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Sample records for 16-doxyl stearic acid

  1. 21 CFR 184.1090 - Stearic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stearic acid. 184.1090 Section 184.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1090 Stearic acid. (a) Stearic acid (C18H36O2, CAS Reg. No. 57-11-4) is a white to yellowish...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1090 - Stearic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stearic acid. 184.1090 Section 184.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1090 Stearic acid. (a) Stearic acid (C18H36O2, CAS Reg. No. 57-11-4) is...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1090 - Stearic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stearic acid. 184.1090 Section 184.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1090 Stearic acid. (a) Stearic acid (C18H36O2, CAS Reg. No. 57-11-4) is...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1090 - Stearic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stearic acid. 184.1090 Section 184.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1090 Stearic acid. (a) Stearic acid (C18H36O2, CAS Reg. No. 57-11-4) is...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1090 - Stearic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stearic acid. 184.1090 Section 184.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1090 Stearic acid. (a) Stearic acid (C18H36O2, CAS Reg. No. 57-11-4) is...

  6. Near infrared spectroscopy of stearic acid adsorbed on montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Longfei; Cai, Jingong; Frost, Ray L

    2010-03-01

    The adsorption of stearic acid on both sodium montmorillonites and calcium montmorillonites has been studied by near infrared spectroscopy complimented with infrared spectroscopy. Upon adsorption of stearic acid on Ca-Mt additional near infrared bands are observed at 8236 cm(-1) and is assigned to an interaction of stearic acid with the water of hydration. Upon adsorption of the stearic acid on Na-Mt, the NIR bands are now observed at 5671, 5778, 5848 and 5912 cm(-1) and are assigned to the overtone and combination bands of the CH fundamentals. Additional bands at 4177, 4250, 4324, 4337, 4689 and 4809 cm(-1) are attributed to CH combination bands resulting from the adsorption of the stearic acid. Stearic acid is used as a model molecule for adsorption studies. The application of near infrared spectroscopy to the study of this adsorption proved most useful.

  7. Influence of stearic acid on postprandial lipemia and hemostatic function.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Thomas A B; Berry, Sarah E E

    2005-12-01

    It has been suggested that fats rich in stearic acid may result in exaggerated postprandial lipemia and have adverse effects on hemostatic function. The effects of test meals containing different saturated and monounsaturated FA were compared in healthy subjects in a series of studies to investigate this hypothesis. Stearic acid, when present as cocoa butter, resulted in similar postprandial lipemia and factor VII activation compared with a meal containing high-oleic sunflower oil. Stearic acid when presented as shea butter or as randomized stearate-rich TAG resulted in decreased postprandial lipemia and decreased postprandial activation of factor VII. Stearic acid-rich test meals did not result in impaired fibrinolytic activity compared with either a low-fat meal or a meal high in oleate. The difference in responses between the different stearic acid-rich fats appears to be due to varying solid fat contents of the fats at 37 degrees C.

  8. Temperature effect on a high stearic acid sunflower mutant.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Moya, Valle; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Garcés, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    Vegetable oil with elevated saturated fatty acid content may be useful for producing solid fat without hydrogenation or transesterification. Under the nutritional point of view stearic acid is preferred to other saturated fatty acids because of its neutral effect on serum cholesterol lipoproteins. Selection of a very high stearic acid sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) line (CAS-14), with up to a 37.3% of stearic acid in the seed oil, and the relationship between the expression of this character and the growth temperature are presented. The mutant was selected from the M(2) progeny of 3000 mutagenized seeds (4 mM sodium azide mutagenesis treatment) by analysing the fatty acid composition of half-seed by gas liquid chromatography. In order to genetically fix the mutant character, plants were grown at high day/night temperatures during seed formation. We found that temperatures higher than 30/20 degrees C are required for good expression of the phenotype, the maximum stearic acid content being obtained at 39/24 degrees C. This behaviour is totally opposed to that observed in normal and previously isolated high-stearic acid sunflower lines that contain more stearic acid at low temperature. Thus, a new type of temperature regulation on the stearate desaturation must occur. This line is the sunflower mutant with the highest stearic acid content reported so far.

  9. Influence of stearic acid on hemostatic risk factors in humans.

    PubMed

    Tholstrup, Tine

    2005-12-01

    Stearic acid has been claimed to be prothrombotic. Elevated plasma factor VII coagulant activity (FVIIc) may raise the risk of coronary thrombosis in the event of plaque rupture. Fibrinogen, an acute-phase protein, is necessary for normal blood clotting; however, elevated levels of fibrinogen increase the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Here I report the results of three controlled, human dietary intervention studies, which used a randomized crossover design to investigate the hemostatic effects of stearic acid-rich test diets in healthy young men. A diet high in stearic acid (shea butter) resulted in a 13% lower fasting plasma FVIIc than a high palmitic acid diet, and was 18% lower than a diet high in myristic and lauric acids (P = 0.001) after 3 wk of intervention. The stearic acid-rich test fat increased plasma fibrinogen concentrations slightly compared with the myristic-lauric acid diet (P < 0.01). When investigating the acute effects of fatty meals, those high in stearic acid (synthesized test fat) resulted in a smaller postprandial increase in FVII than those high in trans and oleic FA, indicating a smaller increase in activated FVII after ingesting stearic acid compared with fats high in monounsaturated FA, probably caused by lower postprandial lipemia. Thus, the present investigations did not find dietary stearic acid to be more thrombogenic, in either fasting effects compared with other long-chain FA, or in acute effects compared with dietary unsaturated FA, including trans monounsaturated FA. The slightly increased effect on fasting plasma fibrinogen may be biologically insignificant, but it should be investigated further.

  10. Accurate Molecular Dimensions from Stearic Acid Monolayers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Charles A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses modifications in the fatty acid monolayer experiment to reduce the inaccurate moleculary data students usually obtain. Copies of the experimental procedure used and a Pascal computer program to work up the data are available from the authors. (JN)

  11. Functionality of maize, wheat, teff and cassava starches with stearic acid and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Maphalla, Thabelang Gladys; Emmambux, Mohammad Naushad

    2016-01-20

    Consumer concerns to synthetic chemicals have led to strong preference for 'clean' label starches. Lipid and hydrocolloids are food friendly chemicals. This study determines the effects of stearic acid and xanthan gum alone and in combination on the functionality of maize, wheat, teff and cassava starches. An increase in viscosity was observed for all starches with stearic acid and xanthan gum compared to the controls with cassava having the least increase. A further increase in viscosity was observed for the cereal starches with combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum. Stearic acid reduced retrogradation, resulting in soft textured pastes. Combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum reduced the formation of type IIb amylose-lipid complexes, syneresis, and hysteresis in cereal starches compared to stearic acid alone. A combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum produce higher viscosity non-gelling starches and xanthan gum addition increases physical stability to freezing and better structural recovery after shear.

  12. Comparative Study of Stearic Acid/Iron-Oxide Binary and Stearic Acid/Iron-Oxide/Titanium-Oxide Ternary for Use as Energy Storage Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andiarto, Rizky; Khalish Nuryadin, Muhammad; Saleh, Rosari

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a series of stearic acid/Fe3O4, and stearic acid/Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites for thermal energy storage (TES) system were synthesized through a two-step process. Fe3O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites were first prepared using sol-gel methods and then both samples were mixed into stearic acid by dispersion technique at three different weight % ratio to stearic acid: 5%, 10% and 15% to obtain stearic acid/Fe3O4, and stearic acid/Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites. Morphologies and structural properties of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), while thermal properties of the sample were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and fhermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The XRD patterns demonstrate, that stearic acid/Fe3O4 contained characteristic peaks of Fe3O4 and stearic acid structures, while peaks corresponded to anatase TiO2 structures appear in stearic acid/ Fe3O4/TiO2 nanocomposites. From the DSC measurements, it is found that the maximum latent heat was found at samples with weight ratio of 5%. Moreover, the enhancement up to 20% of latent heat in solidifying as well as melting processes was observed. TGA measurements show high degradation temperature in the range of 246 - 251°C. The TGA results also shows that the residual mass of the sample matches the composition of Fe3O4 and Fe3O4/TiO2 which is added to the stearic acid.

  13. Shear rigidity of spread stearic acid monolayers on water

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.; Ketterson, J.B.; Miyano, K.; Kueny, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of Al/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and of pH on the two-dimensional shear modulus of stearic acid spread on a water substrate was determined. A large shear modulus was displayed by the films when the subphase contained Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ ions at the self buffered pH. With Fe/sup 3 +/ dissolved in the subphase, the film displayed a viscous relaxation when strained but no residual stress was observed. No effect was observed with the Ca/sup 2 +/ or Mg/sup 2 +/. Reducing the pH value in the subphase with the trivalent ions caused the shear modulus to disappear. The observations are interpreted in terms of hydrogen bonding.

  14. 21 CFR 178.3450 - Esters of stearic and palmitic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esters of stearic and palmitic acids. 178.3450 Section 178.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3450 Esters of stearic and palmitic acids. The...

  15. 21 CFR 178.3450 - Esters of stearic and palmitic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Esters of stearic and palmitic acids. 178.3450 Section 178.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3450 Esters of stearic and palmitic acids. The...

  16. 21 CFR 178.3450 - Esters of stearic and palmitic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esters of stearic and palmitic acids. 178.3450 Section 178.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3450 Esters of stearic and palmitic acids. The...

  17. 21 CFR 178.3450 - Esters of stearic and palmitic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esters of stearic and palmitic acids. 178.3450 Section 178.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Production Aids § 178.3450 Esters of stearic and palmitic acids. The ester stearyl palmitate or...

  18. 21 CFR 178.3450 - Esters of stearic and palmitic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esters of stearic and palmitic acids. 178.3450 Section 178.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3450 Esters of stearic and palmitic acids. The...

  19. Physicochemical and Mechanical Properties of Bambara Groundnut Starch Films Modified with Stearic Acid.

    PubMed

    Oyeyinka, Samson A; Singh, Suren; Amonsou, Eric O

    2017-01-01

    The physicochemical and mechanical properties of biofilm prepared from bambara starch modified with varying concentrations of stearic acid (0%, 2.5%, 3.5%, 5%, 7%, and 10%) were studied. By scanning electron microscopy, bambara starch films modified with stearic acid (≥3.5%) showed a progressively rough surface compared to those with 2.5% stearic acid and the control. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra revealed a peak shift of approximately 31 cm(-1) , suggesting the promotion of hydrogen bond formation between hydroxyl groups of starch and stearic acid. The addition of 2.5% stearic acid to bambara starch film reduced water vapor permeability by approximately 17%. Bambara starch films modified with higher concentration of stearic acid were more opaque and showed significantly high melting temperatures. However, mechanical properties of starch films were generally negatively affected by stearic acid. Bambara starch film may be modified with 2.5% stearic acid for improved water vapor permeability and thermal stability with minimal effect on tensile strength.

  20. Wollastonite hybridizing stearic acid as thermal energy storage material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dawei; Yang, Huaming

    2014-11-01

    This paper reported on the preparation of a novel stearic acid (SA)/wollastonite (W) composite as a form-stable phase change material (PCM) for thermal energy-storage (TES) by vacuum impregnation, and especially investigated the effect of the size grade of W on the thermal properties of the SA/W composite. Samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser particle-size analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Natural W (Wr) was classified into four size grades by wet screening. The results indicate that no chemical reaction took place between SA and W, and the SA load in the SA/W composite increased with an increase in the length/diameter (L/D) ratio of the W. The SA/W composite with a W L/D ratio of 22.5 exhibited latent heats of melting and freezing of 58.64 J/g and 56.95 J/g, respectively, which was higher than those of the composite incorporating natural W. We believe that the as-prepared form-stable PCM composite could provide a potential means of TES for the concentrated solar power.

  1. Mononuclear phagocyte accumulates a stearic acid derivative during differentiation into macrophages. Effects of stearic acid on macrophage differentiation and Mycobacterium tuberculosis control.

    PubMed

    Mosquera-Restrepo, Sergio Fabián; Caro, Ana Cecilia; Peláez-Jaramillo, Carlos Alberto; Rojas, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    The fatty acid composition of monocytes changes substantially during differentiation into macrophages, increasing the proportion of saturated fatty acids. These changes prompted us to investigate whether fatty acid accumulation in the extracellular milieu could affect the differentiation of bystander mononuclear phagocytes. An esterified fatty acid derivative, stearate, was the only fatty acid that significantly increased in macrophage supernatants, and there were higher levels when cells differentiated in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv or purified protein derivative (PPD). Exogenous stearic acid enhanced the expression of HLA-DR and CD64; there was also accumulation of IL-12, TNF-α, IL-6, MIP-1 α and β and a reduction in MCP-1 and the bacterial load. These results suggested that during differentiation, a derivative of stearic acid, which promotes the process as well as the effector mechanisms of phagocytes against the mycobacterium, accumulates in the cell supernatants.

  2. Dietary stearic acid and risk of cardiovascular disease: intake, sources, digestion, and absorption.

    PubMed

    Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Griel, Amy E; Psota, Tricia L; Gebauer, Sarah K; Zhang, Jun; Etherton, Terry D

    2005-12-01

    Individual FA have diverse biological effects, some of which affect the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the context of food-based dietary guidance designed to reduce CVD risk, fat and FA recommendations focus on reducing saturated FA (SFA) and trans FA (TFA), and ensuring an adequate intake of unsaturated FA. Because stearic acid shares many physical properties with the other long-chain SFA but has different physiological effects, it is being evaluated as a substitute for TFA in food manufacturing. For stearic acid to become the primary replacement for TFA, it is essential that its physical properties and biological effects be well understood.

  3. Polymorphism, crystallinity and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance of stearic acid and stearic acid-capric/caprylic triglyceride matrices for production of stable nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Severino, Patrícia; Pinho, Samantha C; Souto, Eliana B; Santana, Maria H A

    2011-08-01

    There is an increasing interest in lipid nanoparticles because of their suitability for several administration routes. Thus, it becomes even more relevant the physicochemical characterization of lipid materials with respect to their polymorphism, lipid miscibility and stability, as well as the assessment of the effect of surfactant on the type and structure of these nanoparticles. This work focuses on the physicochemical characterization of lipid matrices composed of pure stearic acid or of mixtures of stearic acid-capric/caprylic triglycerides, for drug delivery. The lipids were analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Wide Angle X-ray Diffraction (WAXD), Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) in combination with selected surfactants to determine the best solid-to-liquid ratio. Based on the results obtained by DSC and WAXD, the selected qualitative and quantitative composition contributed for the production of stable nanoparticles, since the melting and the tempering processes provided important information on the thermodynamic stability of solid lipid matrices. The best HLB value obtained for stearic acid-capric/caprylic triglycerides was 13.8, achieved after combining these lipids with accepted surfactants (trioleate sorbitan and polysorbate 80 in the ratio of 10:90). The proposed combinations were shown useful to obtain a stable emulsion to be used as intermediate form for the production of lipid nanoparticles.

  4. Selective use of palmitic acid over stearic acid for synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol in lung

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, F.H.

    1986-11-01

    The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)palmitic acid and (/sup 14/C)stearic acid into phospholipids in rabbit lung tissue was studied. Under equal molar concentrations of palmitate and stearate, palmitate was incorporated to the 1- and 2-positions of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) 2-3 times more than stearate. By contrast, palmitate was 30% less than stearate in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine. These results suggest that preferential utilization of palmitate over stearate, rather than substrate availability, determines the high content of palmitoyl at the 1- and 2-positions of PC and PG in lung.

  5. Effect of microfluidized and stearic acid modified soy protein in natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microfluidized and stearic acid modified soy protein aggregates were used to reinforced natural rubber. The size of soy protein particles was reduced with a microfluidizing and ball milling process. Filler size reduction with longer ball milling time tends to increase tensile strength of the rubber ...

  6. Analytical method for studying terahertz vibrations in a stearic acid single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanno, Takenori; Arnold, Stevanus; Asari, Junya; Yodokawa, Shinichi; Kurabayashi, Toru

    2014-11-01

    The anisotropy of terahertz absorption was investigated for a B-form single crystal of stearic acid. A polarized terahertz spectrometer was used to obtain absorption spectra over the range of 1-5 THz. Seven vibrational modes were observed; four exhibited significant angular dependence. Additionally, we demonstrated a simple approach for estimating the angle of the dipole moment for each vibrational mode.

  7. Incorporation of Palmitic Acid or Stearic Acid into Soybean Oils Using Enzymatic Interesterification.

    PubMed

    Teh, Soek Sin; Voon, Phooi Tee; Hock Ong, Augustine Soon; Choo, Yuen May

    2016-09-01

    Incorporations of nature fatty acids which were palmitic acid and stearic acid into the end positions of soybean oils were done using sn-1,3 specific immobilised lipase from Rhizomucor miehei at different ratios in order to produce symmetrical triglycerides without changing the fatty acids at sn-2 position. The optimum ratio for the process was 25:75 w/w. There were 19.2% increase of SFA for P25 and 16% increase for S25 at the sn-1,3 positions. The research findings indicated that the structured lipids produced from enzymatic interesterification possessed a higher oxidative stability than soybean oil. The newly formed structured lipids (SUS type) could be good sources for various applications in food industry.

  8. Investigations of in vitro bioaccessibility from interesterified stearic and oleic acid-rich blends.

    PubMed

    Thilakarathna, S H; Rogers, M; Lan, Y; Huynh, S; Marangoni, A G; Robinson, L E; Wright, A J

    2016-04-01

    Interesterification was previously found to impact stearic acid absorption in a randomized cross-over study, when human volunteers consumed a 70 : 30 wt% high-oleic sunflower and canola stearin blend (NIE) compared to the same blend which had undergone either chemical (CIE) or enzymatic (EIE) interesterification. In this research, in vitro lipid digestion, bioaccessibility, and changes in undigested lipid composition and melting behavior of these same test fats were investigated using the dynamic, multi-compartmental TIM-1 digestion model and compared with the previous human study. Overall, TIM-1 bioaccessibility was higher with interesterification (p < 0.05). Oleic acid bioaccessibility was higher than stearic acid bioaccessibility for NIE, and vice versa for the interesterified blends (p < 0.05). Stearic acid was more concentrated in the undigested triacylglycerols (TAG) from NIE, corresponding to a relatively higher melting temperature of the undigested lipids. The results confirm the impact of TAG composition, fatty acid position and/or physical properties on lipid digestion. TIM-1 bioaccessibility was linearly correlated (R(2) = 0.8640) with postprandial serum TAG concentration in the human study. Therefore, the in vitro digestion model offered predictive insights related to the impacts of lipid interesterificaton on absorption.

  9. Solid-state interaction of stearic acid with povidone and its effect on dissolution stability of capsules.

    PubMed

    Desai, D; Kothari, S; Huang, M

    2008-04-16

    Capsule formulations of two drugs under development showed slower dissolution upon storage; Drug A, after 2.5 weeks at 40 degrees C/23% RH and 4 weeks at 30 degrees C/60% RH, and Drug B, after 6 weeks at 50 degrees C and 40 degrees C/75% RH. The formulations of both drugs contained povidone as a binder and stearic acid as a lubricant. Replacement of stearic acid by magnesium stearate from the formulation of Drug B, which was selected for further studies, provided rapid dissolution profiles under similar storage conditions with no change occurring on storage. In order to investigate the role of stearic acid further, binary mixtures of stearic acid with the drugs and other excipients used in their respective formulations were prepared and stored at 40 degrees C/75% RH and 50 degrees C. After 1 week of storage, it was observed that povidone and stearic acid mixture formed a transparent, hard, glass-like insoluble substance. It is hypothesized that the substance formed by the interaction can reduce the porosity of the granules and thereby reduces the ingress of the dissolution medium leading to slower dissolution. The infrared (IR) spectra of the glass-like substance showed a slight broadening of the povidone carbonyl band at 1662 cm(-1). The powder X-ray diffraction of the stored mixture showed that the crystallinity of stearic acid was lost. Furthermore, repeated heating and cooling cycles of povidone and stearic acid mixtures in various proportions using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that recrystallization of stearic acid from its melt was strongly affected by the presence of increasing amounts of povidone. Based on the observed solid-state interaction, a combination of stearic and povidone should be avoided for immediate release formulations.

  10. A Mutant of Arabidopsis with Increased Levels of Stearic Acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lightner, J.; Wu, J.; Browse, J.

    1994-01-01

    A mutation at the fab2 locus of Arabidopsis caused increased levels of stearate in leaves. The increase in leaf stearate in fab2 varied developmentally, and the largest increase occurred in young leaves, where stearate accounted for almost 20% of total leaf fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of leaf lipids isolated from the fab2 mutant showed increased stearate in all the major glycerolipids of both the chloroplast and extrachloroplast membranes. Although the stearate content was increased, the fab2 mutant still contained abundant amounts of 18:1, 18:2, and 18:3 fatty acids. These results are consistent with the expectations for a mutation partially affecting the action of the stromal stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase. Positional analysis indicated that the extra 18:0 is excluded with high specificity from the sn-2 position of both chloroplast and extrachloroplast glycerolipids. Although stearate content was increased in all the major leaf membrane lipids, the amount of increase varied considerably among the different lipids, from a high of 25% of fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine to a low of 2.9% of fatty acids in monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. PMID:12232421

  11. CO2-Controllable Foaming and Emulsification Properties of the Stearic Acid Soap Systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenlong; Gu, Hongyao; Zhu, Xionglu; Zhong, Yingping; Jiang, Liwen; Xu, Mengxin; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-06-02

    Fatty acids, as a typical example of stearic acid, are a kind of cheap surfactant and have important applications. The challenging problem of industrial applications is their solubility. Herein, three organic amines-ethanolamine (EA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA)-were used as counterions to increase the solubility of stearic acid, and the phase behaviors were investigated systematically. The phase diagrams were delineated at 25 and 50 °C, respectively. The phase-transition temperature was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements, and the microstructures were vesicles and planar sheets observed by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) observations. The apparent viscosity of the samples was determined by rheological characterizations. The values, rcmc, for the three systems were less than 30 mN·m(-1). Typical samples of bilayers used as foaming agents and emulsifiers were investigated for the foaming and emulsification assays. CO2 was introduced to change the solubility of stearic acid, inducing the transition of their surface activity and further achieving the goal of defoaming and demulsification.

  12. Enzymatic synthesis of cocoa butter equivalent from olive oil and palmitic-stearic fatty acid mixture.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ibrahim O

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of the present research is to restructure olive oil triacylglycerol (TAG) using enzymatic acidolysis reaction to produce structured lipids that is close to cocoa butter in terms of TAG structure and melting characteristics. Lipase-catalyzed acidolysis of refined olive oil with a mixture of palmitic-stearic acids at different substrate ratios was performed in an agitated batch reactor maintained at constant temperature and agitation speed. The reaction attained steady-state conversion in about 5 h with an overall conversion of 92.6 % for the olive oil major triacylglycerol 1-palmitoy-2,3-dioleoyl glycerol (POO). The five major TAGs of the structured lipids produced with substrate mass ratio of 1:3 (olive oil/palmitic-stearic fatty acid mixture) were close to that of the cocoa butter with melting temperature between 32.6 and 37.7 °C. The proposed kinetics model used fits the experimental data very well.

  13. Impact of stearic acid and oleic acid on hemostatic factors in the context of controlled diets consumed by healthy men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence suggests that stearic acid (STE) differentially affects lipoprotein risk factors compared with other saturated fatty acids (SFA). When compared to cholesterol-raising SFA, STE lowers LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and has a neutral effect on HDL-C, thus lowering the ratio of total cholesterol to H...

  14. Improvement of β-TCP/PLLA biodegradable material by surface modification with stearic acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fengcang; Chen, Sai; Liu, Ping; Geng, Fang; Li, Wei; Liu, Xinkuan; He, Daihua; Pan, Deng

    2016-05-01

    Poly-L-lactide (PLLA) is a biodegradable polymer and used widely. Incorporation of beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) into PLLA can enhance its osteoinductive properties. But the interfacial layer between β-TCP particles with PLLA matrix is easy to be destroyed due to inferior interfacial compatibility of the organic/inorganic material. In this work, a method of β-TCP surface modification with stearic acid was investigated to improve the β-TCP/PLLA biomaterial. The effects of surface modification on the β-TCP were investigated by FTIR, XPS, TGA and CA. It was found that the stearic acid reacted with β-TCP and oxhydryl was formed during the surface modification. Hydrophilicity of untreated or modified β-TCP/PLLA composite was increased by the addition of 10 wt.% β-TCP, but it decreased as the addition amount increased from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. Two models were suggested to describe the effect of β-TCP concentration on CA of the composites. Mechanical properties of β-TCP/PLLA composites were tested by bending and tensile tests. Fractures of the composites after mechanical test were observed by SEM. It was found that surface modification with stearic acid improved bending and tensile strengths of the β-TCP/PLLA composites obviously. The SEM results indicated that surface modification decreased the probability of interface debonding between fillers and matrix under load.

  15. Dynamic molecular behavior of semi-fluorinated oleic, elaidic and stearic acids in the liquid state.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shun; Matsuda, Haruna; Kasahara, Yasutoshi; Iwahashi, Makio; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Baba, Teruhiko; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Ordinary fatty acids such as oleic, elaidic and stearic acids exist as their hydrogen-bonded dimers in their liquids and in non-polar solvents. Infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have revealed that semi-fluorinated (SF) acids containing a perfluorooctyl group (C₈F₁₇) as a terminal segment exist also as hydrogen-bonded dimers, which are the units of inter- and intramolecular movements in their liquids and CCl₄. The dynamic molecular properties, such as self-diffusion coefficients and intramolecular movements of SF-oleic, SF-elaidic, and SF-stearic acids were compared with those of corresponding ordinary fatty acids (H-acids). From the high equilibrium spreading pressures (ESPs) for SF-acids compared with those for their corresponding H-acids, it was expected that the inter-acyl chain interaction is weaker for the SF-acid than for the H-acid: the SF-fatty acids should have higher molecular mobility than the corresponding ordinary H-acids in the liquid state. However, the self-diffusion coefficients obtained for SF-acids were smaller than those for the corresponding H-acids; the apparent activation energies for the self-diffusion process (translational movement) of SF-acids were larger than those for the corresponding H-acids. Namely, the motion of SF-acid molecules in a liquid phase is rather restricted compared with H-acid in spite of lower inter-acyl chain interaction of SF-acid. This unexpected result suggests that the molecular motion of SF-acid in a liquid phase is not directly governed by inter-acyl interaction, but may be interpreted as a reptation movement of an acid molecule, which is related to intramolecular movement. In fact, low intramolecular movements for SF-acid were confirmed by ¹³C-NMR T₁ measurements.

  16. Intra-albumin migration of bound fatty acid probed by spin label ESR

    SciTech Connect

    Gurachevsky, Andrey . E-mail: a.gurachevsky@medinnovation.de; Shimanovitch, Ekaterina; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Muravsky, Vladimir

    2007-09-07

    Conventional ESR spectra of 16-doxyl-stearic acid bound to bovine and human serum albumin were recorded at different temperatures in order to investigate the status of spin-labeled fatty acid in the interior of the protein globule. A computer spectrum simulation of measured spectra, performed by non-linear least-squares fits, clearly showed two components corresponding to strongly and weakly immobilized fatty acid molecules. The two-component model was verified on spectra measured at different pH. Thermodynamic parameters of the spin probe exchange between two spin probe states were analyzed. It was concluded that at physiological conditions, fatty acid molecules permanently migrate in the globule interior between the specific binding sites and a space among albumin domains.

  17. Development of a Controlled Release of Salicylic Acid Loaded Stearic Acid-Oleic Acid Nanoparticles in Cream for Topical Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Woo, J. O.; Misran, M.; Lee, P. F.; Tan, L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are colloidal carrier systems that have extensively been investigated for controlled drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications. In this work, a cost effective stearic acid-oleic acid nanoparticles (SONs) with high loading of salicylic acid, was prepared by melt emulsification method combined with ultrasonication technique. The physicochemical properties, thermal analysis and encapsulation efficiency of SONs were studied. TEM micrographs revealed that incorporation of oleic acid induces the formation of elongated spherical particles. This observation is in agreement with particle size analysis which also showed that the mean particle size of SONs varied with the amount of OA in the mixture but with no effect on their zeta potential values. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis showed that the SONs prepared in this method have lower crystallinity as compared to pure stearic acid. Different amount of oleic acid incorporated gave different degree of perturbation to the crystalline matrix of SONs and hence resulted in lower degrees of crystallinity, thereby improving their encapsulation efficiencies. The optimized SON was further incorporated in cream and its in vitro release study showed a gradual release for 24 hours, denoting the incorporation of salicylic acid in solid matrix of SON and prolonging the in vitro release. PMID:24578624

  18. Effect of substitution of high stearic low linolenic acid soybean oil for hydrogenated soybean oil on fatty acid intake.

    PubMed

    DiRienzo, Maureen A; Lemke, Shawna L; Petersen, Barbara J; Smith, Kim M

    2008-05-01

    High stearic, low alpha-linolenic acid soybean oil (HSLL) has been developed via traditional breeding to serve as a substitute for partially hydrogenated soybean oils used in food manufacturing. The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact on fatty acid intake in the United States if HSLL were substituted for partially hydrogenated soybean oils used in several food categories, including baked goods, shortenings, fried foods, and margarines. Using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data (1999-2002), baseline intakes of five fatty acids and trans fatty acids (TFA) were determined at the mean and 90th percentile of fat consumption. Then intakes of these fatty acids were determined after HSLL was substituted for 100% of the partially hydrogenated soybean oils used in these four food categories. The results show that baseline intake of stearic acid is 3.0% energy at the mean and 3.3% energy at the 90th percentile. Use of HSLL could increase stearic acid intake to about 4-5% energy. Mean intakes of TFA could decrease from 2.5 to 0.9% energy, and intake of palmitic acid would remain unchanged. Use of HSLL as a substitute for partially hydrogenated soybean oils would result in changes in the fatty acid composition of the US diet consistent with current dietary recommendations.

  19. Growth and Dissolution of Calcite in the Presence of Adsorbed Stearic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Maria; Segura, Juan José; Erickson, Blake W; Fantner, Georg; Stellacci, Francesco; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2015-07-14

    The interaction of organic molecules with the surface of calcite plays a central role in many geochemical, petrochemical, and industrial processes and in biomineralization. Adsorbed organics, typically fatty acids, can interfere with the evolution of calcite when immersed in aqueous solutions. Here we use atomic force microscopy in liquid to explore in real-time the evolution of the (1014) surface of calcite covered with various densities of stearic acid and exposed to different saline solutions. Our results show that the stearic acid molecules tend to act as "pinning points" on the calcite's surface and slow down the crystal's restructuring kinetics. Depending on the amount of material adsorbed, the organic molecules can form monolayers or bilayer islands that become embedded into the growing crystal. The growth process can also displaces the organic molecules and actively concentrate them into stacked multilayers. Our results provide molecular-level insights into the interplay between the adsorbed fatty acid molecules and the evolving calcite crystal, highlighting mechanisms that could have important implications for several biochemical and geochemical processes and for the oil industry.

  20. Invited review: palmitic and stearic acid metabolism in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Loften, J R; Linn, J G; Drackley, J K; Jenkins, T C; Soderholm, C G; Kertz, A F

    2014-01-01

    Energy is the most limiting nutritional component in diets for high-producing dairy cows. Palmitic (C16:0) and stearic (C18:0) acids have unique and specific functions in lactating dairy cows beyond a ubiquitous energy source. This review delineates their metabolism and usage in lactating dairy cows from diet to milk production. Palmitic acid is the fatty acid (FA) found in the greatest quantity in milk fat. Dietary sources of C16:0 generally increase milk fat yield and are used as an energy source for milk production and replenishing body weight loss during periods of negative energy balance. Stearic acid is the most abundant FA available to the dairy cow and is used to a greater extent for milk production and energy balance than C16:0. However, C18:0 is also intimately involved in milk fat production. Quantifying the transfer of each FA from diet into milk fat is complicated by de novo synthesis of C16:0 and desaturation of C18:0 to oleic acid in the mammary gland. In addition, incorporation of both FA into milk fat appears to be limited by the cow's requirement to maintain fluidity of milk, which requires a balance between saturated and unsaturated FA. Oleic acid is the second most abundant FA in milk fat and likely the main unsaturated FA involved in regulating fluidity of milk. Because the mammary gland can desaturate C18:0 to oleic acid, C18:0 appears to have a more prominent role in milk production than C16:0. To understand metabolism and utilization of these FA in lactating dairy cows, we reviewed production and milk fat synthesis studies. Additional and longer lactation studies on feeding both FA to lactating dairy cows are required to better delineate their roles in optimizing milk production and milk FA composition and yield.

  1. A simple sonochemical method for fabricating poly(methyl methacrylate)/stearic acid phase change energy storage nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guxia; Xu, Weibing; Hou, Qian; Guo, Shengwei

    2015-11-01

    In this study, stearic acid suitable for thermal energy storage applications was nanoencapsulated in a poly(methyl methacrylate) shell. The nanocapsules were prepared using a simple ultrasonically initiated in situ polymerization method. The morphology and particle size of the poly(methyl methacrylate)/stearic acid phase change energy storage nanocapsules (PMS-PCESNs) were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The latent heat storage capacities of stearic acid and the PMS-PCESNs were determined using differential scanning calorimetry. The chemical composition of the nanocapsules was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. All of the results show that the PMS-PCESNs were synthesized successfully and that the latent heat storage capacity and encapsulation efficiency were 155.6 J/g and 83.0%, respectively, and the diameter of each nanocapsule was 80-90 nm.

  2. Effect of processing methods on the mechanical properties of natural rubber filled with stearic acid modified soy protein particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber was reinforced with stearic acid modified soy protein particles prepared with a microfluidizing and ball milling process. Longer ball milling time tends to increase tensile strength of the rubber composites. Elastic modulus of the composites increased with the increasing filler concen...

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Canola Oil-Stearic Acid-Based Trans-Free Structured Lipids for Possible Margarine Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incorporation of stearic acid into canola oil to produce trans-free structured lipid (SL) as a healthy alternative to partially hydrogenated fats for margarine formulation was investigated. Response surface methodology was used to study the effects of lipozyme RM IM from Rhizomucor miehei and Candi...

  4. Thermal Characterization of Lauric-Stearic Acid/Expanded Graphite Eutectic Mixture as Phase Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Zhaonan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    The eutectic mixture of lauric acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) is a desirable phase change material (PCM) due to the constant melting temperature and large latent heat. However, its poor thermal conductivity has hampered its broad utilization. In the present study, pure LA, SA and the mixtures with various mass fractions of LA-SA were used as the basic PCMs, and 10 wt% expanded graphite (EG) was added to enhance the thermal conductivities. The phase change behaviors, microstructural analysis, thermal conductivities and thermal stabilities of the mixtures of PCMs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), transient plane source (TPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The results show that the LA-SA binary mixture of mixture ratio of 76.3 wt%: 23.7 wt% forms an eutectic mixture, which melts at 38.99 °C and has a latent heat of 159.94 J/g. The melted fatty acids are well absorbed by the porous network of EG and they have a good thermal stability. Furthermore, poor thermal conductivities can be well enhanced by the addition of EG.

  5. Optimization of a metformin effervescent floating tablet containing hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and stearic acid.

    PubMed

    Rajab, M; Jouma, M; Neubert, R H; Dittgen, M

    2010-02-01

    This study optimizes the composition of an effervescent floating tablet (EFT) containing metformin hydrochloride (M) regarding tablet hardness (H), time to dissolve 60% of the embedded drug (t60%), and buoyancy, the floating lag time (FLT). A simplex lattice experimental design has been used comprising different levels of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), stearic acid (SA), sodium bicarbonate (SB) as tablet matrix components, and hardness (H), t60%, FLT as response variables. Two models have been applied to decide which composition will result in Fickian diffusion or in overlapping of two dissolution mechanisms, diffusion and matrix erosion. Three of EFT showed the two dissolution mechanisms but most of EFT showed Fickian diffusion only. Checking the experimental response by a linear, quadratic, special cubic and cubic model using multivariate regression analysis resulted in best fit for the cubic model. Overlaying the results for the cubic model under constraints defined shows the domain of accepted values of response variables. The optimized EFT shall have been included HPMC between 15.6% and 24.2%, SA between 12.8 and 15.6% and SB between 16.1% and 17.5%. The result of this study has been critically evaluated considering analogous EFT described in literature.

  6. Silymarin-Loaded Nanoparticles Based on Stearic Acid-Modified Bletilla striata Polysaccharide for Hepatic Targeting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanni; He, Shaolong; Ma, Xueqin; Hong, Tongtong; Li, Zhifang; Park, Kinam; Wang, Wenping

    2016-02-29

    Silymarin has been widely used as a hepatoprotective drug in the treatment of various liver diseases, yet its effectiveness is affected by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability after oral administration, and there is a need for the development of intravenous products, especially for liver-targeting purposes. In this study, silymarin was encapsulated in self-assembled nanoparticles of Bletilla striata polysaccharide (BSP) conjugates modified with stearic acid and the physicochemical properties of the obtained nanoparticles were characterized. The silymarin-loaded micelles appeared as spherical particles with a mean diameter of 200 nm under TEM. The encapsulation of drug molecules was confirmed by DSC thermograms and XRD diffractograms, respectively. The nanoparticles exhibited a sustained-release profile for nearly 1 week with no obvious initial burst. Compared to drug solutions, the drug-loaded nanoparticles showed a lower viability and higher uptake intensity on HepG2 cell lines. After intravenous administration of nanoparticle formulation for 30 min to mice, the liver became the most significant organ enriched with the fluorescent probe. These results suggest that BSP derivative nanoparticles possess hepatic targeting capability and are promising nanocarriers for delivering silymarin to the liver.

  7. Preparation and tribological properties of stearic acid-modified hierarchical anatase TiO 2 microcrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jianhua; Yin, Xiangyu; Wang, Ning; Liu, Lin; Xing, Jinjuan

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical TiO2 microcrystals were synthesized through a facile solvothermal method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) measurements were used to characterize the structure of the as-prepared samples. The results indicated that the synthesized hierarchical titania (TiO2) microspheres were composed of numerous anatase phase TiO2 particles. The as-prepared samples were chemically modified with stearic acid to improve their dispersion in oil. Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) were carried out to evaluate the characteristics of the modified TiO2 microcrystals. The tribological properties of the modified TiO2 microcrystals as additives of liquid paraffin were studied by a four-ball tester, and the results showed that they could significantly improve anti-wear performance, friction-reduction property and load-carrying capacity of liquid paraffin. These advantages make the modified TiO2 microcrystals promising for green lubricating oil additives.

  8. A novel cationic microbubble coated with stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to enhance DNA loading and gene delivery by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Wang, Zhiyong; Yan, Fei; Deng, Zhiting; Ni, Fei; Wu, Junru; Shandas, Robin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2013-01-01

    A novel cationic microbubble (MB) for improvement of the DNA loading capacity and the ultrasound-mediated gene delivery efficiency has been developed; it has been prepared with commercial lipids and a stearic acid modified polyethylenimine 600 (Stearic-PEI600) polymer synthesized via acylation reaction of branched PEI600 and stearic acid mediated by N, N'-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI). The MBs' concentration, size distribution, stability and zeta potential (ζ-potential) were measured and the DNA loading capacity was examined as a function of the amount of Stearic-PEI600. The gene transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity were also examined using breast cancer MCF-7 cells via the reporter plasmid pCMV-Luc, encoding the firefly luciferase gene. The results showed that the Stearic-PEI600 polymer caused a significant increase in magnitude of ζ-potential of MBs. The addition of DNA into cationic MBs can shift ζ-potentials from positive to negative values. The DNA loading capacity of the MBs grew linearly from (5±0.2) ×10⁻³ pg/µm² to (20±1.8) ×10⁻³ pg/µm² when Stearic-PEI600 was increased from 5 mol% to 30 mol%. Transfection of MCF-7 cells using 5% PEI600 MBs plus ultrasound exposure yielded 5.76±2.58×10³ p/s/cm²/sr average radiance intensity, was 8.97- and 7.53-fold higher than those treated with plain MBs plus ultrasound (6.41±5.82) ×10² p/s/cm²/sr, (P<0.01) and PEI600 MBs without ultrasound (7.65±6.18) ×10² p/s/cm²/sr, (P<0.01), respectively. However, the PEI600 MBs showed slightly higher cytotoxicity than plain MBs. The cells treated with PEI600-MBs and plain MBs plus ultrasound showed 59.5±6.1% and 71.4±7.1% cell viability, respectively. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that the novel cationic MBs were able to increase DNA loading capacity and gene transfection efficiency and could be potentially applied in targeted gene delivery and therapy.

  9. Effect of stearic acid on enalapril stability and dissolution from multiparticulate solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Talita A; Serpa, Raphael C; de Oliveira, Ana Paula M; Nasser, Letícia N; de Freitas, Luis Alexandre P; Taveira, Stephania F; Diniz, Danielle G A; Lima, Eliana M; Marreto, Ricardo N

    2013-09-01

    Enalapril maleate (EM) is a widely used anti-hypertensive drug which is unstable when mixed with excipients. Enalaprilate and diketopiperazine (DPK) are the main degradation products of enalapril. The in situ preparation of enalapril sodium salt (NaE) has been used to improve drug stability in dosage forms; however, gas release and product rejection ensue when the chemical reaction for obtaining the sodium salt is not completely finished before packaging. This study evaluated the effect of stearic acid (SA) on enalapril stability in microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) pellets containing EM or NaE. MCC pellets containing SA were prepared by the extrusion-spheronization technique and characterized. Enalapril stability and dissolution were then evaluated. DPK and enalaprilate formation were reduced by the addition of SA in pellets containing EM. The overall enalapril degradation in these formulations was lower when compared with pellets containing EM or even NaE prepared without SA. The immediate-release characteristic was maintained by the addition of 5% crospovidone to all the formulations tested. The incorporation of SA into NaE pellets resulted in unexpected enalapril degradation, caused by the interaction of these compounds, as suggested by a thermal analysis of the SA-NaE binary mixture. The findings presented here showed that formulations containing SA could substitute the formation of NaE, since they provide better enalapril stability in solid dosage forms. In addition, it is suggested that the stabilization effects would be observed for other N-carboxyalkyl dipeptide analogs with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition activity, since these new entities share the same degradation pathway of enalapril.

  10. Chemical surface modification of calcium carbonate particles with stearic acid using different treating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhi; Daly, Michael; Clémence, Lopez; Geever, Luke M.; Major, Ian; Higginbotham, Clement L.; Devine, Declan M.

    2016-08-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is often treated with stearic acid (SA) to decrease its polarity. However, the method of application of the SA treatments has a strong influence on CaCO3 thermoplastic composite's interfacial structure and distribution. Several of papers describe the promising effects of SA surface treatment, but few compare the treatment process and its effect on the properties of the final thermoplastic composite. In the current study, we assessed a new SA treatment method, namely, complex treatment for polymer composite fabrication with HDPE. Subsequently, a comparative study was performed between the "complex" process and the other existing methods. The composites were assessed using different experiments included scanning electron microscopy (SEM), void content, density, wettability, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile tests. It was observed that the "complex" surface treatment yielded composites with a significantly lower voids content and higher density compared to other surface treatments. This indicates that after the "complex" treatment process, the CaCO3 particles and HDPE matrix are more tightly packed than other methods. DSC and wettability results suggest that the "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites had a significantly higher heat of fusion and moisture resistance compared to the "dry" treated CaCO3 composites. Furthermore, "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites have a significantly higher tensile strength than the composites containing untreated and "dry" treated CaCO3. This is mainly because the "wet" and "complex" treatment processes have increased adsorption density of stearate, which enhances the interfacial interaction between matrix and filler. These results confirm that the chemical adsorption of the surfactant ions at the solid-liquid interface is higher than at other interface. From this study, it was concluded that the utilization of the "complex" method minimised the negative effects of void

  11. Improving the physical and moisture barrier properties of Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum biodegradable film with stearic and palmitic acids.

    PubMed

    Seyedi, Samira; Koocheki, Arash; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Zahedi, Younes

    2015-01-01

    Stearic and palmitic fatty acids (10%, 20% and 30%, W/W gum) were used to improve the barrier properties of Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum (LPSG) film. The impact of the incorporation of fatty acids into the film matrix was studied by investigating the physical, mechanical, and barrier properties of the films. Addition of stearic and palmitic fatty acids to LPSG films reduced their water vapor permeability (WVP), moisture content, water solubility and water adsorption. Increasing fatty acid concentration from 10% to 30%, reduced the elongation at break (EB). Lower values of tensile strength (TS) and elastic modulus (EM) were obtained in the presence of higher fatty acids concentrations. Incorporation of fatty acids led to production of opaque films and the opacity increased as function of fatty acids concentration. Results showed that moisture content, water solubility and WVP decreased as the chain length of fatty acid increased. Therefore, LPSG-fatty acids composite film could be used for packaging in which a low affinity toward water is needed.

  12. Mutations in a delta9-Stearoyl-ACP-Desaturase Gene Are Associated with Enhanced Stearic Acid Levels in Soybean Seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Shanklin, J.; Burton, J. W.; Upchurch, R. G.; Whittle, E.; Dewey, R. E.

    2008-11-01

    Stearic acid (18:0) is typically a minor component of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] oil, accounting for only 2 to 4% of the total fatty acid content. Increasing stearic acid levels of soybean oil would lead to enhanced oxidative stability, potentially reducing the need for hydrogenation, a process leading to the formation of undesirable trans fatty acids. Although mutagenesis strategies have been successful in developing soybean germplasm with elevated 18:0 levels in the seed oil, the specific gene mutations responsible for this phenotype were not known. We report a newly identified soybean gene, designated SACPD-C, that encodes a unique isoform of {Delta}{sup 9}-stearoyl-ACP-desaturase, the enzyme responsible for converting stearic acid to oleic acid (18:1). High levels of SACPD-C transcript were only detected in developing seed tissue, suggesting that the encoded desaturase functions to enhance oleic acid biosynthetic capacity as the immature seed is actively engaged in triacylglycerol production and storage. The participation of SACPD-C in storage triacylglycerol synthesis is further supported by the observation of mutations in this gene in two independent sources of elevated 18:0 soybean germplasm, A6 (30% 18:0) and FAM94-41 (9% 18:0). A molecular marker diagnostic for the FAM94-41 SACPD-C gene mutation strictly associates with the elevated 18:0 phenotype in a segregating population, and could thus serve as a useful tool in the development of cultivars with oils possessing enhanced oxidative stability.

  13. Deletions of the SACPD-C locus elevate seed stearic acid levels but also result in fatty acid and morphological alterations in nitrogen fixing nodules

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Soybean (Glycine max) seeds are the primary source of edible oil in the United States. Despite its widespread utility, soybean oil is oxidatively unstable. Until recently, the majority of soybean oil underwent chemical hydrogenation, a process which also generates trans fats. An alternative to chemical hydrogenation is genetic modification of seed oil through identification and introgression of mutant alleles. One target for improvement is the elevation of a saturated fat with no negative cardiovascular impacts, stearic acid, which typically constitutes a minute portion of seed oil (~3%). Results We examined radiation induced soybean mutants with moderately increased stearic acid (10-15% of seed oil, ~3-5 X the levels in wild-type soybean seeds) via comparative whole genome hybridization and genetic analysis. The deletion of one SACPD isoform encoding gene (SACPD-C) was perfectly correlated with moderate elevation of seed stearic acid content. However, SACPD-C deletion lines were also found to have altered nodule fatty acid composition and grossly altered morphology. Despite these defects, overall nodule accumulation and nitrogen fixation were unaffected, at least under laboratory conditions. Conclusions Although no yield penalty has been reported for moderate elevated seed stearic acid content in soybean seeds, our results demonstrate that genetic alteration of seed traits can have unforeseen pleiotropic consequences. We have identified a role for fatty acid biosynthesis, and SACPD activity in particular, in the establishment and maintenance of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. PMID:24886084

  14. Impact of stearic acid and oleic acid on hemostatic factors in the context of controlled diets consumed by healthy men.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, S K; Tracy, R P; Baer, D J

    2014-09-01

    The effects of stearic acid (STA) on cardiovascular disease risk beyond lipid and lipoprotein risk factors, including hemostasis, are unclear, particularly when compared with unsaturated fatty acids. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of STA with those of oleic acid (OL) on markers of hemostasis. In a randomized crossover study, 50 men consumed six controlled diets for 5 weeks each (39% energy from fat, 15% energy from protein, 46% energy from carbohydrate (CHO)). Fat (8% energy) was replaced across diets by: STA, OL, CHO (control), trans fatty acids (TFAs), TFA/STA and 12:0-16:0 saturated fatty acids. Factor VIIc, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and plasmin alpha-2-antiplasmin complex concentrations were not different between OL and STA (P>0.05). Compared with control, OL increased factor VIIc and PAI-1 (P≤0.05), whereas there were no differences with STA (P>0.05). STA and OL similarly affect markers of hemostasis in healthy men, within the context of a highly controlled diet.

  15. Characterising the phase behaviour of stearic acid and its triethanolamine soap and acid-soap by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pudney, Paul D A; Mutch, Kevin J; Zhu, Shiping

    2009-07-07

    The behaviour of stearic acid neutralised by triethanolamine to form soap and its acid-soap has been examined by infrared spectroscopy. It was found that not only could the neutralisation behaviour be characterised, but the thermotropic behaviour could also be followed. The neutralisation confirmed the formation of a fixed stoichiometeric ratio, 2 : 1, acid-soap. When following the thermotropic behaviour the break up of the acid-soap could be followed along with various disordering and melting transitions of the alkyl chain tail. This allowed all the thermal transitions that have been observed to be characterised in terms of the type of molecular rearrangement that was occurring and also the transition temperature at which they occurred. This allowed the binary phase diagram to be plotted and understood for this system. This is the first time IR has been used to measure a whole phase diagram of this type. The nature of the acid-soap complex itself was also characterised, with very short hydrogen bonds being present as well as a free, non-hydrogen bonded, hydroxyl group.

  16. The 73 kilodalton heat shock cognate protein purified from rat brain contains nonesterified palmitic and stearic acids.

    PubMed

    Guidon, P T; Hightower, L E

    1986-08-01

    A protein related to the 71 kilodalton inducible rat heat shock protein was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity in milligram amounts from brain tissue of nonheat-stressed rats. The protein has been designated as a stress cognate protein based on previous studies and data presented herein that this protein cross-reacted with a monoclonal antibody originally raised against the Drosophila 70 kilodalton heat shock protein. The purified protein had an apparent molecular mass of 73 kilodaltons when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an apparent mass of 150 kilodaltons as determined by nondissociative gel chromatography, suggesting that the purified protein is a homodimer. The purified protein had isoelectric points of 5.0 under nondissociative conditions and 5.6 when exposed to protein denaturants, suggesting loss of bound anionic molecules and/or net exposure of basic residues upon denaturation. Chloroform/methanol extraction of the purified protein and subsequent analyses by thin layer and gas-liquid chromatography resulted in the identification of palmitic and stearic acids noncovalently bound to the protein. Approximately four molecules of fatty acids were bound per dimer with palmitic and stearic acids present in a one-to-one ratio. The purified protein did not bind exogenously added radioactive palmitate, indicating that the fatty acid-binding sites of the cognate protein were fully occupied and that the associated fatty acids were too tightly bound to exchange readily. The possible significance of the fatty acids associated with the 73 kilodalton stress cognate protein is discussed.

  17. Investigation into the Coating and Desensitization Effect on HNIW of Paraffin Wax/Stearic Acid Composite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Xu; Chen, Shu-Sen; Jin, Shao-Hua; Shu, Qing-Hai; Jiang, Zhen-Ming; Shang, Feng-Qin; Li, Jin-Xin

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6,8,10,12-Hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW) was bonded by fluorine rubber and then desensitized by paraffin wax (PW), stearic acid (SA), and a PW/SA composite system using an aqueous suspension method. The coating and desensitization effects of the composite systems on HNIW and the influence of the addition of SA on the mechanical properties of the coated HNIW samples were studied. In addition, the PW/SA composite solution was simulated using a molecular dynamics method, and the relationship between the desensitization effect on HNIW and the properties of the composite solution was investigated. The results showed that the PW/SA composite system, of which the desensitization effect on HNIW was between those of the two desensitizers, could effectively coat HNIW and that the composite solution had the most stable and well-distributed state when using benzene as solvent with the mass ratio of PW/SA equal to 7/3 or 3/7, thus resulting in the best desensitization effect on HNIW. Moreover, the addition of stearic acid was successful in enhancing the mechanical properties of the coated HNIW samples.

  18. Preparation of Mg-MgH2 flakes by planetary ball milling with stearic acid and their hydrogen storage properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seong-Hyeon; Song, Myoung Youp

    2016-05-01

    Many studies preparing magnesium hydride using catalyst addition were performed, resulting in the preparation of additive-containing magnesium hydride. Preparation of a sample with a MgH2 phase without additives requires high pressure and high temperature and is time-demanding. In order to prepare an additive-free sample with a MgH2 phase, 90 wt% Mg+10 wt% MgH2 (named 90Mg+10MgH2) was milled under a hydrogen atmosphere with 6 wt% stearic acid as a process-controlling agent, which led to a formation of Mg-MgH2 flakes. The hydrogen storing and releasing properties of the prepared flakes were investigated and compared with those of purchased MgH2. A sample with a majority fraction of MgH2 phase was prepared by planetary ball milling of 90 Mg+10 MgH2 with 6 wt% stearic acid. The resultant particles of 90 Mg+10 MgH2 obtained after hydridingdehydriding cycling were much smaller and had significantly more cracks and defects than those of MgH2 after hydriding-dehydriding cycling. 90 Mg+10 MgH2 released 0.12 wt% hydrogen for 4 min, 3.70 wt% for 20 min, and 5.30 wt% for 60 min at 648 K at the first cycle.

  19. A Robust Epoxy Resins @ Stearic Acid-Mg(OH)2 Micronanosheet Superhydrophobic Omnipotent Protective Coating for Real-Life Applications.

    PubMed

    Si, Yifan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2016-06-29

    Superhydrophobic coating has extremely high application value and practicability. However, some difficult problems such as weak mechanical strength, the need for expensive toxic reagents, and a complex preparation process are all hard to avoid, and these problems have impeded the superhydrophobic coating's real-life application for a long time. Here, we demonstrate one kind of omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating via a simple antideposition route and one-step superhydrophobization process. The whole preparation process is facile, and expensive toxic reagents needed. This omnipotent coating can be applied on any solid substrate with great waterproof ability, excellent mechanical stability, and chemical durability, which can be stored in a realistic environment for more than 1 month. More significantly, this superhydrophobic coating also has four protective abilities, antifouling, anticorrosion, anti-icing, and flame-retardancy, to cope with a variety of possible extreme natural environments. Therefore, this omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating not only satisfies real-life need but also has great application potential in many respects.

  20. Thermodynamics of the interaction of globular proteins with powdered stearic acid in acid pH.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Atanu; Chattoraj, D K; Chakraborty, P

    2006-06-01

    Adsorption isotherms of different globular proteins and gelatin on strearic acid particles have been studied as a function of biopolymer concentration, ionic strength of the medium, and temperature. The effect of neutral salts including CaCl2, Na3PO4, and urea on the adsorption isotherms has been also investigated. It is observed that the extent of adsorption (Gamma2(1)) increases in two steps with the increase of biopolymer concentration (C2) in the bulk. Gamma2(1) increases with an increase of C2 until a steady maximum value Gamma2(m) is reached at a critical concentration C2(m). After initial saturation, Gamma2(1) again increases from Gamma2(m) without reaching any limiting value due to the surface aggregation of the protein. The values of the standard free energy change for adsorption have been calculated on the basis of the Gibbs equation. The standard entropy and enthalpy changes are also calculated.

  1. Identify and validate a quantitative trait locus underlying stearic acid on chromosome 14 in a soybean landrace using recombinant inbred lines and resident heterozygous lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stearic acid (ST) is one of the saturated fatty acids (FAs) in soybean oil and great efforts have been made to elevate ST content through plant breeding. Improving ST content will be helpful to reduce the health risk of coronary heart diseases and breast, colon and prostate cancer. In this study, re...

  2. Photodegradation of Stearic Acid Adsorbed on Superhydrophilic TiO2 Surface: In Situ FT-IR and LDI Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Natalia; Fesenko, Tatiana; Zhukovsky, Maxim; Goworek, Jacek; Eremenko, Anna

    2015-12-01

    TiO2 films prepared by template-assisted sol-gel method were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, scanning and atomic force electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Based on the hexane adsorption-desorption analysis, the films have a surface area of 390-540 m2/g with pore size distribution narrowly centered around 10 nm. Optimal component ratio and condition of heat treatment of mesoporous titania films have been found. Photocatalytic activity of the coatings was determined by the destruction of stearic acid layers, monitored using FT-IR spectroscopy and laser desorption-ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry. Under UV illumination, all the used films reach hydrophilicity with water contact angle of 0°. As the result, hydrophobic fat acid molecules undergo self-association and active desorption from the hydrophilic surface during mass-spectrometric experiment.

  3. Inactivation of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. by Palmitic, Stearic, and Oleic Acid Sophorolipids and Thiamine Dilauryl Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuejie; Ashby, Richard; Solaiman, Daniel K. Y.; Uknalis, Joseph; Fan, Xuetong

    2016-01-01

    Food contaminated with human pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes, frequently causes outbreaks of foodborne illness. Consumer concern over the use of synthesized antimicrobials to enhance microbial food safety has led to a search of natural alternatives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of various types of sophorolipids (SLs) and thiamine dilauryl sulfate (TDS) against pathogenic Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Both free and lactonic forms of SLs were synthesized from Candida bombicola using palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids as co-feedstocks. TDS and purified SLs were used to treat cocktails of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Results showed that lactonic SLs had higher antimicrobial activity than the free-acid form, and Gram-positive Listeria spp. were more susceptible to SLs and TDS than Gram-negative Salmonella spp. Listeria populations were reduced from an initial concentration of 7.2 log CFU/mL to a non-detectible level within a 1 min treatment of 0.1% (w/v) lactonic SLs and TDS in the presence of 20% ethanol, which itself did not significantly reduce the populations. There were no significant differences in the antimicrobial efficacy among palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid-based SLs against Salmonella or Listeria spp. Ethanol was utilized to improve the antimicrobial activity of free-acid SLs against Gram-negative bacteria. In general, TDS was more effective than the SLs against Salmonella and Listeria spp. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that SLs and TDS damaged Listeria cell membranes and resulted in cell lysis. Overall, our results demonstrated that SLs and TDS in the presence of ethanol can be used to inactivate foodborne pathogens, especially Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:28066390

  4. Inactivation of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. by Palmitic, Stearic, and Oleic Acid Sophorolipids and Thiamine Dilauryl Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejie; Ashby, Richard; Solaiman, Daniel K Y; Uknalis, Joseph; Fan, Xuetong

    2016-01-01

    Food contaminated with human pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes, frequently causes outbreaks of foodborne illness. Consumer concern over the use of synthesized antimicrobials to enhance microbial food safety has led to a search of natural alternatives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of various types of sophorolipids (SLs) and thiamine dilauryl sulfate (TDS) against pathogenic Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Both free and lactonic forms of SLs were synthesized from Candida bombicola using palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids as co-feedstocks. TDS and purified SLs were used to treat cocktails of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Results showed that lactonic SLs had higher antimicrobial activity than the free-acid form, and Gram-positive Listeria spp. were more susceptible to SLs and TDS than Gram-negative Salmonella spp. Listeria populations were reduced from an initial concentration of 7.2 log CFU/mL to a non-detectible level within a 1 min treatment of 0.1% (w/v) lactonic SLs and TDS in the presence of 20% ethanol, which itself did not significantly reduce the populations. There were no significant differences in the antimicrobial efficacy among palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid-based SLs against Salmonella or Listeria spp. Ethanol was utilized to improve the antimicrobial activity of free-acid SLs against Gram-negative bacteria. In general, TDS was more effective than the SLs against Salmonella and Listeria spp. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that SLs and TDS damaged Listeria cell membranes and resulted in cell lysis. Overall, our results demonstrated that SLs and TDS in the presence of ethanol can be used to inactivate foodborne pathogens, especially Gram-positive bacteria.

  5. Preparation and evaluation of SiO2-deposited stearic acid-g-chitosan nanoparticles for doxorubicin delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hong; Bao, Xin; Du, Yong-Zhong; You, Jian; Hu, Fu-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Both polymer micelles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles have been widely researched as vectors for small molecular insoluble drugs. To combine the advantages of copolymers and silica, studies on the preparation of copolymer-silica composites and cellular evaluation were carried out. Methods: First, a stearic acid-g-chitosan (CS-SA) copolymer was synthesized through a coupling reaction, and then silicone oxide (SiO2)-deposited doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded stearic acid-g-chitosan (CS-SA/SiO2/DOX) nanoparticles were prepared through the sol-gel reaction. Physical and chemical properties such as particle size, zeta potential, and morphologies were examined, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis was employed to identify the mesoporous structures of the generated nanoparticles. Cellular uptake and cytotoxicity studies were also conducted. Results: CS-SA/SiO2/DOX nanoparticles with different amounts of SiO2 deposited were obtained, and SAXS studies showed that mesoporous structures existed in the CS-SA/SiO2/DOX nanoparticles. The mesoporous size of middle-ratio and high-ratio deposited CS-SA/SiO2/DOX nanoparticles were 4–5 nm and 8–10 nm, respectively. Based on transmission electron microscopy images of CS-SA/SiO2/DOX nanoparticles, dark rings around the nanoparticles could be observed in contrast with CS-SA/DOX micelles. Furthermore, CS-SA/SiO2/DOX nanoparticles exhibited faster release behavior in vitro than CS-SA/DOX micelles; cellular uptake research in A549 indicated that the CS-SA/SiO2/DOX nanoparticles were taken up by A549 cells more rapidly, and that CS-SA/SiO2/DOX nanoparticles entered the cell more easily when the amount of SiO2 was higher. IC50 values of CS-SA/DOX micelles, CS-SA/SiO2/DOX-4, CS-SA/SiO2/DOX-8, and CS-SA/SiO2/DOX-16 nanoparticles against A549 cells measured using the MTT assay were 1.69, 0.93, 0.32, and 0.12 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusion: SiO2-deposited stearic acid-g-chitosan organic–inorganic composites show promise

  6. Effects of diets containing high or low amounts of stearic acid on plasma lipoprotein fractions and fecal fatty acid excretion of men.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, R M; Allman, M A; Iacono, J M

    1995-05-01

    Ten middle-aged males participated in a crossover study to determine the cholesterolemic effect of high amounts of stearic acid in a natural diet. They consumed a 20-d stabilization diet followed by two 40-d intervention diets containing either 1.5% of energy as stearic (18:0) acid and 7.3% of energy as palmitic (16:0) acid (low stearate: LS) or 2.4% of energy as 16:0 and 7.3% of energy as 18:0 (high stearate: HS). The experimental diets also contained approximately 10% of energy each as saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids and 7.2-8% of energy as polyunsaturated fatty acids. The primary source of 18:0 in the HS diet was sheanut oil (commercially referred to as shea butter) and palm oil and butter in the LS diet. Plasma total, low-density-lipoprotein, and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly lower with the HS than with the LS diet. Total fecal fatty acid excretion was higher throughout the HS period. Apparent digestibility of the major dietary fatty acids showed that all of the selected fatty acids, except 18:0, were > or = 95% absorbed. These data demonstrate that feeding diets containing about two times the usual amount of stearic acid consumed in the United States, contributed to an increase in plasma lipoprotein concentrations at 40 d from an earlier decrease at 20 d. The time required to achieve stable cholesterol concentrations appears to vary depending on the kind of saturated fatty acids present in the diet.

  7. Stearic acid and high molecular weight PEO as matrix for the highly water soluble metoprolol tartrate in continuous twin-screw melt granulation.

    PubMed

    Monteyne, Tinne; Adriaensens, Peter; Brouckaert, Davinia; Remon, Jean-Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-10-15

    Granules with release-sustaining properties were developed by twin screw hot melt granulation (HMG) using a combination of stearic acid (SA) and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide (PEO) as matrix for a highly water soluble model drug, metoprolol tartrate (MPT). Earlier studies demonstrated that mixing molten SA and PEO resulted in hydrogen bond formation between hydroxyl groups of fatty acid molecules and ether groups in PEO chains. These molecular interactions might be beneficial in order to elevate the sustained release effect of drugs from a SA/PEO matrix. This study aims to investigate the continuous twin screw melt granulation technique to study the impact of a SA/PEO matrix on the dissolution rate of a highly water soluble drug (MPT). Decreasing the SA/PEO ratio improved the release-sustaining properties of the matrix. The solid state of the granules was characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) in order to understand the dissolution behavior. The results revealed a preferential interaction of the MPT molecules with stearic acid impeding the PEO to form hydrogen bonds with the stearic acid chains. However, this allowed the PEO chains to recrystallize inside the stearic acid matrix after granulation, hence, elevating the release-sustaining characteristics of the formulation.

  8. Genotyping-by-Sequencing-Based Investigation of the Genetic Architecture Responsible for a ∼Sevenfold Increase in Soybean Seed Stearic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Crystal B.; Gillman, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Soybean oil is highly unsaturated but oxidatively unstable, rendering it nonideal for food applications. Until recently, the majority of soybean oil underwent partial chemical hydrogenation, which produces trans fats as an unavoidable consequence. Dietary intake of trans fats and most saturated fats are conclusively linked to negative impacts on cholesterol levels and cardiovascular health. Two major soybean oil breeding targets are: (1) to reduce or eliminate the need for chemical hydrogenation, and (2) to replace the functional properties of partially hydrogenated soybean oil. One potential solution is the elevation of seed stearic acid, a saturated fat which has no negative impacts on cardiovascular health, from 3 to 4% in typical cultivars to > 20% of the seed oil. We performed QTL analysis of a population developed by crossing two mutant lines, one with a missense mutation affecting a stearoyl-acyl-carrier protein desaturase gene resulting in ∼11% seed stearic acid crossed to another mutant, A6, which has 24–28% seed stearic acid. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)-based QTL mapping identified 21 minor and major effect QTL for six seed oil related traits and plant height. The inheritance of a large genomic deletion affecting chromosome 14 is the basis for largest effect QTL, resulting in ∼18% seed stearic acid. This deletion contains SACPD-C and another gene(s); loss of both genes boosts seed stearic acid levels to ≥ 18%. Unfortunately, this genomic deletion has been shown in previous studies to be inextricably correlated with reduced seed yield. Our results will help inform and guide ongoing breeding efforts to improve soybean oil oxidative stability. PMID:27866151

  9. Genotyping-by-Sequencing-Based Investigation of the Genetic Architecture Responsible for a ∼Sevenfold Increase in Soybean Seed Stearic Acid.

    PubMed

    Heim, Crystal B; Gillman, Jason D

    2017-01-05

    Soybean oil is highly unsaturated but oxidatively unstable, rendering it nonideal for food applications. Until recently, the majority of soybean oil underwent partial chemical hydrogenation, which produces trans fats as an unavoidable consequence. Dietary intake of trans fats and most saturated fats are conclusively linked to negative impacts on cholesterol levels and cardiovascular health. Two major soybean oil breeding targets are: (1) to reduce or eliminate the need for chemical hydrogenation, and (2) to replace the functional properties of partially hydrogenated soybean oil. One potential solution is the elevation of seed stearic acid, a saturated fat which has no negative impacts on cardiovascular health, from 3 to 4% in typical cultivars to > 20% of the seed oil. We performed QTL analysis of a population developed by crossing two mutant lines, one with a missense mutation affecting a stearoyl-acyl-carrier protein desaturase gene resulting in ∼11% seed stearic acid crossed to another mutant, A6, which has 24-28% seed stearic acid. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)-based QTL mapping identified 21 minor and major effect QTL for six seed oil related traits and plant height. The inheritance of a large genomic deletion affecting chromosome 14 is the basis for largest effect QTL, resulting in ∼18% seed stearic acid. This deletion contains SACPD-C and another gene(s); loss of both genes boosts seed stearic acid levels to ≥ 18%. Unfortunately, this genomic deletion has been shown in previous studies to be inextricably correlated with reduced seed yield. Our results will help inform and guide ongoing breeding efforts to improve soybean oil oxidative stability.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies of Docosahexaenoic Acid and Gamma Linolenic Acid Effects on Phospholipid Membranes With and Without Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonar, D.; Horasanb, N.; Sünnetçioğlu, M. Maral

    2016-07-01

    Free docosahexaenoic acid (DHAn-3) and gamma linolenic acid (GLAn-6) effects on dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes were studied as a function of temperature by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acid (5-, 16-DS) spin labels were utilized to obtain information from the interfacial and alkyl chain region, respectively. In the studied temperature range, the presence of DHAn-3 or GLAn-6 caused decreases in maximum hyperfi ne splitting values and correlation times of DMPC membranes. Both in the interfacial region and depths of membrane, changes were more pronounced for DHAn-3 in pure DMPC. In the presence of cholesterol (CH), DHAn-3 and GLAn-6 effects were similar and more pronounced in the depths of the membrane. The changes in the structure and dynamics of samples were obtained from simulations of spectra, which indicated some changes in the number of spectral components by incorporation of DHAn-3 and GLAn-6. In the interfacial region and below the main phase transition temperature of DMPC, there was an increase in heterogeneity. For temperatures above the phase transition, a more homogeneous environment for spin label was obtained in the presence of fatty acids.

  11. Compared with stearic acid, palmitic acid increased the yield of milk fat and improved feed efficiency across production level of cows.

    PubMed

    Rico, J E; Allen, M S; Lock, A L

    2014-02-01

    The effects of dietary palmitic and stearic acids on feed intake, yields of milk and milk components, and feed efficiency of dairy cows were evaluated in an experiment with a crossover arrangement of treatments with a covariate period. Cows with a wide range of milk production (38 to 65 kg/d) were used to determine if response to fat supplementation varied according to production level. Thirty-two Holstein cows (143 ± 61 d in milk) were assigned randomly to a treatment sequence within level of milk production. Treatments were diets supplemented (2% of diet dry matter) with palmitic acid (PA; 97.9% C16:0) or stearic acid (SA; 97.4% C18:0). Treatment periods were 21 d and cows were fed a nonfat supplemented diet for 14 d immediately before the first treatment period. The final 4d of each period were used for sample and data collection. Milk production measured during the covariate period (preliminary milk yield) was used as the covariate. No interactions were detected between treatment and preliminary milk yield for the production response variables measured. Compared with SA, the PA treatment increased milk fat concentration (3.66 vs. 3.55%) and yield (1.68 vs. 1.59 kg/d), and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield (47.5 vs. 45.6 kg/d). Treatment did not affect dry matter intake, milk yield, milk protein yield, body weight, or body condition score. Milk protein concentration was lower for PA compared with SA treatment (3.24 vs. 3.29%). The PA treatment increased feed efficiency (3.5% fat-corrected milk yield/dry matter intake) compared with SA (1.48 vs. 1.40). The increase in milk fat yield by PA was entirely accounted for by a 24% increase in 16-carbon fatty acid output into milk. Yields of de novo (3.2%) and preformed fatty acids (2.9%) were only slightly decreased by PA relative to SA. The PA treatment increased plasma concentration of nonesterified fatty acids (96.3 vs. 88.2 μEq/L) and glucose (56.6 vs. 55.7 mg/dL) compared with SA, but insulin and

  12. Investigation of cutaneous penetration properties of stearic acid loaded to dendritic core-multi-shell (CMS) nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Lohan, S B; Icken, N; Teutloff, C; Saeidpour, S; Bittl, R; Lademann, J; Fleige, E; Haag, R; Haag, S F; Meinke, M C

    2016-03-30

    Dendritic core-multi shell (CMS) particles are polymer based systems consisting of a dendritic polar polyglycerol polymer core surrounded by a two-layer shell of nonpolar C18 alkyl chains and hydrophilic polyethylene glycol. Belonging to nanotransport systems (NTS) they allow the transport and storage of molecules with different chemical characters. Their amphipihilic character CMS-NTS permits good solubility in aqueous and organic solutions. We showed by multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy that spin-labeled 5-doxyl stearic acid (5DSA) can be loaded into the CMS-NTS. Furthermore, the release of 5DSA from the carrier into the stratum corneum of porcine skin was monitored ex vivo by EPR spectroscopy. Additionally, the penetration of the CMS-NTS into the skin was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy using indocarbocyanine (ICC) covalently bound to the nanocarrier. Thereby, no transport into the viable skin was observed, whereas the CMS-NTS had penetrated into the hair follicles down to a depth of 340 μm ± 82 μm. Thus, it could be shown that the combined application of fluorescence microscopy and multi-frequency EPR spectroscopy can be an efficient tool for investigating the loading of spin labeled drugs to nanocarrier systems, drug release and penetration into the skin as well as the localization of the NTS in the skin.

  13. Chitosan-Stearic Acid Based Polymeric Micelles for the Effective Delivery of Tamoxifen: Cytotoxic and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Thotakura, Nagarani; Dadarwal, Mukesh; Kumar, Pramod; Sharma, Gajanand; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Raza, Kaisar; Katare, Om Prakash

    2017-04-01

    Chitosan is a widely employed polysaccharide with positive zeta-potential and better tissue/cell adhesion. Its hydrophilicity, high viscosity, and insolubility at physiological pH are major hurdles in proper utilization of this macromolecule. Therefore, it was conjugated with biocompatible stearic acid and the conjugate was employed to develop polymeric micelles for delivery of tamoxifen to breast cancer cells. The conjugate was characterized by FT-IR and NMR, and the nanocarrier was characterized for micromeritics, surface charge, drug loading, and morphological attributes. The efficacy was evaluated by in vitro MTT studies, safety by erythrocyte compatibility, and biodistribution by in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. Despite better drug loading and sustained drug release, cytotoxicity on MCF-7 breast cancer cells was substantially enhanced and the pharmacokinetic profile was significantly modified. The AUC was enhanced manifolds along with reduced clearance. The findings are unique and provide an alternative to the conventional lipid-based nanocarriers for better dose delivery, tissue adhesion, and desired pharmacokinetic modulation.

  14. Characterization of rice starch-ι-carrageenan biodegradable edible film. Effect of stearic acid on the film properties.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Rahul; Saberi, Bahareh; Pristijono, Penta; Golding, John; Stathopoulos, Costas; Scarlett, Christopher; Bowyer, Michael; Vuong, Quan

    2016-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop rice starch (RS), ι-carrageenan (ι-car) based film. Different formulations of RS (1-4%, w/w), ι-car (0.5-2%, w/w) was blended with stearic acid (SA; 0.3-0.9%, w/w) and glycerol (1%, w/w) as a plasticizer. The effect of film ingredients on the thickness, water vapour permeability (WVP), film solubility (FS), moisture content (MC), colour, film opacity (FO), tensile strength (TS), elongation-at-break (EAB) of film was examined. Interactions and miscibility of partaking components was studied by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Hydrocolloid suspension solution of mix polysaccharides imparted a significant impact (p<0.05) on the important attributes of resulting edible film. TS and EAB of film were improved significantly (p<0.05) when ι-car was increased in the film matrix. Formulation F1 comprising 2% ι-car, 2% RS, 0.3% SA, Gly 30% w/w and 0.2% surfactant (tween(®)20) provided film with good physical, mechanical and barrier properties. FT-IR and XRD results reveal that molecular interactions between RS-ι-car have a great impact on the film properties confining the compatibility and miscibility of mixed polysaccharide. Results of the study offers new biodegradable formulation for application on fruit and vegetables.

  15. Effect of stearic acid-grafted starch compatibilizer on properties of linear low density polyethylene/thermoplastic starch blown film.

    PubMed

    Khanoonkon, Nattaporn; Yoksan, Rangrong; Ogale, Amod A

    2016-02-10

    The present work aims to investigate the effect of stearic acid-grafted starch (ST-SA) on the rheological, thermal, optical, dynamic mechanical thermal, and tensile properties of linear low density polyethylene/thermoplastic starch (LLDPE/TPS) blends, as well as on their water vapor and oxygen barrier properties. Blends consisting of LLDPE and TPS in a weight ratio of 60:40 and ST-SA at different concentrations, i.e. 1, 3 and 5%, were prepared using a twin-screw extruder. The obtained resins were subsequently converted into films via blown film extrusion. Incorporation of ST-SA resulted in a decreased degree of shear thinning, reduced ambient temperature elasticity, and improved tensile strength, secant modulus, extensibility, and UV absorption, as well as diminished water vapor and oxygen permeabilities of the LLDPE/TPS blend. These effects are attributed to the enhanced interfacial adhesion between LLDPE and TPS phases through the compatibilizing effect induced by ST-SA, and the good dispersion of the TPS phase in the LLDPE matrix. The results confirmed that ST-SA could potentially be used as a compatibilizer for the LLDPE/TPS blend system.

  16. Fat high in stearic acid favorably affects blood lipids and factor VII coagulant activity in comparison with fats high in palmitic acid or high in myristic and lauric acids.

    PubMed

    Tholstrup, T; Marckmann, P; Jespersen, J; Sandström, B

    1994-02-01

    The effect of fats high in individual, prevalent saturated dietary fatty acids on lipoproteins and hemostatic variables in young healthy subjects was evaluated in a randomized strictly controlled metabolic feeding study. Three experimental diets: shea butter (S; 42% stearic acid), palm oil (P; 43% palmitic palmitic acid), and palm-kernel oil with high-oleic sunflower oil (ML; 10% myristic acid, 30% lauric acid) were served to 15 men for 3 wk each, separated by washout periods. Diet S compared with diet P resulted in significant reduction in plasma cholesterol (22%) LDL cholesterol (26%), apolipoprotein B (18%), HDL cholesterol (12%), apolipoprotein A-I (13%), and a 13% lower factor VII coagulant activity (P = 0.001). Similar differences were observed between diets S and ML. In conclusion, intake of shea butter high in stearic acid favorably affects blood lipids and factor VII coagulant activity in young men, compared with fats high in saturated fatty acids with 12-16 carbons.

  17. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of docetaxel-loaded stearic acid-modified Bletilla striata polysaccharide copolymer micelles

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Qingxiang; Zhang, Guangyuan; Sun, Dandan; Wang, Yue; Liu, Kun; Wang, Miao; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Bingjin; Lv, Jiayin

    2017-01-01

    Bletilla striata polysaccharides (BSPs) have been used in pharmaceutical and biomedical industry, the aim of the present study was to explore a BSPs amphiphilic derivative to overcome its application limit as poorly water-soluble drug carriers due to water-soluble polymers. Stearic acid (SA) was selected as a hydrophobic block to modify B. striata polysaccharides (SA-BSPs). Docetaxel (DTX)-loaded SA-BSPs (DTX-SA-BSPs) copolymer micelles were prepared and characterized. The DTX release percentage in vitro and DTX concentration in vivo was carried out by using high performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 and HeLa cells were subjected to MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazonium bromide) assay to evaluate the cell viability. In vitro evaluation of copolymer micelles showed higher drug encapsulation and loading capacity. The release percentage of DTX from DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles and docetaxel injection was 66.93 ± 1.79% and 97.06 ± 1.56% in 2 days, respectively. The DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles exhibited a sustained release of DTX. A 50% increase in growth inhibition was observed for HepG2 cells treated with DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles as compared to those treated with docetaxel injection for 72 h. DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles presented a similar growth inhibition effect on Hela cells. Furthermore, absolute bioavailability of DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles was shown to be 1.39-fold higher than that of docetaxel injection. Therefore, SA-BSPs copolymer micelles may be used as potential biocompatible polymers for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28334044

  18. Fatty acid binding sites of human and bovine albumins: Differences observed by spin probe ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravsky, Vladimir; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Berezenko, Stephen; Schnurr, Kerstin; Gurachevsky, Andrey

    2009-09-01

    Bovine and human serum albumins and recombinant human albumin, all non-covalently complexed with 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acids, were investigated by ESR spectroscopy in solution over a range of pH values (5.5-8.0) and temperatures (25-50 °C), with respect to the allocation and mobility of fatty acid (FA) molecules bound to the proteins and conformation of the binding sites. In all proteins bound FA undergo a permanent intra-albumin migration between the binding sites and inter-domain residence. Nature identity of the recombinant human albumin to its serum-derived analog was observed. However, the binding sites of bovine albumin appeared shorter in length and wider in diameter than those of human albumin. Presumably, less tightly folded domains in bovine albumin allow better penetration of water molecules in the interior of the globule that resulted in higher activation energy of FA dissociation from the binding site. Thus, the sensitive technique based on ESR non-covalent spin labeling allowed quantitative analysis and reliable comparison of the fine features of binding proteins.

  19. Stearic acid-induced cardiac lipotoxicity is independent of cellular lipid and is mitigated by the fatty acids oleic and capric acid but not by the PPAR agonist troglitazone.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, Simon W; Lodhia, Parth; Lodha, Parth

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of stearic acid to induce cardiomyocyte cell death and the hypothesis that the amount of cellular lipid is a determinant of cell death. In cardiomyocytes from embryonic chick heart, stearic acid (SA) produced a significant (P < 0.001) concentration-dependent increase in cell death with an ED(50) of 71 microM. In contrast, capric (C10:0) or oleic acid (OA; C18:1), at < 200 microM, did not alter cell viability. Stearic acid-induced cell death was significantly reduced by OA and to a lesser extent by capric acid. Neither OA nor capric acid altered cell death produced by potassium cyanide and deoxyglucose. Stearic acid (100 microM) induced a significant (P < 0.05) twofold increase in cellular lipid as assessed by Nile blue and Sudan Black staining. A role for cellular lipid in cardiomyocyte death was excluded because OA increased cellular lipid, at concentrations that did not induce cell death; OA did not alter SA-induced cellular fat stores but reduced cell death; and the PPARgamma; agonist troglitazone at concentrations that reduced cellular lipid content did not alter cell death. High concentrations of troglitazone, however, induced cell death. In summary, SA is a potent inducer of cardiac cell death and intracellular lipid accumulation. The amount of intracellular lipid, however, is not a determinant of cardiomyocyte cell death. Troglitazone has potential cardiotoxicity at high doses but, at lower concentrations, does not prevent cardiac lipotoxicity, which can be completely prevented by low concentrations of oleic acid.

  20. Origin of Epilachnapaenulata defensive alkaloids: incorporation of [1-13C]-sodium acetate and [methyl-2H3]-stearic acid.

    PubMed

    Camarano, S; González, A; Rossini, C

    2012-01-01

    Ladybird beetles produce a large number of defensive alkaloids. Previous studies suggest that the structural diversity of these endogenous alkaloids can be traced to a common biosynthetic route based on the condensation of several acetate units. In this study, adults of Epilachna paenulata, a phytophagous neotropical species, were fed on diet enriched with potential precursors (sodium acetate, fatty acids and the amino acids lysine and ornithine) labeled with stable isotopes ((13)C, (2)H and (15)N). Labeled acetate was incorporated into the structurally related homotropane and piperidine alkaloids. The later also showed incorporation of [methyl-(2)H3] stearic acid. Our results hence support a fatty acid pathway for the biosynthesis of E. paenulata alkaloids. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the incorporation of a labeled fatty acid into a defensive piperidine alkaloid in insects.

  1. Stearic acids at sn-1, 3 positions of TAG are more efficient at limiting fat deposition than palmitic and oleic acids in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Gouk, Shiou-Wah; Cheng, Sit-Foon; Ong, Augustine Soon-Hock; Chuah, Cheng-Hock

    2014-04-14

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of long-acyl chain SFA, namely palmitic acid (16:0) and stearic acid (18:0), at sn-1, 3 positions of TAG on obesity. Throughout the 15 weeks of the experimental period, C57BL/6 mice were fed diets fortified with cocoa butter, sal stearin (SAL), palm mid fraction (PMF) and high-oleic sunflower oil (HOS). The sn-1, 3 positions were varied by 16:0, 18:0 and 18:1, whilst the sn-2 position was preserved with 18:1. The HOS-enriched diet was found to lead to the highest fat deposition. This was in accordance with our previous postulation. Upon normalisation of total fat deposited with food intake to obtain the fat:feed ratio, interestingly, mice fed the SAL-enriched diet exhibited significantly lower visceral fat/feed and total fat/feed compared with those fed the PMF-enriched diet, despite their similarity in SFA-unsaturated fatty acid-SFA profile. That long-chain SFA at sn-1, 3 positions concomitantly with an unsaturated FA at the sn-2 position exert an obesity-reducing effect was further validated. The present study is the first of its kind to demonstrate that SFA of different chain lengths at sn-1, 3 positions exert profound effects on fat accretion.

  2. Functionalities of chitosan conjugated with stearic acid and gallic acid and application of the modified chitosan in stabilizing labile aroma compounds in an oil-in-water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Shi; Liu, Tai-Ti; Lin, I-Hwa

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this research were to conjugate chitosan (CT) with stearic acid (SA) and gallic acid (GA), and apply the modified chitosan to stabilize labile aroma compounds such as allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and limonene in oil-in-water emulsions. Generally, the antioxidant activity of CT-SA-GA increased as the GA content in the conjugate increased. In most assays, GA had a lower IC50 value than that of CT-SA-GA; however, CT-SA-GA exhibited better performance than GA in the Fe(2+)-chelating activity. In accelerated tests (heating or illumination) for evaluating the chemical stability of AITC and limonene during storage, CT-SA and CT-SA-GA were used to prepare AITC and limonene O/W emulsions, respectively. Tween 80 and Span 80 (T-S-80), an emulsifier mixture, were used as a control in both emulsions for comparison. The results show that CT-SA or CT-SA-GA could protect AITC or limonene from degradation or oxidation more effectively than T-S-80.

  3. Linoleic acid and stearic acid elicit opposite effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent signaling pathways in immortalized hypothalamic N38 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songbo; Xiang, Nana; Yang, Liusong; Zhu, Canjun; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Lina; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-03-18

    The regulation of food intake is a promising way to combat obesity. It has been implicated that various fatty acids exert different effects on food intake and body weight. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) on agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression and secretion in immortalized mouse hypothalamic N38 cells and to explore the likely underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that LA inhibited, while SA stimulated AgRP expression and secretion of N38 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LA suppressed the protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), phosphorylation levels of JNK and IKKα/β, suggesting the inhibition of TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway. However, the above mentioned inhibitory effects of LA were eliminated by TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, SA promoted TLR4 protein expression and activated TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway, with elevated ratio of p-JNK/JNK. While TLR4 siRNA reversed the stimulatory effects of SA on AgRP expression and TLR4-dependent inflammation. Moreover, we found that TLR4 was also involved in LA-enhanced and SA-impaired leptin/insulin signal pathways in N38 cells. In conclusion, our findings indicated that LA elicited inhibitory while SA exerted stimulatory effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent inflammation and leptin/insulin pathways in N38 cells. These data provided a better understanding of the mechanism underlying fatty acids-regulated food intake and suggested the potential role of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids such as LA in reducing food intake and treating obesity.

  4. Metabolism in humans of cis-12,trans-15-octadecadienoic acid relative to palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Emken, E.A.; Rohwedder, W.K.; Adlof, R.O.; Rakoff, H.; Gulley, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    Mixtures of triglycerides containing deuterium-labeled hexadecanoic acid (16:0), octadecanoic acid (18:0), cis-9-octadecenoic acid (9c-18:1), cis-9,cis-12-octadecadienoic acid (9c, 12c-18:2) and cis-12,trans-15-octadecadienoic acid (12c,15t-18:2) were fed to two young-adult males. Plasma lipid classes were isolated from samples collected periodically over 48 hr. Incorporation and turnover of the deuterium-labeled fats in plasma lipids were followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the methyl ester derivatives. Absorption of the deuterated fats was followed by GC-MS analysis of chylomicron triglycerides isolated by ultracentrifugation. Results were the following: (i) endogenous fat contributed about 40% of the total fat incorporated into chylomicron triglycerides; (ii) elongation, desaturation and chain-shortened products from the deuterated fats were not detected; (iii) the polyunsaturated isomer 12c,15t-18:2 was metabolically more similar to saturated and 9c-18:1 fatty acids than to 9c,12c-18:2; (iv) relative incorporation of 9c,12c-18:2 into phospholipids did not increase proportionally with an increase of 9c,12c-18:2 in the mixture of deuterated fats fed; (v) absorption of 16:0, 18:0, 9c-18:1, 9c,12c-18:2 and 12c,15t-18:2 were similar; and (vi) data for the 1- and 2-acyl positions of phosphatidylcholine and for cholesteryl ester fractions reflected the known high specificity of phosphatidylcholine acyltransferase and lecithin:cholesteryl acyltransferase for 9c,12c-18:2. These results illustrate that incorporation of dietary fatty acids into human plasma lipid classes is selectively controlled and that incorporation of dietary 9c,12c-18:2 is limited.

  5. Influence of nanographene platelets (NGP) incorporation on Fe3O4 nanoparticles as materials additives for enhancement thermal properties stearic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryadin, M. K.; Andiarto, R.; Taufik, A.; Saleh, R.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and Fe3O4/NGP composite were used as material additive for enhancement thermal properties of stearic acid (SA). The both material additive were synthesized using sol-gel method. Phase change material (PCM) composites SA-Fe3O4 and Sa-Fe3O4/NGP mixtures were made through the dispersion technique with three different weight % ratio of material additives into stearic acid: 1 wt.%, 3 wt.%, and 5 wt.%. X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to investigate the structural properties. Magnetic properties also measured by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) to see influence of NGP in PCM composites. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used in order to analyse the thermal properties of the samples. The results show an enhancement of the latent heat, thermal stability as well as specific heat by the presence of material additives in SA. Compare to SA- Fe3O4, SA-Fe3O4/NGP show better improvement in enhancement of thermal performance of SA. The improvement by about 41.2% in specific heat and 21.2% in latent heat.

  6. AMPKα, C/EBPβ, CPT1β, GPR43, PPARγ, and SCD Gene Expression in Single- and Co-cultured Bovine Satellite Cells and Intramuscular Preadipocytes Treated with Palmitic, Stearic, Oleic, and Linoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Choi, S H; Park, S K; Johnson, B J; Chung, K Y; Choi, C W; Kim, K H; Kim, W Y; Smith, B

    2015-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that bovine subcutaneous preadipocytes promote adipogenic gene expression in muscle satellite cells in a co-culture system. Herein we hypothesize that saturated fatty acids would promote adipogenic/lipogenic gene expression, whereas mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids would have the opposite effect. Bovine semimembranosus satellite cells (BSC) and intramuscular preadipocytes (IPA) were isolated from crossbred steers and cultured with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS)/Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) and 1% antibiotics during the 3-d proliferation period. After proliferation, cells were treated for 3 d with 3% horse serum/DMEM (BSC) or 5% FBS/DMEM (IPA) with antibiotics. Media also contained 10 μg/mL insulin and 10 μg/mL pioglitazone. Subsequently, differentiating BSC and IPA were cultured in their respective media with 40 μM palmitic, stearic, oleic, or linoleic acid for 4 d. Finally, BSC and IPA were single- or co-cultured for an additional 2 h. All fatty acid treatments increased (p = 0.001) carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 beta (CPT1β) gene expression, but the increase in CPT1β gene expression was especially pronounced in IPA incubated with palmitic and stearic acid (6- to 17- fold increases). Oleic and linoleic acid decreased (p = 0.001) stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene expression over 80% in both BSC and IPA. Conversely, palmitic and stearic acid increased SCD gene expression three fold in co-cultured in IPA, and stearic acid increased AMPKα gene expression in single- and co-cultured BSC and IPA. Consistent with our hypothesis, saturated fatty acids, especially stearic acid, promoted adipogenic and lipogenic gene expression, whereas unsaturated fatty acids decreased expression of those genes associated with fatty acid metabolism.

  7. AMPKα, C/EBPβ, CPT1β, GPR43, PPARγ, and SCD Gene Expression in Single- and Co-cultured Bovine Satellite Cells and Intramuscular Preadipocytes Treated with Palmitic, Stearic, Oleic, and Linoleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Choi, S. H.; Park, S. K.; Johnson, B. J.; Chung, K. Y.; Choi, C. W.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, W. Y.; Smith, B.

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that bovine subcutaneous preadipocytes promote adipogenic gene expression in muscle satellite cells in a co-culture system. Herein we hypothesize that saturated fatty acids would promote adipogenic/lipogenic gene expression, whereas mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids would have the opposite effect. Bovine semimembranosus satellite cells (BSC) and intramuscular preadipocytes (IPA) were isolated from crossbred steers and cultured with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS)/Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) and 1% antibiotics during the 3-d proliferation period. After proliferation, cells were treated for 3 d with 3% horse serum/DMEM (BSC) or 5% FBS/DMEM (IPA) with antibiotics. Media also contained 10 μg/mL insulin and 10 μg/mL pioglitazone. Subsequently, differentiating BSC and IPA were cultured in their respective media with 40 μM palmitic, stearic, oleic, or linoleic acid for 4 d. Finally, BSC and IPA were single- or co-cultured for an additional 2 h. All fatty acid treatments increased (p = 0.001) carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 beta (CPT1β) gene expression, but the increase in CPT1β gene expression was especially pronounced in IPA incubated with palmitic and stearic acid (6- to 17- fold increases). Oleic and linoleic acid decreased (p = 0.001) stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene expression over 80% in both BSC and IPA. Conversely, palmitic and stearic acid increased SCD gene expression three fold in co-cultured in IPA, and stearic acid increased AMPKα gene expression in single- and co-cultured BSC and IPA. Consistent with our hypothesis, saturated fatty acids, especially stearic acid, promoted adipogenic and lipogenic gene expression, whereas unsaturated fatty acids decreased expression of those genes associated with fatty acid metabolism. PMID:25656188

  8. Apolipoprotein E isoforms 3/3 and 3/4 differentially interact with circulating stearic, palmitic, and oleic fatty acids and lipid levels in Alaskan Natives.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Tapia, Lyssia; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Ebbesson, Sven O E; Ebbesson, Lars O E; Tejero, M Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Lifestyle changes in Alaskan Natives have been related to the increase of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome in the last decades. Variation of the apolipoprotein E (Apo E) genotype may contribute to the diverse response to diet in lipid metabolism and influence the association between fatty acids in plasma and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the interaction between Apo E isoforms and plasma fatty acids, influencing phenotypes related to metabolic diseases in Alaskan Natives. A sample of 427 adult Siberian Yupik Alaskan Natives was included. Fasting glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, Apo A1, and Apo B plasma concentrations were measured using reference methods. Concentrations of 13 fatty acids in fasting plasma were analyzed by gas chromatography, and Apo E variants were identified. Analyses of covariance were conducted to identify Apo E isoform and fatty acid main effects and multiplicative interactions. The means for body mass index and age were 26 ± 5.2 and 47 ± 1.5, respectively. Significant main effects were observed for variation in Apo E and different fatty acids influencing Apo B levels, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Significant interactions were found between Apo E isoform and selected fatty acids influencing total cholesterol, triglycerides, and Apo B concentrations. In summary, Apo E3/3 and 3/4 isoforms had significant interactions with circulating levels of stearic, palmitic, oleic fatty acids, and phenotypes of lipid metabolism in Alaskan Natives.

  9. Role of Stearic Acid in the Strain-Induced Crystallization of Crosslinked Natural Rubber and Synthetic Cis-1,4-Polyisoprene

    SciTech Connect

    Kohjiya,S.; Tosaka, M.; Furutani, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Toki, S.; Hsiao, B.

    2007-01-01

    Strain-induced crystallization of crosslinked natural rubber (NR) and its synthetic analogue, cis-1,4-polyisoprene (IR), both mixed with various amounts of stearic acid (SA), were investigated by time-resolved X-ray diffraction using a powerful synchrotron radiation source and simultaneous mechanical (tensile) measurement. No acceleration or retardation was observed on NR in spite of the increase of SA amount. Even the SA-free IR crystallized upon stretching, and the overall crystallization behavior of IR shifted to the larger strain ratio with increasing SA content. No difference due to the SA was detected in the deformation of crystal lattice by stress for both NR and IR. These results suggested that the extended network chains are effective for the initiation of crystallization upon stretching, while the role of SA is trivial. These behaviors are much different from their crystallization at low temperature by standing, where SA acts as a nucleating agent.

  10. Immobilization of urease on poly(N-vinyl carbazole)/stearic acid Langmuir-Blodgett films for application to urea biosensor.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Rahul; Gambhir, Anamika; Pandey, M K; Annapoorni, S; Malhotra, B D

    2002-08-01

    Urease was immobilized in mixed monolayers of poly(N-vinyl carbazole) (PNVK) and stearic acid (SA) formed at an air-water interface. The monolayers were transferred onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass plates using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film deposition technique. Urease immobilized on PNVK/SA LB films, characterized using FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopy, was found to exhibit increased stability over a wide pH (6.5-8.5) and temperature (25-50 degrees C) range. Potentiometric measurements on these urease electrodes were carried out using an ammonium ion analyzer. Two values for K(m)(app) were obtained at lower and higher concentrations of substrate urea.

  11. Impact of the oxygen defects and the hydrogen concentration on the surface of tetragonal and monoclinic ZrO2 on the reduction rates of stearic acid on Ni/ZrO2

    SciTech Connect

    Foraita, Sebastian D.; Fulton, John L.; Chase, Zizwe A.; Vjunov, Aleksei; Xu, Pinghong; Barath, Eszter; Camaioni, Donald M.; Zhao, Chen; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-02-02

    The effect of the physicochemical properties of ZrO2 phases on the activity of Ni/ZrO2 catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation of stearic acid are described. A synergistic interaction between Ni and ZrO2 support was found. The effect is greatest for the monoclinic phase of ZrO2.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of novel amphiphilic copolymer stearic acid-coupled F127 nanoparticles for nano-technology based drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qihe; Liang, Qing; Yu, Fei; Xu, Jian; Zhao, Qihua; Sun, Baiwang

    2011-12-01

    Pluronic, F127, amphiphilic block copolymers, are used for several applications, including drug delivery systems. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of F127 is about 0.26-0.8 wt% so that the utility of F127 in nano-technology based drug delivery system is limited since the nano-sized micelles could dissociate upon dilution. Herein, stearic acid (SA) was simply coupled to F127 between the carboxyl group of SA and the hydroxyl group of F127, which formed a novel copolymer named as SA-coupled F127, with significantly lower CMC. Above the CMC 6.9 × 10(-5)wt%, SA-coupled F127 self-assembled stable nanoparticles with Zeta potential -36 mV. Doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded nanoparticles were made, with drug loading (DL) 5.7 wt% and Zeta potential -36 to -39 mV, and the nanoparticles exhibited distinct shape with the size distribution from 20 to 50 nm. DOX-loaded nanoparticles were relatively stable and exhibited DOX dependant cytotoxicity toward MCF-7 cells in vitro. These results suggest that SA-coupled F127 potentially could be applied as a nano-technology based drug delivery method.

  13. Lipase-catalyzed acidolysis of palm mid fraction oil with palmitic and stearic Fatty Acid mixture for production of cocoa butter equivalent.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ibrahim O

    2013-10-01

    Cocoa butter equivalent (CBE) was prepared by enzymatic acidolysis reaction of substrate consisting of refined palm mid fraction oil and palmitic-stearic fatty acid mixture. The reactions were performed in a batch reactor at a temperature of 60 °C in an orbital shaker operated at 160 RPM. Different mass ratios of substrates were explored, and the composition of the five major triacylglycerols (TAGs) of the structured lipids was identified and quantified using cocoa butter certified reference material IRMM-801. The reaction resulted in production of cocoa butter equivalent with the TAGs' composition (1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol 30.7%, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-stearoyl-rac-glycerol 40.1%, 1-palmitoy-2,3- dioleoyl glycerol 9.0%, 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol 14.5 %, and 1-stearoyl-2,3-dioleoyl glycerol 5.7%) and with onset melting temperature of 31.6 °C and peak temperature of 40.4 °C which are close to those of cocoa butter. The proposed kinetics model for the acidolysis reaction presented the experimental data very well. The results of this research showed that palm mid fraction oil TAGs could be restructured to produce value added product such as CBE.

  14. Phase behaviour and morphology of binary mixtures of DPPC with stearonitrile, stearic acid, and octadecanol at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Romão, Rute I S; Gonçalves da Silva, Amélia M

    2004-08-01

    The behaviour of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), mixed with stearonitrile (SN), was investigated at the air-water interface by surface pressure-area (pi-A) measurements and by direct visualisation of monolayers by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). The pi-A-X diagram of system DPPC/SN was compared with the corresponding diagrams of systems DPPC/stearic acid (SA) and DPPC/octadecanol (OD) at 20 degrees C. Monolayers of the three systems reach the closest packing of alkyl chains in the 0.4-0.6 range of XDPPC. Thermodynamic analysis indicates miscibility in the three binary systems with negative deviations from the ideal behaviour. Morphological features of system DPPC/SN change significantly with XDPPC and temperature in the range 10-30 degrees C. At 10 and 20 degrees C mixed monolayers form condensed states from low pi all over the composition range. At 30 degrees C, the liquid-expanded (LE)--liquid-condensed (LC) phase transition occurs at increasing pi with XDPPC. The shape and size of condensed domains change with XDPPC and pi. Contrarily to the behaviour of pure components, mixed monolayers of DPPC/SN exhibit orientational order in the 0.2-0.6 mol fraction range of DPPC. BAM observation confirmed the partial miscibility indicated by GE data in a limited range of compositions at 30 degrees C.

  15. Effects of duodenal infusions of palmitic, stearic, or oleic acids on milk composition and physical properties of butter.

    PubMed

    Enjalbert, F; Nicot, M C; Bayourthe, C; Moncoulon, R

    2000-07-01

    Four dairy cows fitted with a duodenal cannula were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design to investigate the effects of daily duodenal infusion of 500 g of fatty acids (containing mainly C16:0, C18:0, or cis-C18:1) on fecal concentrations of fatty acids, fatty acid profiles of milk fat, and solid fat content of butter. Fecal concentrations of C16:0 and especially of C18:0 were increased by duodenal infusion. Infusion with C16:0 increased the proportion of C16:0 in milk fat and delayed softening of butter when the temperature rose. Infusion with C18:0 resulted only in a slight increase of C18:0 proportion in milk fat and did not significantly affect solid fat in butter between -10 and 30 degrees C. With the infusion of cis-C18:1, the proportion of cis-C18:1 in milk fat was more than twice that of control, to the detriment of C16:0. Butter contained low proportion of solid fat, even at low temperatures. Increasing C16:0 or cis-C18:1 in milk fatty acid via duodenal infusion can be used to study their specific effects on butter characteristics, but, because of a low transfer from infusion to milk, this method is less efficient with C18:0.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of ultrafine Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = Sm, Gd, Dy, Er) pyrochlore oxides by stearic acid method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Weiguang; Zhang Lili; Zhong Hui; Lu Lude; Yang Xujie; Wang Xin

    2010-02-15

    Stearic acid method (SAM) was developed to synthesize series of pyrochlore Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = Sm, Gd, Dy, Er) nanocrystals. The synthesis process was monitored by X-ray diffraction, Thermal-gravimetric-differential thermal analysis and Fourier Transform InfraRed methods. Comparing with traditional solid-state reaction (SSR), Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} can be synthesized at relatively low temperature (700-800 deg. C) with shortened reaction time (2-4 h). The average particle size of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} was greatly reduced (ca. 40 nm) and the BET surface area was increased (ca. 12 m{sup 2}/g) by using SAM. From the X-ray diffraction patterns, we found that Ln has an effect on the crystal structure of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, every lattice peak shifted to larger angle slightly with the increasing atomic number of Ln. Also, the lattice constant of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} was calculated by Jade.5 and found it decreased along with the decrease of ionic radius of Ln{sup 3+}. The morphology of obtained Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} was determined by transmission electron microscopy technique. Results showed that the obtained Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} were all square-like and the interplanar distance of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = Sm, Gd, Dy, Er) according to (111) plane was 0.65, 0.64, 0.63, and 0.62 nm respectively, which was measured from High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy images. Possible reason for this phenomenon was presented.

  17. Docetaxel-Loaded Self-Assembly Stearic Acid-Modified Bletilla striata Polysaccharide Micelles and Their Anticancer Effect: Preparation, Characterization, Cellular Uptake and In Vitro Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qingxiang; Sun, Dandan; Zhang, Guangyuan; Sun, Cheng; Wang, Miao; Ji, Danyang; Yang, Wei

    2016-12-02

    Poorly soluble drugs have low bioavailability after oral administration, thereby hindering effective drug delivery. A novel drug-delivery system of docetaxel (DTX)-based stearic acid (SA)-modified Bletilla striata polysaccharides (BSPs) copolymers was successfully developed. Particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency (EE), and loading capacity (LC) were determined. The DTX release percentage in vitro was determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The hemolysis and in vitro anticancer activity were studied. Cellular uptake and apoptotic rate were measured using flow cytometry assay. Particle size, zeta potential, EE and LC were 125.30 ± 1.89 nm, -26.92 ± 0.18 mV, 86.6% ± 0.17%, and 14.8% ± 0.13%, respectively. The anticancer activities of DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles against HepG2, HeLa, SW480, and MCF-7 (83.7% ± 1.0%, 54.5% ± 4.2%, 48.5% ± 4.2%, and 59.8% ± 1.4%, respectively) were superior to that of docetaxel injection (39.2% ± 1.1%, 44.5% ± 5.3%, 38.5% ± 5.4%, and 49.8% ± 2.9%, respectively) at 0.5 μg/mL drug concentration. The DTX release percentage of DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles and docetaxel injection were 66.93% ± 1.79% and 97.06% ± 1.56% in two days, respectively. Cellular uptake of DTX-FITC-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles in cells had a time-dependent relation. Apoptotic rate of DTX-SA-BSPs copolymer micelles and docetaxel injection were 73.48% and 69.64%, respectively. The SA-BSPs copolymer showed good hemocompatibility. Therefore, SA-BSPs copolymer can be used as a carrier for delivering hydrophobic drugs.

  18. An investigation into the release of cefuroxime axetil from taste-masked stearic acid microspheres. III. The use of DSC and HSDSC as means of characterising the interaction of the microspheres with buffered media.

    PubMed

    Robson, H; Craig, D Q; Deutsch, D

    2000-05-25

    Stearic acid coated cefuroxime axetil (SACA) microspheres have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high sensitivity DSC (HSDSC) in order to examine the interaction between the spheres and a range of buffer systems, with a view to further enhance the understanding of the mechanism of drug release developed in earlier studies [Robson et al., 1999, 2000]. DSC studies indicated that after immersion in Sorensens modified phosphate buffer (SMPB) pH 5.9 followed by washing and drying, no change in the thermal properties of the spheres was detected up to 60 min of immersion, with a single endotherm noted at circa 56 degrees C, that corresponded to the melting of the stearic acid used in this study; similar results were obtained for systems immersed in distilled water. After immersion in SMPB pH 7.0 and 8.0, however, a second peak was noted at approximately 67 degrees C that increased in magnitude relative to the lower temperature endotherm with increasing exposure time to the medium. Spheres that had not been previously washed prior to drying showed complete conversion to the higher temperature endotherm for these two buffers. Systems which had been exposed to a range of pH 7.0 buffers (citrate-phosphate buffer (CPB), phosphate buffer mixed (PBM), boric acid buffer (BAB)) were then examined. Only the CPB systems showed evidence for conversion to the higher melting form. PBM systems to which further sodium had been added were then examined. A maximum conversion was found at 0.05 M sodium, which was in agreement with the maximum in release rate found in a previous study [Robson et al., 2000]. HSDSC was then used to examine systems that were immersed in the buffer. For SMPB, pH 5.9 and distilled water, only the endotherm corresponding to the stearic acid melting was seen. However, for SMPB pH 7.0 and 8.0, three peaks were seen, two corresponding to those seen for the DSC studies and a further lower temperature peak at circa 44 degrees C. Studies on

  19. Biochemistry of high stearic sunflower, a new source of saturated fats.

    PubMed

    Salas, Joaquín J; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Harwood, John L; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Aznar-Moreno, Jose Antonio; Moreno-Pérez, Antonio J; Ruíz-López, Noemí; Serrano-Vega, María J; Graham, Ian A; Mullen, Robert T; Garcés, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    Fats based on stearic acid could be a healthier alternative to existing oils especially hydrogenated fractions of oils or palm, but only a few non-tropical species produce oils with these characteristics. In this regard, newly developed high stearic oil seed crops could be a future source of fats and hard stocks rich in stearic and oleic fatty acids. These oil crops have been obtained either by breeding and mutagenesis or by suppression of desaturases using RNA interference. The present review depicts the molecular and biochemical bases for the accumulation of stearic acid in sunflower. Moreover, aspects limiting the accumulation of stearate in the seeds of this species are reviewed. This included data obtained from the characterization of genes and enzymes related to fatty acid biosynthesis and triacylglycerol assembly. Future improvements and uses of these oils are also discussed.

  20. Application of Box-Behnken design for preparation of levofloxacin-loaded stearic acid solid lipid nanoparticles for ocular delivery: Optimization, in vitro release, ocular tolerance, and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza Salman; Ahad, Abdul; Aslam, Mohammed; Imam, Syed Sarim; Aqil, Mohd; Ali, Asgar

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and optimize levofloxacin loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for the treatment of conjunctivitis. Box-Behnken experimental design was applied for optimization of solid lipid nanoparticles. The independent variables were stearic acid as lipid (X1), Tween 80 as surfactant (X2) and sodium deoxycholate as co-surfactant (X3) while particle size (Y1) and entrapment efficiency (Y2) were the dependent variables. Further in vitro release and antibacterial activity in vitro were also performed. The optimized formulation of levofloxacin provides particle size of 237.82 nm and showed 78.71% entrapment efficiency and achieved flux 0.2,493 μg/cm(2)/h across excised goat cornea. In vitro release study showed prolonged drug release from the optimized formulation following Korsmeyer-Peppas model. Antimicrobial study revealed that the developed formulation possesses antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli equivalent to marketed eye drops. HET-CAM test demonstrated that optimized formulation was found to be non-irritant and safe for topical ophthalmic use. Our results concluded that solid lipid nanoparticles are an efficient carrier for ocular delivery of levofloxacin and other drugs.

  1. The ratio of oleic-to-stearic acid in the prostate predicts biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our study examined lifestyle-related factors that may influence the prognosis of clinically localized prostate cancer, we evaluated the relative impact of obesity and prostatic fatty acid concentrations at diagnosis on risk of biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy. Height and weight w...

  2. Identification of the molecular genetic basis of the low palmitic acid seed oil trait in soybean mutant line RG3 and association analysis of molecular markers with elevated seed stearic acid and reduced seed palmitic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fatty acid composition of vegetable oil is becoming increasingly critical for the ultimate functionality and utilization in foods and industrial products. Partial chemical hydrogenation of soybean oil increases oxidative stability and shelf life but also results in the introduction of trans fats...

  3. Effect of liposomal fluidity on skin permeation of sodium fluorescein entrapped in liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Subongkot, Thirapit; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultradeformable liposome components, Tween 20 and terpenes, on vesicle fluidity. The fluidity was evaluated by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using 5-doxyl stearic acid and 16-doxyl stearic acid as spin labels for phospholipid bilayer fluidity at the C5 atom of the acyl chain near the polar head group (hydrophilic region) and the C16 atom of the acyl chain (lipophilic region), respectively. The electron spin resonance study revealed that Tween 20 increased the fluidity at the C5 atom of the acyl chain, whereas terpenes increased the fluidity at the C16 atom of the acyl chain of the phospholipid bilayer. The increase in liposomal fluidity resulted in the increased skin penetration of sodium fluorescein. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that ultradeformable liposomes with terpenes increase the skin penetration of sodium fluorescein by enhancing hair follicle penetration. PMID:26229462

  4. High-Stearic and High-Oleic Cottonseed Oils Produced by Hairpin RNA-Mediated Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Singh, Surinder P.; Green, Allan G.

    2002-01-01

    We have genetically modified the fatty acid composition of cottonseed oil using the recently developed technique of hairpin RNA-mediated gene silencing to down-regulate the seed expression of two key fatty acid desaturase genes, ghSAD-1-encoding stearoyl-acyl-carrier protein Δ9-desaturase and ghFAD2-1-encoding oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine ω6-desaturase. Hairpin RNA-encoding gene constructs (HP) targeted against either ghSAD-1 or ghFAD2-1 were transformed into cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv Coker 315). The resulting down-regulation of the ghSAD-1 gene substantially increased stearic acid from the normal levels of 2% to 3% up to as high as 40%, and silencing of the ghFAD2-1 gene resulted in greatly elevated oleic acid content, up to 77% compared with about 15% in seeds of untransformed plants. In addition, palmitic acid was significantly lowered in both high-stearic and high-oleic lines. Similar fatty acid composition phenotypes were also achieved by transformation with conventional antisense constructs targeted against the same genes, but at much lower frequencies than were achieved with the HP constructs. By intercrossing the high-stearic and high-oleic genotypes, it was possible to simultaneously down-regulate both ghSAD-1 and ghFAD2-1 to the same degree as observed in the individually silenced parental lines, demonstrating for the first time, to our knowledge, that duplex RNA-induced posttranslational gene silencing in independent genes can be stacked without any diminution in the degree of silencing. The silencing of ghSAD-1 and/or ghFAD2-1 to various degrees enables the development of cottonseed oils having novel combinations of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic contents that can be used in margarines and deep frying without hydrogenation and also potentially in high-value confectionery applications. PMID:12177486

  5. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  6. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  7. Quantification of Randomly-methylated-{beta}-cyclodextrin effect on liposome: An ESR study

    SciTech Connect

    Grammenos, A.; Bahri, M.A.; Guelluy, P.H.; Piel, G.; Hoebeke, M.

    2009-12-04

    In the present work, the effect of Randomly-methylated-{beta}-cyclodextrin (Rameb) on the microviscosity of dimyristoyl-L-{alpha} phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer was investigated using the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The ability of Rameb to extract membrane cholesterol was demonstrated. For the first time, the percentage of cholesterol extracted by Rameb from cholesterol doped DMPC bilayer was monitored and quantified throughout a wide Rameb concentration range. The effect of cholesterol on the inner part of the membrane was also investigated using 16-doxyl stearic acid spin label (16-DSA). 16-DSA seems to explore two different membrane domains and report their respective microviscosities. ESR experiments also establish that the presence of 30% of cholesterol in DMPC liposomes suppresses the jump in membrane fluidity at lipids phase-transition temperature (23.9 {sup o}C).

  8. ESR study of order and dynamics in lecithin liposomes with high cholesterol content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, R.; De Paoli, T.; Ihlo, J. E.; Hager, A. A.; Farach, H. A.; Poole, C. P.; Knight, J. M.

    1994-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that increasing amounts of cholesterol in phosphatidyl choline liposomes (involving cholesterol/lecithin ratios up to 1), produce an increase in order and a decrease in mobility of the phospholipids in the bilayer. The present work focuses on the order and dynamics of the phospholipids in soybean and egg yolk liposomes with cholesterol/lecithin (chol/lec) ratios as high as 2. The influence of cholesterol on the order parameter and correlation times of 5-, 12- and 16-doxyl stearic acid probes, is analyzed for both types of liposomes. The order parameter increases continuously with the increase of the amount of cholesterol although the correlation time at first increases, then it levels off at a chol/lec ratio of 1, and thereafter shows a small, gradual decrease up to a ratio of 2. A statistical model of cholesterol substitution on the lecithin lattice was employed to explain the correlation time results.

  9. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... conditions: (a) They are prepared from corn oil, cottonseed oil, lard, palm oil from fruit, peanut oil...) Polyglycerol esters of a mixture of stearic, oleic, and coconut fatty acids are used as a cloud inhibitor...

  10. Transport of stearic acid-based solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) into human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rohan M; Rajasekaran, Dhivya; Ludford-Menting, Mandy; Eldridge, Daniel S; Palombo, Enzo A; Harding, Ian H

    2016-04-01

    Development of drug delivery systems, as much as the drug molecule itself, is an important consideration for improving drug absorption and bioavailability. The mechanisms by which drug carriers enter target cells can differ depending on their size, surface properties and components. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have gained an increased attention in recent years and are the drug carriers of interest in this paper. They are known to breach the cell-membrane barrier and have been actively sought to transport biomolecules. Previous studies by our group, and also other groups, provided an extensive characterization of SLNs. However, few studies have investigated the uptake of SLNs and these have had limited mechanistic focus. The aim of this work was to investigate the pathway of uptake of SLNs by human epithelial cells i.e., lung A549 and cervical HeLa cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study that investigates the cellular uptake of SLNs by human epithelial cells. The mechanism of cellular uptake was deciphered using pharmacologic inhibitors (sucrose, potassium-free buffer, filipin and cytochalasin B). Imaging techniques and flow assisted cell sorting (FACS) were used to assess the cellular uptake of SLNs loaded with rhodamine 123 as a fluorescent probe. This study provided evidence that the cellular uptake of SLNs was energy-dependent, and the endocytosis of SLNs was mainly dependent on clathrin-mediated mechanisms. The establishment of entry mechanism of SLNs is of fundamental importance for future facilitation of SLNs as biological or drug carriers.

  11. The effects of general anesthetics on ESR spectra of spin labels in phosphatidylcholine vesicles containing purified Na,K-ATPase or microsomal protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Makiko; Hiraoki, Toshifumi; Kimura, Kunie; Fukushima, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the effects of general anesthetics on liposome containing spin labels, 5-doxyl stearic acid (5-DSA) and 16-doxyl stearic acid (16-DSA), and purified Na,K-ATPase or membrane protein of microsome using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The spectra of 16-DSA in liposomes with both proteins showed three sharp signals compared with 5-DSA. The difference in the order parameter S value of 5-DSA and 16-DSA suggested that the nitroxide radical location of 5-DSA and 16-DSA were different in the membrane bilayer. The results were almost the same as those obtained in liposomes without proteins. The addition of sevoflurane, isoflurane, halothane, ether, ethanol and propofol increased the intensity of the signals, but the clinical concentrations of anesthetics did not significantly alter the S and τ values, which are indices of the fluidity of the membrane. These results suggest that anesthetics remain on the surface of the lipid bilayer and do not act on both the inside hydrophobic area and the relatively hydrophilic area near the surface. These results and others also suggest that the existence of Na,K-ATPase and microsomal proteins did not affect the environment around the spin labels in the liposome and the effects of anesthetics on liposome as a model membrane.

  12. The influence of tin compounds on the dynamic properties of liposome membranes: a study using the ESR method.

    PubMed

    Man, Dariusz; Podolak, Marian; Engel, Grzegorz

    2006-01-01

    The influence of organic and inorganic compounds of tin on the dynamic properties of liposome membranes obtained in the process of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) sonication in distilled water was investigated. This was carried out by means of the spin ESR probe method. The probes were selected in such a way as to penetrate different areas of the membrane (a TEMPO probe, 5-DOXYL stearic acid, 16-DOXYL stearic acid). Four compounds of tin were chosen: three organic ones, (CH(3))(4)Sn, (C(2)H(5))(4)Sn and (C(3)H(7))(3)SnCl, and one inorganic one, SnCl(2). The investigated compounds were added to a liposome dispersion, which was prepared prior to that. The concentration of the admixture was changed within the values from 0 to 10%-mole in proportion to DPPC. The studies indicated that the chlorides of tin display the highest activity in their interaction with liposome membranes. Since these compounds have ionic form in a water solution, the obtained result can mean that this form of admixture has a considerable influence on its activity. Furthermore, it was found that there is a slightly stronger influence of tin compounds with a longer hydrocarbon chain on changes in the probes' spectroscopic parameters.

  13. Lipid fluidity at different regions in LDL and HDL of {beta}-thalassemia/Hb E patients

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Noppawan Phumala . E-mail: scnpm@mahidol.ac.th; Charlermchoung, Chalermkhwan; Luechapudiporn, Rataya; Yamanont, Paveena; Fucharoen, Suthat; Chantharaksri, Udom

    2006-11-24

    Atherosclerosis-related vascular complications in {beta}-thalassemia/hemoglobin E ({beta}-thal/Hb E) patients may result from iron induced oxidation of lipoproteins. To identify the specific site of oxidative damage, changes in lipid fluidity at different regions in LDL and HDL particle were investigated using two fluorescence probes and two ESR spin probes. The magnitude of increased lipid fluidity in thalassemic lipoproteins was dependent on the location of the probes. In hydrophobic region, the rotational correlation times for 16-doxyl stearic acid and DPH anisotropy were markedly changed in LDL and HDL of the patients. In the surface region, there was only a slight change in the order parameter (S) for 5-doxyl stearic acid and TMA-DPH anisotropy. Lipid fluidity at the core of LDL and HDL showed good correlation with oxidative stress markers, the ratio of CL/CO, and the level of {alpha}-tocopherol, suggesting that hydrophobic region of thalassemic lipoprotein was a target site for oxidative damage.

  14. GROWTH OF LEPTOSPIRA CANICOLA IN THE PRESENCE OF FATTY ACIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the longer fatty acids, palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid and Tween 80 showed good growth. Growth was so intense in the case of palmitic acid and...longer permitted reproduction. Most favorable were oleic acid in concentrations of .0001 m and . 00001 m, stearic and palmitic acid at .0001. Tween ... 80 gave good growth, but only in the presence of gelatin, in concentrations of 28.2 to 0.00282 mg%. The best results were achieved at higher concentrations of 28.2 and 2.82 mg%. More than 100 organisms were counted in the field.

  15. A new low linolenic acid allele of GmFAD3A gene in soybean PE1690

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relative fatty acid content of soybean oil is about 12 % palmitic acid, 4 % stearic acid, 23 % oleic acid, 54 % linoleic acid, and 8 % linolenic acid. To improve oxidative stability and quality of oil, breeding programs have mainly focused on reducing saturated fatty acids, increasing oleic acid, an...

  16. New bioactive fatty acids from vegetable oils and new uses of bioglycerin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  17. Identification of quantitative trait loci(QTL) controlling important fatty acids in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acids play important role in controlling oil quality of peanut. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80%, there are several minor fatty acids accounting for about 20% in peanut oil, such as palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), stearic (S...

  18. Production of aviation fuel via catalytic hydrothermal decarboxylation of fatty acids in microalgae oil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiyue; Nie, Renfeng; Fu, Jie; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2013-10-01

    A series of fatty acids in microalgae oil, such as stearic acid, palmitic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, arachidic acid and behenic acid, were selected as the raw materials to produce aviation fuel via hydrothermal decarboxylation over a multi-wall carbon nanotube supported Pt catalyst (Pt/MWCNTs). It was found that Pt/MWCNTs catalysts exhibited higher activity for the hydrothermal decarboxylation of stearic acid with a 97% selectivity toward heptadecane compared to Pt/C and Ru/C under the same conditions. And Pt/MWCNTs is also capable for the decarboxylation of different fatty acids in microalgae oil. The reaction conditions, such as Pt/MWCNTs loading amount, reaction temperature and time were optimized. The activation energy of stearic acid decarboxylation over Pt/MWCNTs was calculated (114 kJ/mol).

  19. Evaluation of high oleic-high stearic sunflower hard stearins for cocoa butter equivalent formulation.

    PubMed

    Bootello, Miguel A; Hartel, Richard W; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2012-10-01

    Cocoa butter equivalents (CBEs) are produced from vegetable fats by blending palm mid fraction (PMF) and tropical butters coming from shea, mango kernel or kokum fat. In this regard, high oleic-high stearic (HOHS) sunflower hard stearins from solvent fractionation can be used in CBE production since their compositions and physical properties are similar to those found in the above-mentioned tropical butters. In this work, three sunflower hard stearins (SHS) ranging from 65% to 95% of disaturated triacylglycerols and a shea stearin (used as reference) were blended with PMF to evaluate their potential use in CBEs formulation. Isosolid phase diagrams of mixtures of PMF/SHS showed eutectic formation for SHS 65 and SHS 80, but monotectic behaviour with softening effect for SHS 95. Three CBEs from SHS and shea stearin were formulated according to phase behaviour diagrams and solid fat content data at 25 °C. Isosolid phase diagrams of mixtures of these CBEs with cocoa butter showed no eutectic behaviour. Therefore, CBEs elaborated from SHS exhibited full compatibility with cocoa butter.

  20. Efficient Fractionation and Analysis of Fatty Acids and their Salts in Fat, Oil and Grease (FOG) Deposits.

    PubMed

    Benecke, Herman P; Allen, Sara K; Garbark, Daniel B

    2017-02-01

    A fractionation methodology of fat, oil and grease (FOG) deposits was developed based on the insolubility of fatty acid salts in dichloromethane (DCM) and the relatively high solubility of fatty acids and triglycerides in DCM. Using this method, coupled with spectral analysis, it was shown that fatty acids rather than fatty acid salts were the predominant species in FOG deposits obtained from three metropolitan locations in the United States and that fatty acid triglycerides were either not detected or were present in very small concentrations. This solubility-based fractionation approach also revealed the presence of nitrogen-containing compounds that had not been previously detected in FOG deposits including peptides and (or) proteins. The comparison of the ratios of stearic acid salts to stearic acid versus the ratio of palmitic acid salts to palmitic acid in FOG deposits may indicate that the initial step in FOG deposit formation is the preferential precipitation of stearic acid salts.

  1. Mast cell- and dendritic cell-derived exosomes display a specific lipid composition and an unusual membrane organization.

    PubMed Central

    Laulagnier, Karine; Motta, Claude; Hamdi, Safouane; Roy, Sébastien; Fauvelle, Florence; Pageaux, Jean-François; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Perret, Bertrand; Bonnerot, Christian; Record, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles secreted from multivesicular bodies, which are able to stimulate the immune system leading to tumour cell eradication. We have analysed lipids of exosomes secreted either upon stimulation from rat mast cells (RBL-2H3 cells), or constitutively from human dendritic cells. As compared with parent cells, exosomes displayed an enrichment in sphingomyelin, but not in cholesterol. Phosphatidylcholine content was decreased, but an enrichment was noted in disaturated molecular species as in phosphatidylethanolamines. Lyso(bis)phosphatidic acid was not enriched in exosomes as compared with cells. Fluorescence anisotropy demonstrated an increase in exosome-membrane rigidity from pH 5 to 7, suggesting their membrane reorganization between the acidic multivesicular body compartment and the neutral outer cell medium. NMR analysis established a bilayer organization of exosome membrane, and ESR studies using 16-doxyl stearic acid demonstrated a higher flip-flop of lipids between the two leaflets as compared with plasma membrane. In addition, the exosome membrane exhibited no asymmetrical distribution of phosphatidylethanolamines. Therefore exosome membrane displays a similar content of the major phospholipids and cholesterol, and is organized as a lipid bilayer with a random distribution of phosphatidylethanolamines. In addition, we observed tight lipid packing at neutral pH and a rapid flip-flop between the two leaflets of exosome membranes. These parameters could be used as a hallmark of exosomes. PMID:14965343

  2. Spectroscopic and calorimetric studies on trazodone hydrochloride-phosphatidylcholine liposome interactions in the presence and absence of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Yonar, Dilek; Sünnetçioğlu, M Maral

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of antidepressant drug trazodone hydrochloride (TRZ) with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) multilamellar liposomes (MLVs) in the presence and absence of cholesterol (CHO) was investigated as a function of temperature by using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spin labeling, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) techniques. These interactions were also examined for dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) multilamellar liposomes by using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spin labeling technique. In the EPR spin labeling studies, 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acid (5-DS and 16-DS) spin labels were used to monitor the head group and alkyl chain region of phospholipids respectively. The results indicated that TRZ incorporation causes changes in the physical properties of PC liposomes by decreasing the main phase transition temperature, abolishing the pre-transition, broadening the phase transition profile, and disordering the system around the head group region. The interaction of TRZ with unilamellar (LUV) DPPC liposomes was also examined. The most pronounced effect of TRZ on DPPC LUVs was observed as the further decrease of main phase transition temperature in comparison with DPPC MLVs. The mentioned changes in lipid structure and dynamics caused by TRZ may modulate the biophysical activity of membrane associated receptors and in turn the pharmacological action of TRZ.

  3. Assessment of fluidity of different invasomes by electron spin resonance and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic-Curic, Nina; Friedrich, Manfred; Petersen, Silvia; Scheglmann, Dietrich; Douroumis, Dennis; Plass, Winfried; Fahr, Alfred

    2011-06-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of membrane-softening components (terpenes/terpene mixtures, ethanol) on fluidity of phospholipid membranes in invasomes, which contain besides phosphatidylcholine and water, also ethanol and terpenes. Also mTHPC was incorporated into invasomes in order to study its molecular interaction with phospholipids in vesicular membranes. Fluidity of bilayers was investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) using spin labels 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acid and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Addition of 1% of a single terpene/terpene mixture led to significant fluidity increase around the C16 atom of phospholipid acyl chains comprising the vesicles. However, it was not possible to differentiate between the influences of single terpenes or terpene mixtures. Incorporation of mTHPC into the bilayer of vesicles decreased fluidity near the C16 atom of acyl chains, indicating its localization in the inner hydrophobic zone of bilayers. These results are in agreement with DSC measurements, which showed that terpenes increased fluidity of bilayers, while mTHPC decreased fluidity. Thus, invasomes represent vesicles with very high membrane fluidity. However, no direct correlation between fluidity of invasomes and their penetration enhancing ability was found, indicating that besides fluidity also other phenomena might be responsible for improved skin delivery of mTHPC.

  4. Effects of C18 Fatty Acids on Intracellular Ca(2+) Mobilization and Histamine Release in RBL-2H3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Chul; Kim, Min Gyu; Jo, Young Soo; Song, Ho Sun; Eom, Tae In; Sim, Sang Soo

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the underlying mechanisms of C18 fatty acids (stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid) on mast cells, we measured the effect of C18 fatty acids on intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and histamine release in RBL-2H3 mast cells. Stearic acid rapidly increased initial peak of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, whereas linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid gradually increased this mobilization. In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), stearic acid (100 µM) did not cause any increase of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. Both linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid increased intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, but the increase was smaller than that in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+). These results suggest that C18 fatty acid-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization is mainly dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Verapamil dose-dependently inhibited stearic acid-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, but did not affect both linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. These data suggest that the underlying mechanism of stearic acid, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid on intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization may differ. Linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid significantly increased histamine release. Linoleic acid (C18:2: ω-6)-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and histamine release were more prominent than α-linolenic acid (C18:3: ω-3). These data support the view that the intake of more α-linolenic acid than linoleic acid is useful in preventing inflammation.

  5. Effects of C18 Fatty Acids on Intracellular Ca2+ Mobilization and Histamine Release in RBL-2H3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Chul; Kim, Min Gyu; Jo, Young Soo; Song, Ho Sun; Eom, Tae In

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the underlying mechanisms of C18 fatty acids (stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid) on mast cells, we measured the effect of C18 fatty acids on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and histamine release in RBL-2H3 mast cells. Stearic acid rapidly increased initial peak of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, whereas linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid gradually increased this mobilization. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, stearic acid (100 µM) did not cause any increase of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Both linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid increased intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, but the increase was smaller than that in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. These results suggest that C18 fatty acid-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization is mainly dependent on extracellular Ca2+ influx. Verapamil dose-dependently inhibited stearic acid-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, but did not affect both linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. These data suggest that the underlying mechanism of stearic acid, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization may differ. Linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid significantly increased histamine release. Linoleic acid (C18:2: ω-6)-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and histamine release were more prominent than α-linolenic acid (C18:3: ω-3). These data support the view that the intake of more α-linolenic acid than linoleic acid is useful in preventing inflammation. PMID:24976764

  6. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... produce fatty acid methyl esters, which then undergo conjugation to yield methyl esters of octadecadienoic... contain not less than 35 percent of other fatty acid esters composed of oleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic... the feed of growing and finishing swine as a source of fatty acids at levels not to exceed 0.6% in...

  7. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... produce fatty acid methyl esters, which then undergo conjugation to yield methyl esters of octadecadienoic... contain not less than 35 percent of other fatty acid esters composed of oleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic... the feed of growing and finishing swine as a source of fatty acids at levels not to exceed 0.6% in...

  8. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... contain not less than 35 percent of other fatty acid esters composed of oleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic acids). 573.637 Section 573.637 Food and Drugs FOOD...

  9. Oleic acid prevents detrimental effects of saturated fatty acids on bovine oocyte developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Aardema, Hilde; Vos, Peter L A M; Lolicato, Francesca; Roelen, Bernard A J; Knijn, Hiemke M; Vaandrager, Arie B; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2011-07-01

    Mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue during metabolic stress will increase the amount of free fatty acids in blood and follicular fluid and, thus, may affect oocyte quality. In this in vitro study, the three predominant fatty acids in follicular fluid (saturated palmitic and stearic acid and unsaturated oleic acid) were presented to maturing oocytes to test whether fatty acids can affect lipid storage of the oocyte and developmental competence postfertilization. Palmitic and stearic acid had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the amount of fat stored in lipid droplets and a concomitant detrimental effect on oocyte developmental competence. Oleic acid, in contrast, had the opposite effect, causing an increase of lipid storage in lipid droplets and an improvement of oocyte developmental competence. Remarkably, the adverse effects of palmitic and stearic acid could be counteracted by oleic acid. These results suggest that the ratio and amount of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid is relevant for lipid storage in the maturing oocyte and that this relates to the developmental competence of maturing oocytes.

  10. Genotyping-by-sequencing-based investigation of the genetic architecture responsible for a ~sevenfold increase in soybean seed stearic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil is highly unsaturated and oxidatively unstable, rendering it non-ideal for most food applications. Until recently, the majority of soybean oil underwent partial chemical hydrogenation, a process which produces trans fats as an unavoidable consequence. Dietary intake of trans fat and most...

  11. Inactivation of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. by palmitic, stearic and oleic acid sophorolipids and thiamine dilauryl sulfate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food contaminated with human pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes, frequently causes outbreaks of foodborne illness. Consumer concern over the use of synthesized antimicrobials to enhance microbial food safety has led to a search of natural alternatives. The objectives of th...

  12. Determination of long chain fatty acids in anaerobic digesters using a rapid non-derivatisation GC-FID method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Banks, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    A rapid non-derivatisation gas chromatographic (GC) method for quantification of palmitic, stearic and oleic acids was achieved using a flame ionisation detector and a highly polar capillary column at elevated temperature. These long chain fatty acids (LCFA) can accumulate in anaerobic digesters and a simple extraction method was also developed to permit a more rapid sample turn-around time, facilitating more frequent monitoring. The GC method was satisfactory in terms of peak separation, signal response, reproducibility and linearity range. The extraction method achieved recoveries of 103.8, 127.2 and 84.2% for palmitic, stearic and oleic acid respectively. The method was tested on digestate from mesophilic laboratory-scale digesters fed with source-segregated domestic food waste, and showed good repeatability between replicate samples. It was observed that the concentrations of stearic and palmitic acid in digesters routinely supplemented with trace elements were lower in proportion to the applied lipid loading than those without supplementation.

  13. [Fatty acids profile characterization of white maize hybrids grown in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Alezones, Jesús; Avila, Manuel; Chassaigne, Alberto; Barrientos, Venancio

    2010-12-01

    In Venezuela, white corn is the most important crop regarding production, harvest area and consumption. One of its main by-products is corn oil, whose positive effect on health caused by the high content of unsaturated fatty acids has been widely recognized. In order to characterize the fatty acids profile of twelve white grained maize hybrids extensively grown in Venezuela, and the effect that divergent localities has on this profile, three semi commercial scale trials where established in Portuguesa, Yaracuy and Guárico states. Proportions of the main fatty acids in the raw oil of the different grain samples were determined using gas chromatography. Significant differences (p < 0,01) between hybrids were found for arachidic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, gadoleic and linoleic acids; non significant differences were found for linolenic acid. Significant differences between localities were found for all the fatty acids evaluated. High and significant correlations between fatty acids content were found; the most important relations were: linoleic-oleic (Rho = -0,98**), arachidic-palmitic (Rho = -0,61**), linoleic-stearic (Rho = -0,61**) and oleic-stearic (Rho = 0,58**). Corn produced in Venezuela presents lower levels of linoleic and higher levels of palmitic, stearic and oleic acids than the levels found in temperate corn. These differences involve significant changes in the nutritional properties of Venezuelan corn oil that should be considered in the development of new cultivars and industrial processes for oil production.

  14. Cellular differentiation and I-FABP protein expression modulate fatty acid uptake and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Atshaves, B P; Foxworth, W B; Frolov, A; Roths, J B; Kier, A B; Oetama, B K; Piedrahita, J A; Schroeder, F

    1998-03-01

    The effect of cellular differentiation on fatty acid uptake and intracellular diffusion was examined in transfected pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells stably expressing intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP). Control ES cells, whether differentiated or undifferentiated, did not express I-FABP. The initial rate and maximal uptake of the fluorescent fatty acid, 12-(N-methyl)-N-[(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-octadec anoic acid (NBD-stearic acid), was measured in single cells by kinetic digital fluorescence imaging. I-FABP expression in undifferentiated ES cells increased the initial rate and maximal uptake of NBD-stearic acid 1.7- and 1.6-fold, respectively, as well as increased its effective intracellular diffusion constant (Deff) 1.8-fold as measured by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. In contrast, ES cell differentiation decreased I-FABP expression up to 3-fold and decreased the NBD-stearic acid initial rate of uptake, maximal uptake, and Deff by 10-, 4.7-, and 2-fold, respectively. There were no significant differences in these parameters between the differentiated control and differentiated I-FABP-expressing ES cell lines. In summary, differentiation and expression of I-FABP oppositely modulated NBD-stearic acid uptake parameters and intracellular diffusion in ES cells.

  15. Process strategies to maximize lipid accumulations of novel yeast in acid and base treated hydrolyzates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleaginous yeasts can accumulate up to 70% of cell biomass as lipids, predominantly as triacylglycerols. Yeast lipid fatty acid profiles have been reported to be similar to that of vegetable oils and consist primarily of oleic, palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids. This capability provides the oppo...

  16. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of starch microencapsulated fatty acids as phase change materials thermal energy storage applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable starch-oil composites can be prepared from renewable resources by excess steam jet-cooking aqueous slurries of starch and vegetable oils or other hydrophobic materials. Fatty acids such as stearic acid are promising phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage applica...

  17. [Determination of fatty acids and organic acids in Ranunculus ternatus Thunb using GC-MS].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Cheng; Xia, Li-Ming; Ouyang, Ping-Kai

    2006-08-01

    The determination of fatty acids and organic acids in Chinese medicinal plant Ranunculus ternatus Thunb using GC-MS was studied. The Ranunculus ternatus Thunb from Henan province was cut into less than 20 mesh pieces, then extracted by petroleum ether or ether in refluxing and esteried, and finally was determined using GC-MS. The results show that there are 23 kinds of organic compounds in the Chinese medicinal plant Ranunculus ternatus Thunb from Henan, among which 15 kinds of fatty acids were identified, including myristic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linolenic acid, eicosanoic acid, docosanoic acid etc. The unsaturated fatty acids and oleic acid account for 58.19% and 35.68% of the total organic compounds respectively. The kinds of fatty acid in petroleum ether extract and ether extract are the same.

  18. Deletions of the SACPD-C locus elevate seed stearic acid levels but also result in fatty acid and morphological alterations in nitrogen fixing nodules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean (Glycine max) seeds are the primary source of edible oil in the United States. Despite its widespread utility, soybean oil is oxidatively unstable. Until recently, the majority of soybean oil underwent chemical hydrogenation, a process which generates trans fats. An alternative to chemical h...

  19. Preparation of five 3-MCPD fatty acid esters and the effects of their chemical structures on acute oral toxicity in Swiss mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid esters of 3-monochloro-1, 2-propanediol (3-MCPDEs), including 1-stearic, 1-oleic, 1-linoleic, 1-linoleic-2-palmitic and 1-palmitic-2-linoleic acid esters, were synthetized and examined for their acute oral toxicities in Swiss mice. 3-MCPDEs were obtained through the reaction of 3-MCPD and...

  20. Deficits in docosahexaenoic acid and associated elevations in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and saturated fatty acids in the postmortem orbitofrontal cortex of patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Stanford, Kevin E; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Richtand, Neil M

    2008-09-30

    Previous antemortem and postmortem tissue fatty acid composition studies have observed significant deficits in the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cell (RBC) and postmortem cortical membranes of patients with unipolar depression. In the present study, we determined the fatty acid composition of postmortem orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, Brodmann area 10) of patients with bipolar disorder (n=18) and age-matched normal controls (n=19) by gas chromatography. After correction for multiple comparisons, DHA (-24%), arachidonic acid (-14%), and stearic acid (C18:0) (-4.5%) compositions were significantly lower, and cis-vaccenic acid (18:1n-7) (+12.5%) composition significantly higher, in the OFC of bipolar patients relative to normal controls. Based on metabolite:precursor ratios, significant elevations in arachidonic acid, stearic acid, and palmitic acid conversion/metabolism were observed in the OFC of bipolar patients, and were inversely correlated with DHA composition. Deficits in OFC DHA and arachidonic acid composition, and elevations in arachidonic acid metabolism, were numerically (but not significantly) greater in drug-free bipolar patients relative to patients treated with mood-stabilizer or antipsychotic medications. OFC DHA and arachidonic acid deficits were greater in patients plus normal controls with high vs. low alcohol abuse severity. These results add to a growing body of evidence implicating omega-3 fatty acid deficiency as well as the OFC in the pathoaetiology of bipolar disorder.

  1. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV) envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Virus envelope was isolated from Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus, produced in early fourth-instar larvae. Both polar and neutral lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Fatty acid composition of various individual neutral and polar lipids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The major components of envelope neutral lipid were diacylglycerols. Palmitic acid and stearic acid were the major saturated fatty acids in both polar and neutral lipids. Whereas palmitoleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acids in neutral lipids, oleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acid in the polar lipids.

  2. Fatty acid composition of seeds of some species of Nepeta L.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, Turgut; Dirmenci, Tuncay; Gören, Ahmet C

    2007-05-01

    The fatty acid compositions of Nepeta viscida, N. cilicica, N. crinita, N. nuda ssp. glandulifera and N. aristata were analyzed by GC/MS. The main free fatty acids were found as linolenic acid (49.8-58.5%), linoleic acid (10.9-23.5%), oleic acid (11.5-19.2%), palmitic acid (5.2-6.8%) and stearic acid (2.0-3.7%) and, total fatty acid compositions of species were analyzed and results were found as 36.2-49.8%, 17.1-25.8%, 15.4-25.8%, 6.4-7.8%, and 2.7-4.1%, respectively.

  3. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  4. Localization of fatty acids with selective chain length by imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Nygren, Håkan; Malmberg, Per; Hagenhoff, Birgit

    2007-07-01

    Localization of fatty acids in biological tissues was made by using TOF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry). Two cell-types with a specific fatty acid distribution are shown. In rat cerebellum, different distribution patterns of stearic acid (C18:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), and oleic acid (C18:1) were found. Stearic acid signals were observed accumulated in Purkinje cells with high intensities inside the cell, but not in the nucleus region. The signals colocalized with high intensity signals of the phosphocholine head group, indicating origin from phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin. In mouse intestine, high palmitic acid signals were found in the secretory crypt cells together with high levels of phosphorylinositol colocalized in the crypt region. Palmitic acid was also seen in the intestinal lumen that contains high amounts of mucine, which is known to be produced in the crypt cells. Linoleic acid signals (C18:2) were low in the crypt region and high in the villus region. Oleic acid signals were seen in the villi and stearic acid signals were ubiquitous with no specific localization in the intestine. We conclude that the results obtained by using imaging TOF-SIMS are consistent with known brain and intestine biochemistry and that the localization of fatty acids is specific in differentiated cells.

  5. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-01-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%. PMID:27292280

  6. A Comparative Spin-Label Study of Isolated Plasma Membranes and Plasma Membranes of Whole Cells and Protoplasts from Cold-Hardened and Nonhardened Winter Rye

    PubMed Central

    Windle, John J.

    1988-01-01

    Lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions in the plasma membranes of whole cells and protoplasts and an isolated plasma membrane fraction from winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Puma) have been studied by spin labeling. Spectra were recorded between −40°C and 40°C using the freely diffusing spin-label, 16-doxyl stearic acid, as a midbilayer membrane probe. The probe was reduced by the whole cells and protoplasts and reoxidized by external potassium ferricyanide. The reoxidized probe was assumed to be localized in the plasma membrane. The spectra consisted of the superposition of a narrow and a broad component indicating that both fluid and immobilized lipids were present in the plasma membrane. The two components were separated by digital subtraction of the immobilized component. Temperature profiles of the membranes were developed using the percentage of immobilized lipid present at each temperature and the separation between the outermost hyperfine lines for the fluid lipid component. Lipid immobilization was attributed to lipid-protein interactions, lipid-cell wall interactions, and temperature-induced lipid phase transitions to the gel-state. Temperature profiles were compared for both cold-hardened and nonhardened protoplasts, plasma membranes, and plasma membrane lipids, respectively. Although cold-hardening extended the range of lipid fluidity by 5°C, it had no effect on lipid-protein interactions or activation energies of lipid mobility. Differences were found, however, between the temperature profiles for the different samples, suggesting that alterations in the plasma membrane occurred as a consequence of the isolation methods used. PMID:16666471

  7. The influence of saturated fatty acids on complex index and in vitro digestibility of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Soong, Yean Yean; Goh, Hui Jen; Henry, C Jeya K

    2013-08-01

    In Asia, rice and rice products are the main sources of carbohydrate contributing to both dietary energy and glycaemic load. It is known that complexation of starch with lipids could potentially reduce the availability of starch to enzymatic degradation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of capric, lauric, myristic, palmitic and stearic acids, ranging from 0 to 2 mmol/g starch, on complexing index and in vitro digestibility of gelatinized rice starch. The results revealed that the ability of rice starch to complex with saturated fatty acids increased with increasing concentration; but reduced with increasing lipid chain length. The complexation of rice starch with capric, lauric, myristic and stearic acids did not reduce the in vitro starch digestibility, except rice starch-palmitic acid complexes.

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid-induced amelioration on impairment of memory learning in amyloid beta-infused rats relates to the decreases of amyloid beta and cholesterol levels in detergent-insoluble membrane fractions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio; Hossain, Shahdat; Agdul, Haqu; Shido, Osamu

    2005-12-30

    We investigated the effects of dietary administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3) on the levels of amyloid beta (A beta) peptide (1-40) and cholesterol in the nonionic detergent Triton 100 x-insoluble membrane fractions (DIFs) of the cerebral cortex and, also, on learning-related memory in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats infused with A beta peptide (1-40) into the cerebral ventricle. The infusion increased the levels of A beta peptide and cholesterol in the DIFs concurrently with a significant increase in reference memory errors (measured by eight-arm radial-maze tasks) compared with those of vehicle rats. Conversely, the dietary administration of DHA to AD-model rats decreased the levels of A beta peptide and cholesterol in the DIFs, with the decrease being more prominent in the DHA-administered rats. Regression analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between A beta peptide and each of cholesterol, palmitic acid and stearic acid, and between the number of reference memory errors and each of cholesterol, palmitic, stearic and oleic acid; moreover, a significant negative correlation was observed between the number of reference memory errors and the molar ratio of DHA to palmitic plus stearic acid. These results suggest that DHA-induced protection of memory deficits in AD-model rats is related to the interactions of cholesterol, palmitic acid or stearic acid with A beta peptides in DIFs where DHA ameliorates these interactions.

  9. Fatty Acid Compositions of Six Wild Edible Mushroom Species

    PubMed Central

    Günç Ergönül, Pelin; Akata, Ilgaz; Kalyoncu, Fatih; Ergönül, Bülent

    2013-01-01

    The fatty acids of six wild edible mushroom species (Boletus reticulatus, Flammulina velutipes var. velutipes, Lactarius salmonicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus, Polyporus squamosus, and Russula anthracina) collected from different regions from Anatolia were determined. The fatty acids were identified and quantified by gas chromatography and studied using fruit bodies. Fatty acid composition varied among species. The dominant fatty acid in fruit bodies of all mushrooms was cis-linoleic acid (18 : 2). Percentage of cis-linoleic acid in species varied from 22.39% to 65.29%. The other major fatty acids were, respectively, cis-oleic, palmitic, and stearic acids. Fatty acids analysis of the mushrooms showed that the unsaturated fatty acids were at higher concentrations than saturated fatty acids. PMID:23844377

  10. Films prepared from poly(vinyl alcohol) and amylose-fatty acid salt inclusion complexes with increased surface hydrophobicity and high elongation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, water-soluble amylose-inclusion complexes were prepared from high amylose corn starch and sodium salts of lauric, palmitic, and stearic acid by steam jet cooking. Cast films were prepared by combining the amylose complexes with poly(vinyl alcohol)(PVOH) solution at ratios varying from...

  11. Identification of fatty acids in canine seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Díaz, R; Inostroza, K; Risopatrón, J; Sanchez, R; Sepúlveda, N

    2014-03-01

    Seminal plasma contains various biochemical components associated with sperm function. However, there is limited information regarding the fatty acid composition of seminal plasma and their effect on sperm. The aim of this study was to identify the fatty acid content in canine seminal plasma using gas chromatography. Twelve ejaculates were studied, the seminal plasma was obtained by centrifugation and then the lipids were extracted, methylated and analysed by chromatography. The total lipids in the seminal plasma were 2.5 ± 0.3%, corresponding to 85% saturated fatty acids (SFA) and 15% unsaturated fatty acids (UFA). The greatest proportions of SFA were palmitic acid (30.4%), stearic acid (23.4%) and myristic acid (5.3%) and of UFA oleic acid (9.0%). Therefore, the protocols and techniques used enabled the identification of 18 different fatty acids in canine seminal plasma, which constitutes a good method to evaluate and quantify the fatty acid profile in this species.

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Long-Chain Fatty Acids on Biogas Production and the Protective Effect of Membrane Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Dasa, Kris Triwulan; Westman, Supansa Y.; Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur; Niklasson, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of lipid-containing wastes for biogas production is often hampered by the inhibitory effect of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). In this study, the inhibitory effects of LCFAs (palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid) on biogas production as well as the protective effect of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) against LCFAs were examined in thermophilic batch digesters. The results showed that palmitic and oleic acid with concentrations of 3.0 and 4.5 g/L resulted in >50% inhibition on the biogas production, while stearic acid had an even stronger inhibitory effect. The encased cells in the MBR system were able to perform better in the presence of LCFAs. This system exhibited a significantly lower percentage of inhibition than the free cell system, not reaching over 50% at any LCFA concentration tested. PMID:27699172

  13. Self-assembly of fatty acids and hydroxyl derivative salts.

    PubMed

    Novales, Bruno; Navailles, Laurence; Axelos, Monique; Nallet, Frédéric; Douliez, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    We report the dispersions of a fatty acid and hydroxyl derivative salts in aqueous solutions that were further used to produce foams and emulsions. The tetrabutyl-ammonium salts of palmitic acid, 12-hydroxy stearic acid, and omega-hydroxy palmitic acid formed isotropic solutions of micelles, whereas the ethanolamine salts of the same acids formed turbid birefringent lamellar solutions. The structure and dimension of those phases were confirmed by small-angle neutron scattering and NMR. Micelles exhibited a surprisingly small radius of about 20 A, even for hydroxyl fatty acids, suggesting the formation of hydrogen bonds between lipids in the core of the micelles. In the case of ethanolamine salts of palmitic and 12-hydroxy stearic acids, the lipids were arranged in bilayers, with a phase transition from gel to fluid upon heating, whereas for omega-hydroxy palmitic acid, monolayers formed in accordance with the bola shape of this lipid. Foams and emulsions produced from ethanolamine salt solutions were more stable than those obtained from tetrabutyl-ammonium salt solutions. We discuss these results in terms of counterion size, lipid molecular shape, and membrane curvature.

  14. Bilayers at High pH in the Fatty Acid Soap Systems and the Applications for the Formation of Foams and Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenlong; Zhang, Heng; Zhong, Yingping; Jiang, Liwen; Xu, Mengxin; Zhu, Xionglu; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-08-20

    In our previous work, we reported bilayers at high pH in the stearic acid/CsOH/H2O system, which was against the traditional viewpoint that fatty acid (FA) bilayers must be formed at the pKa of the fatty acid. Herein, the microstructures at high pH of several fatty acid soap systems were investigated systematically. We found that palmitic acid/KOH/H2O, palmitic acid/CsOH/H2O, stearic acid/KOH/H2O, and stearic acid/CsOH/H2O systems can form bilayers at high pH. The bilayer structure was demonstrated by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR), and molecular dynamics simulation was used to confirm the formation of bilayers. The influence of fatty acids with different chain lengths (n = 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18) and different counterions including Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Cs(+), (CH3)4N(+), (C2H5)4N(+), (C3H7)4N(+), and (C4H9)4N(+) on the formation of bilayers was discussed. The stability of foam and emulsification properties were compared between bilayers and micelles, drawing the conclusion that bilayer structures possess a much stronger ability to foam and stronger emulsification properties than micelles do.

  15. Inhibitory Effect of Oleic Acid on Octanoylated Ghrelin Production.

    PubMed

    Oiso, Shigeru; Nobe, Miyuki; Iwasaki, Syuhei; Nii, Wakana; Goto, Natsumi; Seki, Yukari; Nakajima, Kensuke; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kariyazono, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone-releasing peptide that also displays orexigenic activity. Since serine-3 acylation with octanoylate (octanoylation) is essential for the orexigenic activity of ghrelin, suppression of octanoylation could lead to amelioration or prevention of obesity. To enable the exploration of inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production, we developed a cell-based assay system using AGS-GHRL8 cells, in which octanoylated ghrelin concentration increases in the presence of octanoic acid. Using this assay system, we investigated whether fatty acids contained in foods or oils, such as acetic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and α-linolenic acid, have inhibitory effects on octanoylated ghrelin production. Acetic acid did not suppress the increase in octanoylated ghrelin production in AGS-GHRL8 cells, which was induced by the addition of octanoic acid. However, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and α-linolenic acid significantly suppressed octanoylated ghrelin production, with the effect of oleic acid being the strongest. Additionally, oleic acid decreased the serum concentration of octanoylated ghrelin in mice. The serum concentration of des-acyl ghrelin (without acyl modification) was also decreased, but the decrease was smaller than that of octanoylated ghrelin. Decreased octanoylated ghrelin production likely resulted from post-translational ghrelin processing, as there were no significant differences in gene expression in the stomach between oleic acid-treated mice and controls. These results suggest that oleic acid is a potential inhibitor of octanoylated ghrelin production and that our assay system is a valuable tool for screening compounds with suppressive effects on octanoylated ghrelin production.

  16. Differential fatty acid selection during biosynthetic S-acylation of a transmembrane protein (HEF) and other proteins in insect cells (Sf9) and in mammalian cells (CV1).

    PubMed

    Reverey, H; Veit, M; Ponimaskin, E; Schmidt, M F

    1996-09-27

    The transmembrane glycoprotein HEF and its acylation deficient mutant M1 were expressed in Sf9 insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus and in CV1 mammalian cells using the vaccinia T7 system. In insect cells (Sf9), both wild type HEF and HEF(M1) are synthesized in their precursor form HEF0, which appears as a double band in SDS gels. Digestion with glycopeptidase F and endoglycosidase H reveals that the larger 84-kDa form is modified by the attachment of unprocessed carbohydrates of the high mannose type whereas the smaller 76-kDa form is non-glycosylated. As revealed by in vitro labeling experiments with palmitic acid another modification of HEF is the attachment of a long chain fatty acid to cysteine residue Cys-652 which is located at the internal border of the cytoplasmic membrane. After labeling with [3H]palmitic acid in both systems only HEF(WT) is acylated, whereas HEF(M1) is not. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of the fatty acids bound to HEF(WT) expressed in Sf9 insect cells reveals nearly 80% of palmitic acid. In contrast to this finding, the acylation pattern of HEF expressed in CV1 cells shows nearly the same amounts of stearic and palmitic acid (40%). Since the interconversion of the input [3H]palmitic acid to stearic acid is even lower in CV1 cells than in insect cells, it follows that only HEF expressed in mammalian, but not in insect cells selects for stearic acid during its biosynthetic acylation. We extended our study to acylation of endogenous proteins in Sf9 cells. In finding only palmitate linked to protein we present evidence that, in contrast to mammalian cells, insect cells (Sf9) cannot transfer stearic acid to polypeptide. This finding favors the hypothesis of enzymatic acylation over non-enzymatic mechanisms of acyl transfer to protein.

  17. Labile aggregation stimulating substance, free fatty acids, and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, J M; White, J G; Krivit, W

    1976-01-01

    Labile aggregation stimulating substance (LASS), an intermediate produced during platelet biosynthesis of PGE2 and PGF2alpha, acts as a physiologic intercellular messenger to promote platelet aggregation and the release reaction. The activity is formed by intact cells after physiologic stimulation or can be generated from platelet membrane fractions after combination with arachidonate. In the present investigation, small amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids added to an incubation mixture of platelet microsomes and arachidonate were found to significantly inhibit subsequent platelet aggregation. Saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the same concentrations were without effect. However, in higher concentrations mono-unsaturated fatty acids were found to be inhibitory and stearic acid was found to enhance subsequent platelet aggregation. The inhibition caused by the polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleate, was shown to be the result of an effect on the production of LASS through an interaction with the platelet enzyme responsible for conversion of arachidonate to LASS. In contrast, stearic acid was found to enhance platelet aggregation by acting on the platelets and not directly on LASS production. The results suggest that small changes in the fatty acid composition of platelet phospholipids could significantly influence platelet reactivity.

  18. An investigation into the mechanisms of drug release from taste-masking fatty acid microspheres.

    PubMed

    Qi, Sheng; Deutsch, David; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2008-09-01

    Fatty acid microspheres based on stearic and palmitic acids are known to form effective taste masking systems, although the mechanisms by which the drug is preferentially released in the lower gastrointestinal tract are not known. The objective of the present study was to identify the mechanisms involved, with a particular view to clarify the role of acid soap formation in the dissolution process. Microspheres were prepared by a spray chilling process. Using benzoic acid as a model drug and an alkaline dissolution medium, a faster drug release was observed in the mixed fatty acid formulation (50:50 stearic:palmitic acid (w/w)) compared to the single fatty acid component systems. Thermal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicated a greater degree of acid soap formation for the mixed formulation in alkaline media compared to the single fatty acid systems. Particle size and porosity studies indicated a modest reduction in size for the mixed systems and an increase in porosity on immersion in the dissolution medium. It is proposed that the mixed fatty acid system form a mixed crystal system which in turn facilitates interaction with the dissolution medium, thereby leading to a greater propensity for acid soap formation which in turn forms a permeable liquid crystalline phase through which the drug may diffuse. The role of dissolution of palmitic acid into the dissolution medium is also discussed as a secondary mechanism.

  19. The solubilization of fatty acids in systems based on block copolymers and nonionic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirgorodskaya, A. B.; Yatskevich, E. I.; Zakharova, L. Ya.

    2010-12-01

    The solubilizing action of micellar, microemulsion, and polymer-colloid systems formed on the basis of biologically compatible amphiphilic polymers and nonionic surfactants on capric, lauric, palmitic, and stearic acids was characterized quantitatively. Systems based on micelle forming oxyethyl compounds increased the solubility of fatty acids by more than an order of magnitude. Acid molecules incorporated into micelles increased their size and caused structural changes. Solubilization was accompanied by complete or partial destruction of intrinsic acid associates and an increase in their p K a by 1.5-2 units compared with water.

  20. [Raman spectrometry of several saturated fatty acids and their salts].

    PubMed

    Luo, Man; Guan, Ping; Liu, Wen-hui; Liu, Yan

    2006-11-01

    Saturated fatty acids and their salts widely exist in the nature, and they are well known as important chemical materials. Their infrared spectra have been studied in detail. Nevertheless, few works on the Raman spectra characteristics of saturated fatty acids and their salts have been published before. Man-made crystals of acetic acid, stearic acid, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, calcium stearate and magnesium stearate were investigated by means of Fourier transform Raman spectrometry for purpose of realizing their Raman spectra. Positive ions can cause the distinctions between the spectra of saturated fatty acids and their salts. The differences in mass and configuration between Ca2+ and Mg2+ result in the Raman spectra's diversity between calcium and magnesium salts of saturated fatty acids. Meanwhile, it is considered that the long carbon chain weakened the influence of different positive ions on the salts of saturated fatty acids.

  1. Daily pattern of some fatty acids in the athletic horse.

    PubMed

    Piccione, G; Assenza, A; Borruso, M; Fazio, F; Caola, G

    2009-02-01

    In the sport field, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) are important for the physical performance during the aerobic exercise of short intensity and long duration. In man, rat, goat and in the sedentary horse studies on the chronometabolism showed the presence of a circadian rhythm of the plasmatic concentration of NEFA while data for the athletic horse are lacking. To define a chronogram helpful for a specific planning and the differentiation of the training programmme in the athletic horse, the circadian pattern of some fatty acids (NEFA, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids) was studied in five Sella Italiana horses. These horses trained following a daily model of activity consisting of walk, trot, gallop and jump of obstacles of different heights. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein every 4 h, starting at 08:00 hours, for 2 days to assess the concentrations of total NEFA (by spectrophotometry), palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids (by gas chromatography). anova for repeated measures showed a statistical significant effect of the time of the day in NEFA, oleic and linolenic acids. The application of the periodic model showed the periodic pattern of NEFA, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids. Acrophases were in the afternoon for all parameters. The results obtained showed a different trend of the circadian pattern of the studied parameters in the athletic horse than in the sedentary one because the physical activity and the post-prandial metabolism acted as zeitgebers.

  2. Analysis of sterols and fatty acids in natural and cultured Cordyceps by one-step derivatization followed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, F Q; Feng, K; Zhao, J; Li, S P

    2009-07-12

    Ten free fatty acids namely lauric acid, myristic acid, pentadecanoic acid, palmitoleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, stearic acid, docosanoic acid and lignoceric acid and four free sterols including ergosterol, cholesterol, campesterol and beta-sitosterol in natural (wild) Cordyceps sinensis, Cordyceps liangshanensis and Cordyceps gunnii, as well as cultured C. sinensis and Cordyceps militaris were first determined using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatization and GC-MS analysis. The conditions such as the amount of reagent, temperature and time for TMS derivatization of analytes were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, all calibration curves showed good linearity within the tested ranges. The intra- and inter-day variations for 14 investigated compounds were less than 3.4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results showed that palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, stearic acid and ergosterol are main components in natural and cultured Cordyceps which could be discriminated by hierarchical clustering analysis based on the contents of 14 investigated compounds or the 4 fatty acids, where the contents of palmitic acid and oleic acid in natural Cordyceps are significantly higher than those in the cultured ones.

  3. Palladium Catalysts for Fatty Acid Deoxygenation: Influence of the Support and Fatty Acid Chain Length on Decarboxylation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, JP; Immer, JG; Lamb, HH

    2012-03-29

    Supported metal catalysts containing 5 wt% Pd on silica, alumina, and activated carbon were evaluated for liquid-phase deoxygenation of stearic (octadecanoic), lauric (dodecanoic), and capric (decanoic) acids under 5 % H-2 at 300 A degrees C and 15 atm. On-line quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was used to measure CO + CO2 yield, CO2 selectivity, H-2 consumption, and initial decarboxylation rate. Post-reaction analysis of liquid products by gas chromatography was used to determine n-alkane yields. The Pd/C catalyst was highly active and selective for stearic acid (SA) decarboxylation under these conditions. In contrast, SA deoxygenation over Pd/SiO2 occurred primarily via decarbonylation and at a much slower rate. Pd/Al2O3 exhibited high initial SA decarboxylation activity but deactivated under the test conditions. Similar CO2 selectivity patterns among the catalysts were observed for deoxygenation of lauric and capric acids; however, the initial decarboxylation rates tended to be lower for these substrates. The influence of alkyl chain length on deoxygenation kinetics was investigated for a homologous series of C-10-C-18 fatty acids using the Pd/C catalyst. As fatty acid carbon number decreases, reaction time and H-2 consumption increase, and CO2 selectivity and initial decarboxylation rate decrease. The increase in initial decarboxylation rates for longer chain fatty acids is attributed to their greater propensity for adsorption on the activated carbon support.

  4. [Effect of the B-group vitamin complex on the blood content of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Vodoevich, V P; Buko, V U

    1986-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography was used to study the blood content of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, under the influence of the functionally-associated vitamin-B complex, in 45 patients with coronary heart disease and essential hypertension. The vitamins were given daily in the following doses: thiamine diphosphate 50 mg, riboflavine 40 mg, calcium pantothenate 200 mg, nicotinic acid 200 mg and lipoic acid 50 mg. Favourable shifts leading to positive clinical effects were recorded in the fatty acid metabolism after 10-day taking the vitamin-B complex: the content of unsaturated (linoleic and arachidonic) fatty acids increased while that of saturated (stearic and palmitic) fatty acids decreased.

  5. Evaluation of fatty acid and amino acid compositions in okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) grown in different geographical locations.

    PubMed

    Sami, Rokayya; Lianzhou, Jiang; Yang, Li; Ma, Ying; Jing, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Okra has different uses as a food and a remedy in traditional medicine. Since it produces many seeds, distribution of the plant is also quite easy. Although seed oil yield is low (4.7%), since the linoleic acid composition of the seed oil is quiet high (67.5%), it can still be used as a source of (UNSAT) unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, samples of okra grown in four different locations were analyzed to measure fatty acid and amino acid compositions. The content of the lipid extraction ranged from 4.34% to 4.52% on a dry weight basis. Quantitatively, the main okra fatty acids were palmitic acid (29.18-43.26%), linoleic acid (32.22-43.07%), linolenic acid (6.79-12.34%), stearic acid (6.36-7.73%), oleic acid (4.31-6.98%), arachidic acid (ND-3.48%), margaric acid (1.44-2.16%), pentadecylic acid (0.63-0.92%), and myristic acid (0.21-0.49%). Aspartic acid, proline, and glutamic acids were the main amino acids in okra pods, while cysteine and tyrosine were the minor amino acids. Statistical methods revealed how the fatty acid and amino acid contents in okra may be affected by the sampling location.

  6. Serum Paraoxonase 1 Activity Is Associated with Fatty Acid Composition of High Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Boshtam, Maryam; Pourfarzam, Morteza; Ani, Mohsen; Naderi, Gholam Ali; Basati, Gholam; Mansourian, Marjan; Dinani, Narges Jafari; Asgary, Seddigheh; Abdi, Soheila

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cardioprotective effect of high density lipoprotein (HDL) is, in part, dependent on its related enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (PON1). Fatty acid composition of HDL could affect its size and structure. On the other hand, PON1 activity is directly related to the structure of HDL. This study was designed to investigate the association between serum PON1 activity and fatty acid composition of HDL in healthy men. Methods. One hundred and forty healthy men participated in this research. HDL was separated by sequential ultracentrifugation, and its fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography. PON1 activity was measured spectrophotometrically using paraxon as substrate. Results. Serum PON1 activity was directly correlated with the amount of stearic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA). PON1/HDL-C was directly correlated with the amount of miristic acid, stearic acid, and DGLA and was inversely correlated with total amount of ω6 fatty acids of HDL. Conclusion. The fatty acid composition of HDL could affect the activity of its associated enzyme, PON1. As dietary fats are the major determinants of serum lipids and lipoprotein composition, consuming some special dietary fatty acids may improve the activity of PON1 and thereby have beneficial effects on health. PMID:24167374

  7. Milk fat globules: fatty acid composition, size and in vivo regulation of fat liquidity.

    PubMed

    Timmen, H; Patton, S

    1988-07-01

    Populations of large and small milk fat globules were isolated and analyzed to determine differences in fatty acid composition. Globule samples were obtained by centrifugation from milks of a herd and of individual animals produced under both pasture and barn feeding. Triacylglycerols of total globule lipids were prepared by thin layer chromatography and analyzed for fatty acid composition by gas chromatography. Using content of the acids in large globules as 100%, small globules contained fewer short-chain acids, -5.9%, less stearic acid, -22.7%, and more oleic acids, +4.6%, mean values for five trials. These differences are consistent with alternative use of short-chain acids or oleic acid converted from stearic acid to maintain liquidity at body temperature of milk fat globules and their precursors, intracellular lipid droplets. Stearyl-CoA desaturase (EC 1.14.99.5), which maintains fluidity of cellular endoplasmic reticulum membrane, is suggested to play a key role in regulating globule fat liquidity. Possible origins of differences between individual globules in fatty acid composition of their triacylglycerols are discussed.

  8. Oviposition response ofLobesia botrana females to long-chain free fatty acids and esters from its eggs.

    PubMed

    Gabel, B; Thiéry, D

    1996-01-01

    Avoidance of occupied ovisposition sites supposes that females perceive information related to their own progency. Fatty acids identified from egg extracts have been reevaluated using a different extraction method, and we have investigated the dose-dependent oviposition response of European grape vine moths (Lobesia botrana) to myristic acid, palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, methyl palmitate, methyl oleate, and ethyl palmitate; all except ethyl palmitate have been identified from eggs ofL. botrana. A methylene dichloride extract of eggs fromL. botrana revealed the presence of saturated free fatty acids (myristic, palmitic, and stearic) and unsaturated acids (palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic) in amounts ranging from 3.9 ng/egg equivalent for myristic acid to 30 ng/egg equivalent for palmitic and oleic acids. The extract also contained traces of methyl palmitate and methyl stearate. The greatest avoidance indexes were observed in response to palmitic, palmitoleic, and oleic acids. All the other compounds tested caused weaker responses. A reduction in the number of eggs laid was observed when moths were exposed to each of the esters applied at 0.3 µg per application spot. Reduction in eggs laid was also observed at a 10-fold higher dose of oleic acid. The present results confirm that general and simple molecules can be involved in the regulation of oviposition site selection and that they may participate in chemical marking of the eggs.

  9. Pharmaceuticals and Surfactants from Alga-Derived Feedstock: Amidation of Fatty Acids and Their Derivatives with Amino Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Tkacheva, Anastasia; Dosmagambetova, Inkar; Chapellier, Yann; Mäki-Arvela, Päivi; Hachemi, Imane; Savela, Risto; Leino, Reko; Viegas, Carolina; Kumar, Narendra; Eränen, Kari; Hemming, Jarl; Smeds, Annika; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2015-08-24

    Amidation of renewable feedstocks, such as fatty acids, esters, and Chlorella alga based biodiesel, was demonstrated with zeolites and mesoporous materials as catalysts and ethanolamine, alaninol, and leucinol. The last two can be derived from amino acids present in alga. The main products were fatty alkanol amides and the corresponding ester amines, as confirmed by NMR and IR spectroscopy. Thermal amidation of technical-grade oleic acid and stearic acid at 180 °C with ethanolamine were non-negligible; both gave 61% conversion. In the amidation of stearic acid with ethanolamine, the conversion over H-Beta-150 was 80% after 3 h, whereas only 63% conversion was achieved for oleic acid; this shows that a microporous catalyst is not suitable for this acid and exhibits a wrinkled conformation. The highest selectivity to stearoyl ethanolamide of 92% was achieved with mildly acidic H-MCM-41 at 70% conversion in 3 h at 180 °C. Highly acidic catalysts favored the formation of the ester amine, whereas the amide was obtained with a catalyst that exhibited an optimum acidity. The conversion levels achieved with different fatty acids in the range C12-C18 were similar; this shows that the fatty acid length does not affect the amidation rate. The amidation of methyl palmitate and biodiesel gave low conversions over an acidic catalyst, which suggested that the reaction mechanism in the amidation of esters was different.

  10. Effect of Growth on Fatty Acid Composition of Total Intramuscular Lipid and Phospholipids in Ira Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shan; He, Zhifei; Lu, Jingzhi; Tao, Xiaoqi; Zheng, Li; Xie, Yuejie; Xiao, Xia; Peng, Rong; Li, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    The changes in fatty acid composition of total intramuscular lipid and phospholipids were investigated in the longissimus dorsi, left-hind leg muscle, and abdominal muscle of male Ira rabbits. Changes were monitored at 35, 45, 60, 75, and 90 d. Analysis using gas chromatography identified 21 types of fatty acids. Results showed that the intramuscular lipid increased and the intramuscular phospholipids (total intramuscular lipid %) decreased in all muscles with increasing age (p<0.05). An abundant amount of unsaturated fatty acids, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, was distributed in male Ira rabbits at different ages and muscles. Palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), and arachidonic acid (C20:4) were the major fatty acids, which account to the dynamic changes of the n-6/n-3 value in Ira rabbit meat.

  11. Determination of the fatty acid composition of saponified vegetable oils using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ayorinde, F O; Garvin, K; Saeed, K

    2000-01-01

    A method using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) for the determination of the fatty acid composition of vegetable oils is described and illustrated with the analysis of palm kernel oil, palm oil, olive oil, canola oil, soybean oil, vernonia oil, and castor oil. Solutions of the saponified oils, mixed with the matrix, meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin, provided reproducible MALDI-TOF spectra in which the ions were dominated by sodiated sodium carboxylates [RCOONa + Na]+. Thus, palm kernel oil was found to contain capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, and stearic acid. Palm oil had a fatty acid profile including palmitic, linoleic, oleic, and stearic. The relative percentages of the fatty acids in olive oil were palmitoleic (1.2 +/- 0.5), palmitic (10.9 +/- 0.8), linoleic (0.6 +/- 0.1), linoleic (16.5 +/- 0.8), and oleic (70.5 +/- 1.2). For soybean oil, the relative percentages were: palmitoleic (0.4 +/- 0.4), palmitic (6.0 +/- 1.3), linolenic (14.5 +/- 1.8), linoleic (50.1 +/- 4.0), oleic (26.1 +/- 1.2), and stearic (2.2 +/- 0.7). This method was also applied to the analysis of two commercial soap formulations. The first soap gave a fatty acid profile that included: lauric (19.4% +/- 0.8), myristic (9.6% +/- 0.5), palmitoleic (1.9% +/- 0.3), palmitic (16.3% +/- 0.9), linoleic (5.6% +/- 0.4), oleic (37.1% +/- 0.8), and stearic (10.1% +/- 0.7) and that of the second soap was: lauric (9.3% +/- 0.3), myristic (3.8% +/- 0.5), palmitoleic (3.1% +/- 0.8), palmitic (19.4% +/- 0.8), linoleic (4.9% +/- 0.7), oleic (49.5% +/- 1.1), and stearic (10.0% +/- 0.9). The MALDI-TOFMS method described in this communication is simpler and less time-consuming than the established transesterification method that is coupled with analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The new method could be used routinely to determine the qualitative fatty acid composition of vegetable oils

  12. Fatty acids composition of Spanish black (Morus nigra L.) and white (Morus alba L.) mulberries.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Salcedo, Eva M; Sendra, Esther; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A; Martínez, Juan José; Hernández, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    This research has determined qualitatively and quantitatively the fatty acids composition of white (Morus alba) and black (Morus nigra) fruits grown in Spain, in 2013 and 2014. Four clones of each species were studied. Fourteen fatty acids were identified and quantified in mulberry fruits. The most abundant fatty acids were linoleic (C18:2), palmitic (C16:0), oleic (C18:1), and stearic (C18:0) acids in both species. The main fatty acid in all clones was linoleic (C18:2), that ranged from 69.66% (MN2) to 78.02% (MA1) of the total fatty acid content; consequently Spanish mulberry fruits were found to be rich in linoleic acid, which is an essential fatty acid. The fatty acid composition of mulberries highlights the nutritional and health benefits of their consumption.

  13. Prilling of fatty acids as a continuous process for the development of controlled release multiparticulate dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Vervaeck, A; Saerens, L; De Geest, B G; De Beer, T; Carleer, R; Adriaensens, P; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2013-11-01

    In this study, prilling was evaluated as a technique for the development of multiparticulate dosage forms using the fatty acids, stearic acid, and behenic acid as potential matrix formers to control the release of metoprolol tartrate (MPT), a highly water soluble drug. The in vitro drug release was dependent on the drug load, type of fatty acid, and pH of the dissolution medium. Higher drug loads resulted in faster release with behenic acid releasing drug over longer periods relative to stearic acid. The in vitro drug release was pH-dependent at low drug load with the release being slower at lower pH. Due to ionization of the fatty acid at pH 7.4, drug release was susceptible to the ionic strength at this pH value. Solid state characterization indicated that the crystalline state of the fatty acids was not affected by thermal processing via prilling, while the crystallinity of MPT was decreased. During storage, the amorphous MPT fraction recrystallized in the entire matrix. Drug release from behenic acid matrices was increased during storage at 40 °C; however, no polymorphism of behenic acid was detected. The bioavailability of MPT, after oral administration to dogs as prills containing 30% and 40% MPT using behenic acid as matrix former, was not significantly different from a commercial sustained release reference formulation, although the 40% MPT prills showed a burst release.

  14. Influence of Helicteres isora administration for diabetes mellitus: the effect on changes in tissue fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G; Banu, Sharmila; Murugesan, A G

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of aqueous bark extract of Helicteres isora (HI) (Sterculiaceae) on the blood glucose, plasma insulin and fatty acid composition of the total lipids in the liver, kidney and brain of control and streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. The analysis of fatty acids showed that there was a significant increase in the concentrations of palmitic acid (16:1), stearic acid (18:0) and oleic acid (18:1) in the liver, kidney and brain, whereas the concentrations of linolenic acid (18:3) and arachidonic acid (20:4) were significantly decreased in STZ diabetic rats. Oral administration of the aqueous bark extract of HI (100, 200mg/kg body weight) for 30 days to diabetic rats decreased the concentrations of fatty acids, viz., palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid, whereas linolenic and arachidonic acid were elevated. These results suggest that HI exhibits antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects in STZ induced diabetic rats. It also prevents the fatty acid changes produced during diabetes. The antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of HI are more potent than those of tolbutamide, as standard drug. The results of the present study indicate that HI showed an antihyperlipidemic effect in addition to its antidiabetic effect in type 2 diabetic rats.

  15. High Fat Diet Administration during Specific Periods of Pregnancy Alters Maternal Fatty Acid Profiles in the Near-Term Rat.

    PubMed

    Cerf, Marlon E; Herrera, Emilio

    2016-01-04

    Excessive fat intake is a global health concern as women of childbearing age increasingly ingest high fat diets (HFDs). We therefore determined the maternal fatty acid (FA) profiles in metabolic organs after HFD administration during specific periods of gestation. Rats were fed a HFD for the first (HF1), second (HF2), or third (HF3) week, or for all three weeks (HFG) of gestation. Total maternal plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were monitored throughout pregnancy. At day 20 of gestation, maternal plasma, liver, adipose tissue, and placenta FA profiles were determined. In HF3 mothers, plasma myristic and stearic acid concentrations were elevated, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was reduced in both HF3 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, hepatic stearic and oleic acid proportions were elevated; conversely, DHA and linoleic acid (LA) proportions were reduced. In adipose tissue, myristic acid was elevated, whereas DHA and LA proportions were reduced in all mothers. Further, adipose tissue stearic acid proportions were elevated in HF2, HF3, and HFG mothers; with oleic acid increased in HF1 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, placental neutral myristic acid proportions were elevated, whereas DHA was reduced. Further, placental phospholipid DHA proportions were reduced in HF3 and HFG mothers. Maintenance on a diet, high in saturated fat, but low in DHA and LA proportions, during late or throughout gestation, perpetuated reduced DHA across metabolic organs that adapt during pregnancy. Therefore a diet, with normal DHA proportions during gestation, may be important for balancing maternal FA status.

  16. High Fat Diet Administration during Specific Periods of Pregnancy Alters Maternal Fatty Acid Profiles in the Near-Term Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cerf, Marlon E.; Herrera, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fat intake is a global health concern as women of childbearing age increasingly ingest high fat diets (HFDs). We therefore determined the maternal fatty acid (FA) profiles in metabolic organs after HFD administration during specific periods of gestation. Rats were fed a HFD for the first (HF1), second (HF2), or third (HF3) week, or for all three weeks (HFG) of gestation. Total maternal plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were monitored throughout pregnancy. At day 20 of gestation, maternal plasma, liver, adipose tissue, and placenta FA profiles were determined. In HF3 mothers, plasma myristic and stearic acid concentrations were elevated, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was reduced in both HF3 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, hepatic stearic and oleic acid proportions were elevated; conversely, DHA and linoleic acid (LA) proportions were reduced. In adipose tissue, myristic acid was elevated, whereas DHA and LA proportions were reduced in all mothers. Further, adipose tissue stearic acid proportions were elevated in HF2, HF3, and HFG mothers; with oleic acid increased in HF1 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, placental neutral myristic acid proportions were elevated, whereas DHA was reduced. Further, placental phospholipid DHA proportions were reduced in HF3 and HFG mothers. Maintenance on a diet, high in saturated fat, but low in DHA and LA proportions, during late or throughout gestation, perpetuated reduced DHA across metabolic organs that adapt during pregnancy. Therefore a diet, with normal DHA proportions during gestation, may be important for balancing maternal FA status. PMID:26742067

  17. Erythrocyte Membrane Fatty Acid Composition in Premenopausal Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Mehmet; Elmastas, Mahfuz; Ozcicek, Fatih; Yilmaz, Necmettin

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is one of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In the present study, we evaluated erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition in premenopausal patients with IDA. Blood samples of 102 premenopausal women and 88 healthy control subjects were collected. After the erythrocytes were separated from the blood samples, the membrane lipids were carefully extracted, and the various membrane fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography (GC). Statistical analyses were performed with the SPSS software program. We used blood ferritin concentration <15 ng/mL as cut-off for the diagnosis of IDA. The five most abundant individual fatty acids obtained were palmitic acid (16:0), oleic acid (18:1, n-9c), linoleic acid (18:2, n-6c), stearic acid (18:0), and erucic acid (C22:1, n-9c). These compounds constituted about 87% of the total membrane fatty acids in patients with IDA, and 79% of the total membrane fatty acids in the control group. Compared with control subjects, case patients had higher percentages of palmitic acid (29.9% case versus 25.3% control), oleic acid (16.8% case versus 15.1% control), and stearic acid (13.5% case versus 10.5% control), and lower percentages of erucic acid (11.5% case versus 13.6% control) and linoleic acid (15.2% case versus 15.4% control) in their erythrocyte membranes. In conclusion, the total-erythrocyte-membrane saturated fatty acid (SFA) composition in premenopausal women with IDA was found to be higher than that in the control group; however, the total-erythrocyte-membrane unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) composition in premenopausal women with IDA was found to be lower than that in the control group. The differences in these values were statistically significant.

  18. Variations in fatty acid composition of neem seeds collected from the Rajasthan state of India.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, N; Vir, S

    2000-12-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) is a multipurpose tree native to the Indian subcontinent and South-East Asian countries. Products derived from neem have been used for centuries, particularly in India, for medicinal and pest-management purposes. Azadirachtin and neem oil are the two major commercially important products derived from the tree. The oil contains palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acids in good proportion. Although there is growing demand for quality planting material for plantation of neem, efforts are lacking for the selection of neem trees based on their biochemical composition. In the present study, 60 Neem seed samples were collected from different provinances of the Rajasthan state in India. These samples were analysed by GLC to study the variability of fatty acid composition. Significant variability in individual fatty acids was observed. The palmitic acid ranged from 16 to 34%, stearic acid from 6 to 24%, oleic acid from 25 to 58% and linoleic acid from 6 to 17%. This variability can be exploited for selection of trees and for studying the genetic variability in neem. These selections can also be utilized for genetic improvement of the tree.

  19. Free fatty acids as markers of death from hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bańka, Krzysztof; Teresiński, Grzegorz; Buszewicz, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The possibilities of using morphological markers of fatal hypothermia are limited; therefore, other diagnostic criteria of deaths from hypothermia are being researched. The initiation of protective mechanisms against adverse effects of low temperatures results in activation of hormonal systems and development of characteristic biochemical changes that can be impaired by alcohol intoxication. The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of determinations of the profile of free fatty acid concentrations as potential markers of hypothermia-related deaths, particularly in intoxicated victims. The study group consisted of blood samples collected during autopsies of 23 victims of hypothermia. The control group included blood samples collected from 34 victims of sudden, violent deaths at the scene of an incident (hangings and traffic accidents) and 10 victims who died because of post-traumatic subdural hematomas with prolonged agony. The study and control groups were divided into three subgroups according to blood alcohol concentrations: 0.0-0.99; 1.0-2.99 and ≥3.0‰. Statistical analysis in the individual subgroups demonstrated significant increases in concentrations of palmitic, stearic and oleic acids (P<0.05), independent of blood ethanol concentration. Palmitic, stearic and oleic acids can be considered the potential markers of fatal hypothermia, including the cases of intoxicated individuals.

  20. Experimental determination and prediction of (solid+liquid) phase equilibria for binary mixtures of heavy alkanes and fatty acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benziane, Mokhtar; Khimeche, Kamel; Dahmani, Abdellah; Nezar, Sawsen; Trache, Djalal

    2012-06-01

    Solid-liquid equilibria for three binary mixtures, n-Eicosane (1) + Lauric acid (2), n-Tetracosane (1) + Stearic acid (2), and n-Octacosane (1) + Palmitic acid (2), were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter. Simple eutectic behaviour was observed for these systems. The experimental results were correlated by means of the modified UNIFAC (Larsen and Gmehling versions), UNIQUAC and ideal models. The root-mean-square deviations of the solubility temperatures for all measured data vary from 0.26 to 3.15 K and depend on the particular model used. The best solubility correlation was obtained with the UNIQUAC model.

  1. Digestion of fat and fatty acids along the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tancharoenrat, P; Ravindran, V; Zaefarian, F; Ravindran, G

    2014-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted. The first experiment investigated the digestion of fat and fatty acids (FA) from soybean oil and tallow along the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens. The second experiment was conducted to determine endogenous fat and FA losses and the FA profile of chicken bile. In experiment 1, 2-wk-old broilers were fed corn-soy diets supplemented with 50 g/kg of soybean oil or tallow for 7 d and digesta were collected from the duodenum, upper jejunum, upper ileum, and lower ileum. Apparent digestibility coefficients were calculated using the titanium marker ratio in diets, and digesta. Digestibility of fat was determined to be negative in the duodenum, indicating marked net secretion of fat into this segment. Fat was rapidly digested in the jejunum, with digestibility coefficients of 0.60 to 0.64 being determined at the end of the jejunum. The digestion of fat continued in the upper ileum. The apparent digestibility coefficient of fat determined at lower ileum in soybean oil diets was higher (P < 0.05) than that in tallow diets (0.82 vs. 0.74). Linoleic acid was digested throughout the intestinal tract, whereas the digestion of palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids started only in the jejunum. Measurements at the lower ileal level showed that the unsaturated FA (linoleic and oleic acids) were well digested (0.90 to 0.94), irrespective of the source of fat. In contrast, the digestibility of saturated FA (palmitic and stearic acids) was influenced (P < 0.05) by the fat source. Digestibility coefficients of palmitic and stearic acids at lower ileum were markedly higher (P < 0.05) in the diet containing soybean oil (0.77 to 0.85) compared with that containing tallow (0.58 to 0.68). In experiment 2, ileal endogenous fat loss was determined to be 1,714 mg/kg of DM intake. Endogenous fat was composed mainly of palmitic (75 g/kg), stearic (131 g/kg), oleic (73 g/kg), linoleic (133 g/kg), and arachidonic (60 g/kg) acids. Fatty acid profile of

  2. Fatty acids from seeds of Pinus pinea L.: composition and population profiling.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Nizar; Khaldi, Abdelhamid; Fady, Bruno; Triki, Saida

    2005-07-01

    Pinus pinea L. is widely disseminated all over the Mediterranean Basin. Qualitatively, P. pinea fatty acid seed composition is identical and typical of the genus Pinus. This composition is made of unsaturated oil with several unusual polymethylene-interrupted unsaturated fatty acids. Linoleic acid is the major fatty acid followed by oleic, palmitic and stearic acids. Quantitatively, for all Mediterranean populations, total amounts of fatty acids seem to be fairly constant and independent from their origin. When applying principal component analysis, it seems that there is not a distinct geographical variability. Tunisian populations appear to be integral part of the Mediterranean populations without any particular structuring. Taking into account this research and the data reported in the literature, we can confirm that P. pinea expresses no significant variability. This low genetic diversity revealed by fatty acid composition can be explained by anthropogenetic diffusion of genetically homogeneous reproductive material as early as the first explorations.

  3. Amended safety assessment of tall oil acid, sodium tallate, potassium tallate, and ammonium tallate.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Valerie; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Klaassen, Curtis D; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Alan Andersen, F

    2009-01-01

    Tall oil acid is a mixture of oleic and linoleic acids (fatty acids) and rosin acids derived from tall oil, a by-product of pulp from resinous woods, used in cosmetic products as a surfactant at concentrations up to 8%. Ammonium, potassium, and sodium salts also are listed as cosmetic ingredients. In addition to the studies summarized in this report, extensive toxicity, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity studies in animals are available for oleic, lauric, palmitic, myristic, and stearic fatty acids as published earlier by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR). These data may be extrapolated to tall oil acid and its salts. There are no reports of current uses or use concentration data for ammonium tallate, nor are use concentration data available for the other salts. The CIR Expert Panel found tall oil acid, ammonium tallate, potassium tallate, and sodium tallate to be safe cosmetic ingredients in the given practices of use and concentration.

  4. [The identification of several saturated fatty acids and their salts by means of infrared spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Luo, Man; Guan, Ping; Liu, Wen-hui

    2007-02-01

    It is considered that saturated fatty acids and their salts may be potential hydrocarbon-generation matters in carbonate rocks. However, there is no effective method to distinguish them from natural sediments, making recognizing their distribution in sediments a challenge. Formic acid, acetic acid, stearic acid, calcium formate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, calcium stearate, and magnesium stearate from some chemical plants were investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Their infrared spectra were obtained and the distinctions of the infrared spectra between saturated fatty acids and their salts were studied in detail. The differences in the group's electron-releasing ability, molecular reduced mass, ion configuration and the length of carbon chain can cause wavelength shifts of infrared absorption peaks of the saturated fatty acids and their salts. The research provides a method for the identification of saturated fatty acids and their salts in samples from nature.

  5. Soya protein hydrolysates modify the expression of various pro-inflammatory genes induced by fatty acids in ovine phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Politis, Ioannis; Theodorou, Georgios; Lampidonis, Antonios D; Chronopoulou, Roubini; Baldi, Antonella

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that fatty acids are the circulating mediators acting in a pro-inflammatory manner towards activated circulating ovine monocyte/macrophages and neutrophils. Furthermore, whether soya protein hydrolysates (SPH) inhibit the fatty acid-induced increase in the production of pro-inflammatory responses by ovine phagocytes was tested in vitro. All the fatty acids tested (myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic) increased (P<0·01; C18>C16>C14) membrane-bound urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) and u-PA free binding sites in cell membranes of activated ovine blood monocytes/macrophages, but only the C18 fatty acids (stearic, oleic) were effective towards blood neutrophils. The C18 fatty acids up-regulated (P<0·05) the gene expression of u-PA, u-PA receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and inducible NO synthase (in monocytes) but not that of cyclo-oxygenase-2, integrin α X and plasminogen activator inhibitor types 1 and 2 by ovine phagocytes. SPH blocked completely or partially all C18 fatty acid-induced changes in the expression of various pro-inflammatory genes. In conclusion, fatty acids selectively 'activate' ovine phagocytes, suggesting that these cells 'sense' metabolic signals derived from adipocytes. Soya protein peptides inhibit all changes in gene expression induced by fatty acids in ovine phagocytes in vitro. This constitutes a novel mechanism of action.

  6. Micelles versus Ribbons: How Congeners Drive the Self-Assembly of Acidic Sophorolipid Biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Dhasaiyan, Prabhu; Le Griel, Patrick; Roelants, Sophie; Redant, Emile; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Prevost, Sylvain; Prasad, B L V; Baccile, Niki

    2017-03-17

    Sophorolipids (SLs), a class of microbially derived biosurfactants, are reported by different research groups to have different self-assembled structures (either micelles or giant ribbons) under the same conditions. Here we explore the reasons behind these contradictory results and attribute these differences to the role of specific congeners that are present in minute quantities. We show that a sample composed of a majority of oleic acid (C18:1) sophorolipid in the presence of only 0.5 % (or more) of congeners with stearic acid (C18:0) or linoleic acid (C18:2) results in the formation of micelles that are stable over long periods of time. Conversely, the presence of only 10 to 15 % of congeners with a stearic acid chain gives fibrillar structures instead of micelles. To study the mechanisms responsible, oleic acid SLs devoid of any other congeners were prepared. Very interestingly, this sample can self-assemble into either micelles or fibers depending on minute modifications to the self-assembly conditions. The findings are supported by light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy under cryogenic conditions, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Acute effects of dietary fatty acids on the fatty acids of human milk.

    PubMed

    Francois, C A; Connor, S L; Wander, R C; Connor, W E

    1998-02-01

    Although it is known that the fatty acid profile of human milk is altered by diet, the rapidity with which this occurs has not been addressed. We hypothesized that after absorption the fatty acids of a given meal would be transferred rapidly from the chylomicrons of the blood into human milk. Fourteen lactating women drank six test formulas, each containing a different fat: menhaden oil, herring oil, safflower oil, canola oil, coconut oil, or cocoa butter. The subjects collected a midfeeding milk sample before consuming the breakfast test formula and additional samples at 6, 10, 14, and 24 h and then once daily for 4-7 d. Fatty acids of special interest included eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids from menhaden oil, cetoleic acid from herring oil, linoleic acid from safflower oil, linolenic acid from canola oil, lauric acid from coconut oil, and palmitic and stearic acids from cocoa butter. Each of these fatty acids increased significantly in human milk within 6 h of consumption of the test formulas (P < 0.001). Maximum increases occurred 10 h after safflower oil; 14 h after cocoa utter, coconut oil, canola oil, and menhaden oil (eicosapentaenoic acid); and 24 h after herring oil and menhaden oil (docosahexaenoic acid). All of these fatty acids remained significantly elevated in milk (P < 0.05) for 10-24 h, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which remained significantly elevated for 2 d, and eicosapentaenoic acid, which remained elevated for 3 d. These data support the hypothesis that there is a rapid transfer of dietary fatty acids from chylomicrons into human milk.

  8. Characterization of cider apples on the basis of their fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Gomis, Domingo; Mangas Alonso, Juan J; Margolles Cabrales, Inmaculada; Arias Abrodo, Pilar

    2002-02-27

    In the current study, the fatty acids composition of 30 monovarietal apple juices from six cider apple varieties belonging to two categories was analyzed. The different apple juices were obtained from three consecutive harvests (1997, 1998, and 1999). The fatty acids concentration in apple juice together with chemometric techniques such as principal components analysis (PCA), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), allowed us to differentiate apple juices on the basis of the sweet or sharp category to which the cider apple variety belongs. Fatty acids such as the unsaturated oleic and linoleic acids, and saturated caprylic, capric, stearic, and palmitic acids were related to the sweet cider apple category, while pentadecanoic acid is related to the sharp class.

  9. Modulation of Nitro-fatty Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vitturi, Dario A.; Chen, Chen-Shan; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Koenitzer, Jeffrey R.; Stewart, Nicolas A.; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Kensler, Thomas W.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation, characterized by the activation of both resident and infiltrated immune cells, is accompanied by increased production of oxidizing and nitrating species. Nitrogen dioxide, the proximal nitrating species formed under these conditions, reacts with unsaturated fatty acids to yield nitroalkene derivatives. These electrophilic products modulate protein function via post-translational modification of susceptible nucleophilic amino acids. Nitroalkenes react with Keap1 to instigate Nrf2 signaling, activate heat shock response gene expression, and inhibit NF-κB-mediated signaling, inducing net anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective metabolic responses. We report the purification and characterization of a NADPH-dependent liver enzyme that reduces the nitroalkene moiety of nitro-oleic acid, yielding the inactive product nitro-stearic acid. Prostaglandin reductase-1 (PtGR-1) was identified as a nitroalkene reductase by protein purification and proteomic studies. Kinetic measurements, inhibition studies, immunological and molecular biology approaches as well as clinical analyses confirmed this identification. Overexpression of PtGR-1 in HEK293T cells promoted nitroalkene metabolism to inactive nitroalkanes, an effect that abrogated the Nrf2-dependent induction of heme oxygenase-1 expression by nitro-oleic acid. These results situate PtGR-1 as a critical modulator of both the steady state levels and signaling activities of fatty acid nitroalkenes in vivo. PMID:23878198

  10. Conjugated linoleic acid and vaccenic acid in rumen, plasma, and milk of cows fed fish oil and fats differing in saturation of 18 carbon fatty acids.

    PubMed

    AbuGhazaleh, A A; Schingoethe, D J; Hippen, A R; Kalscheur, K F

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of feeding fish oil (FO) along with fat sources that varied in saturation of 18 carbon fatty acids (high stearic, high oleic, high linoleic, or high linolenic acids) on rumen, plasma, and milk fatty acid profiles. Four primiparous Holstein cows at 85 d in milk (+/- 40) were assigned to 4 x 4 Latin squares with 4-wk periods. Treatment diets were 1) 1% FO plus 2% commercial fat high in stearic acid (HS); 2) 1% FO plus 2% fat from high oleic acid sunflower seeds (HO); 3) 1% FO plus 2% fat from high linoleic acid sunflower seeds (HLO); and 4) 1% FO plus 2% fat from flax seeds (high linolenic; HLN). Diets were formulated to contain 18% crude protein and were composed of 50% (dry basis) concentrate mix, 25% corn silage, 12.5% alfalfa silage, and 12.5% alfalfa hay. Milk production, milk protein percentages and yields, and dry matter intake were similar across diets. Milk fat concentrations and yields were least for HO and HLO diets. The proportion of milk cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; 0.71, 0.99, 1.71, and 1.12 g/100 g fatty acids, respectively), and vaccenic acid (TVA; 1.85, 2.60, 4.14, and 2.16 g/100 g fatty acids, respectively) were greatest with the HLO diet. The proportions of ruminal cis-9, trans-11 CLA (0.09, 0.16, 0.18, and 0.16 g/100 g fatty acids, respectively) were similar for the HO, HLO, and HLN diets and all were higher than for the HS diet. The proportions of TVA (2.85, 4.36, 8.69, and 4.64 g/100 g fatty acids, respectively) increased with the HO, HLO, and HLN diets compared with the HS diets, and the increase was greatest with the HLO diet. The effects of fat supplements on ruminal TVA concentrations were also reflected in plasma triglycerides, (2.75, 4.64, 8.77, and 5.42 g/100 g fatty acids, respectively); however, there were no differences in the proportion of cis-9, trans-11 CLA (0.06, 0.07, 0.06, and 0.07 g/100 g fatty acids, respectively). This study further supports the

  11. Milk conjugated linoleic acid response to fish oil supplementation of diets differing in fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    AbuGhazaleh, A A; Schingoethe, D J; Hippen, A R; Kalscheur, K F

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this experiment was to examine the effect of feeding fish oil (FO) along with fat sources that varied in their fatty acid compositions (high stearic, high oleic, high linoleic, or high linolenic acids) to determine which combination would lead to maximum conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9,trans-11 CLA) and transvaccenic acid (TVA) concentrations in milk fat. Twelve Holstein cows (eight multiparous and four primiparous cows) at 73 (+/- 32) DIM were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square with 4-wk periods. Treatment diets were 1) 1% FO plus 2% fat source high in stearic acid (HS), 2) 1% FO plus 2% fat from high oleic acid sunflower seeds (HO), 3) 1% FO plus 2% fat from high linoleic acid sunflower seeds (HLO), and 4) 1% FO plus 2% fat from flax seeds (high linolenic; HLN). Diets formulated to contain 18% crude protein were composed of 50% (dry basis) concentrate mix, 25% corn silage, 12.5% alfalfa haylage, and 12.5% alfalfa hay. Milk production (35.8, 36.3, 34.9, and 35.0 kg/d for diets 1 to 4) was similar for all diets. Milk fat percentages (3.14, 2.81, 2.66, and 3.08) and yields (1.13, 1.02, 0.93, and 1.08 kg/d) for diets 1 to 4 were lowest for HLO. Milk protein percentages (3.04, 3.03, 3.10, and 3.08) and dry matter intake (DMI) (25.8, 26.0, 26.2, and 26.2 kg/d) for diets 1 to 4 were similar for all diets. Milk cis-9,trans-11 CLA concentrations (0.70, 1.04, 1.70, and 1.06 g/100 g fatty acids) for diet 1 to 4 and yields (7.7, 10.7, 15.8, and 11.3 g/d) for diets 1 to 4 were greatest with HLO and were least with HS. Milk cis-9,trans-11 CLA concentrations and yields were similar for cows fed the HO and the HLN diets. Similar to milk cis-9,trans-11 CLA, milk TVA concentration (1.64, 2.49, 3.74, and 2.41 g/100 g fatty acids) for diets 1 to 4 was greatest with the HLO diet and least with the HS diet. Feeding a high linoleic acid fat source with fish oil most effectively increased concentrations and yields of milk cis-9,trans-11 CLA and TVA.

  12. Circulating Fatty Acids and Prostate Cancer Risk: Individual Participant Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Appleby, Paul N.; Travis, Ruth C.; Barnett, Matt; Brasky, Theodore M.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Chajes, Veronique; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; English, Dallas R.; Gibson, Robert A.; Giles, Graham G.; Goodman, Gary E.; Henning, Susanne M.; Kaaks, Rudolf; King, Irena B.; Kolonel, Lawrence N.; Kristal, Alan R.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Park, Song-Yi; Severi, Gianluca; Siddiq, Afshan; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stattin, Pär; Tangen, Catherine M.; Tjønneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Key, Timothy J.; Allen, Naomi E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individual studies have suggested that some circulating fatty acids are associated with prostate cancer risk, but have not been large enough to provide precise estimates of associations, particularly by stage and grade of disease. Methods Principal investigators of prospective studies on circulating fatty acids and prostate cancer were invited to collaborate. Investigators provided individual participant data on circulating fatty acids (weight percent) and other characteristics of prostate cancer cases and controls. Prostate cancer risk by study-specific fifths of 14 fatty acids was estimated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Five thousand and ninety-eight case patients and 6649 control patients from seven studies with an average follow-up of 5.1 (SD = 3.3) years were included. Stearic acid (18:0) was inversely associated with total prostate cancer (odds ratio [OR] Q5 vs Q1 = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.78 to 1.00, P trend = .043). Prostate cancer risk was, respectively, 14% and 16% greater in the highest fifth of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.29, P trend = .001) and docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3) (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.33, P trend = .003), but in each case there was heterogeneity between studies (P = .022 and P < .001, respectively). There was heterogeneity in the association between docosapentaenoic acid and prostate cancer by grade of disease (P = .006); the association was statistically significant for low-grade disease but not high-grade disease. The remaining 11 fatty acids were not statistically associated with total prostate cancer risk. Conclusion There was no strong evidence that circulating fatty acids are important predictors of prostate cancer risk. It is not clear whether the modest associations of stearic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosapentaenoic acid are causal. PMID:25210201

  13. Fatty acid profile of hair lambs and their crossbreds slaughtered at different weights.

    PubMed

    Landim, Aline Vieira; Cardoso, Maximiliano Tadeu Memória; Castanheira, Marlos; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda Soares; Louvandini, Helder; McManus, Concepta

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of breed and slaughter weight on fatty the acid profile of the Longissimus dorsi muscle in lambs. Twenty-four Santa Inês (SI), 24.5 Ile de France × 0.5 Santa Inês (Ile × SI) and 12.5 Texel × 0.5 Santa Inês (Te × SI), slaughtered at different weights (30, 35, 40, and 45 kg), were evaluated. The animals were reared with creep feeding to weaning and were feedlot finished, receiving a diet composed of 30% hay and 70% concentrate. The analyses of fatty acids were carried out on the Longissimus muscle of the 13th rib. The experiment was in a three by four factorial design. The total mean saturated fatty acid level was 44.88%, with 43.30% monounsaturated fats and 1.72% polyunsaturated. The major fatty acids found included oleic (43%), palmitic (22%), and stearic (18%). The concentration of desirable fatty acids varied from 61.56% to 66.78%, with Te × SI (66.78%) having the highest levels (P < 0.05). The slaughter weight affected (P < 0.05) the saturated and unsaturated (both mono and poly) fatty acid profiles. The 35-kg slaughter weight showed the most desirable fatty acid profile. The saturated myristic and stearic fatty acids decreased with an increase in the slaughter weight, but oleic acid increased. In the conditions of the present study, the meat from Santa Ines and Texel × Santa Ines lambs had fatty acid profiles more beneficial for human health due to the higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids.

  14. A novel sodium N-fatty acyl amino acid surfactant using silkworm pupae as stock material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Min-Hui; Wan, Liang-Ze; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2014-03-01

    A novel sodium N-fatty acyl amino acid (SFAAA) surfactant was synthesized using pupa oil and pupa protein hydrolysates (PPH) from a waste product of the silk industry. The aliphatic acids from pupa oil were modified into N-fatty acyl chlorides by thionyl chloride (SOCl2). SFAAA was synthesized using acyl chlorides and PPH. GC-MS analysis showed fatty acids from pupa oil consist mainly of unsaturated linolenic and linoleic acids and saturated palmitic and stearic acids. SFAAA had a low critical micelle concentration, great efficiency in lowering surface tension and strong adsorption at an air/water interface. SFAAA had a high emulsifying power, as well as a high foaming power. The emulsifying power of PPH and SFAAA in an oil/water emulsion was better with ethyl acetate as the oil phase compared to n-hexane. The environment-friendly surfactant made entirely from silkworm pupae could promote sustainable development of the silk industry.

  15. Transport of Palmitic Acid Across the Tegument of the Entomophilic Nematode Romanomermis culicivorax

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Roger; Burford, Ian R.

    1984-01-01

    Romanomermis culicivorax juveniles, dissected out of Aedes aegypti larvae 7 days after infection, were incubated under controlled conditions in isotonic saline containing ¹⁴C-U-palmitic acid to investigate the nature of the transport mechanism(s) used by the nematode for transcuticular uptake of palmitic acid. Net uptake of the isotope by the nematode was of a logarithmic nature with respect to time. Uptake of palmitic acid was accomplished by a combination of diffusion and a mediated process which was substrate saturable and competitively inhibited by myristic and stearic acids. Both 2,4-dinitrophenol and ouabain inhibited uptake of palmitic acid and thus supported the hypothesis that the carrier system is of the active transport variety and is coupled to a Na⁺K⁺ ATPase pump. PMID:19295867

  16. Evaluation of the fatty acid composition of the seeds of Mangifera indica L. and their application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuhsien; Tokuda, Megumi; Kashiwagi, Ayaka; Henmi, Atsushi; Okada, Yoshiharu; Tachibana, Shinya; Nomura, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.), an edible fruit, is one of the main agricultural products in many tropical regions. Mango varieties differ in not only fruit shape but also aroma, which is an important characteristic. Although the fruit has many uses, the seeds are discarded as waste. Therefore, this study aimed to estimate the fatty acid content of seed oil of mangoes from different cultivation areas (Miyazaki, Japan, and Taiwan), and to evaluate their application in cosmetics. Five fatty acids were identified in the mango seed oil. Oleic acid and stearic acid were the principal components of mango seed oil obtained from Miyazaki (46.1% and 39.8%, respectively) and Taiwan (43.7% and 40.1%, respectively). As a cosmetic ingredient, mango seed oil showed good deodorizing effect on both 2-nonenal and isovaleric acid. The results indicated the potential applications of mango seed oil in the cosmetic industry.

  17. A novel sodium N-fatty acyl amino acid surfactant using silkworm pupae as stock material.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Hui; Wan, Liang-Ze; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2014-03-21

    A novel sodium N-fatty acyl amino acid (SFAAA) surfactant was synthesized using pupa oil and pupa protein hydrolysates (PPH) from a waste product of the silk industry. The aliphatic acids from pupa oil were modified into N-fatty acyl chlorides by thionyl chloride (SOCl2). SFAAA was synthesized using acyl chlorides and PPH. GC-MS analysis showed fatty acids from pupa oil consist mainly of unsaturated linolenic and linoleic acids and saturated palmitic and stearic acids. SFAAA had a low critical micelle concentration, great efficiency in lowering surface tension and strong adsorption at an air/water interface. SFAAA had a high emulsifying power, as well as a high foaming power. The emulsifying power of PPH and SFAAA in an oil/water emulsion was better with ethyl acetate as the oil phase compared to n-hexane. The environment-friendly surfactant made entirely from silkworm pupae could promote sustainable development of the silk industry.

  18. Fatty acid composition of lymphocytes and macrophages from rats fed fiber-rich diets: a comparison between oat bran- and wheat bran-enriched diets.

    PubMed

    Felippe, C R; Calder, P C; Vecchia, M G; Campos, M R; Mancini-Filho, J; Newsholme, E A; Curi, R

    1997-06-01

    The effect of oat bran- (OBD) and wheat bran-enriched diets (WBD) on fatty acid composition of neutral lipids and phospholipids of rat lymphocytes and macrophages was investigated. In neutral lipids of lymphocytes, OBD reduced the proportion of palmitoleic acid (48%), whereas WBD reduced by 43% palmitoleic acid and raised oleic (18%), linoleic (52%), and arachidonic (2.5-fold) acids. In neutral lipids of macrophages, OBD increased palmitic (16%) and linoleic (29%) acids and slightly decreased oleic acid (15%). The effect of WBD, however, was more pronounced: It reduced myristic (60%), stearic (24%) and arachidonic (63%) acids, and it raised palmitic (30%) and linoleic (2.3-fold) acids. Neither OBD nor WBD modified the composition of fatty acids in phospholipids of lymphocytes. In contrast, both diets had a marked effect on composition of fatty acids in macrophage phospholipids. OBD raised the proportion of myristic (42%) and linoleic (2.4-fold) acids and decreased that of lauric (31%), palmitoleic (43%), and arachidonic (29%) acids. WBD increased palmitic (18%) and stearic (23%) acids and lowered palmitoleic (35%) and arachidonic (78%) acids. Of both cells, macrophages were more responsive to the effect of the fiber-rich diets on fatty acid composition of phospholipids. The high turnover of fatty acids in macrophage membranes may explain the differences between both cells. The modifications observed due to the effects of both diets were similar in few cases: an increase in palmitic and linoleic acids of total neutral lipids occurred and a decrease in palmitoleic and arachidonic acids of phospholipid. Therefore, the mechanism involved in the effect of both diets might be different.

  19. Distinctive roles of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in hyperlipidemic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Chang, Ming-Chu; Tung, Chien-Chih; Wei, Shu-Chen; Wong, Jau-Min

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate how the saturated and unsaturated fatty acid composition influences the susceptibility of developing acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Primary pancreatic acinar cells were treated with low and high concentrations of different saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and changes in the cytosolic Ca2+ signal and the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) were measured after treatment. RESULTS: Unsaturated fatty acids at high concentrations, including oleic acid, linoleic acid, palmitoleic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid, induced a persistent rise in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations in acinar cells. Unsaturated fatty acids at low concentrations and saturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, stearic acid, and triglycerides, at low and high concentrations were unable to induce a rise in Ca2+ concentrations in acinar cells. Unsaturated fatty acids at high concentrations but not saturated fatty acids induced intra-acinar cell trypsin activation and cell damage and increased PKC expression. CONCLUSION: At sufficiently high concentrations, unsaturated fatty acids were able to induce acinar cells injury and promote the development of pancreatitis. Unsaturated fatty acids may play a distinctive role in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis through the activation of PKC family members. PMID:26327761

  20. A liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry-based workflow for measurement of branched Fatty Acid esters of Hydroxy Fatty Acids (FAHFAs)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tejia; Chen, Shili; Syed, Ismail; Ståhlman, Marcus; Kolar, Matthew J.; Homan, Edwin A.; Chu, Qian; Smith, Ulf; Borén, Jan; Kahn, Barbara B.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Branched Fatty Acid esters of Hydroxy Fatty Acids (FAHFAs) are a recently discovered class of endogenous mammalian lipids with anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory effects. We identified 16 different FAHFA families, such as branched Palmitic Acid esters of Hydroxy Stearic Acids (PAHSA), and each family consists of multiple isomers where the branched ester is at different positions (e.g. 5- and 9-PAHSA). We anticipate increased need for PAHSA measurements as markers of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. In this protocol, we provide a detailed description of the extraction and subsequent liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) of FAHFAs from human or mouse tissues. For a sample size of 6–12 the time frame is 2–3 days. PMID:26985573

  1. The role of holotrichs in the metabolism of dietary linoleic acid in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Girard, V; Hawke, J C

    1978-01-27

    The uptake and metabolism of linoleic acid by rumen holotrichs (mainly Isotricha prostoma and I. intestinalis) has been examined in in vitro infusion experiments. Maximum absorption and metabolism of [1-14C]linoleate by 2 . 10(6) Isotricha suspended in 100 ml buffer was obtained using an infusion rate of 1.6 mg linoleate/h. After 90 min, 84% of the added substrate was recovered within the cells, mainly as free fatty acid or phospholipid. There was a rapid incorporation of radioactivity into phospholipid, mainly phosphatidylcholine, at the commencement of linoleate infusion but no further incorporation after about 40 min. The presence of bacteria during incubations, in approximately the same Isotricha/bacteria ratio as found in the rumen, reduced the uptake of linoleate and the accumulation of free fatty acid by holotrichs but the incorporation into phospholipid remained similar to that obtained in the absence of bacteria. Very little biohydrogenation of linoleic acid occurred in incubations with holotrichs alone. Bacterial suspensions converted linoleic acid to mainly trans monoene and a small amount of stearic acid, but in incubations containing both bacteria and holotrichs, both stearic acid and trans monoene were major products. Using the latter mixed culture, about 20% of the added [1-14C]linoleic acid was present in holotrich phospholipid of which 62% remained as octadecadienoic acid. The Isotricha population was 3 . 10(3)--2 . 10(4)/ml rumen fluid and it contributed about 23% of the linoleic acid in the rumen of a cow on a hay diet.

  2. Effects of roasting temperature and duration on fatty acid composition, phenolic composition, Maillard reaction degree and antioxidant attribute of almond (Prunus dulcis) kernel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jau-Tien; Liu, Shih-Chun; Hu, Chao-Chin; Shyu, Yung-Shin; Hsu, Chia-Ying; Yang, Deng-Jye

    2016-01-01

    Roasting treatment increased levels of unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic, oleic and elaidic acids) as well as saturated fatty acids (palmitic and stearic acids) in almond (Prunus dulcis) kernel oils with temperature (150 or 180 °C) and duration (5, 10 or 20 min). Nonetheless, higher temperature (200 °C) and longer duration (10 or 20 min) roasting might result in breakdown of fatty acids especially for unsaturated fatty acids. Phenolic components (total phenols, flavonoids, condensed tannins and phenolic acids) of almond kernels substantially lost in the initial phase; afterward these components gradually increased with roasting temperature and duration. Similar results also observed for their antioxidant activities (scavenging DPPH and ABTS(+) radicals and ferric reducing power). The changes of phenolic acid and flavonoid compositions were also determined by HPLC. Maillard reaction products (estimated with non-enzymatic browning index) also increased with roasting temperature and duration; they might also contribute to enhancing the antioxidant attributes.

  3. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J Bruce; Gillies, Laura A; Almada, Luis A G; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2013-09-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified.

  4. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeasts species

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J. Bruce; Gillies, Laura A.; Almada, Luis A.G.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2013-01-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified. PMID:23891835

  5. Fatty Acid Composition of Different Collections of Coprinoid Mushrooms (Agaricomycetes) and Their Nutritional and Medicinal Values.

    PubMed

    Badalyan, Susanna M

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the free fatty acid (FA) composition of ethanol extracts obtained from mycelia of 30 genetically identified strains of 18 species of coprinoid mushrooms (CMs) or coprini belonging to clades Coprinellus (C. bisporus, C. curtus, C. disseminatus, C. domesticus, C. ellisii, C.flocculosus, C. micaceus, C. aff radians I, C. aff radians II, C. aff radians III, C. xanthothrix, Coprinellus sp. 4), Coprinopsis (C. cinerea, C. cothurnata, C. gonophylla, C. lagopides, C. maysoidispora, C. strossmayeri), and Coprinus (C. comatus) were evaluated using gas chromatography. Two unsaturated (lineolic, oleic) and 3 saturated (palmitic, stearic, myristic) FAs were detected in the tested mycelial samples. Amounts of unsaturated FAs prevailed over saturated FAs. Lineolic and palmitic acids were detected in all the species in high quantities (up to 64.73% and 53.82%, respectively). All 5 FAs were found in the Coprinus clade (family Agaricaceae) as opposed to the Coprinellus and Coprinopsis clades (family Psathyrellaceae). Based on the unsaturated and saturated FA content, the species from the clade Coprinellus were different from Coprinopsis species and C. comatus. The obtained data confirm that palmitic, linoleic, and stearic acids are predominant in mushrooms, including coprini. The presence of large amounts of unsaturated FAs in the tested coprini make them an option for further studies to formulate novel mushroom-based dietary supplements and nutriceuticals.

  6. Direct monophasic replacement of fatty acid by DMSA on SPION surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, M.; Deb, P.; Vasan, G.; Keil, P.; Kostka, A.; Erbe, A.

    2012-10-01

    Tailoring the surface and understanding the surface characteristics is necessary for biomedical applications of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. In this paper, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were prepared by thermal decomposition of iron nitrate in presence of stearic acid as surfactant. Due to the multilayer organization of surfactant molecules over the nanoparticle surface, the surface potential can be tuned by pH changes and hence the nanoparticles can be made dispersible in nonpolar as well as in polar solvents. We have presented a simple, facile procedure for controlled replacement of stearic acid from maghemite surface and subsequent derivatization by biocompatible dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) to obtain ultrastable hydrophilic nanoparticles with unaltered morphology, phase and properties. The surface chemistry of the functionalized SPIONs was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealing the presence of bound and unbound thiol groups and disulfides, leading to its prolonged stability in aqueous medium. The consequence of spatially selective functionalization on the stability and solubility of surface hydrophilic SPION has also been realized.

  7. Degree of free fatty acid saturation influences chocolate rejection in human assessors.

    PubMed

    Running, Cordelia A; Hayes, John E; Ziegler, Gregory R

    2017-02-01

    In foods, free fatty acids (FFAs) traditionally have been viewed as contributing an odor, yet evidence has accumulated that FFAs also contribute a unique taste ("oleogustus"). However, minimal work has been conducted using actual foods to test the contribution of FFA to taste preferences. Here, we investigate flavor, taste, and aroma contributions of added FFA in chocolate, as some commercial manufacturers already use lipolysis of triglycerides to generate unique profiles. We hypothesized that small added concentrations of FFAs would increase preferences for chocolate, whereas higher added concentrations would decrease preferences. We also hypothesized a saturated fatty acid (stearic C18) would have a lesser effect than a monounsaturated (oleic C18:1), which would have a lesser effect than a polyunsaturated (linoleic C18:2) fatty acid. For each, paired preference tests were conducted for 10 concentrations (0.04% to 2.25%) of added FFAs compared with the control chocolate without added FFAs. Stearic acid was tested for flavor (tasting and nares open), whereas the unsaturated fatty acids were tested for both aroma (orthonasal only and no tasting) and taste (tasting with nares blocked to eliminate retronasal odor). We found no preference for any added FFA chocolate; however, rejection was observed independently for both taste and aroma of unsaturated fatty acids, with linoleic acid reaching rejection at lower concentrations than oleic acid. These data indicate that degree of unsaturation influences rejection of both FFA aroma and taste in chocolate. Thus, alterations of FFA profiles in foods should be approached cautiously to avoid shifting concentrations of unsaturated fatty acids to hedonically unacceptable levels.

  8. Altered plasma and erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid profile in elite female water polo and football players.

    PubMed

    Arsić, Aleksandra; Vučić, Vesna; Tepšić, Jasna; Mazić, Sanja; Djelić, Marina; Glibetić, Marija

    2012-02-01

    The impact of chronic, intense exercise, such as in elite athletes, on phospholipids fatty acids (FA) composition has not been studied in women so far. This study aimed to investigate FA profiles in plasma and erythrocytes phospholipids in elite female water polo (N = 15) and football (N = 19) players in comparison with sedentary women. In spite of similar dietary patterns, as assessed by a food frequency questionnaire, plasma FA profile in the football players showed significantly higher proportions of stearic acid, oleic acid, and monounsaturated FA (MUFA), and significantly lower proportions of total and n-6 polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) than in the water polo and control group. The water polo players had higher percentages of palmitoleic acid and arachidonic acid than the control subjects. Erythrocyte FA profile differed among groups. We found significantly higher proportion of oleic acid and MUFA in the football group than in the controls, and decreased stearic acid and elevated palmitic and palmitoleic acid in the water polo players than in the other 2 groups. Both groups of athletes had significantly lower percentages of n-6 dihomo-γ-linolenic acid, n-6 PUFA, and total PUFA compared with the controls. The estimated activities of elongase and desaturases in erythrocytes were also altered in the athletes. Our results indicate that long-term, intense physical training significantly affects FA status of plasma and erythrocyte phospholipids in women. The observed differences between the water polo and the football players suggest that the type of regular training may contribute to the altered metabolism of FA, although possible genetic differences among the 3 study groups cannot be ruled out.

  9. A fundamental approach to adhesion: Synthesis, surface analysis, thermodynamics and mechanics. [acid-base properties of titanium 6-4 surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    The acid-base properties of titanium 6-4 plates (low surface area) were investigated after three different pretreatments, namely Turco, phosphate-fluoride and Pasa-Jell. A series of indicators was used and color changes were detected using diffuse reflectance visible spectroscopy. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to examine the indicator on the Ti 6-4 surface. Specular reflectance infra-red spectroscopy was used to study the adsorption of stearic acid from cyclohexane solutions on the Ti 6-4 surface.

  10. Prediction of liquid-liquid equilibrium for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, E.; Monnerat, S.; Stragevitch, L.; Pina, C.G.; Goncalves, C.B.; Meirelles, A.J.A.

    1999-12-01

    Group interaction parameters for the UNIFAC and ASOG models were specially adjusted for predicting liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol at temperatures ranging from 20 to 45 C. Experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for systems of triolein, oleic acid, and ethanol and of triolein, stearic acid, and ethanol were measured and utilized in the adjustment. The average percent deviation between experimental and calculated compositions was 0.79% and 0.52% for the UNIFAC and ASOG models, respectively. The prediction of liquid-liquid equilibrium for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol was quite successful, with an average deviation of 1.31% and 1.32% for the UNIFAC and ASOG models, respectively.

  11. Genotype, production system and sex effects on fatty acid composition of meat from goat kids.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mustafa; Demirel, Gulcan; Yakan, Akın; Ekiz, Bülent; Tölü, Cemil; Savaş, Türker

    2015-02-01

    Two trials were performed to assess the meat fatty acid profile of goat kids from different genotypes, production systems and sex. In the first trial, genotype effect was determined in 24 suckling male kids from Turkish Saanen, Maltese and Gokceada breeds. In the second trial, male and female Gokceada Goat kids were used to compare the effect of extensive and semi-intensive production systems on fatty acid composition of meat. Significant genotype effect was observed in the percentages of myristic acid (C14:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1 n-9), linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3), arachidonic acid (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3), despite no differences on the ratios of polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (PUFA/SFA) and n-6/n-3 (P > 0.05). The effect of production system had also significant effects on fatty acids, but sex only influenced significantly stearic acid (C18:0), C18:1 n-9 and C18:3 n-3 fatty acids and total PUFA level and PUFA/SFA ratio. This study confirms that dairy breeds are prone to produce higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids in their muscle. Meanwhile, meat from Gokceada goat kids, which is one of the indigenous breeds in Turkey, had similar PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 ratios to Turkish Saanen and Maltase.

  12. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kanobe, Charles; McCarville, Michael T.; O’Neal, Matthew E.; Tylka, Gregory L.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.

    2015-01-01

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of “metabolic hijacking” by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor. PMID:26684003

  13. A novel derivatization reagent possessing a bromoquinolinium structure for biological carboxylic acids in HPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yuko; Inagaki, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Mayu; Min, Jun Zhe; Inoue, Koichi; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2013-06-01

    A novel bromoquinolinium reagent, i.e. 1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-bromoquinolinium bromide (APBQ), was synthesized for the analysis of carboxylic acids. A simple and practical precolumn derivatization procedure using the APBQ in RP chromatography and MS (HPLC-MS) has been developed using bile acids and free fatty acids, as the representative carboxylic acids in biological samples. The APBQ efficiently reacted with carboxylic acids at 60°C for 60 min in the presence of N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and pyridine as the activation reagents. Because the APBQ possesses a bromine atom in the structure, the identification of a series of carboxylic acids was easily achieved due to the characteristic bromine isotope pattern in the mass spectra. The APBQ also has a quaternary amine structure, thus the positively charged derivatives are predominate for the highly sensitive detection of carboxylic acids. The APBQ was successfully applied to the selective determination of biological carboxylic acids in human plasma. The bile acids (chenodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid) and several saturated (stearic acid and palmitic acid) and unsaturated free fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) were reasonably determined by HPLC-MS under the proposed procedure. Based on the results of analyses of human plasma and saliva, the proposed procedure using APBQ seems to be applicable for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of a series of carboxylic acids in biological samples.

  14. Evaluation of chemical constitute, fatty acids and antioxidant activity of the fruit and seed of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) grown wild in Iran.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Keramatollah; Alirezalu, Abolfazl; Akbari, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, the chemical compositions of berries from sea buckthorn were studied. The amount of ascorbic acid and β-carotene determined by HPLC was 170 mg/100 g FW and 0.20 mg/g FW, respectively. Total phenols, anthocyanins, acidity and total soluble solids (TSS) contents were 247 mg GAE/100 g FW, 3 mg/L (cyanidin-3-glucoside), 5.32% and 13.8%, respectively. Fruit antioxidant activity determined by the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) method was 24.85 mM Fe/100 g FW. Results confirmed the presence of six dominant fatty acids (determined by GC) in fruit including linoleic (34.2%), palmitoleic (21.37%), palmitic (17.2%), oleic (12.8%), linolenic (5.37%) and stearic acid (1.67%). Five dominant fatty acids of the seeds were linoleic (42.36%), linolenic (21.27%), oleic (21.34%), palmitic (6.54%) and stearic acid (2.54%). The nitrogen content was 3.96%. The P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd and Cl contents of fruit were 491, 1674, 1290, 990, 291, 29.77, 108.37, 17.87, 0.021 and 2.18 mg/kg DW, respectively.

  15. Fatty acids profiling reveals potential candidate markers of semen quality.

    PubMed

    Zerbinati, C; Caponecchia, L; Rago, R; Leoncini, E; Bottaccioli, A G; Ciacciarelli, M; Pacelli, A; Salacone, P; Sebastianelli, A; Pastore, A; Palleschi, G; Boccia, S; Carbone, A; Iuliano, L

    2016-11-01

    Previous reports showed altered fatty acid content in subjects with altered sperm parameters compared to normozoospermic individuals. However, these studies focused on a limited number of fatty acids, included a short number of subjects and results varied widely. We conducted a case-control study involving 155 patients allocated into four groups, including normozoospermia (n = 33), oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (n = 32), asthenozoospermia (n = 25), and varicocoele (n = 44). Fatty acid profiling, including 30 species, was analyzed by a validated gas chromatography (GC) method on the whole seminal fluid sample. Multinomial logistic regression modeling was used to identify the associations between fatty acids and the four groups. Specimens from 15 normozoospermic subjects were also analyzed for fatty acids content in the seminal plasma and spermatozoa to study the distribution in the two compartments. Fatty acids lipidome varied markedly between the four groups. Multinomial logistic regression modeling revealed that high levels of palmitic acid, behenic acid, oleic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) confer a low risk to stay out of the normozoospermic group. In the whole population, seminal fluid stearic acid was negatively correlated (r = -0.53), and DHA was positively correlated (r = 0.65) with sperm motility. Some fatty acids were preferentially accumulated in spermatozoa and the highest difference was observed for DHA, which was 6.2 times higher in spermatozoa than in seminal plasma. The results of this study highlight complete fatty acids profile in patients with different semen parameters. Given the easy-to-follow and rapid method of analysis, fatty acid profiling by GC method can be used for therapeutic purposes and to measure compliance in infertility trials using fatty acids supplements.

  16. Allergic contact dermatitis from 12-hydroxystearic Acid and hydrogenated castor oil.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Daniel W

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old male experienced severe allergic contact dermatitis from 12-hydroxystearic acid in a lip balm and from hydrogenated castor oil in an underarm deodorant. He also had a positive patch-test reaction to bis-diglyceryl polyacyladipate-2, which is present in the implicated lip balm and which itself contains 12-hydroxystearic acid. He was also incidentally found to have contact allergy to ricinoleic acid and castor oil. Ricinoleic acid is the principal fatty acid in castor oil, whereas 12-hydroxystearic acid is the principal fatty acid in hydrogenated castor oil. These two fatty acids are each 18-carbon 12-hydroxylated fatty acids, differing only in degree of saturation. The lack of patch-test reactivity to the analogous nonhydroxylated fatty acids, stearic acid (C18:0), and oleic acid (C18:1) indicates that 12-hydroxylation was required for allergenicity in this patient. In addition, serial dilution testing demonstrated that saturation of the hydroxylated C18 fatty acid enhanced its allergenicity.

  17. Genetic enhancement of palmitic acid accumulation in cotton seed oil through RNAi down-regulation of ghKAS2 encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II (KASII).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Wu, Man; Zhang, Baolong; Shrestha, Pushkar; Petrie, James; Green, Allan G; Singh, Surinder P

    2017-01-01

    Palmitic acid (C16:0) already makes up approximately 25% of the total fatty acids in the conventional cotton seed oil. However, further enhancements in palmitic acid content at the expense of the predominant unsaturated fatty acids would provide increased oxidative stability of cotton seed oil and also impart the high melting point required for making margarine, shortening and confectionary products free of trans fatty acids. Seed-specific RNAi-mediated down-regulation of β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II (KASII) catalysing the elongation of palmitoyl-ACP to stearoyl-ACP has succeeded in dramatically increasing the C16 fatty acid content of cotton seed oil to well beyond its natural limits, reaching up to 65% of total fatty acids. The elevated C16 levels were comprised of predominantly palmitic acid (C16:0, 51%) and to a lesser extent palmitoleic acid (C16:1, 11%) and hexadecadienoic acid (C16:2, 3%), and were stably inherited. Despite of the dramatic alteration of fatty acid composition and a slight yet significant reduction in oil content in these high-palmitic (HP) lines, seed germination remained unaffected. Regiochemical analysis of triacylglycerols (TAG) showed that the increased levels of palmitic acid mainly occurred at the outer positions, while C16:1 and C16:2 were predominantly found in the sn-2 position in both TAG and phosphatidylcholine. Crossing the HP line with previously created high-oleic (HO) and high-stearic (HS) genotypes demonstrated that HP and HO traits could be achieved simultaneously; however, elevation of stearic acid was hindered in the presence of high level of palmitic acid.

  18. Quantification of phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid and free fatty acids in an ultrasound contrast agent by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Hvattum, Erlend; Uran, Steinar; Sandbaek, Anne Gunvor; Karlsson, Anders A; Skotland, Tore

    2006-10-11

    Sonazoid is a new contrast agent for ultrasound imaging. The product is an aqueous suspension of perfluorobutane microbubbles coated with phospholipids obtained from hydrogenated egg phosphatidylserine (H-EPS). A normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with evaporative light scattering detection was developed for quantification of free fatty acids, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid in H-EPS and Sonazoid. Separation of the lipids was carried out on an HPLC diol column and a gradient of chloroform and methanol with 0.2% formic acid titrated to pH 7.5 with ammonia. The calibration standards contained stearic acid, distearoyl-phosphatidic acid (DSPA) and distearoyl-phosphatidylserine (DSPS) in the concentration range of 0.016-1.0mg/ml (0.4-25microg injected). The method was validated with a limit of quantification of the three lipids set to 0.4microg (approximately 20-60microM). The best fit of the three calibration curves were obtained when the logarithmic transformed theoretical lipid concentration was plotted against the logarithmic transformed area under the peak and fitted to a second order polynomial equation. Stearic acid, DSPA and DSPS were analysed with an intermediate precision ranging from 4.4% to 5.3% R.S.D. and they were extracted from an aqueous suspension with a recovery ranging from 103.3% to 113.3%. The sum of total phospholipid concentration determined in H-EPS ranged from 96.4% to 103.2% of the theoretical values. The lipids in the ultrasound product were quantitated with a repeatability ranging from 6.2% to 11.7% R.S.D.

  19. Effect of Delta 9–Stearoyl-ACP-Desaturase-C mutants in a high oleic background on soybean seed oil composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] oil typically contains 2-4% stearic acid. Oil with at least 20% stearic acid is desirable because of its baking properties and health profile. This study identifies two new sources of high stearic acid and evaluates the interaction of high stearic and oleic acid al...

  20. Stabilization of alkylated azacrown ether by fatty acid at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Zarbakhsh, Ali; Campana, Mario; Webster, John R P; Wojciechowski, Kamil

    2010-12-07

    The adsorbed amount of partially deuterated dihexadecyl-diaza-18-crown-6 ether (d-ACE16) in the presence of different chain length fatty acids as a function of surface pressure was determined by neutron reflectometry technique. The highest adsorbed amount of the azacrown ether was observed for the mixture of ACE16 with hexadecanoic (palmitic) acid, pointing to the importance of chain length matching between the two species for optimum stabilization of the mixed monolayer. The contrast variation technique was used to estimate the contribution to the total adsorbed amount from stearic acid and ACE16. It was found that the mixed Langmuir monolayer is stable against dissolution up to a surface pressure of 20 mN m(-1). Above this pressure, however, the spread and adsorbed amounts start to deviate, indicative of partial dissolution into the aqueous subphase. The consequences of this behavior for the transport of metal ions through the interfaces of permeation liquid membranes (PLMs) are discussed.

  1. Myocardial imaging and metabolic studies with (17-/sup 123/I)iodoheptadecanoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Freundlieb, C.; Hoeck, A.; Vyska, K.; Feinendegen, L.E.; Machulla, H.J.; Stoecklin, G.

    1980-11-01

    After intravenous administration of the stearic acid analogue (17-/sup 123/I)iodoheptadecanoic acid (I-123 HA), myocardial metabolism was studied in ten normal individuals, eight patients with coronary artery disease and three patients with congestive heart failure. High-quality images were obtained in sequential scintigraphy of I-123 metabolically bound in myocardial tissue. Infarcted zones as well as ischemic regions are indicated by reduced tracer uptake. Iodine-123 in the blood pool and interstitial space consists mainly of radioiodide that is liberated by fatty-acid metabolism and was corrected for. Using the proposed correction not only are the images improved but the uptake and elimination of the I-123 in the myocardial cells can be followed. The average disappearance half-time of I-123 HA from the myocardium of normal persons was 24 +- 4.7 min. In patients with coronary artery disease significant differences between myocardial regions were observed.

  2. Nitro-fatty acid pharmacokinetics in the adipose tissue compartment.

    PubMed

    Fazzari, Marco; Khoo, Nicholas K H; Woodcock, Steven R; Jorkasky, Diane K; Li, Lihua; Schopfer, Francisco J; Freeman, Bruce A

    2017-02-01

    Electrophilic nitro-FAs (NO2-FAs) promote adaptive and anti-inflammatory cell signaling responses as a result of an electrophilic character that supports posttranslational protein modifications. A unique pharmacokinetic profile is expected for NO2-FAs because of an ability to undergo reversible reactions including Michael addition with cysteine-containing proteins and esterification into complex lipids. Herein, we report via quantitative whole-body autoradiography analysis of rats gavaged with radiolabeled 10-nitro-[(14)C]oleic acid, preferential accumulation in adipose tissue over 2 weeks. To better define the metabolism and incorporation of NO2-FAs and their metabolites in adipose tissue lipids, adipocyte cultures were supplemented with 10-nitro-oleic acid (10-NO2-OA), nitro-stearic acid, nitro-conjugated linoleic acid, and nitro-linolenic acid. Then, quantitative HPLC-MS/MS analysis was performed on adipocyte neutral and polar lipid fractions, both before and after acid hydrolysis of esterified FAs. NO2-FAs preferentially incorporated in monoacyl- and diacylglycerides, while reduced metabolites were highly enriched in triacylglycerides. This differential distribution profile was confirmed in vivo in the adipose tissue of NO2-OA-treated mice. This pattern of NO2-FA deposition lends new insight into the unique pharmacokinetics and pharmacologic actions that could be expected for this chemically-reactive class of endogenous signaling mediators and synthetic drug candidates.

  3. Fatty Acids and Circadian Rhythms in Phaseolus coccineus

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, George F.; Stowe, Bruce B.

    1979-01-01

    Five major fatty acids, palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), oleic (18:1), linoleic (18:2), and linolenic (18:3), were identified in polar lipid extracts from pulvini of Samanea saman and Phaseolus coccineus. In P. coccineus their distribution varied quantitatively in the laminar pulvinus, petiolar pulvinus, petiole, stem, leaf and root. Short pulses of red light did not greatly affect the relative quantities of fatty acids in dark grown P. coccineus, but a 30-minute exposure of red light generally increased the degree of unsaturation by increasing linolenic acid and decreasing linoleic and palmitic acids. P. coccineus seeds were exposed to several substituted pyridazinones as well as cerulenin and dimethylethanolamine. The pyridazinones San 6706 and norflurazon altered fatty acid composition but also altered morphology and inhibited chlorophyll synthesis. Exposure to 10 C for 72 hours caused a small but significant increase in the degree of unsaturation of P. coccineus fatty acids but results were equivocal with S. saman. PMID:16660990

  4. Fatty acid profiling of the seed oils of some varieties of field peas (Pisum sativum) by RP-LC/ESI-MS/MS: towards the development of an oilseed pea.

    PubMed

    Villalobos Solis, Manuel Ivan; Patel, Anil; Orsat, Valérie; Singh, Jaswinder; Lefsrud, Mark

    2013-08-15

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to negative-ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (RP-LC/ESI-MS/MS) was used to study the fatty acid profile from the oil of harvested field pea (Pisum sativum) varieties as part of a research project to develop this legume as a commercial oilseed for Canada. The seed oils from pea samples contained palmitic and stearic acids as major saturated fatty acids. Oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids were the major unsaturated fatty acids found. Small percentages of other long chain fatty acids were also detected. This profile suggests that the species of field pea investigated might have the potential to be used as raw materials to develop a future new oilseed crop for the food industry. Fatty acid extracts did not require further manipulation before final analysis by RP-LC/ESI-MS/MS, indicating the utility and relative simplicity of this technique for future screening studies.

  5. Association of SSR markers with contents of fatty acids in olive oil and genetic diversity analysis of an olive core collection.

    PubMed

    Ipek, M; Ipek, A; Seker, M; Gul, M K

    2015-03-27

    The purpose of this research was to characterize an olive core collection using some agronomic characters and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to determine SSR markers associated with the content of fatty acids in olive oil. SSR marker analysis demonstrated the presence of a high amount of genetic variation between the olive cultivars analyzed. A UPGMA dendrogram demonstrated that olive cultivars did not cluster on the basis of their geographic origin. Fatty acid components of olive oil in these cultivars were determined. The results also showed that there was a great amount of variation between the olive cultivars in terms of fatty acid composition. For example, oleic acid content ranged from 57.76 to 76.9% with standard deviation of 5.10%. Significant correlations between fatty acids of olive oil were observed. For instance, a very high negative correlation (-0.812) between oleic and linoleic acids was detected. A structured association analysis between the content of fatty acids in olive oil and SSR markers was performed. STRUCTURE analysis assigned olive cultivars to two gene pools (K = 2). Assignment of olive cultivars to these gene pools was not based on geographical origin. Association between fatty acid traits and SSR markers was evaluated using the general linear model of TASSEL. Significant associations were determined between five SSR markers and stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids of olive oil. Very high associations (P < 0.001) between ssrOeUA-DCA14 and stearic acid and between GAPU71B and oleic acid indicated that these markers could be used for marker-assisted selection in olive.

  6. In silico Analysis for Predicting Fatty Acids of Black Cumin Oil as Inhibitors of P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Babar; Jamal, Qazi Mohd. Sajid; Mir, Showkat R.; Shams, Saiba; Al-Wabel, Naser A.; Kamal, Mohammad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Black cumin oil is obtained from the seeds of Nigella sativa L. which belongs to family Ranunculaceae. The seed oil has been reported to possess antitumor, antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, hypoglycemic, central nervous system depressant, antioxidant, and immunostimulatory activities. These bioactivities have been attributed to the fixed oil, volatile oil, or their components. Seed oil consisted of 15 saturated fatty acids (17%) and 17 unsaturated fatty acids (82.9%). Long chain fatty acids and medium chain fatty acids have been reported to increase oral bioavailability of peptides, antibiotics, and other important therapeutic agents. In earlier studies, permeation enhancement and bioenhancement of drugs has been done with black cumin oil. Objective: In order to recognize the mechanism of binding of fatty acids to P-glycoprotein (P-gp), linoleic acid, oleic acid, margaric acid, cis-11, 14-eicosadienoic acid, and stearic acid were selected for in silico studies, which were carried out using AutoDock 4.2, based on the Lamarckian genetic algorithm principle. Materials and Methods: Template search with BLAST and HHblits has been performed against the SWISS-MODEL template library. The target sequence was searched with BLAST against the primary amino acid sequence of P-gp from Rattus norvegicus. Results: The amount of energy needed by linoleic acid, oleic acid, eicosadienoic acid, margaric acid, and stearic acid to bind with P-gp were found to be − 10.60, −10.48, −9.95, −11.92, and − 10.37 kcal/mol, respectively. The obtained data support that all the selected fatty acids have contributed to inhibit P-gp activity thereby enhances the bioavailability of drugs. Conclusion: This study plays a significant role in finding hot spots in P-gp and may offer the further scope of designing potent and specific inhibitors of P-gp. SUMMARY Generation of 3D structure of fatty acid compounds from Black cumin oil and 3D homology modeling of Rat P

  7. Genetic mapping of QTLs controlling fatty acids provided insights into the genetic control of fatty acid synthesis pathway in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming Li; Khera, Pawan; Pandey, Manish K; Wang, Hui; Qiao, Lixian; Feng, Suping; Tonnis, Brandon; Barkley, Noelle A; Pinnow, David; Holbrook, Corley C; Culbreath, Albert K; Varshney, Rajeev K; Guo, Baozhu

    2015-01-01

    Peanut, a high-oil crop with about 50% oil content, is either crushed for oil or used as edible products. Fatty acid composition determines the oil quality which has high relevance to consumer health, flavor, and shelf life of commercial products. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80% of peanut oil, the six other fatty acids namely palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), arachidic acid (C20:0), gadoleic acid (C20:1), behenic acid (C22:0), and lignoceric acid (C24:0) are accounted for the rest 20%. To determine the genetic basis and to improve further understanding on effect of FAD2 genes on these fatty acids, two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations namely S-population (high oleic line 'SunOleic 97R' × low oleic line 'NC94022') and T-population (normal oleic line 'Tifrunner' × low oleic line 'GT-C20') were developed. Genetic maps with 206 and 378 marker loci for the S- and the T-population, respectively were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. As a result, a total of 164 main-effect (M-QTLs) and 27 epistatic (E-QTLs) QTLs associated with the minor fatty acids were identified with 0.16% to 40.56% phenotypic variation explained (PVE). Thirty four major QTLs (>10% of PVE) mapped on five linkage groups and 28 clusters containing more than three QTLs were also identified. These results suggest that the major QTLs with large additive effects would play an important role in controlling composition of these minor fatty acids in addition to the oleic and linoleic acids in peanut oil. The interrelationship among these fatty acids should be considered while breeding for improved peanut genotypes with good oil quality and desired fatty acid composition.

  8. On the microstructure of organic solutions of mono-carboxylic acids: Combined study by infrared spectroscopy, small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Roman A.; Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T.; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Rosta, László; Grigoryeva, Natalia A.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.

    2015-11-01

    The data of infrared spectroscopy (IR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) have been combined to conclude about the nanoscale structural organization of organic non-polar solutions of saturated mono-carboxylic acids with different alkyl chain lengths for diluted solutions of saturated myristic (C14) and stearic (C18) acids in benzene and decalin. In particular, the degree of dimerization was found from the IR spectra. The structural anisotropy of the acids and their dimers was used in the treatment of the data of MD simulations to describe the solute-solvent interface in a cylindrical approximation and show its rather strong influence on SANS. The corresponding scattering length density profiles were used to fit the experimental SANS data comprising the information about the acid molecule isomerization. The SANS data from concentrated solutions showed a partial self-assembling of the acids within the nematic transition is different for two solvents due to lyophobic peculiarities.

  9. Transformation of waste cooking oil into C-18 fatty acids using a novel lipase produced by Penicillium chrysogenum through solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Negi, Sangeeta

    2015-10-01

    The prime aim of the current work was to illustrate the components existing in repeatedly used cooking oil and to develop an economical process for the production of fatty acids from low cost feedstock waste. The waste cooking oil was characterized by the occurrence of high molecular weight hydrocarbons and polymerized derivative of esters. Triacontanoic acid methyl ester, 2,3,5,8-Tetramethyldecane, 3,3 dimethyl heptane, and 2,2,3,3-teramethyl pentane were detected as thermal and oxidative contaminants that adversely affect the quality of cooking oil. Fundamentally, waste cooking oil comprises ester bonds of long chain fatty acids. The extracellular lipase produced from P. chrysogenum was explored for the hydrolysis of waste cooking oil. The incorporation of lipase to waste cooking oil in 1:1 proportion released 17 % oleic acid and 5 % stearic acid.

  10. Seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) Improves Growth, Immunity, Fatty Acid Profile and Reduces Cholesterol in Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, J. A.; Islam, M. M.; Ahmed, S. T.; Mun, H. S.; Kim, G. M.; Kim, Y. J.; Yang, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the effect of 2% seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product (SW) on growth performance, immunity, carcass characteristics, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile in Hanwoo steers. A total of 20 Hanwoo steers (ave. 22 months old; 619 kg body weight) were randomly assigned to control (basal diet) and 2% SW supplemented diet. Dietary SW supplementation significantly (p<0.05) improved average daily gain and gain:feed ratio as well as serum immunoglobulin G concentration. Chemical composition and quality grade of meat and carcass yield grades evaluated at the end of the trial were found to be unaffected by SW supplementation. Dietary SW significantly reduced meat cholesterol concentration (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation significantly reduced the myristic acid (C14:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:ln-7) concentration, while SW increased the concentration of stearic acid (C18:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) compared to control (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation had no effect on saturated fatty acids (SFA), unsaturated fatty acids, poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or mono unsaturated fatty acid content in muscles. A reduced ratio of PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 were found in SW supplemented group (p<0.05). In conclusion, 2% SW supplementation was found to improve growth, immunity and fatty acid profile with significantly reduced cholesterol of beef. PMID:25083105

  11. Seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) Improves Growth, Immunity, Fatty Acid Profile and Reduces Cholesterol in Hanwoo Steers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J A; Islam, M M; Ahmed, S T; Mun, H S; Kim, G M; Kim, Y J; Yang, C J

    2014-08-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the effect of 2% seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product (SW) on growth performance, immunity, carcass characteristics, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile in Hanwoo steers. A total of 20 Hanwoo steers (ave. 22 months old; 619 kg body weight) were randomly assigned to control (basal diet) and 2% SW supplemented diet. Dietary SW supplementation significantly (p<0.05) improved average daily gain and gain:feed ratio as well as serum immunoglobulin G concentration. Chemical composition and quality grade of meat and carcass yield grades evaluated at the end of the trial were found to be unaffected by SW supplementation. Dietary SW significantly reduced meat cholesterol concentration (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation significantly reduced the myristic acid (C14:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:ln-7) concentration, while SW increased the concentration of stearic acid (C18:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) compared to control (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation had no effect on saturated fatty acids (SFA), unsaturated fatty acids, poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or mono unsaturated fatty acid content in muscles. A reduced ratio of PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 were found in SW supplemented group (p<0.05). In conclusion, 2% SW supplementation was found to improve growth, immunity and fatty acid profile with significantly reduced cholesterol of beef.

  12. Stimulation of phosphatidylglycerolphosphate phosphatase activity by unsaturated fatty acids in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Cao, S G; Hatch, G M

    1994-07-01

    Phosphatidylglycerolphosphate (PGP) synthase and PGP phosphatase catalyze the sequential synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol from cytidine-5'-diphosphate 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (CDP-DG) and glycerol-3-phosphate. PGP synthase and PGP phosphatase activities were characterized in rat heart mitochondrial fractions, and the effect of fatty acids on the activity of these enzymes was determined. PGP synthase was observed to be a heat labile enzyme that exhibited apparent Km values for CDP-PG and glycerol-3-phosphate of 46 and 20 microM, respectively. The addition of exogenous oleic acid to the assay mixture did not affect PGP synthase activity. PGP phosphatase was observed to be a heat labile enzyme, and addition of oleic acid to the assay mixture caused a concentration-dependent stimulation of PGP phosphatase activity. Maximum stimulation (1.9-fold) of enzyme activity was observed in the presence of 0.5 mM oleic acid, but the stimulation was slightly attenuated by the presence of albumin in the assay. The presence of oleic acid in the assay mixture caused the inactivation of PGP phosphatase activity to be retarded at 55 degrees C. Stimulation of PGP phosphatase activity was also observed with arachidonic acid, whereas taurocholic, stearic and palmitic acids did not significantly affect PGP phosphatase activity. The activity of mitochondrial phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase was not affected by inclusion of oleic acid in the incubation mixture. We postulate that unsaturated fatty acids stimulate PGP phosphatase activity in rat heart.

  13. Utilization of milk fatty acids by the suckling Iberian piglets.

    PubMed

    Aguinaga, M A; Haro, A; Lara, L; Gómez-Carballar, F; Nieto, R; Aguilera, J F

    2016-11-01

    A total of 16 pure-bred Iberian (IB) sows, all of them suckling six piglets, were used, eight of them in each of the two consecutive trials (1 and 2). Daily milk yield and composition were determined weekly over a 34-day lactation period. Within each litter, one piglet at birth and four piglets on day 35 of life were slaughtered. Milk intake per piglet tended to be greater in trial 2 (832 v. 893 g/day; P=0.066), but piglets grew at 168±3.3 g/day, irrespective of the trial. In the IB sow milk, the linoleic (LA) : linolenic (LNA) acid ratio averaged 14.6 and 15.2 in trial 1 and trial 2, respectively. A fivefold increase in piglet body fat content was observed over lactation (P<0.001). Most of this fat (81.4%) was present in the carcass. After 34 days of lactation, whole-body relative content of palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic acids were very close to those in the milk consumed, suggesting direct deposition. Daily deposition of LA derivatives and of LNA and its derivatives was found to be extremely low (<0.02 g, on average). Moreover, some of the arachidonic acid (ARA) in tissues of the IB piglet at birth disappeared throughout the lactating period. An overall fractional deposition for total fatty acids (FA) was 0.409. Fractional oxidation (disappearance) rates were 0.939 and 0.926 for n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated FA. The overall rate of disappearance for the major non-essential FA (myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic acids), estimated as 1-the overall fractional deposition rate, was 0.546. It is concluded that the high degree of FA unsaturation, high oxidation rate of LA and LNA, and poor synthesis of ARA from LA and of docosahexaenoic acid from LNA found in the suckling piglet might increase the energy cost of whole-body fat accretion, a contributor to the observed low efficiency of use of milk energy for growth.

  14. Phase diagram for controlled crystallization of calcium phosphate under acidic organic monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, F. Z.; Zhou, L. F.; Cui, H.; Ma, C. L.; Lu, H. B.; Li, H. D.

    1996-12-01

    The effect of ionic concentration and pH on matrix-regulated crystallization may be important in biomineralization processes and biomimetic synthesis of materials. This effect in the system of calcium phosphate solution under stearic acid monolayers was investigated. In experiments, the solution conditions ranged in concentration of Ca ion of 0.1-20mM and in pH of 5.3-7.0. It was found that at the initial stage of the controlled crystallization, the (0001)-oriented hydroxyapatite (HAp) precipitations under the acidic monolayers always occur. At solution conditions near the solubility isotherms of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) in the solubility phase diagram, precipitations of OCP and DCPD phases can form together with HAp precipitation, respectively. Orientations of DCPD or OCP phase precipitations were irregular.

  15. Cuticle Fatty Acid Composition and Differential Susceptibility of Three Species of Cockroaches to the Entomopathogenic Fungi Metarhizium anisopliae (Ascomycota, Hypocreales).

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Alejandra C; Gołębiowski, Marek; Pennisi, Mariana; Peterson, Graciela; García, Juan J; Manfrino, Romina G; López Lastra, Claudia C

    2015-04-01

    Differences in free fatty acids (FFAs) chemical composition of insects may be responsible for susceptibility or resistance to fungal infection. Determination of FFAs found in cuticular lipids can effectively contribute to the knowledge concerning insect defense mechanisms. In this study, we have evaluated the susceptibility of three species of cockroaches to the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin by topical application. Mortality due to M. anisopliae was highly significant on adults and nymphs of Blattella germanica L. (Blattodea: Blattellidae). However, mortality was faster in adults than in nymphs. Adults of Blatta orientalis L. (Blattodea: Blattidae) were not susceptible to the fungus, and nymphs of Blaptica dubia Serville (Blattodea: Blaberidae) were more susceptible to the fungus than adults. The composition of cuticular FFAs in the three species of cockroaches was also studied. The analysis indicated that all of the fatty acids were mostly straight-chain, long-chain, saturated or unsaturated. Cuticular lipids of three species of cockroaches contained 19 FFAs, ranging from C14:0 to C24:0. The predominant fatty acids found in the three studied species of cockroaches were oleic, linoleic, palmitic, and stearic acid. Only in adults of Bl. orientalis, myristoleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, arachidic acid, dihomolinoleic acid, and behenic acid were identified. Lignoceric acid was detected only in nymphs of Bl. orientalis. Heneicosylic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were identified in adults of Ba. dubia.

  16. Comparison of Oil Content and Fatty Acid Profile of Ten New Camellia oleifera Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunying; Liu, Xueming; Chen, Zhiyi; Lin, Yaosheng; Wang, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    The oil contents and fatty acid (FA) compositions of ten new and one wild Camellia oleifera varieties were investigated. Oil contents in camellia seeds from new C. oleifera varied with cultivars from 41.92% to 53.30% and were affected by cultivation place. Average oil content (47.83%) of dry seeds from all ten new cultivars was almost the same as that of wild common C. oleifera seeds (47.06%). New C. oleifera cultivars contained similar FA compositions which included palmitic acid (C16:0, PA), palmitoleic acid (C16:1), stearic acid (C18:0, SA), oleic acid (C18:1, OA), linoleic acid (C18:2, LA), linolenic acid (C18:3), eicosenoic acid (C20:1), and tetracosenoic acid (C24:1). Predominant FAs in mature seeds were OA (75.78%~81.39%), LA (4.85%~10.79%), PA (7.68%~10.01%), and SA (1.46%~2.97%) and OA had the least coefficient of variation among different new cultivars. Average ratio of single FA of ten artificial C. oleifera cultivars was consistent with that of wild common C. oleifera. All cultivars contained the same ratios of saturated FA (SFA) and unsaturated FA (USFA). Oil contents and FA profiles of new cultivars were not significantly affected by breeding and selection. PMID:26942012

  17. Influence of two different alcohols in the esterification of fatty acids over layered zinc stearate/palmitate.

    PubMed

    de Paiva, Eduardo José Mendes; Corazza, Marcos Lúcio; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Wärnå, Johan; Murzin, Dmitry Yu; Wypych, Fernando; Salmi, Tapio

    2015-10-01

    In this work, esterification of fatty acids (oleic, linoleic and stearic acid) with a commercial zinc carboxylate (a layered compound formed by simultaneous intercalation of stearate and palmitate anions) was performed. Kinetic modeling using a quasi-homogeneous approach successfully fitted experimental data at different molar ratio of fatty acids/alcohols (1-butanol and 1-hexanol) and temperature. An apparent first-order reaction related to all reactants was found and activation energy of 66 kJ/mol was reported. The catalyst showed to be unique, as it can be easily recovered like a heterogeneous catalysts behaving like ionic liquids. In addition, this catalyst demonstrated a peculiar behavior, because higher reactivity was observed with the increase in the alcohols chain length compared to the authors' previous work using ethanol.

  18. Effect of dietary alfalfa on the fatty acid composition and indexes of lipid metabolism of rabbit meat.

    PubMed

    Dal Bosco, A; Mugnai, C; Roscini, V; Mattioli, S; Ruggeri, S; Castellini, C

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse and increase the quality of rabbit meat by increasing the levels of natural bioactive compounds through providing fresh alfalfa to rabbits as complementary feed. At 50 days of age, forty rabbits were divided into two homogeneous groups and fed pelleted feed (control group) or pelleted feed plus fresh alfalfa (alfalfa group). The lipid content of meat was significantly higher in the control group likely due to the higher feed consumption observed in this group. The same trend was observed in the contents of myristic, palmitoleic, oleic and linoleic acid. On the contrary, the supplementation of fresh alfalfa increased the stearic, linolenic, eicosatrienoic, eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic and total polyunsaturated fatty acid contents; also the total monounsaturated fatty acids and the α- and γ-tocopherol content was significantly lower. Moreover, alfalfa ingestion decreased the n-6 content, n-6/n-3 ratio and thrombogenicity index.

  19. Impact of methods used to express levels of circulating fatty acids on the degree and direction of associations with blood lipids in humans.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Susan; Ruczinski, Ingo; Ivester, Priscilla; Lee, Tammy C; Morgan, Timothy M; Nicklas, Barbara J; Mathias, Rasika A; Chilton, Floyd H

    2016-01-28

    Numerous studies have examined relationships between disease biomarkers (such as blood lipids) and levels of circulating or cellular fatty acids. In such association studies, fatty acids have typically been expressed as the percentage of a particular fatty acid relative to the total fatty acids in a sample. Using two human cohorts, this study examined relationships between blood lipids (TAG, and LDL, HDL or total cholesterol) and circulating fatty acids expressed either as a percentage of total or as concentration in serum. The direction of the correlation between stearic acid, linoleic acid, dihomo-γ-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid and DHA and circulating TAG reversed when fatty acids were expressed as concentrations v. a percentage of total. Similar reversals were observed for these fatty acids when examining their associations with the ratio of total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol. This reversal pattern was replicated in serum samples from both human cohorts. The correlations between blood lipids and fatty acids expressed as a percentage of total could be mathematically modelled from the concentration data. These data reveal that the different methods of expressing fatty acids lead to dissimilar correlations between blood lipids and certain fatty acids. This study raises important questions about how such reversals in association patterns impact the interpretation of numerous association studies evaluating fatty acids and their relationships with disease biomarkers or risk.

  20. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of cocoa butter equivalent from palm olein and saturated fatty acid distillate from palm oil physical refinery.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ibrahim O

    2012-11-01

    Cocoa butter equivalent was prepared by enzymatic acidolysis reaction of substrate consisting of refined palm olein oil and palmitic-stearic fatty acid mixture. The reactions were performed in a batch reactor at a temperature of 60 °C in an orbital shaker operated at 160 RPM. Different mass ratios of substrates were explored and the compositions of the five major triacylglycerol (TAG) of the structured lipids were identified and quantified using cocoa butter-certified reference material IRMM-801. The reaction resulted in production of cococa butter equivent with TAG compostion (POP 26.6 %, POS 42.1, POO 7.5, SOS 18.0 %, and SOO 5.8 %) and melting temperature between 34.7 and 39.6 °C which is close to that of the cocoa butter. The result of this research demonstrated the potential use of saturated fatty acid distillate (palmitic and stearic fatty acids) obtained from palm oil physical refining process into a value-added product.

  1. Fatty acid effects on fibroblast cholesterol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shireman, R.B.; Muth, J.; Lopez, C.

    1987-05-01

    Two cell lines of normal (CRL 1475, GM5565) and of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) (CM 486,488) fibroblasts were preincubated with medium containing the growth factor ITS, 2.5 mg/ml fatty acid-free BSA, or 35.2 ..mu..mol/ml of these fatty acids complexed with 2.5 mg BSA/ml: stearic (18:0), caprylic (8:0), oleic (18:1;9), linoleic (18:2;9,12), linolenic (18:3;9,12,15), docosahexaenoic (22:6;4,7,10,13,16,19)(DHA) or eicosapentaenoic (20:5;5,8,11,14,17)(EPA). After 20 h, cells were incubated for 2 h with 0.2 ..mu..Ci (/sup 14/C)acetate/ml. Cells were hydrolyzed; an aliquot was quantitated for radioactivity and protein. After saponification and extraction with hexane, radioactivity in the aqueous and organic phases was determined. The FH cells always incorporated 30-90% more acetate/mg protein than normal cells but the pattern of the fatty acid effects was similar in both types. When the values were normalized to 1 for the BSA-only group, cells with ITS had the greatest (/sup 14/C)acetate incorporation (1.45) followed by the caprylic group (1.14). Cells incubated with 18:3, 20:6 or 22:6 incorporated about the same amount as BSA-only. Those preincubated with 18:2, 18:1, 18:0 showed the least acetate incorporation (0.87, 0.59 and 0.52, respectively). The percentage of total /sup 14/C counts which extracted into hexane was much greater in FH cells; however, these values varied with the fatty acid, e.g., 1.31(18:0) and 0.84(8:0) relative to 1(BSA).

  2. [Fast analysis of common fatty acids in edible vegetable oils by ultra-performance convergence chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chunhua; Xie, Xianqing; Fan, Naili; Tu, Yuanhong; Chen, Yan; Liao, Weilin

    2015-04-01

    A fast analytical method for five common fatty acids in six edible vegetable oils was developed by ultra-performance convergence chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPC2-MS). The five fatty acids are palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid. Their contents in the corn oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, tea oil, rapeseed oil and peanut oil were compared. The chromatographic separation was performed on an ACQUITY UPC2 BEH 2-EP column (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.7 µm) using the mobile phases of carbon dioxide and methanol/acetonitrile (1:1, v/v) with gradient elution. The separated compounds were detected by negative electrospray ionization ESF-MS. The results showed that the reasonable linearities were achieved for all the analytes over the range of 0.5-100 mg/L with the correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.9985-0.9998. The limits of quantification (S/N ≥ 10) of the five fatty acids were 0.15-0.50 mg/L. The recoveries of the five fatty acids at three spiked levels were in the range of 89.61%-108.50% with relative standard deviations of 0.69%-3.01%. The developed method showed high performance, good resolution and fast analysis for the underivatized fatty acids. It has been successfully used to detect the five fatty acids from corn oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, tea oil rapeseed oil and peanut oil.

  3. Whole body cholesterol, fat, and fatty acid concentrations of mice (Mus domesticus) used as a food source.

    PubMed

    Crissey, S D; Slifka, K A; Lintzenich, B A

    1999-06-01

    The concentrations of dry matter, cholesterol, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and 29 fatty acids were measured in four size categories of whole mice (Mus domesticus) that are commonly fed to zoo animals. Dry matter increased with age/size of mice, whereas cholesterol decreased with age/size. Significant differences in fatty acid content were found among mice categories with capric, lauric, and myristic acids. Mice categories had similar levels of palmitic, palmitoleic, heptadecenoic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, gamma linolenic, alpha linolenic, eicosenoic, eicosadienoic, arachidonic, docosahexaenoic, and lignoceric acids. Analyzed lipid content of mice exceeded domestic carnivorous animal requirements for linoleic and arachidonic acids. The fatty acid levels in mice were high, falling between published values in beef and fish. Generally, mice contained higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids, including the omega-3 fatty acids, and lower levels of saturated fatty acids than beef. Although fatty acid levels met or exceeded some dietary requirements for carnivores and omnivores, a possibility of excessive levels exists that could lead to eye and tissue abnormalities. Furthermore, as the intake of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids increases, the dietary requirement for vitamin E increases. Thus, it is important that lipid profiles of feeder mice be known and considered when examining captive animal diets.

  4. The production of ω-hydroxy palmitic acid using fatty acid metabolism and cofactor optimization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sung, Changmin; Jung, Eunok; Choi, Kwon-Young; Bae, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Minsuk; Kim, Joonwon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Pyoung Il; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxylated fatty acids (HFAs) are used as important precursors for bulk and fine chemicals in the chemical industry. Here, to overproduce long-chain (C16-C18) fatty acids and hydroxy fatty acid, their biosynthetic pathways including thioesterase (Lreu_0335) from Lactobacillus reuteri DSM20016, β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (fabZ) from Escherichia coli, and a P450 system (i.e., CYP153A from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 and camA/camB from Pseudomonas putida ATCC17453) were overexpressed. Acyl-CoA synthase (fadD) involved in fatty acid degradation by β-oxidation was also deleted in E. coli BW25113. The engineered E. coli FFA4 strain without the P450 system could produce 503.0 mg/l of palmitic (C16) and 508.4 mg/l of stearic (C18) acids, of which the amounts are ca. 1.6- and 2.3-fold higher than those of the wild type. On the other hand, the E. coli HFA4 strain including the P450 system for ω-hydroxylation could produce 211.7 mg/l of ω-hydroxy palmitic acid, which was 42.1 ± 0.1 % of the generated palmitic acid, indicating that the hydroxylation reaction was the rate-determining step for the HFA production. For the maximum production of ω-hydroxy palmitic acid, NADH, i.e., an essential cofactor for P450 reaction, was overproduced by the integration of NAD(+)-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from Candida boidinii into E. coli chromosome and the deletion of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Finally, the NADH-level-optimized E. coli strain produced 610 mg/l of ω-hydroxy palmitic acid (ω-HPA), which was almost a threefold increase in its yield compared to the same strain without NADH overproduction.

  5. Composition of fatty acids triacylglycerols and unsaponifiable matter in Calophyllum calaba L. oil from Guadeloupe.

    PubMed

    Crane, Sylvie; Aurore, Guylène; Joseph, Henry; Mouloungui, Zéphirin; Bourgeois, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The composition of the kernel oils of two Calophyllum species (Calophyllum calaba L. and Calophyllum inophyllum L.) was investigated. The physico-chemical properties and fatty acid composition of the kernel oils were examined. In two species, oleic acid C18:1 (39.1-50%) is the dominating fatty acid followed by linoleic acid C18:2 (21.7-31.1%) as the second major fatty acid. Stearic C18:0 (13.4-14.3%) and palmitic C16:0 (11-13.7%) acids are the major saturates. The oils contains an appreciable amount of unsaturated fatty acids (70.8-73.10%). Most of the fatty acids are present as triacylglycerol (76.7-84%), twenty one triacylglycerols are detected with predominantly unsaturated triacylglycerols. The total unsaponifiable content, its general composition and the identity of the components of the sterol and tocopherol fractions are presented. In both species, analysis of the unsaponifiable fractions revealed the preponderance of phytosterols, mainly stigmasterol (35.8-45.1%) and beta-sitosterol (41.1-43.1%). Among the eight tocopherols and tocotrienols present in two species, variations exist; alpha-tocopherol (183 mg/kg) is the main tocopherol in Calophyllum calaba L. and Delta-tocotrienol (236 mg/kg) is the dominant tocotrienol in Calophyllum inophyllum L.

  6. Bioconversion of volatile fatty acids derived from waste activated sludge into lipids by Cryptococcus curvatus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Jia-Nan; Yuan, Ming; Shen, Zi-Heng; Peng, Kai-Ming; Lu, Li-Jun; Huang, Xiang-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Pure volatile fatty acid (VFA) solution derived from waste activated sludge (WAS) was used to produce microbial lipids as culture medium in this study, which aimed to realize the resource recovery of WAS and provide low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production simultaneously. Cryptococcus curvatus was selected among three oleaginous yeast to produce lipids with VFAs derived from WAS. In batch cultivation, lipid contents increased from 10.2% to 16.8% when carbon to nitrogen ratio increased from about 3.5 to 165 after removal of ammonia nitrogen by struvite precipitation. The lipid content further increased to 39.6% and the biomass increased from 1.56g/L to 4.53g/L after cultivation for five cycles using sequencing batch culture (SBC) strategy. The lipids produced from WAS-derived VFA solution contained nearly 50% of monounsaturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, heptadecanoic acid, ginkgolic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid, which showed the adequacy of biodiesel production.

  7. Antioxidant activities and fatty acid composition of wild grown myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) fruits.

    PubMed

    Serce, Sedat; Ercisli, Sezai; Sengul, Memnune; Gunduz, Kazim; Orhan, Emine

    2010-01-01

    The fruits of eight myrtles, Myrtus communis L. accessions from the Mediterranean region of Turkey were evaluated for their antioxidant activities and fatty acid contents. The antioxidant activities of the fruit extracts were determined by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and beta-carotene-linoleic acid assays. The fatty acid contents of fruits were determined by using gas chromatography. The methanol extracts of fruits exhibited a high level of free radical scavenging activity. There was a wide range (74.51-91.65%) of antioxidant activity among the accessions in the beta-carotene-linoleic acid assay. The amount of total phenolics (TP) was determined to be between 44.41-74.44 mug Gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/mg, on a dry weight basis. Oleic acid was the dominant fatty acid (67.07%), followed by palmitic (10.24%), and stearic acid (8.19%), respectively. These results suggest the future utilization of myrtle fruit extracts as food additives or in chemoprevention studies.

  8. Fatty acids composition of Caenorhabditis elegans using accurate mass GCMS-QTOF.

    PubMed

    Henry, Parise; Owopetu, Olufunmilayo; Adisa, Demilade; Nguyen, Thao; Anthony, Kevin; Ijoni-Animadu, David; Jamadar, Sakha; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-08-02

    The free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a proven model organism for lipid metabolism research. Total lipids of C. elegans were extracted using chloroform and methanol in 2:1 ratio (v/v). Fatty acids composition of the extracted total lipids was converted to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMEs) and analyzed by gas chromatography/accurate mass quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry using both electron ionization and chemical ionization techniques. Twenty-eight fatty acids consisting of 12 to 22 carbon atoms were identified, 65% of them were unsaturated. Fatty acids containing 12 to17 carbons were mostly saturated with stearic acid (18:0) as the major constituent. Several branched-chain fatty acids were identified. Methyl-14-methylhexadecanoate (iso- 17:0) was the major identified branched fatty acid. This is the first report to detect the intact molecular parent ions of the identified fatty acids in C. elegans using chemical ionization compared to electron ionization which produced fragmentations of the FAMEs.

  9. Growth of and mineral deposition in young rats fed saturated and unsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, A.; D'Souza, D. John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Male weanling rats were used in 4 week experiments to study effects of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids on growth and mineral deposition in several organs (bone, kidneys, liver, spleen, testes). Minerals evaluated were calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and zinc, and levels of these minerals in tests diets were appropriate for growing rats. Two levels of dietary fat were used, and fatty acids included in the study were butyric/capronic, palmitic/stearic, oleic, and linoleic/linolenic acids. Decreased weight gains were observed in rats fed saturated fatty acids or 10% fat, while increases in weight gains were associated with increases in polyunsaturated/saturated (P/S) ratios. Copper, iron, or zinc levels tended to be higher in organs of rats fed saturated fatty acids. P/S ratios had no effect on copper or zinc deposition, but decreases in liver iron and increases in spleen iron were observed in rats fed the higher P/S ratios. Manganese levels were generally unaffected by fatty acid types, fat level, or P/S ratio, although liver manganese levels were higher in rats fed unsaturated fatty acids. Dietary fatty acids, fat level, or P/S ratios had no apparent effects on calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, or zinc deposition in femurs and tibias of rats.

  10. Comparison of Absorption and Desorption of Cryomill Process Control Agents and Their Effect on Compressive Behavior of Trimodal Aluminum Metal-Matrix-Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    B4C) powders were cryomilled in liquid nitrogen using different process control agents (PCAs) such as oleic acid , caprylic acid , and stearic acid ...composite agglomerates after 8 h cryomilling with (a) oleic acid , (b) caprylic acid , and (c, d) stearic acid ...8 List of Tables Table 1. Physical and chemical properties of stearic, oleic and caprylic acid

  11. Leptin Reverts Pro-Apoptotic and Antiproliferative Effects of α-Linolenic Acids in BCR-ABL Positive Leukemic Cells: Involvement of PI3K Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Aurore; Poncin, Géraldine; Belaid-Choucair, Zakia; Humblet, Chantal; Bogdanovic, Gordana; Lognay, Georges; Boniver, Jacques; Defresne, Marie-Paule

    2011-01-01

    It is suspected that bone marrow (BM) microenvironmental factors may influence the evolution of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). In this study, we postulated that adipocytes and lipids could be involved in the progression of CML. To test this hypothesis, adipocytes were co-cultured with two BCR-ABL positive cell lines (PCMDS and K562). T cell (Jurkat) and stroma cell (HS-5) lines were used as controls. In the second set of experiments, leukemic cell lines were treated with stearic, oleic, linoleic or α-linolenic acids in presence or absence of leptin. Survival, proliferation, leptin production, OB-R isoforms (OB-Ra and OB-Rb), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3k) and BCL-2 expression have been tested after 24h, 48h and 72h of treatment. Our results showed that adipocytes induced a decrease of CML proliferation and an increase in lipid accumulation in leukemic cells. In addition, CML cell lines induced adipocytes cell death. Chromatography analysis showed that BM microenvironment cells were full of saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated (MUFA) fatty acids, fatty acids that protect tumor cells against external agents. Stearic acid increased Bcl-2 expression in PCMDS, whereas oleic and linoleic acids had no effects. In contrast, α-linolenic acid decreased the proliferation and the survival of CML cell lines as well as BCL-2 and OB-R expression. The effect of α-linolenic acids seemed to be due to PI3K pathway and Bcl-2 inhibition. Leptin production was detected in the co-culture medium. In the presence of leptin, the effect of α-linolenic acid on proliferation, survival, OB-R and BCl-2 expression was reduced. PMID:21991326

  12. Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed as an n-3 fatty acid source for finishing pigs: effects on fatty acid composition and fat stability of the meat and internal fat, growth performance, and meat sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Coates, W; Ayerza, R

    2009-11-01

    Coronary heart disease is caused by arteriosclerosis, which is triggered by an unbalanced fatty acid profile in the body. Today, Western diets are typically low in n-3 fatty acids and high in SFA and n-6 fatty acids; consequently, healthier foods are needed. Chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.), which contains the greatest known plant source of n-3 alpha-linolenic acid, was fed at the rate of 10 and 20% to finishing pigs, with the goal to determine if this new crop would increase the n-3 content of the meat as has been reported for other n-3 fatty acid-rich crops. The effects of chia on fatty acid composition of the meat, internal fats, growth performance, and meat sensory characteristics were determined. Productive performance was unaffected by dietary treatment. Chia seed modified the fatty acid composition of the meat fat, but not of the internal fat. Significantly (P < 0.05) less palmitic, stearic, and arachidic acids were found with both chia treatments. This is different than trials in which flaxseed, another plant based source of omega-3 fatty acid, has been fed. Alpha-linolenic acid content increased with increasing chia content of the diet; however, only the effect of the 20% ration was significantly (P < 0.05) different from that of the control. Chia seed increased panel member preferences for aroma and flavor of the meat. This study tends to show that chia seems to be a viable feed that can produce healthier pork for human consumption.

  13. Effects of cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid, linoleic acid, phytanic acid and the combination of various fatty acids on proliferation and cytokine expression of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Renner, Lydia; Kersten, Susanne; Duevel, Anna; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Dänicke, Sven

    2013-07-12

    Fatty acids may have an impact on immune functions, which is important in times of increased mobilization of body fat, e.g., around parturition. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the CLA isomers cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12, phytanic acid (PA), linoleic acid (LA) and a fatty acid (FA) mixture (containing 29.8% palmitic acid, 6.7% palmitoleic acid, 17.4% stearic acid and 46.1% oleic acid) on the proliferation of bovine blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro using alamar blue (AB) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction analyses were performed to evaluate the expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in response to cis-9,trans-11 and LA. The IC50 values did not differ between the investigated FA, but there were differences within the proliferation in the response of these FA in a concentration range between 20 and 148 µM (e.g., increased proliferation after treatment with lower concentrations of LA). No differences occurred when different FA combinations were tested. ConA stimulation increased the expression of TNF-α and IFN-γ, whereas IL-10 decreased. In general, neither the baseline expression nor the ConA-stimulated mRNA expression of cytokines and PPAR-γ were affected by the FA. In conclusion, all FA inhibit the proliferation of PBMC dose dependently without significantly altering the induced cytokine spectrum of activated bovine PBMC.

  14. A Δ-9 Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene in the Microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl: Cloning and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen-Bin; Liu, Fan; Sun, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-07-16

    The green alga Myrmecia incisa is one of the richest natural sources of arachidonic acid (ArA). To better understand the regulation of ArA biosynthesis in M. incisa, a novel gene putatively encoding the Δ9 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) was cloned and characterized for the first time. Rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was employed to yield a full length cDNA designated as MiΔ9FAD, which is 2442 bp long in sequence. Comparing cDNA open reading frame (ORF) sequence to genomic sequence indicated that there are 8 introns interrupting the coding region. The deduced MiΔ9FAD protein is composed of 432 amino acids. It is soluble and localized in the chloroplast, as evidenced by the absence of transmembrane domains as well as the presence of a 61-amino acid chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment of amino acids revealed two conserved histidine-rich motifs, typical for Δ9 acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases. To determine the function of MiΔ9FAD, the gene was heterologously expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain with impaired desaturase activity. Results of GC-MS analysis indicated that MiΔ9FAD was able to restore the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, generating palmitoleic acid and oleic acid through the addition of a double bond in the Δ9 position of palmitic acid and stearic acid, respectively.

  15. A Δ-9 Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene in the Microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl: Cloning and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen-Bin; Liu, Fan; Sun, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The green alga Myrmecia incisa is one of the richest natural sources of arachidonic acid (ArA). To better understand the regulation of ArA biosynthesis in M. incisa, a novel gene putatively encoding the Δ9 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) was cloned and characterized for the first time. Rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was employed to yield a full length cDNA designated as MiΔ9FAD, which is 2442 bp long in sequence. Comparing cDNA open reading frame (ORF) sequence to genomic sequence indicated that there are 8 introns interrupting the coding region. The deduced MiΔ9FAD protein is composed of 432 amino acids. It is soluble and localized in the chloroplast, as evidenced by the absence of transmembrane domains as well as the presence of a 61-amino acid chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment of amino acids revealed two conserved histidine-rich motifs, typical for Δ9 acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases. To determine the function of MiΔ9FAD, the gene was heterologously expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain with impaired desaturase activity. Results of GC-MS analysis indicated that MiΔ9FAD was able to restore the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, generating palmitoleic acid and oleic acid through the addition of a double bond in the Δ9 position of palmitic acid and stearic acid, respectively. PMID:27438826

  16. Screening of the entire USDA castor germplasm collection for oil content and fatty acid composition for optimum biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming Li; Morris, J Bradley; Tonnis, Brandon; Pinnow, David; Davis, Jerry; Raymer, Paul; Pederson, Gary A

    2011-09-14

    Castor has tremendous potential as a feedstock for biodiesel production. The oil content and fatty acid composition in castor seed are important factors determining the price for production and affecting the key fuel properties of biodiesel. There are 1033 available castor accessions collected or donated from 48 countries worldwide in the USDA germplasm collection. The entire castor collection was screened for oil content and fatty acid composition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively. Castor seeds on the average contain 48.2% oil with significant variability ranging from 37.2 to 60.6%. Methyl esters were prepared from castor seed by alkaline transmethylation. GC analysis of methyl esters confirmed that castor oil was composed primarily of eight fatty acids: 1.48% palmitic (C16:0), 1.58% stearic (C18:0), 4.41% oleic (C18:1), 6.42% linoleic (C18:2), 0.68% linolenic (C18:3), 0.45% gadoleic (C20:1), 84.51% ricinoleic (C18:1-1OH), and 0.47% dihydroxystearic (C18:0-2OH) acids. Significant variability in fatty acid composition was detected among castor accessions. Ricinoleic acid (RA) was positively correlated with dihydroxystearic acid (DHSA) but highly negatively correlated with the five other fatty acids except linolenic acid. The results for oil content and fatty acid composition obtained from this study will be useful for end-users to explore castor germplasm for biodiesel production.

  17. Abnormal fatty acid pattern in the superior temporal gyrus distinguishes bipolar disorder from major depression and schizophrenia and resembles multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Rider, Therese; Jandacek, Ronald; Tso, Patrick

    2014-03-30

    This study investigated the fatty acid composition of the postmortem superior temporal gyrus (STG), a cortical region implicated in emotional processing, from normal controls (n=15) and patients with bipolar disorder (BD, n=15), major depressive disorder (MDD, n=15), and schizophrenia (SZ, n=15). For comparative purposes, STG fatty acid composition was determined in a separate cohort of multiple sclerosis patients (MS, n=15) and normal controls (n=15). Compared with controls, patients with BD, but not MDD or SZ, exhibited abnormal elevations in the saturated fatty acids (SFA) palmitic acid (16:0), stearic acid (18:0), the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) linoleic acid (18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), and reductions in the monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) oleic acid (18:1n-9). The total MUFA/SFA and 18:1/18:0 ratios were lower in the STG of BD patients and were inversely correlated with total PUFA composition. MS patients exhibited a pattern of fatty acid abnormalities similar to that observed in BD patients including elevated PUFA and a lower 18:1/18:0 ratio. Collectively, these data demonstrate that BD patients exhibit a pattern of fatty acid abnormalities in the STG that is not observed in MDD and SZ patients and closely resembles MS patients.

  18. Tracking the oxidative kinetics of carbohydrates, amino acids and fatty acids in the house sparrow using exhaled 13CO2.

    PubMed

    McCue, M D; Sivan, O; McWilliams, S R; Pinshow, B

    2010-03-01

    Clinicians commonly measure the (13)CO(2) in exhaled breath samples following administration of a metabolic tracer (breath testing) to diagnose certain infections and metabolic disorders. We believe that breath testing can become a powerful tool to investigate novel questions about the influence of ecological and physiological factors on the oxidative fates of exogenous nutrients. Here we examined several predictions regarding the oxidative kinetics of specific carbohydrates, amino acids and fatty acids in a dietary generalist, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). After administering postprandial birds with 20 mg of one of seven (13)C-labeled tracers, we measured rates of (13)CO(2) production every 15 min over 2 h. We found that sparrows oxidized exogenous amino acids far more rapidly than carbohydrates or fatty acids, and that different tracers belonging to the same class of physiological fuels had unique oxidative kinetics. Glycine had a mean maximum rate of oxidation (2021 nmol min(-1)) that was significantly higher than that of leucine (351 nmol min(-1)), supporting our prediction that nonessential amino acids are oxidized more rapidly than essential amino acids. Exogenous glucose and fructose were oxidized to a similar extent (5.9% of dose), but the time required to reach maximum rates of oxidation was longer for fructose. The maximum rates of oxidation were significantly higher when exogenous glucose was administered as an aqueous solution (122 nmol min(-1)), rather than as an oil suspension (93 nmol min(-1)), supporting our prediction that exogenous lipids negatively influence rates of exogenous glucose oxidation. Dietary fatty acids had the lowest maximum rates of oxidation (2-6 nmol min(-1)), and differed significantly in the extent to which each was oxidized, with 0.73%, 0.63% and 0.21% of palmitic, oleic and stearic acid tracers oxidized, respectively.

  19. Influences of fatty acid moiety and esterification of polyglycerol fatty acid esters on the crystallization of palm mid fraction in oil-in-water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mitsuhiro; Ohba, Azusa; Kuriyama, Juhei; Maruo, Kouichi; Ueno, Satoru; Sato, Kiyotaka

    2004-08-15

    We examined the crystallization of palm mid fraction (PMF) in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion, after adding polyglycerol fatty acid esters (PGFEs). We employed ultrasonic velocity measurements and DSC techniques, with special emphases on the influences of fatty acid moiety and esterification of PGFE. Twelve types of PGFEs were examined as additives. PGFEs have a large hydrophilic moiety composed of 10 glycerol molecules to which palmitic, stearic and behenic acids were esterified as the fatty acid moiety with different degrees of esterification. Crystallization temperature (T(c)) of PMF remarkably increased with increasing concentrations of the PGFEs as the chain length of the fatty acid moiety increased, and the PGFE became more hydrophobic in accordance with increasing degree of esterification. We observed that the heterogeneous nucleation of PMF in the O/W emulsion was activated at the oil-water interface, where the template effect of very hydrophobic long saturated fatty acid chains of the PGFE might play the main role of heterogeneous nucleation.

  20. Particulate organic acids in the atmosphere of Italian cities: Are they environmentally relevant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balducci, Catia; Cecinato, Angelo

    2010-02-01

    Mono- and dicarboxylic n-alkyl acids were extensively investigated in downtown Rome, Italy, and in Montelibretti, ˜30 km NE of the city, during 2005-2007. Congeners ranging from lauric to mellisic, and from succinic to α,ω-docosanedioic acids were evaluated as well as phthalic, palmitoleic and oleic acids, by solvent extraction of airborne particulates followed by derivatization with propanol in the presence of boron trifluoride, and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. Shorter measurements were made in Milan, in Taranto, at suburban and rural sites of Italy, and in the polar regions, from 1996 to 2005. The predominance of palmitic and stearic acids observed elsewhere was confirmed, and the behaviour of azelaic and phthalic acids resulted strongly dependent upon the year season. In the urban sites, among the long-chain compounds, the lignoceric acid was usually the most abundant, while the cerotic, montanic and mellisic homologues cumulatively never exceeded 8% of the total. Unlike other contaminants, the concentrations of organic acids remained fairly invariant over the last decade, suggesting that more attention must be paid to them in the future.

  1. Effect of fatty acids on the complexation of proteins with porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulkhandanyan, Grigor V.

    2011-02-01

    Porphyrins binding and transport to tumor is the one of the central tasks of photodynamic therapy of tumor (PDT). The main carriers of porphyrins (photosensitizers) in the blood are lipoproteins, serum albumin and hemoglobin. In studying the phenomenon of complexation of proteins with ligands must take into considering the real conditions that exist in the organism and, in particular, take into considering the presence of fatty acids in blood. Up to date the role of fatty acids (palmitic and stearic) in the binding of porphyrins with proteins not been determined. A key step in solving of these problems is to determine the binding constants of porphyrin-protein pairs and effect of fatty acids on this process. The most direct and sufficiently accurate methods of solving such problems are complementary methods of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results of spectral studies on the binding of porphyrins to serum albumin and hemoglobin in the presence of fatty acids demonstrated a significant decrease in the degree of binding pair porphyrin-albumin and porphyrin-hemoglobin with increasing concentrations of fatty acids in solution. The results lead to the conclusion that for hemoglobin the presence in a solution of fatty acids on binding to the porphyrins affected more significantly than for serum albumin. Thus, in natural conditions, when in the blood presented fatty acids the preference between hemoglobin and serum albumin in the binding and in the transport of porphyrins should be given to serum albumin.

  2. Variation in oil content, fatty acid and phytosterols profile of Onopordum acanthium L. during seed development.

    PubMed

    Arfaoui, Moufida Oueslati; Renaud, Justin; Ghazghazi, Hanen; Boukhchina, Sadok; Mayer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This study has determined oil, fatty acid (FA) and phytosterols content during the ripening of the Tunisian Onopordum acanthium L. seeds. In total, nine FAs and six phytosterols were identified. The main FAs were linoleic acid (0.18-8.06 mg/g of seed) followed by oleic acid (0.051-2.45 mg/g of seed), palmitic acid and stearic acid. Pentadecanoic acid was detected, for the first time, in unripe fruits and the two last stages of development were characterised by a relative abundance of erucic acid. Overall, β-sitosterol (34.5-77.79% of total sterols) was the major 4-desmethylsterols during maturation. The first episodes of growth were characterised by the best amounts of stigmasterol and campesterol, while stigmastanol and Δ7 sitosterol had quoted the semi-ripe and fully ripe fruits; however, cholesterol was absent. These findings are useful in understanding a potential new source of important natural compounds (Phytosterols and USFA) found in this fruit and when harvest should be undertaken to optimise desired FA and phytosterols content.

  3. Biochemical precursor effects on the fatty acid production in cell suspension cultures of Theobroma cacao L.

    PubMed

    Parra, O; Gallego, A M; Urrea, A; Rojas, L F; Correa, C; Atehortúa, L

    2017-02-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) is composed of 96% palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic fatty acids that are responsible for the hardness, texture and fusion properties of chocolate. Through in vitro plant cell culture it is possible to modify CB lipid profiles and to study the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway on a subcellular level, evaluating fundamental aspects to enhance in vitro fatty acid production in a specific and controlled way. In this research, culture media was supplemented with acetate, biotin, pyruvate, bicarbonate and glycerol at three different concentrations and the effects on the biomass production (g/L), cell viability, and fatty acids profile and production was evaluated in in vitro cell suspensions culture. It was found that biotin stimulated fatty acid synthesis without altering cell viability and cell growth. It was also evident a change in the lipid profile of cell suspensions, increasing middle and long chain fatty acids proportion, which are unusual to those reported in seeds; thus implying that it is possible to modify lipid profiles according to the treatment used. According to the results of sucrose gradients and enzyme assays performed, it is proposed that cacao cells probably use the pentose phosphate pathway, mitochondria being the key organelle in the carbon flux for the synthesis of reductant power and fatty acid precursors.

  4. Olive oils modulate fatty acid content and signaling protein expression in apolipoprotein E knockout mice brain.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Regina; Navarro, María A; Vögler, Oliver; Perona, Javier S; Osada, Jesús; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis contributes to disruption of neuronal signaling pathways by producing lipid-dependent modifications of brain plasma membranes, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated whether long-term (11 weeks) consumption of refined- (ROO) and pomace- (POO) olive oil modulated the fatty acid composition and the levels of membrane signaling proteins in the brain of apolipoprotein E (apoE) knockout (KO) mice, an animal model of atherosclerosis. Both of these oils are rich in bioactive molecules with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. ROO and POO long-term consumption increased the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), particularly of oleic acid, while reducing the level of the saturated fatty acids (SFAs) palmitic and stearic acid. As a result, the MUFA:SFA ratio was higher in apoE KO mice brain fed with ROO and POO. Furthermore, both oils reduced the level of arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid, suggesting a decrease in the generation of pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids. Finally, ROO and POO induced an increase in the density of membrane proteins implicated in both the Galphas/PKA and Galphaq/PLCbeta1/PKCalpha signaling pathways. The combined effects of long-term ROO and POO consumption on fatty acid composition and the level of signaling proteins involved in PKA and PKC activation, suggest positive effects on neuroinflammation and brain function in apoE KO mice brain, and convert these oils into promising functional foods in diseases involving apoE deficiency.

  5. Kinetic Modeling of Sunflower Grain Filling and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Durruty, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A N; Echarte, María M

    2016-01-01

    Grain growth and oil biosynthesis are complex processes that involve various enzymes placed in different sub-cellular compartments of the grain. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling grain weight and composition, we need mathematical models capable of simulating the dynamic behavior of the main components of the grain during the grain filling stage. In this paper, we present a non-structured mechanistic kinetic model developed for sunflower grains. The model was first calibrated for sunflower hybrid ACA855. The calibrated model was able to predict the theoretical amount of carbohydrate equivalents allocated to the grain, grain growth and the dynamics of the oil and non-oil fraction, while considering maintenance requirements and leaf senescence. Incorporating into the model the serial-parallel nature of fatty acid biosynthesis permitted a good representation of the kinetics of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids production. A sensitivity analysis showed that the relative influence of input parameters changed along grain development. Grain growth was mostly affected by the specific growth parameter (μ') while fatty acid composition strongly depended on their own maximum specific rate parameters. The model was successfully applied to two additional hybrids (MG2 and DK3820). The proposed model can be the first building block toward the development of a more sophisticated model, capable of predicting the effects of environmental conditions on grain weight and composition, in a comprehensive and quantitative way.

  6. Kinetic Modeling of Sunflower Grain Filling and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Durruty, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A. N.; Echarte, María M.

    2016-01-01

    Grain growth and oil biosynthesis are complex processes that involve various enzymes placed in different sub-cellular compartments of the grain. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling grain weight and composition, we need mathematical models capable of simulating the dynamic behavior of the main components of the grain during the grain filling stage. In this paper, we present a non-structured mechanistic kinetic model developed for sunflower grains. The model was first calibrated for sunflower hybrid ACA855. The calibrated model was able to predict the theoretical amount of carbohydrate equivalents allocated to the grain, grain growth and the dynamics of the oil and non-oil fraction, while considering maintenance requirements and leaf senescence. Incorporating into the model the serial-parallel nature of fatty acid biosynthesis permitted a good representation of the kinetics of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids production. A sensitivity analysis showed that the relative influence of input parameters changed along grain development. Grain growth was mostly affected by the specific growth parameter (μ′) while fatty acid composition strongly depended on their own maximum specific rate parameters. The model was successfully applied to two additional hybrids (MG2 and DK3820). The proposed model can be the first building block toward the development of a more sophisticated model, capable of predicting the effects of environmental conditions on grain weight and composition, in a comprehensive and quantitative way. PMID:27242809

  7. Development and characterization of a hydrophobic treatment for jute fibres based on zinc oxide nanoparticles and a fatty acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, M. A.; Dolez, P. I.; Dubé, M.; David, É.

    2017-03-01

    This work aims at developing a hydrophobic treatment for jute fibres based on the grafting and growth of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods on the fibre surface. The first step consists in removing impurities from the fibre surface with a scouring treatment. In the second step, the jute fibres are coated with a layer of ZnO nanoseeds. A hydrothermal process is carried out as a third step to ensure a uniform growth of ZnO nanorods on the surface of the jute fibres. Finally, a hydrophobic treatment is performed on the ZnO nanorod-covered jute fibres using stearic acid (SA), i.e., a typical fatty acid. A large improvement in the fibre hydrophobicity was obtained without any negative effect on thermal stability and limited reduction in strength. Complementary measurements by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were also performed and revealed a hexagonal system for the ZnO nanorods.

  8. Saturated fatty acids are not off the hook.

    PubMed

    Dawczynski, C; Kleber, M E; März, W; Jahreis, G; Lorkowski, S

    2015-12-01

    A recent meta-analysis by Chowdhury et al. (2014) has disclaimed the association between coronary artery diseases and either circulating blood levels or the intake of total saturated fatty acids (SFA). Scrutiny revealed that two of the eight studies included in the meta-analysis focused on the proportion of pentadecanoic acid (C15:0) and heptadecanoic acid (C17:0) and their impact on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. These odd-chain fatty acids are markers for milk or ruminant fat intake. Both studies indicated inverse associations between milk-fat intake and first-ever myocardial infarction. Neither of the two studies described the association between total circulating blood SFA on coronary outcomes. In contrast to the cardioprotective effects of dairy consumption, we expected that an elevated intake of palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) de novo may raise CVD risk. Thus, it is of particular importance to differentiate the effects of individual circulating SFA on cardiovascular outcomes. Excluding the studies that evaluated the association of fatty acids from milk fat and cardiovascular outcomes revealed a positive association of total SFA blood levels and coronary outcome (RR 1.21, CI 1.04-1.40). Therefore, results obtained from studies of C15:0 and C17:0 cannot be mixed with results from studies of other SFA because of the opposite physiological effects of regular consumption of foods rich in C16:0 and C18:0 compared to high intake of milk or ruminant fat. In our opinion, it is vital to analyze the impact of individual SFA on CVD incidence in order to draw prudent conclusions.

  9. Total lipids and fatty acids composition of the coastal and the deep-sea common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) populations: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ben-Youssef, Saoussen; Selmi, Salah; Ezzeddine-Najai, Sofia; Sadok, Saloua

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate biochemical differences between Octopus vulgaris caught off costal zone and from the deep-sea of the Golf of Gabès (South coast of Tunisia). In both fishing grounds, octopus total lipids constituted almost 1.5% of wet tissue showing no significant difference (p < 0.05). The percentage distribution of fatty acids was not significantly different, neither between males and females, nor between both areas. Polyunsaturated fatty acids constituted about 50 % of the total fatty acids. Docosahexaenoic (DHA; C22:6 omega 3), eicosapentaenoic (EPA; C20:5 omega 3) and the arachidonic acids (C20:4) were the most important of this group with percentages of 25, 14 and 10% respectively. The saturated fraction constituted almost 30% of the total fatty acids. The most dominant saturated fatty acids were palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0), with 18% and 7% respectively. The monounsaturated content was found to contribute only 10% of the total fatty acids. Most of the monounsaturated fat was present as oleic acid (C18:1) and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) with 2.5% and 1.5% respectively. The presence of arachidonic acid in substantial proportions with an omega 3 to omega 6 ratios of 3.9 to 1 is of special interest because of the role of cephalopods in the traditional Mediterranean diet.

  10. Identification and determination of carboxylic acids in food samples using 2-(2-(anthracen-10-yl)-1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazol-1-yl)ethyl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate (APIETS) as labeling reagent by HPLC with FLD and APCI/MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiwei; You, Jinmao; Song, Cuihua; Xia, Lian

    2011-08-15

    A new labeling reagent for carboxylic acids, 2-(2-(anthracen-10-yl)-1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazol-1-yl)ethyl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate (APIETS) has been designed and synthesized. It was used to label eight fatty acids (lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, arachidic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid) and four hydroxy pentacyclic triterpene acids (oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, betulinic acid and maslinic acid), successfully. APIETS could easily and quickly label carboxylic acids in the presence of K(2)CO(3) catalyst at 85°C for 35 min in N,N-dimethylformamide solvent. The carboxylic acids derivatives were separated on a C(8) reversed-phase column with gradient elution and fluorescence detection at λ(ex)/λ(em)=315/435 nm. Identification of these derivatives was carried out by online mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in positive ion mode. The detection limits obtained were 13.37-30.26fmol (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The proposed method has been applied to the quantification of carboxylic acids in sultana raisin (Thompson seedless), hawthorn flake (Crataegus pinnatifida Bge.), Lycium barbarum seed oil and Microula sikkimensis seed oil with recoveries over 95.3%. It has been demonstrated that APIETS is a prominent labeling reagent for determining carboxylic acids with high performance liquid chromatography.

  11. An investigation into the interaction between taste masking fatty acid microspheres and alkaline buffer using thermal and spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Sheng; Deutsch, David; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2006-05-01

    Fatty acid-based microspheres may be used for the controlled delivery and taste masking of therapeutic agents, although the mechanisms involved in the release process are poorly understood. In this investigation, microspheres composed of high purity stearic and palmitic acid were prepared using a spray-chilling protocol. In addition, samples of binary fatty acid systems, fatty acid salts and acid-soaps were prepared to allow comparison with the microspheres. The interaction with alkaline buffer, into which release is known to be rapid, was studied using DSC and powder XRD with a view to examining the physicochemical changes undergone by the microspheres as a result of exposure to this medium. New species were identified for the postimmersion microsphere systems; similarities between the thermal and spectroscopic properties of these materials and the acid-soap references indicated the formation of acid-soaps during the exposure to the medium. The data indicate that simple exposure to buffer may result in the formation of acid soaps. This in turn has implications for understanding not only the release of drugs from the microspheres but also the biological fate of fatty acids on ingestion.

  12. Long Chain Fatty Acid Acylated Derivatives of Quercetin-3-O-Glucoside as Antioxidants to Prevent Lipid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Warnakulasuriya, Sumudu N.; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H.P. Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids have shown promise as natural plant-based antioxidants for protecting lipids from oxidation. It was hypothesized that their applications in lipophilic food systems can be further enhanced by esterification of flavonoids with fatty acids. Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G) was esterified individually with six selected long chain fatty acids: stearic acid (STA), oleic acid (OLA), linoleic acid (LNA), α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and decosahexaenoic acid (DHA), using Candida antarctica B lipase as the biocatalyst. The antioxidant activity of esterified flavonoids was evaluated using lipid oxidation model systems of poly-unsaturated fatty acids-rich fish oil and human low density lipoprotein (LDL), in vitro. In the oil-in-water emulsion, Q3G esters exhibited 50% to 100% inhibition in primary oxidation and 30% to 75% inhibition in secondary oxidation. In bulk oil, Q3G esters did not provide considerable protection from lipid oxidation; however, Q3G demonstrated more than 50% inhibition in primary oxidation. EPA, DHA and ALA esters of Q3G showed significantly higher inhibition in Cu2+- and peroxyl radical-induced LDL oxidation in comparison to Q3G. PMID:25384198

  13. Comparative Study of the Behavior of Bathophenanthroline in the Restricted Geometry of Langmuir-Blodgett Film with Two Different Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Jayasree; Deb, Subrata; Chakrabarti, Adrita; Pal, Ajitesh; Nath, Ranendu Kumar

    2014-12-01

    This communication reports the successful fabrication and the comparative study of Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of nonamphiphilic phenanthrene derivative, 1, 10 phenanthroline (bathophenanthroline) (BATH), when incorporated to a long chain fatty acid viz. heptadecanoic acid and stearic acid. Measurements of compressibility modulus from the surface pressure versus area per molecule isotherm indicate that the mixed film of BATH and SA is harder than that with HA. The plot of area per molecule versus mole fraction is the indication of some repulsive interactions between binary components of the mixed monolayer which facilitates the formation of aggregates. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the formation of microcrystalline aggregates in the mixed LB films. Scanning electron microscopic study supports this observation. The dependence of various LB parameters in the mixed films such as mole fraction, number of layers and surface pressure of lifting have also been investigated in the light of electronic absorption spectroscopy.

  14. Oleic acid attenuates trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid-mediated inflammatory gene expression in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Meaghan; Gobern, Semone; Martinez, Kristina; Shen, Wan; Reid, Tanya; McIntosh, Michael

    2012-11-01

    The weight loss supplement conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) consists of an equal mixture of trans-10,cis-12 (10,12) and cis-9,trans-11 (9,11) isomers. However, high levels of mixed CLA isomers, or the 10,12 isomer, causes chronic inflammation, lipodystrophy, or insulin resistance. We previously demonstrated that 10,12 CLA decreases de novo lipid synthesis along with the abundance and activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)-1, a δ-9 desaturase essential for the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Thus, we hypothesized that the 10,12 CLA-mediated decrease in SCD-1, with the subsequent decrease in MUFA, was responsible for the observed effects. To test this hypothesis, 10,12 CLA-treated human adipocytes were supplemented with oleic acid for 12 h to 7 days, and inflammatory gene expression, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and lipid content were measured. Oleic acid reduced inflammatory gene expression in a dose-dependent manner, and restored the lipid content of 10,12 CLA-treated adipocytes without improving insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. In contrast, supplementation with stearic acid, a substrate for SCD-1, or 9,11 CLA did not prevent inflammatory gene expression by 10,12 CLA. Notably, 10,12 CLA impacted the expression of several G-protein coupled receptors that was attenuated by oleic acid. Collectively, these data show that oleic acid attenuates 10,12 CLA-induced inflammatory gene expression and lipid content, possibly by alleviating cell stress caused by the inhibition of MUFA needed for phospholipid and neutral lipid synthesis.

  15. Odd Chain Fatty Acids; New Insights of the Relationship Between the Gut Microbiota, Dietary Intake, Biosynthesis and Glucose Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Benjamin J; Seyssel, Kevin; Chiu, Sally; Pan, Pin-Ho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Stanley, Elizabeth; Ament, Zsuzsanna; West, James A; Summerhill, Keith; Griffin, Julian L; Vetter, Walter; Autio, Kaija J; Hiltunen, Kalervo; Hazebrouck, Stéphane; Stepankova, Renata; Chen, Chun-Jung; Alligier, Maud; Laville, Martine; Moore, Mary; Kraft, Guillaume; Cherrington, Alan; King, Sarah; Krauss, Ronald M; de Schryver, Evelyn; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Ronis, Martin; Koulman, Albert

    2017-03-23

    Recent findings have shown an inverse association between circulating C15:0/C17:0 fatty acids with disease risk, therefore, their origin needs to be determined to understanding their role in these pathologies. Through combinations of both animal and human intervention studies, we comprehensively investigated all possible contributions of these fatty acids from the gut-microbiota, the diet, and novel endogenous biosynthesis. Investigations included an intestinal germ-free study and a C15:0/C17:0 diet dose response study. Endogenous production was assessed through: a stearic acid infusion, phytol supplementation, and a Hacl1(-/-) mouse model. Two human dietary intervention studies were used to translate the results. Finally, a study comparing baseline C15:0/C17:0 with the prognosis of glucose intolerance. We found that circulating C15:0/C17:0 levels were not influenced by the gut-microbiota. The dose response study showed C15:0 had a linear response, however C17:0 was not directly correlated. The phytol supplementation only decreased C17:0. Stearic acid infusion only increased C17:0. Hacl1(-/-) only decreased C17:0. The glucose intolerance study showed only C17:0 correlated with prognosis. To summarise, circulating C15:0 and C17:0 are independently derived; C15:0 correlates directly with dietary intake, while C17:0 is substantially biosynthesized, therefore, they are not homologous in the aetiology of metabolic disease. Our findings emphasize the importance of the biosynthesis of C17:0 and recognizing its link with metabolic disease.

  16. Odd Chain Fatty Acids; New Insights of the Relationship Between the Gut Microbiota, Dietary Intake, Biosynthesis and Glucose Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Benjamin J.; Seyssel, Kevin; Chiu, Sally; Pan, Pin-Ho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Stanley, Elizabeth; Ament, Zsuzsanna; West, James A.; Summerhill, Keith; Griffin, Julian L.; Vetter, Walter; Autio, Kaija J.; Hiltunen, Kalervo; Hazebrouck, Stéphane; Stepankova, Renata; Chen, Chun-Jung; Alligier, Maud; Laville, Martine; Moore, Mary; Kraft, Guillaume; Cherrington, Alan; King, Sarah; Krauss, Ronald M.; de Schryver, Evelyn; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Ronis, Martin; Koulman, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Recent findings have shown an inverse association between circulating C15:0/C17:0 fatty acids with disease risk, therefore, their origin needs to be determined to understanding their role in these pathologies. Through combinations of both animal and human intervention studies, we comprehensively investigated all possible contributions of these fatty acids from the gut-microbiota, the diet, and novel endogenous biosynthesis. Investigations included an intestinal germ-free study and a C15:0/C17:0 diet dose response study. Endogenous production was assessed through: a stearic acid infusion, phytol supplementation, and a Hacl1−/− mouse model. Two human dietary intervention studies were used to translate the results. Finally, a study comparing baseline C15:0/C17:0 with the prognosis of glucose intolerance. We found that circulating C15:0/C17:0 levels were not influenced by the gut-microbiota. The dose response study showed C15:0 had a linear response, however C17:0 was not directly correlated. The phytol supplementation only decreased C17:0. Stearic acid infusion only increased C17:0. Hacl1−/− only decreased C17:0. The glucose intolerance study showed only C17:0 correlated with prognosis. To summarise, circulating C15:0 and C17:0 are independently derived; C15:0 correlates directly with dietary intake, while C17:0 is substantially biosynthesized, therefore, they are not homologous in the aetiology of metabolic disease. Our findings emphasize the importance of the biosynthesis of C17:0 and recognizing its link with metabolic disease. PMID:28332596

  17. The seed's protein and oil content, fatty acid composition, and growing cycle length of a single genotype of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) as affected by environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Ayerza, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    As a botanical source, variability in chia seed composition could be expected between growing locations, and between years within a location, due to genotype and environment effects as well genetic x environment's interactions. The objective of the present study was to determine the location effect on the growing cycle length, and seed's protein content, lipid content, and fatty acid profiles, of a single chia genotype. Seeds of chia genotype Tzotzol grown on eight sites in five different ecosystems were tested. One site was in Argentina, in the Semi-Arid Chaco ecosystem (T(5)); one was in Bolivia, in the Sub-Humid Chaco ecosystem (T(4)); and six in Ecuador, one in the Coastal Desert (T(3)), two on the Tropical Rain Forest (T(2)), and three in the Inter-Andean Dry Valley ecosystem (T(1)). Seeds from plants grown in T(4) and in T(3) contained significantly (P <0.05) more protein percentage than did seeds from the other three ecosystems. No significant (P <0.05) differences in protein content were found between T(3) and T(4), and between T(1), T(2), and T(5). Seeds from T(1) and T(5) ecosystems, with 33.5 and 32.2%, respectively, were the numerically highest oil content producers, but their results were only significantly (P <0.05) higher when compared with the T(2) seeds. Significant (P <0.05) differences in palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and alpha-linolenic fatty acids between oils from seeds grown in different ecosystems were detected, however. Oil of seeds grown in the T(3) ecosystem had the palmitic, stearic and oleic fatty acids' highest contents. Palmitic and oleic fatty acid levels were significantly (P <0.05) higher when were compared to that of seeds grown in the T(1) ecosystem, and stearic when was compared to that of seeds grown in the T(5) ecosystem; omega-6 linoleic fatty acid content was significantly (P <0.05) lower in oils of seeds produced in T(1), and T(2) than in those produced in T(3), T(4), and T(5) ecosystems; omega-3 alpha-linolenic fatty

  18. Fatty acids, sterols, and antioxidant activity in minimally processed avocados during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Lucía; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; de Pascual-Teresa, Sonia; de Ancos, Begoña; Cano, M Pilar

    2009-04-22

    Avocado ( Persea americana Mill.) is a good source of bioactive compounds such as monounsaturated fatty acids and sterols. The impact of minimal processing on its health-promoting attributes was investigated. Avocados cut into slices or halves were packaged in plastic bags under nitrogen, air, or vacuum and stored at 8 degrees C for 13 days. The stabilities of fatty acids and sterols as well as the effect on antioxidant activity were evaluated. The main fatty acid identified and quantified in avocado was oleic acid (about 57% of total content), whereas beta-sitosterol was found to be the major sterol (about 89% of total content). In general, after refrigerated storage, a significant decrease in fatty acid content was observed. Vacuum/halves and air/slices were the samples that maintained better this content. With regard to phytosterols, there were no significant changes during storage. Antioxidant activity showed a slight positive correlation against stearic acid content. At the end of refrigerated storage, a significant increase in antiradical efficiency (AE) was found for vacuum samples. AE values were quite similar among treatments. Hence, minimal processing can be a useful tool to preserve health-related properties of avocado fruit.

  19. Autoxidated linolenic acid inhibits aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus via oxylipin species.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shijuan; Liang, Yating; Zhang, Jindan; Chen, Zhuang; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus species are among the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds in nature. Although it has been known for a long time that seeds with high oil content are more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination, the role of fatty acids in aflatoxin biosynthesis remains controversial. Here we demonstrate in A. flavus that both the saturated stearic acid (C18:0) and the polyunsaturated linolenic acid (C18:3) promoted aflatoxin production, while C18:3, but not C18:0, inhibited aflatoxin biosynthesis after exposure to air for several hours. Further experiments showed that autoxidated C18:3 promoted mycelial growth, sporulation, and kojic acid production, but inhibited the expression of genes in the AF biosynthetic gene cluster. Mass spectrometry analyses of autoxidated C18:3 fractions that were able to inhibit aflatoxin biosynthesis led to the identification of multiple oxylipin species. These results may help to clarify the role of fatty acids in aflatoxin biosynthesis, and may explain why controversial results have been obtained for fatty acids in the past.

  20. Iontophoretic enhancement of leuprolide acetate by fatty acids, limonene, and depilatory lotions through porcine epidermis.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Sumeet K; Singh, Jagdish

    2004-11-01

    The effect of chemical enhancers (e.g., fatty acids, limonene, depilatory lotions) and iontophoresis was investigated on the in vitro permeability of leuprolide acetate through porcine epidermis. Franz diffusion cells and Scepter iontophoretic power source were used for the percutaneous absorption studies. Anodal iontophoresis was performed at 0.2 mA/cm2 current density. Fatty acids used were palmitic (C16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1), stearic (C18:0), oleic (C18:1), linoleic (C18:2), and linolenic (C18:3) acids. The passive and iontophoretic flux were significantly (p < 0.05) greater through fatty acids-treated porcine epidermis in comparison to the control (untreated epidermis) for leuprolide acetate. The passive and iontophoretic permeability of leuprolide acetate increased with increasing number of cis double bonds. Among the fatty acids tested, linolenic acid (C18:3) exhibited the maximum permeability of leuprolide acetate during passive (51.42 x 10(-4) cm/hr) and iontophoretic (318.98 x 10(-4) cm/hr) transport. The passive and iontophoretic flux of leuprolide acetate were significantly (p < 0.05) greater through the limonene and depilatory lotion treated epidermis in comparison to their respective control. In conclusion, iontophoresis in combination with chemical enhancers synergistically increased (p < 0.05) the in vitro permeability of leuprolide acetate through porcine epidermis.

  1. Effects of oral contraceptives on free fatty acids of human cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Singh, E J; Swartwout, J R

    1973-05-01

    Amounts of individual free fatty acids were determined in human cervical mucus from 3 control women, 2 using Ovulen-21, 2 using C-Quens, and 2 using Ovral. Using a tuberculin syringe without a needle, mucus was collected daily, pooled, and frozen. After extraction by the FOLCH technique, and chromatography on a Florisil column, fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography. Fatty acids made up 10.5% of total lipids in controls, 11.8% in C-Quens users, 11.1% in Ovral users and 9.7% in Ovulen-21 users. In controls the greatest changes during the cycle were an increase in the proportion of myristic (14:0), decrease in stearic (18:0), and increase in saturated fatty acids during Cycle Days 12-16, compared to Days 5-9 or 23-27. In C-Quens users the proportion of saturated fatty acids increased on Days 23-27, compared to the rest of the cycle. Pooled results showed a slightly higher proportion of saturated fatty acids (81.2-84.0%) in samples from pill users than controls (79% saturated).

  2. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  3. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  4. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  5. Free fatty acids profile of the fetal brain and the plasma, liver, brain and kidneys of pregnant rats treated with sodium arsenite at mid-organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ivan A; Boyle, Thomas; Johnson, Widmark D; Sprando, Robert L; O'Donnell, Michael W; Ruggles, Dennis; Kim, Chung S

    2010-11-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are known to be markers of cellular membrane degradation through lipid peroxidation and are substrates for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress, due to overproduction of ROS, may facilitate cellular insult by various toxicants. The ability of the rat conceptus to respond to toxic stress may be critical for normal development. In this study, the effects of the environmental toxicant sodium arsenite (NaAsO₂) on FFAs were investigated after administering a single oral dose, in water and in a lipid medium, to pregnant rats on gestational day (GD) 10, a time point at mid-organogenesis. NaAsO₂ was administered in deionized water (AsH₂O) or in half and half dairy cream (AsHH) at a dose of 41 mg sodium arsenite (NaAsO₂)/kg body weight. Control animals were treated with either dairy cream (HH) or deionized water (H₂O). The animals were sacrificed on GD 20. The fetal brain and the maternal liver, brain, plasma and kidneys were harvested. The FFAs were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography. In the liver, there was an increase of myristic acid (1200%), myristoleic acid (174%), palmitic acid (47%), elaidic acid (456%), oleic acid (165%) and docosahexaenoic acid (224%) in the AsH₂O group as compared to the AsHH group. Oleic acid and arachidonic acid were increased by 192% and 900%, respectively, in the AsH₂O group as compared to the H₂O group, and myristic acid was decreased by 90% in the AsHH group as compared to the HH group. In the maternal brain, myristoleic acid was decreased by 91% in the AsH₂O group as compared to the H₂O group, and DHA increased by 148% in the AsHH group as compared to the HH group. In the fetal brain, myristic and stearic acids were decreased by 87% and 89%, respectively, in the AsH₂O group as compared to the AsHH group. Myristic, stearic and arachidonic acids were increased by 411%, 265%, and 144%, respectively, in the AsHH group as compared to the HH group. There was no

  6. Long-Chain Fatty Acids Activate Calcium Channels in Ventricular Myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, James Min-Che; Xian, Hu; Bacaner, Marvin

    1992-07-01

    Nonesterified fatty acids accumulate at sites of tissue injury and necrosis. In cardiac tissue the concentrations of oleic acid, arachidonic acid, leukotrienes, and other fatty acids increase greatly during ischemia due to receptor or nonreceptor-mediated activation of phospholipases and/or diminished reacylation. In ischemic myocardium, the time course of increase in fatty acids and tissue calcium closely parallels irreversible cardiac damage. We postulated that fatty acids released from membrane phospholipids may be involved in the increase of intracellular calcium. We report here that low concentrations (3-30 μM) of each long-chain unsaturated (oleic, linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic) and saturated (palmitic, stearic, and arachidic) fatty acid tested induced multifold increases in voltage-dependent calcium currents (ICa) in cardiac myocytes. In contrast, neither short-chain fatty acids (<12 carbons) or fatty acid esters (oleic and palmitic methyl esters) had any effect on ICa, indicating that activation of calcium channels depended on chain length and required a free carboxyl group. Inhibition of protein kinases C and A, G proteins, eicosanoid production, or nonenzymatic oxidation did not block the fatty acid-induced increase in ICa. Thus, long-chain fatty acids appear to directly activate ICa, possibly by acting at some lipid sites near the channels or directly on the channel protein itself. We suggest that the combined effects of fatty acids released during ischemia on ICa may contribute to ischemia-induced pathogenic events on the heart that involve calcium, such as arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, and myocardial damage due to cytotoxic calcium overload.

  7. Identification of poultry meat-derived fatty acids functioning as quorum sensing signal inhibitors to autoinducer-2 (AI-2).

    PubMed

    Widmer, K W; Soni, K A; Hume, M E; Beier, R C; Jesudhasan, P; Pillai, S D

    2007-11-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a compound that plays a key role in bacterial cell-to-cell communication (quorum sensing). Previous research has shown certain food matrices inhibit this signaling compound. Using the reporter strain, Vibrio harveyi BB170, quorum-sensing inhibitors contained in poultry meat wash (PMW) samples were characterized by molecular weight and hydrophobic properties using liquid chromatography systems. Most fractions that demonstrated AI-2 inhibition were 13.7 kDa or less, and had hydrophobic properties. Hexane was used to extract inhibitory compounds from a PMW preparation and the extract was further separated by gas chromatography (GC). Several fatty acids were identified and quantified. Linoleic acid, oleic acid, palmitic acid, and stearic acid were each tested for inhibition at 0.1, 1, and 10 mM concentrations. All samples expressed AI-2 inhibition (ranging from approximately 25% to 99%). Fatty acids, combined in concentrations equivalent to those determined by GC analysis, expressed inhibition at 59.5%, but higher combined concentrations (10- and 100-fold) had inhibition at 84.4% and 69.5%, respectively. The combined fatty acids (100-fold) did not demonstrate a substantial decrease in colony plate counts, despite presenting high AI-2 inhibition. These fatty acids, through modulating quorum sensing by inhibition, may offer a unique means to control foodborne pathogens and reduce microbial spoilage.

  8. Fatty acid profile of cheese from dairy goats fed a diet enriched with castor, sesame and faveleira vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Ertha; Queiroga, Rita; Oliveira, Maria; Medeiros, Ariosvaldo; Sabedot, Mayara; Bomfim, Marco; Madruga, Marta

    2014-01-15

    The addition of vegetable oils to the diets of dairy goats is an alternative to supplemental feeding during the dry period and improves the lipid profile of milk and by-products. Cheeses were produced using milk from cross bred goats (Saanen×Alpina) fed diets enriched with 4% vegetable oil (faveleira, sesame or castor), the fatty acid profile of cheeses was studied. Supplementation with vegetable oils did not increase the total fat percentage of the cheese (p≥0.05) but did increase the percentage of CLA isomers, long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA); in addition, the index of desirable fatty acids (DFA--expressed as the sum of unsaturated fatty acids plus stearic acid) was increased for cheese made from milk from goats fed sesame or faveleira oil. Cheeses may have had increased percentages of cis-9,trans-11-CLA due to the supplementation of animal diets with vegetable oils rich in C18:2, such as faveleira and sesame oils. The fatty acid profile of goat cheese did not change significantly in response to the use of castor oil. Thus, the addition of sesame and faveleira oils to goat diets positively altered the fatty acid profile, which improved the nutritional characteristics of the fat present in goat cheese.

  9. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  10. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  11. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced changes in oil content, fatty acid profiles and expression of four fatty acid biosynthetic genes in Chlorella vulgaris at early stationary growth phase.

    PubMed

    Jusoh, Malinna; Loh, Saw Hong; Chuah, Tse Seng; Aziz, Ahmad; Cha, Thye San

    2015-03-01

    Microalgae lipids and oils are potential candidates for renewable biodiesel. Many microalgae species accumulate a substantial amount of lipids and oils under environmental stresses. However, low growth rate under these adverse conditions account for the decrease in overall biomass productivity which directly influence the oil yield. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of exogenously added auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) on the oil content, fatty acid compositions, and the expression of fatty acid biosynthetic genes in Chlorella vulgaris (UMT-M1). Auxin has been shown to regulate growth and metabolite production of several microalgae. Results showed that oil accumulation was highest on days after treatment (DAT)-2 with enriched levels of palmitic (C16:0) and stearic (C18:0) acids, while the linoleic (C18:2) and α-linolenic (C18:3n3) acids levels were markedly reduced by IAA. The elevated levels of saturated fatty acids (C16:0 and C18:0) were consistent with high expression of the β-ketoacyl ACP synthase I (KAS I) gene, while low expression of omega-6 fatty acid desaturase (ω-6 FAD) gene was consistent with low production of C18:2. However, the increment of stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD) gene expression upon IAA induction did not coincide with oleic acid (C18:1) production. The expression of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (ω-3 FAD) gene showed a positive correlation with the synthesis of PUFA and C18:3n3.

  12. Studies of fatty acid composition, physicochemical and thermal properties, and crystallization behavior of mango kernel fats from various Thai varieties.

    PubMed

    Sonwai, Sopark; Ponprachanuvut, Punnee

    2014-01-01

    Mango kernel fat (MKF) has received attention in recent years due to the resemblance between its characteristics and those of cocoa butter (CB). In this work, fatty acid (FA) composition, physicochemical and thermal properties and crystallization behavior of MKFs obtained from four varieties of Thai mangoes: Keaw-Morakot (KM), Keaw-Sawoey (KS), Nam-Dokmai (ND) and Aok-Rong (AR), were characterized. The fat content of the mango kernels was 6.40, 5.78, 5.73 and 7.74% (dry basis) for KM, KS, ND and AR, respectively. The analysis of FA composition revealed that all four cultivars had oleic and stearic acids as the main FA components with ND and AR exhibiting highest and lowest stearic acid content, respectively. ND had the highest slip melting point and solid fat content (SFC) followed by KS, KM and AR. All fat samples exhibited high SFC at 20℃ and below. They melted slowly as the temperature increased and became complete liquids as the temperature approached 35°C. During static isothermal crystallization at 20°C, ND displayed the highest Avrami rate constant k followed by KS, KM and AR, indicating that the crystallization was fastest for ND and slowest for AR. The Avrami exponent n of all samples ranged from 0.89 to 1.73. The x-ray diffraction analysis showed that all MKFs crystallized into a mixture of pseudo-β', β', sub-β and β structures with β' being the predominant polymorph. Finally, the crystals of the kernel fats from all mango varieties exhibited spherulitic morphology.

  13. Digestion and deposition of individual fatty acids in growing-finishing pigs fed diets containing either beef tallow or sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Mitchaothai, J; Everts, H; Yuangklang, C; Wittayakun, S; Vasupen, K; Wongsuthavas, S; Srenanul, P; Hovenier, R; Beynen, A C

    2008-08-01

    The apparent digestibility and deposition in carcass of individual dietary fatty acids (FA) were determined in growing-finishing pigs fed diets containing either beef tallow or sunflower oil. The beef tallow was rich in saturated FA (SFA) and the sunflower oil had a high content of polyunsaturated FA (PUFA). A total of 39 barrows was used. The experimental diets contained 5% (w/w) of the variable fat source and were fed ad libitum. The dietary fat type had no effect (p > 0.05) on growth performance, even though the apparent digestibilities of crude fat and crude protein were higher (p < 0.05) in the animals fed sunflower oil. The pigs fed the sunflower oil diet showed higher apparent digestibilities (p < 0.05) of the sum of SFA, monounsaturated FA (MUFA) and PUFA, but had a lower digestibility (p < 0.05) of stearic acid. The intakes of individual digestible FA were derived feed intake data, FA contents of the diets and the digestibility of individual FA. For the entire feeding period of 13 weeks, the ratio of deposition in carcass to intake of digestible FA was increased (p < 0.05) for palmitic and stearic acid in the pigs fed sunflower oil, but the ratios for oleic acid and linoleic acid were decreased (p < 0.001). In the pigs fed sunflower oil instead of beef tallow, the deposition:intake ratio was raised for the SFA (p < 0.001), but diminished for the MUFA (p < 0.05). The calculated minimum de novo synthesis of SFA was increased (p < 0.05) and that of MUFA decreased (p < 0.05) in the pigs fed sunflower oil. It is concluded that the feeding of a diet with sunflower oil instead of beef tallow improved apparent digestibility of SFA, MUFA and PUFA, increased the deposition:digestible intake ratio for SFA, but lowered that for MUFA and PUFA.

  14. Assessment of oil content and fatty acid composition variability in two economically important Hibiscus species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming Li; Morris, Brad; Tonnis, Brandon; Davis, Jerry; Pederson, Gary A

    2012-07-04

    The Hibiscus genus encompasses more than 300 species, but kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) and roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) are the two most economically important species within the genus. Seeds from these two Hibiscus species contain a relatively high amount of oil with two unusual fatty acids: dihydrosterculic and vernolic acids. The fatty acid composition in the oil can directly affect oil quality and its utilization. However, the variability in oil content and fatty acid composition for these two species is unclear. For these two species, 329 available accessions were acquired from the USDA germplasm collection. Their oil content and fatty acid composition were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively. Using NMR and GC analyses, we found that Hibiscus seeds on average contained 18% oil and seed oil was composed of six major fatty acids (each >1%) and seven minor fatty acids (each <1%). Hibiscus cannabinus seeds contained significantly higher amounts of oil (18.14%), palmitic (20.75%), oleic (28.91%), vernolic acids (VA, 4.16%), and significantly lower amounts of stearic (3.96%), linoleic (39.49%), and dihydrosterculic acids (DHSA, 1.08%) than H. sabdariffa seeds (17.35%, 18.52%, 25.16%, 3.52%, 4.31%, 44.72%, and 1.57%, respectively). For edible oils, a higher oleic/linoleic (O/L) ratio and lower level of DHSA are preferred, and for industrial oils a high level of VA is preferred. Our results indicate that seeds from H. cannabinus may be of higher quality than H. sabdariffa seeds for these reasons. Significant variability in oil content and major fatty acids was also detected within both species. The variability in oil content and fatty acid composition revealed from this study will be useful for exploring seed utilization and developing new cultivars in these Hibiscus species.

  15. Novel long chain fatty acid derivatives of quercetin-3-O-glucoside reduce cytotoxicity induced by cigarette smoke toxicants in human fetal lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Warnakulasuriya, Sumudu N; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2016-06-15

    Smoking has become a global health concern due to its association with many disease conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and cancer. Flavonoids are plant polyphenolic compounds, studied extensively for their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G) is a flavonoid which is widely found in plants. Six novel long chain fatty acid [stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] derivatives of Q3G were evaluated for their potential in protecting human lung fibroblasts against cytotoxicity induced by selected cigarette smoke toxicants: 4-(methylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone (NNK), benzo-α-pyrene (BaP), nicotine and chromium (Cr[VI]). Nicotine and Cr[VI] induced toxicity in fibroblasts and reduced the percentage of viable cells, while BaP and NNK did not affect cell viability. The fatty acid derivatives of Q3G provided protection against nicotine- and Cr[VI]-induced cell death and membrane lipid peroxidation. Based on the evaluation of inflammatory markers of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the fatty acid derivatives of Q3G were found to be effective in lowering the inflammatory response. Overall, these novel fatty acid esters of Q3G warrant further investigation as potential cytoprotective agents.

  16. Dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, fatty acids and benzoic acid in PM2.5 aerosol collected during CAREBeijing-2007: an effect of traffic restriction on air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Huang, R.-J.; Kawamura, K.; Tachibana, E.; Lee, S. C.; Ho, S. S. H.; Zhu, T.; Tian, L.

    2014-06-01

    Thirty water-soluble organic species, including dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, fatty acids, and benzoic acid were determined as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in PM2.5 samples collected during the Campaign of Air Quality Research in Beijing 2007 (CAREBeijing-2007) in the urban and suburban areas of Beijing. The objective of this study is to identify the influence of traffic emissions and regional transport to the atmosphere in Beijing during summer. PM2.5 samples collected with or without traffic restriction in Beijing are selected to evaluate the effectiveness of local traffic restriction measure on air pollution reduction. The average concentrations of the total quantified bifunctional organic compounds (TQBOC), total fatty acids and benzoic acid during the entire sampling period were 1184 ± 241 ng m-3, 597 ± 159 ng m-3 and 1496 ± 511ng m-3 in PKU, and 1050 ± 303 ng m-3, 475 ± 114 ng m-3 and 1278 ± 372 ng m-3 in Yufa. Oxalic acid (C2) was found as the most abundant dicarboxylic acid at PKU and Yufa, followed by phthalic acid (Ph). A strong even carbon number predominance with the highest level at palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by stearic acid (C18:0) was found for fatty acids. According to the back trajectories modeling results, the air masses were found to originate mainly from northeast, passing over southeast or south of Beijing (heavily populated, urbanized and industrialized areas), during heavier pollution events, whereas they are mainly from north or northwest sector (mountain areas without serious anthropogenic pollution sources) during cleaner events. The data with wind only from the same sector (minimizing the difference from regional contribution) but with and without traffic restriction in Beijing were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of local traffic restriction measure on the reduction of local air pollution in Beijing. The results suggested that the

  17. Dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, fatty acids and benzoic acid in PM2.5 aerosol collected during CAREBeijing-2007: an effect of traffic restriction on air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Huang, R.-J.; Kawamura, K.; Tachibana, E.; Lee, S. C.; Ho, S. S. H.; Zhu, T.; Tian, L.

    2015-03-01

    Thirty water-soluble organic species, including dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, fatty acids and benzoic acid were determined as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in PM2.5 samples collected during the Campaign of Air Quality Research in Beijing 2007 (CAREBeijing-2007) in the urban and suburban areas of Beijing. The objective of this study is to identify the influence of traffic emissions and regional transport to the atmosphere in Beijing during summer. PM2.5 samples collected with or without traffic restriction in Beijing are selected to evaluate the effectiveness of local traffic restriction measures on air pollution reduction. The average concentrations of the total quantified bifunctional organic compounds (TQBOCs), total fatty acids and benzoic acid during the entire sampling period were 1184±241, 597±159 and 1496±511 ng m-3 in Peking University (PKU), and 1050±303, 475±114 and 1278±372 ng m-3 in Yufa, Beijing. Oxalic acid (C2) was found as the most abundant dicarboxylic acid at PKU and Yufa followed by phthalic acid (Ph). A strong even carbon number predominance with the highest level at stearic acid (C18:0), followed by palmitic acid (C16:0) was found for fatty acids. According to the back trajectories modeling results, the air masses were found to originate mainly from the northeast, passing over the southeast or south of Beijing (heavily populated, urbanized and industrialized areas), during heavier pollution events, whereas they are mainly from the north or northwest sector (mountain areas without serious anthropogenic pollution sources) during less pollution events. The data with wind only from the same sector (minimizing the difference from regional contribution) but with and without traffic restriction in Beijing were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of local traffic restriction measures on the reduction of local air pollution in Beijing. The results suggested

  18. Alteration of fatty acid profile and nucleotide-related substances in post-mortem breast meat of α-lipoic acid-fed broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Y

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of α-lipoic acid supplementation on post-mortem changes in the fatty acid profile and concentrations of nucleotide-related substances, especially those of a taste-active compound, inosine 5'-monophosphate, in chicken meat. Mixed-sex broiler chicks aged 14 d were divided into three groups of 16 birds each and were fed on diets supplemented with α-lipoic acid at levels of 0, 100 or 200 mg/kg for 4 weeks. Blood and breast muscle samples were taken at 42 d of age under the fed condition and then after fasting for 18 h. The breast muscle obtained from fasted chickens was subsequently refrigerated at 2°C for one and 3 d. α-Lipoic acid supplementation did not affect any plasma metabolite concentration independently of feeding condition, while a slight increase in plasma glucose concentration was shown with both administration levels of α-lipoic acid. In early post-mortem breast muscle under the fed condition, α-lipoic acid had no effect on concentrations of fatty acids or nucleotides of ATP, ADP, and AMP. In post-mortem breast tissues obtained from fasted chickens, total fatty acid concentrations were markedly increased by α-lipoic acid feeding at 200 mg/kg irrespective of length of refrigeration. This effect was dependent on stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid. However, among fatty acids, the only predominantly increased unsaturated fatty acid was oleic acid. Dietary supplementation with α-lipoic acid at 200 mg/kg increased the inosine 5'-monophosphate concentration in breast meat and, in contrast, reduced the subsequent catabolites, inosine and xanthine, regardless of the length of refrigeration. Therefore, the present study suggests that α-lipoic acid administration altered the fatty acid profile and improved meat quality by increasing taste-active substances in the post-mortem meat obtained from fasted chickens.

  19. Changes in fatty acids composition during seed growth and physicochemical characteristics of oil extracted from four safflower cultivars.

    PubMed

    Rahamatalla, A B; Babiker, E E; Krishna, A G; El Tinay, A H

    2001-01-01

    Fatty acid contents at different stages of maturity and physicochemical characteristics of oil extracted from mature seeds of four safflower cultivars (S208, S400, S541, and S303) were studied. Results indicated that for all cultivars both saturated and unsaturated fatty acid contents fluctuated with seed growth and development. Palmitic acid content decreased up to day 20 after which it started to increase for the S400, S541, and S303 cultivars, while for S208 it progressively decreased. Stearic acid fluctuated with seed growth and development. Oleic acid showed slight changes with seed growth and development, while linoleic acid decreased with seed growth and development for the S400, S541, and S303 cultivars while for S208 after day 30, it started to increase significantly. For all cultivars, glyceride contents varied among the cultivars with maximum values of 97.70, 2.80 and 0.20 for tri-, di- and monoglycerides, respectively. Physicochemical investigation of mature seed oils showed that the color, density, refractive index, free fatty acids, peroxide value, saponification value and unsaponifiable matter were similar for all cultivars while viscosity, iodine value, and acetone insoluble matter varied among the cultivars.

  20. Polysorbate 20 Degradation in Biopharmaceutical Formulations: Quantification of Free Fatty Acids, Characterization of Particulates, and Insights into the Degradation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Anthony; Demeule, Barthélemy; Lin, Baiwei; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-02

    Polysorbate 20 (PS20), a commonly used surfactant in biopharmaceuticals, showed degradation upon long-term (∼18-36 months) storage of two monoclonal antibody (mAb, mAb-A, and mAb-B) drug products at 2-8 °C. The PS20 degradation resulted in the accumulation of free fatty acids (FFA), which ultimately precipitated to form particles upon long-term storage. This study documents the development, qualification, and application of a method for FFA quantification in soluble and insoluble fraction of protein formulation. The method was applied to the quantification of capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic/oleic acid, and stearic acid in placebo as well as active protein formulations on stability. Quantification of FFA in both the soluble and insoluble fraction of mAb-A and mAb-B provided a better mechanistic understanding of PS20 degradation and the dynamics of subsequent fatty acid particle formation. Additionally, the use of this method for monitoring and quantitation of the FFA on real time storage stability appears to aid in identifying batches with higher probability for particulate formation upon extended storage at 5 °C.

  1. Effect of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on muscle fatty acid composition in goats.

    PubMed

    Abubakr, Abdelrahim; Alimon, Abdul Razak; Yaakub, Halimatun; Abdullah, Norhani; Ivan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effects of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on different muscle fatty acid profiles in goats. Thirty-two Cacang × Boer goats were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments: (1) control diet (CD), (2) 80% decanter cake diet (DCD), (3) 80% palm kernel cake diet (PKCD) and (4) CD plus 5% palm oil (PO) supplemented diet (CPOD). After 100 days of feeding, four goats from each group were slaughtered and longissimus dorsi (LD), infraspinatus (IS) and biceps femoris (BF) were sampled for analysis of fatty acids. Goats fed the PKCD had higher (P<0.05) concentration of lauric acid (C12:0) than those fed the other diets in all the muscles tested. Compared to the other diets, the concentrations of palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) were lower (P<0.05) and that of linoleic acid (C18:2 n-6) was higher (P<0.05) in the muscles from goats fed the CD. It was concluded that palm kernel cake and decanter cake can be included in the diet of goats up to 80% with more beneficial than detrimental effects on the fatty acid profile of their meat.

  2. Effect of Feeding Palm Oil By-Products Based Diets on Muscle Fatty Acid Composition in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Abubakr, Abdelrahim; Alimon, Abdul Razak; Yaakub, Halimatun; Abdullah, Norhani; Ivan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effects of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on different muscle fatty acid profiles in goats. Thirty-two Cacang × Boer goats were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments: (1) control diet (CD), (2) 80% decanter cake diet (DCD), (3) 80% palm kernel cake diet (PKCD) and (4) CD plus 5% palm oil (PO) supplemented diet (CPOD). After 100 days of feeding, four goats from each group were slaughtered and longissimus dorsi (LD), infraspinatus (IS) and biceps femoris (BF) were sampled for analysis of fatty acids. Goats fed the PKCD had higher (P<0.05) concentration of lauric acid (C12:0) than those fed the other diets in all the muscles tested. Compared to the other diets, the concentrations of palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) were lower (P<0.05) and that of linoleic acid (C18:2 n-6) was higher (P<0.05) in the muscles from goats fed the CD. It was concluded that palm kernel cake and decanter cake can be included in the diet of goats up to 80% with more beneficial than detrimental effects on the fatty acid profile of their meat. PMID:25789610

  3. In vitro treatment of HepG2 cells with saturated fatty acids reproduces mitochondrial dysfunction found in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Inmaculada; Solís-Muñoz, Pablo; Fernández-Moreira, Daniel; Muñoz-Yagüe, Teresa; Solís-Herruzo, José A

    2015-02-01

    Activity of the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS) is decreased in humans and mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Nitro-oxidative stress seems to be involved in its pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine whether fatty acids are implicated in the pathogenesis of this mitochondrial defect. In HepG2 cells, we analyzed the effect of saturated (palmitic and stearic acids) and monounsaturated (oleic acid) fatty acids on: OXPHOS activity; levels of protein expression of OXPHOS complexes and their subunits; gene expression and half-life of OXPHOS complexes; nitro-oxidative stress; and NADPH oxidase gene expression and activity. We also studied the effects of inhibiting or silencing NADPH oxidase on the palmitic-acid-induced nitro-oxidative stress and subsequent OXPHOS inhibition. Exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to saturated fatty acids resulted in a significant decrease in the OXPHOS activity. This effect was prevented in the presence of a mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase. Palmitic acid reduced the amount of both fully-assembled OXPHOS complexes and of complex subunits. This reduction was due mainly to an accelerated degradation of these subunits, which was associated with a 3-tyrosine nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Pretreatment of cells with uric acid, an antiperoxynitrite agent, prevented protein degradation induced by palmitic acid. A reduced gene expression also contributed to decrease mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded subunits. Saturated fatty acids induced oxidative stress and caused mtDNA oxidative damage. This effect was prevented by inhibiting NADPH oxidase. These acids activated NADPH oxidase gene expression and increased NADPH oxidase activity. Silencing this oxidase abrogated totally the inhibitory effect of palmitic acid on OXPHOS complex activity. We conclude that saturated fatty acids caused nitro-oxidative stress, reduced OXPHOS complex half-life and activity, and decreased gene expression of mtDNA-encoded subunits

  4. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., lard, palm oil from fruit, peanut oil, safflower oil, sesame oil, soybean oil, and tallow and the fatty... physical or technical effect. (c) Polyglycerol esters of a mixture of stearic, oleic, and coconut...

  5. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., lard, palm oil from fruit, peanut oil, safflower oil, sesame oil, soybean oil, and tallow and the fatty... physical or technical effect. (c) Polyglycerol esters of a mixture of stearic, oleic, and coconut...

  6. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., lard, palm oil from fruit, peanut oil, safflower oil, sesame oil, soybean oil, and tallow and the fatty... physical or technical effect. (c) Polyglycerol esters of a mixture of stearic, oleic, and coconut...

  7. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., lard, palm oil from fruit, peanut oil, safflower oil, sesame oil, soybean oil, and tallow and the fatty... physical or technical effect. (c) Polyglycerol esters of a mixture of stearic, oleic, and coconut...

  8. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... amounts of stearic or oleic acid as lubricants. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with bronze... that such impurities may be avoided by good manufacturing practice: Stearic or oleic acid, not...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... amounts of stearic or oleic acid as lubricants. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with bronze... that such impurities may be avoided by good manufacturing practice: Stearic or oleic acid, not...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... amounts of stearic or oleic acid as lubricants. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with bronze... that such impurities may be avoided by good manufacturing practice: Stearic or oleic acid, not...

  11. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... amounts of stearic or oleic acid as lubricants. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with bronze... that such impurities may be avoided by good manufacturing practice: Stearic or oleic acid, not...

  12. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... amounts of stearic or oleic acid as lubricants. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with bronze... that such impurities may be avoided by good manufacturing practice: Stearic or oleic acid, not...

  13. Expression of lipases and lipid receptors in sperm storage tubules and possible role of fatty acids in sperm survival in the hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Isobe, N; Obitsu, T; Yoshimura, Y

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of fatty acids for sperm survival in the sperm storage tubules (SSTs) of the hen oviduct. The mucosa tissues of uterovaginal junction (UVJ) of White Leghorn laying hens with or without artificial insemination using semen from Barred Plymouth Rock roosters were collected. The lipid density in the epithelium of UVJ and SST was analyzed by Sudan black B staining. The expressions of genes encoding lipid receptors and lipases were assayed by polymerase chain reaction in UVJ mucosa and SST cells isolated by laser microdissection. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and sperm were cultured with or without the identified predominant fatty acids for 24 hours to examine their effect on sperm viability. The lipid droplets were localized in the epithelium of UVJ mucosa and SSTs. The expression of genes encoding very low-density lipoprotein receptor(VLDLR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) were found in SST cells. Expression of genes encoding endothelial lipase (EL), lipase H (LIPH), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were found in UVJ. In contrast, only ATGL was found in SST cells, and its expression was significantly upregulated after artificial insemination. In UVJ mucosal tissues, five fatty acids, namely myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16), stearic acid (C18), oleic acid (C18:1n9), and linoleic acid (C18:2n6), were identified as predominant fatty acids. The viability of sperm cultured with 1 mM oleic acid or linoleic acid was significantly higher than the sperm in the control culture without fatty acids. These results suggest that lipids in the SST cells may be degraded by ATGL, and fatty acids including oleic acid and linoleic acid may be released into the SST lumen to support sperm survival.

  14. Fatty acids for controlled release applications: A comparison between prilling and solid lipid extrusion as manufacturing techniques.

    PubMed

    Vervaeck, A; Monteyne, T; Siepmann, F; Boone, M N; Van Hoorebeke, L; De Beer, T; Siepmann, J; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the solid state characteristics, drug release and stability of fatty acid-based formulations after processing via prilling and solid lipid extrusion. Myristic acid (MA), stearic acid (SA) and behenic acid (BA) were used as matrix formers combined with metoprolol tartrate (MPT) as model drug. The prilling process allowed complete dissolution of MPT in the molten fatty acid phase, generating semi-crystalline MPT and the formation of hydrogen bonds between drug and fatty acids in the solid prills. In contrast, as solid lipid extrusion (SLE) induced only limited melting of the fatty acids, molecular interaction with the drug was inhibited, yielding crystalline MPT. Although the addition of a low melting fatty acid allowed more MPT/fatty acid interaction during extrusion, crystalline MPT was detected after processing. Mathematical modeling revealed that the extrudates exhibited a higher apparent drug/water mobility than prills of the same composition, probably due to differences in the inner systems' structure. Irrespective of the processing method, mixed fatty acid systems (e.g. MA/BA) exhibited a lower matrix porosity, resulting in a slower drug release rate. Solid state analysis of these systems indicated that the crystalline structure of the fatty acids was maintained after SLE, while prilling generated a reduced MA crystallinity. Binary MPT/fatty acid systems processed via extrusion showed better stability during storage at 40 °C than the corresponding prills. Although mixed fatty acid systems were stable at 25 °C, stability problems were encountered during storage at 40 °C: a faster release was obtained from the prills, whereas drug release from the extrudates was slower.

  15. Obeticholic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  16. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  17. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  18. Aristolochic Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences NIH-HHS www.niehs.nih.gov Aristolochic Acids Key Points Report on Carcinogens Status Known to be human carcinogens Aristolochia Clematitis Aristolochic Acids n Known human carcinogens n Found in certain ...

  19. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  20. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  1. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  2. Genetic Mapping of QTLs Controlling Fatty Acids Provided Insights into the Genetic Control of Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Qiao, Lixian; Feng, Suping; Tonnis, Brandon; Barkley, Noelle A.; Pinnow, David; Holbrook, Corley C.; Culbreath, Albert K.; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Guo, Baozhu

    2015-01-01

    Peanut, a high-oil crop with about 50% oil content, is either crushed for oil or used as edible products. Fatty acid composition determines the oil quality which has high relevance to consumer health, flavor, and shelf life of commercial products. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80% of peanut oil, the six other fatty acids namely palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), arachidic acid (C20:0), gadoleic acid (C20:1), behenic acid (C22:0), and lignoceric acid (C24:0) are accounted for the rest 20%. To determine the genetic basis and to improve further understanding on effect of FAD2 genes on these fatty acids, two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations namely S-population (high oleic line ‘SunOleic 97R’ × low oleic line ‘NC94022’) and T-population (normal oleic line ‘Tifrunner’ × low oleic line ‘GT-C20’) were developed. Genetic maps with 206 and 378 marker loci for the S- and the T-population, respectively were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. As a result, a total of 164 main-effect (M-QTLs) and 27 epistatic (E-QTLs) QTLs associated with the minor fatty acids were identified with 0.16% to 40.56% phenotypic variation explained (PVE). Thirty four major QTLs (>10% of PVE) mapped on five linkage groups and 28 clusters containing more than three QTLs were also identified. These results suggest that the major QTLs with large additive effects would play an important role in controlling composition of these minor fatty acids in addition to the oleic and linoleic acids in peanut oil. The interrelationship among these fatty acids should be considered while breeding for improved peanut genotypes with good oil quality and desired fatty acid composition. PMID:25849082

  3. GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS studies on unlabelled and deuterium-labelled oleic acid (C18:1) reactions with peroxynitrite (O=N-O-O⁻) in buffer and hemolysate support the pM/nM-range of nitro-oleic acids in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Trettin, Arne; Böhmer, Anke; Zoerner, Alexander A; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Jordan, Jens; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2014-08-01

    Oleic acid (cis-9,10-octadecenoic acid) is the most abundant monounsaturated fatty acid in human blood. Peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) is a short-lived species formed from the reaction of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2(-)). Peroxynitrite is a potent oxidizing and moderate nitrating agent. We investigated reactions of unlabelled and deuterium labelled oleic acid in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and lysed human erythrocytes with commercially available sodium peroxynitrite (Na(+)ONOO(-)). Non-derivatized reaction products were analyzed by spectrophotometry, HPLC with UV absorbance detection, and LC-MS/MS electrospray ionization in the negative-ion mode. Reaction products were also analyzed by GC-MS/MS in the electron capture negative-ion chemical ionization mode after derivatization first with pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) bromide and then with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide. Identified oleic acid reaction products in PBS and hemolysate include cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid and trans-9,10-epoxystearic acid (about 0.1% with respect to oleic acid), threo- and erythro-9,10-dihydroxy-stearic acids. Vinyl nitro-oleic acids, 9-nitro-oleic acid (9-NO2OA) and 10-nitro-oleic acid (10-NO2OA), or other nitro-oleic acids were not found to be formed from the reaction of oleic acid with peroxynitrite in PBS or hemolysate. Our in vitro study suggests that peroxynitrite oxidizes but does not nitrate oleic acid in biological samples. Unlike thiols and tyrosine, oleic acid is not susceptible to peroxynitrite. GC-MS/MS analysis of PFB esters is by far more efficient than LC-MS/MS analysis of non-derivatized oleic acid and its derivates. Our in vitro results support our previous in vivo findings that nitro-oleic acid plasma concentrations of healthy and diseased subjects are in the pM/nM-range.

  4. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  5. Transient and permanent experience with fatty acids changes Drosophila melanogaster preference and fitness.

    PubMed

    Flaven-Pouchon, Justin; Garcia, Thibault; Abed-Vieillard, Dehbia; Farine, Jean-Pierre; Ferveur, Jean-François; Everaerts, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Food and host-preference relies on genetic adaptation and sensory experience. In vertebrates, experience with food-related cues during early development can change adult preference. This is also true in holometabolous insects, which undergo a drastic nervous system remodelling during their complete metamorphosis, but remains uncertain in Drosophila melanogaster. We have conditioned D. melanogaster with oleic (C18:1) and stearic (C18:0) acids, two common dietary fatty acids, respectively preferred by larvae and adult. Wild-type individuals exposed either during a transient period of development-from embryo to adult-or more permanently-during one to ten generation cycles-were affected by such conditioning. In particular, the oviposition preference of females exposed to each fatty acid during larval development was affected without cross-effect indicating the specificity of each substance. Permanent exposure to each fatty acid also drastically changed oviposition preference as well as major fitness traits (development duration, sex-ratio, fecundity, adult lethality). This suggests that D. melanogaster ability to adapt to new food sources is determined by its genetic and sensory plasticity both of which may explain the success of this generalist-diet species.

  6. Effect of carboxylic acids as compatibilizer agent on mechanical properties of thermoplastic starch and polypropylene blends.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa Bercini; Santana, Ruth Marlene Campomanes

    2016-01-01

    In this work, polypropylene/thermoplastic starch (PP/TPS) blends were prepared as an alternative material to use in disposable packaging, reducing the negative polymeric environmental impact. Unfortunately, this material displays morphological characteristics typical of immiscible polymer blends and a compatibilizer agent is needed. Three different carboxyl acids: myristic (C14), palmitic (C16) and stearic acids (C18) were used as natural compatibilizer agent (NCA). The effects of NCA on the mechanical, physical, thermal and morphological properties of PP/TPS blends were investigated and compared against PP/TPS with and without PP-grafted maleic anhydride (PPgMA). When compared to PP/TPS, blends with C18, PPgMA and C14 presented an improvement of 25, 22 and 17% in tensile strength at break and of 180, 194 and 259% in elongation at break, respectively. The highest increase, 54%, in the impact strength was achieved with C14 incorporation. Improvements could be seen, through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, in the compatibility between the immiscible components by acids incorporation. These results showed that carboxylic acids, specifically C14, could be used as compatibilizer agent and could substitute PPgMA.

  7. [The fatty acid composition of large pumpkin seed oil (Curucbitae maxima Dich) cultivated in Georgia].

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to identify qualitatively and quantitatively fatty acid composition of large pumpkin seed oil cultivated in Georgia (Cucurbitae maxima Duch) and evaluate its biological activities. Evaluation was conducted using high-performance liquid chromatography method. Fatty acids ranging from C12:0 to C22:0 were identified in the probe. The oil contained 0,2В±0,01mg% lauric, 0,3В±0,01 mg% miristic, 9,0В±0,7mg% palmitic, 5,5В±0,4 mg% stearic, 28,1В±1,0 mg% oleic, 40,2В±1,9 mg% linolic, 12,1В±1,0 mg% linolenic, 2,0В±0,2mg% arachinic and 1,2В±0,1 mg% begenic acids. The investigation showed that large pumpkin seed oil contains a range of biologically significant fatty acids, unique proportion of which attaches great value to the vegetative material.

  8. Transient and Permanent Experience with Fatty Acids Changes Drosophila melanogaster Preference and Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Flaven-Pouchon, Justin; Garcia, Thibault; Abed-Vieillard, Dehbia; Farine, Jean-Pierre; Ferveur, Jean-François; Everaerts, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Food and host-preference relies on genetic adaptation and sensory experience. In vertebrates, experience with food-related cues during early development can change adult preference. This is also true in holometabolous insects, which undergo a drastic nervous system remodelling during their complete metamorphosis, but remains uncertain in Drosophila melanogaster. We have conditioned D. melanogaster with oleic (C18∶1) and stearic (C18∶0) acids, two common dietary fatty acids, respectively preferred by larvae and adult. Wild-type individuals exposed either during a transient period of development–from embryo to adult–or more permanently–during one to ten generation cycles–were affected by such conditioning. In particular, the oviposition preference of females exposed to each fatty acid during larval development was affected without cross-effect indicating the specificity of each substance. Permanent exposure to each fatty acid also drastically changed oviposition preference as well as major fitness traits (development duration, sex-ratio, fecundity, adult lethality). This suggests that D. melanogaster ability to adapt to new food sources is determined by its genetic and sensory plasticity both of which may explain the success of this generalist-diet species. PMID:24667657

  9. Dispersion of ceria nanoparticles on γ-alumina surface functionalized using long chain carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledwa, Karolina Anna; Kępiński, Leszek

    2017-04-01

    Dispersion and stability of nanoparticles on a support is determined by the interaction between these phases. In case of hydrophobic nanoparticles (e.g. synthesized by reverse microemulsion method) the interaction with hydrophilic support (e.g. γ-Al2O3) is weak and agglomeration as well as poor resistance to sintering may cause problems. The bonding of the particles to the support may be effectively strengthened by proper modification of the support, e.g. by adsorption of hydrophobic compounds on its surface. In this work decanoic, myristic, stearic and oleic acid were used for the first time to cover γ-Al2O3 surface in order to enhance the dispersion of ceria nanoparticles deposited afterward by impregnation on such support. TGA and FTIR methods revealed that at monolayer coverage (1.1-2.5 molecules per nm2) the acid molecules are firmly bounded to the alumina surface. Morphology, textural properties, phase composition and reducibility of the CeO2/γ-Al2O3 samples were investigated using TEM, SEM, BET, XRD and H2-TPR methods. It has been shown that deposition of CeO2 nanoparticles on γ-Al2O3 surface covered with all studied acids enhances its dispersion, stability and reducibility. The most effective modification of the γ-Al2O3 surface was obtained at loading of 2.3 molecules of decanoic acid per nm2 of the support.

  10. Measurement of total acid number (TAN) and TAN boiling point distribution in petroleum products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kuangnan; Edwards, Kathleen E; Dechert, Gary J; Jaffe, Stephen B; Green, Larry A; Olmstead, William N

    2008-02-01

    We report a new method for rapid measurement of total acid number (TAN) and TAN boiling point (BP) distribution for petroleum crude and products. The technology is based on negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for selective ionization of petroleum acid and quantification of acid structures and molecular weight distributions. A chip-based nanoelectrospray system enables microscale (<200 mg) and higher throughput (20 samples/h) measurement. Naphthenic acid structures were assigned based on nominal masses of a set of predefined acid structures. Stearic acid is used as an internal standard to calibrate ESI-MS response factors for quantification purposes. With the use of structure-property correlations, boiling point distributions of TAN values can be calculated from the composition. The rapid measurement of TAN BP distributions by ESI is demonstrated for a series of high-TAN crudes and distillation cuts. TAN values determined by the technique agree well with those by the titration method. The distributed properties compare favorably with those measured by distillation and measurement of TAN of corresponding cuts.

  11. Simultaneous Determination of Essential Oil Components and Fatty Acids in Fennel using Gas Chromatography with a Polar Capillary Column.

    PubMed

    Najdoska-Bogdanov, Menče; Bogdanov, Jane B; Stefova, Marina

    2015-09-01

    Cultivated and wild growing samples of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae) from R. Macedonia were studied for their volatiles and fatty acid composition. The main essential oil components isolated via hydrodistillation were: trans-anethole (>80%), estragole (< 6%), limonene (< 6%), anisaldehyde (< 1%) and 0.5 % fenchone. An alternative method for characterization of both the non-polar volatile and non volatile fractions was developed using n-hexane and dichloromethane (3:1, v/v) in a Soxhlet extraction followed by transesterification. The obtained extracts were then characterized and the dominant fatty acid was 18:1 (petroselinic and oleic acid) 75.0-82.8%, followed by 18:2 (linoleic acid) 10.8-16.2% and other fatty acids: palmitic (4.3-6.9%), stearic (1.2-1.7%) and myristic (0-2.9%). The results for the volatile fraction after Soxhlet extraction and transesterification did not significantly differ from results obtained after hydrodistillation, especially for the main components (trans-anethole, estragole, fenchone and limonene), implying that the developed method can be used for simultaneous determination of volatiles and fatty acids.

  12. Interleukin-6 and Cyclooxygenase-2 downregulation by fatty-acid fractions of Ranunculus constantinopolitanus

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Medicinal plants represent alternative means for the treatment of several chronic diseases, including inflammation. The genus Ranunculus, a representative of the Ranunculaceae family, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiviral, antibacterial, antiparasitic and antifungal activities, possibly due to the presence of anemonin and other. Different studies have shown the occurrence of unusual fatty acids (FAs) in Ranunculaceae; however, their therapeutic role has not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to characterize potential anti-inflammatory bioactivities in Ranunculus constantinopolitanus D'Urv., traditionally used in Eastern Mediterranean folk medicine. Methods The aerial part of R. constantinopolitanus was subjected to methanol (MeOH) extraction and solvent fractionation. The bioactive fraction (I.2) was further fractionated using column chromatography, and the biologically active subfraction (Y2+3) was identified using infrared (IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of I.2 and Y2+3 on cell viability were studied in mouse mammary epithelial SCp2 cells using trypan blue exclusion method. To study the anti-inflammatory activities of I.2 and Y2+3, their ability to reduce interleukin (IL)-6 levels was assessed in endotoxin (ET)-stimulated SCp2 cells using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, the ability of Y2+3 to reduce cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression was studied in IL-1-treated mouse intestinal epithelial Mode-K cells via western blotting. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK), Tukey HSD, two-sample t-test and Dunnett t-tests for multiple comparisons. Results The chloroform fraction (I.2) derived from crude MeOH extract of the plant, in addition to Y2+3, a FA mix isolated from this fraction and containing palmitic acid, C18:2 and C18:1 isomers and stearic acid (1:5:8:1 ratio

  13. Fatty acid modulation of autoinducer (AI-2) influenced growth and macrophage invasion by Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Kenneth W; Jesudhasan, Palmy; Pillai, Suresh D

    2012-03-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a small molecule that is involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling whose precursor formation is mediated by luxS. A luxS mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium PJ002 (ΔluxS) was grown in glucose-containing M-9 minimal medium supplemented with varying concentrations (1×, 10×, and 100×) of long-chain fatty acids (linoleic acid, oleic acid, palmitic acid, and stearic acid) to study the influence of fatty acids on growth rate and macrophage invasion. Additionally, in vitro synthesized AI-2 was added to this medium to identify the influence of AI-2 on S. Typhimurium PJ002 (ΔluxS) growth rate and macrophage invasion. The growth rate constant (k) for each experimental treatment was determined based on OD₆₀₀ values recorded during 12 h of incubation. There was a significant (p=0.01) increase in the growth rate of S. Typhimurium PJ002 (ΔluxS) in the presence of AI-2 when compared to the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control. However, fatty acids either singly or in a mixture were unable to influence AI-2's effect on growth rate. The presence of AI-2 significantly (p=0.02) decreased the invasiveness of S. Typhimurium PJ002 (ΔluxS) towards the murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. However, the fatty acid mixture was able to reverse this reduction and restore invasiveness to background levels. These results suggest that, while AI-2 may enhance the growth rate and reduce macrophage invasion by the luxS mutant S. Typhimurium PJ002 (ΔluxS), fatty acids may influence the virulence in S. Typhimurium (PJ002) by modulating AI-2 activity.

  14. Fatty acid profiling of soybean cotyledons by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C A; Ren, C; Beuselinck, P R; Benedict, H R; Bilyeu, K

    2006-11-01

    Genetically improved soybean grain often contains altered fatty acid profiles. Such alterations can have deleterious effects on seed germination and seedling development, making it necessary to monitor fatty acid profiles in follow-up physiological studies. The objective of this research was to quantify the five fatty acids in soybean (Glycine max) cotyledons using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Soybean cotyledon samples were dried, ground, and scanned with visible and NIR radiation from 400 to 2500 nm, and reflectance was recorded. Samples were also analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) for palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids and total oil; GC data, expressed as actual concentration and proportion of total oil, were regressed against spectral data to develop calibration equations. Equation statistics indicated that four of the five fatty acids could be predicted accurately by NIR spectroscopy; the fifth fatty acid could be determined by subtraction. Principal component analysis revealed that most of the spectral variation in this population was due to chlorophyll absorbance in the visible region. Therefore, the spectra were trimmed to include the NIR region only (1100-2500 nm), and a second set of equations was developed. Equations based exclusively on NIR spectra had equal or greater precision than equations based on visible and NIR spectra. Principal component analysis and partial least squares analysis revealed that even after trimming, at least 90% of the spectral variation was unrelated to fatty acid, though variation from fatty acid was identified in the second and third principal components. This research provides an NIR method for complete fatty acid profiling of soybean cotyledons. Equations were achieved with NIR spectra only, so spectrophotometers that analyze both the visible and NIR regions are not needed for this analysis. In addition, equations were possible with a 250 mg sample, which is one-tenth the normal sample size for

  15. Effect of pH on conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) formation of linolenic acid biohydrogenation by ruminal microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yongjae

    2013-08-01

    Conventional beliefs surrounding the linolenic acid (LNA; cis-9 cis-12 cis-15 C18:3) biohydrogenation (BH) pathway propose that it converts to stearic acid (SA) without the formation of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) as intermediate isomers. However, an advanced study (Lee and Jenkins, 2011) verified that LNA BH yields multiple CLAs. This study utilized the stable isotope tracer to investigate the BH intermediates of (13)C-LNA with different pH conditions (5.5 and 6.5). The (13)C enrichment was calculated as a (13)C/(12)C ratio of labeled minus unlabeled. After 24 h, eight CLA isomers were significantly enriched on both pH treatment, this result verifies that these CLAs originated from (13)C-LNA BH which supports the results of Lee and Jenkins (2011). The enrichment of cis-cis double bond CLAs (cis-9 cis-11 and cis-10 cis-12 CLA) were significantly higher at low pH conditions. Furthermore, the concentration of cis-10 cis-12 CLA at low pH was four times higher than at high pH conditions after a 3 h incubation. These differences support the LNA BH pathways partial switch under different pH conditions, with a strong influence on the cis-cis CLA at low pH. Several mono-, di-, and tri-enoic fatty acid isomers were enriched during 24 h of incubation, but the enrichment was decreased or restricted at low pH treatment. Based on these results, it is proposed that low pH conditions may cause a changed or limited capacity of the isomerization and reduction steps in BH.

  16. Identification and expression of a stearoyl-ACP desaturase gene responsible for oleic acid accumulation in Xanthoceras sorbifolia seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Qiuqi; Li, Rufang; Xia, Xinli; Qin, Xiaowei; Guo, Huihong

    2015-02-01

    Xanthoceras sorbifolia Bunge is an oilseed tree that grows well on barren lands in dry climate. Its seeds contain a large amount of oil rich in oleic acid (18:1(Δ9)) and linoleic acid (18:2(Δ9, 12)). However, the molecular regulation of oil biosynthesis in X. sorbifolia seeds is poorly understood. Stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD, EC 1.14.99.6) is a plastid-localized soluble desaturase that catalyzes the conversion of stearic acid (18:0) to oleic acid, which plays a key role in determining the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, a full-length cDNA of XsSAD was isolated from developing X. sorbifolia embryos. The XsSAD open reading frame had 1194-bp, encoding a polypeptide of 397 amino acids. XsSAD expression in Escherichia coli cells resulted in increased 18:1(Δ9) level, confirming the biological activity of the enzyme encoded by XsSAD. XsSAD expression in Arabidopsis ssi2 mutants partially restored the morphological phenotype and effectively increased the 18:1(Δ9) level. The levels of other unsaturated fatty acids synthesized with 18:1(Δ9) as the substrate also increased to some degree. XsSAD in X. sorbifolia had a much higher expression in embryos than in leaves and petals. XsSAD expression also correlated well with the oleic acid, unsaturated fatty acid, and total fatty acid levels in developing embryos. These data suggested that XsSAD determined the synthesis of oleic acid and contributed to the accumulation of unsaturated fatty acid and total oil in X. sorbifolia seeds. A preliminary tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing system established in X. sorbifolia can also be helpful for further analyzing the functions of XsSAD and other oil synthesis-related genes in woody plants.

  17. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  18. Agronomic effects of mutations in two soybean Stearoyl-ACP-Desaturases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] oil normally contains 2-4% stearic acid. Oil with higher levels of stearic acid is desired for use in the baking industry, for both its chemical properties and human health benefits. Several lines with increased stearic acid have been identified; however, the agronom...

  19. Cytoplasmic tail length influences fatty acid selection for acylation of viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Veit, M; Reverey, H; Schmidt, M F

    1996-01-01

    We report remarkable differences in the fatty acid content of thioester-type acylated glycoproteins of enveloped viruses from mammalian cells. The E2 glycoprotein of Semliki Forest virus contains mainly palmitic acid like most other palmitoylated proteins analysed so far. However, the other glycoprotein (E1) of the same virus, as well as the HEF (haemagglutinin esterase fusion) glycoprotein of influenza C virus, are unique in this respect because they are acylated primarily with stearic acid. Comparative radiolabelling of uninfected cells with different fatty acids suggests that stearate may also be the prevailing fatty acid in some cellular acylproteins. To look for further differences between palmitoylated and stearoylated glycoproteins we characterized stearoylation in more detail. We identified the acylation site of HEF as a cysteine residue located at the boundary between the transmembrane region and the cytoplasmic tail. The attachment of stearate to HEF and E1 occurs post-translationally in a pre-Golgi compartment. Thus, stearoylated and palmitoylated proteins cannot be discriminated on the basis of the fatty acid linkage site or the intracellular compartment, where acylation occurs. However, stearoylated acylproteins contain a very short, positively charged cytoplasmic tail, whereas in palmitoylated proteins this molecular region is longer. Replacing the short cytoplasmic tail of stearoylated HEF with the long influenza A virus haemagglutinin (HA) tail in an HEF-HA chimera, and subsequent vaccinia T7 expression in CV-1 cells, yielded proteins with largely palmitic acid bound. The reverse chimera, HA-HEF with a short cytoplasmic tail was not fatty acylated at all during expression, indicating that conformational or topological constraints control fatty acid transfer. PMID:8761467

  20. Plasma Phospholipid Saturated Fatty Acids and Incident Atrial Fibrillation: The Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Fretts, Amanda M.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Siscovick, David S.; Djousse, Luc; Heckbert, Susan R.; King, Irena B.; McKnight, Barbara; Sitlani, Colleen; Sacks, Frank M.; Song, Xiaoling; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Spiegelman, Donna; Wallace, Erin R.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prior studies suggest that circulating fatty acids may influence the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), but little is known about the associations of circulating saturated fatty acids with risk of AF. Methods and Results The study population included 2899 participants from the Cardiovascular Health Study, a community‐based longitudinal cohort of adults aged 65 years or older in the United States who were free of prevalent coronary heart disease and AF in 1992. Cox regression was used to assess the association of all the long‐chain saturated fatty acids—palmitic acid (16:0), stearic acid (18:0), arachidic acid (20:0), behenic acid (22:0), and lignoceric acid (24:0)—with incident AF. During a median of 11.2 years of follow‐up, 707 cases of incident AF occurred. After adjustment for other AF risk factors, higher levels of circulating 16:0 were associated with a higher risk of AF (hazard ratio comparing highest and lowest quartiles: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.18, 1.86). In contrast, higher levels of circulating 18:0, 20:0, 22:0, and 24:0 were each associated with a lower risk of AF. The hazard ratios (95% CI) for AF in the top and bottom quartiles were 0.76 (95% CI: 0.61, 0.95) for 18:0; 0.78 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.97) for 20:0; 0.62 (95% CI: 0.50, 0.78) for 22:0; and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.55, 0.85) for 24:0. Conclusions Results from this prospective cohort study of older adults demonstrate divergent associations of circulating 16:0 versus longer‐chain saturated fatty acids with incident AF, highlighting the need to investigate both determinants of these levels and potential pathways of the observed differential risk. PMID:24970268

  1. Fatty Acid Composition and Community Structure of Plankton from the San Lorenzo Channel, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavaniegos, B. E.; López-Cortés, D.

    1997-12-01

    The structure of the plankton community and fatty acid composition of nano-, micro- and zooplankton are described during four seasons of 1994 from the San Lorenzo Channel. During August, the warmest temperature in the surface water was observed and a thermocline developed between 20 and 30 m. In the remaining months, a well-mixed layer occurred in the upper 30 m. The chlorophyllacontent of the nanoplankton fraction (<38 μm) was higher than the microplanktonic fraction (38-200 μm) year round. Maximal chlorophyll values (1·5-3 μ l-1) occurred in January, which may be associated with organic matter, since phytoplankton was lower than at other seasons. The relative abundance of diatoms increased from January (57% of phytoplankton) to November (99%). The increment was mainly due toNitzschiaandChaetoceros. Dinoflagellates were always low (0·03-1·36 cells ml-1). Copepods (mainlyEucalanus) dominated the zooplankton in winter and fall, while in spring and summer, the abundance of doliolids was similar to the copepods (Nannocalanus minordominated). Four fatty acids (16:0, 16:1, 18:0, 18:1) were the most conspicuous in the plankton, representing usually between 40 and 80% of the total fatty acids throughout the water column. In winter, higher fatty acid content and higher relative amounts of 16:0 and 16:1 were observed than in the warm months. Stearic acid (18:0) peaked during fall. The major seasonal differences occurred in the nanoplankton, which had peaks of 20:5 during January, and 16:4 in April. A strong decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) occurred during the warm months. The fatty acid composition of microplankton and larger zooplankton was similar in winter-spring. Individual copepods of selected species (Eucalanus sewelli,Rhincalanus nasutus,Centropages furcatusandLabidocera acuta) showed fatty acid profiles similar to the mixed zooplankton, with some differences in content of PUFA.

  2. Fatty Acid Profiles of Ten Muscles from High and Low Marbled (Quality Grade 1++ and 2) Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Young-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate: 1) the fatty acid profile of ten muscles from high marbled (HM, quality grade 1++) and low marbled (LM, quality grade 2) Hanwoo carcass, 2) the relationship between the fatty acid profile and sensory traits. There were significant (p<0.001) differences in fat content and fatty acid composition among the 10 muscles obtained from HM and LM Hanwoo steers. The proportions of SFA (saturated fatty acid), MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acid) and PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acid) were significantly (p<0.001) different among the 10 muscles due to differences in all fatty acids except eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3). The high-fat muscles had a lower n-6/n-3 ratio compared to the low-fat muscles (p<0.001). LM muscles had a significantly (p<0.05) higher proportion of SFA than HM muscles due to a higher proportion of stearic acid (C18:0). On the contrary, HM muscles had a significantly (p<0.01) higher proportion of MUFA than LM muscles due to higher oleic acid (C18:1n-9) proportion. SFA had a significant correlation with CIE a* (r=0.281; p<0.01) and drip loss (%) (r=−0.233; p<0.001). Cooking loss (%) had a significantly (p<0.05) negative correlation with PUFA (r=−0.233; p<0.05). Overall palatability was positively correlated with SFA (r=0.262; p<0.01), but negatively correlated with PUFA (r=−0.567; p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between oleic acid and any of the sensory traits (p>0.05). PMID:27857545

  3. The effects of changing dairy intake on trans and saturated fatty acid levels- results from a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dairy food is an important natural source of saturated and trans fatty acids in the human diet. This study evaluates the effect of dietary advice to change dairy food intake on plasma fatty acid levels known to be present in milk in healthy volunteers. Methods Twenty one samples of whole fat dairy milk were analyzed for fatty acids levels. Changes in levels of plasma phospholipid levels were evaluated in 180 healthy volunteers randomized to increase, not change or reduce dairy intake for one month. Fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and levels are normalized to d-4 alanine. Results The long chain fatty acids palmitic (13.4%), stearic (16.7%) and myristic (18.9%) acid were most common saturated fats in milk. Four trans fatty acids constituted 3.7% of the total milk fat content. Increased dairy food intake by 3.0 (± 1.2) serves/ day for 1 month was associated with small increases in plasma levels of myristic (+0.05, 95% confidence level-0.08 to 0.13, p = 0.07), pentadecanoic (+0.014, 95% confidence level -0.016 to 0.048, p = 0.02) and margaric acid (+0.02, -0.03 to 0.05, p = 0.03). There was no significant change in plasma levels of 4 saturated, 4 trans and 10 unsaturated fatty acids. Decreasing dairy food intake by 2.5 (± 1.2) serves per day was not associated with change in levels of any plasma fatty acid levels. Conclusion Dietary advice to change dairy food has a minor effect on plasma fatty acid levels. Trial registration ACTRN12612000574842. PMID:24708591

  4. Fatty Acid Desaturation Links Germ Cell Loss to Longevity Through NHR-80/HNF4 in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Goudeau, Jérôme; Bellemin, Stéphanie; Toselli-Mollereau, Esther; Shamalnasab, Mehrnaz; Chen, Yiqun; Aguilaniu, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Background Preventing germline stem cell proliferation extends lifespan in nematodes and flies. So far, studies on germline-longevity signaling have focused on daf-16/FOXO and daf-12/VDR. Here, we report on NHR-80/HNF4, a nuclear receptor that specifically mediates longevity induced by depletion of the germ line through a mechanism that implicates fatty acid monodesaturation. Methods and Findings nhr-80/HNF4 is induced in animals lacking a germ line and is specifically required for their extended longevity. Overexpressing nhr-80/HNF4 increases the lifespan of germline-less animals. This lifespan extension can occur in the absence of daf-16/FOXO but requires the presence of the nuclear receptor DAF-12/VDR. We show that the fatty acid desaturase, FAT-6/SCD1, is a key target of NHR-80/HNF4 and promotes germline-longevity by desaturating stearic acid to oleic acid (OA). We find that NHR-80/HNF4 and OA must work in concert to promote longevity. Conclusions Taken together, our data indicate that the NHR-80 pathway participates in the mechanism of longevity extension through depletion of the germ line. We identify fat-6 and OA as essential downstream elements although other targets must also be present. Thus, NHR-80 links fatty acid desaturation to lifespan extension through germline ablation in a daf-16/FOXO independent manner. PMID:21423649

  5. [Oxidative stress in blood leukocytes, pro/antioxidant status and fatty acids composition of pancreas lipids at experimental acute pancreatitis in rats].

    PubMed

    Pryvrots'ka, I B; Kuchmerovs'ka, T M

    2013-01-01

    In an experimental model of acute pancreatitis (AP) in rats no alteration in leukocyte's viability was found by flow cytometry as compared to control. After 1 day of AP production of reactive oxygen forms in granulocytes was increased more than 5 times, but after 3 days their level was decreased. Alterations of pro/antioxidant status and specific changes in the fatty acid composition in the pancreas were established. With the development of AP, the processes of lipids peroxidation were intensified while antioxidant system was altered, that was evidenced by inflammation in the pancreas. In these conditions, the increase of phospholipase A2 activity was accompanied by significant changes of fatty acid composition of the total lipids in the pancreas. This increased relative total content of saturated fatty acids, in particular myristic, palmitic and stearic acid increased, while the total content of polyunsaturated essential fatty acids omega-3 (linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, dokozapentayenoic, docosahexaenoic) decreased. The preparation containing omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids partially normalized the lipid and fatty acids composition as well as prooxidant-antioxidant system.

  6. New method for GC/FID and GC-C-IRMS analysis of plasma free fatty acid concentration and isotopic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Kangani, Cyrous O; Kelley, David E; Delany, James P

    2008-09-15

    A simple, direct and accurate method for the determination of concentration and enrichment of free fatty acids (FFAs) in human plasma was developed. The validation and comparison to a conventional method are reported. Three amide derivatives, dimethyl, diethyl and pyrrolidide, were investigated in order to achieve optimal resolution of the individual fatty acids. This method involves the use of dimethylamine/Deoxo-Fluor to derivatize plasma free fatty acids to their dimethylamides. This derivatization method is very mild and efficient, and is selective only towards FFAs so that no separation from a total lipid extract is required. The direct method gave lower concentrations for palmitic acid and stearic acid and increased concentrations for oleic acid and linoleic acid in plasma as compared to methyl ester derivative after thin-layer chromatography. The [(13)C]palmitate isotope enrichment measured using direct method was significantly higher than that observed with the BF(3)/MeOH-TLC method. The present method provided accurate and precise measures of concentration as well as enrichment when analyzed with gas chromatography combustion-isotope ratio-mass spectrometry.

  7. The Effect of Saturated Fatty Acids on Methanogenesis and Cell Viability of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Meile, Leo; Kreuzer, Michael; Zeitz, Johanna O.

    2013-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids (SFAs) are known to suppress ruminal methanogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not well known. In the present study, inhibition of methane formation, cell membrane permeability (potassium efflux), and survival rate (LIVE/DEAD staining) of pure ruminal Methanobrevibacter ruminantium (DSM 1093) cell suspensions were tested for a number of SFAs. Methane production rate was not influenced by low concentrations of lauric (C12; 1 μg/mL), myristic (C14; 1 and 5 μg/mL), or palmitic (C16; 3 and 5 μg/mL) acids, while higher concentrations were inhibitory. C12 and C14 were most inhibitory. Stearic acid (C18), tested at 10–80 μg/mL and ineffective at 37°C, decreased methane production rate by half or more at 50°C and ≥50 μg/mL. Potassium efflux was triggered by SFAs (C12 = C14 > C16 > C18 = control), corroborating data on methane inhibition. Moreover, the exposure to C12 and C14 decreased cell viability to close to zero, while 40% of control cells remained alive after 24 h. Generally, tested SFAs inhibited methanogenesis, increased cell membrane permeability, and decreased survival of M. ruminantium in a dose- and time-dependent way. These results give new insights into how the methane suppressing effect of SFAs could be mediated in methanogens. PMID:23710130

  8. The effect of saturated fatty acids on methanogenesis and cell viability of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Meile, Leo; Kreuzer, Michael; Zeitz, Johanna O

    2013-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids (SFAs) are known to suppress ruminal methanogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not well known. In the present study, inhibition of methane formation, cell membrane permeability (potassium efflux), and survival rate (LIVE/DEAD staining) of pure ruminal Methanobrevibacter ruminantium (DSM 1093) cell suspensions were tested for a number of SFAs. Methane production rate was not influenced by low concentrations of lauric (C12; 1 μg/mL), myristic (C14; 1 and 5 μg/mL), or palmitic (C16; 3 and 5 μg/mL) acids, while higher concentrations were inhibitory. C12 and C14 were most inhibitory. Stearic acid (C18), tested at 10-80 μg/mL and ineffective at 37°C, decreased methane production rate by half or more at 50°C and ≥50 μg/mL. Potassium efflux was triggered by SFAs (C12 = C14 > C16 > C18 = control), corroborating data on methane inhibition. Moreover, the exposure to C12 and C14 decreased cell viability to close to zero, while 40% of control cells remained alive after 24 h. Generally, tested SFAs inhibited methanogenesis, increased cell membrane permeability, and decreased survival of M. ruminantium in a dose- and time-dependent way. These results give new insights into how the methane suppressing effect of SFAs could be mediated in methanogens.

  9. Predicted changes in fatty acid intakes, plasma lipids, and cardiovascular disease risk following replacement of trans fatty acid-containing soybean oil with application-appropriate alternatives.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Michael; Mensink, Ronald P; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Petersen, Barbara; Smith, Kim; Flickinger, Brent D

    2012-10-01

    The varied functional requirements satisfied by trans fatty acid (TFA)--containing oils constrains the selection of alternative fats and oils for use as potential replacements in specific food applications. We aimed to model the effects of replacing TFA-containing partially hydrogenated soybean oil (PHSBO) with application-appropriate alternatives on population fatty acid intakes, plasma lipids, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 24-hour dietary recalls for 1999-2002, we selected 25 food categories, accounting for 86 % of soybean oil (SBO) and 79 % of TFA intake for replacement modeling. Before modeling, those in the middle quintile had a mean PHSBO TFA intake of 1.2 % of energy. PHSBO replacement in applications requiring thermal stability by either low-linolenic acid SBO or mid-oleic, low-linolenic acid SBO decreased TFA intake by 0.3 % of energy and predicted CVD risk by 0.7-0.8 %. PHSBO replacement in applications requiring functional properties with palm-based oils reduced TFA intake by 0.8 % of energy, increased palmitic acid intake by 1.0 % of energy, and reduced predicted CVD risk by 0.4 %, whereas replacement with fully hydrogenated interesterified SBO reduced TFA intake by 0.7 % of energy, increased stearic acid intake by 1.0 % of energy, and decreased predicted CVD risk by 1.2 %. PHSBO replacement in both thermal and functional applications reduced TFA intake by 1.0 % of energy and predicted CVD risk by 1.5 %. Based solely on changes in plasma lipids and lipoproteins, all PHSBO replacement models reduced estimated CVD risk, albeit less than previously reported using simpler replacement models.

  10. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  11. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications.

  12. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  13. Effect of salinity stress on growth, lipid productivity, fatty acid composition, and biodiesel properties in Acutodesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Priti Raj; Fulekar, Madhusudan H; Karuna, Mallampalli Sri Lakshmi

    2017-04-07

    Two microalgae strains including Chlorella vulgaris and Acutodesmus obliquus were grown on BG11 medium with salinity stress ranging from 0.06 to 0.4 M NaCl. Highest lipid content in C. vulgaris and A. obliquus was 49 and 43% in BG11 amended with 0.4 M NaCl. The microalgal strains C. vulgaris and A. obliquus grow better at 0.06 M NaCl concentration than control condition. At 0.06 M NaCl, improved dry biomass content in C. vulgaris and A. obliquus was 0.92 and 0.68 gL(-1), respectively. Stress biomarkers like reactive oxygen species, antioxidant enzyme catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase were also lowest at 0.06 M NaCl concentration revealing that both the microalgal strains are well acclimatized at 0.06 M NaCl concentration. The fatty acid composition of the investigated microalgal strains was also improved by increased NaCl concentration. At 0.4 M NaCl, palmitic acid (37%), oleic acid (15.5%), and linoleic acid (20%) were the dominant fatty acids in C. vulgaris while palmitic acid (54%) and stearic acid (26.6%) were major fatty acids found in A. obliquus. Fatty acid profiling of C. vulgaris and A. obliquus significantly varied with salinity concentration. Therefore, the study showed that salt stress is an effective stress that could increase not only the lipid content but also improved the fatty acid composition which could make C. vulgaris and A. obliquus potential strains for biodiesel production.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study Singles Out SCD and LEPR as the Two Main Loci Influencing Intramuscular Fat Content and Fatty Acid Composition in Duroc Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ros-Freixedes, Roger; Gol, Sofia; Pena, Ramona N.; Tor, Marc; Ibáñez-Escriche, Noelia; Dekkers, Jack C. M.; Estany, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content and fatty acid composition affect the organoleptic quality and nutritional value of pork. A genome-wide association study was performed on 138 Duroc pigs genotyped with a 60k SNP chip to detect biologically relevant genomic variants influencing fat content and composition. Despite the limited sample size, the genome-wide association study was powerful enough to detect the association between fatty acid composition and a known haplotypic variant in SCD (SSC14) and to reveal an association of IMF and fatty acid composition in the LEPR region (SSC6). The association of LEPR was later validated with an independent set of 853 pigs using a candidate quantitative trait nucleotide. The SCD gene is responsible for the biosynthesis of oleic acid (C18:1) from stearic acid. This locus affected the stearic to oleic desaturation index (C18:1/C18:0), C18:1, and saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated (MUFA) fatty acids content. These effects were consistently detected in gluteus medius, longissimus dorsi, and subcutaneous fat. The association of LEPR with fatty acid composition was detected only in muscle and was, at least in part, a consequence of its effect on IMF content, with increased IMF resulting in more SFA, less polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and greater SFA/PUFA ratio. Marker substitution effects estimated with a subset of 65 animals were used to predict the genomic estimated breeding values of 70 animals born 7 years later. Although predictions with the whole SNP chip information were in relatively high correlation with observed SFA, MUFA, and C18:1/C18:0 (0.48–0.60), IMF content and composition were in general better predicted by using only SNPs at the SCD and LEPR loci, in which case the correlation between predicted and observed values was in the range of 0.36 to 0.54 for all traits. Results indicate that markers in the SCD and LEPR genes can be useful to select for optimum fatty acid profiles of pork. PMID:27023885

  15. 18:1 n7 fatty acids inhibit growth and decrease inositol phosphate release in HT-29 cells compared to n9 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Awad, A B; Herrmann, T; Fink, C S; Horvath, P J

    1995-05-04

    Studies have shown that trans fatty acids may play a role in the development of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. The objective of the present project was to examine the effect of supplementation with 18:1 isomers, both positional and geometrical, as compared to 18:0 on the growth, membrane fatty acid composition and the phosphoinositide cycle of HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Cells were supplemented with 30 microM stearic acid (18:0), elaidic acid (18:1, n9, trans), oleic acid (18:1, n9, cis), vaccenic acid (18:1, n7, cis) or trans-vaccenic acid (18:1, n7, trans) as sodium salts complexed to fatty acid-free bovine serum. Cells were grown in these media for 9 days. Cell growth was examined by counting the number of cells and expressed as percentage of control (18:0 supplemented cells). The phosphoinositide (PI) cycle was examined by measuring the inositol phosphate (IP) released from phosphoinositides in the absence (basal) or presence of stimuli (0.1 mM carbachol, 0.1 mM A23187 or 20 mM NaF). The results obtained indicated that cis and trans n7 fatty acids inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells by 11% and 23%, respectively, as compared to 18:0 supplementation. 18:1, n9 had no effect on tumor growth. Supplementation with all forms of 18:1 resulted in an increase in IP and IP2 production as compared to 18:0 supplemented cells without influencing IP3. The presence of the double bond at the 9 position in the supplemented fatty acid increases total IP production by 59% and in the cis form by 37% above the control. The breakdown of phosphoinositides in the absence and presence of several stimuli supports the observed finding on IP. Trans fatty acid supplementation resulted in lower hydrolysis of PI as compared to cis fatty acids. It is concluded that the observed inhibition of tumor growth by the vaccenic acids may be mediated by their effect(s) on the PI cycle which may be associated with their incorporation into membrane lipids.

  16. Non-Esterified Fatty Acids Profiling in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Associations with Clinical Features and Th1 Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Carrio, Javier; Alperi-López, Mercedes; López, Patricia; Ballina-García, Francisco Javier; Suárez, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Since lipid compounds are known to modulate the function of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages, we hypothesize that altered levels of serum non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) may underlie rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. Methods Serum levels of NEFA (palmitic, stearic, palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, γ-linoleic, arachidonic –AA–, linolenic, eicosapentaenoic –EPA– and docosahexaenoic –DHA–) were quantified by LC-MS/MS after methyl-tert-butylether (MTBE)-extraction in 124 RA patients and 56 healthy controls (HC). CD4+ phenotype was studied by flow cytometry. TNFα, IL-8, VEGF, GM-CSF, IFNγ, IL-17, CCL2, CXCL10, leptin and resistin serum levels were quantified by immunoassays. The effect of FA on IFNγ production by PBMC was evaluated in vitro. Results Lower levels of palmitic (p<0.0001), palmitoleic (p = 0.002), oleic (p = 0.010), arachidonic (p = 0.027), EPA (p<0.0001) and DHA (p<0.0001) were found in RA patients, some NEFA being altered at onset. Cluster analysis identified a NEFA profile (hallmarked by increased stearic and decreased EPA and DHA) overrepresented in RA patients compared to HC (p = 0.002), being associated with clinical features (RF, shared epitope and erosions), increased IFNγ expression in CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.002) and a Th1-enriched serum milieu (IFNγ, CCL2 and CXCL10, all p<0.005). In vitro assays demonstrated that imbalanced FA could underlie IFNγ production by CD4+ T-cells. Finally, changes on NEFA levels were associated with clinical response upon TNFα-blockade. Conclusion An altered NEFA profile can be found in RA patients associated with clinical characteristics of aggressive disease and enhanced Th1 response. These results support the relevance of lipidomic studies in RA and provide a rationale for new therapeutic targets. PMID:27487156

  17. Seasonal variations and source identification of selected organic acids associated with PM10 in the coastal area of Southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shui-Ping; Schwab, James; Liu, Bi-Lian; Li, Tsung-Chang; Yuan, Chung-Shin

    2015-03-01

    PM10 aerosols from the coastal area of Southeastern China were collected from April 2010 to March 2011 and were measured for C2-C10 dicarboxylic acids, phthalic acids (Ph) and five fatty acids (palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and elaidic acids). For all sites and seasons, molecular distributions of diacids were always characterized by a predominance of oxalic acid (C2), with a relative abundance of 68-87%, followed by malonic acid (C3) and by either succinic acid (C4) or phthalic acid (Ph). This observed molecular composition was different from that in Chinese megacities where Ph was significantly higher than C3 and C4 diacids, which was likely due to the less intensive traffic emissions in the coastal area. Seasonal means of total diacids ranged between 394 and 547 ng m- 3 at the coastal urban sites and between 163 and 245 ng m- 3 at off-island sites. These levels were much lower than those reported in Chinese megacities (668-1568 ng m- 3) and slightly lower than those in Jeju Island, Korea (464-744 ng m- 3) but higher than those in marine and continental background locations. In all seasons, saturated fatty acids were significantly higher than unsaturated fatty acids due to their greater photochemical stabilities in the atmosphere. Most organic acids showed higher levels in spring and winter and lower levels in summer and fall, which was likely due to the influence of transport and meteorology. The diagnostic ratios of malonic acid to succinic acid (C3/C4), adipic acid to azelaic acid (C6/C9) and phthalic acid to azelaic acid (Ph/C9) were significantly higher in summer than in winter. These diagnostic ratios in the sampled ambient aerosols were completely different from those in primary emissions, suggesting the importance of photochemical production - especially in summer. The diurnal variations of diacids and fatty acid as well as the diagnostic ratios are associated with higher solar radiation and anthropogenic activities during the daytime. Principal

  18. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  19. Modulation of the reactivity of the thiol of human serum albumin and its sulfenic derivative by fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Torres, María José; Turell, Lucía; Botti, Horacio; Antmann, Laura; Carballal, Sebastián; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Radi, Rafael; Alvarez, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    The single cysteine residue of human serum albumin (HSA-SH) is the most abundant plasma thiol. HSA transports fatty acids (FA), a cargo that increases under conditions of diabetes, exercise or adrenergic stimulation. The stearic acid-HSA (5/1) complex reacted 6-fold faster at pH 7.4 with the disulfide 5,5′-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and 2-fold faster with hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite. The apparent pKa of HSA-SH decreased from 7.9 ± 0.1 to 7.4 ± 0.1. Exposure to H2O2 (2 mM, 5 min, 37 °C) yielded 0.29 ± 0.04 moles of sulfenic acid (HSA-SOH) per mole of FA-bound HSA. The reactivity of HSA-SOH with low molecular weight thiols increased ~3-fold in the presence of FA. The enhanced reactivity of the albumin thiol at neutral pH upon FA binding can be rationalized by considering that the corresponding conformational changes that increase thiol exposure both increase the availability of the thiolate due to a lower apparent pKa and also loosen steric constraints for reactions. Since situations that increase circulating FA are associated with oxidative stress, this increased reactivity of HSA-SH could assist in oxidant removal. PMID:22450170

  20. Effect of solvents and methods of stirring in extraction of lycopene, oleoresin and fatty acids from over-ripe tomato.

    PubMed

    López-Cervantes, Jaime; Sánchez-Machado, Dalia I; Valenzuela-Sánchez, Karla P; Núñez-Gastélum, José A; Escárcega-Galaz, Ana A; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Lycopene and oleoresin extraction from powder of tomato over-ripe by three agitation methods and four solvents have been evaluated. Also, tomato powder and the oleoresins were characterized biochemically. On average, the moisture content of powder was found to be 4.30, ash 8.90, proteins 11.23 and lipids 4.35 g 100 g(-1). The best oleoresin extraction yield was achieved by combining sonication and acetone at 1.43 g 100 g(-1). The greatest amount of lycopene (65.57 ± 0.33 mg 100 g(-1)) was also obtained using the same treatment. The presence of trans-lycopene was positively confirmed by HPLC and FTIR. In oleoresins, linoleic acid (C18:2n6) was the predominant with 50% of total fatty acids, whereas stearic acid (C18:0) is presented in a smaller proportion (5%). A simple and suitable method for extraction of lycopene from over-ripe tomato was optimized. In industrial applications, tomato by-products are a viable source of analytes, such as lycopene and unsaturated fatty acids.

  1. Studies on antioxidant activity, volatile compound and fatty acid composition of different parts of Glycyrrhiza echinata L.

    PubMed Central

    Çakmak, Yavuz Selim; Aktumsek, Abdurrahman; Duran, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    The essential oil compound, fatty acid composition and the in vitro antioxidant activity of the root and aerial of Glycyrrhiza echinata L., a medicinal plant growing in Turkey, have been studied. The antioxidant capacity tests were designed to evaluate the antioxidant activities of methanol extracts. Total phenolic and flavonoid concentrations of each extract were also determined by using both Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and aluminum chloride. The aerial part was found to possess the highest total phenolic content (146.30 ± 4.58 mg GAE/g) and total antioxidant capacity (175.33 ± 3.98 mg AE/g). The essential oil from root and aerial parts was analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) systems. The major components identified were n-hexadecanoic acid, hexahydro farnesyl acetone, α-caryophyllen, hexanal and phytol. In fatty acid profiles of plant, palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acid were detected as the main components. The results of this study have shown that the extracts G. echinata are suitable as a natural antioxidant and food supplement source for pharmacological and food industries due to their beneficial chemical composition and antioxidant capacity. PMID:27418901

  2. An insect with a delta-12 desaturase, the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis, benefits from nutritional supply with linoleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstetter, Birgit; Ruther, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The availability of linoleic acid (LA; C18:2∆9,12) is pivotal for animals. While vertebrates depend on a nutritional supply, some invertebrates, including the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis, are able to synthesize LA from oleic acid (OA; C18:1∆9). This raises the question as to whether these animals nevertheless benefit from the additional uptake of LA with the diet. LA plays an important role in the sexual communication of N. vitripennis because males use it as a precursor for the synthesis of an abdominal sex pheromone attracting virgin females. We reared hosts of N. vitripennis that were fed diets enriched in the availability of stearic acid (SA: C18:0), OA or LA. N. vitripennis males developing on the different host types clearly differed in both the fatty acid composition of their body fat and sex pheromone titres. Males from LA-enriched hosts had an almost fourfold higher proportion of LA and produced significantly more sex pheromone than males from SA (2.2-fold) and OA (1.4-fold) enriched hosts, respectively. Our study demonstrates that animals being able to synthesize important nutrients de novo may still benefit from an additional supply with their diet.

  3. Semi-Batch Deoxygenation of Canola- and Lard-Derived Fatty Acids to Diesel-Range Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, JP; Thapaliya, N; Kelly, MJ; Roberts, WL; Lamb, HH

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) derived via thermal hydrolysis of food-grade lard and canola oil were deoxygenated in the liquid phase using a commercially available 5 wt % Pd/C catalyst. Online quadrupole mass spectrometry and gas chromatography were used to monitor the effluent gases from the semi-batch stirred autoclave reactors. Stearic, oleic, and palmitic acids were employed as model compounds. A catalyst lifetime exceeding 2200 turnovers for oleic acid deoxygenation was demonstrated at 300 degrees C and 15 atm under 10% H-2. The initial decarboxylation rate of palmitic acid under 5% H-2 decreases sharply with increasing initial concentration; in contrast, the initial decarbonylation rate increases linearly, indicative of first-order kinetics. Scale-up of diesel-range hydrocarbon production was investigated by increasing the reactor vessel size, initial FA concentration, and FA/catalyst mass ratio. Lower CO2 selectivity and batch productivity were observed at the larger scales (600 and 5000 mL), primarily because of the higher initial FA concentration (67 wt %) employed. Because unsaturated FAs must be hydrogenated before deoxygenation can proceed at an appreciable rate, the additional batch time required for FA hydrogenation reduces the batch productivity for unsaturated feedstocks. Low-temperature hydrogenation of unsaturated feedstocks (using Pd/C or another less-expensive catalyst) prior to deoxygenation is recommended.

  4. The adjuvant activity of fatty acid esters. The role of acyl chain length and degree of saturation.

    PubMed Central

    Bomford, R

    1981-01-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions of metabolizable fatty acid esters, with the non-toxic surfactant Pluronic L122 as emulsifying agent, potentiated the humoral response to bovine serum albumin and staphylococcal toxoid in the mouse. Adjuvant activity was increased by changing the chemical nature of the esters as follows: (i) using a series of ethyl esters, adjuvant activity appeared when the acyl chain length of the fatty acid component was 16 or greater; (ii) isobutyl and isopropyl esters of palmitic acid (C16:0) were superior to ethyl; (iii) the ethyl esters of oleic (C18:1) and linoleic (C18:2) acids were better than stearic (C18:0). Since emulsions prepared with longer chain saturated esters are very viscous or solid at room temperature, and unsaturated esters are chemically reactive, emulsions were prepared with differing proportions of ethyl caprate (C10:0) and butyl stearate. At a ratio of 9:1 the emulsions possessed the low viscosity of ethyl caprate, but gained the adjuvant activity of butyl stearate. 125I-labelled BSA was retained in the footpad to a significantly greater extent than with a caprate emulsion, but reasons are given for believing that slow release of antigen is not the only mechanism of adjuvant activity. The ester emulsions caused more acute but less chronic local inflammation (footpad swelling) than Freund's incomplete adjuvant. PMID:7275184

  5. Fat Metabolism in Higher Plants XXVI. Biosynthesis of Fatty Acids in Tissues of Developing Seeds and Germinating Seedlings of Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Vern; Stumpf, P. K.

    1966-01-01

    The capacity of both developing seeds and germinating seedlings of safflower for the incorporation of acetate-C14 into long-chain fatty acids is examined. Intact tissue of the developing seed shows a low rate of acetate incorporation into fatty acid initially but between the tenth and twenty-fifth day after flowering the tissue has a high rate of synthesis, in particular with respect to the unsaturated fatty acids. Centrifuged fractionation of homogenates of this developmental tissue yielded several active fractions, the most active being the PI fraction consisting mostly of plastids. Cofactor requirements and pH effects are examined. Germinating tissue shows a more uniform capacity for synthesis of fatty acids since there is no marked change in synthetic capacity. The newly synthesized fatty acids are consistently palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid. No linoleic synthesis could be detected. The most active fraction of cell-free preparation of germinating tissue is the plastid fraction (PI), similar to what was formed with developing tissue. PMID:5904587

  6. Effect of steam-flaked corn and soybeans on muscle and intramuscular fatty acid composition in Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Q; He, D C; Meng, Q X; Wang, D C

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of steam-flaked corn grains and soybeans on muscle fatty acid composition. Thirty Holstein bull calves (21 ± 3 d) were divided into 3 groups according to birth date and BW and were randomly assigned to receive fresh milk and a commercial pelleted starter diet containing extruded corn and soybean (ECS), steam-flaked corn and soybean (SFCS), or ground corn and raw soybean (GCS). The calves were fed the designated diet from 3 to 13 wk of age, after which they were slaughtered. The supraspinatus (CTM), longissimus lumborum (RLM), and spinalis dorsi (ERM) were analyzed to determine the chemical and intramuscular fatty acid composition. The fatty acid composition of muscle and its deposition differed among calves fed different starter feeds. Medium-chain fatty acid levels of the RLM and CTM were greater in GCS-fed calves than in ECS- and SFCS-fed calves ( < 0.05). Extruded processing increased the content of linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids of the RLM ( < 0.05). The palmitoleic and -vaccenic acid content of the ERM were greater in GCS-fed calves than in ECS- or SFCS-fed calves ( < 0.05). No significant differences were observed among the 3 diets with respect to the stearic, oleic, linoleic, -9 -11 CLA, or arachidonic acid content of the ERM ( > 0.05). The levels of -3 and -6 fatty acids were similar among the 3 groups; a lower -6:-3 PUFA ratio was observed in GCS-fed calves ( < 0.05). The cereal processing method of the calf starter feed had no significant effect on the chemical composition of the CTM, RLM, or ERM. Therefore, different methods of processing corn and soybean in calf starter feeds had no effect on the chemical composition of the RLM, CTM, or ERM but had a significant effect on the intramuscular fatty acid composition.

  7. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  8. Acid Rain

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA Is Doing Acid Rain Program Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Progress Reports Educational Resources Kid's Site for ... Monitoring National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Exit Interstate Air Pollution Transport Contact Us to ask a question, provide ...

  9. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid can hide signs that you lack vitamin B12, which can cause nerve damage. 10 Do I ... Rosenberg, I.H., et al. (2007). Folate and vitamin B12 status in relation to anemia, macrocytosis and cognitive ...

  10. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  11. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  12. Effect of different feeds on meat quality and fatty acid composition of lambs fattened at pasture.

    PubMed

    Velasco, S; Cañeque, V; Lauzurica, S; Pérez, C; Huidobro, F

    2004-02-01

    Two kinds of feed (commercial concentrate vs whole supplemented barley) were compared in unweaned lambs and lambs weaned at 40 days of age, fattened at pasture and slaughtered at 28 kg live weight, in order to observe their effects on meat quality and fatty acid composition. The weaning status influenced fatness; unweaned lambs displayed a greater carcass fatness score and more kidney knob and channel fat than weaned lambs. Compared with the unweaned animals, weaned lambs exhibited higher pH values at 0 h and 45 min in the m. longissimus thoracis (LT) and at 45 min and 24 h in the m. semitendinosus. The redness index (a*) of the m. LT of weaned lambs was higher than that of unweaned lambs, and lambs fed concentrate displayed a higher yellowness index (b*) and a higher Hue value than those given whole barley. Water-holding capacity did not vary with the treatments studied. The proportion of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in intramuscular fat was higher (P⩾0.001) in unweaned lambs than in weaned ones while, on the other hand, the latter displayed a higher proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and a higher n-6/n-3 ratio in the same tissue. As was the case with intramuscular fat, the subcutaneous fat of unweaned lambs exhibited higher proportions of medium-chain fatty acids (C12:0, C14:0 y C16:0) and lower ones of stearic (C18:0) and oleic (C18:1) fatty acids than that of weaned lambs. Higher levels of heptadecenoic acid (C17:1) were found in the subcutaneous fat of lambs fed whole barley than in that of lambs given concentrate. PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 ratios were lower in the m. LT than in the m. quadriceps femoris.

  13. Identification of Bioactivity, Volatile and Fatty Acid Profile in Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Mexican arnica

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, J. Saúl; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P.; Arévalo-Gallegos, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Iqbal, Hafiz M. N.; Parra-Saldivar, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a sustainable technique used for the extraction of lipophilic metabolites such as pigments and fatty acids. Arnica plant is considered a potential candidate material with high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore, in this study, a locally available Heterotheca inuloides, also known as Mexican arnica, was analyzed for the extraction of high-value compounds. Based on different pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (CoS), four treatments (T) were prepared. A maximum 7.13% yield was recovered from T2 (T = 60 °C, P = 10 MPa, CoS = 8 g/min), followed by 6.69% from T4 (T = 60 °C, P = 30 MPa, CoS = 4 g/min). Some bioactive sesquiterpenoids such as 7-hydroxycadalene, caryophyllene and δ-cadinene were identified in the extracts by GC/MS. The fatty acid profile revealed that the main components were palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by linoleic acid (C18:2ω6c), α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) and stearic acid (C18:0) differing in percent yield per treatment. Antibacterial activities were determined by the agar diffusion method, indicating that all the treatments exerted strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, C. albicans, and E. coli strains. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was also measured by three in vitro assays, DPPH, TEAC and FRAP, using Trolox as a standard. Results showed high antioxidant capacity enabling pharmaceutical applications of Mexican arnica. PMID:27626416

  14. Identification of Bioactivity, Volatile and Fatty Acid Profile in Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Mexican arnica.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, J Saúl; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P; Arévalo-Gallegos, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Parra-Saldivar, Roberto

    2016-09-12

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a sustainable technique used for the extraction of lipophilic metabolites such as pigments and fatty acids. Arnica plant is considered a potential candidate material with high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore, in this study, a locally available Heterotheca inuloides, also known as Mexican arnica, was analyzed for the extraction of high-value compounds. Based on different pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (CoS), four treatments (T) were prepared. A maximum 7.13% yield was recovered from T2 (T = 60 °C, P = 10 MPa, CoS = 8 g/min), followed by 6.69% from T4 (T = 60 °C, P = 30 MPa, CoS = 4 g/min). Some bioactive sesquiterpenoids such as 7-hydroxycadalene, caryophyllene and δ-cadinene were identified in the extracts by GC/MS. The fatty acid profile revealed that the main components were palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by linoleic acid (C18:2ω6c), α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) and stearic acid (C18:0) differing in percent yield per treatment. Antibacterial activities were determined by the agar diffusion method, indicating that all the treatments exerted strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, C. albicans, and E. coli strains. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was also measured by three in vitro assays, DPPH, TEAC and FRAP, using Trolox as a standard. Results showed high antioxidant capacity enabling pharmaceutical applications of Mexican arnica.

  15. Chromatographic analysis of the effects of fatty acids and glycation on binding by probes for Sudlow sites I and II to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Anguizola, Jeanethe; Debolt, Erin; Suresh, D; Hage, David S

    2016-05-15

    The primary endogenous ligands of human serum albumin (HSA) are non-esterified fatty acids, with 0.1-2mol of fatty acids normally being bound to HSA. In type II diabetes, fatty acid levels in serum are often elevated, and the presence of high glucose results in an increase in the non-enzymatic glycation of HSA. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used to examine the combined effects of glycation and the presence of long chain fatty acids on the binding of HSA with R-warfarin and l-tryptophan (i.e., probes for Sudlow sites I and II, the major sites for drugs on this protein). Zonal elution competition studies were used to examine the interactions of myristic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid with these probes on HSA. It was found that all these fatty acids had direct competition with R-warfarin at Sudlow site I of normal HSA and glycated HSA, with the glycated HSA typically having stronger binding for the fatty acids at this site. At Sudlow site II, direct competition was observed for all the fatty acids with l-tryptophan when using normal HSA, while glycated HSA gave no competition or positive allosteric interactions between these fatty acids and l-tryptophan. These data indicated that glycation can alter the interactions of drugs and fatty acids at specific binding sites on HSA. The results of this study should lead to a better understanding of how these interactions may change during diabetes and demonstrate how HPAC can be used to examine drug/solute-protein interactions in complex systems.

  16. Fatty acid composition of Echinostoma trivolvis (Trematoda) rediae and adults and of the digestive gland-gonad complex of Helisoma trivolvis (Gastropoda) infected with the intramolluscan stages of this echinostome.

    PubMed

    Fried, B; Rao, K S; Sherma, J; Huffman, J E

    1993-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatographic studies were done to determine the fatty acid composition of the digestive gland-gonad (DGG) complex of Helisoma trivolvis snails infected with the intramolluscan stages of Echinostoma trivolvis, of rediae freed from the DGG, of uninfected DGG, and of 41-day-old adult worms grown in golden hamsters. The DGG of infected snails showed significantly higher levels of stearic acid (18:0), hexatrienoic acid (16:3n-4), and docosahexanoic acid (22:6n-3) than that of uninfected snails. However, the DGG of uninfected snails showed significantly higher levels of 20:2 non-methylene-interrupted diene (NMID) and adrenic acid (22:4n-6) than that of infected snails. The profiles of other fatty acids were remarkably similar in both infected and uninfected snails. Adult worms showed significantly higher amounts of numerous saturated fatty acids and dienes as compared with the rediae. However, the rediae showed significantly higher amounts of certain monoenes and trienes as compared with the adults. Fatty acid differences between rediae and adults probably reflect differences in either the available lipid pools in the immediate host sites or the metabolic activity of each stage of this echinostome.

  17. Formulation of curcumin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles produced by fatty acids coacervation technique.

    PubMed

    Chirio, Daniela; Gallarate, Marina; Peira, Elena; Battaglia, Luigi; Serpe, Loredana; Trotta, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin (CU) loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of fatty acids (FA) were prepared with a coacervation technique based on FA precipitation from their sodium salt micelles in the presence of polymeric non-ionic surfactants. Myristic, palmitic, stearic, and behenic acids, and different polymers with various molecular weights and hydrolysis grades were employed as lipid matrixes and stabilisers, respectively. Generally, spherical-shaped nanoparticles with mean diameters below 500 nm were obtained, and using only middle-high hydrolysis, grade-polymer SLNs with diameters lower than 300 nm were produced. CU encapsulation efficiency was in the range 28-81% and highly influenced by both FA and polymer type. Chitosan hydrochloride was added to FA SLN formulations to produce bioadhesive, positively charged nanoparticles. A CU-chitosan complex formation could be hypothesised by DSC analysis, UV-vis spectra and chitosan surface tension determination. A preliminary study on HCT-116 colon cancer cells was developed to evaluate the influence of CU-loaded FA SLNs on cell viability.

  18. Oleic acid content is responsible for the reduction in blood pressure induced by olive oil.

    PubMed

    Terés, S; Barceló-Coblijn, G; Benet, M; Alvarez, R; Bressani, R; Halver, J E; Escribá, P V

    2008-09-16

    Numerous studies have shown that high olive oil intake reduces blood pressure (BP). These positive effects of olive oil have frequently been ascribed to its minor components, such as alpha-tocopherol, polyphenols, and other phenolic compounds that are not present in other oils. However, in this study we demonstrate that the hypotensive effect of olive oil is caused by its high oleic acid (OA) content (approximately 70-80%). We propose that olive oil intake increases OA levels in membranes, which regulates membrane lipid structure (H(II) phase propensity) in such a way as to control G protein-mediated signaling, causing a reduction in BP. This effect is in part caused by its regulatory action on G protein-associated cascades that regulate adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. In turn, the OA analogues, elaidic and stearic acids, had no hypotensive activity, indicating that the molecular mechanisms that link membrane lipid structure and BP regulation are very specific. Similarly, soybean oil (with low OA content) did not reduce BP. This study demonstrates that olive oil induces its hypotensive effects through the action of OA.

  19. Pattern formation in fatty acid-nanoparticle and lipid-nanoparticle mixed monolayers at water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, M.; Datta, A.; Iyengar, A. N. Sekar; Janaki, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    Dodecanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are self-organized in two different amphiphilic monolayers one of which is a single-tailed fatty acid Stearic acid (StA) and the other a double-tailed lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC). In the StA-AuNP film the AuNPs self-organize to form an interconnected network of nanoclusters on compression while in the DMPC-AuNP film the AuNPs aggregate to form random, isolated clusters in the film. The long time evolution of the films at constant surface pressure reveals ring structures in the former and diffusion limited aggregates in the latter that with time evolve into an irregular porous maze of AuNPs in the DMPC film. The difference in structure of the AuNP patterns in the two films can be attributed to a difference in the lipophilic interactions between the NPs and the amphiphilic molecules. The mean square intensity fluctuations f(ln) calculated along a typical line for the 2D structures in both the films at initial and final stages of long time evolution reflect the structural changes in the films over time.

  20. Fat deposition, fatty acid composition and meat quality: A review.

    PubMed

    Wood, J D; Enser, M; Fisher, A V; Nute, G R; Sheard, P R; Richardson, R I; Hughes, S I; Whittington, F M

    2008-04-01

    This paper reviews the factors affecting the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue and muscle in pigs, sheep and cattle and shows that a major factor is the total amount of fat. The effects of fatty acid composition on meat quality are also reviewed. Pigs have high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), including the long chain (C20-22) PUFA in adipose tissue and muscle. The full range of PUFA are also found in sheep adipose tissue and muscle whereas cattle 'conserve' long chain PUFA in muscle phospholipid. Linoleic acid (18:2n-6) is a major ingredient of feeds for all species. Its incorporation into adipose tissue and muscle in relation to the amount in the diet is greater than for other fatty acids. It is deposited in muscle phospholipid at a high level where it and its long chain products eg aracidonic acid (20:4n-6) compete well for insertion into phospholipid molecules. Its proportion in pig adipose tissue declines as fat deposition proceeds and is an index of fatness. The same inverse relationships are not seen in ruminant adipose tissue but in all species the proportion of 18:2n-6 declines in muscle as fat deposition increases. The main reason is that phospholipid, where 18:2n-6 is located, declines as a proportion of muscle lipid and the proportion of neutral lipid, with its higher content of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, increases. Oleic acid (18:1cis-9), formed from stearic acid (18:0) by the enzyme stearoyl Co-A desaturase, is a major component of neutral lipid and in ruminants the same enzyme forms conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), an important nutrient in human nutrition. Like 18:2n-6, α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) is an essential fatty acid and is important to ruminants since it is the major fatty acid in grass. However it does not compete well for insertion into phospholipid compared with 18:2n-6 and its incorporation into adipose tissue and muscle is less efficient. Greater biohydrogenation of 18:3n-3 and a long rumen transit time

  1. Monitoring of Used Frying Oils and Frying Times for Frying Chicken Nuggets Using Peroxide Value and Acid Value

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the condition of frying oil used for frying chicken nuggets in a deep fryer. The acidification of the frying oils used, soybean oil (SB), canola oil (CA), palm oil (PA), and lard (LA), were determined as peroxide value, acid value, and fatty acid composition, after chicken nuggets were fried in them for 101 times. The acid value and peroxide value obtained were 5.14 mg KOH/g and 66.03 meq/kg in SB, 4.47 mg KOH/g and 71.04 meq/kg in CA, 2.66 mg KOH/g and 15.48 meq/kg in PA, and 5.37 mg KOH/g and 62.92 meq/kg in LA, respectively. The ranges of the major fatty acid contents were palmitic acid, 8.91-45.84%; oleic acid, 34.74-58.68%; linoleic acid, 10.32-18.65%; and stearic acid, 2.28-10.86%.Used frying oils for food except animal products have a legal limit for the freshness standard, set by the Food Codex regulations (AV<2.5, POV<50). Therefore, this study could help develop a freshness standard for frying oils used for animal products such as chicken nuggets. Based on the quality limits associated with food regulations stated, we suggested that the estimated frying times before acceptable freshness was exceeded were 41 for SB, 38 for LA, 53 for CA, and 109 for PA. This data may be useful in determining food quality regulations for frying oil used for animal products. PMID:27857536

  2. Gas chromatographic separation of fatty acid esters of cholesterol and phytosterols on an ionic liquid capillary column.

    PubMed

    Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2015-12-15

    Steryl esters are high molecular weight compounds (600-700g/mol) regularly present as a minor lipid class in animal and plant lipids. Different sterol backbones (e.g., cholesterol, β-sitosterol and brassicasterol) which can be esterified with various fatty acids can result in highly complex steryl ester patterns in food samples. The gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of intact steryl esters is challenging, since high elution temperatures are required for their elution. On nonpolar GC phases, steryl esters with fatty acids with differing degree of unsaturation (e.g., oleate and linoleate) cannot be separated and there are only few polar columns available with sufficient temperature stability. In this study, we used gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and analyzed intact steryl esters on a commercial room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) column which was shortened to a length of 12m. The column separated the steryl esters both by total carbon number and by degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. For instance, cholesteryl esters with stearic acid (18:0), oleic acid (18:1n-9), linoleic acid (18:2n-6) and α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) could be resolved (R≥1.3) from each other. By analysis of synthesized standard substances, the elution orders for different steryl backbones and different fatty acids on a given sterol backbone could be determined. Analysis of spreads and plant oils allowed to determine retention times for 37 steryl esters, although a few co-elutions were observed. The ionic liquid column proved to be well-suited for the analysis of intact steryl esters.

  3. Hexadecenoic Fatty Acid Isomers in Human Blood Lipids and Their Relevance for the Interpretation of Lipidomic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Anna; Tolika, Evanthia; Louka, Maria; Sunda, Valentina; Deplano, Simone; Melchiorre, Michele; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Formisano, Cesare; Di Micco, Rosa; Faraone Mennella, Maria Rosaria; Ferreri, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) are emerging health biomarkers, and in particular the ratio between palmitoleic acid (9cis-16:1) and palmitic acid (16:0) affords the delta-9 desaturase index that is increased in obesity. Recently, other positional and geometrical MUFA isomers belonging to the hexadecenoic family (C16 MUFA) were found in circulating lipids, such as sapienic acid (6cis-16:1), palmitelaidic acid (9trans-16:1) and 6trans-16:1. In this work we report: i) the identification of sapienic acid as component of human erythrocyte membrane phospholipids with significant increase in morbidly obese patients (n = 50) compared with age-matched lean controls (n = 50); and ii) the first comparison of erythrocyte membrane phospholipids (PL) and plasma cholesteryl esters (CE) in morbidly obese patients highlighting that some of their fatty acid levels have opposite trends: increases of both palmitic and sapienic acids with the decrease of linoleic acid (9cis,12cis-18:2, omega-6) in red blood cell (RBC) membrane PL were reversed in plasma CE, whereas the increase of palmitoleic acid was similar in both lipid species. Consequentially, desaturase enzymatic indexes gave different results, depending on the lipid class used for the fatty acid content. The fatty acid profile of morbidly obese subjects also showed significant increases of stearic acid (C18:0) and C20 omega-6, as well as decreases of oleic acid (9cis-18:1) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 omega-3) as compared with lean healthy controls. Trans monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids were also measured and found significantly increased in both lipid classes of morbidly obese subjects. These results highlight the C16 MUFA isomers as emerging metabolic marker provided that the assignment of the double bond position and geometry is correctly performed, thus identifying the corresponding lipidomic pathway. Since RBC membrane PL and plasma CE have different fatty acid trends, caution must also be used in the

  4. [Mineral elements analysis of Momordica charantiap seeds by ICP-AES and fatty acid profile identification of seed oil by GC-MS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-ru; Deng, Ze-yuan; Fan, Ya-wei; Li, Jing; Liu, Zhi-han

    2010-08-01

    In the present study, a special kind of Momordica charantia seeds produced in Hai Nan was selected and analyzed. Firstly, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrophotometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the mineral elements. It was clear that the contents of K, Mg and P are the highest in the seeds; Cr and Zn takes up to 5.65% and 45.45% high, especially, which are rare in plant foods. These minerals, especially Cr and Zn might have a complex effect on those proteins or polysaccharides and form a stronger anticipation of hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and cholesterol. Secondly, seed oil was extracted by supercritical CO2 extraction with a yield ratio of 36.89, and the fatty acids were treated by methylation in alkaline process and purified by thin-layer chromatography, then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) identification. The saturated fatty acids (SFA) take up 36.712, and mainly are stearic acid; monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) is only 3.33% which is dominantly linoleic acid (LA); Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) accounted for 59.96%, and the alpha-eleostearic acid takes up 54.26% as the main fatty acids in all. The plentiful alpha-eleostearic acid leads to strong effects of inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, lowering blood fat, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and preventing cardiovascular diseases, and so on. Knowing clearly the mineral elements distribution and identifying the composition of fatty acid, especially the main fatty acids in the oil, are both of great guiding importance to further exploit the clinical and edible value in Momordica charantiap seeds.

  5. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1993-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  6. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  7. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  8. Effect of dehulling, germination and cooking on nutrients, anti-nutrients, fatty acid composition and antioxidant properties in lentil (Lens culinaris).

    PubMed

    Pal, R S; Bhartiya, Anuradha; Yadav, Pradhuman; Kant, Lakshmi; Mishra, K K; Aditya, J P; Pattanayak, A

    2017-03-01

    The changes in chemical composition, antioxidant activity and fatty acid composition of lentil flour after dehulling, germination and cooking of seeds were investigated. Dehulling showed no significant effect on protein content, however, protein content decreased in most of the varieties after germination and cooking. Total soluble sugars (TSS) content increased significantly after dehulling (2.0-41.64 %) and cooking (2.08-31.07 %) whereas, germination had no significant effect on TSS content. Total lipids increased significantly after dehulling (21.56-42.86 %) whereas, it decreased significantly after germination (2.97-26.52 %) and cooking (23.05-58.63 %). Cooking was more effective than other methods in reducing trypsin inhibitors (80.51-85.41 %). Dehulling was most effective in reducing tannins (89.46-92.99 %) and phytic acid (52.63-60.00 %) content over raw seed. Myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acid content decreased while linolenic acid content increased after dehulling. Dehulling, germination and cooking decreased the content of antioxidant metabolite (gallic acid, catechin and quercetin) and also antioxidant activities. Raw samples followed by germinated samples showed the highest concentrations of phytochemicals responsible for antioxidant activity and also the antioxidant capacities. Present study showed germination and cooking would be useful in formulation and development of lentil based functional foods for human health benefits.

  9. Hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of flax and pumpkin seed mixture rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Makni, M; Fetoui, H; Gargouri, N K; Garoui, El M; Jaber, H; Makni, J; Boudawara, T; Zeghal, N

    2008-12-01

    Flax and pumpkin seeds are a rich source of unsaturated fatty acids, antioxidants and fibers, known to have anti-atherogenic and hepatoprotective activities. These effects were evaluated in Wistar rats fed with 1% cholesterol diet. The study was performed on 30 male rats divided into three groups: a control group (CD), CD-chol group fed diet with 1% cholesterol and MS-chol group fed diet enriched with flax and pumpkin seed mixture. In CD-chol group, total cholesterol TC, triacylglycerol TG in plasma and liver, plasma LDL-C, atherogenic index AI and LDL/HDL ratio significantly increased. In MS-chol group lipid parameters decreased significantly, plasma and liver fatty acid composition showed an increase of PUFAs (ALA and LA), and MUFAs (oleic and eicosaenoic acid) and a decrease of SFA (palmitic and stearic acid). In plasma and liver of MS-chol group, malondialdehyde levels decreased and the efficiency of antioxidant defense system was improved compared to CD-chol group. Liver histological sections showed lipid storage in hepatocytes of CD-chol group and an improvement was noted in MS-chol group. Our results suggested that flax and pumpkin seed mixture had anti-atherogenic and hepatoprotective effects which were probably mediated by unsaturated fatty acids present in seed mixture.

  10. Consumer sensory evaluation, fatty acid composition, and shelf-life of ground beef with subcutaneous fat trimmings from different carcass locations.

    PubMed

    Kerth, Chris R; Harbison, Amanda L; Smith, Stephen B; Miller, Rhonda K

    2015-06-01

    Brisket, chuck, plate, flank, and round subcutaneous fat trim were used to produce ground beef patties then evaluated for color, lipid oxidation, fatty acid composition, volatile chemical compounds and consumer sensory evaluation. Color, TBARS, consumer sensory evaluation, and cook/freezer loss did not differ (P>0.05) among carcass fat locations. Percentage stearic acid was lower (P=0.044) in the ground beef using brisket fat than using the chuck and flank fat. Patties made with brisket fat were higher in cis-vaccenic acid (P=0.016) and the saturated to monounsaturated fatty acid ratio (P=0.018) than all other sources of subcutaneous fat. Butanedione was highest (P=0.013) in patties using flank and plate fat. Ground beef with brisket fat was higher (P=0.003) than all other sources for beefy aroma. Altering the profile of non-polar, triglyceride fatty acids has no effect on sensory flavor or major volatile chemical compounds.

  11. Microelement contents and fatty acid compositions of Rhus coriaria L. and Pistacia terebinthus L. fruits spread commonly in the south eastern Anatolia region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kizil, Suleyman; Turk, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Sumac (Rhus coriaria L.) and terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) are two important spice plants of south eastern Anatolia, Turkey. Nutrients, physical properties including moisture, ash, dry matter, protein, fatty oil and essential oil content, along with Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Ni, Pb, Zn and characteristics of fruit sizes and fatty acid compositions of both plants were determined from ripe fruits. The free fatty acid content was determined in the fruit oil, and the main fatty acids of sumac and terebinth were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. They included oleic, linoleic, palmitic and stearic acids in a ratio of 37.7% and 34.8%, 27.4% and 17.3%, 21.1% and 21.7% and, 4.7% and 2.5%, respectively. The fruits of both plants were rich in oil, fatty acids and minerals, suggesting that they are valuable for using in food. The data may also be useful for the evaluation of nutritional information.

  12. The effect of ethoxyquin on the quality of ground poultry mortality carcasses preserved by lactic acid fermentation and phosphoric acid stabilization.

    PubMed

    Middleton, T F; Ferket, P R; Boyd, L C

    2001-08-01

    Fermentation and acidification have been shown to preserve the protein quality of ground poultry coproducts, but the effects of these processes on their lipid stability are unknown, especially in the presence of an antioxidant. To evaluate the effects of these treatments on lipid quality, ground poultry mortality carcasses, with and without an addition of 500 ppm ethoxyquin, were stabilized for 14 and 45 d by lactic acid fermentation or acidification with 2.76, 5.07, 7.35, or 9.65% feed-grade H3PO4. Ethoxyquin treatment significantly (P < 0.001) improved the oxidative stability of lipids from all storage treatments. However, the addition of ethoxyquin increased (P < 0.001) the levels of volatile N (VN) from 2.51 to 3.18% in products stored for 45 d and resulted in an increase (P < 0.001) in free fatty acids in all ensiled products. Ethoxyquin addition had no effect (P > 0.120) on the fatty acid profile of products stored for 14 d but significantly increased (P < 0.001) the levels of stearic (C18:0) and arachidonic acids (C20:4) in products stored for 45 d. In this experiment, the addition of ethoxyquin to preservation systems for the short-term storage of poultry mortality carcasses improved the lipid quality of the ground material without compromising the protein quality or affecting proximate analysis parameters. However, the increased oxidative stability of mortality silage materials that contain ethoxyquin may contribute to enhanced microbial or enzymatic activities that result in proteolytic or lypolytic breakdown products following longer periods of storage.

  13. Technical note: stearidonic acid metabolism by mixed ruminal microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maia, M R G; Correia, C A S; Alves, S P; Fonseca, A J M; Cabrita, A R J

    2012-03-01

    Dietary supplementation of stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4n-3) has been considered a possible strategy to increase n-3 unsaturated fatty acid content in ruminant products; however, little is known about its metabolism in the rumen. In vitro batch incubations were carried out with bovine ruminal digesta to investigate the metabolism of SDA and its biohydrogenation products. Incubation mixtures (4.5 mL) that contained 0 (control), 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, or 1.50 mg of SDA supplemented to 33 mg (DM basis) of commercial total mixed ration based on corn silage, for dairy cows, were incubated for 72 h at 39°C. The content of most fatty acids in whole freeze-dried cultures was affected by SDA supplementation. Branched-chain fatty acids decreased linearly (P < 0.01), and odd-chain fatty acids decreased quadratically (P < 0.01), particularly from 1.00 mg of SDA and above, whereas most C18 fatty acids increased linearly or quadratically (P ≤ 0.04). Stearidonic acid concentrations at 72 h of incubation were very small (<0.6% of total fatty acids and ≤0.9% of added SDA) in all treatments. The apparent biohydrogenation of SDA was extensive, but it was not affected by SDA concentration (P > 0.05). Biohydrogenation followed a pattern similar to that of other C18 unsaturated fatty acids up to 1.00 mg of SDA. Stearic acid (18:0) and vaccenic acid (18:1 trans-11) were the major fatty acids formed, with the latter increasing 9-fold in the 1.00 mg of SDA treatment. At greater inclusion rates, 18:0 and 18:1 trans isomers decreased (P ≤ 0.03), accompanied by increases in unidentified 18:3 and 18:4 isomers (P = 0.02), suggesting that the biohydrogenation pathway was inhibited. The present results clearly indicate that SDA was metabolized extensively, with numerous 18:4 and 18:3 products formed en route to further conversion to 18:2, 18:1 isomers, and 18:0.

  14. Maternal high-fat-diet programs rat offspring liver fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seet, Emily L; Yee, Jennifer K; Jellyman, Juanita K; Han, Guang; Ross, Michael G; Desai, Mina

    2015-06-01

    In offspring exposed in utero to a maternal diet high in fat (HF), we have previously demonstrated that despite similar birth weights, HF adult offspring at 6 months of age had significantly higher body weights, greater adiposity, and increased triacylglycerol (TAG) levels as compared to controls. We hypothesized that a maternal HF diet predisposes to offspring adiposity via a programmed increase in the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids in the liver and hence increased substrate availability for liver TAG synthesis. We further hypothesized that programmed changes in offspring liver fatty acid metabolism are associated with increased liver expression of the lipogenic enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1). Female rats were maintained on a HF diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) prior to and throughout pregnancy and lactation. After birth, newborns were nursed by the same dam, and all offspring were weaned to control diet. Plasma and liver fatty acid compositions were determined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Fatty acid C16 desaturation indices of palmitoleic/palmitic and (vaccenic + palmitoleic)/palmitic and the C18 desaturation index of oleic/stearic were calculated. Liver protein abundance of SCD-1 was analyzed in newborns and adult offspring. Plasma and liver C16 desaturation indices were decreased in HF newborns, but increased in the adult offspring. Liver SCD-1 expression was increased in the HF adult offspring. These data show that the maternal HF diet during pregnancy and lactation increases offspring liver SCD-1 protein abundance and alters the liver C16 desaturase pathway.

  15. Chlorogenic acid stabilized nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) of atorvastatin: formulation, design and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saba; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed; Narang, R S; Narang, Jasjeet K

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at developing an optimized oral nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) formulation of poorly soluble atorvastatin Ca (AT Ca) and assessing its in vitro release, oral bioavailability and pharmacodynamic activity. In this study, chlorogenic acid, a novel excipient having synergistic cholesterol lowering activity was utilized and explored in NLC formulation development. The drug-loaded NLC formulations were prepared using a high pressure homogenization technique and optimized by the Box-Behnken statistical design using the Design-Expert software. The optimized NLC formulation was composed of oleic acid and stearic acid as lipid phase (0.9% w/v), poloxamer 188 as surfactant (1% w/v) and chlorogenic acid (0.05% w/v). The mean particle size, polydispersity index (PDI) and % drug entrapment efficiency of optimized NLC were 203.56 ± 8.57 nm, 0.27 ± 0.028 and 83.66 ± 5.69, respectively. In vitro release studies showed that the release of drug from optimized NLC formulations were markedly enhanced as compared to solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and drug suspension. The plasma concentration time profile of AT Ca in rats showed 3.08- and 4.89-fold increase in relative bioavailability of developed NLC with respect to marketed preparation (ATORVA® tablet) and drug suspension, respectively. Pharmacodynamic study suggested highly significant (**p < 0.01) reduction in the cholesterol and triglyceride values by NLC in comparison with ATORVA® tablet. Therefore, the results of in vivo studies demonstrated promising prospects for successful oral delivery of AT Ca by means of its chlorogenic acid integrated NLC.

  16. Transport of heptafluorostearate across model membranes. Membrane transport of long-chain fatty acid anions I.

    PubMed

    Schmider, W; Fahr, A; Blum, H E; Kurz, G

    2000-05-01

    Heptafluorostearic acid, an isogeometric derivative of stearic acid, has a pK(a) value of about 0.5. To evaluate the suitability of heptafluorostearate as model compound for anions of long-chain fatty acids in membrane transport, monolayer and liposome studies were performed with lipid mixtures containing phospholipids;-cholesterol-heptafluorostearate or stearate (100:40:20 molar ratios). Transfer of heptafluorostearate and stearate from liposomes to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was followed by measuring the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA. The percentage of heptafluorostearate, equivalent to the amount placed in their outer monolayer, transferred from liposomes (120;-130 nm diameter) to BSA was 55.7 +/- 3.7% within 10 min at 25 degrees C and 55 +/- 2% within 5 min at 37 degrees C. Slow transfer of 22.7 +/- 2.5% of heptafluorostearate at 25 degrees C followed with a half-life of 2.3 +/- 0.4 h and of 20 +/- 4% at 37 degrees C with a half-life of 0.9 +/- 0.1 h until the final equilibrium distributions between BSA and liposomes were reached, 79 +/- 6% to 21 +/- 5% at 25 degrees C and 75 +/- 5% to 25 +/- 4% at 37 degrees C. The pseudounimolecular rate constants for flip-flop of heptafluorostearate equal k(FF,25) = 0.24 +/- 0.05 h(-) and k(FF,37) = 0.6 +/- 0.1 h(-), respectively. By comparison, transfer of stearate required only 3 min to reach equilibrium distribution. The difference between heptafluorostearate and stearate may be explained by a rapid flip-flop movement of the un-ionized fatty acids which exist in different concentrations in accordance with their pK(a) values. Half-life of flip-flop of heptafluorostearate makes it suitable to study mediated membrane transport of long-chain fatty acid anions.

  17. Agricultural practices altered soybean seed protein, oil, fatty acids, sugars, and minerals in the Midsouth USA

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Bruns, H. Arnold; Abbas, Hamed K.; Mengistu, Alemu; Fisher, Daniel K.; Reddy, Krishna N.

    2015-01-01

    Information on the effects of management practices on soybean seed composition is scarce. Therefore, the objective of this research was to investigate the effects of planting date (PD) and seeding rate (SR) on seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars) and seed minerals (B, P, and Fe) in soybean grown in two row-types (RTs) on the Mississippi Delta region of the Midsouth USA. Two field experiments were conducted in 2009 and 2010 on Sharkey clay and Beulah fine sandy loam soil at Stoneville, MS, USA, under irrigated conditions. Soybean were grown in 102 cm single-rows and 25 cm twin-rows in 102 cm centers at SRs of 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m-2. The results showed that in May and June planting, protein, glucose, P, and B concentrations increased with increased SR, but at the highest SRs (40 and 50 seeds m-2), the concentrations remained constant or declined. Palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acid concentrations were the least responsive to SR increases. Early planting resulted in higher oil, oleic acid, sucrose, B, and P on both single and twin-rows. Late planting resulted in higher protein and linolenic acid, but lower oleic acid and oil concentrations. The changes in seed constituents could be due to changes in environmental factors (drought and temperature), and nutrient accumulation in seeds and leaves. The increase of stachyose sugar in 2010 may be due to a drier year and high temperature in 2010 compared to 2009; suggesting the possible role of stachyose as an environmental stress compound. Our research demonstrated that PD, SR, and RT altered some seed constituents, but the level of alteration in each year dependent on environmental factors such as drought and temperature. This information benefits growers and breeders for considering agronomic practices to select for soybean seed nutritional qualities under drought and high heat conditions. PMID:25741347

  18. Agricultural practices altered soybean seed protein, oil, fatty acids, sugars, and minerals in the Midsouth USA.

    PubMed

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Bruns, H Arnold; Abbas, Hamed K; Mengistu, Alemu; Fisher, Daniel K; Reddy, Krishna N

    2015-01-01

    Information on the effects of management practices on soybean seed composition is scarce. Therefore, the objective of this research was to investigate the effects of planting date (PD) and seeding rate (SR) on seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars) and seed minerals (B, P, and Fe) in soybean grown in two row-types (RTs) on the Mississippi Delta region of the Midsouth USA. Two field experiments were conducted in 2009 and 2010 on Sharkey clay and Beulah fine sandy loam soil at Stoneville, MS, USA, under irrigated conditions. Soybean were grown in 102 cm single-rows and 25 cm twin-rows in 102 cm centers at SRs of 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m(-2). The results showed that in May and June planting, protein, glucose, P, and B concentrations increased with increased SR, but at the highest SRs (40 and 50 seeds m(-2)), the concentrations remained constant or declined. Palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acid concentrations were the least responsive to SR increases. Early planting resulted in higher oil, oleic acid, sucrose, B, and P on both single and twin-rows. Late planting resulted in higher protein and linolenic acid, but lower oleic acid and oil concentrations. The changes in seed constituents could be due to changes in environmental factors (drought and temperature), and nutrient accumulation in seeds and leaves. The increase of stachyose sugar in 2010 may be due to a drier year and high temperature in 2010 compared to 2009; suggesting the possible role of stachyose as an environmental stress compound. Our research demonstrated that PD, SR, and RT altered some seed constituents, but the level of alteration in each year dependent on environmental factors such as drought and temperature. This information benefits growers and breeders for considering agronomic practices to select for soybean seed nutritional qualities under drought and high heat conditions.

  19. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  20. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA 635 / R - 03 / 007 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID ( CAS No . 79 - 43 - 6 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) August 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been revi

  1. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 09 / 003F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF TRICHLOROACETIC ACID ( CAS No . 76 - 03 - 9 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2011 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER This document has

  2. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  3. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  4. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  5. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  6. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  7. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  8. Variations in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of processed cheese by lactation time, feeding regimen, and ripening.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kwon, O-Jun; Choi, Nag-Jin; Oh, Se Jong; Jeong, Ha-Yeon; Song, Man-Kang; Jeong, Inhye; Kim, Young Jun

    2009-04-22

    Dairy products are major sources of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA); thus, an increase in CLA content can improve the quality value of dairy products. The objective of this work was to determine the effects of lactation time, feeding regimen, and ripening period on the level of CLA in processed cheese. CLA content in milk varied with the period of lactation; high in spring (April and May, about 6.8 mg CLA/g fat) and relatively low in mid summer and winter (about 4.3 mg CLA/g fat). The effects of dietary regimen and ripening period were determined in milk, which was obtained from March to May. After aging for 4 months, the cheese made from milk obtained from cows fed on pasture contained relatively higher levels of CLA compared to cheese made from milk obtained from cows fed indoors (8.12 mg CLA/g fat vs 6.76 mg CLA/g fat), but there was no difference in 7 month-aged cheeses. In both pasture and indoor feeding, 7 month-aged cheeses showed higher CLA content than 4 month-aged cheeses. The contents of stearic acid (C18:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3) were significantly higher in cheese from pasture fed cows compared to those in cows fed indoors. These findings should be helpful for the efficient production of functional dairy products with high CLA contents.

  9. Acidic methanolysis v. alkaline saponification in gas chromatographic characterization of mycobacteria: differentiation between Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare and Mycobacterium gastri.

    PubMed

    Larsson, L

    1983-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare and M.gastri were analyzed with capillary gas chromatography after each strain had been subjected to acidic methanolysis or to alkaline saponification followed by methylation. Prominent peaks of myristic, palmitoleic, palmitic, oleic, stearic and tuberculostearic acids were found in the chromatograms of both species, whereas 2-octadecanol and 2-eicosanol were detected only in M. avium-intracellulare. In initial runs, both of the derivatization principles yielded virtually identical chromatograms for a given strain. After repeated injections of extracts from alkaline saponification, however, the alcohol peaks showed pronounced tailing and finally almost disappeared from the chromatograms. This disadvantage, which was not observed when only acid methanolysis was used, could be overcome with trifluoroacetylation. Restored peak shape of the underivatized alcohols could be achieved by washing the cross-linked stationary phase in the capillary tubing with organic solvents. The study demonstrated the importance of conditions which enable separation of 2-octadecanol and 2-eicosanol when gas chromatography is used for species identification of mycobacteria.

  10. Azelaic acid.

    PubMed

    Nazzaro-Porro, M

    1987-12-01

    This review is an update on the literature accumulated over the past 10 years following the original observation that azelaic acid, a naturally occurring and nontoxic C9 dicarboxylic acid, possesses significant biologic properties and a potential as a therapeutic agent. These studies have shown that azelaic acid is a reversible inhibitor of tyrosinase and other oxidoreductases in vitro and that it inhibits mitochondrial respiration. It can also inhibit anaerobic glycolysis. Both in vitro and in vivo it has an antimicrobial effect on both aerobic and anaerobic (Propionibacterium acnes) microorganisms. In tissue culture it exerts a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect on malignant melanocytes, associated with mitochondrial damage and inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis. Tumoral cell lines not containing tyrosinase are equally affected. Normal cells in culture exposed to the same concentrations of the diacid that are toxic for tumoral cells are in general not damaged. Radioactive azelaic acid has been shown to penetrate tumoral cells at a higher level than normal cells of the corresponding line. Topically applied (a 20% cream), it has been shown to be of therapeutic value in skin disorders of different etiologies. Its beneficial effect on various forms of acne (comedogenic, papulopustular, nodulocystic) has been clearly demonstrated. Particularly important is its action on abnormal melanocytes, which has led to the possibility of obtaining good results on melasma and highly durable therapeutic responses on lentigo maligna. It is also capable of causing regression of cutaneous malignant melanoma, but its role in melanoma therapy remains to be investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Beef tallow increases the potency of conjugated linoleic acid in the reduction of mouse mammary tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Neil E; Lim, Debora; Erickson, Kent L

    2006-01-01

    Animal studies consistently show that dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces mammary tumorigenesis including metastasis. Relatively low concentrations of CLA are required for those effects, and a threshold level exists above which there is no added reduction. We reasoned that the concentration of CLA required to effectively alter mammary tumor metastasis may be dependent on the type of dietary fat because select fatty acids can enhance or suppress normal or malignant cell growth and metastasis. For this study, the diets (a total of 12 different groups) differed in fatty acid composition but not in energy from fat (40%). In experiments involving spontaneous metastasis, mice were fed for 11 wk; in experiments in which mice were injected i.v. with tumor cells, they were fed for 7 wk. Mice were then assessed for the effect of CLA concentration on mammary tumorigenesis. Mammary tumor growth was not altered, but metastasis was significantly decreased when beef tallow (BT) replaced half of a defined vegetable fat blend (VFB). That blend reflects the typical fat content of a Western diet. In addition, that same VFB:BT diet lowered the concentration of CLA required to significantly decrease mammary tumor metastasis from 0.1% of the diet to 0.05%. A diet in which corn oil replaced half of the VFB did not lower the threshold from 0.1 to 0.05%. In vitro, the main fatty acid in vegetable oil, linoleic acid, reduced the efficacy of CLA toxicity on mammary tumor cells in culture. Alternatively, fatty acids normally found in BT, such as oleic, stearic, and palmitic acids, either did not change or enhanced the cytolytic effects of CLA isomers on mouse mammary tumor cells in culture. These data provide evidence that dietary BT, itself with negligible levels of CLA, may increase the efficacy of dietary CLA in reducing mammary tumorigenesis.

  12. Distribution of plasma fatty acids is associated with response to chemotherapy in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Zorica; Vučić, Vesna; Cvetković, Bora; Karadžić, Ivana; Ranić, Marija; Glibetić, Marija

    2013-12-01

    Our recent data have linked plasma phospholipid fatty acid (FA) profile in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with the clinical stage and aggressiveness of the disease. Thus, we proposed that plasma FA status in these patients may influence the effect of chemotherapy. The aim of this work was to assess FA status in NHL patients undergoing chemotherapy in relation to their response to therapy. We analyzed plasma FA profile in 47 newly diagnosed NHL patients before chemotherapy, after 3 cycles and after the end of the planned chemotherapy. Patients were treated according to the hospital protocol: 28 patients with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone, 7 with other anthracycline-containing regimens, 4 patients with cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisone and 8 with fludarabine-based regimens. Rituximab was added in 22 patients. Ten patients who did not receive all planned chemotherapy due to death or toxicity (non-completers) had significantly lower (p < 0.05) baseline proportion of palmitoleic, linoleic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid, as well as n-3 and n-6 FA, than the patients who completed chemotherapy (completers). Furthermore, the completers were divided according to the response to chemotherapy to complete remission (CR), stable disease and progressive disease (PD). Proportion of palmitic acid after the end of chemotherapy was the highest in the PD group, while stearic acid showed the opposite trend. Palmitoleic acid and all n-3 FA (18:3, 20:5, 22:5 and 22:6) were the highest in the patients in remission and the lowest in PD (p < 0.001). Linoleic acid decreased and arachidonic acid increased from the CR to the PD group (p < 0.001). These results suggest that aberrations in plasma FA may influence response to chemotherapy in patients with NHL.

  13. Microalgae Synthesize Hydrocarbons from Long-Chain Fatty Acids via a Light-Dependent Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Légeret, Bertrand; Mirabella, Boris; Guédeney, Geneviève; Jetter, Reinhard; Peltier, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are considered a promising platform for the production of lipid-based biofuels. While oil accumulation pathways are intensively researched, the possible existence of a microalgal pathways converting fatty acids into alka(e)nes has received little attention. Here, we provide evidence that such a pathway occurs in several microalgal species from the green and the red lineages. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlorophyceae), a C17 alkene, n-heptadecene, was detected in the cell pellet and the headspace of liquid cultures. The Chlamydomonas alkene was identified as 7-heptadecene, an isomer likely formed by decarboxylation of cis-vaccenic acid. Accordingly, incubation of intact Chlamydomonas cells with per-deuterated D31-16:0 (palmitic) acid yielded D31-18:0 (stearic) acid, D29-18:1 (oleic and cis-vaccenic) acids, and D29-heptadecene. These findings showed that loss of the carboxyl group of a C18 monounsaturated fatty acid lead to heptadecene formation. Amount of 7-heptadecene varied with growth phase and temperature and was strictly dependent on light but was not affected by an inhibitor of photosystem II. Cell fractionation showed that approximately 80% of the alkene is localized in the chloroplast. Heptadecane, pentadecane, as well as 7- and 8-heptadecene were detected in Chlorella variabilis NC64A (Trebouxiophyceae) and several Nannochloropsis species (Eustigmatophyceae). In contrast, Ostreococcus tauri (Mamiellophyceae) and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum produced C21 hexaene, without detectable C15-C19 hydrocarbons. Interestingly, no homologs of known hydrocarbon biosynthesis genes were found in the Nannochloropsis, Chlorella, or Chlamydomonas genomes. This work thus demonstrates that microalgae have the ability to convert C16 and C18 fatty acids into alka(e)nes by a new, light-dependent pathway. PMID:27288359

  14. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  15. Effects of bovine fatty acid synthase, stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, and growth hormone gene polymorphisms on fatty acid composition and carcass traits in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, T; Maruyama, S; Uemoto, Y; Kobayashi, N; Mannen, H; Abe, T; Sakaguchi, S; Kobayashi, E

    2011-01-01

    The quality of fat is an important factor in defining the quality of meat. Fat quality is determined by the composition of fatty acids. Among lipid metabolism-related genes, including fatty acid synthesis genes, several genetic variations have been reported in the bovine fatty acid synthase (FASN), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), and GH genes. In the present study, we evaluated the single and epistatic effects of 5 genetic variations (4 SNP and 1 insertion/deletion) in 4 genes (FASN, SCD, SREBP1, and GH) on the fatty acid composition of the longissimus thoracis muscle and carcass and meat quality traits in 480 commercial Japanese Black cattle. Significant single effects of FASN, SCD, and GH(L127V) polymorphisms on the fatty acid composition of the longissimus thoracis muscle were detected. The A293V polymorphism of SCD had the largest effect on myristic acid (C14:0, P < 0.001), myristoleic acid (C14:1, P < 0.001), stearic acid (C18:0, P < 0.001), oleic acid (C18:1, P < 0.001), and MUFA (P < 0.001). Polymorphisms in the FASN, SCD, and SREBP1 genes showed no effect on any meat yield trait. There were no significant epistatic effects on fatty acid composition among pairs of the 3 genes (FASN, SCD, and SREBP1) involved in fatty acid synthesis. No epistatic interactions (P > 0.1) were detected between FASN and SCD for any carcass trait. When the genotypes of 3 markers (FASN, SCD, and GH(L127V)) were substituted from the lesser effect allele to the greater effect allele, the proportion of C18:1 increased by 4.46%. More than 20% of the genetic variance in the C18:1 level could be accounted for by these 3 genetic markers. The present results revealed that polymorphisms in 2 fatty acid synthesis genes (FASN and SCD) independently influenced fatty acid composition in the longissimus thoracis muscle. These results suggest that SNP in the FASN and SCD genes are useful markers for the improvement of fatty acid composition in

  16. Influence of dietary oils and protein level on pork quality. 1. Effects on muscle fatty acid composition, carcass, meat and eating quality.

    PubMed

    Teye, G A; Sheard, P R; Whittington, F M; Nute, G R; Stewart, A; Wood, J D

    2006-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of three dietary oils - palm kernel (PKO), palm (PO) and soyabean (SBO) - and two protein levels - high (HP) and low (LP) in a 3×2 factorial design involving 60 pigs on growth performance, muscle fatty acid composition and content, carcass, meat and eating qualities. Oil type did not have a significant effect on growth and carcass quality. PKO significantly reduced the polyunsaturated (PUFA) to saturated (SFA) fatty acid (P:S) ratio in longissimus muscle (P<0.001). PKO increased the concentrations of lauric (12:0), myristic (14:0), palmitic (16:0) and stearic (18:0) fatty acids and decreased linoleic acid (18:2). The LP diet increased intramuscular fat (IMF) from 1.7g/100g muscle in HP to 2.9g/100g (P<0.001), increased tenderness by 0.6 units (P<0.01) and juiciness by 0.5 units (P<0.01) on the 1-8 scale, but at the expense of lower daily weight gain (P<0.01), lower feed conversion efficiency (P<0.01), reduced P:S ratio (P<0.001) and increased lipid oxidation (P<0.01). The results suggest that PKO and PO could be used in tropical developing countries as cheaper alternatives to SBO for the production of good quality and healthy pork, but their limits of inclusion need to be determined.

  17. The effect of replacing soya bean oil with glycerol in diets on performance, egg quality and egg fatty acid composition in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Cufadar, Y; Göçmen, R; Kanbur, G

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to replace soya bean oil with glycerol in laying hen diets and assess the change's effect on performance, parameters of egg quality and the egg fatty acid profile. A total of 60 44-week-old Hy-Line W36 laying hens were distributed according to a completely randomised experimental design into four treatments consisting of glycerol substitutions for soya bean oil dietary at varying inclusion levels (0%, 25%, 50% and 75%), with five replicates of three birds each. Dietary treatments had no significant effect on BW change, egg production, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, egg weight and egg mass of laying hens. The inclusion of glycerol in the diet of laying hens had no significant effect on egg specific gravity, eggshell breaking strength, eggshell weight, eggshell thickness, egg shape index, albumen index, yolk index, haugh unit, albumen pH, yolk pH and egg yolk colour values. The inclusion of glycerol in the diet of laying hens had no significant effect on palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic, oleic and linolenic acid contents of the egg yolk. The linoleic acid and polyunsaturated fatty acid contents of the egg yolk significantly decreased with the higher levels of dietary glycerol supplementation (P<0.05). The results of this study show that it is possible to replace 75% of soya bean oil (4.5% in diet) with glycerol.

  18. [Blood deficiency values of polyunsaturated fatty acids of phospholipids, vitamin E and glutathione peroxidase as possible risk factors in the onset and development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Passi, S; De Luca, C; Picardo, M; Morrone, A; Ippolito, F

    1990-04-01

    Plasma levels of vitamin E (vit E) and polyunsatured fatty acids of phospholipids (PUFA-PL) as well as erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity are significantly lower (p less than 0.001) in patients HIV sero-positive (AIDS and ARC cases) both affected and not affected with seborrheic dermatitis and in 32% of HIV sero-negative intravenous drug abusers (IVDA, A subgroup) than in controls. The deficiency of PUFA-PL (mainly C20:3 n-6, C20:4 n-6 and C22:6 n-3) which is associated with a significant increase (p less than 0.001) of saturated palmitic and stearic acids and monounsaturated oleic acid, cannot be correlated to an active lipoperoxidative process. In fact the levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive materials (TBA-RM) are not increased in the plasma of HIV sero-positive patients and A subgroup of IVDA. It is likely that the reduction of PUFA-PL is due to an inhibition of hepatic microsomal desaturase enzymes (delta 6 desaturase, delta 5 desaturase, delta 4 desaturase) which are involved in both n-6 and n-3 pathways. Since IVDA represent, and not only in Italy, a major risk category for HIV infection, we suggest that reduced blood levels of vit E, GSH-Px and particularly PUFA-PL may be added to the list of risk factors favouring the onset and the development of AIDS.

  19. Effect of lauric acid and coconut oil on ruminal fermentation, digestion, ammonia losses from manure, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Hristov, A N; Vander Pol, M; Agle, M; Zaman, S; Schneider, C; Ndegwa, P; Vaddella, V K; Johnson, K; Shingfield, K J; Karnati, S K R

    2009-11-01

    This experiment (replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design) was conducted to investigate the effects of lauric acid (LA) or coconut oil (CO) on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, ammonia losses from manure, and milk fatty acid (FA) composition in lactating cows. Treatments consisted of intraruminal doses of 240 g of stearic acid/d (SA; control), 240 g of LA/d, or 530 g of CO/d administered once daily, before feeding. Between periods, cows were inoculated with ruminal contents from donor cows and allowed a 7-d recovery period. Treatment did not affect dry matter intake, milk yield, or milk composition. Ruminal pH was slightly increased by CO compared with the other treatments, whereas LA and CO decreased ruminal ammonia concentration compared with SA. Both LA and CO decreased protozoal counts by 80% or more compared with SA. Methane production rate in the rumen was reduced by CO compared with LA and SA, with no differences between LA and SA. Treatments had no effect on total tract apparent dry matter, organic matter, N, and neutral detergent fiber digestibility coefficients or on cumulative (15 d) in vitro ammonia losses from manure. Compared with SA, LA and CO increased milk fat 12:0, cis-9 12:1, and trans-9 12:1 content and decreased 6:0, 8:0, 10:0, cis-9 10:1, 16:0, 18:0, cis 18:1, total 18:2, 18:3 n-3 and total polyunsaturated FA concentrations. Administration of LA and 14:0 (as CO) in the rumen were apparently transferred into milk fat with a mean efficiency of 18 and 15%, respectively. In conclusion, current data confirmed that LA and CO exhibit strong antiprotozoal activity when dosed intraruminally, an effect that is accompanied by decreases in ammonia concentration and, for CO, lowered methane production. Administration of LA and CO in the rumen also altered milk FA composition.

  20. The physicochemical and thermal properties of Malaysian high free fatty acid crude palm oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadi, Murad Awadh; Salimon, Jumat; Japir, Abd-Wali M.

    2016-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine the physicochemical properties and the thermal behavior of Malaysian high free fatty acid crude palm oil (HFFA-CPO). The physicochemical properties showed that the free fatty acid (FFA %), acid value, iodine value, saponification value, unsaponifiable matter, hydroxyl value, specific gravity, refractive index at 28°C, moisture content, viscosity at 28°C and colour at 28°C values were 9.4±0.1 %, 21.3±0.1 mg/g, 50.6±0.2 mg/g, 203.1±0.1 mg/g, 0.7±0.1%, 43.4±0.2 mg/g, 0.878 g/ml, 1.4669, 0.6 %, 52 cP and 50R-40Y respectively. Gas chromatography (GC) was used to determine the fatty acid (FA) composition in HFFA-CPO. The fatty acids were found to be comprised mostly with 45.7 % palmitic acid (C16:0), 39.5 % oleic acid (C18:1), 9.4 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 4.3 % stearic acid (C18:0). The analysis of triacylglycerol components with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has resulted with 3.5 % triunsaturated (OOO, OLL and OLO), 32.7 % monosaturated (POO, PLO, SOO and PLL), 35.7 % disaturated (MLP, PPL, PPO, POS and SOS) and 2.32 % trisaturated fatty acids (PPP and PPS). The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the crystallization of TAG displayed two major exothermic regions of HFFA-CPO with the di and trisaturated TAG at 23.11°C and the di and triunsaturated TAG at 9.31 °C. The melting curve displayed multiple endothermic peak regions at 25.13 °C and 35.31 °C could be attributed to the di and trisaturated TAGs. While the peaks at 0.95 °C, 6.94 °C and 9.77 °C could be attributed to the mono, di and triunsaturated TAGs.

  1. Deletion of ELOVL6 blocks the synthesis of oleic acid but does not prevent the development of fatty liver or insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young-Ah; Ochoa, Courtney R; Mitsche, Matthew A; Hammer, Robert E; Horton, Jay D

    2014-12-01

    Elongation of very long chain fatty acid-like family member 6 (ELOVL6) is a fatty acyl elongase that performs the initial and rate-limiting condensing reaction required for microsomal elongation of long-chain fatty acids. Our previous in vitro studies suggested that ELOVL6 elongated long-chain saturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids with chain lengths of 12 to 16 carbons. Here, we describe the generation and phenotypic characterization of Elovl6(-/-) mice. As predicted from the in vitro studies, livers from Elovl6(-/-) mice accumulated palmitic (C16:0) and palmitoleic (C16:1, n-7) fatty acids and contained significantly less stearic (C18:0) and oleic (C18:1, n-9) acids, confirming that ELOVL6 is the only enzyme capable of elongating palmitate (C16:0). Unexpectedly, Elovl6(-/-) mice produced vaccenic acid (C18:1, n-7), the elongated product of palmitoleate (C16:1, n-7), suggesting that palmitoleate (C16:1, n-7) to vaccenate (C18:1, n-7) elongation was not specific to ELOVL6. The only detected consequence of deleting Elovl6(-/-) in mice was that their livers accumulated significantly more triglycerides than wild-type mice when fed a fat-free/high-carbohydrate diet. When mice were fed a high-fat diet or ELOVL6 was deleted in ob/ob mice, the absence of ELOVL6 did not alter the development of obesity, fatty liver, hyperglycemia, or hyperinsulinemia. Combined, these results suggest that palmitoleic (C16:1, n-7) and vaccenic (C18:1, n-7) acids can largely replace the roles of oleic acid (C18:1, n-9) in vivo and that the deletion of ELOVL6 does not protect mice from the development of hepatic steatosis or insulin resistance.

  2. Milk fatty acid composition, rumen microbial population, and animal performances in response to diets rich in linoleic acid supplemented with chestnut or quebracho tannins in dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Buccioni, A; Pauselli, M; Viti, C; Minieri, S; Pallara, G; Roscini, V; Rapaccini, S; Marinucci, M Trabalza; Lupi, P; Conte, G; Mele, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate milk fatty acid (FA) profile, animal performance, and rumen microbial population in response to diets containing soybean oil supplemented or not with chestnut and quebracho tannins in dairy ewes. Eighteen Comisana ewes at 122±6 d in milking were allotted into 3 experimental groups. Diets were characterized by chopped grass hay administered ad libitum and by 800 g/head and day of 3 experimental concentrates containing 84.5 g of soybean oil/kg of dry matter (DM) and 52.8 g/kg of DM of bentonite (control diet), chestnut tannin extract (CHT diet), or quebracho tannin extract (QUE diet). The trial lasted 4 wk. Milk yield was recorded daily, and milk composition and blood parameters were analyzed weekly. At the end of the experiment, samples of rumen fluid were collected to analyze pH, volatile fatty acid profile, and the relative proportions of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus in the rumen microbial population. Hepatic functionality, milk yield, and gross composition were not affected by tannin extracts, whereas milk FA composition was characterized by significant changes in the concentration of linoleic acid (CHT +2.77% and QUE +9.23%), vaccenic acid (CHT +7.07% and QUE +13.88%), rumenic acid (CHT -1.88% and QUE +24.24%), stearic acid (CHT + 8.71% and QUE -11.45%), and saturated fatty acids (CHT -0.47% and QUE -3.38%). These differences were probably due to the ability of condensed versus hydrolyzable tannins to interfere with rumen microbial metabolism, as indirectly confirmed by changes in the relative proportions of B. fibrisolvens and B. proteoclasticus populations and by changes in the molar proportions of volatile fatty acids. The effect of the CHT diet on the milk FA profile and microbial species considered in this trial was intermediate between that of QUE and the control diet, suggesting a differential effect of condensed and hydrolyzable tannins on rumen microbes. Compared with control animals

  3. Acidic domains around nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, G; Pack, G R

    1990-01-01

    The hydrogen ion concentration in the vicinity of DNA was mapped out within the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Experimental conditions were modeled by assuming Na-DNA to be solvated in a buffer solution containing 45 mM Tris and 3 mM Mg cations at pH 7.5. Three regions of high H+ concentration (greater than 10 microM) are predicted: one throughout the minor groove of DNA and two localized in the major groove near N7 of guanine and C5 of cytosine for a G.C base pair. These acidic domains correlate well with the observed covalent binding sites of benzo[a]pyrene epoxide (N2 of guanine) and of aflatoxin B1 epoxide (N7 of guanine), chemical carcinogens that presumably undergo acid catalysis to form highly reactive carbocations that ultimately bind to DNA. It is suggested that these regions of high H+ concentration may also be of concern in understanding interactions involving proteins and noncarcinogenic molecules with or near nucleic acids. PMID:2123348

  4. Liver free fatty acid (FFA) accumulation as an indicator of ischemic injury during cold preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, E.M.; Kang, Y.; DeWolf, A.M.; Lin, M.R.; Bleyaert, A.L.; Winter, P.M.

    1987-05-01

    Reliable assessment of hepatic viability prior to harvest and transplant could improve graft success and aid in evaluating the efficacy of liver preservation techniques. Hepatic tissue metabolites, protein (Pr) synthesis, and ATP have been studied, but none reliably correlate with hepatic viability. Therefore, they studied changes in liver FFA relative to changes in ATP and Pr synthesis during cold ischemic preservation. Rats mechanically ventilated on 0.5% isoflurane/70% N/sub 2/O/30% O/sub 2/ were heparinized and their livers perfused with air-equilibrated Euro-Collins solution (ECS) at 0-4/sup 0/C and kept on ice. A piece of the liver was removed after 0, 2, 6, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h of preservation for ATP and FFA analysis. A portion of the liver was sliced (250 ..mu..m thick) and incubated in vitro for /sup 14/C-lysine incorporation in albumin. ATP, FFA and Pr synthesis were unchanged in the first 8 h, but markedly decreased between 8 and 12 h with little change thereafter. In contrast, between 8 and 48 h, arachidonic and stearic acids increased by 5 and 2-fold, respectively. Changes in ATP and Pr synthesis correlate with the empirically derived clinical maximum of 8 to 12 h preservation. FFA accumulation appears to reflect hepatic ischemic injury and may be a means of evaluating the quality of a donor liver.

  5. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  6. Preparation and characterization of composites based on poly(lactic acid) and CaCO{sub 3} nanofiller

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, Janaína Fernandes; Silva, Ana Lúcia N. da E-mail: ananazareth@ima.ufrj.br; Sousa, Ana Maria F. de

    2015-05-22

    In recent years, extensive studies have been conducted on the study of the poly(lactic acid) (PLA) properties, because of its being a typical biobased and biodegradable polymer, with good mechanical properties. However, its toughness and gas barrier properties are not satisfactory and can be improved by the addition of nanofillers, such as calcium carbonate (n-CaCO{sub 3}). The present work PLA composites with nano-sized precipitated calcium carbonate (n-NPCC) were prepared by melt extrusion. Thermal, mechanical and flow properties of the composites were evaluated by using a factorial design.The results showed that the addition of the nanofiller in the PLA matrix didn’t improve thethermal and mechanical properties of the matrix significantly. This behavior is probably due to the presence of the stearic acid that is coating on the n-NPCC particles, resulting in a weak polymer-particle interaction. Beyond this, it was also observed a decrease in MFI of the composites when nanofiller was added and at a higher screw speed.

  7. Preparation and characterization of composites based on poly(lactic acid) and CaCO3 nanofiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Janaína Fernandes; da Silva, Ana Lúcia N.; da Silva, Antonio Henrique Monteiro da Fonseca T.; de Sousa, Ana Maria F.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, extensive studies have been conducted on the study of the poly(lactic acid) (PLA) properties, because of its being a typical biobased and biodegradable polymer, with good mechanical properties. However, its toughness and gas barrier properties are not satisfactory and can be improved by the addition of nanofillers, such as calcium carbonate (n-CaCO3). The present work PLA composites with nano-sized precipitated calcium carbonate (n-NPCC) were prepared by melt extrusion. Thermal, mechanical and flow properties of the composites were evaluated by using a factorial design.The results showed that the addition of the nanofiller in the PLA matrix didn't improve thethermal and mechanical properties of the matrix significantly. This behavior is probably due to the presence of the stearic acid that is coating on the n-NPCC particles, resulting in a weak polymer-particle interaction. Beyond this, it was also observed a decrease in MFI of the composites when nanofiller was added and at a higher screw speed.

  8. Effect of β-glucan-fatty acid esters on microstructure and physical properties of wheat straw arabinoxylan films.

    PubMed

    Ali, Usman; Bijalwan, Vandana; Basu, Santanu; Kesarwani, Atul Kumar; Mazumder, Koushik

    2017-04-01

    Arabinoxylans (AX) was isolated from wheat straw, whereas β-glucan (BG) was extracted from oat flour. The compositional analysis indicated wheat straw AX contained arabinose and xylose as major constituent sugars whereas higher β-glucan content (77%) was found in the extracted material from oat flour. The BG was conjugated with lauric (LA), myristic (MA), palmitic (PA), stearic (SA) and oleic (OA) acid to prepare corresponding β-glucan-fatty acid esters (BGFAs) with nearly similar degree of substitution. The effect of BGFAs to AX films on the water barrier, optical and mechanical properties were investigated. The addition of LABG and MABG to AX formed laminar structures in the composite films which limited water vapor permeability, giving rise to more opacity. Films prepared by blending AX with SABG and OABG were less effective as water vapor barrier due to their non-layer film microstructures; however they were less opaque. The laminar structures also imparted less mechanical strength and flexibility in the composite films. Furthermore, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that all AX-BGFAs composite films were thermally more stable than pure AX and AX-BG films.

  9. On the nature of the deactivation of supported palladium nanoparticle catalysts in the decarboxylation of fatty acids.

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, E. W.; Pierson, J.; Wallace, R.; Miller, J. T.; Fuller, T. F.; Jones, C. W.

    2011-04-15

    Supported palladium catalysts are effective catalysts for the hydrogen-free decarboxylation of fatty acids. However, the catalysts deactivate severely after one use. Here, the recyclability of a well-defined, mesoporous silica-supported palladium nanoparticle catalyst is evaluated in the batch decarboxylation of stearic acid at 300 C under inert atmosphere, producing n-heptadecane. The nature of the catalyst deactivation is examined in detail via an array of characterization techniques. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrates that little palladium surface oxidation occurs over the course of the reaction, and a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suggests negligible particle sintering or agglomeration. Physisorption and chemisorption measurements demonstrate substantial loss in total surface area and porosity as well as accessible palladium surface area with these losses attributed to significant organic deposition on the catalyst, as verified via thermogravimetric analysis. High temperature calcination is applied to combust and remove these residues, but resultant nanoparticle agglomeration is significant. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and solid dissolution followed by organic extraction methodologies demonstrate that the carbonaceous deposits are not coke but rather strongly adsorbed reactants and products. Detrimental coke formation, as suggested by prior literature, is verified to be absent, as extraction of the surface-deposited organic species yields nearly complete recovery of the total surface area, pore volume, and active palladium surface area. Furthermore, the regenerated catalyst exhibits a corresponding significant recovery of decarboxylation activity.

  10. Fatty acid metabolism in lambs fed citrus pulp.

    PubMed

    Lanza, M; Scerra, M; Bognanno, M; Buccioni, A; Cilione, C; Biondi, L; Priolo, A; Luciano, G

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, we have hypothesized that replacing barley with high proportions of dried citrus pulp in a concentrate-based diet for lambs could increase the intake of unsaturated fatty acids and could reduce the rate of the ruminal biohydrogenation of PUFA, with a consequent improvement of the intramuscular fatty acid composition. To test this hypothesis, 26 Comisana lambs were divided into 3 groups and for 56 d were fed a barley-based concentrate diet (CON; 8 lambs) or 2 diets in which barley was replaced with 24% (CIT24; 9 lambs) or 35% (CIT35; 9 lambs) dried citrus pulp. An overall improvement of the fatty acid composition of LM from lambs fed citrus pulp-containing diets was found. The PUFA/SFA ratio was lower (P < 0.05) in the LM from lambs in the CON group compared with both the CIT24 and CIT35 groups. The thrombogenic index was lower (P < 0.05) in meat from lambs fed the CIT35 diet compared with those fed the CON diet. The CIT35 diet increased the proportion of C20:5 n-3 in the LM (P < 0.05), whereas the CIT24 diet enhanced that of C22:6 -3 (P < 0.05) compared with the CON diet. Some of these results might be explained considering that feeding the CIT24 and CIT35 diets increased the intake of total fatty acids (P < 0.05) and of C18:3 n-3 (P < 0.01) compared with feeding the CON treatment. On the other hand, phenolic compounds present in citrus pulp could have inhibited the ruminal biohydrogenation of PUFA. This is supported by the fact that regardless of the level of inclusion in the diet, citrus pulp increased the proportion of rumenic acid (P < 0.001) in LM compared with the CON diet. The plasma from lambs fed both CIT24 and CIT35 diets had a greater percentage of vaccenic acid (VA; < 0.001) compared with that from lambs fed the CON diet, and the CIT35 diet increased the proportion of rumenic acid in plasma compared with the CON treatment (P < 0.05). In the ruminal fluid, stearic acid (SA) tended to decrease, and the sum of CLA tended to increase

  11. Effects of 1-Year Intervention with a Mediterranean Diet on Plasma Fatty Acid Composition and Metabolic Syndrome in a Population at High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chisaguano, Maribel; Castellote, Ana I.; Estruch, Ramón; Covas, María Isabel; Fitó, Montserrat; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa; Ros, Emilio; López-Sabater, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become an important public concern due to its increasing prevalence. An altered fatty acid composition has been associated with MetS, but the Mediterranean diet has been shown to have a protective effect. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of a Mediterranean dietary pattern, as assessed by the biomarkers of food supplied, on the plasma fatty acid composition and its relation with MetS after 1 year of intervention. Methods A total of 424 subjects were randomly selected from the PREDIMED randomized dietary trial after completing a 1-year intervention program. Participants aged 55 to 80 years and at high risk of cardiovascular disease were randomly assigned to three dietary interventions: Mediterranean diet supplemented with virgin olive oil or nuts, or a low-fat diet. Results After 1 year of intervention participants in the virgin olive oil group showed significantly increased plasma concentrations of palmitic and oleic acids, but reduced proportions of margaric, stearic, and linoleic acids. In turn, subjects in the nut group showed significantly increased levels of palmitic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids, but reduced proportions of myristic, margaric, palmitoleic, and dihommo-γ-linoleic acids. Increases in the biomarkers of foods supplied to the Mediterranean diet groups, i.e., oleic and α-linolenic acids, were beneficially associated with the incidence, reversion and prevalence of MetS. No weight changes were observed among participants. Conclusions The nut and olive oil diets induced a fatty acid composition that has been shown to be beneficial in the face of MetS. Therefore, a Mediterranean diet rich in fats of vegetable origin may be a useful tool for the management of MetS without the need for concerns over weight gain due to its high fat content. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN35739639 PMID:24651160

  12. Composition and antimicrobial activity of fatty acids detected in the hygroscopic secretion collected from the secretory setae of larvae of the biting midge Forcipomyia nigra (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Aleksandra; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Stepnowski, Piotr; Boros-Majewska, Joanna; Gabriel, Iwona; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gołębiowski, Marek

    2012-09-01

    The hygroscopic secretion produced by the secretory setae of terrestrial larvae of the biting midge Forcipomyia nigra (Winnertz) was analysed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The viscous secretion is stored at the top of each seta and absorbs water from moist air. GC-MS analyses (four independent tests) showed that the secretion contained 12 free fatty acids, the most abundant of which were oleic (18:1), palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (16:1) and linoleic (18:2). Other acids identified were valeric (5:0), enanthic (7:0), caprylic (8:0), pelargonic (9:0), capric (10:0), lauric (12:0), myristic (14:0) and stearic (18:0). Two other compounds, glycerol and pyroglutamic acid, were also found. The antibacterial activity of the fatty acids and pyroglutamic acid was tested using the agar disc diffusion method and targeted Gram positive (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram negative bacterial strains (Citrobacter freundii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens). The antifungal activity was tested by determining minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of examined compounds. Fatty acids were tested against enthomopathogenic fungi (Paecilomyces lilacinus, Paecilomyces fumosoroseus, Lecanicillium lecanii, Metarhizium anisopliae, Beauveria bassiana (Tve-N39), Beauveria bassiana (Dv-1/07)). The most effective acids against bacterial and fungal growth were C(9:0), C(10:0) and C(16:1), whereas C(14:0), C(16:0,) C(18:0) and C(18:1) demonstrated rather poor antifungal activity and did not inhibit the growth of bacteria. The antimicrobial assay investigated mixtures of fatty and pyroglutamic acids (corresponding to the results of each GC-MS test): they were found to be active against almost all the bacteria except P. fluorescens and also demonstrated certain fungistatic activity against enthomopathogenic fungi. The hygroscopic secretion facilitates cuticular respiration and plays an important role in the

  13. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  14. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, R.H.; Boyle, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acid rain, says Boyle is a chemical leprosy eating into the face of North America and Europe, perhaps the major ecological problem of our time. Boyle describes the causes and scope of the phenomenon; the effects on man, wildlife, water, and our cultural heritage. He probes the delays of politicians and the frequent self-serving arguments advanced by industry in the face of what scientists have proved. The solutions he offers are to strengthen the Clean Air Act and require emission reductions that can be accomplished by establishing emission standards on a regional or bubble basis, burn low-sulfur coal, install scrubbers at critical plants, and invest in alternative energy sources. 73 references, 1 figure.

  15. Effects of Rice Bran, Flax Seed, and Sunflower Seed on Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics, Fatty Acid Composition, Free Amino Acid and Peptide Contents, and Sensory Evaluations of Native Korean Cattle (Hanwoo)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Bon; Kwon, Hana; Kim, Sung Il; Yang, Un Mok; Lee, Ju Hwan; Park, Eun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary supplementation with rice bran, flax seed, or sunflower seed to finishing native Korean cattle (Hanwoo) on growth performances, carcass characteristics, fatty acid composition, free amino acid and peptide contents, and sensory evaluations of Longissimus muscle (LM). A total of 39 Hanwoo steers (average age of 22.2 mo and average body weight (BW) of 552.2 kg) were randomly divided into Control, rice bran (RB), flax seed (FS), or Sunflower seed (SS) groups. The steers were group fed for 273 d until they reached an average age of 31.2 mo. Final BW was 768.2, 785.8, 786.2, and 789.0 kg, and average daily gain was 0.79, 0.85, 0.82, and 0.84 kg for the Control, RS, FS, and SS groups, respectively (p>0.05). Fat thickness of the FS group (19.8 mm) was greater (p<0.05) than that of the other groups. Final yield grade converted into numerical values was 2.0 for the RB group, 1.7 for the Control and SS groups, and 1.4 for the FS group. Marbling degrees for the Control, SS, RB, and FS groups were 5.3, 5.1, 4.7, and 4.6, respectively. Percentages of palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), and arachidic acid (C20:0) in the LM were not different among the groups. Palmitoleic (C16:1) acid was higher (p<0.05) in the SS group. The concentration of oleic acid was highest (p<0.05) in the Control group (47.73%). The level of linolenic acid (C18:3) was 2.3 times higher (p<0.05) in the FS group compared to the other groups. Methionine concentration was (p<0.05) higher in FS (1.7 mg/100 g) and SS (1.2 mg/100 g) steers than in the Control or RB groups. Glutamic acid and α-aminoadipic acid (α-AAA) contents were (p<0.05) higher in the FS group compared to the other groups. LM from the FS group had numerically higher (p>0.05) scores for flavor, umami, and overall palatability in sensory evaluations. In conclusion, supplementation of flax seed to diets of finishing Hanwoo steers improved sensory evaluations which might have been

  16. UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS and GC-MS Analyses on Phenolic, Fatty Acid and Essential Oil of Verbascum pinetorum with Antioxidant, Anticholinesterase, Antimicrobial and DNA Damage Protection Effects

    PubMed Central

    Boğa, Mehmet; Ertaş, Abdulselam; Yılmaz, Mustafa Abdullah; Kızıl, Murat; Çeken, Bircan; Haşimi, Nesrin; Özden, Tuğba Yılmaz; Demirci, Serpil; Yener, İsmail; Deveci, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the first phytochemical and ABTS cation radical decolorisation activity, cupric reducing antioxidant capacity, anticholinesterase and DNA damage protection effect of endemic Verbascum pinetorum (Boiss.) O. Kuntze. Phenolic profile of V. pinetorum were qualified and quantified by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. Malic acid (47250.61±2504.28 µg/g) and luteolin (7651.96±527.98 µg/g) were found as most abundant compounds for metanol and acetone extracts, respectively. Fatty acid and essential oil compositions were determined by GC-MS analysis. The main components of fatty acid were found to be palmitic (27.1%) and stearic (22.1%) acids. The main compounds of the essential oil were cineole (16.9%) and α-selinene (16.4%). The acetone extract was found to be more active than BHT used as a standard in β-carotene-linoleic acid test system. In DPPH free radical scavenging activity, the acetone and methanol extracts showed higher activity than BHT at all tested concentrations. The acetone, methanol and water extracts showed strong inhibition while the acetone extract showed better activity than BHT and α-tocopherol which were used as standards in ABTS cation radical scavenging and cupric reducing antioxidant capacity assays, respectively. All extracts were found to be inactive in antialzheimer activity. The acetone extract exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity against C. albicans. The methanol extract of V. pinetorum were found no significant effect on DNA cleavage protection. PMID:27980574

  17. Fatty Acid Patterns of Seeds of Some Salvia Species from Iran--A Chemotaxonomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Moazzami Farida, Seyed Hamed; Radjabian, Tayebeh; Ranjbar, Massoud; Salami, Seyed Alireza; Rahmani, Nosrat; Ghorbani, Abdolbaset

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the seed oil content and fatty acid (FA) profile of 21 populations from 16 wild Salvia species of Iran were analyzed by GC. Patterns of chemical variations of the oils among species were identified via numerical analyses and also the taxonomic status of the infrageneric grouping was outlined in the genus. Salvia species were scored based on the contents of main FAs using principal coordinate analysis (PCO). The results showed that the total oil content in the seeds varied significantly, and ranged from 6.68 to 38.53% dry weight. α-Linolenic (18:3ω3, 1.69 - 53.56%), linoleic (18:2ω6, 13.04 - 60.64%), oleic (18:1ω9, 6.15 - 27.06%), palmitic (16:0, 3.77 - 9.27%), and stearic (18:0, 1.78 - 3.05%) acid were identified as five major FAs in the oils. The amount of ω-3 and ω-6 FAs ranged between 1.90 - 53.80% and 13.46 - 60.83% of total FAs in the seed oils, respectively. The results confirmed that FA profiles were distinctive among the species and that they can be used as chemotaxonomic markers. The discrimination of Salvia species according to their botanical classification at intersectional level was supported. In general, seed oils of Salvia species were rich sources of polyunsaturated FAs, except in linoleic and α-linolenic acid, and may be valuable for food and pharmaceutical industries.

  18. Inhibition of type 1 and type 2 5alpha-reductase activity by free fatty acids, active ingredients of Permixon.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Jean Pierre; Cousse, Henri; Martin, Pierre Marie

    2002-10-01

    In different cell systems, the lipido-sterolic extract of Serenoa repens (LSESr, Permixon inhibits both type 1 and type 2 5alpha-reductase activity (5alphaR1 and 5alphaR2). LSESr is mainly constituted of fatty acids (90+/-5%) essentially as free fatty acids (80%). Among these free fatty acids, the main components are oleic and lauric acids which represent 65% and linoleic and myristic acids 15%. To evaluate the inhibitory effect of the different components of LSESr on 5alphaR1 or 5alphaR2 activity, the corresponding type 1 and type 2 human genes have been cloned and expressed in the baculovirus-directed insect cell expression system Sf9. The cells were incubated at pH 5.5 (5alphaR2) and pH 7.4 (5alphaR1) with 1 or 3nM testosterone in presence or absence of various concentrations of LSESr or of its different components. Dihydrotestosterone formation was measured with an automatic system combining HPLC and an on-line radiodetector. The inhibition of 5alphaR1 and 5alphaR2 activity was only observed with free fatty acids: esterified fatty acids, alcohols as well as sterols assayed were inactive. A specificity of the fatty acids in 5alphaR1 or 5alphaR2 inhibition has been found. Long unsaturated chains (oleic and linolenic) were active (IC(50)=4+/-2 and 13+/-3 microg/ml, respectively) on 5alphaR1 but to a much lesser extent (IC(50)>100 and 35+/-21 microg/ml, respectively) on 5alphaR2. Palmitic and stearic acids were inactive on the two isoforms. Lauric acid was active on 5alphaR1 (IC(50)=17+/-3 microg/ml) and 5alphaR2 (IC(50)=19+/-9 microg/ml). The inhibitory activity of myristic acid was evaluated on 5alphaR2 only and found active on this isoform (IC(50)=4+/-2 microg/ml). The dual inhibitory activity of LSESr on 5alpha-reductase type 1 and type 2 can be attributed to its high content in free fatty acids.

  19. Molecular characterization, functional expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Illescas, Oscar; Carrero, Julio C; Bobes, Raúl J; Flisser, Ana; Rosas, Gabriela; Laclette, Juan P

    2012-12-01

    The fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) comprise a family of proteins that are widely expressed in animal cells and perform a variety of vital functions. Here, we report the identification, characterization, recombinant expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium FABP (TsFABP1). The TsFABP1 primary structure showed all the conserved residues characteristic of the subfamily iv of the intracellular Lipid-Binding Proteins (iLBPs), including those involved in the binding stabilization of the fatty acid molecule. Through a competitive binding assay we found that TsFABP1 is able to bind at least six different fatty acids with preference toward palmitic and stearic acid, suggesting that TsFABP1 is a member of the iLBP subfamily iv. Immunolocalization assays carried out on larval and adult tissues of four species of taeniids using anti-TsFABP1 hyperimmune sera produced in mice and rabbit, showed intense labeling in the tegument of the spiral canal and in subtegumental cytons of the larvae. These findings suggest that the spiral canal might be a major place for FA uptake in the developing scolex. In contrast, only subtegumental cytons in the adult worms stained positive. We propose that TsFABP1 is involved in the mechanism to mobilize fatty acids between compartments in the extensive syncytial tissue of taeniids. Protection assays carried out in a murine model of cysticercosis showed that subcutaneous immunization with TsFABP1 resulted in about 45% reduction of parasite load against an intraperitoneal challenge with Taenia crassiceps cysts. This reduction in parasite load correlated with the level of cellular and humoral immune responses against TsFABP1, as determined in spleen lymphocyte proliferation and ELISA testing.

  20. Bacterial and protozoal communities and fatty acid profile in the rumen of sheep fed a diet containing added tannins.

    PubMed

    Vasta, Valentina; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R; Mele, Marcello; Serra, Andrea; Luciano, Giuseppe; Lanza, Massimiliano; Biondi, Luisa; Priolo, Alessandro

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of tannins on ruminal biohydrogenation (BH) due to shifts in the ruminal microbial environment in sheep. Thirteen lambs (45 days of age) were assigned to two dietary treatments: seven lambs were fed a barley-based concentrate (control group) while the other six lambs received the same concentrate with supplemental quebracho tannins (9.57% of dry matter). At 122 days of age, the lambs were slaughtered, and the ruminal contents were subjected to fatty acid analysis and sampled to quantify populations of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, which converts C(18:2) c9-c12 (linoleic acid [LA]) to C(18:2) c9-t11 (rumenic acid [RA]) and then RA to C(18:1) t11 (vaccenic acid [VA]); we also sampled for Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus, which converts VA to C(18:0) (stearic acid [SA]). Tannins increased (P < 0.005) VA in the rumen compared to the tannin-free diet. The concentration of SA was not affected by tannins. The SA/VA ratio was lower (P < 0.005) for the tannin-fed lambs than for the controls, suggesting that the last step of the BH process was inhibited by tannins. The B. proteoclasticus population was lower (-30.6%; P < 0.1), and B. fibrisolvens and protozoan populations were higher (+107% and +56.1%, respectively; P < 0.05) in the rumen of lambs fed the tannin-supplemented diet than in controls. These results suggest that quebracho tannins altered BH by changing ruminal microbial populations.

  1. Fatty acid composition of muscle fat and enzymes of storage lipid synthesis in whole muscle from beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Kazala, E Chris; Lozeman, Fred J; Mir, Priya S; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Schmutz, Sheila M; Weselake, Randall J

    2006-11-01

    Enhanced intramuscular fat content (i.e., marbling) in beef is a desirable trait, which can result in increased product value. This study was undertaken with the aim of revealing biochemical factors associated with the marbling trait in beef cattle. Samples of longissimus lumborum (LL) and pars costalis diaphragmatis (PCD) were taken from a group of intact crossbred males and females at slaughter, lipids extracted, and the resulting FAME examined for relationships with marbling fat deposition. For LL, significant associations were found between degree of marbling and myristic (14:0, r = 0.55, P < 0.01), palmitic (16:0, r = 0.80, P < 0.001), stearic (18:0, r = -0.58, P < 0.01), and oleic (18:1c-9, r = 0.79, P < 0.001) acids. For PCD, significant relationships were found between marbling and palmitic (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) and oleic (r = 0.74, P < 0.001) acids. Microsomal fractions prepared from PCD muscle were assayed for diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT), and phosphatidic acid phosphatase-1 (PAP-1) activity, and the results examined for relationships with degree of intramuscular fat deposition. None of the enzyme activities from PCD displayed an association with marbling fat content, but DGAT specific activity showed significant positive associations with LPAAT (r = 0.54, P < 0.01), total PAP (r = 0.66, P < 0.001), and PAP-1 (r = 0.63, P < 0.01) specific activities. The results on FA compositions of whole muscle tissues provide insight into possible enzyme action associated with the production of specific FA. The increased proportion of oleic acid associated with enhanced lipid content of whole muscle is noteworthy given the known health benefits of this FA.

  2. Fatty acid profiles, tocopherol contents, and antioxidant activities of heartnut (Juglans ailanthifolia Var. cordiformis) and Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Tsao, Rong; Yang, Raymond; Kramer, John K G; Hernandez, Marta

    2007-02-21

    The fatty acid and tocopherol compositions of three heartnut (Juglans ailanthifolia var. cordiformis) varieties (Imshu, Campbell CW1, and Campbell CW3) were examined and compared with those of two Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.) varieties (Combe and Lake). The major fatty acids found in heartnuts and walnuts were identified by gas chromatography as linoleic (18:2n-6), alpha-linolenic (18:3n-3), oleic (18:1n-9), palmitic (16:0), and stearic acid (18:0). Polyunsaturated fatty acids were the main group of fatty acids found in both heartnut and walnut, ranging from 73.07 to 80.98%, and were significantly higher in heartnut than in Persian walnuts (P < 0.001). In addition, heartnuts had significantly higher levels of 18:2n-6 and lower levels of 18:3n-3 compared to the Persian walnuts. gamma-Tocopherol was the main tocopherol homologue present in both types of nuts, followed by delta- and alpha-tocopherol. The highest concentration of gamma-tocopherol was found in Combe Persian walnut at 267.87 mug/g, followed by Lake Persian walnut and Imshu, Campbell CW1, and CW3 heartnut at 205.45, 187.33, 161.84, and 126.46 mug/g, respectively. Tocopherols, particularly the gamma-tocopherol, were found to contribute the most to the strong total antioxidant activities of both walnut and heartnut oils using either the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay or the photochemiluminescence method.

  3. Inhibitory effect of the ether extract of human feces on activities of mutagens: inhibition by oleic and linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Arimoto, S; Togawa, K; Makita, M

    1981-05-01

    An ether extract of normal human feces showed inhibitory effects on the activities of several mutagens in the Ames tests. By addition of the ether extract at an amount equivalent to 0.5 g of a sample of feces, the mutagenicity of 1.5 nmole of 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) on Salmonella typhimurium TA98 was completely inhibited. No killing of the bacteria was detected during this treatment. Other mutagens also subject to the inhibition were 2-amino-6-methyl-dipyrido[1,2-a:3',2'-d]imidazole (Glu-P-1), 2-amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (Glob-P-2), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-d]quinoline (IQ), benzo[a]pyrene and aflatoxin B1. Apart from these mutagens, which require S9 for their activation, the direct mutagen prepared from Trp-P-1 by treatment with S9 was also inhibited by the fecal extract. The inhibitory principles in the fecal extract were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography on silica gel and were identified as oleic and linoleic acids. Whereas these unsaturated fatty acids showed strong inhibitory activities, saturated fatty acids, i.e, stearic and palmitic acids, did not exhibit any inhibition. Although the physiological significance of these effects of oleate and linoleate is yet to be elucidated, this finding has indicated that care must be taken in screening mutagens by the Ames tests to avoid false negatives resulting from the presence of unsaturated fatty acids in the system.

  4. Glucomannan- and glucomannan plus spirulina-enriched pork affect liver fatty acid profile, LDL receptor expression and antioxidant status in Zucker fa/fa rats fed atherogenic diets

    PubMed Central

    González-Torres, Laura; Matos, Cátia; Vázquez-Velasco, Miguel; Santos-López, Jorge A.; Sánchez-Martínez, Iria; García–Fernández, Camino; Bastida, Sara; Benedí, Juana; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We evaluated the effects of glucomannan or glucomannan plus spirulina-restructured pork (RP) on liver fatty acid profile, desaturase/elongase enzyme activities and oxidative status of Zucker fa/fa rats for seven weeks. Control (C), glucomannan (G) and glucomannan/spirulina (GS)-RP; HC (cholesterol-enriched control), HG and HGS (cholesterol-enriched glucomannan and glucomannan/spirulina-RP) experimental diets were tested. Increased metabolic syndrome markers were found in C, G and GS rats. Cholesterol feeding increased liver size, fat, and cholesterol and reduced antioxidant enzyme levels and expressions. Cholesterolemia was lower in HG and HGS than in HC. GS vs. G showed higher stearic but lower oleic levels. SFA and PUFA decreased while MUFA increased by cholesterol feeding. The arachidonic/linoleic and docosahexaenoic/alpha-linolenic ratios were lower in HC, HG, and HGS vs. C, G, and GS, respectively, suggesting a delta-6-elongase-desaturase system inhibition. Moreover, cholesterol feeding, mainly in HGS, decreased low-density-lipoprotein receptor expression and the delta-5-desaturase activity and increased the delta-9-desaturase activity. In conclusion, the liver production of highly unsaturated fatty acids was limited to decrease their oxidation in presence of hypercholesterolaemia. Glucomannan or glucomannan/spirulina-RP has added new attributes to their functional properties in meat, partially arresting the negative effects induced by high-fat-high-cholesterol feeding on the liver fatty acid and antioxidant statuses. PMID:28325998

  5. Saturated fatty acids up-regulate COX-2 expression in prostate epithelial cells via toll-like receptor 4/NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Hu, Shuai; Cui, Yun; Sun, Meng-Kui; Xie, Feng; Zhang, Qian; Jin, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis, and recently it has been confirmed to be a molecular target of saturated fatty acids (SFAs). In the present study, we investigated the effect of stearic acid (SA) and palmitic acid (PA), two of the most abundant SFAs contained in dietary fat, on COX-2 expression in prostate epithelial cells and the signaling transduction pathway involved. First, we demonstrated that both SA and PA increased the mRNA and protein expression of COX-2, and consistently induced the activation of NF-κB in RWPE-1, BPH-1 and PC-3 prostate epithelial cell lines. The effect of SA and PA on COX-2 over-expression and NF-κB activation was in a dose-dependent manner, and PA was more potent than SA at the same concentration. Then, we demonstrated inhibition of NF-κB using its specific inhibitor strikingly attenuated PA-induced COX-2 expression. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was revealed to be expressed on RWPE-1, BPH-1 and PC-3 cell lines by PCR and immunofluorescence staining, and blocking its signaling significantly inhibited PA induced COX-2 over-expression and NF-κB activation. Taken together, we demonstrated that SFAs can up-regulate COX-2 expression in prostate epithelial cells, and this effect was mediated mainly through the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  6. Comparative researches on two direct transmethylation without prior extraction methods for fatty acids analysis in vegetal matrix with low fat content

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of our work was to compare two methods, both based on direct transmethylation with different reagents, BF3/MeOH (boron trifluoride in methanol) or HCl/MeOH (hydrochloride acid in methanol), in acid catalysis, without prior extraction, to find the fast, non-expensive but enough precise method for 9 principal fatty acids (lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, arahidic and behenic acids) analysis in vegetal matrix with low fat content (forage from grassland), for nutrition and agrochemical studies. Results Comparatively, between the average values obtained for all analysed fatty acids by the two methods based on direct transmethylation without prior extraction no significantly difference was identified (p > 0.05). The results of fatty acids for the same forage sample were more closely to their average value, being more homogenous for BF3/MeOH than HCl/MeOH, because of the better accuracy and repeatability of this method. Method that uses BF3/MeOH reagent produces small amounts of interfering compounds than the method using HCl/MeOH reagent, results reflected by the better statistical parameters. Conclusion The fast and non-expensive BF3/methanol method was applied with good accuracy and sensitivity for the determination of free or combined fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) in forage matrix with low fat content from grassland. Also, the final extract obtained by this method, poorer in interfering compounds, is safer to protect the injector and column from contamination with heavy or non-volatile compounds formed by transmethylation reactions. PMID:22269394

  7. Different effects of fibrates on the microsomal fatty acid chain elongation and the acyl composition of phospholipids in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M; Alegret, M; López, M; Rodríguez, C; Adzet, T; Merlos, M; Laguna, J C

    1995-12-01

    1. The effects in vitro and in vivo of three fibric acid derivatives, clofibrate (CFB), bezafibrate (BFB) and gemfibrozil (GFB) on some enzyme activities related to fatty acid biosynthesis, namely palmitoyl-CoA synthetase and hydrolases (microsomal and cytosolic), NADH and NADPH cytochrome c reductases and acyl-CoA elongases were investigated in guinea-pigs. 2. The three fibrates inhibited acyl-CoA elongation in vitro, irrespective of the substrate of elongation used (saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated) and with an order of potency GFB > BFB > CFB. In the case of GFB, inhibition occurred at concentrations that can be reached in vivo. 3. Microsomal palmitoyl-CoA hydrolase and synthetase were also inhibited in vitro (GFB > or = BFB > CFB), whereas NADH cytochrome c reductase activity was increased by GFB. Nevertheless, the magnitude of changes were lower than those observed in elongation activities. 4. Treatment with fibrates did not produce peroxisomal proliferation in guinea-pigs, as measured by peroxisomal beta-oxidation activity and liver weight/body weight ratio. Nevertheless, fibrates provoked a reduction in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, at least in GFB- and BFB-treated animals. 5. Fatty acid elongation was significantly modified by GFB treatment in vivo. The remaining enzyme activities studied were only slightly changed by fibrate treatment. 6. Treatment with BFB and to a lesser extent with CFB, increased the relative proportion of MUFA (palmitoleic and oleic acids) in microsomal phospholipids, whereas PUFA (mainly linoleic acid) decreased. GFB behaved differently, increasing palmitic and linoleic acids and decreasing stearic and oleic acids. The latter changes are attributable to an inhibition of elongation activity by GFB. 7. The changes observed after fibrate treatment in both rats and guinea-pigs, as they are not directly related to peroxisome proliferation, could be more reliably extrapolated to man than those observed only in rats.

  8. Different effects of fibrates on the microsomal fatty acid chain elongation and the acyl composition of phospholipids in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, M.; Alegret, M.; López, M.; Rodríguez, C.; Adzet, T.; Merlos, M.; Laguna, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects in vitro and in vivo of three fibric acid derivatives, clofibrate (CFB), bezafibrate (BFB) and gemfibrozil (GFB) on some enzyme activities related to fatty acid biosynthesis, namely palmitoyl-CoA synthetase and hydrolases (microsomal and cytosolic), NADH and NADPH cytochrome c reductases and acyl-CoA elongases were investigated in guinea-pigs. 2. The three fibrates inhibited acyl-CoA elongation in vitro, irrespective of the substrate of elongation used (saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated) and with an order of potency GFB > BFB > CFB. In the case of GFB, inhibition occurred at concentrations that can be reached in vivo. 3. Microsomal palmitoyl-CoA hydrolase and synthetase were also inhibited in vitro (GFB > or = BFB > CFB), whereas NADH cytochrome c reductase activity was increased by GFB. Nevertheless, the magnitude of changes were lower than those observed in elongation activities. 4. Treatment with fibrates did not produce peroxisomal proliferation in guinea-pigs, as measured by peroxisomal beta-oxidation activity and liver weight/body weight ratio. Nevertheless, fibrates provoked a reduction in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, at least in GFB- and BFB-treated animals. 5. Fatty acid elongation was significantly modified by GFB treatment in vivo. The remaining enzyme activities studied were only slightly changed by fibrate treatment. 6. Treatment with BFB and to a lesser extent with CFB, increased the relative proportion of MUFA (palmitoleic and oleic acids) in microsomal phospholipids, whereas PUFA (mainly linoleic acid) decreased. GFB behaved differently, increasing palmitic and linoleic acids and decreasing stearic and oleic acids. The latter changes are attributable to an inhibition of elongation activity by GFB. 7. The changes observed after fibrate treatment in both rats and guinea-pigs, as they are not directly related to peroxisome proliferation, could be more reliably extrapolated to man than those observed only in rats. PMID

  9. Purification and initial characterization of the 71-kilodalton rat heat-shock protein and its cognate as fatty acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Guidon, P T; Hightower, L E

    1986-06-03

    The major rat heat-shock (stress) protein and its cognate were purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from livers of heat-shocked rats. Both proteins exhibited similar behavior on a variety of column chromatography matrices but were separable by preparative isoelectric focusing under nondenaturing conditions by virtue of a 0.2 pH unit difference in isoelectric point. Both purified proteins had similar physical properties, suggesting the possibility that they may have similar biological functions as well. Both proteins were homodimers under nondissociative conditions (Mr 150 000) with isoelectric points of 5.0 (cognate) and 5.2 (major stress protein). After denaturation, both proteins had an increase in isoelectric point of 0.6 pH unit, and the resulting polypeptide chains had apparent molecular weights of 73 000 (cognate) and 71 000 (major stress protein). Similarities in the electrophoretic properties of these two proteins and serum albumin, which also undergoes a large basic shift in isoelectric point due to loss of fatty acids and conformational changes accompanying denaturation, prompted us to search for lipids associated with the purified 71-kilodalton stress protein and its cognate. Thin-layer chromatography of chloroform/methanol extracts of these two proteins revealed nonesterified fatty acids bound to both proteins. Palmitic acid, stearic acid, and a small amount of myristic acid were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Both proteins contained approximately four molecules of fatty acid per dimer with palmitate and stearate present in a one to one molar ratio. Possible roles of the major stress protein and its cognate as fatty acid associated proteins in cellular responses to stress are discussed.

  10. Quantifying Protein-Fatty Acid Interactions Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lan; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2011-02-01

    The application of the direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assay to quantify interactions between bovine β-lactoglobulin (Lg) and a series of fatty acids (FA), CH3(CH2)xCOOH, where x = 6 (caprylic acid, CpA), 8 (capric acid, CA), 10 (lauric acid, LA), 12 (myristic acid, MA), 14 (palmitic acid, PA) and 16 (stearic acid, SA), is described. Control ESI-MS binding measurements performed on the Lg-PA interaction revealed that both the protonated and deprotonated gas phase ions of the (Lg + PA) complex are prone to dissociate in the ion source, which leads to artificially small association constants ( K a ). The addition of imidazole, a stabilizing solution additive, at high concentration (10 mM) increased the relative abundance of (Lg + PA) complex measured by ESI-MS in both positive and negative ion modes. The K a value measured in negative ion mode and using sampling conditions that minimize in-source dissociation is in good agreement with a value determined using a competitive fluorescence assay. The K a values measured by ESI-MS for the Lg interactions with MA and SA are also consistent with values expected based on the fluorescence measurements. However, the K a values measured using optimal sampling conditions in positive ion mode are significantly lower than those measured in negative ion mode for all of the FAs investigated. It is concluded that the protonated gaseous ions of the (Lg + FA) complexes are kinetically less stable than the deprotonated ions. In-source dissociation was significant for the complexes of Lg with the shorter FAs (CpA, CA, and LA) in both modes and, in the case of CpA, no binding could be detected by ESI-MS. The affinities of Lg for CpA, CA, and LA determined using the reference ligand ESI-MS assay, a method for quantifying labile protein-ligand complexes that are prone to in-source dissociation, were found to be in good agreement with reported values.

  11. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  12. Organic acids tunably catalyze carbonic acid decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Busch, Daryle H; Subramaniam, Bala; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-07-10

    Density functional theory calculations predict that the gas-phase decomposition of carbonic acid, a high-energy, 1,3-hydrogen atom transfer reaction, can be catalyzed by a monocarboxylic acid or a dicarboxylic acid, including carbonic acid itself. Carboxylic acids are found to be more effective catalysts than water. Among the carboxylic acids, the monocarboxylic acids outperform the dicarboxylic ones wherein the presence of an intramolecular hydrogen bond hampers the hydrogen transfer. Further, the calculations reveal a direct correlation between the catalytic activity of a monocarboxylic acid and its pKa, in contrast to prior assumptions about carboxylic-acid-catalyzed hydrogen-transfer reactions. The catalytic efficacy of a dicarboxylic acid, on the other hand, is significantly affected by the strength of an intramolecular hydrogen bond. Transition-state theory estimates indicate that effective rate constants for the acid-catalyzed decomposition are four orders-of-magnitude larger than those for the water-catalyzed reaction. These results offer new insights into the determinants of general acid catalysis with potentially broad implications.

  13. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  14. Uric acid - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid ...

  15. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  16. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  17. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid ...

  18. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  19. Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... other health conditions > Fatty acid oxidation disorders Fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... these disorders, go to genetests.org . What fatty acid oxidation disorders are tested for in newborn screening? ...

  20. Suppression of the rice fatty-acid desaturase gene OsSSI2 enhances resistance to blast and leaf blight diseases in rice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chang-Jie; Shimono, Masaki; Maeda, Satoru; Inoue, Haruhiko; Mori, Masaki; Hasegawa, Morifumi; Sugano, Shoji; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    Fatty acids and their derivatives play important signaling roles in plant defense responses. It has been shown that suppressing a gene for stearoyl acyl carrier protein fatty-acid desaturase (SACPD) enhances the resistance of Arabidopsis (SSI2) and soybean to multiple pathogens. In this study, we present functional analyses of a rice homolog of SSI2 (OsSSI2) in disease resistance of rice plants. A transposon insertion mutation (Osssi2-Tos17) and RNAi-mediated knockdown of OsSSI2 (OsSSI2-kd) reduced the oleic acid (18:1) level and increased that of stearic acid (18:0), indicating that OsSSI2 is responsible for fatty-acid desaturase activity. These plants displayed spontaneous lesion formation in leaf blades, retarded growth, slight increase in endogenous free salicylic acid (SA) levels, and SA/benzothiadiazole (BTH)-specific inducible genes, including WRKY45, a key regulator of SA/BTH-induced resistance, in rice. Moreover, the OsSSI2-kd plants showed markedly enhanced resistance to the blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea and leaf-blight bacteria Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. These results suggest that OsSSI2 is involved in the negative regulation of defense responses in rice, as are its Arabidopsis and soybean counterparts. Microarray analyses identified 406 genes that were differentially expressed (>or=2-fold) in OsSSI2-kd rice plants compared with wild-type rice and, of these, approximately 39% were BTH responsive. Taken together, our results suggest that induction of SA-responsive genes, including WRKY45, is likely responsible for enhanced disease resistance in OsSSI2-kd rice plants.

  1. Saturated fatty acids induce post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP mRNA via AU-rich element-binding protein, human antigen R (HuR).

    PubMed

    Lu, Sizhao; Mott, Justin L; Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2015-10-02

    Iron is implicated in fatty liver disease pathogenesis. The human hepcidin gene, HAMP, is the master switch of iron metabolism. The aim of this study is to investigate the regulation of HAMP expression by fatty acids in HepG2 cells. For these studies, both saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA)) and unsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid (OA)) were used. PA and, to a lesser extent, SA, but not OA, up-regulated HAMP mRNA levels, as determined by real-time PCR. To understand whether PA regulates HAMP mRNA at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level, the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D was employed. PA-mediated induction of HAMP mRNA expression was not blocked by actinomycin D. Furthermore, PA activated HAMP 3'-UTR, but not promoter, activity, as shown by reporter assays. HAMP 3'-UTR harbors a single AU-rich element (ARE). Mutation of this ARE abolished the effect of PA, suggesting the involvement of ARE-binding proteins. The ARE-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) stabilizes mRNA through direct interaction with AREs on 3'-UTR. HuR is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. PA activated this process. The binding of HuR to HAMP mRNA was also induced by PA in HepG2 cells. Silencing of HuR by siRNA abolished PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP mRNA levels. PKC is known to phosphorylate HuR. Staurosporine, a broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor, inhibited both PA-mediated translocation of HuR and induction of HAMP expression. Similarly, rottlerin, a novel class PKC inhibitor, abrogated PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP expression. In conclusion, lipids mediate post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP throughPKC- and HuR-dependent mechanisms.

  2. Preparation of interesterified plastic fats from fats and oils free of trans fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeung Hee; Akoh, Casimir C; Himmelsbach, David S; Lee, Ki-Teak

    2008-06-11

    Interesterified plastic fats were produced with trans-free substrates of fully hydrogenated soybean oil, extra virgin olive oil, and palm stearin in a weight ratio of 10:20:70, 10:40:50, and 10:50:40, respectively, by lipase catalysis. The major fatty acids of the products were palmitic (32.2-47.4%), stearic (12.0-12.4%), and oleic acid (33.6-49.5%). After storage at 5 degrees C (refrigerator temperature) or 24 degrees C (room temperature) for 16 h, the physical properties were evaluated for solid fat content, texture, melting, and crystallization behavior, viscoelastic properties, crystal polymorphism, and crystal microstructure. The interesterified fats contained desirable crystal polymorphs (beta' form) as determined by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. They exhibited a wide plastic range of solid fat content of 52-58% at 10 degrees C and 15% at 40 degrees C. The physical properties were influenced by the ratio of palm stearin and olive oil. Harder and more brittle texture, crystallization and melting at higher temperature, higher solid fat contents, and more elastic (G') or viscous (G') characteristics were observed in the produced fats containing a higher content of palm stearin and lower content of olive oil. The produced fats stored at 5 degrees C consisted mostly of beta' form crystal together with a small content of beta form, while those at 24 degrees C had only beta' form. The produced fat with a higher amount of palm stearin appeared to have more beta' form crystal and small size crystal clusters. Thus, the physical properties of the produced plastic fats may be desirable for use in a bakery product.

  3. Photoactive layer-by-layer films of cellulose phosphate and titanium dioxide containing phosphotungstic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Sajjad; Acuña, José Javier Sáez; Pasa, André Avelino; Bilmes, Sara A.; Vela, Maria Elena; Benitez, Guillermo; Rodrigues-Filho, Ubirajara Pereira

    2013-07-01

    A versatile layer-by-layer (LbL) procedure for the preparation of highly dispersed, adherent and porous multilayer films of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) and phosphotungstic acid (HPW) on a variety of substrates at room temperature was developed based on the use of cellulose phosphate (CP) as an efficient and non-conventional polyelectrolyte. UV/vis absorption spectroscopy confirmed the linear and regular growth of the films with the number of immersion cycles and a strong adsorption ability of CP towards TiO2 NPs. FTIR spectroscopy showed that HPW binds to the surface of TiO2 through the oxygen atom at the corner of the Keggin structure. XPS results showed that the interaction between TiO2 and CP is through Ti-O-P linkage. A model is proposed for the TiO2-HPW interaction based on XPS and FTIR results. FEG/SEM study of the surface morphology revealed a porous film structure with a homogenous distribution of the TiO2 NPs induced by CP. HRTEM studies showed that the resulting composite films consist of crystalline anatase and rutile phases and poly-nano-crystalline HPW with a semi-crystalline TiO2-HPW interface. These CP/TiO2 and CP/TiO2/HPW LbL films showed good photoactivity against both saturated and unsaturated species, for instance, stearic acid (SA), crystal violet (CV) and methylene blue (MB) under UV irradiation. The CP/HPW films formed on bacterial cellulose (BC) showed good photochromic response which is enhanced in presence of TiO2 due to an interfacial electron transfer from TiO2 to HPW. This simple and environmentally safe method can be used to form coatings on a variety of surfaces with photoactive TiO2 and TiO2/HPW films.

  4. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  5. Impact of fat and selected profiles of fatty acids contained in the colostrum and milk of sows of native breeds on piglet rearing.

    PubMed

    Skrzypczak, Ewa; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Beszterda, Monika; Goliński, Piotr; Szulc, Karolina; Buczyński, Janusz T; Babicz, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the level of fat and selected fatty acids found in the milk of sows on the rearing of native breed piglets. Simultaneously, in order to improve the accuracy of the performed analyses, atomic absorption spectrometry was employed in the applied analytic methodology. The experimental animal material comprised 60 sows of the indigenous White Złotnicka breed. Colostrum and milk were collected on the first and 14th days of lactation. In all, 240 samples were collected. The following parameters were determined in the course of the experiment: number and weight of piglets, body weight gains as well as deaths of piglets. A total of 1270 born piglets was subjected to investigations. The performed experiments demonstrated that, with the progress of the lactation period, the content of fat and saturated fatty acids (SFA) turned out to be statistically significant and showed a growing tendency. Fat increased by about 2% and palmitic acid (C16:0) increased most, that is by 5%. Linolic (C18:2) and linolenic (C18:3) acids revealed decreasing trends. Irrespective of the day of lactation, the level of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) determined in sows' colostrum and milk was higher in comparison with that of SFA, and the UFA to SFA ratio ranged from 1.84% to 1.33%. Proportions of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids were determined at the level of about 1.6:1.0 in the colostrum and 1.3:10 in milk. The highest daily body weight gains were recorded in the case of piglets derived from sows with the highest fat level - 294 g, while in the case of stearic acid (C18:0), the smaller its concentration in the colostrum and milk of the experimental sows, the better body weight gains of piglets - 262 g. At the same time, stearic acid (C18:0) was found to exert a statistically significant effect on piglet mortality at the level of P ≤ 0.05. Its highest concentration caused the highest proportion of deaths among piglets - 16.23%. The performed

  6. Fatty acid esters of 3-chloropropane-1,2-diol in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Zelinková, Z; Svejkovská, B; Velísek, J; Dolezal, M

    2006-12-01

    A series of 25 virgin and refined edible oils, obtained from retailers, was analyzed for levels of free 3-chloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and 3-MCPD released from esters with higher fatty acids (bound 3-MCPD). Oils containing free 3-MCPD ranging from <3 microg kg-1 (LOD) to 24 microg kg-1. Surprisingly, bound 3-MCPD levels were much higher and varied between <100 (LOD) and 2462 microg kg-1. On average, virgin oils had relatively low levels of bound 3-MCPD, ranging from <100 (LOD) to <300 microg kg-1 (LOQ). Higher levels of bound 3-MCPD were found in oils from roasted oilseeds (337 microg kg-1) and in the majority of refined oils (<300-2462 microg kg-1), including refined olive oils. In general, it appears that the formation of bound 3-MCPD in oils is linked to preliminary heat treatment of oilseeds and to the process of oil refining. Analysis of unrefined, de-gummed, bleached, and deodorized rapeseed oil showed that the level of bound MCPD decreased during the refining process. However, additional heating of seed oils for 30 min at temperatures ranging from 100 to 280 degrees C, and heating at 230 degrees C (260 degrees C) for up to 8 h, led to an increase in bound 3-MCPD levels. On the other hand, heating of olive oil resulted in a decrease in bound 3-MCPD levels. For comparison, fat isolated from salami was analyzed for intact fatty acid esters of 3-MCPD. This fat contained bound 3-MCPD at a level of 1670 microg kg-1 and the fatty acid esters of 3-MCPD mainly consisted of 3-MCPD diesters; monoesters of 3-MCPD were present in smaller amounts. The major types of 3-MCPD diesters (about 85%) were mixed diesters of palmitic acid with C18 fatty acids (stearic, oleic, linoleic acids). These diesters were followed by 3-MCPD distearate (11%) and 3-MCPD dipalmitate (4%). Generally, very little 3-MCPD existed as the free compound (31 microg kg-1).

  7. Interaction between differential gene expression profile and phenotype in bovine blastocysts originating from oocytes exposed to elevated non-esterified fatty acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, V; Rizos, D; Gutierrez-Adan, A; Pintelon, I; Jorssen, E; Dufort, I; Sirard, M A; Verlaet, A; Hermans, N; Bols, P E J; Leroy, J L M R

    2015-01-01

    Maternal metabolic disorders linked to lipolysis are major risk factors for reproductive failure. A notable feature of such disorders is increased non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations in the blood, which are reflected in the ovarian follicular fluid. Elevated NEFA concentrations impact on the maturing oocyte and even alter subsequent embryo physiology. The aetiological mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, in the present study, bovine in vitro maturing cumulus-oocyte complexes were exposed (24 h) to three different maturation treatments containing: (1) physiological (72 µM) NEFA concentrations (=control); (2) elevated (75 µM) stearic acid (SA) concentrations (=HIGH SA); and (3) elevated (425 µM) NEFA concentrations (=HIGH COMBI). Zygotes were fertilised and cultured following standard procedures. Transcriptomic analyses in resulting Day 7.5 blastocysts revealed that the major pathways affected are related to lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in HIGH COMBI embryos and to lipid metabolism and cell death in HIGH SA embryos. Furthermore, lower glutathione content and a reduced number of lipid droplets per cell were observed in HIGH SA-exposed oocytes and resulting morulae, respectively, compared with their HIGH COMBI-exposed counterparts. Vitrified embryos originating from HIGH SA-exposed oocytes tended to exhibit lower survival rates compared with controls. These data suggest possible mechanisms explaining why females across species suffering lipolytic disorders experience difficulties in conceiving.

  8. Redberry juniper as a roughage source in lamb feedlot rations: wool and carcass characteristics, meat fatty acid profiles, and sensory panel traits.

    PubMed

    Whitney, T R; Lupton, C J; Smith, S B

    2011-10-01

    Effects of replacing cottonseed hulls with juniper leaves on end products were investigated in lambs. Lambs were individually fed diets containing cottonseed hulls (CSH), half of the CSH replaced by juniper (CSHJ), or all the CSH replaced by juniper (JUN). Lambs grew the same amount of wool when measured as greasy fleece (P>0.19), clean fleece (P>0.46), and clean wool production per unit of BW (P>0.54). Average fiber diameter quadratically decreased (P=0.04) and became more uniform (P<0.04) as percentage of juniper increased in the diet. Carcass characteristics were not affected (P>0.16) by diet. Myristic, palmitoleic, and arachidic acids, cis-9, trans-11 CLA, and the ∆9 desaturase index linearly increased (P<0.09) and stearic acid linearly decreased (P=0.05) as percentage of juniper increased in the diet. Off-flavor linearly increased (P=0.02) as juniper increased in the diet.

  9. 13C NMR quantification of mono and diacylglycerols obtained through the solvent-free lipase-catalyzed esterification of saturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Jane Luiza Nogueira; de Souza, Rodrigo Octavio Mendonça Alves; de Vasconcellos Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira

    2012-06-01

    In the present investigation, we studied the enzymatic synthesis of monoacylglycerols (MAG) and diacylglycerols (DAG) via the esterification of saturated fatty acids (stearic, palmitic and an industrial residue containing 87% palmitic acid) and glycerol in a solvent-free system. Three immobilized lipases (Lipozyme RM IM, Lipozyme TL IM and Novozym 435) and different reaction conditions were evaluated. Under the optimal reaction conditions, esterifications catalyzed by Lipozyme RM IM resulted in a mixture of MAG and DAG at high conversion rates for all of the substrates. In addition, except for the reaction of industrial residue at atmospheric pressure, all of these products met the World Health Organization and European Union directives for acylglycerol mixtures for use in food applications. The products were quantified by (13)C NMR, with the aid of an external reference signal which was generated from a sealed coaxial tube filled with acetonitrile-d3. After calibrating the area of this signal using the classical external reference method, the same coaxial tube was used repeatedly to quantify the reaction products.

  10. Supercritical Extraction from Vinification Residues: Fatty Acids, α-Tocopherol, and Phenolic Compounds in the Oil Seeds from Different Varieties of Grape

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, F.; Bertussi, R. A.; Agostini, G.; Atti dos Santos, A. C.; Rossato, M.; Vanderlinde, R.

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction has been widely employed in the extraction of high purity substances. In this study, we used the technology to obtain oil from seeds from a variety of grapes, from vinification residues generated in the Southern region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This work encompasses three varieties of Vitis vinifera (Moscato Giallo, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon) and two of Vitis labrusca (Bordô e Isabel), harvested in 2005 and 2006. We obtained the highest oil content from Bordô (15.40%) in 2005 and from Merlot (14.66%), 2006. The biggest concentration of palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids was observed in Bordô, 2005, and in Bordô, Merlot, and Moscato Giallo, 2006. Bordô showed the highest concentration of oleic acid and α-tocopherol in both seasons too. For the equivalent of procyanidins, we did not notice significant difference among the varieties from the 2005 harvest. In 2006, both varieties Isabel and Cabernet Sauvignon showed a value slightly lower than the other varieties. The concentration of total phenolics was higher in Bordô and Cabernet Sauvignon. The presence of these substances is related to several important pharmacological properties and might be an alternative to conventional processes to obtain these bioactives. PMID:22593706

  11. Folate and vitamin B12 concentrations are associated with plasma DHA and EPA fatty acids in European adolescents: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study.

    PubMed

    Iglesia, I; Huybrechts, I; González-Gross, M; Mouratidou, T; Santabárbara, J; Chajès, V; González-Gil, E M; Park, J Y; Bel-Serrat, S; Cuenca-García, M; Castillo, M; Kersting, M; Widhalm, K; De Henauw, S; Sjöström, M; Gottrand, F; Molnár, D; Manios, Y; Kafatos, A; Ferrari, M; Stehle, P; Marcos, A; Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Moreno, L A

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between vitamin B6, folate and vitamin B12 biomarkers and plasma fatty acids in European adolescents. A subsample from the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study with valid data on B-vitamins and fatty acid blood parameters, and all the other covariates used in the analyses such as BMI, Diet Quality Index, education of the mother and physical activity assessed by a questionnaire, was selected resulting in 674 cases (43 % males). B-vitamin biomarkers were measured by chromatography and immunoassay and fatty acids by enzymatic analyses. Linear mixed models elucidated the association between B-vitamins and fatty acid blood parameters (changes in fatty acid profiles according to change in 10 units of vitamin B biomarkers). DHA, EPA) and n-3 fatty acids showed positive associations with B-vitamin biomarkers, mainly with those corresponding to folate and vitamin B12. Contrarily, negative associations were found with n-6:n-3 ratio, trans-fatty acids and oleic:stearic ratio. With total homocysteine (tHcy), all the associations found with these parameters were opposite (for instance, an increase of 10 nmol/l in red blood cell folate or holotranscobalamin in females produces an increase of 15·85 µmol/l of EPA (P value <0·01), whereas an increase of 10 nmol/l of tHcy in males produces a decrease of 2·06 µmol/l of DHA (P value <0·05). Positive associations between B-vitamins and specific fatty acids might suggest underlying mechanisms between B-vitamins and CVD and it is worth the attention of public health policies.

  12. 9 CFR 317.400 - Exemption from nutrition labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... fat, stearic acid, polyunsaturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and cholesterol. (2) Foods represented or..., saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, potassium, total carbohydrate, and dietary fiber; (ii) Nutrient...

  13. 9 CFR 381.500 - Exemption from nutrition labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... fat, stearic acid, polyunsaturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and cholesterol. (2) Foods represented or..., saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, potassium, total carbohydrate, and dietary fiber; (ii) Nutrient...

  14. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  15. A review of fatty acid profiles and antioxidant content in grass-fed and grain-fed beef

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Growing consumer interest in grass-fed beef products has raised a number of questions with regard to the perceived differences in nutritional quality between grass-fed and grain-fed cattle. Research spanning three decades suggests that grass-based diets can significantly improve the fatty acid (FA) composition and antioxidant content of beef, albeit with variable impacts on overall palatability. Grass-based diets have been shown to enhance total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (C18:2) isomers, trans vaccenic acid (TVA) (C18:1 t11), a precursor to CLA, and omega-3 (n-3) FAs on a g/g fat basis. While the overall concentration of total SFAs is not different between feeding regimens, grass-finished beef tends toward a higher proportion of cholesterol neutral stearic FA (C18:0), and less cholesterol-elevating SFAs such as myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) FAs. Several studies suggest that grass-based diets elevate precursors for Vitamin A and E, as well as cancer fighting antioxidants such as glutathione (GT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity as compared to grain-fed contemporaries. Fat conscious consumers will also prefer the overall lower fat content of a grass-fed beef product. However, consumers should be aware that the differences in FA content will also give grass-fed beef a distinct grass flavor and unique cooking qualities that should be considered when making the transition from grain-fed beef. In addition, the fat from grass-finished beef may have a yellowish appearance from the elevated carotenoid content (precursor to Vitamin A). It is also noted that grain-fed beef consumers may achieve similar intakes of both n-3 and CLA through the consumption of higher fat grain-fed portions. PMID:20219103

  16. Effects of increasing amount of dietary Prosopis laevigata pods on performance, meat quality and fatty acid profile in growing lambs.

    PubMed

    Negrete, L O; Pinos-Rodríguez, J M; Grajales-Lagunes, A; Morales, J A; García-López, J C; Lee-Rangel, H A

    2016-10-18

    A study with finishing lambs assessed the effect of dietary inclusion of Prosopis laevigata pods (PLPs) on performance, carcass characteristics, meat traits and fatty acid profile of subcutaneous fat. Twenty-one Rambouillet lambs (27.0 ± 3.0 kg BW) were assigned to one of three experimental diets with 0, 150 and 300 g PLP/kg DM. Evaluation of growth performance lasted 49 days. The experimental design was completely randomized and analysed with a mixed model. Lambs fed diets with 0, 150 and 300 g PLP had similar growth performance. Lambs fed diets with 300 g PLP/kg DM had better (p < 0.05) carcass yield and classification, less (p < 0.05) fat deposition and lower lightness (L*) value (p < 0.05) in meat than lambs fed diets with 0 and 150 g PLP/kg DM. Saturated fatty acids (palmitic and stearic) decreased (p < 0.05) and unsaturated fatty acids (oleic and linoleic) increased (p < 0.05) in subcutaneous fat of lambs fed diets with 150 and 300 g pods as compared with lambs not fed PLP. Prosopis laevigata pods are a safe feedstuff that can replace a third of conventional ingredients and reduce feed costs in growing lambs. Addition of PLP reduced (p < 0.05) total feed cost by 21%.

  17. Dietary Fish Oil Can Change Sperm Parameters and Fatty Acid Profiles of Ram Sperm during Oil Consumption Period and after Removal of Oil Source

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, AliReza; Esmaeili, Vahid; Shahverdi, Abdolhossein; Rashidi, Ladan

    2014-01-01

    Objective The effects of dietary fish oil on semen quality and sperm fatty acid profiles during consumption of n-3 fatty acids as well as the persistency of fatty acids in ram’s sperm after removing dietary oil from the diet were investigated. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we randomly assigned 9 Zandi rams to two groups (isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets): control (CTR; n=5) and fish oil (FO; n=4) for 70 days with a constant level of vitamin E in both groups. Semen was collected at the first week and at the last week of the feeding period (phase 1). After the feeding period, all rams were fed a conventional diet and semen samples were collected one and two months after removal of FO (phase 2). The sperm parameters and fatty acid profiles were measured by computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively. The completely randomized design was used and data were analyzed with SPSS version 16. Results Dietary FO had significant positive effects on all sperm quality and quantity parameters compared with the CTR during the feeding period (p<0.05). The positive effects of FO on sperm concentration and total sperm output were observed at one and two months after removal of FO (p<0.05), whereas other sperm parameters were unaffected. Before feeding, C14 (myristic acid), C16 (palmitic acid), C18 (stearic acid), C18:1 (oleic acid) and C22:6 (docosahexaenoic acid: DHA) were the primary sperm FA. FO in the diet increased sperm DHA, C14:0 and C18:0 during the feeding period (p<0.05). Conclusion The present study showed not only manipulation of ram sperm fatty acid profiles by dietary FO and sperm parameters during the feeding period, but also the persistency of unique effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids up to two months following its removal from the diet. Also, we recommend that sperm fatty acid profiles should be comprehensively analyzed and monitored. PMID:24611147

  18. Differentiation of farmed and wild turbot (Psetta maxima): proximate chemical composition, fatty acid profile, trace minerals and antimicrobial resistance of contaminant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Martínez, B; Miranda, J M; Nebot, C; Rodriguez, J L; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2010-10-01

    The proximate, cholesterol, fatty acid and trace mineral compositions in the flesh of farmed and wild turbot (Psetta maxima) were evaluated. Additionally, the potential influence of the use of antimicrobial agents in the bacteria carried by farmed turbot was investigated. For this purpose, a total of 144 Pseudomonas spp. and 127 Aeromonas spp. were isolated and tested for their susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials by a disk diffusion method. Farmed turbot contained higher fat, cholesterol and calories as well as lower moisture content than its wild counterpart. The fatty acid profile of farmed turbot included higher levels of myristic, pentadecanoic, palmitoleic, gadoleic, cetoleic, linoleic, linolenic, stearidonic, eicosadienoic and eicosapentaenoic acids, and lower levels of stearic, arachidonic, docosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids than its wild counterpart. The proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids and n-3/n-6 ratios were higher in wild turbot than in farmed turbot. With respect to trace minerals, no toxic levels were found, and higher amounts of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn, as well as lower amounts of Cr, were found in farmed turbot relative to wild turbot. The antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas spp. and Aeromonas spp. were quite similar, with only the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance of Aeromonas spp. isolated from farmed turbot being higher than those isolated from wild turbot. In the case of ampicillin, Pseudomonas spp. isolated from wild turbot showed higher resistance levels than those of their counterparts isolated from farmed turbot. In conclusion, the nutritional parameters of wild turbot are more adequate with respect to nutritional recommendations, while no differences were observed in food safety derived from trace mineral concentrations or the antimicrobial resistance of bacteria isolated from wild and farmed turbot.

  19. Production of Chlorella vulgaris as a source of essential fatty acids in a tubular photobioreactor continuously fed with air enriched with CO2 at different concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ortiz Montoya, Erika Y; Casazza, Alessandro A; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Perego, Patrizia; Converti, Attilio; de Carvalho, João C Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    To reduce CO2 emissions and simultaneously produce biomass rich in essential fatty acids, Chlorella vulgaris CCAP 211 was continuously grown in a tubular photobioreactor using air alone or air enriched with CO2 as the sole carbon source. While on one hand, nitrogen-limited conditions strongly affected biomass growth, conversely, they almost doubled its lipid fraction. Under these conditions using air enriched with 0, 2, 4, 8, and 16% (v/v) CO2 , the maximum biomass concentration was 1.4, 5.8, 6.6, 6.8, and 6.4 gDB L(-1) on a dry basis, the CO2 consumption rate 62, 380, 391, 433, and 430 mgCO2 L(-1) day(-1) , and the lipid productivity 3.7, 23.7, 24.8, 29.5, and 24.4 mg L(-1) day(-1) , respectively. C. vulgaris was able to grow effectively using CO2 -enriched air, but its chlorophyll a (3.0-3.5 g 100gDB (-1) ), chlorophyll b (2.6-3.0 g 100gDB (-1) ), and lipid contents (10.7-12.0 g 100gDB (-1) ) were not significantly influenced by the presence of CO2 in the air. Most of the fatty acids in C. vulgaris biomass were of the saturated series, mainly myristic, palmitic, and stearic acids, but a portion of no less than 45% consisted of unsaturated fatty acids, and about 80% of these were high added-value essential fatty acids belonging to the ω3 and ω6 series. These results highlight that C. vulgaris biomass could be of great importance for human health when used as food additive or for functional food production.

  20. Gas-phase acidities of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and their amino acid amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H.; Velazquez, Hector Adam; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2007-09-01

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or [Delta]Gacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage's importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3-4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  1. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  2. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  3. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  4. Genetic Architecture of Palm Oil Fatty Acid Composition in Cultivated Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) Compared to Its Wild Relative E. oleifera (H.B.K) Cortés

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Carmenza; Cochard, Benoit; Flori, Albert; Cros, David; Lopes, Ricardo; Cuellar, Teresa; Espeout, Sandra; Syaputra, Indra; Villeneuve, Pierre; Pina, Michel; Ritter, Enrique; Leroy, Thierry; Billotte, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    We searched for quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with the palm oil fatty acid composition of mature fruits of the oil palm E. guineensis Jacq. in comparison with its wild relative E. oleifera (H.B.K) Cortés. The oil palm cross LM2T x DA10D between two heterozygous parents was considered in our experiment as an intraspecific representative of E. guineensis. Its QTLs were compared to QTLs published for the same traits in an interspecific Elaeis pseudo-backcross used as an indirect representative of E. oleifera. Few correlations were found in E. guineensis between pulp fatty acid proportions and yield traits, allowing for the rather independent selection of both types of traits. Sixteen QTLs affecting palm oil fatty acid proportions and iodine value were identified in oil palm. The phenotypic variation explained by the detected QTLs was low to medium in E. guineensis, ranging between 10% and 36%. The explained cumulative variation was 29% for palmitic acid C16:0 (one QTL), 68% for stearic acid C18:0 (two QTLs), 50% for oleic acid C18:1 (three QTLs), 25% for linoleic acid C18:2 (one QTL), and 40% (two QTLs) for the iodine value. Good marker co-linearity was observed between the intraspecific and interspecific Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) linkage maps. Specific QTL regions for several traits were found in each mapping population. Our comparative QTL results in both E. guineensis and interspecific materials strongly suggest that, apart from two common QTL zones, there are two specific QTL regions with major effects, which might be one in E. guineensis, the other in E. oleifera, which are independent of each other and harbor QTLs for several traits, indicating either pleiotropic effects or linkage. Using QTL maps connected by highly transferable SSR markers, our study established a good basis to decipher in the future such hypothesis at the Elaeis genus level. PMID:24816555