Tingting; Rao, Mumin; Li, Weishan

    2014-12-01

    A novel gel polymer electrolyte (GPE), based on poly(methyl methacrylate-acrylonitrile-ethyl acrylate) (P(MMA-AN-EA)) terpolymer, is designed to match LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode of 5 V lithium ion battery. The performances of the synthesized P(MMA-AN-EA) terpolymer and the corresponding membrane and GPE are investigated by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectra, thermogravimetric analyzer, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, linear sweep voltammetry, and charge/discharge test. It is found that the pore structure of P(MMA-AN-EA) membrane is affected by the dose of pore forming agent, polyethylene glycol (PEG400). The membrane with 3 wt% PEG400 presents the best pore structure, in which pores are dispersed uniformly and interconnected, and exhibits the largest electrolyte uptake, resulting in the highest ionic conductivity of 3.82 × 10-3 S cm-1 for the corresponding GPE at room temperature. The GPE has improved compatibility with lithium anode and is electrochemically stable up to 5.2 V (vs. Li/Li+). The high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode using the resulting GPE exhibits excellent cyclic stability, maintaining 97.9% of its initial discharge capacity after 100 cycles compared to that of 79.7% for the liquid electrolyte at 0.5 C.

  15. Importance of nanostructure for reversible Li-insertion into octahedral sites of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 and its application towards aqueous Li-ion chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, Nagasubramanian; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Ling, Wong Chui; Madhavi, Srinivasan

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate the significance of nanostructuring on the reversible Li-insertion into octahedral sites of the nickel substituted spinel Li[Ni0.5Mn1.5]O4. One dimensional nanofibers (50-250 nm diameter) of the Li[Ni0.5Mn1.5]O4 were prepared by a single spinneret electrospinning and their performance was compared with powders synthesized via a conventional solid state approach. Li-diffusion coefficient of electrospun fibers was an order of magnitude higher (5.8 × 10-11 cm2 s-1) than that of conventional powders (1.22 × 10-12 cm2 s-1). Galvanostatic studies revealed a much improved capacity and rate performance for electrospun fibers. The fibers delivered a reversible capacity of ∼87 mAh g-1 after 150 cycles at 1C rate compared to negligible capacity for solid-state prepared material. Finally, the performance of this nanostructured spinel phase as an anode in aqueous rechargeable Li-ion system was demonstrated to require a strongly alkaline electrolyte.

  16. Truncated octahedral LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material for ultralong-life lithium-ion battery: Positive (100) surfaces in high-voltage spinel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haidong; Kloepsch, Richard; Wang, Jun; Winter, Martin; Li, Jie

    2015-12-01

    So far, it has not yet reached an agreement that (111) surfaces or (100) surfaces are more positive to electrochemical performance in the spinel system. Herein, we present the synthesis of regular truncated octahedral high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 single crystals with preferred growth of (100) surfaces, which incredibly exhibit the best long-term cycling stability compared with the state-of-art spinel material. The capacity retention is about 90% after 2000 cycles at 1 C. The extraordinary performance is mostly attributed to the highly regular truncated octahedral microstructure with large portions of stable (100) facets, which can stabilize the spinel structure to effectively suppress the side reactions with the electrolyte at high operating voltage and are also orientated to support Li+ transport kinetics. Therefore, our work further promotes the practical application of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material in next generation Lithium-ion batteries with high energy density and power performance.

  17. Determination of transition metal ion distribution in cubic spinel Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} using anomalous x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. N.; Sinha, A. K. Ghosh, Haranath

    2015-08-15

    We report anomalous x-ray diffraction studies on Co ferrite with composition Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} to obtain the distribution of transition metal ions in tetrahedral and octahedral sites. We synthesize spinel oxide (Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}O{sub 4}) through co-precipitation and subsequent annealing route. The imaginary part (absorption) of the energy dependent anomalous form factor is measured and the real part is calculated theoretically through Kramers–Krönig transformation to analyze anomalous x-ray diffraction peak intensities. Fe and Co K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra are used to estimate charge states of transition metals. Our analysis, within experimental errors, suggests 44% of the tetrahedral sites contain Co in +2 oxidation state and the rest 56% sites contain Fe in +2 and +3 oxidation states. Similarly, 47% of the octahedral sites contain Fe in +3 oxidation states, whereas, the rest of the sites contain Co in +2 and +3 oxidation states. While a distinct pre-edge feature in the Fe K-edge XANES is observed, Co pre-edge remains featureless. Implications of these results to magnetism are briefly discussed.

  18. A gas jet target for radioactive ion beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Sarazin, F.; Bardayan, D. W.; Pain, S. D.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E.; Browne, J.; Kontos, A.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Schatz, H.; Erikson, L. E.; Lemut, A.; and others

    2013-04-19

    New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, like FRIB in the US or FAIR in Europe, will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Thus, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever: developments in exotic beams should coincide with developments in targets for use with those beams, in order for nuclear physics to remain on the cutting edge. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure, and conventional targets often suffer too many drawbacks to allow for such experimental designs. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area, highly-segmented silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and novel heavy ion detectors to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address this issue, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration led by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is in the process of designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target provides a high density and high purity of target nuclei within a tightly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials. The design also enables the use of multiple state-of-the-art detection systems.

  19. Opportunistic Mass Measurements at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hausladen, Paul; Beene, James R; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Larochelle, Y; Liang, J Felix; Mueller, Paul Edward; Shapira, Dan; Stracener, Daniel W; Thomas, J. S.; Varner Jr, Robert L; Wollnik, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    A technique for measuring mass differences has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) that requires no specialized equipment. Mass differences are measured as position differences between known and unknown-mass isobars, dispersed at the image of the energy-analyzing magnet following the 25MV tandem post-accelerator, and identified by an energy-loss measurement. The technique has been demonstrated on neutron-rich 77 79Cu and 83 86Ge isotopes produced using the isotope separator online (ISOL) method with the 238U(p,fission) reaction, where a mass accuracy of 500 keV was achieved. These nuclides are well suited to the measurement technique, as they readily migrate out of the production target and to the ion source and comprise the most neutron-rich elements of the isobarically mixed beam. Because modest precision mass values can be obtained with only a few tens of counts of the nuclide of interest among orders of magnitude more of the isobaric neighbors closer to stability, the sensitivity of this technique makes it appropriate for initial mass measurements far from stability.

  20. Effect of C6+ Ion Irradiation on structural and electrical properties of Yb and Eu doped Bi1.5 Zn0.92 Nb1.5 O6.92 pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumak, Mehmet; Mergen, Ayhan; Qureshi, Anjum; Singh, N. L.

    2015-03-01

    Pyrochlore general formula of A2B2X7 where A and B are cations and X is an anion Pyrochlore compounds exhibit semiconductor, metallic or ionic conduction properties, depending on the doping, compositions/ substituting variety of cations and oxygen partial pressure. Ion beam irradiation can induce the structural disordering by mixing the cation and anion sublattices, therefore we aim to inevestigate effects of irradiation in pyrochlore compounds. In this study, Eu and Yb-doped Bi1.5Zn0.92Nb1.5O6.92 (Eu-BZN, Yb-BZN) Doping effect and single phase formation of Eu-BZN, Yb-BZN was characterized by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD). Radiation-induced effect of 85 MeV C6+ ions on Eu-BZN, Yb-BZN was studied by XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and temperature dependent dielectric measurements at different fluences. XRD results revealed that the ion beam-induced structural amorphization processes in Eu-BZN and Yb-BZN structures. Our results suggested that the ion beam irradiation induced the significant change in the temprature depndent dielectric properties of Eu-BZN and Yb-BZN pyrochlores due to the increased oxygen vacancies as a result of cation and anion disordering. Department of Metallurgical and Materials Eng., Marmara University, Istanbul-81040, Turkey.

  1. Direct reaction measurements with a 132Sn radioactive ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Katherine L.; Nunes, Filomena M.; Adekola, Aderemi S.; Bardayan, Dan W.; Blackmon, Jeff; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, Kelly A.; Cizewski, Jolie A.; Erikson, Luke E.; Harlin, C.; Hatarik, R.; Kapler, R.; Kozub, Raymond L.; Liang, J. F.; Livesay, Ronald J.; Ma, Zhongguo J.; Moazen, B. H.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Pain, Steven D.; Patterson, N. P.; Shapira, Dan; Shriner, Jr., John F.; Smith, Michael S.; Swan, Thomas P.; Thomas, Jeff S.

    2011-09-01

    The (d,p) neutron transfer and (d,d) elastic scattering reactions were measured in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion beam of 132Sn at 630 MeV. The elastic scattering data were taken in a region where Rutherford scattering dominated the reaction, and nuclear effects account for less than 8% of the elastic scattering cross section. The magnitude of the nuclear effects, in the angular range studied, was found to be independent of the optical potential used, allowing the transfer data to be normalized in a reliable manner. The neutron-transfer reaction populated a previously unmeasured state at 1363 keV, which is most likely the single-particle 3p1/2 state expected above the N = 82 shell closure. The data were analyzed using finite-range adiabatic-wave calculations and the results compared with the previous analysis using the distorted-wave Born approximation. Angular distributions for the ground and first-excited states are consistent with the previous tentative spin and parity assignments. Spectroscopic factors extracted from the differential cross sections are similar to those found for the one-neutron states beyond the benchmark doubly magic nucleus 208Pb.

  2. Direct reaction measurements with a (132)Sn radioactive ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Chae, K. Y.; Kapler, R.; Ma, Zhanwen; Moazen, Brian; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, Robert; Pain, S. D.; Swan, T. P.; Nunes, F. M.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Liang, J Felix; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Shapira, Dan; Smith, Michael Scott; Chipps, Kelly A; Erikson, Luke; Livesay, R. J.; Harlin, Christopher W; Patterson, N. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Kozub, R. L.; Shriner, Jr., John F

    2011-01-01

    The (d,p) neutron transfer and (d,d) elastic scattering reactions were measured in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion beam of {sup 132}Sn at 630 MeV. The elastic scattering data were taken in a region where Rutherford scattering dominated the reaction, and nuclear effects account for less than 8% of the elastic scattering cross section. The magnitude of the nuclear effects, in the angular range studied, was found to be independent of the optical potential used, allowing the transfer data to be normalized in a reliable manner. The neutron-transfer reaction populated a previously unmeasured state at 1363 keV, which is most likely the single-particle 3p{sub 1/2} state expected above the N=82 shell closure. The data were analyzed using finite-range adiabatic-wave calculations and the results compared with the previous analysis using the distorted-wave Born approximation. Angular distributions for the ground and first-excited states are consistent with the previous tentative spin and parity assignments. Spectroscopic factors extracted from the differential cross sections are similar to those found for the one-neutron states beyond the benchmark doubly magic nucleus {sup 208}Pb.

  3. Effects of phosphorus doping by plasma immersion ion implantation on the structural and optical characteristics of Zn0.85Mg0.15O thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S.; Nagar, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-08-01

    ZnMgO thin films deposited on <100> Si substrates by RF sputtering were annealed at 800, 900, and 1000 °C after phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation. X-ray diffraction spectra confirmed the presence of <101¯0> and <101¯3> peaks for all the samples. However, in case of the annealed samples, the <0002> peak was also observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the variation in surface morphology caused by phosphorus implantation. Implanted and non-implanted samples were compared to examine the effects of phosphorus implantation on the optical properties of ZnMgO. Optical characteristics were investigated by low-temperature (15 K) photoluminescence experiments. Inelastic exciton-exciton scattering and localized, and delocalized excitonic peaks appeared at 3.377, 3.42, and 3.45 eV, respectively, revealing the excitonic effect resulting from phosphorus implantation. This result is important because inelastic exciton-exciton scattering leads to nonlinear emission, which can improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices.

  4. Simultaneous fluorination of active material and conductive agent for improving the electrochemical performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 electrode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Min Sang; Kim, Dae Sik; Park, Eunjun; Choi, Jae Man; Kim, Hansu

    2016-09-01

    High-voltage cathode materials have gained much attention as one of the promising electrode materials to increase power density of lithium ion batteries by raising the working voltage. However, the use of such high-voltage cathode materials is still challenging, because their working voltage is close to the electrochemical oxidation potential of organic electrolyte used in lithium ion batteries. In this work, we demonstrated that simultaneous fluorination of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) particles as well as conductive agent in the electrode could significantly improve the electrochemical stability of LNMO cathode. The resulting electrode showed better cycle performance both at room temperature and elevated temperature compared to both bare LNMO electrode and the electrode with only LNMO fluorinated. These results showed that direct fluorination of high voltage cathode can reduce the side reaction of high voltage cathode electrode with the electrolyte, thereby stabilizing the surface of carbon black as well as that of high voltage cathode material.

  5. Lithium-ion transport through a tailored disordered phase on the LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 surface for high-power cathode materials.

    PubMed

    Jo, Mi Ru; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Yunok; Chae, Ji Su; Roh, Kwang Chul; Yoon, Won-Sub; Kang, Yong-Mook

    2014-08-01

    The phase control of spinel LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 was achieved through surface treatment that led to an enhancement of its electrochemical properties. Li(+) diffusion inside spinel LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 could be promoted by modifying the surface structure of LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 through phosphidation into a disordered phase (Fd3m) that allows facile Li(+) transport. Phosphidated LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 showed a significantly enhanced electrochemical performance, even at high rates exceeding 10 C, demonstrating that the improved kinetics (related to the amount of Mn(3+) ) can render LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 competitive as a high-power cathode material for electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles.

  6. Surface chemistry of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 particles coated by Al2O3 using atomic layer deposition for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Dong Hyeon; Oh, Dae Yang; Lee, Hyeyoun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jae Hyun; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2015-01-01

    The effects of depositing ultrathin (<1 nm) Al2O3 coatings on LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) particles using atomic layer deposition (ALD) are presented. Promising electrochemical performance of the Al2O3 ALD coated LNMO at 30 °C is demonstrated in not only significantly improved coulombic efficiency, cycle retention, and rate capability, but also in dramatically suppressed self-discharge and dissolution of transition metals. Combined analyses by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, ex-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ex-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry reveal that the solid electrolyte interphase layer on the Al2O3 ALD coated LNMO is much thinner and contains fewer organic species than the one on the bare LNMO. This difference originates from the suppression of the side reaction at high voltage by the Al2O3 ALD protective coating. Also, fluorination of Al2O3 ALD layer upon repeated charge-discharge cycling is confirmed, and this can account for the capacity increases during the initial charge-discharge cycles. Finally, it is also demonstrated that a full LNMO/Li4Ti5O12 battery incorporating the Al2O3 ALD coated LNMO outperforms the one incorporating only bare LNMO.

  7. Tailoring high-voltage and high-performance LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material for high energy lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axmann, P.; Gabrielli, G.; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, M.

    2016-01-01

    Increased specific capacity and/or working potential are important prerequisites for high energy functional materials for lithium-ion batteries. Furthermore practical applications require materials with high tap density in order to maximize the loading of the electrodes, thereby optimizing the energy density on cell level. Stoichiometric and phase pure LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LMNO) has been synthesised via a continuous co-precipitation and lithiation process, suited for large scale production. Powder properties have been controlled in order to obtain spherical particles consisting of a multitude of densely-packed primary crystallites. The obtained material exhibits a single plateau at 4.7 V vs. Li/Li+ with high capacity, rate capability and cycling stability. Morphological factors such as crystallite size, particle size and particle architecture, and additionally the variation of oxygen stoichiometry have been investigated. This study clearly illustrates the importance of these factors on the electrochemical performance of an optimized LMNO high-voltage material.

  8. High intensity ion guides and purification techniques for low energy radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grévy, S.

    2016-06-01

    This report gives an overview of the different devices which can be used for the purification of high intensity low energy radioactive ion beams: high resolution magnetic separators (HRS), multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separators (MR-TOF-MS) and Penning traps (PT). An overview of HRS, existing or in development, and the methods to increase the resolving power are presented. The MR-TOF-MS of ISOLTRAP and other projects having been presented during this conference, only the main characteristics of such devices are discussed. Concerning the PT, intensively used to measure masses with high precisions, we will present the PIPERADE project which aims to provide pure beams of exotic nuclei with unprecedent intensities at the future DESIR/SPIRAL2 facility.

  9. Ion-exchange material and method of storing radioactive wastes

    DOEpatents

    Komarneni, S.; Roy, D.M.

    1983-10-31

    A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt, and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatible with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1984-04-01

    The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor.

  11. A cheap and compact mass spectrometer for radioactive ions based on a Wien filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, C.; Maunoury, L.; Pacquet, J. Y.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Tuske, O.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents simulations of a mass spectrometer composed of one or two Wien filters. The ion source used is MONO1000 ECRIS. This ion source can produce singly charged ions with high efficiency, especially for gaseous materials. After extraction, the ions are mass selected and can be injected either into a beam line towards an experiment area or in an N+ charge booster. Due to its compactness and simplicity the proposed spectrometer is well adapted for preparing and analyzing radioactive beams. The simulations are based on the SIMION 3D [www.simion.com/] software.

  12. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

    2008-08-26

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

  13. Exploiting neutron-rich radioactive ion beams to constrain the symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohley, Z.; Christian, G.; Baumann, T.; DeYoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Frank, N.; Jones, M.; Smith, J. K.; Snyder, J.; Spyrou, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-10-01

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and 4 Tm Sweeper magnet were used to measure the free neutrons and heavy charged particles from the radioactive ion beam induced 32Mg+9Be reaction. The fragmentation reaction was simulated with the constrained molecular dynamics model (CoMD), which demonstrated that the of the heavy fragments and free neutron multiplicities were observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities. Through comparison of these simulations with the experimental data, constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy were extracted. The advantage of radioactive ion beams as a probe of the symmetry energy is demonstrated through examination of CoMD calculations for stable and radioactive-beam-induced reactions.

  14. β-delayed neutron spectroscopy using trapped radioactive ions.

    PubMed

    Yee, R M; Scielzo, N D; Bertone, P F; Buchinger, F; Caldwell, S; Clark, J A; Deibel, C M; Fallis, J; Greene, J P; Gulick, S; Lascar, D; Levand, A F; Li, G; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Savard, G; Segel, R E; Sharma, K S; Sternberg, M G; Van Schelt, J; Zabransky, B J

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique for β-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been demonstrated using trapped ions. The neutron-energy spectrum is reconstructed by measuring the time of flight of the nuclear recoil following neutron emission, thereby avoiding all the challenges associated with neutron detection, such as backgrounds from scattered neutrons and γ rays and complicated detector-response functions. (137)I(+) ions delivered from a (252)Cf source were confined in a linear Paul trap surrounded by radiation detectors, and the β-delayed neutron-energy spectrum and branching ratio were determined by detecting the β(-) and recoil ions in coincidence. Systematic effects were explored by determining the branching ratio three ways. Improvements to achieve higher detection efficiency, better energy resolution, and a lower neutron-energy threshold are proposed. PMID:23496704

  15. Measuring Neutrino Mass with Radioactive Ions in a Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2010-03-30

    A method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay is proposed. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. By counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for m{sub n}u<0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than deltap/p<10{sup -5}, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least O(10{sup 18}) decays.

  16. Measuring neutrino mass with radioactive ions in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    We propose a method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. Then, by counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for m ν <0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than δ p/ p<10-5, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least mathcal{O}(10^{18}) decays.

  17. Measuring neutrino mass with radioactive ions in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. Then, by counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for mν < 0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than δp/p < 10-5, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least Script O(1018) decays.

  18. Measuring Neutrino Mass with Radioactive Ions in a Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    A method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay is proposed. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. By counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for mν<0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than δp/p<10-5, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least O(1018) decays.

  19. Commissioning and initial operation of a radioactive beam ion source at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombsky, M.; Bishop, D.; Bricault, P.; Dale, D.; Hurst, A.; Jayamanna, K.; Keitel, R.; Olivo, M.; Schmor, P.; Stanford, G.

    2000-02-01

    In November of 1998, the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF started delivering on-line isotope separated radioactive beams to experiments. A surface ionization source developed for ISAC has been used to commission the mass separator and beam transport systems and is providing radioactive beams to the first generation of ISAC experiments. The ion source is integral with the radioactive beam production target and is designed to be simple, radiation hard, inexpensive, and easily exchanged by remote-handling techniques. The ion source and its extraction column are suspended at the bottom of ˜2 m of steel shielding incorporated in the target module. The module is suspended in a vacuum tank with primary and secondary vacuum systems. All services for the target/ion source and beam extraction system are ducted through the module shielding. The first sets of beam transport elements and beam diagnostic devices are similarly suspended in vacuum at the bottom of two additional shielded modules. Ion beam characteristics can be routinely monitored during on-line operation by a system of Faraday cups, wire scanners, "harp" monitors, and a novel emittance measurement apparatus that can measure beam emittance in both horizontal and vertical planes. The diagnostics devices are capable of resolving beam signals down to the 10 pA range.

  20. The latest from the new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    The status of new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is slated to start its scientific program late in 1996 is discussed, as is the new experimental equipment which is being constructed at this facility. Information on the early scientific program is also given.

  1. Michigan state upgrade to produce intense radioactive ion beams by fragmentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lubkin, G.B.

    1997-05-01

    This article describes the planned upgrading of accelerator facilities to produce intense radioactive ion beams, by a fragmentation technique, for experimental simulation of nucleosynthesis in novas and supernovas. (AIP) {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.} {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital American Institute of Physics}

  2. The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The status of the new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is slated to start its scientific program late this year is discussed, as is the new experimental equipment which is being constructed at this facility. Information on the early scientific program also is given.

  3. Radioactive halos and ion microprobe measurement of Pb isotope ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    This investigation was to obtain, if possible, the Pb isotope ratios of both lunar and meteoritic troilite grains by utilizing ion microprobe techniques. Such direct in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios would eliminate contamination problems inherent in wet chemistry separation procedures, and conceivably determine whether lunar troilite grains were of meteoritic origin. For comparison purposes two samples of meteoritic troilite were selected (one from Canyon Diablo) for analysis along with two very small lunar troilite grains (approximately 50-100 microns). It was concluded that the ion microprobe as presently operating, does not permit the in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios in lunar or meteoritic troilite. On the basis of these experiments no conclusions could be drawn as to the origin of the lunar troilite grains.

  4. Transport of radioactive ion beams and related safety issues: The 132Sn+ case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osswald, F.; Bouquerel, E.; Boutin, D.; Dinkov, A.; Kazarinov, N.; Perrot, L.; Sellam, A.

    2014-12-01

    The transport of intense radioactive ion beam currents requires a careful design in order to limit the beam losses, the contamination and thus the dose rates. Some investigations based on numerical models and calculations have been performed in the framework of the SPIRAL 2 project to evaluate the performance of a low energy beam transport line located between the isotope separation on line (ISOL) production cell and the experiment areas. The paper presents the results of the transverse phase-space analysis, the beam losses assessment, the resulting contamination, and radioactivity levels. They show that reasonable beam transmission, emittance growth, and dose rates can be achieved considering the current standards.

  5. Transport of radioactive ion beams and related safety issues: the 132Sn+ case study.

    PubMed

    Osswald, F; Bouquerel, E; Boutin, D; Dinkov, A; Kazarinov, N; Perrot, L; Sellam, A

    2014-12-01

    The transport of intense radioactive ion beam currents requires a careful design in order to limit the beam losses, the contamination and thus the dose rates. Some investigations based on numerical models and calculations have been performed in the framework of the SPIRAL 2 project to evaluate the performance of a low energy beam transport line located between the isotope separation on line (ISOL) production cell and the experiment areas. The paper presents the results of the transverse phase-space analysis, the beam losses assessment, the resulting contamination, and radioactivity levels. They show that reasonable beam transmission, emittance growth, and dose rates can be achieved considering the current standards.

  6. Ion source developments for the production of radioactive isotope beams at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, F. Bricault, P.; Heggen, H.; Kunz, P.; Lassen, J.; Mjøs, A.; Raeder, S.; Teigelhöfer, A.

    2014-02-15

    At the ISAC facility at TRIUMF radioactive ions are produced by bombarding solid targets with up to 100 μA of 500 MeV protons. The reaction products have to diffuse out of the hot target into an ion source. Normally, singly charged ions are extracted. They can be transported either directly to experiments or via an ECR charge state breeder to a post accelerator. Several different types of ion sources have to be used in order to deliver a large variety of rare isotope beams. At ISAC those are surface ion sources, forced electron beam arc discharge (FEBIAD) ion sources and resonant laser ionization sources. Recent development activities concentrated on increasing the selectivity for the ionization to suppress isobaric contamination in the beam. Therefore, a surface ion rejecting resonant laser ionization source (SIRLIS) has been developed to suppress ions from surface ionization. For the FEBIAD ion source a cold transfer line has been introduced to prevent less volatile components from reaching the ion source.

  7. X-ray absorption near-edge structures of LiMn2O4 and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel oxides for lithium-ion batteries: the first-principles calculation study.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toyoki; Yamaguchi, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Hironori

    2016-07-21

    Experimental Mn and Ni K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were well reproduced for 5 V-class LixNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinels as well as 4 V-class LixMn2O4 spinels using density functional theory. Local environmental changes around the Mn or Ni centres due to differences in the locations of Li ions and/or phase transitions in the spinel oxides were found to be very important contributors to the XANES shapes, in addition to the valence states of the metal ions. PMID:27333155

  8. X-ray absorption near-edge structures of LiMn2O4 and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel oxides for lithium-ion batteries: the first-principles calculation study.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toyoki; Yamaguchi, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Hironori

    2016-07-21

    Experimental Mn and Ni K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were well reproduced for 5 V-class LixNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinels as well as 4 V-class LixMn2O4 spinels using density functional theory. Local environmental changes around the Mn or Ni centres due to differences in the locations of Li ions and/or phase transitions in the spinel oxides were found to be very important contributors to the XANES shapes, in addition to the valence states of the metal ions.

  9. Cerebral blood volume measured with inhaled C/sup 15/O and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.; Powers, W.J.; Raichle, M.E.

    1987-08-01

    Local cerebral blood volume (CBV) has been measured previously with inhaled /sup 11/CO and positron emission tomography (PET). The model used assumes that equilibrium in tracer concentration has occurred between arterial and systemic venous blood before the PET measurement is made. To verify that this model may be used with the much shorter half-lived C/sup 15/O, we have simultaneously measured arterial and venous blood radioactivity following C/sup 15/O inhalation. Equilibrium occurred 95 +/- 39 s after inhalation (n = 7). If the PET measurement is commenced prior to arteriovenous equilibrium, significant errors occur in calculated CBV. These data indicate that C/sup 15/O may be used as a tracer for CBV measurement provided that emission data collection commences at approximately 120 s after inhalation. Strict quality control measures must be maintained to minimize the contamination of administered C/sup 15/O with /sup 15/O-labeled CO/sub 2/.

  10. A Negative-Surface Ionization for Generation of Halogen Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zaim, H.

    2001-04-16

    A simple and efficient negative surface ionization source has been designed, fabricated and initially tested for on-line generation of radioactive ion beams of the halogens (Cl, Br, I, and At) for use in the nuclear-structure and nuclear-astrophysics research programs at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The source utilizes a solid, spherical geometry LaB{sub 6} surface ionizer for forming highly electronegative atoms and molecules. Despite its widely publicized propensity for being easily poisoned, no evidences of this effect were experienced during testing of the source. Nominal efficiencies of 15% for Br{sup {minus}} beam generation were obtained during off-line evaluation of the source with AlBr3 feed material when account is taken of the fractional dissociation of the molecule. Principles of operation, design features, operational parameter data, initial performance results, and beam quality data (emittance) are presented in this article.

  11. Charge state breeding for the acceleration of radioactive ions at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, F.; Baartman, R.; Bricault, P.; Jayamanna, K.; McDonald, M.; Lamy, T.

    2010-02-15

    A 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (PHOENIX from Pantechnik) has been set up at the Isotope Separation and ACceleration (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF for the charge state breeding of radioactive ions. After extensive testing and optimization on a test bench it has been moved on-line and put into operation. During a first test in 2008 a beam of {sup 80}Rb{sup 14+} was successfully created from {sup 80}Rb{sup 1+} and accelerated by the ISAC postaccelerator. Further tests with different stable and radioactive isotopes from the ISAC on-line sources and from a test source with stable Cs have been carried out. Until now an efficiency of 1.4% for {sup 124}Cs{sup 20+} has been obtained.

  12. Development of a 1+/N+ setup for the production of multicharged radioactive alkali ions in SPIRAL.

    PubMed

    Eléon, C; Gaubert, G; Jardin, P; Saint-Laurent, M-G; Alcantara, J; Alvès Condé, R; Barué, C; Boilley, D; Cornell, J C; Delahaye, P; Dubois, M; Jacquot, B; Leherissier, P; Leroy, R; Lhersonneau, G; Marie-Jeanne, M; Maunoury, L; Pacquet, J-Y; Pellemoine, F; Pierret, C; Thomas, J C; Villari, A C C

    2008-02-01

    In the framework of the production of radioactive ion beams by the isotope separator online method, a new system has been developed at GANIL/SPIRAL I to produce multicharged alkali ions. The principle, referred to as the "direct 1+/N+ method," consists of a surface ionization source associated with a multicharged electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source without an intermediate mass separator. This new system has been tested online using a (48)Ca primary beam at 60.3 A MeV. The experimental evidence of the direct 1+/N+ process has been obtained for a potential difference between the two sources of 11 V and with a 1+/N+ charge breeding efficiency of 0.04% for (47)K(5+). This value is significantly lower than the value of 6% obtained for stable K ions with the standard 1+/N+ method. A possible explanation is given in the text.

  13. Development of a 1+/N+ setup for the production of multicharged radioactive alkali ions in SPIRALa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eléon, C.; Gaubert, G.; Jardin, P.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Alcantara, J.; Alvès Condé, R.; Barué, C.; Boilley, D.; Cornell, J. C.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Jacquot, B.; Leherissier, P.; Leroy, R.; Lhersonneau, G.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Maunoury, L.; Pacquet, J.-Y.; Pellemoine, F.; Pierret, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Villari, A. C. C.

    2008-02-01

    In the framework of the production of radioactive ion beams by the isotope separator online method, a new system has been developed at GANIL/SPIRAL I to produce multicharged alkali ions. The principle, referred to as the "direct 1+/N+ method," consists of a surface ionization source associated with a multicharged electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source without an intermediate mass separator. This new system has been tested online using a Ca48 primary beam at 60.3AMeV. The experimental evidence of the direct 1+/N+ process has been obtained for a potential difference between the two sources of 11V and with a 1+/N+ charge breeding efficiency of 0.04% for K5+47. This value is significantly lower than the value of 6% obtained for stable K ions with the standard 1+/N+ method. A possible explanation is given in the text.

  14. The SPES radioactive ion beam project of LNL: status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Prete, G.; Andrigetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 8 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.7 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission on an Uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research centre for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  15. Safe disposal of radioactive iodide ions from solutions by Ag2O grafted sodium niobate nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wanjun; Li, Xingliang; Liu, Guoping; Yu, Qianhong; Xie, Xiang; Wei, Hongyuan; Jian, Yuan

    2016-01-14

    Radioactive iodine isotopes are released into the environment by the nuclear industry and medical research institutions using radioactive materials, and have negative effects on organisms living within the ecosystem. Thus, safe disposal of radioactive iodine is necessary and crucial. For this reason, the uptake of iodide ions was investigated in Ag2O nanocrystal grafted sodium niobate nanofibers, which were prepared by forming a well-matched phase coherent interface between them. The resulting composite was applied as an efficient adsorbent for I(-) anions by forming an AgI precipitate, which also remained firmly attached to the substrates. Due to their one-dimensional morphology, the new adsorbents can be easily dispersed in liquids and readily separated after purification. This significantly enhances the adsorption efficiency and reduces the separation costs. The change in structure from the pristine sodium niobate to Ag2O anchored sodium niobate and to the used adsorbent was examined by using various characterization techniques. The effects of Ag(+) concentration, pH, equilibration time, ionic strength and competing ions on the iodide ion removal ability of the composite were studied. The Ag2O nanocrystal grafted sodium niobate adsorbent showed a high adsorption capacity and excellent selectivity for I(-) anions in basic solutions. Our results are useful for the further development of improved adsorbents for removing I(-) anions from basic wastewater.

  16. TATRA: a versatile high-vacuum tape transportation system for decay studies at radioactive-ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoušek, V.; Sedlák, M.; Venhart, M.; Janičkovič, D.; Kliman, J.; Petrík, K.; Švec, P.; Švec, , P.; Veselský, M.

    2016-03-01

    A compact and versatile tape transport system for the collection and counting of radioactive samples from radioactive ion beam facilities has been developed. It uses an amorphous metallic tape for transportation of the activity. Because of this material, the system can hold very good vacuum, typically below 10-7 mbar.

  17. Nuclear and Astro Physics at the Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, Jolie A.

    2010-10-11

    Neutron transfer reactions with radioactive ion beams of atomic nuclei have been used to probe the shell structure of nuclei far from stability and provide information important to understanding the origin of the elements heavier than iron.

  18. Development and properties of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchangers for radioactive waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Brown, N.E.

    1997-04-01

    Crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) are a new class of ion exchangers that were jointly invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University. One particular CST, known as TAM-5, is remarkable for its ability to separate parts-per-million concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions (pH> 14) containing high sodium concentrations (>5M). It is also highly effective for removing cesium from neutral and acidic solutions, and for removing strontium from basic and neutral solutions. Cesium isotopes are fission products that account for a large portion of the radioactivity in waste streams generated during weapons material production. Tests performed at numerous locations with early lab-scale TAM-5 samples established the material as a leading candidate for treating radioactive waste volumes such as those found at the Hanford site in Washington. Thus Sandia developed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partnership with UOP, a world leader in developing, commercializing, and supplying adsorbents and associated process technology to commercialize and further develop the material. CSTs are now commercially available from UOP in a powder (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-910 ion exchanger) and granular form suitable for column ion exchange operations (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 ion exchanger). These materials exhibit a high capacity for cesium in a wide variety of solutions of interest to the Department of Energy, and they are chemically, thermally, and radiation stable. They have performed well in tests at numerous sites with actual radioactive waste solutions, and are being demonstrated in the 100,000 liter Cesium Removal Demonstration taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with Melton Valley Storage Tank waste. It has been estimated that applying CSTs to the Hanford cleanup alone will result in a savings of more than $300 million over baseline technologies.

  19. Nuclear Structure Studies with Radioactive Ion Beams in the Mass A = 80 Region

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Padilla, E.; Beene, James R; Lagergren, Karin B; Mueller, Paul Edward; Radford, David C; Stracener, Daniel W; Urrego-Blanco, J. P.; Varner Jr, Robert L; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2009-01-01

    An experimental program to measure spectroscopic properties of neutron-rich nuclei in the A = 80 region is underway at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Our approach has been to get a comprehensive picture of the shell structure in this region by studying a series of properties of low lying states (E (2+), B (E2), g-factors and quadrupole moments). The beams, instrumentation and techniques developed specifically for this purpose have allowed us to systematically study the behavior of these observables along isotopic and isotonic chains using both stable and radioactive nuclei under almost identical experimental conditions. We have developed many techniques and detectors for in-beam gamma spectroscopy and decay studies with radioactive ion beams. Most of the detectors can be used individually or in combination. Generally these detector systems have very large efficiencies. We give examples of their use from three recent experiments; namely, Coulomb excitation of n-rich nuclei along the N = 50 shell closure, the static quadrupole moment of the first 2+ in 78Ge and g-factor measurements of n-rich isotopes near N = 50.

  20. Facile synthesis of hierarchical micro/nanostructured MnO material and its excellent lithium storage property and high performance as anode in a MnO/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O(4-δ) lithium ion battery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gui-Liang; Xu, Yue-Feng; Fang, Jun-Chuan; Fu, Fang; Sun, Hui; Huang, Ling; Yang, Shihe; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2013-07-10

    Hierarchical micro/nanostructured MnO material is synthesized from a precursor of MnCO3 with olive shape that is obtained through a facile one-pot hydrothermal procedure. The hierarchical micro/nanostructured MnO is served as anode of lithium ion battery together with a cathode of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O(4-δ) material, which is synthesized also from the precursor of MnCO3 with olive shape through a different calcination process. The structures and compositions of the as-prepared materials are characterized by TGA, XRD, BET, SEM, and TEM. Electrochemical tests of the MnO materials demonstrate that it exhibit excellent lithium storage property. The MnO material in a MnO/Li half cell can deliver a reversible capacity of 782.8 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles at a rate of 0.13 C, and a stable discharge capacity of 350 mAh g(-1) at a high rate of 2.08 C. Based on the outstanding electrochemical property of the MnO material and the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O(4-δ) as well, the MnO/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O(4-δ) full cell has demonstrated a high discharge specific energy ca. 350 Wh kg(-1) after 30 cycles at 0.1 C with an average high working voltage at 3.5 V and a long cycle stability. It can release a discharge specific energy of 227 Wh kg(-1) after 300 cycles at a higher rate of 0.5 C. Even at a much higher rate of 20 C, the MnO/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O(4-δ) full cell can still deliver a discharge specific energy of 145.5 Wh kg(-1). The excellent lithium storage property of the MnO material and its high performance as anode in the MnO/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O(4-δ) lithium ion battery is mainly attributed to its hierarchical micro/nanostructure, which could buffer the volume change and shorten the diffusion length of Li(+) during the charge/discharge processes.

  1. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Harada, K; Hayamizu, T; Inoue, T; Ishikawa, T; Itoh, M; Kawamura, H; Kato, K; Kato, T; Uchiyama, A; Aoki, T; Furukawa, T; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Sato, T; Shimizu, Y; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a (18)O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line. PMID:24593466

  2. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a 18O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  3. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Harada, K; Hayamizu, T; Inoue, T; Ishikawa, T; Itoh, M; Kawamura, H; Kato, K; Kato, T; Uchiyama, A; Aoki, T; Furukawa, T; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Sato, T; Shimizu, Y; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a (18)O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  4. New reaction chamber for transient field g-factor measurements with radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illana, A.; Perea, A.; Nácher, E.; Orlandi, R.; Jungclaus, A.

    2015-06-01

    A new reaction chamber has been designed and constructed to measure g-factors of short-lived excited states using the Transient Field technique in combination with Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics. In this paper we will discuss several important aspects which have to be considered in order to successfully carry out this type of measurement with radioactive ion beams, instead of the stable beams used in a wide range of experiments in the past. The technical solutions to the problems arising from the use of such radioactive beams will be exposed in detail and the first successful experiment using the new chamber in combination with MINIBALL cluster detectors at REX-ISOLDE (CERN) will be reported on.

  5. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arikawa, Hiroshi Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Yoshida, H. P.; Imai, K.; and others

    2014-02-15

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a {sup 18}O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  6. Radioactive sputter cathodes for 32P plasma-based ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Fortin, M A; Paynter, R W; Sarkissian, A; Stansfield, B L

    2006-05-01

    The development of clinical treatments involving the use of beta-emitting millimetric and sub-millimetric devices has been a continuing trend in nuclear medicine. Implanted a few nanometers below the surface of endovascular implants, seeds or beads, beta-emitting radioisotopes can be used in a variety of biomedical applications. Recently, new technologies have emerged to enable the rapid and efficient activation of such devices. A pulsed, coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma reactor was designed and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of plasma-based radioactive ion implantation (PBRII). It has been shown that such plasma reactors allow for the implantation of radioisotopes (32P) into biomedical devices with higher efficiencies than those obtained with conventional ion beams. Fragments containing radioactive atoms are produced in the implanter by means of a negatively biased solid sputter cathode that is inserted into an argon plasma. Dilute orthophosphoric acid solutions (H3(32)PO4) are used for the fabrication of flat sputter targets, since they offer a high radioisotope content. However, the aggregation of the radioactive solute into highly hygroscopic ring-like deposits rather than flat, thin radioactive films is observed on certain substrates. This article describes the effect of this nonuniform distribution of the radioisotopes on the efficiency of PBRII, and presents a technique which enables a better distribution of 32P by coating the substrates with iron. The iron coating is shown to enable optimal radioisotope sputtering rates, which are essential in 32P-PBRII for the efficient activation of millimetric biomedical devices such as stents or coils.

  7. Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at TRIUMF-ISAC: the New Frontier of Radioactive Ion Beam Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, G. C.; Andreoiu, C.; Austin, R. A. E.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Becker, J. A.; Bricault, P.; Brown, N.; Chan, S.; Churchman, R.; Colosimo, S.; Coombes, H.; Cross, D.; Demand, G.; Drake, T. E.; Dombsky, M.; Ettenauer, S.; Finlay, P.; Furse, D.; Garnsworthy, A.; Garrett, P. E.; Green, K. L.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Hackman, G.; Kanungo, R.; Kulp, W. D.; Lassen, J.; Leach, K. G.; Leslie, J. R.; Mattoon, C.; Melconian, D.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Rand, E.; Sarazin, F.; Svensson, C. E.; Sumithrarachchi, S.; Schumaker, M. A.; Triambak, S.; Waddington, J. C.; Walker, P. M.; Williams, S. J.; Wood, J. L.; Wong, J.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2009-03-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is essential to fully exploit the unique scientific opportunities at the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities such as the TRIUMF Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC). At ISAC the 8π spectrometer and its associated auxiliary detectors is optimize for β-decay studies while TIGRESS an array of segmented clover HPGe detectors has been designed for studies with accelerated beams. This paper gives a brief overview of these facilities and also presents recent examples of the diverse experimental program carried out at the 8π spectrometer.

  8. Review of work related to ion sources and targets for radioactive beams at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A group including many ANL Physics Division staff and ATLAS outside users has discussed the possibilities for research with radioactive ion beams and prepared a working paper entitled {open_quotes}Concept for an Advanced Exotic Beam Facility Based on ATLAS.{close_quotes} Several subgroups have been working on issues related to ion sources and targets which could be used in the production and ionization of radionuclides with high power primary beams. Present activities include: (a) setting up an ion source test stand to measure emittances and energy spreads of ISOL-type ion sources, (b) experiments to evaluate methods of containing liquid uranium for production targets, (c) experimental evaluation of geometries for the generation of secondary neutron beams for production of radionuclides, (d) setting up an ISOL-type ion source at a neutron generator facility to measure fission fragment release times and efficiencies, and (e) computer simulations of an electron-beam charge-state amplifier to increase the charge states of 1{sup +} secondary beams to 2,3 or 4{sup +}. The present status of these projects and future plans are reported below.

  9. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y. Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W.

    2014-02-15

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 μA], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 μA], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  10. Key strategies for enhancing the cycling stability and rate capacity of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 as high-voltage cathode materials for high power lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ting-Feng; Mei, Jie; Zhu, Yan-Rong

    2016-06-01

    Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) is one of the most promising high voltage cathode materials for future application due to its advantages of large reversible capacity, high thermal stability, low cost, environmental friendliness, and high energy density. LNMO can provide 20% and 30% higher energy density than traditional cathode materials LiCoO2 and LiFePO4, respectively. Unfortunately, LNMO-based batteries with LiPF6-based carbonate electrolytes always suffer from severe capacity deterioration and poor thermostability because of the oxidization of organic carbonate solvents and decomposition of LiPF6, especially at elevated temperatures and water-containing environment. Hence, it is necessary to systematically and comprehensively summarize the progress in understanding and modifying LNMO cathode from various aspects. In this review, the structure, transport properties and different reported possible fading mechanisms of LNMO cathode are first discussed detailedly. And then, the major goal of this review is to highlight new progress in using proposed strategies to improve the cycling stability and rate capacity of LNMO-based batteries, including synthesis, control of special morphologies, element doping and surface coating etc., especially at elevated temperatures. Finally, an insight into the future research and further development of LNMO cathode is discussed.

  11. Cryogenic molecular separation system for radioactive {sup 11}C ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Suzuki, K.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.; Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    A {sup 11}C molecular production/separation system (CMPS) has been developed as part of an isotope separation on line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive {sup 11}C ion beams. In the ISOL system, {sup 11}CH{sub 4} molecules will be produced by proton irradiation and separated from residual air impurities and impurities produced during the irradiation. The CMPS includes two cryogenic traps to separate specific molecules selectively from impurities by using vapor pressure differences among the molecular species. To investigate the fundamental performance of the CMPS, we performed separation experiments with non-radioactive {sup 12}CH{sub 4} gases, which can simulate the chemical characteristics of {sup 11}CH{sub 4} gases. We investigated the separation of CH{sub 4} molecules from impurities, which will be present as residual gases and are expected to be difficult to separate because the vapor pressure of air molecules is close to that of CH{sub 4}. We determined the collection/separation efficiencies of the CMPS for various amounts of air impurities and found desirable operating conditions for the CMPS to be used as a molecular separation device in our ISOL system.

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on the science of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.B.; Vieira, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a 2-1/2 day workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams which was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on April 10--12, 1990. The workshop was attended by 105 people, representing 30 institutions from 10 countries. The thrust of the workshop was to develop the scientific opportunities which become possible with a new generation intense Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, currently being discussed within North America. The workshop was organized around five primary topics: (1) reaction physics; (2) nuclei far from stability/nuclear structure; (3) nuclear astrophysics; (4) atomic physics, material science, and applied research; and (5) facilities. Overview talks were presented on each of these topics, followed by 1-1/2 days of intense parallel working group sessions. The final half day of the workshop was devoted to the presentation and discussion of the working group summary reports, closing remarks and a discussion of future plans for this effort.

  13. Development of a surface ionization source for the production of radioactive alkali ion beams in SPIRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eléon, C.; Jardin, P.; Gaubert, G.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Alcántara-Núñez, J.; Alvès Condé, R.; Barué, C.; Boilley, D.; Cornell, J.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Jacquot, B.; Leherissier, P.; Leroy, R.; Lhersonneau, G.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Maunoury, L.; Pacquet, J. Y.; Pellemoine, F.; Pierret, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Villari, A. C. C.

    2008-10-01

    In the framework of the production of radioactive alkali ion beams by the isotope separation on-line (ISOL) method in SPIRAL I, a surface ionization source has been developed at GANIL to produce singly-charged ions of Li, Na and K. This new source has been designed to work in the hostile environment whilst having a long lifetime. This new system of production has two ohmic heating components: the first for the target oven and the second for the ionizer. The latter, being in carbon, offers high reliability and competitive ionization efficiency. This surface ionization source has been tested on-line using a 48Ca primary beam at 60.3 A MeV with an intensity of 0.14 pA. The ionization efficiencies obtained for Li, Na and K are significantly better than the theoretical values of the ionization probability per contact. The enhanced efficiency, due to the polarization of the ionizer, is shown to be very important also for short-lived isotopes. In the future, this source will be associated with the multicharged electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) ion source NANOGAN III for production of multicharged alkali ions in SPIRAL. The preliminary tests of the set up are also presented in this contribution.

  14. Recent Results of Experiments with Radioactive 21Na and 7Be ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Greife, U.; Livesay, Jake; Jewett, Cybele; Chipps, K.; Sarazin, F.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Smith, Michael Scott; Champagne, A. E.; Fitzgerald, R. P.; Jones, K. L.; Thomas, J. S.; Kozub, R. L.

    2007-03-01

    We report here on experiments with radioactive 21Na and 7Be beams performed by Colorado School of Mines students at the ISAC facility of TRIUMF and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of ORNL. At TRIUMF, the DRAGON recoil separator and its segmented BGO array were used to investigate higher energy resonances in the reaction H(21Na,gamma)22Mg. Using the HRIBF we performed an experiment with a 7Be ion beam to measure scattering off Hydrogen and Carbon. Both elastic 7Be + p scattering and for the first time resonant inelastic scattering 7Be(p,p0)7Be* were observed.

  15. Ion implantation effects in insulators and the long-term stability of radioactive waste storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dran, J. C.; Langevin, Y.; Maurette, M.; Petit, J. C.; Vassent, B.

    1981-05-01

    Most insulator materials so far proposed for storing high-level radioactive wastes, such as glass and and the constituent minerals of ceramics are nuclear track detectors. Lead ion implantation experiments show that such materials should be transformed into "giant" nuclear tracks, when the internal fluence of heavy recoils emitted during the α-decay of actinide elements stored in them exceeds a critical value, which corresponds to an equivalent storage period of a few thousand years for the wastes expected from a pressurized water reactor. In contrast, actinide bearing minerals are much more stable against α-recoil damage. As nuclear tracks are extremely chemical reactive, α-recoil damage is expected to shorten the lifetime of storage materials such as glass and ceramics against dissolution in ground waters. Fortunately new nuclear track concepts are already yielding guidelines for predicting and improving the long-term stability of storage materials. The results of the present studies also bear on the physics of ion implantation phenomena an insulator targets exposed to high fluences of low energy ions.

  16. Analysis methods of safe Coulomb-excitation experiments with radioactive ion beams using the GOSIA code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska, M.; Gaffney, L. P.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Clément, E.; Grahn, T.; Kesteloot, N.; Napiorkowski, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Warr, N.

    2016-04-01

    With the recent advances in radioactive ion beam technology, Coulomb excitation at safe energies becomes an important experimental tool in nuclear-structure physics. The usefulness of the technique to extract key information on the electromagnetic properties of nuclei has been demonstrated since the 1960s with stable beam and target combinations. New challenges present themselves when studying exotic nuclei with this technique, including dealing with low statistics or number of data points, absolute and relative normalisation of the measured cross-sections and a lack of complementary experimental data, such as excited-state lifetimes and branching ratios. This paper addresses some of these common issues and presents analysis techniques to extract transition strengths and quadrupole moments utilising the least-squares fit code, GOSIA.

  17. Novel fungus-titanate bio-nanocomposites as high performance adsorbents for the efficient removal of radioactive ions from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingze; Wei, Guodong; Liu, Na; Zhou, Liang; Fu, Chengwei; Chubik, M; Gromov, A; Han, Wei

    2014-01-21

    Reclaimable adsorbents have a critical application in the adsorption of radioactive materials. In this study, the novel bio-nanocomposites comprising fungi and titanate nanotubes are successfully synthesized by a simple and low-cost method. Morphological characterizations and composite mechanism analysis confirm that the composites are sufficiently stable to avoid dust pollution resulting from the titanate nanomaterials. Adsorption experiments demonstrate that the bio-nanocomposites are efficient adsorbents with a saturated sorption capacity as high as 120 mg g(-1) (1.75 meq. g(-1)) for Ba(2+) ions. The results suggest that the bio-nanocomposites can be used as promising radioactive adsorbents for removing radioactive ions from water caused by nuclear leakage.

  18. Nuclear reactions with 11C and 14O radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fanqing

    2004-12-09

    Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) have been shown to be a useful tool for studying proton-rich nuclides near and beyond the proton dripline and for evaluating nuclear models. To take full advantage of RIBs, Elastic Resonance Scattering in Inverse Kinematics with Thick Targets (ERSIKTT), has proven to be a reliable experimental tool for investigations of proton unbound nuclei. Following several years of effort, Berkeley Experiments with Accelerated Radioactive Species (BEARS), a RIBs capability, has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. The current BEARS provides two RIBs: a 11C beam of up to 2x108 pps intensity on target and an 14O beam of up to 3x104 pps intensity. While the development of the 11C beam has been relatively easy, a number of challenges had to be overcome to obtain the 14O beam. The excellent 11C beam has been used to investigate several reactions. The first was the 197Au(11C,xn)208-xnAt reaction, which was used to measure excitation functions for the 4n to 8n exit channels. The measured cross sections were generally predicted quite well using the fusion-evaporation code HIVAP. Possible errors in the branching ratios of ?? decays from At isotopes as well as the presence of incomplete fusion reactions probably contribute to specific overpredictions. 15F has been investigated by the p(14O,p)14O reaction with the ERSIKTT technology. Several 14O+p runs have been performed. Excellent energy calibration was obtained using resonances from the p(14N,p)14N reaction in inverse kinematics, and comparing the results to those obtained earlier with normal kinematics. The differences between 14N+p and 14O+p in the stopping power function have been evaluated for better energy calibration. After careful calibration, the energy levels of 15F were fitted with an R-matrix calculation. Spins and parities were assigned to the two observed resonances. This new measurement of the 15F ground state supports the disappearance of the Z = 8

  19. Novel fungus-titanate bio-nanocomposites as high performance adsorbents for the efficient removal of radioactive ions from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingze; Wei, Guodong; Liu, Na; Zhou, Liang; Fu, Chengwei; Chubik, M.; Gromov, A.; Han, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Reclaimable adsorbents have a critical application in the adsorption of radioactive materials. In this study, the novel bio-nanocomposites comprising fungi and titanate nanotubes are successfully synthesized by a simple and low-cost method. Morphological characterizations and composite mechanism analysis confirm that the composites are sufficiently stable to avoid dust pollution resulting from the titanate nanomaterials. Adsorption experiments demonstrate that the bio-nanocomposites are efficient adsorbents with a saturated sorption capacity as high as 120 mg g-1 (1.75 meq. g-1) for Ba2+ ions. The results suggest that the bio-nanocomposites can be used as promising radioactive adsorbents for removing radioactive ions from water caused by nuclear leakage.Reclaimable adsorbents have a critical application in the adsorption of radioactive materials. In this study, the novel bio-nanocomposites comprising fungi and titanate nanotubes are successfully synthesized by a simple and low-cost method. Morphological characterizations and composite mechanism analysis confirm that the composites are sufficiently stable to avoid dust pollution resulting from the titanate nanomaterials. Adsorption experiments demonstrate that the bio-nanocomposites are efficient adsorbents with a saturated sorption capacity as high as 120 mg g-1 (1.75 meq. g-1) for Ba2+ ions. The results suggest that the bio-nanocomposites can be used as promising radioactive adsorbents for removing radioactive ions from water caused by nuclear leakage. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The experimental section and supplementary figures are shown in supplementary information. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03467d

  20. Simultaneous injection of stable and radioactive ions into upgraded multi-user atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Amichay

    Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) national user research facility, located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Presently, Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) produced in the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility are charge bred in an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) charge breeder prior to post acceleration in ATLAS. A new state of the art Electron Beam Ion Source charge breeder, the CARIBU-EBIS charge breeder, has been developed (not in the scope of the work presented here) at ANL to replace the existing ECR charge breeder for charge breeding RIBs generated in CARIBU. The CARIBU-EBIS charge breeder is now in the final stages of offline at the Accelerator Development Test Facility (ADTF). A significant part of the commissioning effort has been devoted to testing the source by breeding singly-charged cesium ions injected from a surface ionization source. Characterization of the CARIBU-EBIS performance has been accomplished through a comparison between the measured properties of extracted beams and simulation results. Following its offline commissioning, CARIBU-EBIS will be relocated to its permanent location in ATLAS. An electrostatic transport line has been designed to transport RIBs from CARIBU and inject them into CARIBU-EBIS. In addition, modifications to the existing ATLAS Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) were required in order to transport the charge bred RIBs from CARIBU-EBIS to ATLAS. A proposal for upgrading ATLAS to a multi-user facility has been explored as well. In this context, beam dynamics simulations show that further modifications to the ATLAS LEBT will enable the simultaneous injection and acceleration of RIBs and stable beams in ATLAS. Furthermore, a novel technique proposed by Ostroumov et al. will allow for the acceleration of multiple charge states from CARIBU-EBIS, thereby increasing the intensity of available RIBs by up to 60%.

  1. Effects of phosphorus doping by plasma immersion ion implantation on the structural and optical characteristics of Zn{sub 0.85}Mg{sub 0.15}O thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, S.; Nagar, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-08-11

    ZnMgO thin films deposited on 〈100〉 Si substrates by RF sputtering were annealed at 800, 900, and 1000 °C after phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation. X-ray diffraction spectra confirmed the presence of 〈101{sup ¯}0〉 and 〈101{sup ¯}3〉 peaks for all the samples. However, in case of the annealed samples, the 〈0002〉 peak was also observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the variation in surface morphology caused by phosphorus implantation. Implanted and non-implanted samples were compared to examine the effects of phosphorus implantation on the optical properties of ZnMgO. Optical characteristics were investigated by low-temperature (15 K) photoluminescence experiments. Inelastic exciton–exciton scattering and localized, and delocalized excitonic peaks appeared at 3.377, 3.42, and 3.45 eV, respectively, revealing the excitonic effect resulting from phosphorus implantation. This result is important because inelastic exciton–exciton scattering leads to nonlinear emission, which can improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices.

  2. Transport of radioactive ion beams and related safety issues: The {sup 132}Sn{sup +} case study

    SciTech Connect

    Osswald, F. Bouquerel, E.; Boutin, D.; Dinkov, A.; Sellam, A.

    2014-12-15

    The transport of intense radioactive ion beam currents requires a careful design in order to limit the beam losses, the contamination and thus the dose rates. Some investigations based on numerical models and calculations have been performed in the framework of the SPIRAL 2 project to evaluate the performance of a low energy beam transport line located between the isotope separation on line (ISOL) production cell and the experiment areas. The paper presents the results of the transverse phase-space analysis, the beam losses assessment, the resulting contamination, and radioactivity levels. They show that reasonable beam transmission, emittance growth, and dose rates can be achieved considering the current standards.

  3. Radioactive Barium Ion Trap Based on Metal-Organic Framework for Efficient and Irreversible Removal of Barium from Nuclear Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yaguang; Huang, Hongliang; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2016-04-01

    Highly efficient and irreversible capture of radioactive barium from aqueous media remains a serious task for nuclear waste disposal and environmental protection. To address this task, here we propose a concept of barium ion trap based on metal-organic framework (MOF) with a strong barium-chelating group (sulfate and sulfonic acid group) in the pore structures of MOFs. The functionalized MOF-based ion traps can remove >90% of the barium within the first 5 min, and the removal efficiency reaches 99% after equilibrium. Remarkably, the sulfate-group-functionalized ion trap demonstrates a high barium uptake capacity of 131.1 mg g(-1), which surpasses most of the reported sorbents and can selectively capture barium from nuclear wastewater, whereas the sulfonic-acid-group-functionalized ion trap exhibits ultrafast kinetics with a kinetic rate constant k2 of 27.77 g mg(-1) min(-1), which is 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than existing sorbents. Both of the two MOF-based ion traps can capture barium irreversibly. Our work proposes a new strategy to design barium adsorbent materials and provides a new perspective for removing radioactive barium and other radionuclides from nuclear wastewater for environment remediation. Besides, the concrete mechanisms of barium-sorbent interactions are also demonstrated in this contribution.

  4. A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Karmakar, P.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Dechoudhury, S.; Mondal, M.; Pandey, H. K.; Lavanyakumar, D.; Mandi, T. K.; Dutta, D. P.; Kundu Roy, T.; Bhowmick, D.; Sanyal, D.; Srivastava, S. C. L.; Ray, A.; Ali, Md. S.

    2013-03-01

    Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms/molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms/molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of 14O (71 s), 42K (12.4 h), 43K (22.2 h), and 41Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 103 particles per second (pps). About 3.2 × 103 pps of 1.4 MeV 14O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future.

  5. Ion microscopy of the thyroid gland: a method for imaging stable and radioactive iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.P.; Escaig, F.; Lange, F.; Galle, P.

    1986-07-01

    Analytical ion microscopy has been applied to the study of distribution of stable and radioactive iodine in the thyroid gland. Analytical images, each of them representing the distribution of one isotope of iodine, can easily be obtained in a few seconds from an Epon section with a resolution of 0.5 micron. In thyroids of normal rats, intrafollicular and intracytoplasmic stable 127I can be clearly distinguished. After thyreostimulin injection, a rapid and important redistribution of 127I is observed which reflects an intense cytoplasmic reabsorption of intrafollicular iodine. After injection of a long-lived isotope of iodine, 129I, the progressive incorporation of this isotope has been observed and the images of the natural iodine 129I have been compared to the images of 127I. An unusual iodine distribution has been observed in proliferating cells of an autonomous nodule. The very high sensitivity of this method makes possible the study of intracellular and extracellular stable iodine in the thyroid gland in a number of physiological and pathological conditions; its ability for isotopic analysis in microscopic volumes offers new possibilities for kinetic studies of iodine metabolism. However, in the present state of the art the specimen cannot be studied at the ultrastructural level as it is with other methods, and some difficulties remain in qualitative analysis such as the contamination of spectra with organic mass fragments which makes difficult the study of some elements such as sulfur. In addition, the matrix effect on ionization efficiency or on sputtering rate makes quantitative analysis difficult. In the future, image processing systems will be needed for a better quantitative interpretation.

  6. Development of materials for the removal of metal ions from radioactive and non-radioactive waste streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Shameem

    Nuclear wastes that were generated during cold-war era from various nuclear weapon programs are presently stored in hundreds of tanks across the United States. The composition of these wastes is rather complex containing both radionuclides and heavy metals, such as 137Cs, 90Sr, Al, Pb, Cr, and Cd. In this study, chitosan based biosorbents were prepared to adsorb some of these metal ions. Chitosan is a partially acetylated glucosamine biopolymer encountered in the cell walls of fungi. In its natural form this material is soft and has a tendency to agglomerate or form gels. Various methods were used to modify chitosan to avoid these problems. Chitosan is generally available commercially in the form of flakes. For use in an adsorption system, chitosan was made in the form of beads to reduce the pressure drop in an adsorption column. In this research, spherical beads were prepared by mixing chitosan with perlite and then by dropwise addition of the slurry mixture into a NaOH precipitation bath. Beads were characterized using Fourier Transform InfraRed Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Tunneling Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). The SEM, EDS, and TEM data indicated that the beads were porous in nature. The TGA data showed that bead contained about 32% chitosan. The surface area, pore volume, and porosity of the beads were determined from the BET surface area that was measured using N2 as adsorbate at 77K. Adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI), Cr(III), Cd(II), U(VI), Cu(II), from aqueous solutions of these metal ions were studied to evaluate the adsorption capacities of the beads for these metals ions. Equilibrium adsorption data of these metals on the beads were found to correlate well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. Chitosan coated perlite beads had negligible adsorption capacity for Sr(II) and Cs(I). It was found that Fullers earth

  7. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber used with TwinSol radioactive-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, T.; Bardayan, D. W.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Becchetti, F. D.; Bradt, J.; Brodeur, M.; Carpenter, L.; Chajecki, Z.; Cortesi, M.; Fritsch, A.; Hall, M. R.; Hall, O.; Jensen, L.; Kolata, J. J.; Lynch, W.; Mittig, W.; O'Malley, P.; Suzuki, D.

    2016-06-01

    The study of low-energy reactions with radioactive-ion beams has been greatly enhanced by the recent use of active-target detectors, which have high efficiency and low thresholds to detect low-energy charged-particle decays. Both of these features have been used in experiments with the Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber to study α -cluster structure in unstable nuclei and 3-body charged-particle decays after implantation. Predicted α -cluster structures in 14 C were probed using resonant α scattering and the nature of the 3- α breakup of the 02+ Hoyle state in 12 C after the beta decay of 12 N and 12 B was studied. These experiments used in-flight radioactive-ion beams that were produced using the dual superconducting solenoid magnets TwinSol at the University of Notre Dame. Preliminary results from these experiments as well as the development of future radioactive beams to be used in conjunction with the PAT-TPC are presented.

  8. New pathways to bypass the 15O waiting point

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, I.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Angelique, M.; Dalouzy, J. C.; de Grancey, F.; Fadil, M.; Grevy, S.; Lenhardt, M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Navin, A.; Perrot, L.; Saint Laurent, M. G.; Ray, I.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Dumitru, G.; Buta, A.; Borcea, R.

    2007-02-26

    Two reactions 15O(p,{beta}+)16O and 15O(p,{gamma})({beta}+)16O are proposed as new pathways to bypass the 15O waiting point in astrophysical context. The later reaction is found to have a surprisingly high cross section, approximately 1010 times higher than the first reaction. These cross sections were calculated after precise measurements of energies and widths of the proton-unbound 16F low lying states, obtained using the H(15O,p)15O reaction. The large (p,{gamma})({beta}+) cross section can be understood to arise from the more efficient feeding of the low energy wing of the ground state resonance by the gamma decay. The implications of the new reactions are discussed.

  9. First Results with TIGRESS and Accelerated Radioactive Ion Beams from ISAC: Coulomb Excitation of 20,21,29Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, M. A.; Hurst, A. M.; Svensson, C. E.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Cline, D.; Hackman, G.; Pearson, C. J.; Stoyer, M. A.; Andreyev, A.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Barton, C. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Buchmann, L.; Churchman, R.; Cifarelli, F.; Colosimo, S. J.; Cooper, R. J.; Cross, D. S.; Dashdorj, D.; Demand, G. A.; Dimmock, M. R.; Djongolov, M.; Drake, T. E.; Finlay, P.; Gallant, A. T.; Garrett, P. E.; Gray-Jones, C.; Green, K. L.; Grint, A. N.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harkness, L. J.; Hayes, A. B.; Kanungo, R.; Leach, K. G.; Kulp, W. D.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Lee, G.; Lloyd, S.; Maharaj, R.; Martin, J.-P.; Millar, B. A.; Moisan, F.; Morton, A. C.; Mythili, S.; Nelson, L.; Newman, O.; Nolan, P. J.; Orce, J. N.; Oxley, D. C.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Phillips, A. A.; Porter-Peden, M.; Ressler, J. J.; Rigby, S. V.; Roy, R.; Ruiz, C.; Sarazin, F.; Scraggs, D. P.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Triambak, S.; Waddington, J. C.; Walker, P. M.; Wan, J.; Whitbeck, A.; Williams, S. J.; Wong, J.; Wood, J. L.

    2009-03-01

    The TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) is a state-of-the-art γ-ray spectrometer being constructed at the ISAC-II radioactive ion beam facility at TRIUMF. TIGRESS will be comprised of twelve 32-fold segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) clover-type γ-ray detectors, with BGO/CsI(Tl) Compton-suppression shields, and is currently operational at ISAC-II in an early-implementation configuration of six detectors. Results have been obtained for the first experiments performed using TIGRESS, which examined the A = 20, 21, and 29 isotopes of Na by Coulomb excitation.

  10. Biodegradable radioactive implants for glaucoma filtering surgery produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, W.; Schubert, M.; Held, A.; Pichler, A.; Chill, A.; Kiermaier, S.; Schlösser, K.; Busch, H.; Schenk, K.; Streufert, D.; Lanzl, I.

    2007-04-01

    A biodegradable, β-emitting implant has been developed and successfully tested which prevents fresh intraocular pressure increase after glaucoma filtering surgery. Ion implantation has been used to load the polymeric implants with the β-emitter 32P. The influence of ion implantation and gamma sterilisation on degradation and 32P-fixation behavior has been studied by ion beam and chemical analysis. Irradiation effects due to the applied ion fluence (1015 ions/cm2) and gamma dose (25 kGy) are found to be tolerable.

  11. The use of aluminum nitride to improve Aluminum-26 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry measurements and production of Radioactive Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Meghan S.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Liu, Yuan; Mills, Gerald D.; Romero-Romero, Elisa; Stracener, Daniel W.

    2015-10-01

    We present results and discuss the use of aluminum nitride as a promising source material for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) science applications of 26Al isotopes. The measurement of 26Al in geological samples by AMS is typically conducted on Al2O3 targets. However, Al2O3 is not an ideal source material because it does not form a prolific beam of Al- required for measuring low-levels of 26Al. Multiple samples of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), aluminum nitride (AlN), mixed Al2O3-AlN as well as aluminum fluoride (AlF3) were tested and compared using the ion source test facility and the stable ion beam (SIB) injector platform at the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Negative ion currents of atomic and molecular aluminum were examined for each source material. It was found that pure AlN targets produced substantially higher beam currents than the other materials and that there was some dependence on the exposure of AlN to air. The applicability of using AlN as a source material for geological samples was explored by preparing quartz samples as Al2O3 and converting them to AlN using a carbothermal reduction technique, which involved reducing the Al2O3 with graphite powder at 1600 °C within a nitrogen atmosphere. The quartz material was successfully converted to AlN. Thus far, AlN proves to be a promising source material and could lead towards increasing the sensitivity of low-level 26Al AMS measurements. The potential of using AlN as a source material for nuclear physics is also very promising by placing 26AlN directly into a source to produce more intense radioactive beams of 26Al.

  12. Astrophysically Important 19Ne States Studied with the 2H(18F,alpha+15O)n Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adekola, Aderemi S; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Brune, C.; Chae, K. Y.; Champagne, A. E.; Domizioli, Carlo P; Greife, U.; Heinen, Z.; Hornish, M.; Johnson, Micah; Jones, K. L.; Kapler, R.; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Massey, T.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Thomas, J. S.; Smith, Nathan A; Smith, Michael Scott; Visser, D. W.; Voinov, A.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear structure of {sup 19}Ne near the proton threshold is of interest for understanding the rates of proton-induced reactions on {sup 18}F in novae. Analogues for several states in the mirror nucleus {sup 19}F have not yet been identified in {sup 19}Ne indicating the level structure of {sup 19}Ne in this region is incomplete. The {sup 18}F(d;n){sup 19}Ne and {sup 18}F(d,p){sup 19}F reactions have been measured simultaneously at E{sub c.m.} = 14.9 MeV. The experiments were performed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by bombarding a 720-mg/cm{sub 2} CD{sub 2} target with a radioactive {sup 18}F beam. The {sup 19}Ne states of interest near the proton threshold decay by breakup into a and {sup 15}O particles. These decay products were detected in coincidence with position-sensitive E-{Delta}E silicon telescopes. The {alpha} and {sup 15}N particles from the break up of the mirror nucleus {sup 19}F were also measured with these detectors. Particle identification, coincidence, and Q-value requirements enable us to distinguish the reaction of interest from other reactions. The reconstruction of relative energy of the detected particles reveals the excited states of {sup 19}Ne and {sup 19}F which are populated. The neutron (proton) angular distributions for states in {sup 19}Ne ({sup 19}F) were extracted using momentum conservation. The observed states in {sup 19}Ne and {sup 19}F will be presented.

  13. Mapping 15O production rate for proton therapy verification

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, Kira; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Testa, Mauro; Winey, Brian; Normandin, Marc D.; Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This is a proof-of-principle study for the evaluation of 15O production as an imaging target, through the use of positron emission tomography (PET), to improve verification of proton treatment plans and study the effects of perfusion. Methods and Materials Dynamic PET measurements of irradiation-produced isotopes were taken for a phantom and rabbit thigh muscles. The rabbit muscle was irradiated and imaged in both live and dead conditions. A differential equation was fitted to the phantom and the in vivo data, yielding estimates of the 15O production and clearance rates, which was compared for live versus dead for the rabbit, and to Monte Carlo (MC) predictions. Results PET clearance rates agreed with the decay constants of the dominant radionuclide species in three different phantom materials. In two oxygen-rich materials, the ratio of 15O production rates agreed with the MC prediction. In the dead rabbit thighs, the dynamic PET concentration histories were accurately described using the 15O decay constant, while the live thigh activity decayed faster. Most importantly, the 15O production rates agreed within 2% (p> 0.5) between conditions. Conclusion We developed a new method for quantitative measurement of 15O production and clearance rates in the period immediately following proton therapy. Measurements in the phantom and rabbits were well described in terms of 15O production and clearance rates, plus a correction for other isotopes. These proof-of-principle results support the feasibility of detailed verification of proton therapy treatment delivery. In addition, 15O clearance rates may be useful in monitoring permeability changes due to therapy. PMID:25817530

  14. Mapping {sup 15}O Production Rate for Proton Therapy Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Grogg, Kira; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Testa, Mauro; Winey, Brian; Normandin, Marc D.; Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This work was a proof-of-principle study for the evaluation of oxygen-15 ({sup 15}O) production as an imaging target through the use of positron emission tomography (PET), to improve verification of proton treatment plans and to study the effects of perfusion. Methods and Materials: Dynamic PET measurements of irradiation-produced isotopes were made for a phantom and rabbit thigh muscles. The rabbit muscle was irradiated and imaged under both live and dead conditions. A differential equation was fitted to phantom and in vivo data, yielding estimates of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, which were compared to live versus dead rates for the rabbit and to Monte Carlo predictions. Results: PET clearance rates agreed with decay constants of the dominant radionuclide species in 3 different phantom materials. In 2 oxygen-rich materials, the ratio of {sup 15}O production rates agreed with the expected ratio. In the dead rabbit thighs, the dynamic PET concentration histories were accurately described using {sup 15}O decay constant, whereas the live thigh activity decayed faster. Most importantly, the {sup 15}O production rates agreed within 2% (P>.5) between conditions. Conclusions: We developed a new method for quantitative measurement of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates in the period immediately following proton therapy. Measurements in the phantom and rabbits were well described in terms of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, plus a correction for other isotopes. These proof-of-principle results support the feasibility of detailed verification of proton therapy treatment delivery. In addition, {sup 15}O clearance rates may be useful in monitoring permeability changes due to therapy.

  15. Paul trapping of radioactive 6He+ ions and direct observation of their beta decay.

    PubMed

    Fléchard, X; Liénard, E; Méry, A; Rodríguez, D; Ban, G; Durand, D; Duval, F; Herbane, M; Labalme, M; Mauger, F; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Thomas, J C; Velten, Ph

    2008-11-21

    We demonstrate that abundant quantities of short-lived beta unstable ions can be trapped in a novel transparent Paul trap and that their decay products can directly be detected in coincidence. Low energy 6He+ (807 ms half-life) ions were extracted from the SPIRAL source at GANIL, then decelerated, cooled, and bunched by means of the buffer gas cooling technique. More than 10(8) ions have been stored over a measuring period of six days, and about 10(5) decay coincidences between the beta particles and the 6Li++ recoiling ions have been recorded. The technique can be extended to other short-lived species, opening new possibilities for trap assisted decay experiments.

  16. Validity of using a 3-dimensional PET scanner during inhalation of 15O-labeled oxygen for quantitative assessment of regional metabolic rate of oxygen in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Yuki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Iguchi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Akihide; Enmi, Junichiro; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Morita, Naomi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Casey, Michael E.; Iida, Hidehiro

    2014-09-01

    Use of 15O labeled oxygen (15O2) and positron emission tomography (PET) allows quantitative assessment of the regional metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in vivo, which is essential to understanding the pathological status of patients with cerebral vascular and neurological disorders. The method has, however, been challenging, when a 3D PET scanner is employed, largely attributed to the presence of gaseous radioactivity in the trachea and the inhalation system, which results in a large amount of scatter and random events in the PET assessment. The present study was intended to evaluate the adequacy of using a recently available commercial 3D PET scanner in the assessment of regional cerebral radioactivity distribution during an inhalation of 15O2. Systematic experiments were carried out on a brain phantom. Experiments were also performed on a healthy volunteer following a recently developed protocol for simultaneous assessment of CMRO2 and cerebral blood flow, which involves sequential administration of 15O2 and C15O2. A particular intention was to evaluate the adequacy of the scatter-correction procedures. The phantom experiment demonstrated that errors were within 3% at the practically maximum radioactivity in the face mask, with the greatest radioactivity in the lung. The volunteer experiment demonstrated that the counting rate was at peak during the 15O gas inhalation period, within a verified range. Tomographic images represented good quality over the entire FOV, including the lower part of the cerebral structures and the carotid artery regions. The scatter-correction procedures appeared to be important, particularly in the process to compensate for the scatter originating outside the FOV. Reconstructed images dramatically changed if the correction was carried out using inappropriate procedures. This study demonstrated that accurate reconstruction could be obtained when the scatter compensation was appropriately carried out. This study also suggested the

  17. An Antiproton Ion Collider (AIC) for Measuring Neutron and Proton Distributions in Stable and Radioactive Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-10-19

    An antiproton-ion collider is proposed to independently determine mean square radii for protons and neutrons in stable and short lived nuclei by means of antiproton absorption at medium energies. The experiment makes use of the electron ion collider complex (ELISE) of the GSI FAIR project with appropriate modifications of the electron ring to store, cool and collide antiprotons of 30 MeV energy with 740A MeV energy ions.The total absorption cross-section of antiprotons by the stored ions will be measured by detecting their loss by means of the Schottky noise spectroscopy method. Cross sections for the absorption on protons and neutrons, respectively, will be studied by detection of residual nuclei with A-1 either by the Schottky method or by analysing them in recoil detectors after the first dipole stage of the NESR following the interaction zone. With a measurement of the A-1 fragment momentum distribution, one can test the momentum wave functions of the annihilated neutron and proton, respectively. Furthermore by changing the incident ion energy the tails of neutron and proton distribution can be measured.The absorption cross section is at asymptotic energies in leading order proportional to the mean square radius of the nucleus. Predicted cross sections and luminosities show that the method is applicable to nuclei with production rates of about 105 s-1 or lower, depending on the lifetime of the ions in the NESR, and for half-lives down to 1 second.

  18. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  19. Reaction dynamics induced by the radioactive ion beam {sup 7}Be on medium-mass and heavy targets

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzocco, M. Stefanini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Lay, J. A.; Molini, P.; Soramel, F.; Boiano, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Di Meo, P.; Boiano, C.; La Commara, M.; Sandoli, M.; Silvestri, R.; Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Acosta, L.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Glodariu, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    We studied the reaction dynamics induced at Coulomb barrier energies by the weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beam {sup 7}Be (S{sub α} = 1.586 MeV) on medium-mass ({sup 58}Ni) and heavy ({sup 208}Pb) targets. The experiments were performed at INFN-LNL (Italy), where a 2-3×10{sup 5} pps {sup 7}Be secondary beam was produced with the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of high-granularity silicon detectors in rather wide angular ranges. The contribution presents an up-to-date status of the data analysis and theoretical interpretation for both systems.

  20. Hydrogels Containing Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Toward Removal of Radioactive Cesium Ions.

    PubMed

    Kamachi, Yuichiro; Zakaria, Mohamed B; Torad, Nagy L; Nakato, Teruyuki; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Malgras, Victor; Yamauchil, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated the practical application of Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles toward environmental clean-up of radionuclide 173Cs. Herein, we prepared a large amount of PB nanoparticles by mixing both iron(III) chloride and sodium ferrocyanide hydrate as starting precursors. The obtained PB nanoparticles show a high surface area (440 m2. g-1) and consequently an excellent uptake ability of Cs ions from aqueous solutions. The uptake ability of Cs ions into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPA) hydrogel is drastically increased up to 156.7 m2. g-1 after incorporating our PB nanoparticles, compared to 30.2 m2 . g-1 after using commercially available PB. Thus, our PB-containing PNIPA hydrogel can be considered as an excellent candidate for the removal of Cs ions from aqueous solutions, which will be useful for the remediation of the nuclear waste.

  1. Hydrogels Containing Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Toward Removal of Radioactive Cesium Ions.

    PubMed

    Kamachi, Yuichiro; Zakaria, Mohamed B; Torad, Nagy L; Nakato, Teruyuki; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Malgras, Victor; Yamauchil, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated the practical application of Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles toward environmental clean-up of radionuclide 173Cs. Herein, we prepared a large amount of PB nanoparticles by mixing both iron(III) chloride and sodium ferrocyanide hydrate as starting precursors. The obtained PB nanoparticles show a high surface area (440 m2. g-1) and consequently an excellent uptake ability of Cs ions from aqueous solutions. The uptake ability of Cs ions into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPA) hydrogel is drastically increased up to 156.7 m2. g-1 after incorporating our PB nanoparticles, compared to 30.2 m2 . g-1 after using commercially available PB. Thus, our PB-containing PNIPA hydrogel can be considered as an excellent candidate for the removal of Cs ions from aqueous solutions, which will be useful for the remediation of the nuclear waste. PMID:27451787

  2. The Research Program at RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil)-III

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Barioni, A.; Morais, M. C.; Pampa Condori, R.; Assuncao, M.; Moro, A. M.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Arazi, A.

    2010-04-30

    A part of the research program developed in the RIBRAS facility over the last four years is presented. Experiments using radioactive secondary beams of light exotic nuclei such as {sup 6}He, {sup 7}Be, {sup 8}Li on several targets have been performed. Elastic angular distributions have been analysed by the Optical Model and four body Continuous Discretized Coupled Channels Calculations (4b-CDCC) and the total reaction cross sections have been obtained. A comparison between the reaction cross sections of {sup 6}He and other stable projectiles with medium-heavy targets was performed. Measurements of the proton transfer reaction {sup 12}C({sup 8}Li,{sup 9}Be){sup 11}B are also presented.

  3. Transportation of a radioactive ion beam for precise laser-trapping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Köhler, L.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Francium is the heaviest species among the alkali elements. Due to its properties, francium is said to be of advantage in measurements of tiny observations, such as atomic parity violation and electric dipole moment. Before executing experiments with francium, it must be produced artificially because it is one of the most unstable elements. We produced francium with the nuclear fusion reaction of an oxygen beam and gold target, ionized the produced francium through a thermal ionization process, and extracted the ion with electrostatic fields. However, the thermal ionization process is known to ionize not only an objective atom but also other atomic species. Therefore, a Wien filter was installed to analyze the composition of the ion beam and purify the beam. This allowed us to improve the beam purity from ˜10-6 to ˜10-3.

  4. Transportation of a radioactive ion beam for precise laser-trapping experiments.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Arikawa, H; Harada, K; Hayamizu, T; Inoue, T; Ishikawa, T; Itoh, M; Kato, K; Köhler, L; Sakamoto, K; Uchiyama, A; Sakemi, Y

    2016-02-01

    Francium is the heaviest species among the alkali elements. Due to its properties, francium is said to be of advantage in measurements of tiny observations, such as atomic parity violation and electric dipole moment. Before executing experiments with francium, it must be produced artificially because it is one of the most unstable elements. We produced francium with the nuclear fusion reaction of an oxygen beam and gold target, ionized the produced francium through a thermal ionization process, and extracted the ion with electrostatic fields. However, the thermal ionization process is known to ionize not only an objective atom but also other atomic species. Therefore, a Wien filter was installed to analyze the composition of the ion beam and purify the beam. This allowed us to improve the beam purity from ∼10(-6) to ∼10(-3). PMID:26932093

  5. Sorption induced structural deformation of sodium hexa-titanate nanofibers and their ability to selectively trap radioactive Ra(II) ions from water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjiang; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Yuan, Yong; Liu, Hongwei; Waclawik, Eric R; Ke, Xuebin; Xie, Mengxia; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2010-02-14

    Sodium hexa-titanate (Na(2)Ti(6)O(13)) nanofibers, which have microporous tunnels, were prepared by heating sodium tri-titanate nanofibers with a layered structure at 573 K. The void section of the tunnels consist of eight linked TiO(6) octahedra, having a quasi-rectangular shape and the sodium ions located in these tunnel micropores are exchangeable. The exchange of these sodium ions with divalent cations, such as Sr(2+) and Ba(2+) ions, induces moderate structural deformation of the tunnels due to the stronger electrostatic interactions between di-valent ions Sr(2+) and Ba(2+) and the solid substrate. However, as the size of Ba(2+) ions (0.270 nm) is larger than the minimum width (0.240 nm) of the tunnel, the deformation can lock the Ba(2+) ions in the nanofibers, whereas Sr(2+) ions (0.224 nm) are smaller than the minimum width so the fibers can release the Sr(2+) ions exchanged into the channels instead. Therefore, the hexa-titanate (Na(2)Ti(6)O(13)) nanofibers display selectivity in trapping large divalent cations, since the deformed tunnels cannot trap smaller cations within the fibers. The fibers can be used to selectively remove radioactive Ra(2+) ions, which have a similar size and ion-exchange ability to Ba(2+) ions, from wastewater for safe disposal.

  6. Removal of Radioactive Nuclides by Multi-Functional Microcapsules Enclosing Inorganic Ion-Exchangers and Organic Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Mimura, H.; Akiba, K.; Onodera, Y.

    2002-02-26

    The microcapsules enclosing two kinds of functional materials, inorganic ion-exchangers and organic extractants, were prepared by taking advantage of the high immobilization ability of alginate gel polymer. The fine powders of inorganic ion-exchanger and oil drops of extractant were kneaded with sodium alginate (NaALG) solution and the kneaded sol readily gelled in a salt solution of CaCl2, BaCl2 or HCl to form spherical gel particles. The uptake properties of various nuclides, 137Cs, 85Sr, 60Co, 88Y, 152Eu and 241Am, for thirty-four specimens of microcapsules in the presence of 10-1-10-4 M HNO3 were evaluated by the batch method. The distribution coefficient (Kd) of Cs+ above 103 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules enclosing CuFC or AMP. The Kd of Sr2+ around 102 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules containing clinoptilolite, antimonic acid, zeolite A, zeolite X or titanic acid. The microcapsules enclosing DEHPA exhibited relatively large Kd values of trivalent metal ions above 103 cm3/g; for example, the Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for a favorable microcapsule (CuFC/clinoptilolite/DEHPA/CaALG) were 1.1x104, 7.5x10, 1.1x10, 1.0x104, 1.4x104, 3.4x103 cm3/g, respectively. The uptake rates of Cs+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for this microcapsule were rather fast; the uptake percentage above 90% was obtained after 19 h-shaking and the uptake equilibrium was attained within 1 d. The AMP/CaALG exhibited high uptake ability for Cs+ even after irradiation of 188 kGy, and DEHPA/CaALG microcapsule had similar Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ ions before and after irradiation. The microcapsules with various shapes such as spherical, columnar, fibrous and filmy forms were easily prepared by changing the way of dipping kneaded sol into gelling salt solution. The microcapsules enclosing inorganic ion-exchangers and extractants have a potential possibility for the simultaneous removal of various radioactive nuclides from waste solutions.

  7. 26Si excited states via one-neutron removal from a 27Si radioactive ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Chen, A. A.; Amthor, A. M.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A. D.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Glasmacher, T.; Kahl, D.; Lorusso, G.; Matos, M.; Ouellet, C. V.; Pereira, J.; Schatz, H.; Smith, K.; Wales, B.; Weisshaar, D.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2012-04-01

    A study of 26Si states by neutron removal from a fast radioactive beam of 27Si has been performed. A beam of 27Si of energy 84.3 MeV/nucleon impinged on a polypropylene foil (C3H6) of 180 mg/cm2 thickness. Deexcitation γ rays were detected with a highly segmented germanium detector array, in coincidence with the 26Si recoils, and the corresponding 26Si level energies were determined. In comparing our results to two previous γ-ray spectroscopic studies of 26Si level structures, we find good agreement with a recent measurement of the 12C(16O,2nγ)26Si reaction. Our results support the use of excitation energies from that study in helping determine the important resonance energies for the thermonuclear 25Al(p,γ)26Si reaction rate. We do not observe a bound state at 4093 keV reported in an earlier study of the 24Mg(3He,nγ)26Si reaction.

  8. Radioactive Spent Ion-Exchange Resins Conditioning by the Hot Supercompaction Process at Tihange NPP - Early Experience - 12200

    SciTech Connect

    Braet, Johan; Charpentier, David; Centner, Baudouin; Vanderperre, Serge

    2012-07-01

    Spent ion-exchange resins are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during their conditioning to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. In Belgium, for economical reasons, the Volume Reduction Factor is a key criterion. After Tractebel Engineering performed a technical and economical comparison of the industrially available systems, Tihange NPP decided to install a spent ion-exchange resins hot supercompaction unit with Tractebel Engineering in the role of architect-engineer. The treatment and conditioning unit processes the spent ion-exchange resins through the following steps: dewatering of the resins, drying the resins under deep vacuum, discharging the dried resins into compactable drums, super-compacting the drums to generate pellets, grouting the pellets into standard 400 litres waste drums (overpacks) licensed for final disposal in the near-surface repository in Belgium. Several developments were required to adapt the reference process and equipment to PWR spent ion-exchange bead resins and Belgian radioactive waste acceptance criteria. In order to avoid cracks on the compacted drum, and external surface contamination from resin leaks, some improvements were achieved to minimize spring-back as well as the risk of cracking the drum wall. Placing the compactable drum inside a second, slightly larger drum, guarantees clean and reproducible pellets. Currently the commissioning phase is on-going. Numerous process validation tests have been completed. An acceptance file was transmitted to the Belgian Waste Management Authority recently. This will be followed by demonstration tests necessary to obtain their final acceptance of the installation. More than 3 800 drums of mixed powdered and bead resins have been processed by the reference Hot Compaction process, achieving a Volume Reduction Factor (VRF) of 2.5. The equipment has been proven to be a reliable technology with low operation and maintenance

  9. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  10. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  11. Radioactive ion beams at ISOLDE/CERN recent developments and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Georg, U.; Catherall, R.; Giles, T.; Jonsson, O. C.; Koester, U.; Kugler, E.; Lettry, J.; Nilsson, T.; Ravn, H.; Simon, H.; Tamburella, C.; Bennett, J. R. J.; Drumm, P.; Bergmann, U. C.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Junghans, A. R.; Mishin, V. I.; Schmidt, K.-H.

    1999-11-16

    Since the move of ISOLDE from CERN's synchrocyclotron (SC) to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) in 1992 extensive work has been devoted to the development of new beams, i.e. the production of new isotopes, beams of higher intensity and the ionization of further elements. Most of these developments were driven by the particular needs of the physics community proposing new experiments. The main achievements were the adaption of liquid metal targets to the pulsed proton beam to prevent shockwaves and splashing inside the target container and systematic studies on the time structure of the release of the isotopes from the target. Furthermore the work on laser ion-sources already started at ISOLDE-2 was continued, the so-called RIST target was developed, and most recently first tests on the isotope production while increasing the proton energy from 1 GeV to 1.4 GeV were done. The latter topics are discussed in this paper.

  12. Radioactive Ion Beams at ISOLDE/CERN Recent Developments and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    U. Georg; J.R.J. Bennett; U.C. Bergmann; R. Catherall; P. Drumm; V.N. Fedoseyev; T. Giles; O.C. Jonsson; A.R. Junghans; U. Koester; E. Kugler; J. Lettry; V.I. Mishin; T. Nilsson; H. Ravn; K.-H. Schmidt; H. Simon; C. Tamburella

    1999-12-31

    Since the move of ISOLDE from CERN's synchrocyclotron (SC) to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) in 1992 extensive work has been devoted to the development of new beams, i.e. the production of new isotopes, beams of higher intensity and the ionization of further elements. Most of these developments were driven by the particular needs of the physics community proposing new experiments. The main achievements were the adaption of liquid metal targets to the pulsed proton beam to prevent shockwaves and splashing inside the target container and systematic studies on the time structure of the release of the isotopes from the target. Furthermore the work on laser ion-sources already started at ISOLDE-2 was continued, the so-called RIST target was developed, and most recently first tests on the isotope production while increasing the proton energy from 1 GeV to 1.4 GeV were done. The latter topics are discussed in this paper.

  13. Radioactive ion beams produced by neutron-induced fission at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherall, R.; Lettry, J.; Gilardoni, S.; Köster, U.; Isolde Collaboration

    2003-05-01

    The production rates of neutron-rich fission products for the next-generation radioactive beam facility EURISOL [EU-RTD Project EURISOL (HPRI-CT-1999-50001)] are mainly limited by the maximum amount of power deposited by protons in the target. An alternative approach is to use neutron beams to induce fission in actinide targets. This has the advantage of reducing: the energy deposited by the proton beam in the target; contamination from neutron-deficient isobars that would be produced by spallation; and mechanical stress on the target. At ISOLDE CERN [E. Kugler, Hyperfine Interact. 129 (2000) 23], tests have been made on standard ISOLDE actinide targets using fast-neutron bunches produced by bombarding thick, high- Z metal converters with 1 and 1.4 GeV proton pulses. This paper reviews the first applications of converters used at ISOLDE. It highlights the different geometries and the techniques used to compare fission yields produced by the proton beam directly on the target with neutron-induced fission. Results from the six targets already tested, namely UC 2/graphite and ThO 2 targets with tungsten and tantalum converters, are presented. To gain further knowledge for the design of a dedicated target as required by the TARGISOL project [EU-RTD Project TARGISOL (HPRI-CT-2001-50033)], the results are compared to simulations, using the MARS [N.V. Mokhov, S.I. Striganov, A. Van Ginneken, S.G. Mashnik, A.J. Sierk, J. Ranft, MARS code developments, in: 4th Workshop on Simulating Accelerator Radiation Environments, SARE-4, Knoxville, USA, 14-15.9.1998, FERMILAB-PUB-98-379, nucl-th/9812038; N.V. Mokhov, The Mars Code System User's Guide, Fermilab-FN-628, 1995; N.V. Mokhov, MARS Code Developments, Benchmarking and Applications, Fermilab-Conf-00-066, 2000; O.E. Krivosheev, N.V. Mokhov, A New MARS and its Applications, Fermilab-Conf-98/43, 1998] code interfaced with MCNP [J.S. Hendrics, MCNP4C LANL Memo X-5; JSH-2000-3; J.F. Briemesteir (Ed.), MCNP - A General Montecarlo N

  14. Radioactive ion beams produced by neutron-induced fission at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isolde Collaboration; Catherall, R.; Lettry, J.; Gilardoni, S.; Köster, U.

    2003-05-01

    The production rates of neutron-rich fission products for the next-generation radioactive beam facility EURISOL [EU-RTD Project EURISOL (HPRI-CT-1999-50001)] are mainly limited by the maximum amount of power deposited by protons in the target. An alternative approach is to use neutron beams to induce fission in actinide targets. This has the advantage of reducing: the energy deposited by the proton beam in the target; contamination from neutron-deficient isobars that would be produced by spallation; and mechanical stress on the target. At ISOLDE CERN [E. Kugler, Hyperfine Interact. 129 (2000) 23], tests have been made on standard ISOLDE actinide targets using fast-neutron bunches produced by bombarding thick, high-/Z metal converters with 1 and 1.4 GeV proton pulses. This paper reviews the first applications of converters used at ISOLDE. It highlights the different geometries and the techniques used to compare fission yields produced by the proton beam directly on the target with neutron-induced fission. Results from the six targets already tested, namely UC2/graphite and ThO2 targets with tungsten and tantalum converters, are presented. To gain further knowledge for the design of a dedicated target as required by the TARGISOL project [EU-RTD Project TARGISOL (HPRI-CT-2001-50033)], the results are compared to simulations, using the MARS [N.V. Mokhov, S.I. Striganov, A. Van Ginneken, S.G. Mashnik, A.J. Sierk, J. Ranft, MARS code developments, in: 4th Workshop on Simulating Accelerator Radiation Environments, SARE-4, Knoxville, USA, 14-15.9.1998, FERMILAB-PUB-98-379, nucl-th/9812038; N.V. Mokhov, The Mars Code System User's Guide, Fermilab-FN-628, 1995; N.V. Mokhov, MARS Code Developments, Benchmarking and Applications, Fermilab-Conf-00-066, 2000; O.E. Krivosheev, N.V. Mokhov, A New MARS and its Applications, Fermilab-Conf-98/43, 1998] code interfaced with MCNP [J.S. Hendrics, MCNP4C LANL Memo X-5; JSH-2000-3; J.F. Briemesteir (Ed.), MCNP - A General Montecarlo N

  15. The Use of the Photofission of 238U for a Neutron-Rich Radioactive Ion Beams Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szöllős, O.; Kliman, J.

    2003-10-01

    The fission fragments yield for photofission of 238U, induced by bremsstrahlung photons with endpoint energies of 25 and 50MeV was evaluated to estimate the possibility of producing the neutron-rich nuclei. The systematics coming from A.C. Wahl's Zp model 1 for charge distribution of fission fragments were used. Results for xenon and krypton isotopes are compared with experimental data 2 obtained on the DRIBs 3 (Dubna Radioactive Ion Beams) facility for neutron-rich nuclei production in Flerov Laboratory. The fission rate and fission density in production target for metallic uranium and UCx compounds were simulated with Geant4 4 simulation toolkit to design the target geometry, The fission rate dependence on material of the electron stopping target was examined, At nominal beam values on microtron MT-25 (Ie = 20μA, Ee = 25MeV) up to 2.1011 fissions/s could be achieved. Then the production rate of neutron-rich isotopes reaching order of 109s-1. The induced activity in the production target depending on an irradiation time was calculated for radiation protection purposes and target safety estimation. The cumulation of actinide nuclei was also calculated.

  16. Copper Ferrocyanide Functionalized Core-Shell Magnetic Silica Composites for the Selective Removal of Cesium Ions from Radioactive Liquid Waste.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Kyu; Yang, Da Som; Oh, Wonzin; Choi, Sang-June

    2016-06-01

    The copper ferrocyanide functionalized core-shell magnetic silica composite (mag@silica-CuFC) was prepared and was found to be easily separated from aqueous solutions by using magnetic field. The synthesized mag@silica-CuFC composite has a high sorption ability of Cs owing to its strong affinity for Cs as well as the high surface area of the supports. Cs sorption on the mag@silica-CuFC composite quickly reached the sorption equilibrium after 2 h of contact time. The effect of the presence of salts with a high concentration of up to 3.5 wt% on the efficiency of Cs sorption onto the composites was also studied. The maximum sorption ability was found to be maintained in the presence of up to 3.5 wt% of NaCl in the solution. Considering these results, the mag@silica-CuFC composite has great potential for use as an effective sorbent for the selective removal of radioactive Cs ions.

  17. Copper Ferrocyanide Functionalized Core-Shell Magnetic Silica Composites for the Selective Removal of Cesium Ions from Radioactive Liquid Waste.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Kyu; Yang, Da Som; Oh, Wonzin; Choi, Sang-June

    2016-06-01

    The copper ferrocyanide functionalized core-shell magnetic silica composite (mag@silica-CuFC) was prepared and was found to be easily separated from aqueous solutions by using magnetic field. The synthesized mag@silica-CuFC composite has a high sorption ability of Cs owing to its strong affinity for Cs as well as the high surface area of the supports. Cs sorption on the mag@silica-CuFC composite quickly reached the sorption equilibrium after 2 h of contact time. The effect of the presence of salts with a high concentration of up to 3.5 wt% on the efficiency of Cs sorption onto the composites was also studied. The maximum sorption ability was found to be maintained in the presence of up to 3.5 wt% of NaCl in the solution. Considering these results, the mag@silica-CuFC composite has great potential for use as an effective sorbent for the selective removal of radioactive Cs ions. PMID:27427694

  18. The role of diffusion in ISOL targets for the production of radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, G. J.; Hagebø, E.; Novgorodov, A. F.; Ravn, H. L.; Isolde Collaboration

    2003-05-01

    On-line isotope separation techniques (ISOL) for production of ion beams of short-lived radionuclides require fast separation of nuclear reaction products from irradiated target materials followed by a transfer into an ion source. As a first step in this transport chain the release of nuclear reaction products from refractory metals has been studied systematically and will be reviewed. High-energy protons (500-1000 MeV) produce a large number of radionuclides in irradiated materials via the nuclear reactions spallation, fission and fragmentation. Foils and powders of Re, W, Ta, Hf, Mo, Nb, Zr, Y, Ti and C were irradiated with protons (600-1000 MeV) at the Dubna synchrocyclotron, the CERN synchrocyclotron and at the CERN PS-booster to produce different nuclear reaction products. The main topic of the paper is the determination of diffusion coefficients of the nuclear reaction products in the target matrix, data evaluation and a systematic interpretation of the data. The influence of the ionic radius of the diffusing species and the lattice type of the host material used as matrix or target on the diffusion will be evaluated from these systematics. Special attention was directed to the release of group I-, II- and III-elements. Arrhenius plots lead to activation energies of the diffusion process. Results:A strong radius determined diffusion behaviour was found: DIIIB> DIIA> DIA> DVIIIA, ( DY> DSr> DRb> DKr). Rare earth elements diffuse as Me 3+-species. Within the host elements of one period of the periodic table the diffusion of the trace elements changes in the following order: DIIIB> DIVB≫ DVB> DVIB. In a given target trace elements of group I and II of a lower period diffuse faster than the corresponding elements of the higher period of the periodic table. D2ndperiod> D5thperiod> D6thperiod, ( DBe≫ DSr> DBa). The diffusion determined transport rate of nuclear reaction products in solid target materials is often satisfactory, and consequently several

  19. New laser setup for the selective isotope production and investigation in a laser ion source at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barzakh, A. E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Panteleev, V. N.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2012-02-15

    New laser installation for the resonance ionization spectroscopy in a laser ion source and for rare isotope production has been recently put into operation at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina). This is a significant improvement of a previous target-laser ion source device of the IRIS mass-separator, working on-line with 1 GeV proton beam of PNPI (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute) synchrocyclotron. It makes possible for us to get the isobarically clean radioactive isotope beams of a great number of chemical elements. New laser setup provides the two- or three-resonance step ionization in the range of wavelength of 265-850 nm. The first results obtained at the laser setup for Tl isotopes are presented.

  20. Effect of temperature on the durability of class C fly ash belite cement in simulated radioactive liquid waste: synergy of chloride and sulphate ions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; Goñi, S; Allegro, V R

    2009-06-15

    The durability of class C fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) in simulated radioactive liquid waste (SRLW) rich in a mixed sodium chloride and sulphate solution is presented here. The effect of the temperature and potential synergic effect of chloride and sulfate ions are discussed. This study has been carried out according to the Koch-Steinegger test, at the temperature of 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C during a period of 180 days. The durability has been evaluated by the changes of the flexural strength of mortar, fabricated with this cement, immersed in a simulated radioactive liquid waste rich in sulfate (0.5M), chloride (0.5M) and sodium (1.5M) ions--catalogued like severely aggressive for the traditional Portland cement--and demineralised water, which was used as reference. The reaction mechanism of sulphate, chloride and sodium ions with the mortar was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosity and pore-size distribution, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the chloride binding and formation of Friedel's salt was inhibited by the presence of sulphate. Sulphate ion reacts preferentially with the calcium aluminate hydrates forming non-expansive ettringite which precipitated inside the pores; the microstructure was refined and the mechanical properties enhanced. This process was faster and more marked at 40 degrees C.

  1. Effect of temperature on the durability of class C fly ash belite cement in simulated radioactive liquid waste: synergy of chloride and sulphate ions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; Goñi, S; Allegro, V R

    2009-06-15

    The durability of class C fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) in simulated radioactive liquid waste (SRLW) rich in a mixed sodium chloride and sulphate solution is presented here. The effect of the temperature and potential synergic effect of chloride and sulfate ions are discussed. This study has been carried out according to the Koch-Steinegger test, at the temperature of 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C during a period of 180 days. The durability has been evaluated by the changes of the flexural strength of mortar, fabricated with this cement, immersed in a simulated radioactive liquid waste rich in sulfate (0.5M), chloride (0.5M) and sodium (1.5M) ions--catalogued like severely aggressive for the traditional Portland cement--and demineralised water, which was used as reference. The reaction mechanism of sulphate, chloride and sodium ions with the mortar was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosity and pore-size distribution, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the chloride binding and formation of Friedel's salt was inhibited by the presence of sulphate. Sulphate ion reacts preferentially with the calcium aluminate hydrates forming non-expansive ettringite which precipitated inside the pores; the microstructure was refined and the mechanical properties enhanced. This process was faster and more marked at 40 degrees C. PMID:19056176

  2. Insight into the Atomic Structure of High-Voltage Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Cathode Material in the First Cycle

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xuejie; Yu, Xiqian; Lin, Mingxiang; Ben, Liubin; Sun, Yang; Wang, Hao; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Zhao, Haofei; et al

    2014-12-22

    Application of high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material is the closest and the most realistic approach to meeting the midterm goal of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). However, this application has been hampered by long-standing issues, such as capacity degradation and poor first-cycle Coulombic efficiency of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material. Although it is well-known that the structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 into which Li ions are reversibly intercalated plays a critical role in the above issues, performance degradation related to structural changes, particularly in the first cycle, are not fully understood. Here, we report detailed investigations ofmore » local atomic-level and average structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 during first cycle (3.5–4.9 V) at room temperature. We observed two types of local atomic-level migration of transition metals (TM) ions in the cathode of a well-prepared LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4//Li half-cell during first charge via an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Surface regions (~2 nm) of the cycled LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 particles show migration of TM ions into tetrahedral Li sites to form a Mn3O4-like structure. However, subsurface regions of the cycled particles exhibit migration of TM ions into empty octahedral sites to form a rocksalt-like structure. The migration of these TM ions are closely related to dissolution of Ni/Mn ions and building-up of charge transfer impedance, which contribute significantly to the capacity degradation and the poor first-cycle Coulombic efficiency of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material. Accordingly, we provide suggestions of effective stabilization of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 structure to obtain better electrochemical performance.« less

  3. Absorbed dose estimates for positron emission tomography (PET): C/sup 15/O, /sup 11/CO, and CO/sup 15/O

    SciTech Connect

    Kearfott, K.J.

    1982-11-01

    Regional cerebral blood volume and blood flow may be determined using PET and C/sup 15/O, /sup 11/CO, and CO/sup 15/O. Detailed estimates of radiation absorbed dose for 22 organs and the whole body are reported and compared for these gases administered by continuous or bolus inhalation and by infusion techniques.

  4. Radioactive Beams Using the AECR-U and the 88-Inch Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, M. A.; Leitner, D.; Powell, J.; Silver, C.

    2005-03-01

    The high ionization efficiency of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source combined with the mass resolution of a cyclotron is ideal for the generation of some ISOL-type radioactive ion beams (RIBs). In two separate projects at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL — BEARS and the Recyclotron — we have developed techniques to efficiently ionize and accelerate beams of gaseous species of 11C (t1/2 = 20 min), 14,15O (t1/2 = 70 sec, 2 min) and 76,79Kr (t1/2 = 14,35 hours). Measurements of the ionization efficiency and hold-up times are discussed, along with issues of source contamination and poisoning encountered in running both RIBs and high-intensity stable beam experiments using the same ion source, the LBNL AECR-U. Methods used to tune clean RIBs through the Cyclotron with high efficiency are also discussed, including the use and limitations of analog beams.

  5. Evaporation Residue Yields in Reactions of Heavy Neutron-Rich Radioactive Ion Beams with 64Ni and 96Zr Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Dan; Liang, J Felix; Gross, Carl J; Varner Jr, Robert L; Beene, James R; Stracener, Daniel W; Mueller, Paul Edward; Kolata, Jim J; Roberts, Amy; Loveland, Walter; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Prisbrey, Landon; Sprunger, Peter H; Grzywacz-Jones, Kate L; Caraley, Anne L

    2009-01-01

    As hindrance sets in for the fusion of heavier systems, the effect of large neutron excess in the colliding nuclei on their probability to fuse is still an open question. The detection of evaporation residues (ERs), however, provides indisputable evidence for the fusion (complete and incomplete) in the reaction. We therefore devised a system with which we could measure ERs using low intensity neutron-rich radioactive ion beams with an efficiency close to 100%. We report on measurements of the production of ERs in collisions of {sup 132,134}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 134}Sb ion beams with medium mass, neutron-rich targets. The data taken with {sup 132,134}Sn bombarding a {sup 64}Ni target are compared to available data (ERs and fusion) taken with stable Sn isotopes. Preliminary data on the fusion of {sup 132}Sn with {sup 96}Zr target are also presented.

  6. Properties of radioactive wastes and waste containers. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980. [Resin/bitumen composites; cement/ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, N.; Weiss, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    A study was initiated to evaluate the leachability and integrity of bitumen/organic ion exchange resin composites. Mixtures of anionic and cationic resins in the SO/sub 4//sup -2/, H/sup +/, Cs/sup +/, and Sr/sup +2/ forms were used. The leachability of sodium and cesium from the bitumen/organic ion exchange resin composites was observed to increase when anionic resins in the sulfate form were incorporated in the composite. Topical application of a coat of bitumen on these composites decreased Na leachability by sixfold. The leachability of cesium-137 from cement waste forms and cement/organic ion exchange resin (H/sup +/ form) was studied. Portland II and lumnite cements were used in making the forms. Cesium-137 was leached at a faster rate from portland II/ion exchange resin composites that contained the higher ratio of cement to resins, and also from portland II cement waste forms than from that were made with lumnite cement. An experiment was initiated to study the volumetric changes of organic ion exchange resin beds in aquwous media as a function of ionic species and their concentrations in an aqueous milieu. The species studied were cesium, strontium, and aluminum. The resin volumes were observed to decrease when the solute ionic concentration increased, and a hysteresis effect was observed when the solute concentration was then decreased. The resin bed volumes were observed to increase as the solute concentrations decreased, but the resin volumes did not return to their original values. This observed shrinking and swelling is used to explain the disintegration of cement/organic ion exchange resin composites when immersed in water. The paper on ''Radiation effects on ion exchangers used in radioactive waste management'' in Appendix A has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. 18 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. X-ray production with heavy post-accelerated radioactive-ion beams in the lead region of interest for Coulomb-excitation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bree, N.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Butler, P. A.; Gaffney, L. P.; Grahn, T.; Huyse, M.; Kesteloot, N.; Pakarinen, J.; Petts, A.; Van Duppen, P.; Warr, N.

    2015-10-01

    Characteristic K X-rays have been observed in Coulomb-excitation experiments with heavy radioactive-ion beams in the lead region (Z = 82), produced at the REX-ISOLDE facility, and were used to identify the decay of strongly converted transitions as well as monopole 02+ → 01+ transitions. Different targets were used, and the X-rays were detected by the Miniball γ-ray spectrometer surrounding the target position. A stable mercury isotope, as well as neutron-deficient mercury, lead, polonium, and radon isotopes were studied, and a detailed description of the analysis using the radioactive 182,184,186,188Hg isotopes is presented. Apart from strongly converted transitions originating from the decay of excited states, the heavy-ion induced K-vacancy creation process has been identified as an extra source for K X-ray production. Isolating the atomic component of the observed K X-rays is essential for a correct analysis of the Coulomb-excitation experiment. Cross sections for the atomic reaction have been estimated and are compared to a theoretical approach.

  8. Efficient removal of radioactive iodide ions from water by three-dimensional Ag2O-Ag/TiO2 composites under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuaishuai; Wang, Na; Zhang, Yuchang; Li, Yaru; Han, Zhuo; Na, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional Ag2O and Ag co-loaded TiO2 (3D Ag2O-Ag/TiO2) composites have been synthesized through a facile method, characterized using SEM, EDX, TEM, XRD, XPS, UV-vis DRS, BET techniques, and applied to remove radioactive iodide ions (I(-)). The photocatalytic adsorption capacity (207.6 mg/g) of the 3D Ag2O-Ag/TiO2 spheres under visible light is four times higher than that in the dark, which is barely affected by other ions, even in simulated salt lake water where the concentration of Cl(-) is up to 590 times that of I(-). The capability of the composites to remove even trace amounts of I(-) from different types of water, e.g., deionized or salt lake water, is demonstrated. The composites also feature good reusability, as they were separated after photocatalytic adsorption and still performed well after a simple regeneration. Furthermore, a mechanism explaining the highly efficient removal of radioactive I(-) has been proposed according to characterization analyses of the composites after adsorption and subsequently been verified by adsorption and desorption experiments. The proposed cooperative effects mechanism considers the interplay of three different phenomena, namely, the adsorption performance of Ag2O for I(-), the photocatalytic ability of Ag/TiO2 for oxidation of I(-), and the readsorption performance of AgI for I2.

  9. Intersubject variability and reproducibility of 15O PET studies.

    PubMed

    Coles, Jonathan P; Fryer, Tim D; Bradley, Peter G; Nortje, Jurgens; Smielewski, Peter; Rice, Kenneth; Clark, John C; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen-15 positron emission tomography (15O PET) can provide important data regarding patients with head injury. We provide reference data on intersubject variability and reproducibility of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral metabolism (CMRO2) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in patients and healthy controls, and explored alternative ways of assessing reproducibility within the context of a single PET study. In addition, we used independent measurements of CBF and CMRO2 to investigate the effect of mathematical correlation on the relationship between flow and metabolism. In patients, intersubject coefficients of variation (CoV) for CBF, CMRO2 and OEF were larger than in controls (32.9%+/-2.2%, 23.2%+/-2.0% and 22.5%+/-3.4% versus 13.5%+/-1.4%, 12.8%+/-1.1% and 7.3%+/-1.2%), while CoV for CBV were lower (15.2%+/-2.1% versus 22.5%+/-2.8%) (P<0.001). The CoV for the test-retest reproducibility of CBF, CBV, CMRO2 and OEF in patients were 2.1%+/-1.5%, 3.8%+/-3.0%, 3.7%+/-3.0% and 4.6%+/-3.5%, respectively. These were much lower than the intersubject CoV figures, and were similar to alternative measures of reproducibility obtained by fractionating data from a single study. The physiological relationship between flow and metabolism was preserved even when mathematically independent measures were used for analysis. These data provide a context for the design and interpretation of interventional PET studies. While ideally each centre should develop its own bank of such data, the figures provided will allow initial generic approximations of sample size for such studies.

  10. Direct measurement of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction at nova temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, C. E.; Laird, A. M.; Bentley, M. A.; Diget, C. A.; Fox, S. P.; Fulton, B. R.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Davinson, T.; Salter, P.; Buchman, L.; Davids, B.; Hager, U.; Howell, D.; Martin, L.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Vockenhuber, C.; Walden, P.

    2011-04-15

    The {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction rate is crucial for understanding the final abundance of {sup 18}F predicted by nova models. The {gamma}-ray emission in the first few hours after a nova outburst is expected to be dominated by 511 keV annihilation photons from the decay of {sup 18}F, and so understanding its production can provide important constraints on the conditions during the outburst when compared with observations. Results are presented from the lowest-energy direct measurement to date, performed at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator radioactive beam facility at the TRIUMF laboratory, Canada. Cross section measurements at center-of-mass energies of 250, 330, 453, and 673 keV are obtained and the results compared to previous data and R-matrix calculations. The implications for the overall reaction rate in the context of nova explosions have been discussed.

  11. Trojan Horse measurement of the 18F(p,α)15O astrophysical S(E)-factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Roeder, B. T.; McCleskey, M.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Indelicato, I.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Spartá, R.

    2016-02-01

    Crucial information on novae nucleosynthesis is linked to the abundance of 18F , which, due to great improvements in gamma-ray astronomy, can be detected in explosive environments. Therefore, the reaction network producing and destroying this radioactive isotope has been extensively studied in the last years. Among those reactions, the 18F(p,α)15O cross section has been measured by means of several dedicated experiments, both using direct and indirect methods. The presence of resonances in the energy region of astrophysical interest has been reported by many authors. In the present work a report on a recent experiment performed via the Trojan Horse Method (THM) is presented and the results are given and compared with the ones known in the literature, both direct and indirect. Data arising from THM measurements are then averaged and the reaction rate calculated in the novae energy range.

  12. Isospin Effects in Heavy-Ion Collisions: Some Results From CHIMERA Experiments At LNS And Perspectives With Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Verde, G.; Amorini, F.; Cavallaro, S.; Lombardo, I.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Anzalone, A.; Maiolino, C.; Arena, N.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Lo Nigro, S.; Politi, G.; Auditore, L.

    2009-05-04

    CHIMERA is a 4{pi} multidetector for charged particles available at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS). A new method to measure the time scale of the emission of nuclear fragments is described, together with some applications in the field of the isospin dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. Competition between fusion-like and binary reactions near the energy threshold for nuclear multifragmentation is discussed. Opportunities are pointed out to use the detector at low and intermediate energies using the kinematical-coincidence method.

  13. Phase transition kinetics of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 analyzed by temperature-controlled operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ikuma; Arai, Hajime; Murayama, Haruno; Sato, Kenji; Komatsu, Hideyuki; Tanida, Hajime; Koyama, Yukinori; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2016-01-21

    LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) is a promising positive electrode material for lithium ion batteries because it shows a high potential of 4.7 V vs. Li/Li(+). Its charge-discharge reaction includes two consecutive phase transitions between LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (Li1) ↔ Li0.5Ni0.5Mn1.5O4 (Li0.5) and Li0.5 ↔ Ni0.5Mn1.5O4 (Li0) and the complex transition kinetics that governs the rate capability of LNMO can hardly be analyzed by simple electrochemical techniques. Herein, we apply temperature-controlled operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy to directly capture the reacting phases from -20 °C to 40 °C under potential step (chronoamperometric) conditions and evaluate the phase transition kinetics using the apparent first-order rate constants at various temperatures. The constant for the Li1 ↔ Li0.5 transition (process 1) is larger than that for the Li0.5 ↔ Li0 transition (process 2) at all the measured temperatures, and the corresponding activation energies are 29 and 46 kJ mol(-1) for processes 1 and 2, respectively. The results obtained are discussed to elucidate the limiting factor in this system as well as in other electrode systems.

  14. Removal efficiency of radioactive cesium and iodine ions by a flow-type apparatus designed for electrochemically reduced water production.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 11, 2011 attracted people's attention, with anxiety over possible radiation hazards. Immediate and long-term concerns are around protection from external and internal exposure by the liberated radionuclides. In particular, residents living in the affected regions are most concerned about ingesting contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water. Efficient removal of radionuclides from rainwater and drinking water has been reported using several pot-type filtration devices. A currently used flow-type test apparatus is expected to simultaneously provide radionuclide elimination prior to ingestion and protection from internal exposure by accidental ingestion of radionuclides through the use of a micro-carbon carboxymethyl cartridge unit and an electrochemically reduced water production unit, respectively. However, the removability of radionuclides from contaminated tap water has not been tested to date. Thus, the current research was undertaken to assess the capability of the apparatus to remove radionuclides from artificially contaminated tap water. The results presented here demonstrate that the apparatus can reduce radioactivity levels to below the detection limit in applied tap water containing either 300 Bq/kg of 137Cs or 150 Bq/kg of 125I. The apparatus had a removal efficiency of over 90% for all concentration ranges of radio-cesium and -iodine tested. The results showing efficient radionuclide removability, together with previous studies on molecular hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles as reactive oxygen species scavengers, strongly suggest that the test apparatus has the potential to offer maximum safety against radionuclide-contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water.

  15. Removal Efficiency of Radioactive Cesium and Iodine Ions by a Flow-Type Apparatus Designed for Electrochemically Reduced Water Production

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 11, 2011 attracted people’s attention, with anxiety over possible radiation hazards. Immediate and long-term concerns are around protection from external and internal exposure by the liberated radionuclides. In particular, residents living in the affected regions are most concerned about ingesting contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water. Efficient removal of radionuclides from rainwater and drinking water has been reported using several pot-type filtration devices. A currently used flow-type test apparatus is expected to simultaneously provide radionuclide elimination prior to ingestion and protection from internal exposure by accidental ingestion of radionuclides through the use of a micro-carbon carboxymethyl cartridge unit and an electrochemically reduced water production unit, respectively. However, the removability of radionuclides from contaminated tap water has not been tested to date. Thus, the current research was undertaken to assess the capability of the apparatus to remove radionuclides from artificially contaminated tap water. The results presented here demonstrate that the apparatus can reduce radioactivity levels to below the detection limit in applied tap water containing either 300 Bq/kg of 137Cs or 150 Bq/kg of 125I. The apparatus had a removal efficiency of over 90% for all concentration ranges of radio–cesium and –iodine tested. The results showing efficient radionuclide removability, together with previous studies on molecular hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles as reactive oxygen species scavengers, strongly suggest that the test apparatus has the potential to offer maximum safety against radionuclide-contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water. PMID:25029447

  16. Lifetime Measurement of the 6.79 MeV Excited State of 15O to Help Constrain the 14N(p,gamma)15O Reaction Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinski, Naomi

    2013-12-01

    In main sequence stars such as our Sun, the source of energy comes from converting hydrogen into helium. There are two competing mechanisms via which this can happen: the pp chain and CNO cycle. The latter is a cycle of reactions involving carbon, nitrogen and oxygen which are catalysts for the conversion of hydrogen into helium. The slowest reaction 14N(p, gamma) 15O in the cycle will affect the energy generation timescale and the amount of helium ash produced via the CNO cycle. This has several astrophysical impacts. It affects the evolutionary timescale of main sequence stars from which the ages of globular clusters can be calculated, the nucleosynthesis of heavier elements in H burning shells of red giant stars, and the fraction of energy produced by the CNO cycle compared to the pp chain in our Sun which helps determine the interior composition of the Sun. For main sequence stars the CNO cycle dominates over the pp chain for core temperatures T ≳ 0.02 GK. For the 14N(p, gamma)15O reaction this corresponds to a low center of mass energy Ecm = 30 keV. This is lower than the low energy limit of the reaction rate measurable in the laboratory. This means that we need to extrapolate down to low energy using theory. The largest remaining uncertainty in the theoretical calculations is due to the lifetime tau of the 6.79 MeV state of 15O. In this work the lifetimes of three excited states of 15O were measured using the Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM) populating the states via the 3He(16O,alpha)15O reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. The low lifetime limit measurable using the DSAM is ˜1 fs. The lifetime of the 6.79 MeV state is near that limit, making this measurement challenging. A 1.8 fs upper limit (68.3% C.L.) on this lifetime is reported here. In addition we measured the lifetimes of the 6.17 and 6.86 MeV state in 15O which were < 2.5 fs and 13.3+0.8-1.2 fs (68.3% C.L.) respectively. iii Acknowledgments

  17. RADIOACTIVE CONCENTRATOR AND RADIATION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, L.P.

    1959-12-29

    A method is presented for forming a permeable ion exchange bed using Montmorillonite clay to absorb and adsorb radioactive ions from liquid radioactive wastes. A paste is formed of clay, water, and a material that fomns with clay a stable aggregate in the presence of water. The mixture is extruded into a volume of water to form clay rods. The rods may then be used to remove radioactive cations from liquid waste solutions. After use, the rods are removed from the solution and heated to a temperature of 750 to 1000 deg C to fix the ratioactive cations in the clay.

  18. Spectroscopy of 19Ne for the thermonuclear 15O(α ,γ )19Ne and 18F(p ,α )15O reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, A.; Laird, A. M.; de Séréville, N.; Wimmer, K.; Faestermann, T.; Hertenberger, R.; Seiler, D.; Wirth, H.-F.; Adsley, P.; Fulton, B. R.; Hammache, F.; Kiener, J.; Stefan, I.

    2015-11-01

    Uncertainties in the thermonuclear rates of the 15O (α ,γ ) 19 Ne and 18 F(p ,α ) 15 O reactions affect model predictions of light curves from type I x-ray bursts and the amount of the observable radioisotope 18F produced in classical novae, respectively. To address these uncertainties, we have studied the nuclear structure of 19Ne over Ex=4.0 -5.1 and 6.1-7.3 MeV using the (3He19F,t )19Ne reaction. We find the Jπ values of the 4.14- and 4.20-MeV levels to be consistent with 9 /2- and 7 /2- , respectively, in contrast to previous assumptions. We confirm the recently observed triplet of states around 6.4 MeV and find evidence that the state at 6.29 MeV, just below the proton threshold, is either broad or a doublet. Our data also suggest that predicted but yet unobserved levels may exist near the 6.86-MeV state. Higher resolution experiments are urgently needed to further clarify the structure of 19Ne around the proton threshold before a reliable 18 F(p ,α ) 15 O rate for nova models can be determined.

  19. Measurement of human cerebral blood flow with (15O)butanol and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Berridge, M.S.; Adler, L.P.; Nelson, A.D.; Cassidy, E.H.; Muzic, R.F.; Bednarczyk, E.M.; Miraldi, F. )

    1991-09-01

    Although H2(15)O is widely used for CBF measurement by positron tomography, it underestimates CBF, especially at elevated flow rates. Several tracers, including butanol, overcome this problem, but the short half-life of 15O provides advantages that cause water to remain the tracer of choice. The authors report the first use and evaluation of 15O-labeled butanol for CBF measurement. Flow measurements made in a similar fashion with water and butanol at 10-min intervals were compared in normal volunteers under resting and hypercapnic conditions. Regional analysis showed good agreement between the tracers at low flows, and significant underestimation of flow by water relative to butanol in regions of elevated flow. The observed relationship between the tracers and the curve-fitted permeability-surface area product for water (133 ml.100 g-1.min-1) follow the known relationship between water and true flow. These observations indicate that (15O)-butanol provided accurate measurements of human regional CBF under conditions of elevated perfusion. They conclude that butanol is a convenient and accurate method for routine CBF determination by positron emission tomography.

  20. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:27620100

  1. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes.

  2. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes.

  3. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:26420096

  4. Simulated Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  5. Radioactivity Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Ronald J.

    1969-01-01

    Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

  6. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  7. On-line synthesis of (/sup 15/O)N/sub 2/O: new blood-flow tracer for PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Diksic, M.; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Feindel, W.

    1983-07-01

    This paper describes a recently developed on-line synthesis of a new blood-flow tracer, O-15-labeled nitrous oxide. The tracer was produced by catalytic oxidation of anhydrous ammonia in a gas mixture containing O-15-labeled molecular oxygen. (The oxygen-15 was produced by a /sup 14/N(d,n)/sup 15/O reaction.) Anhydrous ammonia was mixed with the gas containing (/sup 15/O)O/sub 2/, and after preheating to about 200/sup 0/C was carried through an oven containing a Pt catalyst kept at about 310/sup 0/C. Labeled gas was purified in H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ and KOH traps. O-15-labeled nitrous oxide was identified by gas radiochromatography and by various chemical reactions. Radiochemical purity of the O-15-labeled nitrous oxide exceeded 98%, radiochemical yield corrected for radioactive decay was 15 to 20%, and specific activity at the end of synthesis was about 50 mCi/mmole.

  8. Production of [15O]water at low-energy proton cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Powell, J; O'Neil, J P

    2006-07-01

    We report a simple system for producing [15O]H2O from 15N in a nitrogen/hydrogen gas target with recycling of the target nitrogen, allowing production on low-energy proton-only accelerators with minimal consumption of isotopically enriched 15N. The radiolabeled water is separated from the target gas and radiolytically produced ammonia by temporary freezing in a small trap at -40 degrees C.

  9. The astrophysical reaction rate for the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Paul, M.; Roberts, A.D.

    1996-03-01

    Proton and alpha widths for a 3/2{sup +} ({ell}{sub p} = 0) state in {sup 19}Ne at E{sub x} = 7.1 MeV have been extracted using the results of recent measurements of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction. This {ell}{sub p} = 0 resonance dominates the astrophysical reaction rates at temperatures T{sub 9} > 0.5.

  10. Production of [15O]Water at Low-Energy Proton Cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, James; O'Neil, James P.

    2005-12-12

    We report a simple system for producing [15O]H2O from nitrogen-15 in a nitrogen/hydrogen gas target with recycling of the target nitrogen, allowing production on low-energy proton-only accelerators with minimal consumption of isotopically enriched nitrogen-15. The radiolabeled water is separated from the target gas and radiolytically produced ammonia by temporary freezing in a small trap at -40 C.

  11. Enhanced rate performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 fibers synthesized by electrospinning

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; Zhang, Xiaofeng; chamoun, rita; Shui, Jianglan; Li, James; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil; Belharouak, IB

    2015-05-29

    Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) provides a high working potential as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. Yet there is a phase transition from cubic to tetragonal structure in LNMO during the ~3 V charge/discharge region. To suppress the large volume change and capacity fade inherent with bulk-sized LNMO particles when discharged to below 3.0 V, one-dimensional nano-structured LNMO was prepared by an electrospinning method and a subsequent heat treatment. The well-separated nanofiber precursors combat the growth and aggregation of LNMO particles during the heating procedure and lead to improved capacity, better cycling stability, and improved rate capability of the final LMNO nanofibers. The as-prepared LMNO nanofibers have a diameter as thin as 50–100 nm, which is the thinnest of this kind of complex compounds that contain multi-transition metal elements produced through the electrospinning method. In coin cell tests of this material at a current density of 27 mA g-1, the initial discharge capacity was 130 mAh g-1 over a voltage range of 3.5–4.8 V and 300 mAh g-1 over a voltage range of 2.0–4.8 V.

  12. Lattice Mn3+ Behaviors in Li4Ti5O12/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Full Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-05-28

    High voltage spinels LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) with different contents of residual Mn3+ ions have been evaluated in full cells using Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) as standard anode. Greatly improved cycling stability has been observed for all spinels in LTO-limited full cell, compared with those in LNMO-limited ones, while the underlying mechanisms are quite different. It has been discovered that the participation of active Mn3+ in the extended cycling and thus its observable contribution to Li+ diffusion kinetics depend on the limiting electrode and the sufficiency of Li+ ions. Potential Mn dissolution has also been discussed to identify the key factors that need to be considered to construct full cells employing high voltage spinel as the cathode.

  13. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  14. Radioactivity method.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactivity measurements have played an important role in geophysics since about 1935, and they have increased in importance to the present. The most important areas of application have been in petroleum and uranium exploration. Radioactivity measurements have proved useful in geologic mapping, as well as in specialized applications such as reactor-site monitoring. The technological development of the method has reached a plateau, and the future of the method for some applications will depend upon development of more sophisticated data processing and interpretation. -Author

  15. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a (12)C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u(-1). Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible.

  16. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a (12)C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u(-1). Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible. PMID:27280308

  17. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a 12C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u-1. Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible.

  18. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a 12C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u‑1. Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible.

  19. Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  20. Radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Hickox, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    This paper provides a review of literature published in 1995 on the subject of radioactive wastes. Topics covered include: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; decontamination and decommissioning; remedial actions and treatment; and environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides. 155 refs.

  1. Regional cerebral blood flow measurement with intravenous ( sup 15 O)water bolus and ( sup 18 F)fluoromethane inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Herholz, K.; Pietrzyk, U.; Wienhard, K.; Hebold, I.; Pawlik, G.; Wagner, R.; Holthoff, V.; Klinkhammer, P.; Heiss, W.D. )

    1989-09-01

    In 20 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease, classic migraine, or angiomas, we compared paired dynamic positron emission tomographic measurements of regional cerebral blood flow using both ({sup 15}O)water and ({sup 18}F)fluoromethane as tracers. Cerebral blood flow was also determined according to the autoradiographic technique with a bolus injection of ({sup 15}O)water. There were reasonable overall correlations between dynamic ({sup 15}O)water and ({sup 18}F)fluoromethane values for cerebral blood flow (r = 0.82) and between dynamic and autoradiographic ({sup 15}O)water values for cerebral blood flow (r = 0.83). We found a close correspondence between abnormal pathologic findings and visually evaluated cerebral blood flow tomograms obtained with the two tracers. On average, dynamic ({sup 15}O)water cerebral blood flow was 6% lower than that measured with ({sup 18}F)fluoromethane. There also was a general trend toward a greater underestimation with ({sup 15}O)water in high-flow areas, particularly in hyperemic areas, probably due to incomplete first-pass extraction of ({sup 15}O)water. Underestimation was not detected in low-flow areas or in the cerebellum. Absolute cerebral blood flow values were less closely correlated between tracers and techniques than cerebral blood flow patterns. The variability of the relation between absolute flow values was probably caused by confounding effects of the variation in the circulatory delay time. The autoradiographic technique was most sensitive to this type error.

  2. High-Performance LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Spinel Controlled by Mn3+ Concentration and Site Disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Chen, Xilin; Sushko, P. V.; Sushko, Maria L.; Kovarik, Libor; Feng, Jijun; Deng, Zhiqun; Zheng, Jianming; Graff, Gordon L.; Nie, Zimin; Choi, Daiwon; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Whittingham, M. S.

    2012-03-19

    The influences of Mn3+ ions on the properties of high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is systematically investigated in this work. The content of Mn3+ ions in the spinel is tuned by further annealing of the sample or partially substitution of Ni2+ in the lattice structure. The former decreases the amount of Mn3+ while the latter increases Mn3+ concentration, which has been confirmed by both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron diffraction analysis. It has also been experimentally and theoretically proven that Mn3+ ions are directly related to the disordering between Ni2+ and Mn4+ on the octahedral sites in the spinel structure which facilitates the transportation of Li+ ions especially at elevated current densities. An extremely cycling stability as well as good rate capability have been observed in the Cr-substituted spinel confirming that an appropriate amount of Mn3+ ions is the key for a high performance high voltage spinel.

  3. First g(2+) measurement on neutron-rich 72Zn, and the high-velocity transient field technique for radioactive heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, E.; Georgiev, G.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Jungclaus, A.; Balabanski, D. L.; Blazhev, A.; Cabaret, S.; Clément, E.; Danchev, M.; Daugas, J. M.; Grevy, S.; Hass, M.; Kumar, V.; Leske, J.; Lozeva, R.; Lukyanov, S.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Modamio, V.; Mouginot, B.; Nowacki, F.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Perrot, L.; Pietralla, N.; Sieja, K.; Speidel, K.-H.; Stefan, I.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Walker, J.; Zell, K. O.

    2012-03-01

    The high-velocity transient-field (HVTF) technique was used to measure the g factor of the 2+ state of 72Zn produced as a radioactive beam. The transient-field strength was probed at high velocity in ferromagnetic iron and gadolinium hosts using 76Ge beams. The potential of the HVTF method is demonstrated and the difficulties that need to be overcome for a reliable use of the TF technique with high-Z, high-velocity radioactive beams are revealed. The polarization of K-shell vacancies at high velocity, which shows more than an order of magnitude difference between Z=20 and Z=30 is discussed. The g-factor measurement hints at the theoretically predicted transition in the structure of the Zn isotopes near N=40.

  4. Precision Measurement of the Hyperfine Structure of Laser-Cooled Radioactive {sup 7}Be{sup +} Ions Produced by Projectile Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, K.; Wada, M.; Nakamura, T.; Takamine, A.; Schury, P.; Ishida, Y.; Sonoda, T.; Kanai, Y.; Kojima, T. M.; Lioubimov, V.; Ogawa, M.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, A.; Kubo, T.; Katayama, I.; Ohtani, S.; Wollnik, H.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2008-11-21

    The ground state hyperfine splitting of {sup 7}Be{sup +} has been measured by laser-microwave double-resonance spectroscopy in the online rf trap of RIKEN's slow RI-beam facility. Be ions produced by projectile fragmentation of {sup 13}C at {approx_equal}1 GeV were thermalized in a rf ion guide gas cell and subsequently laser cooled in the ion trap to {approx_equal}1 {mu}eV. This 10{sup 15}-fold reduction of the kinetic energy allows precision spectroscopy of these ions. A magnetic hfs constant of A=-742.772 28(43) MHz was measured for {sup 7}Be{sup +}, from which a nuclear magnetic moment of {mu}{sub I}=-1.399 28(2){mu}{sub N} was deduced.

  5. A continuous [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O production and infusion system for PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad, Munawwar; Liow, Jeih-San

    1999-06-10

    A system for continuous production and infusion of [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O has been designed for PET cerebral blood flow studies. The injection system consists of a four-port-two-position valve, two Horizon Nxt infusion pumps, and a sterile 50 ml vial. The variation of the production of [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O was <1%. The variation of activity delivered measured by scanner counts during the steady state period was <2%.

  6. Electronic and multiferroic properties of Zn{sub 0.85}Mg{sub 0.15}O thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, Vanita Joshi, B. C.; Kumar, Manish; Wadikar, A. D.; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.

    2015-06-24

    Thin film sample of Zn{sub 0.85}Mg{sub 0.15}O was prepared on Si (100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition and its structural, electronic, magnetic and ferroelectric properties were investigated. The Zn{sub 0.85}Mg{sub 0.15}O thin film sample is found to show room temperature multiferroic properties; suitable for device fabrication.

  7. Multifunctional flexible free-standing titanate nanobelt membranes as efficient sorbents for the removal of radioactive 90Sr2+ and 137Cs+ ions and oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zhiwei; Shen, Congcong; Li, Jiaxing; Tan, Xiaoli; Zeb, Akif; Wang, Xiangke; Xu, An-Wu

    2016-02-01

    For the increasing attention focused on saving endangered environments, there is a growing need for developing membrane materials able to perform complex functions such as removing radioactive pollutants and oil spills from water. A major challenge is the scalable fabrication of membranes with good mechanical and thermal stability, superior resistance to radiation, and excellent recyclability. In this study, we constructed a multifunctional flexible free-standing sodium titanate nanobelt (Na-TNB) membrane that was assembled as advanced radiation-tainted water treatment and oil uptake. We compared the adsorption behavior of 137Cs+ and 90Sr2+ on Na-TNB membranes under various environmental conditions. The maximum adsorption coefficient value (Kd) for Sr2+ reaches 107 mL g-1. The structural collapse of the exchange materials were confirmed by XRD, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy as well as Raman analysis. The adsorption mechanism of Na-TNB membrane is clarified by forming a stable solid with the radioactive cations permanently trapped inside. Besides, the engineered multilayer membrane is exceptionally capable in selectively and rapidly adsorbing oils up to 23 times the adsorbent weight when coated with a thin layer of hydrophobic molecules. This multifunctional membrane has exceptional potential as a suitable material for next generation water treatment and separation technologies.

  8. Multifunctional flexible free-standing titanate nanobelt membranes as efficient sorbents for the removal of radioactive 90Sr2+ and 137Cs+ ions and oils

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zhiwei; Shen, Congcong; Li, Jiaxing; Tan, Xiaoli; Zeb, Akif; Wang, Xiangke; Xu, An-Wu

    2016-01-01

    For the increasing attention focused on saving endangered environments, there is a growing need for developing membrane materials able to perform complex functions such as removing radioactive pollutants and oil spills from water. A major challenge is the scalable fabrication of membranes with good mechanical and thermal stability, superior resistance to radiation, and excellent recyclability. In this study, we constructed a multifunctional flexible free-standing sodium titanate nanobelt (Na-TNB) membrane that was assembled as advanced radiation-tainted water treatment and oil uptake. We compared the adsorption behavior of 137Cs+ and 90Sr2+ on Na-TNB membranes under various environmental conditions. The maximum adsorption coefficient value (Kd) for Sr2+ reaches 107 mL g−1. The structural collapse of the exchange materials were confirmed by XRD, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy as well as Raman analysis. The adsorption mechanism of Na-TNB membrane is clarified by forming a stable solid with the radioactive cations permanently trapped inside. Besides, the engineered multilayer membrane is exceptionally capable in selectively and rapidly adsorbing oils up to 23 times the adsorbent weight when coated with a thin layer of hydrophobic molecules. This multifunctional membrane has exceptional potential as a suitable material for next generation water treatment and separation technologies. PMID:26865116

  9. Multifunctional flexible free-standing titanate nanobelt membranes as efficient sorbents for the removal of radioactive (90)Sr(2+) and (137)Cs(+) ions and oils.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zhiwei; Shen, Congcong; Li, Jiaxing; Tan, Xiaoli; Zeb, Akif; Wang, Xiangke; Xu, An-Wu

    2016-01-01

    For the increasing attention focused on saving endangered environments, there is a growing need for developing membrane materials able to perform complex functions such as removing radioactive pollutants and oil spills from water. A major challenge is the scalable fabrication of membranes with good mechanical and thermal stability, superior resistance to radiation, and excellent recyclability. In this study, we constructed a multifunctional flexible free-standing sodium titanate nanobelt (Na-TNB) membrane that was assembled as advanced radiation-tainted water treatment and oil uptake. We compared the adsorption behavior of (137)Cs(+) and (90)Sr(2+) on Na-TNB membranes under various environmental conditions. The maximum adsorption coefficient value (Kd) for Sr(2+) reaches 10(7) mL g(-1). The structural collapse of the exchange materials were confirmed by XRD, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy as well as Raman analysis. The adsorption mechanism of Na-TNB membrane is clarified by forming a stable solid with the radioactive cations permanently trapped inside. Besides, the engineered multilayer membrane is exceptionally capable in selectively and rapidly adsorbing oils up to 23 times the adsorbent weight when coated with a thin layer of hydrophobic molecules. This multifunctional membrane has exceptional potential as a suitable material for next generation water treatment and separation technologies. PMID:26865116

  10. Self-discharge suppression of 4.9 V LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode by using tris(trimethylsilyl)borate as an electrolyte additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiaolin; Huang, Qiming; Mai, Shaowei; Wang, Xianshu; Xu, Mengqing; Xing, Lidan; Liao, Youhao; Li, Weishan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, tris(trimethylsilyl)borate (TMSB) is evaluated as an electrolyte additive for the self-discharge suppression of 4.9 V LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode for lithium ion battery. The effect of TMSB on the surface properties of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is investigated via linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), charge-discharge test, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It is found that the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode charged to 4.9 V (vs. Li/Li+) suffers a serious self-discharge in 1 mol L-1 LiPF6-EC/DMC (1:2, in weight), which can be suppressed effectively by adding 1 wt.% TMSB into the electrolyte. After storage for 20 days, the voltage of the charged cathode decreases from 4.7 to 0.5 V (vs. Li/Li+) in the additive-free electrolyte, while that remains almost unchanged in the TMSB-containing electrolyte. The self-discharge suppression of the charged LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode results from the preferential oxidation of TMSB and the subsequent formation of a protective solid electrolyte interphase film, which prevents electrolyte decomposition and protects LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 from destruction.

  11. Low-velocity transient-field technique with radioactive ion beams: g factor of the first excited 2+ state in 72Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illana, A.; Jungclaus, A.; Orlandi, R.; Perea, A.; Bauer, C.; Briz, J. A.; Egido, J. L.; Gernhäuser, R.; Leske, J.; Mücher, D.; Pakarinen, J.; Pietralla, N.; Rajabali, M.; Rodríguez, T. R.; Seiler, D.; Stahl, C.; Voulot, D.; Wenander, F.; Blazhev, A.; De Witte, H.; Reiter, P.; Seidlitz, M.; Siebeck, B.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Warr, N.

    2014-05-01

    The g factor of the first excited 2+ state in 72Zn has been measured using the transient-field (TF) technique in combination with Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics. This experiment presents only the third successful application of the TF method to a short-lived radioactive beam in 10 y, highlighting the intricacies of applying this technique to present and future isotope separator on-line facilities. The significance of the experimental result, g(21+)=+0.47(14), for establishing the structure of the Zn isotopes near N =40 is discussed on the basis of shell-model and beyond-mean-field calculations, the latter accounting for the triaxial degree of freedom, configuration mixing, and particle number and angular momentum projections.

  12. Cross section measurement of 14N(p ,γ )15O in the CNO cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Görres, J.; deBoer, R. J.; Imbriani, G.; Best, A.; Kontos, A.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: The CNO cycle is the main energy source in stars more massive than our sun; it defines the energy production and the cycle time that lead to the lifetime of massive stars, and it is an important tool for the determination of the age of globular clusters. In our sun about 1.6% of the total solar neutrino flux comes from the CNO cycle. The largest uncertainty in the prediction of this CNO flux from the standard solar model comes from the uncertainty in the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction rate; thus, the determination of the cross section at astrophysical temperatures is of great interest. Purpose: The total cross section of the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction has large contributions from the transitions to the Ex=6.79 MeV excited state and the ground state of 15O. The Ex=6.79 MeV transition is dominated by radiative direct capture, while the ground state is a complex mixture of direct and resonance capture components and the interferences between them. Recent studies have concentrated on cross-section measurements at very low energies, but broad resonances at higher energy may also play a role. A single measurement has been made that covers a broad higher-energy range but it has large uncertainties stemming from uncorrected summing effects. Furthermore, the extrapolations of the cross section vary significantly depending on the data sets considered. Thus, new direct measurements have been made to improve the previous high-energy studies and to better constrain the extrapolation. Methods: Measurements were performed at the low-energy accelerator facilities of the nuclear science laboratory at the University of Notre Dame. The cross section was measured over the proton energy range from Ep=0.7 to 3.6 MeV for both the ground state and the Ex=6.79 MeV transitions at θlab=0∘ , 45∘, 90∘, 135∘, and 150∘. Both TiN and implanted-14N targets were utilized. γ rays were detected by using an array of high-purity germanium detectors. Results: The excitation function as

  13. Determining the isotopic compositions of uranium and fission products in radioactive environmental microsamples using laser ablation ICP-MS with multiple ion counters.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F; Prohaska, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS)--a Nu Plasma HR--equipped with three ion-counting multipliers and coupled to a laser ablation system (LA) for the rapid and sensitive determination of the 235U/238U, 236U/238U, 145Nd/143Nd, 146Nd/143Nd, 101Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) and 102Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) isotope ratios in microsamples collected in the vicinity of Chernobyl. Microsamples with dimensions ranging from a hundred mum to about 1 mm and with surface alpha activities of 3-38 mBq were first identified using nuclear track radiography. U, Nd and Ru isotope systems were then measured sequentially for the same microsample by LA-MC-ICP-MS. The application of a zoom ion optic for aligning the ion beams into the ion counters allows fast switching between different isotope systems, which enables all of the abovementioned isotope ratios to be measured for the same microsample within a total analysis time of 15-20 min (excluding MC-ICP-MS optimization and calibration). The 101Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) and 102Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) isotope ratios were measured for four microsamples and were found to be significantly lower than the natural ratios, indicating that the microsamples were contaminated with the corresponding fission products (Ru and Tc). A slight depletion in 146Nd of about 3-5% was observed in the contaminated samples, but the Nd isotopic ratios measured in the contaminated samples coincided with natural isotopic composition within the measurement uncertainty, as most of the Nd in the analyzed samples originates from the natural soil load of this element. The 235U/238U and 236U/238U isotope ratios were the most sensitive indicators of irradiated uranium. The present work yielded a significant variation in uranium isotope ratios in microsamples, in contrast with previously published results from the bulk analysis of contaminated samples originating from the vicinity of Chernobyl. Thus, the 235U/238U ratios measured in ten

  14. Determining the isotopic compositions of uranium and fission products in radioactive environmental microsamples using laser ablation ICP-MS with multiple ion counters.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F; Prohaska, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS)--a Nu Plasma HR--equipped with three ion-counting multipliers and coupled to a laser ablation system (LA) for the rapid and sensitive determination of the 235U/238U, 236U/238U, 145Nd/143Nd, 146Nd/143Nd, 101Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) and 102Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) isotope ratios in microsamples collected in the vicinity of Chernobyl. Microsamples with dimensions ranging from a hundred mum to about 1 mm and with surface alpha activities of 3-38 mBq were first identified using nuclear track radiography. U, Nd and Ru isotope systems were then measured sequentially for the same microsample by LA-MC-ICP-MS. The application of a zoom ion optic for aligning the ion beams into the ion counters allows fast switching between different isotope systems, which enables all of the abovementioned isotope ratios to be measured for the same microsample within a total analysis time of 15-20 min (excluding MC-ICP-MS optimization and calibration). The 101Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) and 102Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) isotope ratios were measured for four microsamples and were found to be significantly lower than the natural ratios, indicating that the microsamples were contaminated with the corresponding fission products (Ru and Tc). A slight depletion in 146Nd of about 3-5% was observed in the contaminated samples, but the Nd isotopic ratios measured in the contaminated samples coincided with natural isotopic composition within the measurement uncertainty, as most of the Nd in the analyzed samples originates from the natural soil load of this element. The 235U/238U and 236U/238U isotope ratios were the most sensitive indicators of irradiated uranium. The present work yielded a significant variation in uranium isotope ratios in microsamples, in contrast with previously published results from the bulk analysis of contaminated samples originating from the vicinity of Chernobyl. Thus, the 235U/238U ratios measured in ten

  15. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  16. ICA based automatic segmentation of dynamic H(2)(15)O cardiac PET images.

    PubMed

    Margadán-Méndez, Margarita; Juslin, Anu; Nesterov, Sergey V; Kalliokoski, Kari; Knuuti, Juhani; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we applied an iterative independent component analysis (ICA) method for the separation of cardiac tissue components (myocardium, right, and left ventricle) from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. Previous phantom and animal studies have shown that ICA separation extracts the cardiac structures accurately. Our goal in this study was to investigate the methodology with human studies. The ICA separated cardiac structures were used to calculate the myocardial perfusion in two different cases: 1) the regions of interest were drawn manually on the ICA separated component images and 2) the volumes of interest (VOI) were automatically segmented from the component images. For the whole myocardium, the perfusion values of 25 rest and six drug-induced stress studies obtained with these methods were compared to the values from the manually drawn regions of interest on differential images. The separation of the rest and stress studies using ICA-based methods was successful in all cases. The visualization of the cardiac structures from H (2) (15) O PET studies was improved with the ICA separation. Also, the automatic segmentation of the VOI seemed to be feasible. PMID:19273031

  17. Study of nuclear reactions with intense, high-purity, low-energy radioactive ion beams using a versatile multi-configuration dual superconducting-solenoid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. Y.; Becchetti, F. D.; O'Donnell, T. W.; Roberts, D. A.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Guimarães, V.; Kolata, J. J.; Peterson, D.; Santi, P.; DeYoung, P. A.; Peaslee, G. F.; Hinnefeld, J. D.

    1999-02-01

    A new device (TwinSol) installed at the Nuclear Structure Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame implements a pair of large-bore 6 T superconducting solenoids for producing relatively pure, high-intensity beams of exotic light nuclei at low-energies (10-80 MeV). Typical beams include 8Li and 6He (T 1/2<1 s). The device efficiently produces, collects and focuses beams onto (or implants into) suitable target foils and test materials. The system uses various combinations of the following detection schemes: XY position sensitive gas counters for time-of-flight and ion ray-tracing; multiple stacks of silicon surface barrier detector telescopes mounted at various angles on a rotating table; 2D position-sensitive silicon detectors (PSDs) for high precision angular measurements; multi-annular, multisectored "CD" detectors for large solid angle (nearly 2π in lab frame), high-collection efficiency (multi-hit) particle detection; and ion-implanted stacks of target foils for off-line detection. Also available are a set of HPGe detectors which will be implemented upon completion of a low-background gamma cave. TwinSol represents an advancement in the application of large-bore superconducting magnet technology, capable of running in persistent mode for weeks without liquid helium (LHe) refill or measurable degradation of magnetic field (<0.1%).

  18. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  19. Cortical activation in profoundly deaf patients during cochlear implant stimulation demonstrated by H sub 2 (15)O PET

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, H.; Lamprecht, A.; Kuehn, A.R.; Roden, W.; Vosteen, K.H.; Feinendegen, L.E. )

    1991-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are used to provide sensations of sound to profoundly deaf patients. The performance of the CI is assessed mainly by the subjective reports of patients. The aim of this study was to look for objective cortical responses to the stimulation of the CI. Two postlingually and two prelingually deaf patients were investigated by positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 15}O-labeled water (H{sub 2}{sup 15}O) to determine the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Instead of quantifying rCBF in absolute terms, it was estimated by referring the regional tissue concentration of H{sub 2}{sup 15}O to the mean whole brain concentration. CI stimulation encoded from white noise and sequential words led to an increased rCBF in the primary and secondary (Wernicke) auditory cortex. Relative elevations of up to 33% were observed bilaterally, although they were higher contralateral to the CI. These results were obtained not only in the postlingually deaf patients but also in two patients who had never been able to hear. Thus, it could be demonstrated that PET measurements of cerebral H{sub 2}{sup 15}O distribution yield objective responses of the central auditory system during electrical stimulation by CIs in profoundly deaf patients.

  20. The {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction studied with a composite germanium detector

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Formicola, A.; Gustavino, C.; Junker, M.; Broggini, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Caciolli, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Lemut, A.; Prati, P.; Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Somorjai, E.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Mazzocchi, C.

    2011-04-15

    The rate of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle of hydrogen burning is controlled by the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction. The reaction proceeds by capture to the ground states and several excited states in {sup 15}O. In order to obtain a reliable extrapolation of the excitation curve to astrophysical energy, fits in the R-matrix framework are needed. In an energy range that sensitively tests such fits, new cross-section data are reported here for the four major transitions in the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction. The experiment has been performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) 400-kV accelerator placed deep underground in the Gran Sasso facility in Italy. Using a composite germanium detector, summing corrections have been considerably reduced with respect to previous studies. The cross sections for capture to the ground state and to the 5181, 6172, and 6792 keV excited states in {sup 15}O have been determined at 359, 380, and 399 keV beam energy. In addition, the branching ratios for the decay of the 278-keV resonance have been remeasured.

  1. Structural and functional characterization of TRI3 trichothecene 15-O-acetyltransferase from Fusarium sporotrichioides

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Graeme S; McCormick, Susan P; Alexander, Nancy J; Rayment, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Fusarium head blight is a devastating disease of cereal crops whose worldwide incidence is increasing and at present there is no satisfactory way of combating this pathogen or its associated toxins. There is a wide variety of trichothecene mycotoxins and they all contain a 12,13-epoxytrichothecene skeleton but differ in their substitutions. Indeed, there is considerable variation in the toxin profile across the numerous Fusarium species that has been ascribed to differences in the presence or absence of biosynthetic enzymes and their relative activity. This article addresses the source of differences in acetylation at the C15 position of the trichothecene molecule. Here, we present the in vitro structural and biochemical characterization of TRI3, a 15-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase isolated from F. sporotrichioides and the “in vivo” characterization of Δtri3 mutants of deoxynivalenol (DON) producing F. graminearum strains. A kinetic analysis shows that TRI3 is an efficient enzyme with the native substrate, 15-decalonectrin, but is inactive with either DON or nivalenol. The structure of TRI3 complexed with 15-decalonectrin provides an explanation for this specificity and shows that Tri3 and Tri101 (3-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase) are evolutionarily related. The active site residues are conserved across all sequences for TRI3 orthologs, suggesting that differences in acetylation at C15 are not due to differences in Tri3. The tri3 deletion mutant shows that acetylation at C15 is required for DON biosynthesis even though DON lacks a C15 acetyl group. The enzyme(s) responsible for deacetylation at the 15 position of the trichothecene mycotoxins have not been identified. PMID:19319932

  2. Structural and functional characterization of TRI3 trichothecene 15-O-acetyltransferase from Fusarium sporotrichioides

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Graeme S.; McCormick, Susan P.; Alexander, Nancy J.; Rayment, Ivan

    2009-08-14

    Fusarium head blight is a devastating disease of cereal crops whose worldwide incidence is increasing and at present there is no satisfactory way of combating this pathogen or its associated toxins. There is a wide variety of trichothecene mycotoxins and they all contain a 12,13-epoxytrichothecene skeleton but differ in their substitutions. Indeed, there is considerable variation in the toxin profile across the numerous Fusarium species that has been ascribed to differences in the presence or absence of biosynthetic enzymes and their relative activity. This article addresses the source of differences in acetylation at the C15 position of the trichothecene molecule. Here, we present the in vitro structural and biochemical characterization of TRI3, a 15-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase isolated from F. sporotrichioides and the 'in vivo' characterization of Deltatri3 mutants of deoxynivalenol (DON) producing F. graminearum strains. A kinetic analysis shows that TRI3 is an efficient enzyme with the native substrate, 15-decalonectrin, but is inactive with either DON or nivalenol. The structure of TRI3 complexed with 15-decalonectrin provides an explanation for this specificity and shows that Tri3 and Tri101 (3-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase) are evolutionarily related. The active site residues are conserved across all sequences for TRI3 orthologs, suggesting that differences in acetylation at C15 are not due to differences in Tri3. The tri3 deletion mutant shows that acetylation at C15 is required for DON biosynthesis even though DON lacks a C15 acetyl group. The enzyme(s) responsible for deacetylation at the 15 position of the trichothecene mycotoxins have not been identified.

  3. Development of a Monte Carlo code for the data analysis of the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, A.; Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, ML.; Crucillà, V.; Gulino, M.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; and others

    2015-02-24

    Novae are astrophysical events (violent explosion) occurring in close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence star or a star in a more advanced stage of evolution. They are called 'narrow systems' because the two components interact with each other: there is a process of mass exchange with resulting in the transfer of matter from the companion star to the white dwarf, leading to the formation of this last of the so-called accretion disk, rich mainly of hydrogen. Over time, more and more material accumulates until the pressure and the temperature reached are sufficient to trigger nuclear fusion reactions, rapidly converting a large part of the hydrogen into heavier elements. The products of 'hot hydrogen burning' are then placed in the interstellar medium as a result of violent explosions. Studies on the element abundances observed in these events can provide important information about the stages of evolution stellar. During the outbursts of novae some radioactive isotopes are synthesized: in particular, the decay of short-lived nuclei such as {sup 13}N and {sup 18}F with subsequent emission of gamma radiation energy below 511 keV. The gamma rays from products electron-positron annihilation of positrons emitted in the decay of {sup 18}F are the most abundant and the first observable as soon as the atmosphere of the nova starts to become transparent to gamma radiation. Hence the importance of the study of nuclear reactions that lead both to the formation and to the destruction of {sup 18}F. Among these, the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction is one of the main channels of destruction. This reaction was then studied at energies of astrophysical interest. The experiment done at Riken, Japan, has as its objective the study of the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction, using a beam of {sup 18}F produced at CRIB, to derive important information about the phenomenon of novae. In this paper we present the experimental technique and the Monte Carlo code

  4. Development of a Monte Carlo code for the data analysis of the 18F(p,α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, A.; Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Crucillà, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, ML.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; de Séréville, N.

    2015-02-01

    Novae are astrophysical events (violent explosion) occurring in close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence star or a star in a more advanced stage of evolution. They are called "narrow systems" because the two components interact with each other: there is a process of mass exchange with resulting in the transfer of matter from the companion star to the white dwarf, leading to the formation of this last of the so-called accretion disk, rich mainly of hydrogen. Over time, more and more material accumulates until the pressure and the temperature reached are sufficient to trigger nuclear fusion reactions, rapidly converting a large part of the hydrogen into heavier elements. The products of "hot hydrogen burning" are then placed in the interstellar medium as a result of violent explosions. Studies on the element abundances observed in these events can provide important information about the stages of evolution stellar. During the outbursts of novae some radioactive isotopes are synthesized: in particular, the decay of short-lived nuclei such as 13N and 18F with subsequent emission of gamma radiation energy below 511 keV. The gamma rays from products electron-positron annihilation of positrons emitted in the decay of 18F are the most abundant and the first observable as soon as the atmosphere of the nova starts to become transparent to gamma radiation. Hence the importance of the study of nuclear reactions that lead both to the formation and to the destruction of 18F . Among these, the 18F(p,α)15O reaction is one of the main channels of destruction. This reaction was then studied at energies of astrophysical interest. The experiment done at Riken, Japan, has as its objective the study of the 18F(p,α)15O reaction, using a beam of 18F produced at CRIB, to derive important information about the phenomenon of novae. In this paper we present the experimental technique and the Monte Carlo code developed to be used in the data analysis process.

  5. Effect of Surface Modification on Nano-Structured LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 Spinel Materials.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyung-Man; Chen, Michael Vincent; MacRae, Alex C; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2015-08-01

    Fine-tuning of particle size and morphology has been shown to result in differential material performance in the area of secondary lithium-ion batteries. For instance, reduction of particle size to the nanoregime typically leads to better transport of electrochemically active species by increasing the amount of reaction sites as a result of higher electrode surface area. The spinel-phase oxide LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO), was prepared using a sol-gel based template synthesis to yield nanowire morphology without any additional binders or electronic conducting agents. Therefore, proper experimentation of the nanosize effect can be achieved in this study. The spinel phase LMNO is a high energy electrode material currently being explored for use in lithium-ion batteries, with a specific capacity of 146 mAh/g and high-voltage plateau at ∼4.7 V (vs Li/Li(+)). However, research has shown that extensive electrolyte decomposition and the formation of a surface passivation layer results when LMNO is implemented as a cathode in electrochemical cells. As a result of the high surface area associated with nanosized particles, manganese ion dissolution results in capacity fading over prolonged cycling. In order to prevent these detrimental effects without compromising electrochemical performance, various coating methods have been explored. In this work, TiO2 and Al2O3 thin films were deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the surface of LNMO particles. This resulted in effective surface protection by prevention of electrolyte side reactions and a sharp reduction in resistance at the electrode/electrolyte interface region.

  6. RADIOACTIVITY AND PHYSIOLOGICAL ACTION OF POTASSIUM.

    PubMed

    Loeb, R F

    1920-11-20

    1. The non-radioactive cesium ion can replace the potassium ion almost quantitatively in solutions required for the development of the egg of the sea urchin into swimming blastulae. 2. Thorium chloride and uranium acetate cannot replace the potassium chloride in the solutions required for the development of the egg. 3. Thorium chloride and uranium acetate do not antagonize the action of the potassium contained in sea water upon the development of eggs.

  7. Measurements with radioactive beams at ATLAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K. E.

    1998-08-06

    Reactions of interest to nuclear astrophysics have been studied with radioactive beams at the ATLAS accelerator. Using a modified ISOL technique, beams of {sup 18}F (T{sub 1/2} = 110 min) and {sup 56}Ni (T{sub 1/2} = 6.1d) were produced and the reactions {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O, {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}){sup 19}Ne, and {sup 56}Ni(d,p){sup 57}Ni have been investigated. The results indicate that the {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}) route is a small contributor to the breakout from the hot CNO cycle into the rp process, while the {sup 56}Ni(p,{gamma}){sup 57}Cu rate is about ten times larger than previously assumed.

  8. 15-O-Acetyl-3-O-benzoylcharaciol and helioscopinolide A, two diterpenes isolated from Euphorbia helioscopia suppress microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Jingling; Xu, Jing; Cui, Chun-Ai; Guo, Yuanqiang; Jin, Da-Qing

    2016-01-26

    Microglia activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases by producing neurotoxic factors. In the present study, we found that two diterpenes isolated from Euphorbia helioscopia, 15-O-Acetyl-3-O-benzoylcharaciol and helioscopinolide A suppressed NO and PGE2 production by inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia cells. The diterpenes also inhibited the production of ROS and proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the mechanism involved the NF-κB but not Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Moreover, the two diterpenes also attenuate microglia activation-mediated neuronal death. These results suggest that 15-O-Acetyl-3-O-benzoylcharaciol and helioscopinolide A may provide potential therapeutic strategy for various neuroinflammatory diseases.

  9. Determination of Complex Structures from Powder Diffraction Data: The Crystal Structure of La 3Ti 5Al 15O 37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Russell E.; Owen, Jonathan J.; Stalick, Judith K.; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    1994-07-01

    The applicability of powder diffraction techniques to structure determination has improved substantially in recent times, but it has only been successfully utilized in the solution of relatively simple structures of up to 29 atoms in the asymmetric unit. The structure La 3Ti 5Al 15O 37, which has 60 atoms in the asymmetric unit, has been solved using a combination of synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. This represents a considerable advance in the size of structure that has been solved using powder diffraction techniques. The structure of La 3Ti 5Al 15O 37 consists of small regions of simpler structure types in the La/Ti/Al/O system, interleaved to form a complex 3D network.

  10. Microwave property improvement of Ca[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ perovskite by A-site substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mingzhe; Xiong, Gang; Ding, Zhao

    2016-04-01

    The crystal structure and microwave dielectric properties of Ca[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ ceramic (CLNZ) are tuned by A-site substitution of Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions in the present paper. The tuning effect on the crystal structure is investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and it illustrates that single phase of orthorhombic perovskite structure is formed, however, minor amount of BaNb2O6-type second phase is also detected in (Ca1-xBax)[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ ceramics (CBLNZ) in the range of x ≥ 0.025, while pure perovskite phase is obtained in (Ca1-xSrx)[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ ceramics (CSLNZ) in the whole investigation range of 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2. With the increase of x value, the unit cell volumes of both CBLNZ and CSLNZ perovskites gradually expand, which results in the degradation of the vibration bond strength between the B-site ions and oxygen in the perovskites. The microscopic structure related thermal parameters in CSLNZ and CBLNZ perovskites are analyzed in terms of Clausius-Mossotti equation to reveal the original contributors in the temperature coefficients. The results show that both Sr2+ and Ba2+ substitution can effectively improve the permittivity and Qf value, especially, improve the temperature coefficient of CLNZ ceramic in a certain range.

  11. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  12. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  13. Lifetime measurement of the 6.79 MeV state in {sup 15}O with the AGATA demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Michelagnoli, C.; Depalo, R.; Ur, C. A.; Menegazzo, R.; Broggini, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Caciolli, A.; Farnea, E.; Lunardi, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Keeley, N.; Erhard, M.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Marta, M.; Mengoni, D.; Mijatovic, T.; Recchia, F.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Szuecs, T.; and others

    2012-11-12

    The preliminary results of a new direct measurement of the lifetime of the first excited 3/2{sup +} state in {sup 15}O are discussed. An accurate evaluation of this lifetime is of paramount importance for the determination of the cross section of the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction, the slowest one in the CNO cycle, at the energies of the solar Gamow peak. The {sup 2}H({sup 14}N,{sup 15}O)n reaction in inverse kinematics at 32MeV beam energy (XTU Tandem, LNL) was used to populate the level of interest, which decays via a 6.79 MeV E1 gamma-ray transition to the ground state. Gamma rays were detected with 4 triple clusters of HPGe detectors of the AGATA Demonstrator array. The energy resolution and position sensitivity of this state-of-the-art gamma-ray spectrometer have been exploited to investigate the Doppler Shift Attenuation effect on the lineshape of the gamma-ray peak in the energy spectrum. The deconvolution of the lifetime effects from those due to the kinematics of the emitting nuclei has been performed using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the gamma emission and detection. CDCC-CRC calculations for the nucleon transfer process have been used for this purpose and preliminary results are shown.

  14. Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  15. Lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate and LiBF4 blend salts electrolyte for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongming; Xiao, Kaiwen; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate (LiODFB) and LiBF4 blend salts in ethylene carbonate + dimethyl carbonate + ethyl(methyl) carbonate (EC + DMC + EMC, 1:1:1, by wt.) have been investigated for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode in lithium-ion batteries. The electric conductivity tests are utilized to examine the relationship among solution conductivity, the electrolyte composition and temperature. Through cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge test and AC impedance measurements, we compare the capacity and cycling efficiency of LNMO cathode in different electrolyte systems at different temperatures and discharge current rates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are served to analyze the surface nature of LNMO cathode after cycles at elevated temperature. These results demonstrate that LNMO cathode can exert excellent electrochemical performance with the increase of LiODFB concentration at room temperature and elevated temperature and it is found that just slight LiBF4, mixed with LiODFB as blend salts, can strikingly improve the cyclability at -20 °C, especially in high-rate cycling. Grouped together, the optimum LiODFB/LiBF4 molar ratio is around 4:1, which can present an excellent affinity to LNMO cathode in a wide electrochemical window.

  16. Preparation and conductivity of composite apatite La9.33Si6O26 (LSO) - Zr0.85Y0.15O1.925 (YSZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noviyanti, Atiek Rostika; Irwansyah, Ferli S.; Hidayat, Sahrul; Hardian, Arie; Syarif, Dani Gustaman; Yuliyati, Yati B.; Hastiawan, Iwan

    2016-02-01

    A great challenge to reduce high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to intermediate temperature SOFC (IT-SOFC, 500-750 °C), is the development of solid electrolyte materials with high ionic conductivity at intermediate temperature range. In response to this challenge, here we report a novel composite material La9.33Si6O26 (LSO)-Zr0.85Y0.15O1.925 (YSZ). LSO-YSZ composite synthesis was carried out by combining LSO with commercial YSZ (9:1, 8:2, 7:3) using hydrothermal method. In order to get dense pellet, all of the product were sintered at 1450 °C for 3 hours. X-ray diffraction pattern of the entire pellets show typical both of LSO and YSZ pattern which indicate that the composite was succesfully formed. The highest conductivity was detected in YSZ-7LSO (YSZ:LSO = 7: 3), i.e 1.72 × 10-4 Scm-1 at 700 °C and also has low activation energy (0.88 eV). This result suggests that the LSO-YSZ composite materials are good oxide ion conductor and potential to be used as an alternative solid electrolyte in IT-SOFC technology.

  17. Exploiting chemically and electrochemically reactive phosphite derivatives for high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Min; Kim, Choon-Ki; Kim, Ko-Eun; Hong, Sung You; Choi, Nam-Soon

    2016-01-01

    A family of organophosphorus compounds including triphenyl phosphite (TPP), trimethyl phosphite (TMP), tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TFEP), and tris(trimethylsilyl) phosphite (TMSP) is investigated as additives for the stabilization of high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) cathode-electrolyte interface. Our investigation reveals that the cycling performance of Li/LNMO half cells with the TMP, TFEP or TMSP additive is drastically improved at 60 °C compared to the baseline electrolyte. Among the various phosphite-based additives tested, TMSP additive enables facile Li ion transport at high C rates and significantly enhances the storage performance of the Li/LNMO cells at 60 °C. To understand the effects of the phosphite-based additives on electrolyte oxidative decomposition at high voltages, the surface chemistry of the cathode after precycling is investigated via ex-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, the roles of phosphite-based additives to suppress LiPF6 hydrolysis and to remove HF are examined via 19F and 31P NMR spectroscopies.

  18. Radioactive oxygen-15 in the study of cerebral blood flow, blood volume, and oxygen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Herscovitch, P.

    1985-10-01

    The short half-life of /sup 15/O led early observers to believe that it was unsuitable for use as a biological tracer. However, initial studies with this nuclide demonstrated its potential usefulness for in vivo, regional physiologic measurements. Subsequently, techniques were developed to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume, and oxygen metabolism using intracarotid injection of /sup 15/O-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and highly collimated scintillation probes to record the time course of radioactivity in the brain. The development of positron emission tomography (PET) made possible the in vivo, noninvasive measurement of the absolute concentration of positron-emitting nuclides. A variety of tracer kinetic models were formulated to obtain physiologic measurements from tomographic images of the distribution of 15O-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in the brain. Regional cerebral oxygen metabolism is measured using scan data obtained following the inhalation of /sup 15/O-labeled oxygen. The tracer kinetic models used to measure rCBV, blood flow, and oxygen metabolism will be described and their relative advantages and limitations discussed. Several examples of the use of /sup 15/O tracer methods will be reviewed to demonstrate their widespread applicability to the study of cerebral physiology and pathophysiology. 110 references.

  19. REMOVAL OF RADIOACTIVE IONS FROM WATERS

    DOEpatents

    Silker, W.B.

    1962-04-10

    A process for removing neutron-reaction products, such as phosphorus, arsenic, manganese, copper, zinc, lanthanides, and actinides, from aqueous solutions by sorption on particles of aluminum metal is described. (AEC)

  20. Electron Accelerators for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lia Merminga

    2007-10-10

    The summary of this paper is that to optimize the design of an electron drive, one must: (a) specify carefully the user requirements--beam energy, beam power, duty factor, and longitudinal and transverse emittance; (b) evaluate different machine options including capital cost, 10-year operating cost and delivery time. The author is convinced elegant solutions are available with existing technology. There are several design options and technology choices. Decisions will depend on system optimization, in-house infrastructure and expertise (e.g. cryogenics, SRF, lasers), synergy with other programs.

  1. Apparatus and method for preparing oxygen-15 labeled water H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] in an injectable form for use in positron emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Ferrieri, Richard A.; Schlyer, David J.; Alexoff, David

    1996-01-09

    A handling and processing apparatus for preparing Oxygen-15 labeled water (H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O]) in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography from preferably H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] produced by irradiating a flowing gas target of nitrogen and hydrogen. The apparatus includes a collector for receiving and directing a gas containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] gas and impurities, mainly ammonia (NH.sub.3) gas into sterile water to trap the H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] and form ammonium (NH.sub.4.sup.+) in the sterile water. A device for displacing the sterile water containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] and NH.sub.4.sup.+ through a cation resin removes NH.sub.4.sup.+ from the sterile water. A device for combining the sterile water containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] with a saline solution produces an injectable solution. Preferably, the apparatus includes a device for delivering the solution to a syringe for injection into a patient. Also, disclosed is a method for preparing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography in which the method neither requires isotopic exchange reaction nor application of high temperature.

  2. Apparatus and method for preparing oxygen-15 labeled water H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] in an injectable form for use in positron emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Schlyer, D.J.; Alexoff, D.

    1996-01-09

    A handling and processing apparatus is revealed for preparing Oxygen-15 labeled water (H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O]) in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography from preferably H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] produced by irradiating a flowing gas target of nitrogen and hydrogen. The apparatus includes a collector for receiving and directing a gas containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] gas and impurities, mainly ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas into sterile water to trap the H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] and form ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) in the sterile water. A device for displacing the sterile water containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] and NH{sub 4}{sup +} through a cation resin removes NH{sub 4}{sup +} from the sterile water. A device for combining the sterile water containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] with a saline solution produces an injectable solution. Preferably, the apparatus includes a device for delivering the solution to a syringe for injection into a patient. Also, disclosed is a method for preparing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography in which the method neither requires isotopic exchange reaction nor application of high temperature. 7 figs.

  3. Semiconductor to metallic type transition in Ni1.5Fe1.5O4 ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneeshkumar K., S.; Bhowmik, R. N.

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated electrical properties of Ni1.5Fe1.5O4 ferrite. The sample has been prepared by chemical coprecipitation route. The dc limit of conductivity has been derived from the fitting of ac conductivity data using Johnscher power law and Cole-Cole plot of impedance spectrum. The temperature dependence of dc conductivity data indicated a semiconductor to metallic type transition at 373K and metallic to semiconductor transition at 413K. Such electrical transition may be attributed to the effect of localization and de-localization of charge carriers in the hopping paths (Fe3+-O-Fe3+) and (Ni2+-O-Ni3+).

  4. 77 FR 58416 - Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Spent Ion Exchange Resins From Commercial Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste Spent Ion Exchange Resins from... Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste Spent...

  5. Reclaiming the spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya; Cui, Yan; Zuo, Xiaoxi; Huang, Shanna; Hu, Keshui; Xiao, Xin; Nan, Junmin

    2014-10-01

    A process for reclaiming the materials in spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide (Zn-Mn) batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 materials is presented. After dismantling battery cans, the iron cans, covers, electric rods, organic separator, label, sealing materials, and electrolyte are separated through the washing, magnetic separation, filtrating, and sieving operations. Then, the powder residues react with H2SO4 (2 mol L(-1)) solution to dissolve zinc under a liquid/solid ratio of 3:1 at room temperature, and subsequently, the electrolytic Zn with purity of ⩾99.8% is recovered in an electrolytic cell with a cathode efficiency of ⩾85% under the conditions of 37-40°C and 300 A m(-2). The most of MnO2 and a small quantity of electrolytic MnO2 are recovered from the filtration residue and the electrodeposit on the anode of electrolytic cell, respectively. The recovered manganese oxides are used to synthesize LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material of lithium-ion battery. The as-synthesized LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 discharges 118.3 mAh g(-1) capacity and 4.7 V voltage plateau, which is comparable to the sample synthesized using commercial electrolytic MnO2. This process can recover the substances in the spent Zn-Mn batteries and innocuously treat the wastewaters, indicating that it is environmentally acceptable and applicable. PMID:24906867

  6. SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE COLUMBIUM TRACER

    DOEpatents

    Glendenin, L.E.; Gest, H.

    1958-08-26

    A process is presented for the recovery of radioactive columbium from solutions containing such columbium together with radioactive tellurium. The columbium and tellurium values are separated from such solutions by means of an inorganic oxide carrier precipitate, such as MnO/sub 2/. This oxide carrier precipitate and its associated columbium and telluriuan values are then dissolved in an aqueous acidic solution and nonradioactive tellurium, in an ionic form, is then introduced into such solution, for example in the form of H/sub 2/TeO/sub 3/. The tellurium present in the solution is then reduced to the elemental state and precipitates, and is then separated from the supernataat solution. A basic acetate precipitate is formed in the supernatant and carries the remaining columblum values therefrom. After separation, this basic ferric acetate precipitate is dissolved, and the ferric ions are removed by means of an organic solvent extraction process utilizing ether. The remaining solution contains carrier-free columbium as its only metal ion.

  7. Radioactivity and food

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references.

  8. Comparisons between radioactive and non-radioactive gas lantern mantles.

    PubMed

    Furuta, E; Yoshizawa, Y; Aburai, T

    2000-12-01

    Gas lantern mantles containing radioactive thorium have been used for more than 100 years. Although thorium was once believed to be indispensable for giving a bright light, non-radioactive mantles are now available. From the radioactivities of the daughter nuclides, we estimated the levels of radioactivity of 232Th and 228Th in 11 mantles. The mantles contained various levels of radioactivity from background levels to 1410 +/- 140 Bq. Our finding that radioactive and non-radioactive mantles are equally bright suggests that there is no advantage in using radioactive mantles. A remaining problem is that gas lantern mantles are sold without any information about radioactivity.

  9. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  10. A 15O-H2O PET study of meditation and the resting state of normal consciousness.

    PubMed

    Lou, H C; Kjaer, T W; Friberg, L; Wildschiodtz, G; Holm, S; Nowak, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the neural structures subserving meditation can be reproducibly measured, and, if so, whether they are different from those supporting the resting state of normal consciousness. Cerebral blood flow distribution was investigated with the 15O-H20 PET technique in nine young adults, who were highly experienced yoga teachers, during the relaxation meditation (Yoga Nidra), and during the resting state of normal consciousness. In addition, global CBF was measured in two of the subjects. Spectral EEG analysis was performed throughout the investigations. In meditation, differential activity was seen, with the noticeable exception of V1, in the posterior sensory and associative cortices known to participate in imagery tasks. In the resting state of normal consciousness (compared with meditation as a baseline), differential activity was found in dorso-lateral and orbital frontal cortex, anterior cingulate gyri, left temporal gyri, left inferior parietal lobule, striatal and thalamic regions, pons and cerebellar vermis and hemispheres, structures thought to support an executive attentional network. The mean global flow remained unchanged for both subjects throughout the investigation (39+/-5 and 38+/-4 ml/100 g/min, uncorrected for partial volume effects). It is concluded that the (H2)15O PET method may measure CBF distribution in the meditative state as well as during the resting state of normal consciousness, and that characteristic patterns of neural activity support each state. These findings enhance our understanding of the neural basis of different aspects of consciousness.

  11. A new approach of weighted integration technique based on accumulated images using dynamic PET and H2(15)O

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoi, T.; Kanno, I.; Iida, H.; Miura, S.; Uemura, K. )

    1991-05-01

    We developed a new technique of weighted integration for the measurement of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and the blood-tissue partition coefficient (p) using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and H2(15)O. The weighted integration in the new technique is carried out on the equation of the first time integration of the Kety-Schmidt differential equation. Practically, serially accumulated images with sequentially prolonged accumulation times are weighted by two arbitrary functions. The weighting functions do not have to be differentiated because of the exclusion of the differential term in the starting equation. Consequently, the method does not require data at the end of the scan. The technique was applied to H2(15)O dynamic PET performed on four normal subjects, and was verified to provide a better signal-to-noise ratio than the previously developed integrated projection (IP) technique. Computer simulations were carried out to investigate the effects of statistical noise, tissue heterogeneity, and time delay and dispersion in arterial input function. The simulation showed that the new technique provided about a 1.4 times lower statistical error in both LCBF and p at 50 ml 100 g-1 min-1 compared to the IP technique, and it should be noted that the new technique was less sensitive to the shape of the weighting functions. The new technique provides a new strategy with respect to the statistical error for estimation of LCBF and p.

  12. Methodological aspects of brain activation studies: cerebral blood flow determined with [15O]butanol and positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Ingvar, M; Eriksson, L; Greitz, T; Stone-Elander, S; Dahlbom, M; Rosenqvist, G; af Trampe, P; von Euler, C

    1994-07-01

    In this methodological study, a procedure for measuring regional CBF (rCBF) with positron emission tomography and 15O-labelled tracers is optimized. Four healthy volunteers were subjected to eight studies with use of [15O]butanol as a tracer: four times while reading aloud and four times while reading silently from a phonologically balanced list of single words. The gain from these repeated intra-individual studies of the same activation state (fractionation) was demonstrated in terms of noise-equivalent counts in a phantom study. A computerized brain atlas was used to reformat the images to a common anatomical representation, thereby minimizing the effects of inter- and intra-individual anatomical and positional variations. This allowed the formation of inter- and intra-individual average subtraction images with error estimates. Differences between the two activation states were detected with use of an exploratory significance map based on a paired Student's t test. The results compared well with Friston's method of determining levels of statistical significance. No difference was obtained when comparing results from rCBF images and images generated from measurement of uptake of the tracer. The paradigm chosen for activation was shown to yield a constant activation level during the repeated measurements (i.e., no habituation).

  13. Reclaiming the spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ya; Cui, Yan; Zuo, Xiaoxi; Huang, Shanna; Hu, Keshui; Xiao, Xin; Nan, Junmin

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The spent Zn–Mn batteries collected from manufacturers is the target waste. • A facile reclaiming process is presented. • The zinc is reclaimed to valuable electrolytic zinc by electrodepositing method. • The manganese elements are to produce valuable LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} battery material. • The reclamation process features environmental friendliness and saving resource. - Abstract: A process for reclaiming the materials in spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide (Zn–Mn) batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials is presented. After dismantling battery cans, the iron cans, covers, electric rods, organic separator, label, sealing materials, and electrolyte are separated through the washing, magnetic separation, filtrating, and sieving operations. Then, the powder residues react with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (2 mol L{sup −1}) solution to dissolve zinc under a liquid/solid ratio of 3:1 at room temperature, and subsequently, the electrolytic Zn with purity of ⩾99.8% is recovered in an electrolytic cell with a cathode efficiency of ⩾85% under the conditions of 37–40 °C and 300 A m{sup −2}. The most of MnO{sub 2} and a small quantity of electrolytic MnO{sub 2} are recovered from the filtration residue and the electrodeposit on the anode of electrolytic cell, respectively. The recovered manganese oxides are used to synthesize LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} material of lithium-ion battery. The as-synthesized LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} discharges 118.3 mAh g{sup −1} capacity and 4.7 V voltage plateau, which is comparable to the sample synthesized using commercial electrolytic MnO{sub 2}. This process can recover the substances in the spent Zn–Mn batteries and innocuously treat the wastewaters, indicating that it is environmentally acceptable and applicable.

  14. Membrane technologies for liquid radioactive waste treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, A. G.; Harasimowicz, M.; Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with some problems concerning reduction of radioactivity of liquid low-level nuclear waste streams (LLLW). The membrane processes as ultrafiltration (UF), seeded ultrafiltration (SUF), reverse osmosis (RO) and membrane distillation (MD) were examined. Ultrafiltration enables the removal of particles with molecular weight above cut-off of UF membranes and can be only used as a pre-treatment stage. The improvement of removal is achieved by SUF, employing macromolecular ligands binding radioactive ions. The reduction of radioactivity in LLLW to very low level were achieved with RO membranes. The results of experiments led the authors to the design and construction of UF+2RO pilot plant. The development of membrane distillation improve the selectivity of membrane process in some cases. The possibility of utilisation of waste heat from cooling system of nuclear reactors as a preferable energy source can significantly reduce the cost of operation.

  15. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  16. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  17. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  18. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  19. Radioactivity Measurements on Glazed Ceramic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, T G

    2000-01-01

    A variety of commonly available household and industrial ceramic items and some specialty glass materials were assayed by alpha pulse counting and ion chamber voltage measurements for radioactivity concentrations. Identification of radionuclides in some of the items was performed by gamma spectroscopy. The samples included tableware, construction tiles and decorative tiles, figurines, and other products with a clay based composition. The concentrations of radioactivity ranged from near background to about four orders of magnitude higher. Almost every nuclide identification test demonstrated some radioactivity content from one or more of the naturally occurring radionuclide series of thorium or uranium. The glazes seemed to contribute most of the activity, although a sample of unglazed pottery greenware showed some activity. Samples of glazing paints and samples of deliberately doped glass from the World War II era were included in the test, as was a section of foam filled poster board. A glass disc with known (232)Th radioactivity concentration was cast for use as a calibration source. The results from the two assay methods are compared, and a projection of sensitivity from larger electret ion chamber devices is presented.

  20. Superspin glassy behaviour of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.15}O{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manish; Choudhary, R. J. Shukla, D. K.; Phase, D. M.

    2014-07-21

    Here, we present the low temperature magnetic behaviour of epitaxial La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.15}O{sub 3} (LCMAO) thin film through a series of DC magnetic measurements. Overall behaviour inferred from the magnetization measurements indicate that the magnetic phases created due to Al doping induced inhomogeneous distribution of Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} ions and oxygen vacancies present in the system act like superspins, and the strong interaction among themselves results in the superspin glassy behaviour. Interactions among the superspins are marked by the aging and zero filed memory effects. The glassy magnetic phase in LCMAO is found to follow the hierarchical model of spin glasses.

  1. A 15O-H2O PET study of meditation and the resting state of normal consciousness.

    PubMed

    Lou, H C; Kjaer, T W; Friberg, L; Wildschiodtz, G; Holm, S; Nowak, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the neural structures subserving meditation can be reproducibly measured, and, if so, whether they are different from those supporting the resting state of normal consciousness. Cerebral blood flow distribution was investigated with the 15O-H20 PET technique in nine young adults, who were highly experienced yoga teachers, during the relaxation meditation (Yoga Nidra), and during the resting state of normal consciousness. In addition, global CBF was measured in two of the subjects. Spectral EEG analysis was performed throughout the investigations. In meditation, differential activity was seen, with the noticeable exception of V1, in the posterior sensory and associative cortices known to participate in imagery tasks. In the resting state of normal consciousness (compared with meditation as a baseline), differential activity was found in dorso-lateral and orbital frontal cortex, anterior cingulate gyri, left temporal gyri, left inferior parietal lobule, striatal and thalamic regions, pons and cerebellar vermis and hemispheres, structures thought to support an executive attentional network. The mean global flow remained unchanged for both subjects throughout the investigation (39+/-5 and 38+/-4 ml/100 g/min, uncorrected for partial volume effects). It is concluded that the (H2)15O PET method may measure CBF distribution in the meditative state as well as during the resting state of normal consciousness, and that characteristic patterns of neural activity support each state. These findings enhance our understanding of the neural basis of different aspects of consciousness. PMID:9950067

  2. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one of us (MV) worked at, and after talking with numerous colleagues we know this is still the case at many schools. What options are there then for physics teachers to allow their students to experimentally investigate certain characteristics of radioactivity, such as how distance affects the intensity of radiation coming from a radioactive source? There are computer simulations that can be run, or perhaps the teacher has a light sensor and tries to make an analogy between the intensity of light from a light bulb and the intensity of radiation from a radioactive source based on geometric arguments to get an inverse-square law. But for many there is no direct experimental option if one does not possess a Geiger counter and good radioactive sample. It is for that teacher and class of students that an online, remote radioactivity experiment was created.

  3. Radioactive Target Production at RIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, J. C.

    2002-12-01

    We explore the production of samples of long-lived isotopes (t1/2 >1 h) at an advanced radioactive ion beam facility, RIA. Production yields at RIA are compared to capabilities at stable beam facilities and at high-flux reactors. Long-lived neutron-rich nuclei can generally be produced more efficiently in a nuclear reactor if appropriate target samples are available. As a result, only two s process branch point nuclei, 135Cs and 163Ho, seem suitable for sample production at RIA. In contrast, samples of many long-lived proton-rich nuclei are produced effectively at RIA, including isotopes important for the p process. Sample production at RIA is more favored when the lifetime of the isotope is shorter.

  4. [Hight-temperature matrices to immobilize radioactive waste].

    PubMed

    Stefanovskiĭ, S V; Lashenova, T N; Ptashkin, A G

    2006-01-01

    To immobilize liquid radioactive waste with medium activity level, specialists of "RADON" Industrial Research Association use borosilicate glass incorporating up to 30-35 mass percent of radioactive waste, with sulfate and chloride ions content up to 1 mass percent. To increase those concentrations, the authors suggest putting phosphate or vanadate additives into borosilicate glass or using phosphate glass. In vitrification of solid waste, for instance burning oven slag, sodium silicate or dolomite and bentonite mixture are suggested as additives. PMID:16568844

  5. Leachate tests with sewage sludge contaminated by radioactive cesium.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Ikuo; Ogoshi, Masashi; Harada, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The sewer systems of eastern Japan have transported radioactive fallout from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident to wastewater treatment plants, where the radioisotopes have accumulated. To better understand the potential problems associated with the disposal of contaminated sewage sludge in landfills, leachate tests were conducted with radioactive incinerator ash, cement solidification incinerator ash, and dewatered sludge cake. Radioactivity was undetectable in the eluate from incinerator ash and dewatered sludge cake, but about 30% of the radioactivity initially in cement solidification incinerator ash appeared in the eluate during the leaching experiments. Moreover, modification of test conditions revealed that the presence of Ca(2+) ions and strong alkali in the water that contacted the incinerator ash enhanced leaching of cesium. Lastly, the capacity of pit soil to absorb radioactive cesium was estimated to be at least 3.0 Bq/g (dry).

  6. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2012-02-15

    We investigated the ion-loss distribution on the sidewall of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chamber using the 18-GHz ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC). Similarities and differences between the ion-loss distributions (longitudinal and azimuthal) of different ion species (i.e., radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions that are typical volatile and nonvolatile elements) was qualitatively discussed to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency. Especially, the similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  7. Radioactive iodine uptake

    MedlinePlus

    ... much radioactive iodine is taken up by your thyroid gland in a certain time period. A similar test ... over the area of your neck where the thyroid gland is located. The probe detects the location and ...

  8. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  9. Sol-gel synthesis of aliovalent vanadium-doped LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O(4) cathodes with excellent performance at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Chul; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Hu, Enyuan; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Kim, Hyungsub; Kang, Kisuk; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Kim, Woo-Seong; Lee, Yun-Sung

    2014-03-01

    Extraordinary performance at elevated temperature is achieved for high-voltage spinel-phase LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 cathodes prepared using an adipic-acid-assisted sol-gel technique and doped with vanadium. V-substitution in the Li sites (Wykoff position 8a) is confirmed by V K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Rietveld refinement (Li0.995 V0.005 Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 ). V-doped LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 delivered a reversible capacity of approximately 130 and 142 mAh g(-1) at ambient and elevated temperature conditions, respectively. Furthermore, the Li0.995 V0.005 Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 phase rendered approximately 94 % and 84 % of initial capacity compared to approximately 85 % and 3 % for the LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 phase after 100 cycles in ambient and elevated temperature conditions, respectively. The enhancements are mainly because of the suppression of Mn dissolution and unwanted side reaction with electrolyte counterpart, and to the increase in conductivity, improving the electrochemical profiles for the V-doped phase. PMID:24399460

  10. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  11. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  12. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  13. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, Stanley R.

    1985-01-01

    A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

  14. Resonance strengths in the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, Michele; Trompler, Erik; Bemmerer, Daniel; Beyer, Roland; Grosse, Eckart; Hannaske, Roland; Junghans, Arnd R.; Nair, Chithra; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas; Yakorev, Dmitry; Broggini, Carlo; Caciolli, Antonio; Erhard, Martin; Menegazzo, Roberto; Fueloep, Zsolt; Gyuerky, Gyoergy; Szuecs, Tamas; Vezzu, Simone

    2010-05-15

    The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction is the slowest reaction of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle of hydrogen burning in stars. As a consequence, it determines the rate of the cycle. The {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reaction is frequently used in inverse kinematics for hydrogen depth profiling in materials. The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reactions have been studied simultaneously, using titanium nitride targets of natural isotopic composition and a proton beam. The strengths of the resonances at E{sub p} = 1058 keV in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and at E{sub p} = 897 and 430 keV in {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C have been determined with improved precision, relative to the well-known resonance at E{sub p} = 278 keV in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O. The new recommended values are omegagamma=0.353+-0.018, 362+-20, and 21.9+-1.0 eV for their respective strengths. In addition, the branching ratios for the decay of the E{sub p} = 1058 keV resonance in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O have been redetermined. The data reported here should facilitate future studies of off-resonant capture in the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction that are needed for an improved R-matrix extrapolation of the cross section. In addition, the data on the 430 keV resonance in {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C may be useful for hydrogen depth profiling.

  15. Coulomb excitation of radioactive {sup 79}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; Blumenthal, D.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    The technical challenges expected in experiments with radioactive beams can already be explored by using ions produced in primary reactions. In addition, the re-excitation of these ions by Coulomb excitation allows a sensitive search for collective states that are well above the yrast line. We are building an experiment to study Coulomb excitation of radioactive ions which are separated from beam particles by the Fragment Mass Analyzer. An array of gamma detectors will be mounted at the focal plane to measure the gamma radiation following re-excitation. Five Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and five planar LEPS detectors will be used. The optimum experiment of this type appears to be the study of {sup 79}Rb following the {sup 24}Mg ({sup 58}Ni,3p) reaction. We calculate that about 5 x 10{sup 5} {sup 79}Rb nuclei/second will reach the excitation foil. This rubidium isotope was selected for study as it is strongly produced and is highly deformed, so easily re-excited. The use of a {sup 58}Ni re-excitation foil offers the best yields. After re-excitation the ions will be subsequently transported into a shielded beamdump to prevent the accumulation of activity.

  16. Rapid screening of radioactivity in food for emergency response.

    PubMed

    Bari, A; Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Syed, U-F; Roselan, A; Haines, D K; Roth, G; West, L; Arndt, M

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the development of methods for the rapid screening of gross alpha (GA) and gross beta (GB) radioactivity in liquid foods, specifically, Tang drink mix, apple juice, and milk, as well as screening of GA, GB, and gamma radioactivity from surface deposition on apples. Detailed procedures were developed for spiking of matrices with (241)Am (alpha radioactivity), (90)Sr/(90)Y (beta radioactivity), and (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (241)Am (gamma radioactivity). Matrix stability studies were performed for 43 days after spiking. The method for liquid foods is based upon rapid digestion, evaporation, and flaming, followed by gas proportional (GP) counting. For the apple matrix, surface radioactivity was acid-leached, followed by GP counting and/or gamma spectrometry. The average leaching recoveries from four different apple brands were between 63% and 96%, and have been interpreted on the basis of ion transport through the apple cuticle. The minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs) were calculated from either the background or method-blank (MB) measurements. They were found to satisfy the required U.S. FDA's Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) in all but one case. The newly developed methods can perform radioactivity screening in foods within a few hours and have the potential to capacity with further automation. They are especially applicable to emergency response following accidental or intentional contamination of food with radioactivity.

  17. Words in melody: an H(2)15O PET study of brain activation during singing and speaking.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, K J; Fritz, J B; Braun, A R

    2003-04-15

    We used H(2)15O PET to characterize the interaction of words and melody by comparing brain activity measured while subjects spoke or sang the words to a familiar song. Relative increases in activity during speaking vs singing were observed in the left hemisphere, in classical perisylvian language areas including the posterior superior temporal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and frontal operculum, as well as in Rolandic cortices and putamen. Relative increases in activity during singing were observed in the right hemisphere: these were maximal in the right anterior superior temporal gyrus and contiguous portions of the insula; relative increases associated with singing were also detected in the right anterior middle temporal gyrus and superior temporal sulcus, medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, mesial temporal cortices and cerebellum, as well as in Rolandic cortices and nucleus accumbens. These results indicate that the production of words in song is associated with activation of regions within right hemisphere areas that are not mirror-image homologues of left hemisphere perisylvian language areas, and suggest that multiple neural networks may be involved in different aspects of singing. Right hemisphere mechanisms may support the fluency-evoking effects of singing in neurological disorders such as stuttering or aphasia.

  18. Measurement of the Erc .m .=259 keV resonance in the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, S.; Kelly, K. J.; Champagne, A. E.; Buckner, M. Q.; Iliadis, C.; Howard, C.

    2016-08-01

    The 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction regulates the power generated by the CN cycle and thus impacts the structure and evolution of every star at some point in its life. The lowest positive-energy resonance in this reaction is located at Erc .m .=259 keV, too high in energy to strongly influence quiescent stellar burning. However, the strength of this resonance is used as a cross-section normalization for lower-energy measurements of this reaction. We report on new measurements of the energy, strength, and γ -ray branching ratios for the 259-keV resonance, using different detection and data-analysis schemes. We have also reevaluated previous results, where possible. Our new recommended strength of ω γ =12.6 (3 ) meV is in agreement with the previous value of 13.1(6) meV, but is more precise and thus provides a more reliable normalization for low-energy (p ,γ ) measurements.

  19. Radioactivity in food crops

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  20. Radioactivity of Consumer Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek; Fulmer, Philip

    2006-11-01

    A variety of consumer products and household items contain varying amounts of radioactivity. Examples of these items include: FiestaWare and similar glazed china, salt substitute, bananas, brazil nuts, lantern mantles, smoke detectors and depression glass. Many of these items contain natural sources of radioactivity such as Uranium, Thorium, Radium and Potassium. A few contain man-made sources like Americium. This presentation will detail the sources and relative radioactivity of these items (including demonstrations). Further, measurements of the isotopic ratios of Uranium-235 and Uranium-238 in several pieces of china will be compared to historical uses of natural and depleted Uranium. Finally, the presenters will discuss radiation safety as it pertains to the use of these items.

  1. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  2. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, S.R.

    1984-05-30

    A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

  3. Alterations in CNS Activity Induced by Botulinum Toxin Treatment in Spasmodic Dysphonia: An H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, S. Omar; Thomassen, Michael; Schulz, Geralyn M.; Hosey, Lara A.; Varga, Mary; Ludlow, Christy L.; Braun, Allen R.

    2006-01-01

    Speech-related changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured using H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O positron-emission tomography in 9 adults with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) before and after botulinum toxin (BTX) injection and 10 age- and gender-matched volunteers without neurological disorders. Scans were acquired at rest…

  4. Quantitative agreement between [(15)O]H2O PET and model free QUASAR MRI-derived cerebral blood flow and arterial blood volume.

    PubMed

    Heijtel, D F R; Petersen, E T; Mutsaerts, H J M M; Bakker, E; Schober, P; Stevens, M F; van Berckel, B N M; Majoie, C B L M; Booij, J; van Osch, M J P; van Bavel, E T; Boellaard, R; Lammertsma, A A; Nederveen, A J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether there was an agreement between quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial cerebral blood volume (CBVA) measurements by [(15)O]H2O positron emission tomography (PET) and model-free QUASAR MRI. Twelve healthy subjects were scanned within a week in separate MRI and PET imaging sessions, after which quantitative and qualitative agreement between both modalities was assessed for gray matter, white matter and whole brain region of interests (ROI). The correlation between CBF measurements obtained with both modalities was moderate to high (r(2): 0.28-0.60, P < 0.05), although QUASAR significantly underestimated CBF by 30% (P < 0.001). CBVA was moderately correlated (r(2): 0.28-0.43, P < 0.05), with QUASAR yielding values that were only 27% of the [(15)O]H2O-derived values (P < 0.001). Group-wise voxel statistics identified minor areas with significant contrast differences between [(15)O]H2O PET and QUASAR MRI, indicating similar qualitative CBVA and CBF information by both modalities. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that QUASAR MRI and [(15)O]H2O PET provide similar CBF and CBVA information, but with systematic quantitative discrepancies.

  5. Bench-scale treatability testing of biological, UV oxidation, distillation, and ion-exchange treatment of trench water from a low-level radioactive waste disposal area at West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Sundquist, J.A.; Gillings, J.C.; Sonntag, T.L.; Denault, R.P.

    1993-03-01

    Ecology and Environment, Inc. (E and E), under subcontract to Pacific Nuclear Services (PNS), conducted for the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) treatability tests to support the selection and design of a treatment system for leachate from Trench 14 of the West Valley State-Licensed, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area (SDA). In this paper E and E presents and discusses the treatability test results and provides recommendations for the design of the full-scale treatment system.

  6. BACE0.85Y0.15O3-DELTA Based Materials for Inovative Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhov, Kiril; Vladikova, Daria

    2016-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a promising green technology of direct conversion of chemical energy of fuel into electricity. Among the families of metal oxides, which can be successfully used as electrodes (cathodes or anodes) in SOFC, certain members of the large family of transition-metal oxides with perovskite structure ABO _{3} were found very prospective to fulfil most of the features required for preparation of mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) oxide materials for SOFCs operated in the intermediate temperature range. In this regard Barium cerate with Y-substitution at the B-site (Ce site) is well known for excellent conduction capabilities in the temperature range 400-800 °C as a result from the proton motion in the crystal lattice. Doping with Y ^{3+} is very effective and the proton conductivity in BaCe _{1-x}Y _{x}O _{3-δ} increases with the increasing of the dopant concentration up to x =0.2. However, the phase behaviour of the composition BCY20 (x=0.20) is very complicated. Even at room temperature the crystalline structure remains contradictory because various structures of monoclinic, rhombohedral and orthorhombic symmetry are reported. The characterization of the chemical composition and stability, oxygen stoichiometry and cationic ratios of each synthesized phase is of great importance to understand the defect-chemistry that would govern the transport properties. We report on oxygen-deficient BaCe _{0.85}Y _{0.15}O _{3-δ} (BCY15) perovskites prepared by auto-combustion with following calcination at high temperature. The structural details of powder, dense and porous samples of materials based on BCY15 were investigated from full profile analysis of neutron and x-ray diffraction patterns. The materials were used recently as cathode, anode and central membrane in an innovative monolithic design of SOFC.

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow during light sleep--a H(2)(15)O-PET study.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Troels W; Law, Ian; Wiltschiøtz, Gordon; Paulson, Olaf B; Madsen, Peter L

    2002-09-01

    This is the first report on the distribution of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes during stage-1 sleep or somnolence. Two hypotheses were tested: (A) that rCBF differed between the awake relaxed state and stage-1 sleep, (B) that hypnagogic hallucinations frequently experienced at sleep onset would be accompanied by measurable changes in rCBF using positron emission tomography (PET). Eight subjects were PET-scanned with (15)O-labeled water injection in three conditions: awake, stage-1 sleep with reportable experiences and stage-1 sleep without reportable experiences. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed continuously during the experiment. Sleep interviews were performed after each scan. The EEG was scored blindly to determine sleep stage. The sleep interviews revealed a substantial increase in how unrealistic and how leaping the thoughts were during stage-1 sleep. During sleep there was a relative flow increase in the occipital lobes and a relative flow decrease in the bilateral cerebellum, the bilateral posterior parietal cortex, the right premotor cortex and the left thalamus. Hypnagogic experiences seemed not to be associated with any relative flow changes. The topography of the occipital activation during stage-1 sleep supports a hypothesis of this state being a state of imagery. The rCBF decreases in premotor cortex, thalamus and cerebellum could be indicative of a general decline in preparedness for goal directed action during stage-1 sleep. Stage-1 sleep seems more similar to other forms of altered awareness, for example, relaxation meditation than to deeper sleep stages. We are of the opinion that stage-1 sleep represents the dreaming state of wakefulness, while rapid eye movement (REM) sleep reflects the dreaming state of the unaware, sleeping brain.

  8. Is perivetricular hyperintensity region caused by decreased cerebral blood flow?; assessment by {sup 15}O-PET study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminaga, T.; Hayashida, K.; Ishida, Y.

    1994-05-01

    The clinical significance of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism has not been established in patients who had periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study is to correlate the results of rCBF and oxygen metabolism by positron emission tomography (PET) with PVH by MRI. The subjects were 27 patients; 16 patient (group I) (male; 7, female; 9, age; 56.8{plus_minus}18.6) with PVH and age matched 11 patients (group II) (male; 6, female; 5, age; 55.3{plus_minus}13.6) without PVH. {sup 15}O-PET study was carried out by Headtome IV and rCBF, cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) of PVH and cerebellum was calculated. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained in all patients. Angiography was performed over 11 patients. The mean rCBF of group I in PVH (28.5{plus_minus}7.5 ml/100g/min) was significantly (p<0.01) lower than that of group II (38.6{plus_minus}5.7). The mean rCBF of group I and group II in cerebellum were 49.5{plus_minus}9.9 ml/100g/min and 50.2{plus_minus}8.9 respectively. There was no significant difference on CMRO{sub 2} and OEF between group I and group II. In MRI examination, PVH was detected in all group I patients and multiple high intensities were also detected in 7 patients of group I and 4 patients of group II on T2-weighted images. No significant stenosis (more than 75%) was detected in 11 patients by angiography. These data strongly indicate that PVH might be caused by decreased cerebral blood flow.

  9. Active remote detection of radioactivity based on electromagnetic signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Hafizi, B.; Milchberg, H.; Nusinovich, G.; Zigler, A.

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents a new concept for the remote detection of radioactive materials. The concept is based on the detection of electromagnetic signatures in the vicinity of radioactive material and can enable stand-off detection at distances greater than 100 m. Radioactive materials emit gamma rays, which ionize the surrounding air. The ionized electrons rapidly attach to oxygen molecules forming O{sub 2}{sup −} ions. The density of O{sub 2}{sup −} around radioactive material can be several orders of magnitude greater than background levels. The elevated population of O{sub 2}{sup −} extends several meters around the radioactive material. Electrons are easily photo-detached from O{sub 2}{sup −} ions by laser radiation. The photo-detached electrons, in the presence of laser radiation, initiate avalanche ionization which results in a rapid increase in electron density. The rise in electron density induces a frequency modulation on a probe beam, which becomes a direct spectral signature for the presence of radioactive material.

  10. Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Todd, Terry A.; Burchfield, Larry A.; Anshits, Alexander G.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Sapozhnikova, Natalia V.

    2006-10-03

    Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

  11. Reduced uptake of 18F-FDG and 15O-H2O in Alzheimer's disease-related regions after glucose loading.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kenji; Kawasaki, Keiichi; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ishii, Kenji

    2015-08-01

    Increased plasma glucose levels are known to reduce fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related regions, resulting in the appearance of an AD-like pattern. However, the relationships of its appearance with cerebral blood flow and insulin levels are uncertain. We performed (18)F-FDG and oxygen-15-labeled water ((15)O-H2O) positron emission tomography in the fasting and glucose-loading conditions on nine young healthy volunteers with no cognitive impairments. Measurement of plasma glucose and insulin levels confirmed that all subjects were free of insulin resistance, and that glucose loading significantly increased plasma glucose and insulin levels. Fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose and (15)O-H2O images were compared between the two conditions, focusing on AD-related regions: precuneus/posterior cingulate (PP), lateral parietal cortex (LPC), and frontal cortex (FC). Volume-of-interest analyses showed significantly lower uptake of both (18)F-FDG and (15)O-H2O in PP, LPC, and FC after glucose loading (P<0.05). Whole-brain voxel-wise analyses also revealed the PP, LPC, and FC areas where uptake of both (18)F-FDG and (15)O-H2O decreased (P<0.05, familywise error rate-corrected). We concluded that increased plasma glucose and insulin levels can cause the appearance of the AD-like pattern in both (18)F-FDG and (15)O-H2O images, and this phenomenon can occur even in subjects without insulin resistance. PMID:26058692

  12. Radioactivity test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of nuclear test performed to evaluate thyroid function. The patient ingests radioactive iodine (I-123 or I-131) capsules or liquid. After a time (usually 6 and 24-hours later), a gamma probe is placed over the thyroid gland to ...

  13. TABLE OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    For those chemical elements which have no stable nuclides with a terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on radioactive half-lives and relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest and importance have been evaluated and the recommended values and uncertainties are listed.

  14. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  15. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  16. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  17. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  18. Radioactivity and foods

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. )

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food--on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undersirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chenobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods.

  19. Di- and tricobalt Dawson sandwich complexes: synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and electrochemical behavior of Na(18)[(NaOH(2))(2)Co(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)] and Na(17)[(NaOH(2))Co(3)(H(2)O)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)].

    PubMed

    Ruhlmann, Laurent; Canny, Jacqueline; Contant, Roland; Thouvenot, René

    2002-07-29

    The reaction of the trivacant Dawson anion alpha-[P(2)W(15)O(56)](12-) and the divalent cations Co(2+) is known to form the tetracobalt sandwich complex [Co(4)(H(2)O)(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](16-) (Co(4)P(4)W(30)). Two new complexes, with different Co/P(2)W(15) stoichiometry, [(NaOH(2))(2)Co(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](18-) (Na(2)Co(2)P(4)W(30)) and [(NaOH(2))Co(3)(H(2)O)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](17-) (NaCo(3)P(4)W(30)), have been synthesized as aqueous-soluble sodium salts, by a slight modification of the reaction conditions. Both compounds were characterized by IR, elemental analysis, and (31)P solution NMR spectroscopy. These species are "lacunary" sandwich complexes, which add Co(2+) cations according to Na(2)Co(2)P(4)W(30) + Co(2+) --> NaCo(3)P(4)W(30) + Na(+) followed by NaCo(3)P(4)W(30) + Co(2+) --> Co(4)P(4)W(30) + Na(+). A Li(+)/Na(+) exchange in the cavity was evidenced by (31)P dynamic NMR spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of the sandwich complexes [(NaOH(2))Co(3)(H(2)O)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](17-) and [(NaOH(2))(2)Co(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](18-) were investigated in aqueous solutions and compared with that of [Co(4)(H(2)O)(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](16-). These complexes showed an electrocatalytic effect on nitrite reduction.

  20. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  1. Wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-11-16

    A wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector and monitor capable of measuring radioactive-gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude is described. The device is designed to have an ionization chamber sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel-plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel-plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization-chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  2. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, D E; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C(4+) and C(6+) ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 10(10) C(4+) ions per pulse and about 5 × 10(9) C(6+) ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 10(11) C(6+) ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the (11)C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C(4+) ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of (11)C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated (11)C(4+) beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the (11)C(4+) beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  3. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, D E; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C(4+) and C(6+) ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 10(10) C(4+) ions per pulse and about 5 × 10(9) C(6+) ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 10(11) C(6+) ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the (11)C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C(4+) ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of (11)C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated (11)C(4+) beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the (11)C(4+) beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons. PMID:26329182

  4. Overview of linac applications at future radioactive beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    There is considerable interest worldwide in the research which could be done at a next generation, advanced radioactive beam facility. To generate high quality, intense beams of accelerated radionuclides via the {open_quotes}isotope separator on-line{close_quotes} (ISOL) method requires two major accelerator components: a high power (100 kW) driver device to produce radionuclides in a production target/ion source complex, and a secondary beam accelerator to produce beams of radioactive ions up to energies on the order of 10 MeV per nucleon over a broad mass range. In reviewing the technological challenges of such a facility, several types of modem linear accelerators appear well suited. This paper reviews the properties of the linacs currently under construction and those proposed for future facilities for use either as the driver device or the radioactive beam post-accelerator. Other choices of accelerators, such as cyclotrons, for either the driver or secondary beam devices of a radioactive beam complex will also be compared. Issues to be addressed for the production accelerator include the choice of ion beam types to be used for cost-effective production of radionuclides. For the post-accelerator the choice of ion source technology is critical and dictates the charge-to-mass requirements at the injection stage.

  5. Membrane Treatment of Liquid Salt Bearing Radioactive Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, S. A.; Adamovich, D. V.; Demkin, V. I.; Timofeev, E. M.

    2003-02-25

    The main fields of introduction and application of membrane methods for preliminary treatment and processing salt liquid radioactive waste (SLRW) can be nuclear power stations (NPP) and enterprises on atomic submarines (AS) utilization. Unlike the earlier developed technology for the liquid salt bearing radioactive waste decontamination and concentrating this report presents the new enhanced membrane technology for the liquid salt bearing radioactive waste processing based on the state-of-the-art membrane unit design, namely, the filtering units equipped with the metal-ceramic membranes of ''TruMem'' brand, as well as the electrodialysis and electroosmosis concentrators. Application of the above mentioned units in conjunction with the pulse pole changer will allow the marked increase of the radioactive waste concentrating factor and the significant reduction of the waste volume intended for conversion into monolith and disposal. Besides, the application of the electrodialysis units loaded with an ion exchange material at the end polishing stage of the radioactive waste decontamination process will allow the reagent-free radioactive waste treatment that meets the standards set for the release of the decontaminated liquid radioactive waste effluents into the natural reservoirs of fish-farming value.

  6. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.; McElroy, Jack L.; Mendel, John E.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

  7. Radioactive waste disposal via electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that space transportation is a feasible method of removal of radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The high decay heat of the isotopes powers a thermionic generator which provides electrical power for ion thrust engines. The massive shields (used to protect ground and flight personnel) are removed in orbit for subsequent reuse; the metallic fuel provides a shield for the avionics that guides the orbital stage to solar system escape. Performance calculations indicate that 4000 kg. of actinides may be removed per Shuttle flight. Subsidiary problems - such as cooling during ascent - are discussed.

  8. Astrophysics experiments with radioactive beams at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Clark, J. A.; Pardo, R. C.; Rehm, K. E. Savard, G.

    2014-04-15

    Reactions involving short-lived nuclei play an important role in nuclear astrophysics, especially in explosive scenarios which occur in novae, supernovae or X-ray bursts. This article describes the nuclear astrophysics program with radioactive ion beams at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. The CARIBU facility as well as recent improvements for the in-flight technique are discussed. New detectors which are important for studies of the rapid proton or the rapid neutron-capture processes are described. At the end we briefly mention plans for future upgrades to enhance the intensity, purity and the range of in-flight and CARIBU beams.

  9. Positron emission tomographic measurement of cerebral blood flow and permeability-surface area product of water using (/sup 15/O)water and (/sup 11/C)butanol

    SciTech Connect

    Herscovitch, P.; Raichle, M.E.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Welch, M.J.

    1987-10-01

    We have previously adapted Kety's tissue autoradiographic method for measuring regional CBF in laboratory animals to the measurement of CBF in humans with positron emission tomography (PET) and H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O. Because this model assumes diffusion equilibrium between tissue and venous blood, the use of a diffusion-limited tracer, such as H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O, may lead to an underestimation of CBF. We therefore validated the use of (/sup 11/C)butanol as an alternative freely diffusible tracer for PET. We then used it in humans to determine the underestimation of CBF that occurs with H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O, and thereby were able to calculate the extraction Ew and permeability-surface area product PSw of H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O. Measurements of the permeability of rhesus monkey brain to (/sup 11/C)butanol, obtained by means of an intracarotid injection, external detection technique, demonstrated that this tracer is freely diffusible up to a CBF of at least 170 ml/min-100 g. CBF measured in baboons with the PET autoradiographic method and (/sup 11/C)butanol was then compared with CBF measured in the same animals with a standard residue detection method. An excellent correspondence was obtained between both of these measurements. Finally, paired PET measurements of CBF were made with both H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O and (/sup 11/C)butanol in 17 normal human subjects. Average global CBF was significantly greater when measured with (/sup 11/C)butanol (53.1 ml/min-100 g) than with H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O (44.4 ml/min-100 g). Average global Ew was 0.84 and global PSw was 104 ml/min-100 g. Regional measurements showed a linear relationship between local PSw and CBF, while Ew was relatively uniform throughout the brain. Simulations were used to determine the potential error associated with the use of an incorrect value for the brain-blood partition coefficient for (/sup 11/C)butanol and to calculate the effect of tissue heterogeneity and errors in flow measurement on the calculation of PSw.

  10. 15O PET Measurement of Blood Flow and Oxygen Consumption in Cold-Activated Human Brown Fat

    PubMed Central

    Muzik, Otto; Mangner, Thomas J.; Leonard, William R.; Kumar, Ajay; Janisse, James; Granneman, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Although it has been believed that brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots disappear shortly after the perinatal period in humans, PET imaging using the glucose analog 18F-FDG has shown unequivocally the existence of functional BAT in adult humans, suggesting that many humans retain some functional BAT past infancy. The objective of this study was to determine to what extent BAT thermogenesis is activated in adults during cold stress and to establish the relationship between BAT oxidative metabolism and 18F-FDG tracer uptake. Methods Twenty-five healthy adults (15 women and 10 men; mean age ± SD, 30 ± 7 y) underwent triple-oxygen scans (H215O, C15O, and 15O2) as well as measurements of daily energy expenditure (DEE; kcal/d) both at rest and after exposure to mild cold (15.5°C [60°F]) using indirect calorimetry. The subjects were divided into 2 groups (high BAT and low BAT) based on the presence or absence of 18F-FDG tracer uptake (standardized uptake value [SUV] > 2) in cervical–supraclavicular BAT. Blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were calculated from dynamic PET scans at the location of BAT, muscle, and white adipose tissue. Regional blood oxygen saturation was determined by near-infrared spectroscopy. The total energy expenditure during rest and mild cold stress was measured by indirect calorimetry. Tissue-level metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2) in BAT was determined and used to calculate the contribution of activated BAT to DEE. Results The mass of activated BAT was 59.1 ± 17.5 g (range, 32–85 g) in the high-BAT group (8 women and 1 man; mean age, 29.6 ± 5.5 y) and 2.2 ± 3.6 g (range, 0–9.3 g) in the low-BAT group (9 men and 7 women; mean age, 31.4 ± 10 y). Corresponding maximal SUVs were significantly higher in the high-BAT group than in the low-BAT group (10.7 ± 3.9 vs. 2.1 ± 0.7, P = 0.01). Blood flow values were significantly higher in the high-BAT group than in the low-BAT group for BAT (12.9 ± 4.1 vs. 5.9 ± 2.2 mL/100 g/min, P = 0

  11. Kinetics of Radioactive Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, S.

    At present there are over 3,000 known nuclides (see the Appendix in Vol. 2 on the “Table of the Nuclides”), 265 of which are stable, while the rest, i.e., more than 90% of them, are radioactive. The chemical applications of the specific isotopes of chemical elements are mostly connected with the latter group, including quite a number of metastable nuclear isomers, making the kinetics of radioactive decay an important chapter of nuclear chemistry. After giving a phenomenological and then a statistical interpretation of the exponential law, the various combinations of individual decay processes as well as the cases of equilibrium and nonequilibrium will be discussed. Half-life systematics of the different decay modes detailed in Chaps. 2 and 4 of this volume are also summarized.

  12. Table of radioactive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    As has been the custom in the past, the Commission publishes a table of relative atomic masses and halflives of selected radionuclides. The information contained in this table will enable the user to calculate the atomic weight for radioactive materials with a variety of isotopic compositions. The atomic masses have been taken from the 1984 Atomic Mass Table. Some of the halflives have already been documented.

  13. PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

    1961-11-14

    A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

  14. Radioactive waste storage issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  15. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1953-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified in 13; two contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on 7 properties was not ascertained; and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and 9 are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities; the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontit. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint 9 only 4 of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951, the Majuba Hill mine, the Stalin's Present prospect, and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. Reserves of ore grade are small on all of these properties and probably cannot be developed commercially unless an ore-buying station is set up nearby. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  16. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1954-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by personnel of the U. S. Geological Surveyor of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified at 13 sites; two sites contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on nine properties was not ascertained, and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and nine are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities, the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontite. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint, only four of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951; the Majuba Hill mine; the Stalin's Present prospect; and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  17. Theory of the formation of the ordered LiZn{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} phase

    SciTech Connect

    Talanov, V. M.; Shirokov, V. B.

    2013-03-15

    A theory of the structural phase transition in LiZn{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} cathode material is proposed. The symmetry of the order parameter, thermodynamics, and mechanisms of formation of the atomic structure of low-symmetry ordered cubic lithium-zinc-manganese oxide spinel have been studied. The critical order parameter inducing the phase transition has been found. It is shown that the calculated LiZn{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} structure is formed due to displacements and orderings of lithium, zinc, manganese, and oxygen atoms. Within the Landau theory of phase transitions, it is shown that the phase states may change from high-symmetry cubic disordered Fd3m phase to the low-symmetry ordered cubic P2{sub 1}3 phase as a result of first-order phase transitions.

  18. Structural and impedance studies of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 synthesized by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Laurel Simon; Rubankumar, A.; Kalainathan, S.

    2016-05-01

    LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is synthesized by sol-gel method by using succinic acid as chelating agent. X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the material is spinel cubic structure with Fd3m space group. Impedance spectroscopy analysis of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 was performed under a wide frequency and temperature range of 50 Hz to 5 MHz and 303 K to 783 K respectively. The hopping of the electrons, ionic conductivity and activation energy were analyzed from the relaxation frequency of the imaginary impedance (Z"). The activation energy Ea is calculated from the Arrhenius plots and it is found to be 0.3713 eV, which indicates the existence of oxygen vacancy in the material. Nyquist plot indicates the presence of grain effect in the material and suppression in the grain effect is observed with increasing temperature.

  19. Influence of synthesis conditions on electrochemical properties of high-voltage Li 1.02Ni 0.5Mn 1.5O 4 spinel cathode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, B. J.; Wu, Y. W.; Venkateswarlu, M.; Cheng, M. Y.; Santhanam, R.

    Li 1.02Ni 0.5Mn 1.5O 4 spinel cathode materials were successfully synthesized by a citric acid-assisted sol-gel method. The structure and morphology of the materials have been examined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties of the materials were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements at two different temperatures (25 and 55 °C) using lithium anode. The initial capacity and capacity retention are highly dependent on the particle size, particle size distribution, crystallinity and purity of the materials. The Li 1.02Ni 0.5Mn 1.5O 4 materials synthesized both at 800 and 850 °C have shown best electrochemical performance in terms of capacity and capacity retention between 3.5 and 4.9 V with a LiPF 6 based electrolyte.

  20. NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS PROJECT WITH A NEW LOW-ENERGY RIB SEPARATOR CRIB:. Study of a Critical Stellar Reaction 15O(α,γ)19Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Michimasa, S.; Teranishi, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Fulop, Z.; Liu, X.; Kumagai, K.; Abe, K.; Yun, C. C.; Watanabe, S.; Yamazaki, N.; Ohshiro, Y.; Kurokawa, M.; Strasser, P.; Hahn, K. I.; Kishida, T.; Imai, N.; Kato, S.; Fuchi, Y.; Tanaka, M. H.

    2003-04-01

    One of the critical stellar reactions for the onset of explosive hydrogen burning, 15O(α,γ)19Ne, is discussed with our recent experimental effort and a new possibility in our new RIB project. This reaction was investigated experimentally by indirect methods. Single particle nature of the threshold states was studied by the analog reactions, (d,t) and (d,3He) on 20Ne. The α-branching ratios for some states were also measured by a coincidence measurement of a triton and α from 19F(3He,t)19Ne*(α)15O(g.s.). Experimental plan for the problem was also discussed that uses a new low-energy RIB facility at CNS, called CRIB, which will come into operation soon.

  1. Charge-state enhancement for radioactive beam post-acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.A.; Dooling, J.

    1995-08-01

    A critical question for an ISOL-type radioactive-beam facility, such as that being discussed by the North American Isospin Laboratory Committee, is the efficiency and q/m of the ion source for the radioactive species. ISOLDE at CERN demonstrated that high efficiency is obtained for a wide variety of species in the 1{sup +} charge state. These ion sources also generally have excellent transverse emittances and low energy spreads. One possibility is to use this proven technology plus an ionizer stage to increase the output of such sources to 2, 3, or 4{sup +} with high efficiency. We are currently investigating technical options for such charge-state enhancement. There is a proposal by a Heidelberg/ISOLDE collaboration to build a {open_quotes}charge-state breeder{close_quotes} as part of an experiment called REX-ISOLDE. This concept would deliver batches of radioactive ions with low duty cycle, optimized for relatively low-intensity secondary beams, on the order of 10{sup 6}/sec. We are independently doing simulations of an alternative approach, called the Electron-Beam Charge-State Amplifier (EBQA), which would yield DC beams with improved transverse emittance and would not have the intensity limitation of the batch transfer process. The cost and efficiency of the EBQA will have to be compared with those of a normally-conducting CW RFQ followed by ion stripping, as alternatives for the first stage of a secondary ion accelerator.

  2. Direct evidence of gradient Mn(II) evolution at charged states in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 electrodes with capacity fading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ruimin; Wang, Yuesheng; Olalde-Velasco, Paul; Li, Hong; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Wanli

    2015-01-01

    Mn evolution has long been considered critical for understanding the capacity fading of spinel electrodes in batteries. However, the detailed mechanism is still under debate; chemical evolution and distribution of the detrimental Mn is yet to be experimentally clarified. Here we perform a comparative soft X-ray absorption spectroscopic study on two batches of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with the same bulk spinel phase, but different electrochemical performance. By virtue of the sensitivity of soft X-ray to the transition-metal 3d states and oxygen 2p states, evolutions of Ni, Mn, and O in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 are compared between the two batches of electrodes. In the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with fast capacity fading, Mn2+ is evidently observed in the initial charge cycle. Strikingly, the Mn2+ content is notably high at the fully charged state. This sharply contradicts the conventional wisdom that Mn2+ evolves from a disproportional reaction favored in the discharged state. Additionally, the shallow probe depth of soft X-ray spectroscopy enables another finding that Mn2+ manifests itself mostly on the side of the electrode facing separator. Our comparative study provides direct experimental evidence on the association between Mn2+ and performance failure. It strongly suggests that Mn2+ formation is mostly determined by electrode-electrolyte surface reactions, instead of disproportional reactions.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

  4. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Workman, Rhonda Jackson

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  5. Cross flow filtration of aqueous radioactive tank wastes

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.J.; Reynolds, B.A.; Todd, T.A.; Wilson, J.H.

    1997-02-01

    The Tank Focus Area (TFA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology addresses remediation of radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks. Baseline technologies for treatment of tank waste can be categorized into three types of solid liquid separation: (a) removal of radioactive species that have been absorbed or precipitated, (b) pretreatment, and (c) volume reduction of sludge and wash water. Solids formed from precipitation or absorption of radioactive ions require separation from the liquid phase to permit treatment of the liquid as Low Level Waste. This basic process is used for decontamination of tank waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Ion exchange of radioactive ions has been proposed for other tank wastes, requiring removal of insoluble solids to prevent bed fouling and downstream contamination. Additionally, volume reduction of washed sludge solids would reduce the tank space required for interim storage of High Level Wastes. The scope of this multi-site task is to evaluate the solid/liquid separations needed to permit treatment of tank wastes to accomplish these goals. Testing has emphasized cross now filtration with metal filters to pretreat tank wastes, due to tolerance of radiation and caustic.

  6. Excess lithium salt functions more than compensating for lithium loss when synthesizing Li6.5La3Ta0.5Zr1.5O12 in alumina crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Ma, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Chang-An

    2014-08-01

    Garnet type electrolyte "Li6.5La3Ta0.5Zr1.5O12" (LLZTO) was prepared by conventional solid-state reaction in alumina crucibles and excess lithium salt (from 0% to 50 mol%) was added into the starting materials to investigate the effects of excess lithium salt on the property of LLZTO. SEM, XRD and AC impedance were used to determine the microstructure, phase formation and Li-ion conductivity. Cubic garnet with a minor second phase LiAlO2 in the grain boundary was obtained for the pellets with excess lithium salt. As the amount of excess lithium salt increased, more Al element diffused from alumina crucibles to LLZTO pellets and reacted with excess lithium salt to form liquid Li2O-Al2O3 phase in the grain boundary, which accelerated the pellets' densification and reduced lithium loss at a high temperature. Ionic conductivity of LLZTO pellets increased with the amount of excess lithium salt added and leveled off at ∼4 × 10-4 S cm-1 when lithium salt exceeded 30 mol%. The performance of Li-air batteries with hybrid electrolytes, using homemade LLZTO thin pellets as solid electrolytes, was investigated. The LLZTO thin pellet with more excess lithium salt in starting material had a higher density and resulted in better cell performance.

  7. Oxygen vacancies and ordering of d-levels control voltage suppression in oxide cathodes: the case of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Petr V.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Sushko, Maria L.

    2013-06-19

    Spinel Li-Mn rich oxides form one of the most promising classes of high voltage cathode materials for next generation Li-ion batteries for electric vehicle applications. Our simulations for spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) show that neutral oxygen vacancies promote formation of Ni-rich regions, which are negatively charged with respect to the lattice. This makes the electrons associated with these vacancies to localize on Mn3+ eg states of two types: shallow states in the Ni-rich regions and deep states in the Ni-poor regions. The positive electrostatic potential produced by the oxygen vacancies and the existence of the shallow and deep Mn3+ states result in appearance of the low-voltage region at high Li content and high-voltage region at low Li content. This is consistent with characteristic changes in the voltage capacity curves observed experimentally during electrochemical cycling. We propose that doping LNMO with judiciously selected cations can help to remedy voltage suppression effects. This approach may also be used to enhance the electrochemical stability of Li-Mn rich oxides, which tend to experience continuous voltage fade.

  8. Kinetics analysis and quantitative calculations for the successive radioactive decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiping; Yan, Deyue; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2015-01-01

    The general radioactive decay kinetics equations with branching were developed and the analytical solutions were derived by Laplace transform method. The time dependence of all the nuclide concentrations can be easily obtained by applying the equations to any known radioactive decay series. Taking the example of thorium radioactive decay series, the concentration evolution over time of various nuclide members in the family has been given by the quantitative numerical calculations with a computer. The method can be applied to the quantitative prediction and analysis for the daughter nuclides in the successive decay with branching of the complicated radioactive processes, such as the natural radioactive decay series, nuclear reactor, nuclear waste disposal, nuclear spallation, synthesis and identification of superheavy nuclides, radioactive ion beam physics and chemistry, etc.

  9. PERSPECTIVE: Fireworks and radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenecker, Katharina

    2009-09-01

    both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4]. A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin. Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure. Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6]. Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere. So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity? In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium. The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols

  10. [The investigation of the composition of liquid radioactive waste].

    PubMed

    Suslov, A V; Suslova, I N; Bagiian, A; Leonov, V V; Kapustin, V K

    2008-01-01

    In investigation the process of composition sediment of liquid unorganic radioactive waste, that are forming in cistern-selectors at PNPI RAS, it was discovered apart from great quantity of ions of different metals and radionuclides considerable maintenance of organic material (to 30% and more from volume of sediment) unknown origin. A supposition was made about its microbiological origin. Investigation shows, that the main microorganisms, setting this sediment, are the bacterious of Pseudomonas kind, capable of effectively bind in process of grow the radionuclide 90Sr, that confirms the potential posibility of using this microorganisms for bioremediation of liquid low radioactive wastes (LRW).

  11. Radioactive and magnetic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heye, D.; Beiersdorf, H.

    1979-01-01

    Age and growth pattern determination of manganese nodules were explored. Two methods are discussed: (1) measurement of the presence of radioactive iodine isotopes; which is effective only up to 3.105 years, and (2) measurements of magnetism. The growth rates of three nodules were determined. The surface of the nodule was recent, and the overall age of the nodule could be determined with accuracy of better than 30%. Measurement of paleomagnetic effect was attempted to determine wider age ranges, however, the measured sign changes could not be interpreted as paleomagnetic reversals.

  12. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  13. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  14. Material for radioactive protection

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.S.; Boyer, N.W.

    A boron containing burn resistant, low-level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source is described. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25 to 50%, coal tar in the range of 25 to 37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  15. Levels of radioactivity in Qatar

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Thani, A.A.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Mohammed, K.

    1995-12-31

    The levels of natural and man-made radioactivity in soil and seabed were measured in Qatar to assess radiation exposure levels and to evaluate any radioactive contamination that may have reached the country from fallout or due to the Chernobyl accident radioactivity release. Qatar peninsula is located on the Arabian Gulf, 4500 km from Chernobyl, and has an area of {approximately}11,600 km{sup 2} and a population of {approximately}600,000.

  16. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  17. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Robert E.; Ziegler, Anton A.; Serino, David F.; Basnar, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

  18. Ion production from solid state laser ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Raeder, S.; Wendt, K.; Havener, C.; Liu, Y.; Lassen, J.; Rothe, S.

    2010-02-15

    Laser ion sources based on resonant excitation and ionization of atoms are well-established tools for selective and efficient production of radioactive ion beams. Recent developments are focused on the use of the state-of-the-art all solid-state laser systems. To date, 35 elements of the periodic table are available from laser ion sources based on tunable Ti:sapphire lasers. Recent progress in this field regarding the establishment of suitable optical excitation schemes for Ti:sapphire lasers are reported.

  19. Separation and recovery of radioactive and non-radioactive toxic trace elements from aqueous industrial effluents.

    PubMed

    Iyer, R H

    2003-09-01

    An update is presented on liquid membrane-based processes as viable and relevant alternatives to conventional approaches such as precipitation, solvent extraction, ion exchange processes and electrochemical techniques for the removal and recovery of some toxic and/or valuable trace metal ions including some actinides and fission products e.g. U, Am, Y etc and As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Zn etc from radioactive as well as non-radioactive aqueous waste solutions respectively. In particular, results of experiments aimed at developing supported liquid membrane(SLM)-based process using commercially available porous membranes and indigenously prepared track--etch membranes (TEMs) have been critically examined in laboratory studies to generate basic data needed to evaluate their utility for continuous operation without regeneration. These include effect of pore size, porosity, optimum pore size and their reusability. It is clearly demonstrated that indigenously prepared 10 microm thick TEMs with a porosity in the range of 2-5% give comparable transport rates for metal ions-matching with that of commercial membranes of much higher thickness (160 microm) and higher porosity of 60-85%. The smaller thickness of TEMs more than compensates for their lower porosity. It is shown that because of their well defined pore characteristics TEMs could serve as model supports in SLM studies. By comparing the values of permeability coefficient (P) for TEM and polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE) supports for the transport of Pb2+ chosen as a typical divalent metal ion, and using di-2 ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as the carrier, it is unambiguously proved that diffusion of the metal complex across the membrane is the rate controlling step in metal ion transport in SLM-based processes. An overview of the experimental findings along with future outlook and suggestions for further work are presented in this paper.

  20. Electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  1. Stefan Meyer: Pioneer of Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Wolfgang L.

    2001-03-01

    Stefan Meyer was one of the pioneers in radioactivity research and director of the Vienna Radium Institute, the first institution in the world devoted exclusively to radioactivity. I give here a biographical sketch of Meyer and of some of his colleagues and an overview of the research activities at the Radium Institute.

  2. Radioactive elements in stellar atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gopka, Vira; Yushchenko, Alexander; Goriely, Stephane; Shavrina, Angelina; Kang, Young Woon

    2006-07-12

    The identification of lines of radioactive elements (Tc, Pm and elements with 83radioactive decay of Th and U in the upper levels of stellar atmospheres, contamination of stellar atmosphere by recent SN explosion, and spallation reactions.

  3. Temporal alignment of tissue and arterial data and selection of integration start times for the H[sub 2] [sup 15]O autoradiographic CBF model in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Muzic, R.F. Jr. . Dept. of Biomedical Engineering); Nelson, A.D.; Miraldi, F. . Div. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1993-09-01

    A technique has been developed and tested that provides an automated method of temporally aligning the PET tissue activity curve with the arterial activity curve for quantification of cerebral blood flow using the H[sub 2] [sup 15]O autoradiographic model. This technique not only determines the relative time delay between the two curves, but also provides the start time of integration. Variability in computing global cerebral blood flow using this technique is shown to be less than that obtained by trained observers manually selecting parameters and at least as good as that obtained by using another automated alignment technique.

  4. Heavy fragment radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.B.

    1987-12-10

    This recently discovered mode of radioactive decay, like alpha decay and spontaneous fission, is believed to involve tunneling through the deformation-energy barrier between a very heavy nucleus and two separated fragments the sum of whose masses is less than the mass of the parent nucleus. In all known cases the heavier of the two fragments is close to doubly magic /sup 208/Pb, and the lighter fragment has even Z. Four isotopes of Ra are known to emit /sup 14/C nuclei; several isotopes of U as well as /sup 230/Th and /sup 231/Pa emit Ne nuclei; and /sup 234/U exhibits four hadronic decay modes: alpha decay, spontaneous fission, Ne decay and Mg decay.

  5. Low Radioactivity in CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, T.; Ogawa, I.; Hazama, R.; Yoshida, S.; Umehara, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Sakai, H.; Yokoyama, D.; Mukaida, K.; Ichihara, K.; Tatewaki, Y.; Kishimoto, K.; Hirano, Y.; Yanagisawa, A.; Ajimura, S.

    2005-09-08

    CANDLES is the project to search for double beta decay of 48Ca by using CaF2 crystals. Double beta decay of 48Ca has the highest Q value among all nuclei whose double beta decay is energetically allowed. This feature makes the study almost background free and becomes important once the study is limited by the backgrounds. We studied double beta decays of 48Ca by using ELEGANTS VI detector system which features CaF2(Eu) crystals. We gave the best limit on the lifetime of neutrino-less double beta decay of 48Ca although further development is vital to reach the neutrino mass of current interest for which CANDLES is designed. In this article we present how CANDLES can achieve low radioactivity, which is the key for the future double beta decay experiment.

  6. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

    1985-08-30

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

  7. PERSPECTIVE: Fireworks and radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenecker, Katharina

    2009-09-01

    both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4]. A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin. Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure. Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6]. Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere. So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity? In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium. The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols

  8. Progress of resonant ionization laser ion source development at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    Henares, J. L. Huguet, Y.; Lecesne, N.; Leroy, R.; Osmond, B.; Sjödin, A. M.; Kron, T.; Schneider, F.; Wendt, K.

    2014-02-15

    SPIRAL2 (Système de Production d’Ions Radioactifs Accélérés en Ligne) is a research facility under construction at GANIL (Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds) for the production of radioactive ion beams by isotope separation on-line methods and low-energy in-flight techniques. A resonant ionization laser ion source will be one of the main techniques to produce the radioactive ion beams. GISELE (GANIL Ion Source using Electron Laser Excitation) is a test bench developed to study a fully operational laser ion source available for Day 1 operations at SPIRAL2 Phase 2. The aim of this project is to find the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. Latest results about the new ion source geometry will be presented.

  9. [Radioactivity of phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingke; Cai, Wei; Zhao, Liancheng

    2003-09-01

    Exposed to neutron flow, the phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy gets radioactive. This radioactive material is used in vascular stent for prevention and cure of restenosis. Phosphorus implantation is carried out in a plasma immerged ion implantation system, and the dose of phosphorus implantation is in the range of 2-10 x 10(17) cm-2. After ion implantation, the alloy is exposed to the slow neutron flow in a nuclear reactor, the dose of the slow neutron is 1.39-5.88 x 10(19) n/cm2. The radioactivity of the TiNi alloy was measured by liquid scintillation spectrometry and radio-chromic-film dosimetry. The result shows that whether the phosphorus is implanted or not, the TiNi alloy comes to be radioactive after exposure to neutron flow. Just after neutron irradiation, the radiation dose of phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy is about one hundred times higher than that of un-phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy. The radiation difference between phosphorus and un-phosphorus implanted alloy decreases as time elapses. Within three months after neutron irradiation, the average half-decay period of phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy is about 62 days. The radiation ray penetration of phosphorus implanted TiNi alloy is deeper than that of pure 32P; this is of benefit to making radiation uniformity between stent struts and reducing radiation grads beyond the edge of stent.

  10. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  11. Environmental radioactive intercomparison program and radioactive standards program

    SciTech Connect

    Dilbeck, G.

    1993-12-31

    The Environmental Radioactivity Intercomparison Program described herein provides quality assurance support for laboratories involved in analyzing public drinking water under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Regulations, and to the environmental radiation monitoring activities of various agencies. More than 300 federal and state nuclear facilities and private laboratories participate in some phase of the program. This presentation describes the Intercomparison Program studies and matrices involved, summarizes the precision and accuracy requirements of various radioactive analytes, and describes the traceability determinations involved with radioactive calibration standards distributed to the participants. A summary of program participants, sample and report distributions, and additional responsibilities of this program are discussed.

  12. Evaluation of the ECAT EXACT HR{sup +} 3D PET scanner in {sup 15}O-water brain activation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Cantu, J.J.; Thompson, C.J.; Zatorre, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    We evaluated the performance of the ECAT EXACT HR{sup +} 3D whole body PET scanner when employed to measure brain function using {sup 15}O-water-bolus activation protocols in single data acquisition sessions. Using vibrotactile and auditory stimuli as independent activation tasks, we studied the scanner`s performance under different imaging conditions in four healthy volunteers. Cerebral blood flow images were acquired from each volunteer using {sup 15}O-water-bolus injections of activity varying from 5 to 20mCi. Performance characteristics. The scanner`s dead time grew linearly with injected dose from 10% to 25%. Random events varied from 30% to 50% of the detected events. Scattered events were efficiently corrected at all doses. Noise-effective-count curves plateau at about 15mCi. One-session 12-injection bolus PET activation protocol. Using an acquisition protocol that accounts for the scanner`s performance and the practical aspects of imaging volunteers and patients in one session, we assessed the correlation between the statistical significance of activation foci and the dose per injection used The one-session protocol employs 12 bolus injections per subject. We present evidence suggesting that 15-20mCi is the optimal dose per injection to be used routinely in one-time scanning sessions.

  13. Alpha self-irradiation effect on the local structure of the U0.85Am0.15O2±x solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieur, D.; Martin, P. M.; Lebreton, F.; Delahaye, T.; Jankowiak, A.; Laval, J.-P.; Scheinost, A. C.; Dehaudt, P.; Blanchart, P.

    2012-10-01

    Uranium-americium mixed oxides are promising fuels for achieving an efficient Am recycling. Previous studies on U0.85Am0.15O2±x materials showed that the high α activity of 241Am induces pellet swelling which is a major issue for cladding materials design. In this context, X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy measurements were used to study self-irradiation effects on U0.85Am0.15O2±x local structure and to correlate these results with those obtained at the macroscopic scale. For a cumulative α decay dose equal to 0.28 dpa, it was shown that non-defective fluorite solid solutions were achieved and therefore, that the fluorite structure is stable for the studied doses. In addition, both interatomic distance and lattice parameter expansions were observed, which only partially explains the macroscopic swelling. As expected, an increase of the structural disorder with self-irradiation was also observed.

  14. [Pixel values of [15O]H2O2 PET images with OSEM algorithm depending on numbers of subset and iteration times: comparative assessment to FBP].

    PubMed

    Yamanoi, Rie; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Kawamura, Kazunori; Ohkubo, Masaki; Suzuki, Yuji; Nakamura, Yukihiro

    2014-11-01

    To investigate a potential application of ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm for clinical [15O]H2O PET studies, region of interest (ROI) measurements were performed on both images with OSEM and filtered back projection (FBP). Forty OSEM images were reconstructed with variable combinations of numbers of the subset (1-40) and iteration times (2-12). PET scans were acquired using a PET/CT scanner (Discovery ST Elite, GE), and 3T-MRI images were obtained for fusion images. The mean values were measured on the frontal cortical regions in the middle cerebral artery distribution. Differences of the values between the OSEM and FBP were evaluated as %Error. Relationship between ROI mean values and the iteration times was investigated on the OSEM images. The smallest %Error 0.4% was measured in the combination of the subset number 10 and iteration times 8 [10, 8], and in that of [28, 2].The mean values were stable with iteration number 8 or more. OSEM image with [28, 2] was reconstructed in a shorter time (2.5 min) than that with [10, 8] (6 min). OSEM image with [28, 2] was superior to that with [10, 8] in the qualitative evaluation. The mean values on OSEM images with [28, 2] were comparable with those on FBP images with little artifacts and higher spatial resolution. OSEM with optimal parameter setting seemed applicable for both quantitative and qualitative [15O]H2O PET studies.

  15. Radioactive deposits in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Lovering, Tom G.

    1954-01-01

    Reconnaissance examination by Government geologists of many areas, mine properties, and prospects in California during the period between 1948 and 1953 has confirmed the presence of radioactive materials in place at more than 40 localities. Abnormal radioactivity at these localities is due to concentrations of primary and secondary uranium minerals, to radon gas, radium (?), and to thorium minerals. Of the known occurrences only three were thought to contain uranium oxide (uranitite or pitchblende), 4 contained uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals, 12 contained secondary uranium minerals, such as autunite, carnotite, and torbernite, one contained radon gas, 7 contained thorium minerals, and, at the remaining 16 localities, the source of the anomalous radiation was not positively determined. The occurrences in which uranium oxide has been tentatively identified include the Rathgeb mine (Calaveras County), the Yerih group of claims (San Bernardino County), and the Rainbow claim (Madera County). Occurrences of secondary uranium minerals are largely confined to the arid desert regions of south-eastern California including deposits in San Bernardino, Kern, Inyo, and Imperial Counties. Uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals have been reported from pegmatite and granitic rock in southeastern and eastern California. Thorium minerals have been found in vein deposits in eastern San Bernardino County and from pegmatites and granitic rocks in various parts of southeastern California; placer concentrations of thorium minerals are known from nearly all areas in the State that are underlain, in part, by plutonic crystalline rocks. The primary uranium minerals occur principally as minute accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, or with base-metal sulfide minerals in veins. Thorium minerals also occur as accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, in placer deposits derived from such rock, and, at Mountain Pass, in veins

  16. Ion exchange determines iodine-131 concentration in aqueous samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairman, W. D.; Sedlet, J.

    1967-01-01

    Inorganic radioiodide in aqueous media is analyzed by separating the radioactive iodine-131 as the iodide ion on a silver chloride column. The activity in the final precipitate may be determined by beta or gamma counting.

  17. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B.; Katagiri, K.; Noda, K.

    2015-08-15

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C{sup 4+} and C{sup 6+} ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 10{sup 10} C{sup 4+} ions per pulse and about 5 × 10{sup 9} C{sup 6+} ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 10{sup 11} C{sup 6+} ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the {sup 11}C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C{sup 4+} ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of {sup 11}C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated {sup 11}C{sup 4+} beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the {sup 11}C{sup 4+} beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  18. Automatic Searching Radioactive Sources by Airborne Radioactive Survey Using Multicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, H.; Eun, S. B.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Jung, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to prepare emergency situation lost a dangerous radioelement source in advance and to search a radioactive source automatically, we develop airborne radioelement survey system by multicopter. This multicopter radioelement survey system consists of a small portable customized BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) detector, video recording part, wireless connecting part to ground pilot, GPS, and several equipments for automatic flight. This system is possible to search flight by preprogramed lines. This radioactive detecting system are tested to find intentional hidden source, The performance of detecting a source is well proved with very low flight altitude in spite of depending on the magnitude of radioelement sources. The advantage of multicopter system, one of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle), is to avoid the potential of close access to a dangerous radioactive source by using fully automatic searching capability. In this paper, we introduce our multicopter system for detecting radioactive source and synthetic case history for demonstrating this system.

  19. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste - LLW, intermediate-level waste - ILW, high-level waste - HLW) are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  20. SELF SINTERING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    DOEpatents

    McVay, T.N.; Johnson, J.R.; Struxness, E.G.; Morgan, K.Z.

    1959-12-29

    A method is described for disposal of radioactive liquid waste materials. The wastes are mixed with clays and fluxes to form a ceramic slip and disposed in a thermally insulated container in a layer. The temperature of the layer rises due to conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat boillng off the liquid to fomn a dry mass. The dry mass is then covered with thermal insulation, and the mass is self-sintered into a leach-resistant ceramic cake by further conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat.

  1. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  2. Radioactive beam studies of cosmological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sale, K. E.; Boyd, R. N.; Mathews, G. J.; Corn, P. B.; Islam, M. S.

    1989-04-01

    Experimental efforts by the LLNL/Ohio State radioactive ion beam collaboration are described. We are presently focusing on some reactions which are of great importance in the newly proposed inhomogeneous big bang cosmological models [G.M. Fuller, G.J. Mathews and C.R. Alcock, in: Origin and Distribution of the Elements, ed. G.J. Mathews (World Scientific, Singapore, 1987)]. Specifically we are using our system to make beams of 8Li for measurements of the 8Li(d, n)9Be and 8Li(a, n)11B cross sections. These are the key reactions which determine the production of heavy (A > 12) elements during the era of big bang nucleosynthesis, and thus the initial composition of stars and subsequent stellar isotope production. Plans for future experiments, including the measurement of the 7Be(p, γ)8B cross section will be discussed.

  3. Radioactive Waste Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, P. A.; Atkins-Duffin, C. E.

    Issues related to the management of radioactive wastes are presented with specific emphasis on high-level wastes generated as a result of energy and materials production using nuclear reactors. The final disposition of these high-level wastes depends on which nuclear fuel cycle is pursued, and range from once-through burning of fuel in a light water reactor followed by direct disposal in a geologic repository to more advanced fuel cycles (AFCs) where the spent fuel is reprocessed or partitioned to recover the fissile material (primarily 235U and 239Pu) as well as the minor actinides (MAs) (neptunium, americium, and curium) and some long-lived fission products (e.g., 99Tc and 129I). In the latter fuel cycle, the fissile materials are recycled through a reactor to produce more energy, the short-lived fission products are vitrified and disposed of in a geologic repository, and the minor actinides and long-lived fission products are converted to less radiotoxic or otherwise stable nuclides by a process called transmutation. The advantages and disadvantages of the various fuel cycle options and the challenges to the management of nuclear wastes they represent are discussed.

  4. Radioactive decay data tables

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  5. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  6. Process for treating radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Chino, K.; Kawamura, F.; Kikuchi, M.; Yusa, H.

    1982-11-30

    N-beta-(Aminoethyl)-gamma-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (NH2(CH2)2NH(CH2)3SI(OCH3)3) as a silane coupling agent and SiO(2 -x)(ONa)x/2(OH)x/2 as colloidal silica are mixed into a radioactive liquid waste containing sodium sulfate as a main component, coming from a boiling water-type, nuclear power plant as an effluent. The resulting mixed radioactive liquid waste is supplied into a vessel provided with a rotating shaft with blades. The rotating shaft is revolved while heating the radioactive liquid waste in the vessel, thereby making the radioactive liquid waste into powder. The resulting powder containing the silane coupling agent and the colloidal silica is shaped into pellets by a pelletizer. The pellets having a low hygroscopicity and a high strength are obtained.

  7. Radioactive stilbene derivatives in radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Jouquey, A.; Touyer, G.

    1985-07-16

    Novel radioactive stilbene derivatives marked with iodine 125 or 131 possessing an iodine acceptor group and marked with iodine 125 or 131 and their preparation and antigens obtained therefrom and a process for preparing said antigens.

  8. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  9. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

    1990-04-24

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

  10. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Newman, Darrell F.; Ross, Wayne A.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

  11. Radioactivity of the Cooling Water

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wigner, E. P.

    1943-03-01

    The most important source of radioactivity at the exit manifold of the pile will be due to O{sup 19}, formed by neutron absorption of O{sup 18}. A recent measurement of Fermi and Weil permits to estimate that it will be safe to stay about 80 minutes daily close to the exit manifolds without any shield. Estimates are given for the radioactivities from other sources both in the neighborhood and farther away from the pile.

  12. Storage depot for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Szulinski, Milton J.

    1983-01-01

    Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

  13. 49 CFR 172.556 - RADIOACTIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE placard. 172.556 Section 172.556... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.556 RADIOACTIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... on the RADIOACTIVE placard must be white in the lower portion with a yellow triangle in the...

  14. 49 CFR 172.556 - RADIOACTIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE placard. 172.556 Section 172.556... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.556 RADIOACTIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... on the RADIOACTIVE placard must be white in the lower portion with a yellow triangle in the...

  15. 49 CFR 172.556 - RADIOACTIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE placard. 172.556 Section 172.556... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.556 RADIOACTIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... on the RADIOACTIVE placard must be white in the lower portion with a yellow triangle in the...

  16. 49 CFR 172.556 - RADIOACTIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE placard. 172.556 Section 172.556... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.556 RADIOACTIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... on the RADIOACTIVE placard must be white in the lower portion with a yellow triangle in the...

  17. 49 CFR 172.556 - RADIOACTIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE placard. 172.556 Section 172.556... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.556 RADIOACTIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... on the RADIOACTIVE placard must be white in the lower portion with a yellow triangle in the...

  18. Investigation of ion-ion-recombination at atmospheric pressure with a pulsed electron gun.

    PubMed

    Heptner, Andre; Cochems, Philipp; Langejuergen, Jens; Gunzer, Frank; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    For future development of simple miniaturized sensors based on pulsed atmospheric pressure ionization as known from ion mobility spectrometry, we investigated the reaction kinetics of ion-ion-recombination to establish selective ion suppression as an easy to apply separation technique for otherwise non-selective ion detectors. Therefore, the recombination rates of different positive ion species, such as protonated water clusters H(+)(H(2)O)(n) (positive reactant ions), acetone, ammonia and dimethyl-methylphosphonate ions, all recombining with negative oxygen clusters O(2)(-)(H(2)O)(n) (negative reactant ions) in a field-free reaction region, are measured and compared. For all experiments, we use a drift tube ion mobility spectrometer equipped with a non-radioactive electron gun for pulsed atmospheric pressure ionization of the analytes. Both, ionization and recombination times are controlled by the duty cycle and repetition rate of the electron emission from the electron gun. Thus, it is possible to investigate the ion loss caused by ion-ion-recombination depending on the recombination time defined as the time delay between the end of the electron emission and the ion injection into the drift tube. Furthermore, the effect of the initial total ion density in the reaction region on the ion-ion-recombination rate is investigated by varying the density of the emitted electrons.

  19. The complete set of spin observables for the (13)C(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(13)N and (15)N(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(15)O reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qun Qun

    1998-12-01

    The 13C(p,n)13N and 15N(p,n)15O reactions have been a puzzle for more than ten years. The ground state transitions are Jπ=1/2- to Jπ=1/2-. These are 'mixed' transitions because they can involve quantum number changes either (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=0,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=0), or (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=1,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=1); these quantum number changes are refered to as 'Fermi' and 'Gamow-Teller' respectively. Because the quantum number changes are the same as for Fermi and Gamow-Teller beta decay. From the systematics of (p,n) and (n,p) reactions on pure Fermi transitions (e.g. 0 + to 0+) and pure Gamow-Teller transitions (e.g. 0+ to 1+), calibrations have been established of cross section per unit B(F) or unit B(GT), where 'B' refers to doubly reduced matrix elements extracted from beta decay. However, cross sections for the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s.) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) reactions are substantially larger than one would then predict from the known B(F)s and B(GT)s for these transitions. To explore this anomaly, spin observables were used to extract separately the Fermi and Gamow-Teller cross sections for these reactions. To acquire the complete sets of polarization- transfer observables, a new neutron polarimeter was designed, built, commissioned and calibrated. This polarimeter, call the '2π polarimeter' because of its complete azimuthal coverage for scattered neutrons, has very good position and timing resolution (354 ps). The complete sets of spin-transfer coefficients Dij for 13C(p,n)13N (at 0o , 5.5o , and 11o ) and 15N(p,n)15O (at 0o ) at 135 MeV were measured. Following the formalism of Ichimura and Kawahigashi, we extracted the spin-longitudinal, and spin-transverse and spin-independent responses D0,/ Dq,/ Dn and Dp from the measured Dijs. The F and GT fractions of the (p,n) cross sections are then extracted as f F=D0 and fGT=Dn+Dp+Dq=1- d0. Values of Dk for both the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) were extracted. From these responses, we

  20. Mn1.5Co1.5O4 Spinel Protection Layers on Ferritic Stainless Steels for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-01-26

    In intermediate solid oxide fuel cells, the use of cost effective chromia forming alloy interconnects such as ferritic stainless steels can lead to severe degradation in cell performance due to chromium migration into the cells at the cathode side. To protect cells from chromium poisoning and improve their performance, a Mn1.5Co1.5O4 spinel barrier layer has been developed and tested on the ferritic stainless steel Crofer22 APU. Thermal and electrical tests confirmed the effectiveness of the spinel protection layer as a means of stopping chromium migration and decreasing oxidation, while promoting electrical contact and minimizing cathode/interconnect interfacial resistance. The thermally grown spinel protection layer was well-bonded to the Crofer22 APU substrate and demonstrated stable performance under thermal cycling.

  1. Cross sections and analyzing powers of sup 15 N(p,n) sup 15 O at 200 MeV and 494 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ciskowski, D.E. )

    1989-11-01

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers have been measured for the {sup 15}N(p,n){sup 15} O(g.s.) reaction at bombarding energies of 200 MeV and 494 MeV. The 494 MeV data were obtained at the LAMPF Neutron Time-Of-Flight Facility on an 82 m flight path with a resolution of about 2.7 MeV. The 200 MeV data were obtained at IUCF on a 76m flight path with a resolution of about 1.1 MeV. At both energies, the measured analyzing power is small, the magnitude is less than .2 for momentum transfers of less than 1 fm{sup {minus}1}. In contrast, both Relativistic and standard DWIA calculations predict a maximum of A={minus}.7 near q=0.7 fm{sup {minus}1}. 53 refs., 44 figs.

  2. Synthesis, magnetism, and electrochemistry of the Ni14- and Ni5-containing heteropolytungstates [Ni14(OH)6(H2O)10(HPO4)4(P2W15O56)4]34- and [Ni5(OH)4(H2O)4(β-GeW9O34)(β-GeW8O30(OH))]13-.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Masooma; Xiang, Yixian; Bassil, Bassem S; Lan, Yanhua; Powell, Annie K; de Oliveira, Pedro; Keita, Bineta; Kortz, Ulrich

    2013-08-01

    The two Ni(2+)-containing heteropolytungstates [Ni14(OH)6(H2O)10(HPO4)4(P2W15O56)4](34-) (Ni14) and [Ni5(OH)4(H2O)4(β-GeW9O34)(β-GeW8O30(OH))](13-) (Ni5) have been successfully synthesized in aqueous, basic media under conventional reaction conditions, and they were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and elemental analyses, electrochemistry, and magnetic studies. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) patterns of Ni14 and Ni5 showed chemically reversible multielectronic waves for slow scan time scales. For Ni14, an important acidity inversion effect between its reduced forms was observed. Magnetic studies revealed dominant ferromagnetic interactions among the nickel(II) ions in both polyanions.

  3. Optimization of methods for quantification of rCBF using high-resolution [15O]H2O PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. D.; Feldmann, M.; Matthews, J. C.; Anton-Rodriguez, J. M.; Wang, S.; Koepp, M. J.; Asselin, M.-C.

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to derive accurate estimates of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) from noisy dynamic [15O]H2O PET images acquired on the high-resolution research tomograph, while retaining as much as possible the high spatial resolution of this brain scanner (2-3 mm) in parametric maps of rCBF. The PET autoradiographic method and generalized linear least-squares (GLLS), with fixed or extended to include spatially variable estimates of the dispersion of the measured input function, were compared to nonlinear least-squares (NLLS) for rCBF estimation. Six healthy volunteers underwent two [15O]H2O PET scans with continuous arterial blood sampling. rCBF estimates were obtained from three image reconstruction methods (one analytic and two iterative, of which one includes a resolution model) to which a range of post-reconstruction filters (3D Gaussian: 2, 4 and 6 mm FWHM) were applied. The optimal injected activity was estimated to be around 11 MBq kg-1 (800 MBq) by extrapolation of patient-specific noise equivalent count rates. Whole-brain rCBF values were found to be relatively insensitive to the method of reconstruction and rCBF quantification. The grey and white matter rCBF for analytic reconstruction and NLLS were 0.44 ± 0.03 and 0.15 ± 0.03 mL min-1 cm-3, respectively, in agreement with literature values. Similar values were obtained from the other methods. For generation of parametric images using GLLS or the autoradiographic method, a filter of ⩾4 mm was required in order to suppress noise in the PET images which otherwise produced large biases in the rCBF estimates.

  4. Decontaimination of radioactive metals

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, T.S.; Gass, W.R.; Worcester, S.A.; Ayers, L.J.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a method of extracting technetium and actinide radiocontaminants from radiocontaminated nickel comprising the steps: fabricating a nickel electrode contaminated with technetium and actinides; and then anodically dissolving the electrode contaminated with technetium and actinides in a oxidizing acid electrolyte solution to produce a solution containing actinide ions and at least 30 grams/liter of nickel and to oxidize the technetium to produce pertechnetate anions; and then removing pertechnetate anions and actinides by counter-current solvent extraction with a barren solution containing TOPO, D[sub 2]EHPA or mixtures thereof dissolved in an organic solvent, to produce a decontaminated, nickel containing raffinate, and a contaminated, loaded solvent stream; and then stripping the technetium values from the contaminated, loaded solvent stream with hydrochloric acid; passing the decontaminated, nickel containing raffinate through an absorbent for organic solvent; and then electrowinning the raffinate in an electrolysis cell with acidic electrolyte to remove residual actinides present, and to recover cathodic nickel.

  5. [Investigation of radioactivity measurement of medical radioactive waste].

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Kazutaka; Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Kinoshita, Fujimi; Kobayashi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kida, Tetsuo; Yanagisawa, Masamichi; Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Ikebuchi, Hideharu; Kusama, Keiji; Namiki, Nobuo; Okuma, Hiroshi; Fujimura, Yoko; Horikoshi, Akiko; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2004-11-01

    To explore the possibility of which medical radioactive wastes could be disposed as general wastes after keeping them a certain period of time and confirming that their radioactivity reach a background level (BGL), we made a survey of these wastes in several nuclear medicine facilities. The radioactive wastes were collected for one week, packed in a box according to its half-life, and measured its radioactivity by scintillation survey meter with time. Some wastes could reach a BGL within 10 times of half-life, but 19% of the short half-life group (group 1) including 99mTc and 123I, and 8% of the middle half-life group (group 2) including 67Ga, (111)In, and 201Tl did not reach a BGL within 20 times of half-life. A reason for delaying the time of reaching a BGL might be partially attributed to high initial radiation dose rate or heavy package weight. However, mixing with the nuclides of longer half-life was estimated to be the biggest factor affecting this result. When disposing medical radioactive wastes as general wastes, it is necessary to avoid mixing with radionuclide of longer half-life and confirm that it reaches a BGL by actual measurement.

  6. Progress in ISOL target ion source systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, U.; Arndt, O.; Bouquerel, E.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Frånberg, H.; Joinet, A.; Jost, C.; Kerkines, I. S. K.; Kirchner, R.; Targisol Collaboration

    2008-10-01

    The heart of every ISOL (isotope separation on-line) facility is its target and ion source system. Its efficiency, selectivity and rapidity is decisive for the production of intense and pure ion beams of short-lived isotopes. Recent progress in ISOL target and ion source technology is discussed at the examples of radioactive ion beams of exotic zinc and tin isotopes that were purified by isothermal chromatography and molecular sideband separation respectively. An outlook is given to which other elements these purification methods are applicable.

  7. Heavy ion tumour therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M.

    2000-03-01

    Ion beams represent a promising radiotherapy modality for the treatment of deep seated tumours. Compared to conventional photon beams, in particular beams of heavier ions like e.g. carbon show several advantages which are related to their different physical and radiobiological properties: The dose increases with penetration depth and shows a sharp distal fall off at the end of the particle range, i.e., the depth dose profile is inverted compared to photon beams. They exhibit an increased biological effectiveness in particular at the end of their range and thus in the target volume. The spatial distribution of stopping particles can be monitored by means of PET-techniques making use of the small amount of radioactive projectile fragments. Ion beams were first used for medical applications in 1954 in Berkeley. Since then, several treatment facilities for tumour therapy have been established worldwide, and approximately 25 000 patients have been treated with protons and 3000 patients with heavier ions successfully. As an example, the specific advantages of the heavy ion therapy facility at GSI Darmstadt established in cooperation with the Radiological Clinics and DKFZ Heidelberg and FZ Rossendorf will be described. In contrast to most existing facilities, it is based on an active beam delivery system, using magnetic deflection of a pencil beam (raster scan) and accelerator energy variation to adjust the penetration depth. Thus, an optimal conformation of the dose to the target volume is achieved. PET-measurements allow for a quasi on-line monitoring of the 3D distribution of stopping particles and in particular of the position of the distal edge of the dose distribution. Furthermore, in the treatment planning procedure the radiobiological properties of ion beams are taken into account in great detail. In December 1997, patient treatments started at GSI, and up to now 42 patients were treated with carbon ions alone or in a mixed carbon/photon beam regime.

  8. Radioactive Nanomaterials for Multimodality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Daiqin; Dougherty, Casey A.; Yang, Dongzhi; Wu, Hongwei; Hong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging techniques, including primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), can provide quantitative information for a biological event in vivo with ultra-high sensitivity, however, the comparatively low spatial resolution is their major limitation in clinical application. By convergence of nuclear imaging with other imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging, the hybrid imaging platforms can overcome the limitations from each individual imaging technique. Possessing versatile chemical linking ability and good cargo-loading capacity, radioactive nanomaterials can serve as ideal imaging contrast agents. In this review, we provide a brief overview about current state-of-the-art applications of radioactive nanomaterials in the circumstances of multimodality imaging. We present strategies for incorporation of radioisotope(s) into nanomaterials along with applications of radioactive nanomaterials in multimodal imaging. Advantages and limitations of radioactive nanomaterials for multimodal imaging applications are discussed. Finally, a future perspective of possible radioactive nanomaterial utilization is presented for improving diagnosis and patient management in a variety of diseases. PMID:27227167

  9. Radioactive source localization inside pipes using a long-range alpha detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xue-Mei; Tuo, Xian-Guo; Li, Zhe; Liu, Ming-Zhe; Zhang, Jin-Zhao; Dong, Xiang-Long; Li, Ping-Chuan

    2013-08-01

    Long-range alpha detectors (LRADs) are attracting much attention in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities because of some problems in obtaining source positions on an interior surface during pipe decommissioning. By utilizing the characteristic that LRAD detects alphas by collecting air-driving ions, this article applies a method to localize the radioactive source by ions' fluid property. By obtaining the ion travel time and the airspeed distribution in the pipe, the source position can be determined. Thus this method overcomes the ion's lack of periodic characteristics. Experimental results indicate that this method can approximately localize the source inside the pipe. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Radioactivity in bottled mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; Rubio Montero, M P; Gómez Escobar, V; Jurado Vargas, M

    1999-06-01

    Consumption of bottled mineral water is a growing practice and is sometimes a necessity rather than a choice. In this work, a study of the radioactive content of a wide selection of commercial bottled mineral waters for human intake was carried out. The origins of the analyzed waters were very different, coming from various locations in France, Portugal and Spain. Their total alpha and beta activity concentrations were determined and also gamma spectrometry was used to detect some radionuclides. In some cases, the waters presented high values of the total alpha and beta activity concentrations surpassing the reference levels established by the CSN, the Spanish. Regulatory Organization. In these cases, a determination of uranium and 226Ra was also performed by using low-level liquid scintillation counting. The results revealed a strong correlation between radioactive content and dry residue, and lead one to conclude that high radioactive content is mainly related to the mineralization in waters of underground origin.

  11. Sorting of solid radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.; Pecival, I.; Hejtman, J.; Wildman, J.; Cechak, T.

    1993-12-31

    In the nuclear power plants solid radioactive wastes are produced during regular operation and during small repairs. It is necessary to sort them into the highly contaminated wastes for which a special procedure for storage is necessary and waste that is not radioactive and can be stored in the environment under specific regulations. The aim of the project was to propose and to construct equipment, which is able to sort the waste with a high degree of reliability and to distinguish highly contaminated wastes from wastes which are less dangerous to the environment. The sensitivity of the detection system was tested by a mathematical model. The radioactive wastes from the primary part of the nuclear power plant can have three composition types. Details of the composition of the radioisotopes mixture are presented.

  12. Isobar separator for radioactive nuclear beams project

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    In order to produce pure beams of radioactive products emanating from the production target/ion source system, both mass and isobar separation is required. A preliminary mass separation with a resolution {triangle}M/M of approximately 10{sup -3} will select the proper mass beam. An isobar separator is needed because the masses of adjacent isobars are usually quite close, especially for beams near stability. In general, a mass resolution of 5 x 10{sup -5} is needed for isobar separation in the A < 120 region, while a resolution of 3 x 10{sup -5} or better is needed for heavier masses. Magnets are used to obtain mass separation. However, in addition to having mass dispersion properties, magnets also have an equal energy dispersion. This means that an energy variation in the beam cannot be distinguished from a mass difference. This is important because ions emerge from the ion source having a small ({approximately} 10{sup -5} - 10{sup -4}) energy spread. In order to make the system respond only to mass differences, it must be made energy dispersion. This is normally accomplished by using a combination of electric and magnetic fields. The most convenient way of doing this is to use an electric deflection following the magnet separator. A preliminary isobar separator which achieves a mass resolution of 2.7 x 10{sup -5} is shown in Figure I-38. It uses two large 60{degrees} bending magnets to obtain a mass dispersion of 140 mm/%, and four electric dipoles with bending angles of 39{degrees} to cancel the energy dispersion. Sextupole and octupole correction elements are used to reduce the geometrical aberrations.

  13. Radioactive ion beams for biomedical research and nuclear medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, G. J.

    2000-12-01

    In this article a review is given on the research strategies, on experimental work and application of ISOLDE produced radionuclides used in the field of biomedicine over a period of more than 2 decades. Special attention will be directed to the radio-lanthanides for several reasons: firstly, the radio-lanthanides are three-valent metallic radionuclides which show any radiation properties we wish (single photon emission suitable for SPECT, positron emission suitable for PET, β-- and Auger electron emission suitable for therapy). Even the alpha decay mode (suitable for therapy in selected cases) is available in the lanthanide group. Secondly, the 15 lanthanides can be seen chemically as one single element for labelling of tracer molecules, providing the unique possibility to study systematically relationships between physico-chemical molecule parameter and a biological response without changes in the basic tracer molecule. Very recent developments in bioconjugation chemistry call for three-valent metallic radionuclides for all kinds of nuclear medical application: diagnosis, in vivo dosimetry and radionuclide therapy where the rare-earth elements will play an important role in future.

  14. Radioactive dating of the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John J.; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Truran, James W.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which an accurate determination of the age of the Galaxy, and thus a lower bound on the age of the universe, can be obtained from radioactive dating is discussed. Emphasis is given to the use of the long-lived radioactive nuclei Re-187, Th-232, U-238, and U-235. The nature of the production sites of these and other potential Galactic chronometers is examined along with their production ratios. Age determinations from models of nucleocosmochronology are reviewed and compared with age determination from stellar sources and age constraints form cosmological considerations.

  15. Storage containers for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

    1980-07-31

    A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

  16. Storage containers for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Groh, Edward F.; Cassidy, Dale A.; Dates, Leon R.

    1981-01-01

    A radioactive material storage system for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together, whereby the plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or

  17. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  18. SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

    2009-10-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

  19. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control.

    PubMed

    Cochems, P; Kirk, A T; Bunert, E; Runge, M; Goncalves, P; Zimmermann, S

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  20. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    SciTech Connect

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-15

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  1. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu (Hoştuc), Ioana-Carmen; Petru, Filip; Humelnicu, Ionel; Mateescu, Marina; Militaru, Ecaterina; Humelnicu, Doina

    2014-10-01

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  2. Cerebral blood flow with [15O]water PET studies using an image-derived input function and MR-defined carotid centerlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Edward K.; Carson, Richard E.

    2013-03-01

    Full quantitative analysis of brain PET data requires knowledge of the arterial input function into the brain. Such data are normally acquired by arterial sampling with corrections for delay and dispersion to account for the distant sampling site. Several attempts have been made to extract an image-derived input function (IDIF) directly from the internal carotid arteries that supply the brain and are often visible in brain PET images. We have devised a method of delineating the internal carotids in co-registered magnetic resonance (MR) images using the level-set method and applying the segmentations to PET images using a novel centerline approach. Centerlines of the segmented carotids were modeled as cubic splines and re-registered in PET images summed over the early portion of the scan. Using information from the anatomical center of the vessel should minimize partial volume and spillover effects. Centerline time-activity curves were taken as the mean of the values for points along the centerline interpolated from neighboring voxels. A scale factor correction was derived from calculation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using gold standard arterial blood measurements. We have applied the method to human subject data from multiple injections of [15O]water on the HRRT. The method was assessed by calculating the area under the curve (AUC) of the IDIF and the CBF, and comparing these to values computed using the gold standard arterial input curve. The average ratio of IDIF to arterial AUC (apparent recovery coefficient: aRC) across 9 subjects with multiple (n = 69) injections was 0.49 ± 0.09 at 0-30 s post tracer arrival, 0.45 ± 0.09 at 30-60 s, and 0.46 ± 0.09 at 60-90 s. Gray and white matter CBF values were 61.4 ± 11.0 and 15.6 ± 3.0 mL/min/100 g tissue using sampled blood data. Using IDIF centerlines scaled by the average aRC over each subjects’ injections, gray and white matter CBF values were 61.3 ± 13.5 and 15.5 ± 3.4 mL/min/100 g tissue. Using global

  3. Effect of radioactivity on stent-graft incorporation after endovascular treatment of aneurysms: An animal study.

    PubMed

    Lerouge, Sophie; Raymond, Jean; Schloesser, Klaus; Gaboury, Louis; Soulez, Gilles

    2006-12-01

    Poor stent-graft (SG) incorporation into the vessel wall, following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR), can lead to endoleaks and SG migration. Low-dose radiation can prevent aneurysm recurrence after coil embolization, and has been associated with a "paradoxical" increase in neointima formation after stenting in a few studies. It was hypothesized that in situ beta radiation emitted from SG could improve its incorporation by preventing the persistence of circulating channels between the implant and the vessel wall and increasing neointima formation around the SG. Phosphorus 32 ((32)P, 200 or 400 kBq per SG (n = 6 each)) was ion implanted on the external surface of balloon-expandable SGs. Twelve radioactive and six non-radioactive SGs were deployed in iliac arteries of nine Mongrel dogs. Neointima formation inside the graft and the persistence of circulating flow through an artificial groove created during the endovascular procedure were assessed by follow-up imaging and by blinded, computerized histomorphometric analysis after animal sacrifice at 3 months. Occlusion occurred in four radioactive SGs. A lesser number of patent grooves was observed along high-activity SGs than along control SGs (1/3 versus 4/4). No difference in neointima formation was observed in radioactive and non-radioactive SGs. Alteration of external graft surface was observed after ion implantation. Ion implantation of (32)P on SGs does not seem to be a viable strategy to improve incorporation and prevent type-I endoleak after EVAR.

  4. High-efficiency target-ion sources for RIB generation

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1993-12-31

    A brief review is given of high-efficiency ion sources which have been developed or are under development at ISOL facilities which show particular promise for use at existing, future, or radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities now under construction. Emphasis will be placed on those sources which have demonstrated high ionization efficiency, species versatility, and operational reliability and which have been carefully designed for safe handling in the high level radioactivity radiation fields incumbent at such facilities. Brief discussions will also be made of the fundamental processes which affect the realizable beam intensities in target-ion sources. Among the sources which will be reviewed will be selected examples of state-of-the-art electron-beam plasma-type ion sources, thermal-ionization, surface-ionization, ECR, and selectively chosen ion source concepts which show promise for radioactive ion beam generation. A few advanced, chemically selective target-ion sources will be described, such as sources based on the use of laser-resonance ionization, which, in principle, offer a more satisfactory solution to isobaric contamination problems than conventional electromagnetic techniques. Particular attention will be given to the sources which have been selected for initial or future use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. Recent Progress in Isospin Physics with Heavy-Ion Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Liewen; Ko, Che Ming; Li Baoan

    2008-11-11

    We review recent progress in the determination of the subsaturation density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy from heavy-ion collisions as well as the theoretical progress in probing the high density behavior of the symmetry energy in heavy-ion reactions induced by future high energy radioactive beams. Implications of these results for the nuclear effective interactions are also discussed.

  6. Magneto-optical trapping of radioactive atoms for test of the fundamental symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Köhler, L.; Mathis, J.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y.

    2015-11-01

    We are planning test experiments of fundamental symmetries based on the intrinsic properties of francium. It is expected that the laser cooling and trapping of francium will produce precision measurements. The pilot experiment using rubidium was performed with the goal of francium trapping. The ion beam generated with a francium ion source was investigated using a Wien filter. Each piece of equipment still must be studied in more detail, and the equipment should be upgraded in order to trap radioactive atoms.

  7. Radioactivity and the Biology Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsey, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses minimum necessary nuclear fundamentals of radioactive isotopes such as levels of activity, specific activity and the use of carrier materials. Corrections that need to be taken into account in using an isotope to obtain a valid result are also described and statistics for a valid result are included. (BR)

  8. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1990-09-30

    This report discusses the nuclear structure of the following isotopes as a result of radioactive decays: neutron-deficient iridium isotopes; neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; neutron-deficient gold isotopes; neutron-deficient mercury isotopes; neutron-deficient thallium isotopes; neutron-deficient lead isotopes; neutron-deficient promethium isotopes; and neutron-deficient samarium isotopes.

  9. RadioActive101 Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brites, Maria José; Ravenscroft, Andrew; Dellow, James; Rainey, Colin; Jorge, Ana; Santos, Sílvio Correia; Rees, Angela; Auwärter, Andreas; Catalão, Daniel; Balica, Magda; Camilleri, Anthony F.

    2014-01-01

    In keeping with the overarching RadioActive101 (RA101) spirit and ethos, this report is the product of collaborative and joined-up thinking from within the European consortium spread across five countries. As such, it is not simply a single voice reporting on the experiences and knowledge gained during the project. Rather it is a range of…

  10. High-Level Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Howard C.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a method to calculate the amount of high-level radioactive waste by taking into consideration the following factors: the fission process that yields the waste, identification of the waste, the energy required to run a 1-GWe plant for one year, and the uranium mass required to produce that energy. Briefly discusses waste disposal and…

  11. Electrodynamic radioactivity detector for microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T. L.; Davis, E. J.; Jenkins, R. W., Jr.; McRae, D. D.

    1989-03-01

    A new technique for the measurement of the radioactive decay of single microparticles has been demonstrated. Although the experiments were made with droplets of order 20 μm in diameter, microparticles in the range 0.1-100 μm can be accommodated. An electrodynamic balance and combination light-scattering photometer were used to measure the charge-loss rate and size of a charged microsphere suspended in a laser beam by superposed ac and dc electrical fields. The charged particle undergoes charge loss in the partially ionized gas atmosphere which results from radioactive decay of 14C-tagged compounds, and the rate of charge loss is proportional to the rate of decay here. The charge on a particle was determined by measuring the dc voltage necessary to stably suspend the particle against gravity while simultaneously determining the droplet size by light-scattering techniques. The parameters which affect the operation of the electrodynamic balance as a radioactivity detector are examined, and the limits of its sensitivity are explored. Radioactivity levels as low as 120 pCi have been measured, and it appears that by reducing the background contamination inside our balance activity levels on the order of 10 pCi can be detected. This new technique has application in the measurement of activity levels and source discrimination of natural and man-made aerosols and smokes and is also useful for studies involving specifically labeled radio-chemical probes.

  12. The Speciation of Particulate Iron and Carbon in the East Pacific Rise 15oS Near-field Hydrothermal Plume and Underlying Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, B. M.; Lam, P. J.; Nicholas, S. L.; Ohnemus, D.; Hoffman, C. L.; Fitzsimmons, J. N.; Sherrell, R. M.; German, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate iron and carbon speciation were measured for water column and sediment samples collected at the East Pacific Rise ridge axis (15oS; Station 18) and approximately 80 km down-current (Station 20) during the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruise. Water column particles were collected by in situ filtration (0.2 micron, polycarbonate) from above, within, and below the hydrothermal plume. Water column samples were handled in an anaerobic chamber and stored frozen under inert gas shipboard, and protected from ambient oxygen during analysis. The flocculant, top-layer of the sediments was sampled shipboard under ambient conditions and stored frozen until analysis. Iron and carbon speciation were measured using X-ray microprobe (10.3.2) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) instruments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA. Iron (1s and 2p) and carbon (1s) X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and imaging for particles revealed that: (1) in comparison to the above plume sample, organic carbon is abundant in particles within and below the plume, as well as in surface sediments; (2) iron sulfides are not detectable in any water column sample investigated so far; (3) the fraction of non-sulfide reduced iron is highest in the below plume samples; and (4) the below plume sample is rich in free-living microbial cells.

  13. Evaluation of the implementation of the R-matrix formalism with reference to the astrophysically important 18F(p,α)15O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountford, D. J.; deBoer, R. J.; Descouvemont, P.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2014-12-01

    Background. The R-Matrix formalism is a crucial tool in the study of nuclear astrophysics reactions, and many codes have been written to implement the relevant mathematics. One such code makes use of Visual Basic macros. A further open-source code, AZURE, written in the FORTRAN programming language is available from the JINA collaboration and a C++ version, AZURE2, has recently become available. Purpose The detailed mathematics and extensive programming required to implement broadly applicable R-Matrix codes make comparisons between different codes highly desirable in order to check for errors. This paper presents a comparison of the three codes based around data and recent results of the astrophysically important 18F(p,α)15O reaction. Methods Using the same analysis techniques as in the work of Mountford et al. parameters are extracted from the two JINA codes, and the resulting cross-sections are compared. This includes both refitting data with each code and making low-energy extrapolations. Results All extracted parameters are shown to be broadly consistent between the three codes and the resulting calculations are in good agreement barring a known low-energy problem in the original AZURE code. Conclusion The three codes are shown to be broadly consistent with each other and equally valid in the study of astrophysical reactions, although one must be careful when considering low lying, narrow resonances which can be problematic when integrating.

  14. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark L.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Bartsch, Richard A.; Barrans, Jr., Richard E.; Rausch, David

    1999-01-01

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution.

  15. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bartsch, R.A.; Barrans, R.E. Jr.; Rausch, D.

    1999-03-30

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution. 4 figs.

  16. Prospects for research with radioactive beams and targets

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1984-06-01

    Research with heavy ion (HI) beams has become a major field of physics. Nuclei of all naturally occuring elements and isotopes can be accelerated to energies as high as 2 GeV/A with even higher energies expected in the future. With the advent of relativistic heavy ion accelerators and the development of high intensity on-line isotope separators it has now become possible to explore a new dimension in nuclear physics based on the production and application of radioactive ion beams (RIB). More than 1400 unstable nuclei with half lives of more than 1 ..mu..s are known and could potentially serve as projectiles in RIB experiments. The purpose of this paper is firstly to point out that there are now several promising possibilities to obtain RIB's of acceptable intensity and that secondly a large variety of scientific questions can be addressed should such beams become routinely available. The discussion of the production of RIB's is divided into methods where the radioactive species are stopped and reaccelerated, and methods where the RIB emerges as a secondary beam from a suitable nuclear reation. A third section is devoted to the far reaching experimental possibilities related to accumulator and storage rings. The chapters on research will cover the application of RIB's to the synthesis of exotic nuclei, astrophysics, reaction mechanisms, nuclear structure, atomic- and solid-state physics, bio-medicine, and physics related to the special characteristics of storage rings.

  17. Potassium niobate nanolamina: a promising adsorbent for entrapment of radioactive cations from water.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Yang, Dongjiang; Sun, Cuihua; Liu, Long; Yang, Shuanglei; Alec Jia, Yi; Cai, Rongsheng; Yao, Xiangdong

    2014-12-04

    Processing and managing radioactive waste is a great challenge worldwide as it is extremely difficult and costly; the radioactive species, cations or anions, leaked into the environment are a serious threat to the health of present and future generations. We report layered potassium niobate (K4Nb6O17) nanolamina as adsorbent to remove toxic Sr(2+), Ba(2+) and Cs(+) cations from wastewater. The results show that K4Nb6O17 nanolamina can permanently confine the toxic cations within the interlayer spacing via a considerable deformation of the metastable layered structure during the ion exchange process. At the same time, the nanolaminar adsorbent exhibits prompt adsorption kinetics, high adsorption capacity and selectivity, and superior acid resistance. These merits make it be a promising material as ion exchanger for the removal of radioactive cations from wastewater.

  18. Radioactive Waste Incineration: Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diederich, A.R.; Akins, M.J.

    2008-07-01

    Incineration is generally accepted as a method of reducing the volume of radioactive waste. In some cases, the resulting ash may have high concentrations of materials such as Plutonium or Uranium that are valuable materials for recycling. Incineration can also be effective in treating waste that contains hazardous chemicals as well as radioactive contamination. Despite these advantages, the number of operating incinerators currently in the US currently appears to be small and potentially declining. This paper describes technical, regulatory, economic and political factors that affect the selection of incineration as a preferred method of treating radioactive waste. The history of incinerator use at commercial and DOE facilities is summarized, along with the factors that have affected each of the sectors, thus leading to the current set of active incinerator facilities. In summary: Incineration has had a long history of use in radioactive waste processing due to their ability to reduce the volume of the waste while destroying hazardous chemicals and biological material. However, combinations of technical, regulatory, economic and political factors have constrained the overall use of incineration. In both the Government and Private sectors, the trend is to have a limited number of larger incineration facilities that treat wastes from a multiple sites. Each of these sector is now served by only one or two incinerators. Increased use of incineration is not likely unless there is a change in the factors involved, such as a significant increase in the cost of disposal. Medical wastes with low levels of radioactive contamination are being treated effectively at small, local incineration facilities. No trend is expected in this group. (authors)

  19. On-Line Commissioning of the HRIBF Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Jost, Carola U; Mendez, II, Anthony J; Stracener, Daniel W; Williams, Cecil L; Madurga, M; Miernik, Krzysztof A; Miller, D.; Padgett, S; Paulauskas, Stanley V; Gross, Carl J; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Wolinska-Cichocka, Marzena

    2013-01-01

    A highly-selective resonant ionization laser ion source has been successfully commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the production of pure beams of short-lived nuclei for spectroscopic studies. The laser ion source provided beams of neutron-rich Ga isotopes to the Low-energy Radioactive Ion Beam Spectroscopy Station for beta decay measurements. The radioactive Ga isotopes were produced by 50-MeV proton induced fission of 238U and ionized by laser radiation using a two-step resonant ionization scheme. Isobarically pure 83Ga, 85Ga, and 86Ga beams were delivered to the experiment at approximate rates of 12000 ions/s, 100 ions/s, and 3 ions/s, respectively.

  20. 46 CFR 147.100 - Radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (NRC) under 10 CFR parts 30 and 34. (b) Stowage of radioactive materials must conform to the... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radioactive materials. 147.100 Section 147.100 Shipping... Stowage and Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.100 Radioactive materials....

  1. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  2. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  3. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  4. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  5. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  6. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers...

  7. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers...

  8. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers...

  9. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers...

  10. 46 CFR 147.100 - Radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (NRC) under 10 CFR parts 30 and 34. (b) Stowage of radioactive materials must conform to the... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radioactive materials. 147.100 Section 147.100 Shipping... Stowage and Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.100 Radioactive materials....

  11. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers...

  12. 46 CFR 147.100 - Radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (NRC) under 10 CFR parts 30 and 34. (b) Stowage of radioactive materials must conform to the... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radioactive materials. 147.100 Section 147.100 Shipping... Stowage and Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.100 Radioactive materials....

  13. 46 CFR 147.100 - Radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (NRC) under 10 CFR parts 30 and 34. (b) Stowage of radioactive materials must conform to the... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radioactive materials. 147.100 Section 147.100 Shipping... Stowage and Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.100 Radioactive materials....

  14. 46 CFR 147.100 - Radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (NRC) under 10 CFR parts 30 and 34. (b) Stowage of radioactive materials must conform to the... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radioactive materials. 147.100 Section 147.100 Shipping... Stowage and Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.100 Radioactive materials....

  15. Radioactive waste treatment technologies and environment

    SciTech Connect

    HORVATH, Jan; KRASNY, Dusan

    2007-07-01

    The radioactive waste treatment and conditioning are the most important steps in radioactive waste management. At the Slovak Electric, plc, a range of technologies are used for the processing of radioactive waste into a form suitable for disposal in near surface repository. These technologies operated by JAVYS, PLc. Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, PLc. Jaslovske Bohunice are described. Main accent is given to the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment and Conditioning Centre, Bituminization plant, Vitrification plant, and Near surface repository of radioactive waste in Mochovce and their operation. Conclusions to safe and effective management of radioactive waste in the Slovak Republic are presented. (authors)

  16. Electrophoretic deposition of Mn1.5Co1.5O4 on metallic interconnect and interaction with glass-ceramic sealant for solid oxide fuel cells application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeacetto, Federico; De Miranda, Auristela; Cabanas Polo, Sandra; Molin, Sebastian; Boccaccini, Dino; Salvo, Milena; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-04-01

    Cr-containing stainless steels are widely used as metallic interconnects for SOFCs. Volatile Cr-containing species, which originate from the oxide formed on steel, can poison the cathode material and subsequently cause degradation in the SOFC stack. Mn1.5Co1.5O4 spinel is one of the most promising coating materials due to its high electrical conductivity, good CTE match with the stainless steel substrate and an excellent chromium retention capability. In this work Mn1.5Co1.5O4 spinel coatings are deposited on Crofer22APU substrates by cathodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD) followed by sintering at 800-1150 °C in different atmospheres. Dense, continuous and crack free Mn1.5Co1.5O4 coatings (with thickness ranging from 10 to 40 μm) are obtained on Crofer22APU substrates. Moreover, electrical properties of the coated Crofer22APU alloy are tested up to 2500 h and an excellent compatibility is found between Mn1.5Co1.5O4 coated Crofer22APU and a new glass-ceramic sealant, after 500 h of thermal tests in air, thus suggesting that the spinel protection layer can effectively act as a barrier to outward diffusion of Cr.

  17. A potential role for the midbrain in integrating fat-free mass determined energy needs: An H2 (15) O PET study.

    PubMed

    Weise, Christopher M; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Reiman, Eric M; Chen, Kewei; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Little is known on how sensing of energy needs is centrally represented, integrated, and translated into the behavioral aspects of energy homeostasis. Fat free mass (FFM) is the major determinant of energy expenditure. We investigated how interindividual variances in FFM relate to neuronal activity in humans. Healthy adults (n = 64, 21F/43M; age 31.3 ± 9.1y; percentage of body fat [PFAT] 25.6 ± 10.7%; BMI 30.4 ± 9) underwent a 36h fast and subsequent H(2) (15) O positron emission tomographic (PET) measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Multiple variable regression analysis revealed significant associations of FFM with rCBF within the midbrain [including parts of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), ventral tegmental area (VTA), thalamic and hypothalamic regions], the bilateral parahippocampal region, left anterior cingulate, left insular cortex, right cerebellum, and distinct regions within the temporal and occipital cortex. In contrast, no significant associations were found for fat mass (FM). We investigated the potential functional-anatomical link between FFM and central regulation of food intake by performing a conjunction analysis of FFM and the perceived hunger feelings. This showed a significant overlap within the midbrain PAG. Mediation analysis demonstrated a significant indirect effect of FFM on hunger with PAG rCBF as mediator. Most regions we found to be associated with FFM form part in ascending homeostatic pathways and cortical circuitries implicated in the regulation of basic bodily functions indicating a potential role of these central networks in the integration of FFM determined energy needs. PMID:25766283

  18. A potential role for the midbrain in integrating fat-free mass determined energy needs: An H2 (15) O PET study.

    PubMed

    Weise, Christopher M; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Reiman, Eric M; Chen, Kewei; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Little is known on how sensing of energy needs is centrally represented, integrated, and translated into the behavioral aspects of energy homeostasis. Fat free mass (FFM) is the major determinant of energy expenditure. We investigated how interindividual variances in FFM relate to neuronal activity in humans. Healthy adults (n = 64, 21F/43M; age 31.3 ± 9.1y; percentage of body fat [PFAT] 25.6 ± 10.7%; BMI 30.4 ± 9) underwent a 36h fast and subsequent H(2) (15) O positron emission tomographic (PET) measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Multiple variable regression analysis revealed significant associations of FFM with rCBF within the midbrain [including parts of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), ventral tegmental area (VTA), thalamic and hypothalamic regions], the bilateral parahippocampal region, left anterior cingulate, left insular cortex, right cerebellum, and distinct regions within the temporal and occipital cortex. In contrast, no significant associations were found for fat mass (FM). We investigated the potential functional-anatomical link between FFM and central regulation of food intake by performing a conjunction analysis of FFM and the perceived hunger feelings. This showed a significant overlap within the midbrain PAG. Mediation analysis demonstrated a significant indirect effect of FFM on hunger with PAG rCBF as mediator. Most regions we found to be associated with FFM form part in ascending homeostatic pathways and cortical circuitries implicated in the regulation of basic bodily functions indicating a potential role of these central networks in the integration of FFM determined energy needs.

  19. Public attitudes about radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bisconti, A.S.

    1992-12-31

    Public attitudes about radioactive waste are changeable. That is my conclusion from eight years of social science research which I have directed on this topic. The fact that public attitudes about radioactive waste are changeable is well-known to the hands-on practitioners who have opportunities to talk with the public and respond to their concerns-practitioners like Ginger King, who is sharing the podium with me today. The public`s changeability and open-mindedness are frequently overlooked in studies that focus narrowly on fear and dread. Such studies give the impression that the outlook for waste disposal solutions is dismal. I believe that impression is misleading, and I`d like to share research findings with you today that give a broader perspective.

  20. Radioactive Waste Management BasisApril 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B K

    2011-08-31

    This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  1. Environmental Geochemistry of Radioactive Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, M. D.; Bryan, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Psychometric studies of public perception of risk have shown that dangers associated with radioactive contamination are considered the most dreaded and among the least understood hazards (Slovic, 1987). Fear of the risks associated with nuclear power and associated contamination has had important effects on policy and commercial decisions in the last few decades. In the US, no new nuclear power plants were ordered between 1978 and 2002, even though it has been suggested that the use of nuclear power has led to significantly reduced CO2 emissions and may provide some relief from the potential climatic changes associated with fossil fuel use. The costs of the remediation of sites contaminated by radioactive materials and the projected costs of waste disposal of radioactive waste in the US dwarf many other environmental programs. The cost of disposal of spent nuclear fuel at the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will likely exceed 10 billion. The estimated total life cycle cost for remediation of US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons production sites ranged from 203-247 billion dollars in constant 1999 dollars, making the cleanup the largest environmental project on the planet (US DOE, 2001). Estimates for the cleanup of the Hanford site alone exceeded $85 billion through 2046 in some of the remediation plans.Policy decisions concerning radioactive contamination should be based on an understanding of the potential migration of radionuclides through the geosphere. In many cases, this potential may have been overestimated, leading to decisions to clean up contaminated sites unnecessarily and exposing workers to unnecessary risk. It is important for both the general public and the scientific community to be familiar with information that is well established, to identify the areas of uncertainty and to understand the significance of that uncertainty to the assessment of risk.

  2. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1991-09-30

    This report discusses nuclear structure from radioactive decay of the following: Neutron-Deficient Iridium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Platinum Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Gold Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Mercury Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Thallium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Lead Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Samarium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Promethium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Neodymium Isotopes; and Neutron-Deficient Praseodymium Isotopes. Also discussed are Nuclear Systematics and Models.

  3. Optimization of radioactive waste storage.

    PubMed

    Dellamano, José Claudio; Sordi, Gian-Maria A A

    2007-02-01

    In several countries, low-level radioactive wastes are treated and stored awaiting construction and operation of a final repository. In some cases, interim storage may be extended for decades requiring special attention regarding security issues. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends segregation of wastes that may be exempted from interim storage or ultimate disposal. The paper presents a method to optimize the decision making process regarding exemption vs. interim storage or ultimate disposal of these wastes. PMID:17228185

  4. Radioactive substances in tap water.

    PubMed

    Atsuumi, Ryo; Endo, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Akihiko; Kannotou, Yasumitu; Nakada, Masahiro; Yabuuchi, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    A 9.0 magnitude (M) earthquake with an epicenter off the Sanriku coast occurred at 14: 46 on March 11, 2011. TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F-1 NPP) was struck by the earthquake and its resulting tsunami. Consequently a critical nuclear disaster developed, as a large quantity of radioactive materials was released due to a hydrogen blast. On March 16(th), 2011, radioiodine and radioactive cesium were detected at levels of 177 Bq/kg and 58 Bq/kg, respectively, in tap water in Fukushima city (about 62km northwest of TEPCO F-1 NPP). On March 20th, radioiodine was detected in tap water at a level of 965 Bq/kg, which is over the value-index of restrictions on food and drink intake (radioiodine 300 Bq/kg (infant intake 100 Bq/kg)) designated by the Nuclear Safety Commission. Therefore, intake restriction measures were taken regarding drinking water. After that, although the all intake restrictions were lifted, in order to confirm the safety of tap water, an inspection system was established to monitor all tap water in the prefecture. This system has confirmed that there has been no detection of radioiodine or radioactive cesium in tap water in the prefecture since May 5(th), 2011. Furthermore, radioactive strontium ((89) Sr, (90)Sr) and plutonium ((238)Pu, (239)Pu+(240)Pu) in tap water and the raw water supply were measured. As a result, (89) Sr, (238)Pu, (239)Pu+(240)Pu were undetectable and although (90)Sr was detected, its committed effective dose of 0.00017 mSv was much lower than the yearly 0.1 mSv of the World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water quality. In addition, the results did not show any deviations from past inspection results.

  5. Radioactivity of spent TRIGA fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Usang, M. D. Nabil, A. R. A.; Alfred, S. L.; Hamzah, N. S.; Abi, M. J. B.; Rawi, M. Z. M.; Abu, M. P.

    2015-04-29

    Some of the oldest TRIGA fuel in the Malaysian Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is approaching the limit of its end of life with burn-up of around 20%. Hence it is prudent for us to start planning on the replacement of the fuel in the reactor and other derivative activities associated with it. In this regard, we need to understand all of the risk associated with such operation and one of them is to predict the radioactivity of the fuel, so as to estimate the safety of our working conditions. The radioactivity of several fuels are measured and compared with simulation results to confirm the burnup levels of the selected fuels. The radioactivity measurement are conducted inside the water tank to reduce the risk of exposure and in this case the detector wrapped in plastics are lowered under water. In nuclear power plant, the general practice was to continuously burn the fuel. In research reactor, most operations are based on the immediate needs of the reactor and our RTP for example operate periodically. By integrating the burnup contribution for each core configuration, we simplify the simulation of burn up for each core configuration. Our results for two (2) fuel however indicates that the dose from simulation underestimate the actual dose from our measurements. Several postulates are investigated but the underlying reason remain inconclusive.

  6. Disposition of intravenous radioactive acyclovir

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda, P.; Good, S.S.; Laskin, O.L.; Krasny, H.C.; Connor, J.D.; Lietman, P.S.

    1981-11-01

    The kinetic and metabolic disposition of (8-14C)acyclovir (ACV) was investigated in five subjects with advanced malignancy. The drug was administered by 1-hr intravenous infusion at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg. Plasma and blood radioactivity-time, and plasma concentration-time data were defined by a two-compartment open kinetic model. There was nearly equivalent distribution of radioactivity in blood and plasma. The overall mean plasma half-life and total body clearance +/- SD of ACV were 2.1 +/- 0.5 hr and 297 +/- 53 ml/min/1.73 m2. Binding of ACV to plasma proteins was 15.4 +/- 4.4%. Most of the radioactive dose excreted was recovered in the urine (71% to 99%) with less than 2% excretion in the feces and only trace amounts in the expired Co2. Analyses by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that 9-(carboxymethoxymethyl)guanine was the only significant urinary metabolite of ACV, accounting for 8.5% to 14.1% of the dose. A minor metabolite (less than 0.2% of dose) had the retention time of 8-hydroxy-9-((2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl)guanine. Unchanged urinary ACV ranged from 62% to 91% of the dose. There was no indication of ACV cleavage to guanine. Renal clearance of ACV was approximately three times the corresponding creatinine clearances.

  7. Radioactivity of spent TRIGA fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usang, M. D.; Nabil, A. R. A.; Alfred, S. L.; Hamzah, N. S.; Abi, M. J. B.; Rawi, M. Z. M.; Abu, M. P.

    2015-04-01

    Some of the oldest TRIGA fuel in the Malaysian Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is approaching the limit of its end of life with burn-up of around 20%. Hence it is prudent for us to start planning on the replacement of the fuel in the reactor and other derivative activities associated with it. In this regard, we need to understand all of the risk associated with such operation and one of them is to predict the radioactivity of the fuel, so as to estimate the safety of our working conditions. The radioactivity of several fuels are measured and compared with simulation results to confirm the burnup levels of the selected fuels. The radioactivity measurement are conducted inside the water tank to reduce the risk of exposure and in this case the detector wrapped in plastics are lowered under water. In nuclear power plant, the general practice was to continuously burn the fuel. In research reactor, most operations are based on the immediate needs of the reactor and our RTP for example operate periodically. By integrating the burnup contribution for each core configuration, we simplify the simulation of burn up for each core configuration. Our results for two (2) fuel however indicates that the dose from simulation underestimate the actual dose from our measurements. Several postulates are investigated but the underlying reason remain inconclusive.

  8. Extending the applicability of an open-ring trap to perform experiments with a single laser-cooled ion.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, J M; Colombano, M; Doménech, J; Block, M; Delahaye, P; Rodríguez, D

    2015-10-01

    A special ion trap was initially built up to perform β-ν correlation experiments with radioactive ions. The trap geometry is also well suited to perform experiments with laser-cooled ions, serving for the development of a new type of Penning trap, in the framework of the project TRAPSENSOR at the University of Granada. The goal of this project is to use a single (40)Ca(+) ion as detector for single-ion mass spectrometry. Within this project and without any modification to the initial electrode configuration, it was possible to perform Doppler cooling on (40)Ca(+) ions, starting from large clouds and reaching single ion sensitivity. This new feature of the trap might be important also for other experiments with ions produced at radioactive ion beam facilities. In this publication, the trap and the laser system will be described, together with their performance with respect to laser cooling applied to large ion clouds down to a single ion.

  9. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  10. Efficient Removal of Cationic and Anionic Radioactive Pollutants from Water Using Hydrotalcite-Based Getters.

    PubMed

    Bo, Arixin; Sarina, Sarina; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Xiao, Qi; Gu, Yuantong; Ayoko, Godwin A; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2016-06-29

    Hydrotalcite (HT)-based materials are usually applied to capture anionic pollutants in aqueous solutions. Generally considered anion exchangers, their ability to capture radioactive cations is rarely exploited. In the present work, we explored the ability of pristine and calcined HT getters to effectively capture radioactive cations (Sr(2+) and Ba(2+)) which can be securely stabilized at the getter surface. It is found that calcined HT outperforms its pristine counterpart in cation removal ability. Meanwhile, a novel anion removal mechanism targeting radioactive I(-) is demonstrated. This approach involves HT surface modification with silver species, namely, Ag2CO3 nanoparticles, which can attach firmly on HT surface by forming coherent interface. This HT-based anion getter can be further used to capture I(-) in aqueous solution. The observed I(-) uptake mechanism is distinctly different from the widely reported ion exchange mechanism of HT and much more efficient. As a result of the high local concentrations of precipitants on the getters, radioactive ions in water can be readily immobilized onto the getter surface by forming precipitates. The secured ionic pollutants can be subsequently removed from water by filtration or sedimentation for safe disposal. Overall, these stable, inexpensive getters are the materials of choice for removal of trace ionic pollutants from bulk radioactive liquids, especially during episodic environmental crisis.

  11. Injected 1+ ion beam as a diagnostics tool of charge breeder ECR ion source plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Lamy, T.; Angot, J.; Thuillier, T.; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.; Choinski, J.; Standylo, L.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Koivisto, H.

    2015-06-01

    Charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (CB-ECRIS) are used as 1+  →n+  charge multiplication devices of post-accelerated radioactive ion beams. The charge breeding process involves thermalization of the injected 1+  ions with the plasma ions in ion-ion collisions, subsequent ionization by electron impact and extraction of the n+  ions. Charge breeding experiments of 85Rb and 133Cs ion beams with the 14.5 GHz PHOENIX CB-ECRIS operating with oxygen gas demonstrate the plasma diagnostics capabilities of the 1+  injection method. Two populations can be distinguished in the m/q-spectrum of the extracted ion beams, the low (1+  and 2+) charge states representing the uncaptured fraction of the incident 1+  ion beam and the high charge states that have been captured in ion-ion collisions and subsequently charge bred through electron impact ionization. Identification of the uncaptured fraction of the 1+  ions allows estimating the lower limit of ion-ion collision frequency of various charge states in the ECRIS plasma. The collision frequencies of highly charged ions (˜107 Hz) are shown to exceed their gyrofrequencies (˜106 Hz) at least by an order of magnitude, which implies that the dynamics of high charge state ions are dictated by magnetically confined electrons and ambipolar diffusion and only low charge state ions can be considered magnetized. Furthermore, it is concluded that the plasma density of the ECRIS charge breeder is most likely on the order of 1011 cm-3 i.e. well below the critical density for 14.5 GHz microwaves.

  12. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Martina, E.F.

    1958-04-22

    An improved ion source particularly adapted to provide an intense beam of ions with minimum neutral molecule egress from the source is described. The ion source structure includes means for establishing an oscillating electron discharge, including an apertured cathode at one end of the discharge. The egress of ions from the source is in a pencil like beam. This desirable form of withdrawal of the ions from the plasma created by the discharge is achieved by shaping the field at the aperture of the cathode. A tubular insulator is extended into the plasma from the aperture and in cooperation with the electric fields at the cathode end of the discharge focuses the ions from the source,

  13. REMOTE DETECTION OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES USING MILLIMETER WAVE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnowski, R.; Chien; H.; Gopalsami, N.

    2009-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, a common method for manufacturing weapons-grade special nuclear materials, is accompanied by the release of fi ssion products trapped within the fuel. One of these fi ssion products is a radioactive isotope of Krypton (Kr-85); a pure β- emitter with a half-life of 10.72 years. Due to its chemical neutrality and relatively long half life, nearly all of the Kr-85 is released into the surrounding air during reprocessing, resulting in a concentration of Kr-85 near the source that is several orders of magnitude higher than the typical background (atmospheric) concentrations. This high concentration of Kr-85 is accompanied by a proportionately high increase in air ionization due to the release of beta radiation from Kr-85 decay. Millimeter wave (MMW) sensing technology can be used to detect the presence of Kr-85 induced plumes since a high concentration of ions in the air increases the radar cross section due to a combination of atmospheric phenomena. Possible applications for this technology include the remote sensing of reprocessing activities across national borders bolstering global anti-proliferation initiatives. The feasibility of using MMW radar technology to uniquely detect the presence of Kr-85 can be tested using commercial ion generators or sealed radioactive sources in the laboratory. In this paper we describe our work to derive an ion dispersion model that will describe the spatial distribution of ions from Kr-85 and other common lab sources. The types and energies of radiation emitted by isotopes Co-60 and Cs-137 were researched, and these parameters were incorporated into these dispersion models. Our results can be compared with the results of MMW detection experiments in order to quantify the relationship between radar cross section and air ionization as well as to further calibrate the MMW detection equipment.

  14. 4-(Trifluoromethyl)-benzonitrile: A novel electrolyte additive for lithium nickel manganese oxide cathode of high voltage lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenna; Xing, Lidan; Wang, Yating; Xu, Mengqing; Li, Weishan; Xie, Fengchao; Xia, Shengan

    2014-12-01

    In this work, 4-(Trifluoromethyl)-benzonitrile (4-TB) is used as a novel electrolyte additive for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode of high voltage lithium ion battery. Charge-discharge tests show that the cyclic stability of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is significantly improved by using 0.5 wt.% 4-TB. With using 4-TB, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 delivers an initial capacity of 133 mAh g-1 and maintains 121 mAh g-1 after 300 cycles with a capacity retention of 91%, compared to the 75% of that using base electrolyte (1 M LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate(EC)/dimethyl carbonate(DMC)). The results from linear sweep voltammetry, density functional theory calculations, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared, and inductively coupled plasma, indicate that 4-TB has lower oxidative stability than EC and DMC, and is preferentially oxidized on LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 forming a low-impedance protective film, which prevents the subsequent oxidation decomposition of the electrolyte and suppresses the manganese dissolution from LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4.

  15. Electrochemical performance of a graphene nanosheets anode in a high voltage lithium-ion cell.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Oscar; Caballero, Álvaro; Morales, Julián; Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Scrosati, Bruno; Hassoun, Jusef

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a lithium ion battery (LIB) using graphene nanosheets (GNS) as the anode in combination with a LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 (LNMO) high voltage, spinel-structure cathode. The GNS anode is characterized by a reversible capacity of the order of 600 mA h g(-1) and a working voltage of around 0.9 V, while the 4.8-V cathode has a theoretical capacity of 146.7 mA h g(-1). The full GNS/LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 cell has an average working voltage of about 3.75 V and a capacity of the order of 100 mA h g(-1). The findings of this paper suggest that the graphene may be proposed as a suitable anode for application in lithium ion batteries.

  16. Final storage of radioactive cesium by pollucite hydrothermal synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yokomori, Yoshinobu; Asazuki, Kazuhito; Kamiya, Natsumi; Yano, Yudai; Akamatsu, Koki; Toda, Tetsuya; Aruga, Atsushi; Kaneo, Yoshiaki; Matsuoka, Seiko; Nishi, Koji; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident has highlighted the importance of finding a better final storage method for radioactive cesium species. Cs is highly soluble in water, and can easily exchange with other alkali ions in zeolites or clays to form stable complexes. However, Cs+ is released from Cs+ complexes into water when surrounded by an excess of water. Pollucite may be the best final storage option for Cs+, but its typical synthesis requires heating to about 1200°C in air. Here, we show that the hydrothermal synthesis of pollucite can be completed at 300°C in three hours from any zeolite or clay. Furthermore, our procedure does not require ion exchange before synthesis. Radioactive Cs is usually found in complexes with clays. At that time, this method only requires calcium hydroxide, water, and three hours of hydrothermal synthesis, so the process is both inexpensive and practical for large-scale application. Pollucite is an analog of analcime zeolite, and contains a channel system 2.8 Å in diameter, which is formed by 6-oxygen rings. As the diameter of Cs+ is 3.34 Å and each Cs+ exists independently within a separate portion of the channel, Cs+ cannot exit the pollucite framework without breaking it. PMID:24569302

  17. ECR Ion Source Developments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; Liu, Y.; Meyer, F.W.

    1998-10-05

    New techniques for enhancing the performances of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We have utilized the multiple discrete frequency technique to improve the charge state distributions extracted from conventional magnetic field geometry ECR source by injecting three frequencies into the source. A new flat central magnetic field concept, has been incorporated in the designs of a compact all-permanent-magnet source for high charge-state ion beam generation and a compact electromagnetic source for singly ionized radioactive ion beam generation for use in the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) research program. A review of the three frequency injection experiments and descriptions of the design aspects of the "volume-type" ECR ion sources will be given in this report.

  18. Thermochemical Processing of Radioactive Waste Using Powder Metal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ojovan, M. I.; Sobolev, I. A.; Dmitriev, S. A.; Panteleev, V. I.; Karlina, O. K.; Klimov. V. L.

    2003-02-25

    Problematic radioactive wastes were generated during various activities of both industrial facilities and research institutions usually in relative small amounts. These can be spent ion exchange resins, inorganic absorbents, wastes from research nuclear reactors, irradiated graphite, mixed, organic or chlorine-containing radioactive waste, contaminated soils, un-burnable heavily surface-contaminated materials, etc. Conventional treatment methods encounter serious problems concerning processing efficiency of such waste, e.g. complete destruction of organic molecules and avoiding of possible emissions of radionuclides, heavy metals and chemically hazardous species. Some contaminations cannot be removed from surface using common decontamination methods. Conditioning of ash residues obtained after treatment of solid radioactive waste including ashes received from treating problematic wastes also is a complicated task. Moreover due to relative small volume of specific type radioactive waste the development of target treatment procedures and facilities to conduct technological processes and their deployment could be economically unexpedient and ecologically no justified. Thermochemical processing technologies are used for treating and conditioning problematic radioactive wastes. The thermochemical processing uses powdered metal fuels (PMF) that are specifically formulated for the waste composition and react chemically with the waste components. The composition of the PMF is designed in such a way as to minimize the release of hazardous components and radionuclides in the off gas and to confine the contaminants in the ash residue. The thermochemical procedures allow decomposition of organic matter and capturing hazardous radionuclides and chemical species simultaneously. A significant advantage of thermochemical processing is its autonomy. Thermochemical treatment technologies use the energy of exothermic reactions in the mixture of radioactive or hazardous waste with PMF

  19. Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, S S

    2011-08-31

    This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  20. SHIPPING CONTAINER FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, H.D.; Biggs, B.B.; Tariello, P.J.; George, K.O.

    1963-01-15

    A shipping container is described for transponting a large number of radioactive nuclear fuel element modules which produce a substantial amount of heat. The container comprises a primary pressure vessel and shield, and a rotatable head having an access port that can be indexed with module holders in the container. In order to remove heat generated in the fuel eleme nts, a heat exchanger is arranged within the container and in contact with a heat exchange fluid therein. The heat exchanger communicates with additional external heat exchangers, which dissipate heat to the atmosphere. (AEC)

  1. Tracking of Ions Produced at Near Barrier Energies in Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Examples of detectors, presently in use, for tracking products from nuclear reactions induced by radioactive ion beams are described. A new tracking detector is being designed to study the binary products from reactions induced by heavy neutron-rich radioactive ion beams on heavy neutron-rich target nuclei. The motivation for such studies and the features designed to accomplish this goal will be presented.

  2. Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  3. Cooling of radioactive isotopes for Schottky mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, M.; Beckert, K.; Eickhoff, H.; Franzke, B.; Nolden, F.; Reich, H.; Schlitt, B.; Winkler, T.

    1999-01-15

    Nuclear masses of radioactive isotopes can be determined by measurement of their revolution frequency relative to the revolution frequency of reference ions with well-known masses. The resolution of neighboring frequency lines and the accuracy of the mass measurement is dependent on the achievable minimum longitudinal momentum spread of the ion beam. Electron cooling allows an increase of the phase space density by several orders of magnitude. For high intensity beams Coulomb scattering in the dense ion beam limits the beam quality. For low intensity beams a regime exists in which the diffusion due to intrabeam scattering is not dominating any more. The minimum momentum spread {delta}p/p=5x10{sup -7} which is observed by Schottky noise analysis is considerably higher than the value expected from the longitudinal electron temperature. The measured frequency spread results from fluctuations of the magnetic field in the storage ring magnets. Systematic mass measurements have started and can be presently used for ions with half-lives of some ten seconds. For shorter-lived nuclei a stochastic precooling system is in preparation.

  4. The Model 9977 Radioactive Material Packaging Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.

    2015-10-09

    The Model 9977 Packaging is a single containment drum style radioactive material (RAM) shipping container designed, tested and analyzed to meet the performance requirements of Title 10 the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A radioactive material shipping package, in combination with its contents, must perform three functions (please note that the performance criteria specified in the Code of Federal Regulations have alternate limits for normal operations and after accident conditions): Containment, the package must “contain” the radioactive material within it; Shielding, the packaging must limit its users and the public to radiation doses within specified limits; and Subcriticality, the package must maintain its radioactive material as subcritical

  5. Spontaneously generated radioactive nanoparticles in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, William H.; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2003-04-01

    For almost 100 years, and perhaps longer, observers have detected spontaneous dispersal of radioactivity from macroscopic quantities of radioactive materials with the first published observations reported in 1910. In the 1960"s and later, radioactivity was observed to migrate through HEPA filters de-spite their well-established filtration characteristics. In measurements of ground water, radioactivity has been found to disperse from its original location of deposition in soil, despite the size, insolubility, and resistance to chemical reactions of the radioactive particles originally deposited. Similarly, measurements of the uptake of these materials in lung tissue and studies of their solubility in simulated biological fluids showed the solubility to be related to the radioactivity of the materials. In numerous practical examples, the migration and deposition of radioactivity affects work and operational practices. Despite this long and varied history indicating the importance of self-dispersal of radioactive materials, no measurements had ever been reported of the materials which were actually dispersed until recently and the results are quite surprising, suggesting a well-defined process creating discrete nanoparticle fractions. This paper will review the history of the observations of spontaneous dispersal of radioactivity and close with a description of the first measure-ments of the dispersed nanoparticles and suggestions of the physical processes involved in their formation.

  6. [Microbiological Aspects of Radioactive Waste Storage].

    PubMed

    Safonov, A V; Gorbunova, O A; German, K E; Zakharova, E V; Tregubova, V E; Ershov, B G; Nazina, T N

    2015-01-01

    The article gives information about the microorganisms inhabiting in surface storages of solid radioactive waste and deep disposal sites of liquid radioactive waste. It was shown that intensification of microbial processes can lead to significant changes in the chemical composition and physical state of the radioactive waste. It was concluded that the biogeochemical processes can have both a positive effect on the safety of radioactive waste storages (immobilization of RW macrocomponents, a decreased migration ability of radionuclides) and a negative one (biogenic gas production in subterranean formations and destruction of cement matrix).

  7. [Microbiological Aspects of Radioactive Waste Storage].

    PubMed

    Safonov, A V; Gorbunova, O A; German, K E; Zakharova, E V; Tregubova, V E; Ershov, B G; Nazina, T N

    2015-01-01

    The article gives information about the microorganisms inhabiting in surface storages of solid radioactive waste and deep disposal sites of liquid radioactive waste. It was shown that intensification of microbial processes can lead to significant changes in the chemical composition and physical state of the radioactive waste. It was concluded that the biogeochemical processes can have both a positive effect on the safety of radioactive waste storages (immobilization of RW macrocomponents, a decreased migration ability of radionuclides) and a negative one (biogenic gas production in subterranean formations and destruction of cement matrix). PMID:26310021

  8. Radioactive material package seal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} std cm{sup 3}/s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  10. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The systematics of induced radioactivity on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were studied in a wide range of materials using low level background facilities for detection of gamma rays. Approx. 400 samples of materials processed from structural parts of the spacecraft, as well as materials from onboard experiments, were analyzed at national facilities. These measurements show the variety of radioisotopes that are produced with half-lives greater than 2 wks, most of which are characteristic of proton induced reactions above 20 MeV. For the higher activity, long lived isotopes, it was possible to map the depth and directional dependences of the activity. Due to the stabilized configuration of the LDEF, the induced radioactivity data clearly show contributions from the anisotropic trapped proton flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly. This effect is discussed, along with evidence for activation by galactic protons and thermal neutrons. The discovery of Be-7 was made on leading side parts of the spacecraft, although this was though not to be related to the in situ production of radioisotopes from external particle fluxes.

  11. Cosmic radioactivity and INTEGRAL results

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Roland

    2014-05-02

    Gamma-ray lines from radioactive decay of unstable isotopes co-produced by nucleosynthesis in massive stars and supernova have been measured since more than thirty years. Over the past ten years, INTEGRAL complemented the first sky survey made by COMPTEL. The {sup 26}A1 isotope with 1 My decay time had been first direct proof of currently-ongoing nucleosynthesis in our Galaxy. This has now become a tool to study the ∼My history of specific source regions, such as massive-star groups and associations in nearby regions which can be discriminated from the galactic-plane background, and the inner Galaxy, where Doppler shifted lines add to the astronomical information about bar and spiral structure. Recent findings suggest that superbubbles show a remarkable asymmetry, on average, in the spiral arms of our galaxy. {sup 60}Fe is co-produced by the sources of {sup 26}A1, and the isotopic ratio from their nucleosynthesis encodes stellar-structure information. Annihilation gamma-rays from positrons in interstellar space show a puzzling bright and extended source region central to our Galaxy, but also may be partly related to nucleosynthesis. {sup 56}Ni and {sup 44}Ti isotope gamma-rays have been used to constrain supernova explosion mechanisms. Here we report latest results using the accumulated multi-year database of INTEGRAL observations, and discuss their astrophysical interpretations, connecting to other traces of cosmic radioactivity and to other cosmic messengers.

  12. Enhanced electrochemical performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode using an electrolyte with 3-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethoxy)-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoropropane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ying; Lu, Taolin; Zhang, Yixiao; Yan, Liqin; Xie, Jingying; Mao, Samuel S.

    2016-08-01

    A new electrolyte based on fluorinated 3-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethoxy)-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoropropane (F-EPE) solvent is studied in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/Li cells. The electrochemical stability of the electrolyte with 10% F-EPE is carried out by linear sweep voltammetry and electrochemical floating test. These results indicate that the electrolyte with F-EPE has an oxidation potential of more than 5.2 V vs. Li+/Li, which is higher than that without F-EPE and enlarges the oxidative window of electrolyte. A thin and uniform SEI layer is formed on the surface of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode by using electrolyte with F-EPE, leads to an improvement in the electrochemical performance, validated by charge-discharge tests, EIS, SEM, TEM, and XPS analysis.

  13. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, J.; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M. M.; deSouza, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. Optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (< 5 MeV / A) the detector presents only three 0.5 μm/cm2 foils to the beam in addition to the detector gas. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a risetime of 60-70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate and providing a time resolution of 6-8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as ∼ 8 % for an energy deposit of ∼3.5 MeV. The energy resolution with beams of 2.5 and 4.0 MeV/A 39K ions and the dependence of the energy resolution on beam intensity is measured. At an instantaneous rate of 3×105 ions/s the energy resolution has degraded to 14% with a pileup of 12%. The good energy resolution of this detector at rates up to 3×105 ions/s makes it an effective tool in the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams.

  14. A novel imidazole-based electrolyte additive for improved electrochemical performance at elevated temperature of high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Haibo; Xu, Mengqing; Xie, Boyuan; Lin, Haibin; Zhu, Yunmin; Zheng, Xiongwen; Huang, Weizhao; Liao, Youhao; Xing, Lidan; Li, Weishan

    2016-10-01

    A novel electrolyte additive, 1,1‧-sulfonyldiimidazole (SDM), is firstly reported to improve the cycling performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 at high voltage and elevated temperature (55 °C). Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), initial differential capacity vs. voltage, and computation results indicate that SDM is oxidized at a lower potential than the solvents of the electrolyte. Coulombic efficiency and capacity retention of a Li/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cell can be significantly enhanced in the presence of SDM, and moreover cells with SDM deliver lower impedance after 100 cycles at elevated temperature. To better understand the functional mechanism of the enhanced performance with incorporation of SDM in the electrolyte, ex-situ analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are employed to gain insight into the reaction mechanism of SDM on the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 electrode at high voltage and elevated temperature (55 °C). Surface analysis reveals that the improved electrochemical performance of the cells can be ascribed to the highly stable surface layer generated by SDM, which thus mitigates the detrimental decomposition of the electrolyte occurring and stabilizes the interphase of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode while cycling at high voltage and elevated temperature.

  15. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  16. HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES - SIA RADON EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Lifanov, F.A.; Kobelev, A.P.; Popkov, V.N.; Polkanov, M.A.; Savkin, A.E.; Varlakov, A.P.; Karlin, S.V.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Karlina, O.K.; Semenov, K.N.

    2003-02-27

    This review describes high temperature methods of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) treatment currently used at SIA Radon. Solid and liquid organic and mixed organic and inorganic wastes are subjected to plasma heating in a shaft furnace with formation of stable leach resistant slag suitable for disposal in near-surface repositories. Liquid inorganic radioactive waste is vitrified in a cold crucible based plant with borosilicate glass productivity up to 75 kg/h. Radioactive silts from settlers are heat-treated at 500-700 0C in electric furnace forming cake following by cake crushing, charging into 200 L barrels and soaking with cement grout. Various thermochemical technologies for decontamination of metallic, asphalt, and concrete surfaces, treatment of organic wastes (spent ion-exchange resins, polymers, medical and biological wastes), batch vitrification of incinerator ashes, calcines, spent inorganic sorbents, contaminated soil, treatment of carbon containing 14C nuclide, reactor graphite, lubricants have been developed and implemented.

  17. Ion Exchange Media for Reduction of Liquid Radwaste in Commercial Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yarnell, P.A.; Tavares, A.

    2008-07-01

    Ion exchange resins currently make up as much as one-half of all radioactive waste generated by commercial nuclear power plants. A major challenge is reduction of the quantity of ion exchange media requiring disposal. Although the amount of spent ion exchange resins disposed has decreased year after year, a new urgency has arisen with the pending closure of a major disposal site in 2008. This paper explores whether ion exchange resins also can be used to potentially reduce radioactive liquid waste volumes and / or limit them to Class A wastes only. Source term reduction and minimization of manpower exposure to radioactivity are other important goals. Specialty ion exchange products may help to achieve source term reduction of certain radionuclides. Some established operations, data, and process concepts are presented to address these critical issues encountered in liquid radwaste management. (authors)

  18. 46 CFR 148.300 - Radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... radioactive materials defined in 49 CFR 173.403 as Low Specific Activity Material, LSA-1, or Surface... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radioactive materials. 148.300 Section 148.300 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.300...

  19. 46 CFR 148.300 - Radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... radioactive materials defined in 49 CFR 173.403 as Low Specific Activity Material, LSA-1, or Surface... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radioactive materials. 148.300 Section 148.300 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.300...

  20. 46 CFR 148.300 - Radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID... materials. (a) Radioactive materials that may be stowed or transported in bulk are limited to those radioactive materials defined in 49 CFR 173.403 as Low Specific Activity Material, LSA-1, or...