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Sample records for 16-quadrature amplitude modulation

  1. Noise tolerance in optical waveguide circuits for recognition of optical 16 quadrature amplitude modulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoshita, Kensuke; Hama, Yoshimitsu; Kishikawa, Hiroki; Goto, Nobuo

    2016-12-01

    In photonic label routers, various optical signal processing functions are required; these include optical label extraction, recognition of the label, optical switching and buffering controlled by signals based on the label information and network routing tables, and label rewriting. Among these functions, we focus on photonic label recognition. We have proposed two kinds of optical waveguide circuits to recognize 16 quadrature amplitude modulation codes, i.e., recognition from the minimum output port and from the maximum output port. The recognition function was theoretically analyzed and numerically simulated by finite-difference beam-propagation method. We discuss noise tolerance in the circuit and show numerically simulated results to evaluate bit-error-rate (BER) characteristics against optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR). The OSNR required to obtain a BER less than 1.0×10-3 for the symbol rate of 2.5 GBaud was 14.5 and 27.0 dB for recognition from the minimum and maximum output, respectively.

  2. Simultaneous subchannel data updating for multiple channels of 16-quadrature amplitude modulation signals using a single periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Yang, Jeng-Yuan; Wu, Xiaoxia; Khaleghi, Salman; Ziyadi, Morteza; Tur, Moshe; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M; Paraschis, Loukas; Willner, Alan E

    2012-11-01

    Subchannel data updating of high-order modulation format signals using cascaded sum- and difference-frequency generation in a single periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide is demonstrated. One quadrature phase-shift-keying subchannel of a 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) signal at 40 Gbit/s is successfully updated, with an optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) penalty of ~2 dB for return-to-zero and ~4 dB for non-return-to-zero at a bit-error rate (BER) of 2×10(-3). Simultaneous processing of four wavelength-multiplexed 16-QAM signals with an average OSNR penalty of 4.5 dB at a BER of 2×10(-3) is also demonstrated.

  3. Amplitude Modulator Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Erbert, G

    2009-09-01

    The Amplitude Modulator Chassis (AMC) is the final component in the MOR system and connects directly to the PAM input through a 100-meter fiber. The 48 AMCs temporally shape the 48 outputs of the MOR using an arbitrary waveform generator coupled to an amplitude modulator. The amplitude modulation element is a two stage, Lithium Niobate waveguide device, where the intensity of the light passing through the device is a function of the electrical drive applied. The first stage of the modulator is connected to a programmable high performance Arbitrary Waveform Generator (AWG) consisting of 140 impulse generators space 250 ps apart. An arbitrary waveform is generated by independently varying the amplitude of each impulse generator and then summing the impulses together. In addition to the AWG a short pulse generator is also connected to the first stage of the modulator to provide a sub 100-ps pulse used for timing experiments. The second stage of the modulator is connect to a square pulse generator used to further attenuate any pre or post pulse light passing through the first stage of the modulator. The fast rise and fall time of the square pulse generator is also used to produce fast rise and fall times of the AWG by clipping the AWG pulse. For maximum extinction, a pulse bias voltage is applied to each stage of the modulator. A pulse voltage is applied as opposed to a DC voltage to prevent charge buildup on the modulator. Each bias voltage is adjustable to provide a minimum of 50-dB extinction. The AMC is controlled through ICCS to generate the desired temporal pulse shape. This process involves a closed-loop control algorithm, which compares the desired temporal waveform to the produced optical pulse, and iterates the programming of the AWG until the two waveforms agree within an allowable tolerance.

  4. Pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias; Wu, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chlorophyll fluorometry may be used for detecting toxins in a sample because of changes in micro algae. A portable lab on a chip ("LOAC") based chlorophyll fluorometer may be used for toxin detection and environmental monitoring. In particular, the system may include a microfluidic pulse amplitude modulated ("PAM") chlorophyll fluorometer. The LOAC PAM chlorophyll fluorometer may analyze microalgae and cyanobacteria that grow naturally in source drinking water.

  5. Versatile offset-free 16-QAM single dual-drive IQ modulator driven by binary signals.

    PubMed

    Malacarne, Antonio; Fresi, Francesco; Klamkin, Jonathan; Potì, Luca

    2012-10-01

    A customized IQ modulator driven by equal-amplitude binary signals for generating offset-free 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) is proposed and validated through simulations. The incorporation of tunable splitters demonstrates the feasibility of the transmitter and enables more efficient constellations such as hexagonal 16-QAM.

  6. Amplitude Modulations of Acoustic Communication Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turesson, Hjalmar K.

    2011-12-01

    In human speech, amplitude modulations at 3 -- 8 Hz are important for discrimination and detection. Two different neurophysiological theories have been proposed to explain this effect. The first theory proposes that, as a consequence of neocortical synaptic dynamics, signals that are amplitude modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz are propagated better than un-modulated signals, or signals modulated above 8 Hz. This suggests that neural activity elicited by vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz is optimally transmitted, and the vocalizations better discriminated and detected. The second theory proposes that 3 -- 8 Hz amplitude modulations interact with spontaneous neocortical oscillations. Specifically, vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz entrain local populations of neurons, which in turn, modulate the amplitude of high frequency gamma oscillations. This suggests that vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz should induce stronger cross-frequency coupling. Similar to human speech, we found that macaque monkey vocalizations also are amplitude modulated between 3 and 8 Hz. Humans and macaque monkeys share similarities in vocal production, implying that the auditory systems subserving perception of acoustic communication signals also share similarities. Based on the similarities between human speech and macaque monkey vocalizations, we addressed how amplitude modulated vocalizations are processed in the auditory cortex of macaque monkeys, and what behavioral relevance modulations may have. Recording single neuron activity, as well as, the activity of local populations of neurons allowed us to test both of the neurophysiological theories presented above. We found that single neuron responses to vocalizations amplitude modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz resulted in better stimulus discrimination than vocalizations lacking 3 -- 8 Hz modulations, and that the effect most likely was mediated by synaptic dynamics. In contrast, we failed to find support for the oscillation-based model proposing a

  7. [Amplitude modulation in sound signals by mammals].

    PubMed

    Nikol'skiĭ, A A

    2012-01-01

    Periodic variations in amplitude of a signal, or amplitude modulation (AM), affect the structure of communicative messages spectrum. Within the spectrum of AM-signals, side frequencies are formed both above and below the carrier frequency that is subjected to modulation. In case of harmonic signal structure they are presented near fundamental frequency as well as near harmonics. Thus, AM may by viewed as a relatively simple mechanism for controlling the spectrum of messages transmitted by mammals. Examples of AM affecting the spectrum structure of functionally different sound signals are discussed as applied to representatives of four orders of mammals: rodents (Reodentia), duplicidentates (Lagomorpha), pinnipeds (Pinnipedia), and paridigitates (Artiodactia). For the first time, the classification of AM in animals' sound signals is given. Five forms of AM are picked out in sound signals by mammals: absence of AM, continuous AM, fragmented, heterogeneous, and multilevel one. AM presence/absence is related neither with belonging to any specific order nor with some particular function of a signal. Similar forms of AM can occur in different orders of mammals in parallel. On the contrary, different forms of AM can be detected in signals meant for similar functions. The assumption is made about AM-signals facilitating information encoding and jamprotection of messages transmitted by mammals. Preliminry analysis indicates that hard-driving amplitude modulation is incompatible with hard-driving frequency modulation.

  8. Detection of combined frequency and amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Moore, B C; Sek, A

    1992-12-01

    This article is concerned with the detection of mixed modulation (MM), i.e., simultaneously occurring amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM). In experiment 1, an adaptive two-alternative forced-choice task was used to determine thresholds for detecting AM alone. Then, thresholds for detecting FM were determined for stimuli which had a fixed amount of AM in the signal interval only. The amount of AM was always less than the threshold for detecting AM alone. The FM thresholds depended significantly on the magnitude of the coexisting AM. For low modulation rates (4, 16, and 64 Hz), the FM thresholds did not depend significantly on the relative phase of modulation for the FM and AM. For a high modulation rate (256 Hz) strong effects of modulator phase were observed. These phase effects are as predicted by the model proposed by Hartmann and Hnath [Acustica 50, 297-312 (1982)], which assumes that detection of modulation at modulation frequencies higher than the critical modulation frequency is based on detection of the lower sideband in the modulated signal's spectrum. In the second experiment, psychometric functions were measured for the detection of AM alone and FM alone, using modulation rates of 4 and 16 Hz. Results showed that, for each type of modulation, d' is approximately a linear function of the square of the modulation index. Application of this finding to the results of experiment 1 suggested that, at low modulation rates, FM and AM are not detected by completely independent mechanisms. In the third experiment, psychometric functions were again measured for the detection of AM alone and FM alone, using a 10-Hz modulation rate. Detectability was then measured for combined AM and FM, with modulation depths selected so that each type of modulation would be equally detectable if presented alone. Significant effects of relative modulator phase were found when detectability was relatively high. These effects were not correctly predicted by either a

  9. Photon Counting Chirped Amplitude Modulation Ladar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to...135 S. Taylor Ave., Room 103, Louisville, CO 80027-3025 14. ABSTRACT This work developed a method using Geiger -mode avalanche photodiode (GM-APD...architecture are discussed. 15. SUBJECT TERMS laser radar, ladar, avalanche photo-detectors, Geiger mode detectors, chirped amplitude modulation

  10. Modulated Source Interferometry with Combined Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved interferometer is produced by modifying a conventional interferometer to include amplitude and/or frequency modulation of a coherent light source at radio or higher frequencies. The phase of the modulation signal can be detected in an interfering beam from an interferometer and can be used to determine the actual optical phase of the beam. As such, this improvement can be adapted to virtually any two-beam interferometer, including: Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, and Sagnac interferometers. The use of an amplitude modulated coherent tight source results in an interferometer that combines the wide range advantages of coherent interferometry with the precise distance measurement advantages of white light interferometry.

  11. Speech recognition with amplitude and frequency modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Nie, Kaibao; Stickney, Ginger S.; Kong, Ying-Yee; Vongphoe, Michael; Bhargave, Ashish; Wei, Chaogang; Cao, Keli

    2005-02-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are commonly used in communication, but their relative contributions to speech recognition have not been fully explored. To bridge this gap, we derived slowly varying AM and FM from speech sounds and conducted listening tests using stimuli with different modulations in normal-hearing and cochlear-implant subjects. We found that although AM from a limited number of spectral bands may be sufficient for speech recognition in quiet, FM significantly enhances speech recognition in noise, as well as speaker and tone recognition. Additional speech reception threshold measures revealed that FM is particularly critical for speech recognition with a competing voice and is independent of spectral resolution and similarity. These results suggest that AM and FM provide independent yet complementary contributions to support robust speech recognition under realistic listening situations. Encoding FM may improve auditory scene analysis, cochlear-implant, and audiocoding performance. auditory analysis | cochlear implant | neural code | phase | scene analysis

  12. Baseline blood oxygenation modulates response amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Zhao, Chenguang; Ge, Yulin; Lewis-Amezcua, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Although BOLD fMRI provides a useful tool for probing neuronal activities, large inter-subject variations in signal amplitude are commonly observed. Understanding the physiologic basis for these variations will have a significant impact on many fMRI studies. First, the physiologic modulator can be used as a regressor to reduce variations across subjects, thereby improving statistical power for detecting group differences. Second, if a pathologic condition or a drug treatment is shown to change fMRI responses, monitoring this modulatory parameter is useful in correctly interpreting the fMRI changes to neuronal deficits/recruitments. Here we present evidence that the task-evoked fMRI signals are modulated by baseline blood oxygenation. To measure global blood oxygenation, we used a recently developed technique, T2-Relaxation-Under-Spin-Tagging MRI, yielding baseline oxygenation of 63.7±7.2% in sagittal sinus with an estimation error of 1.3%. It was found that individuals with higher baseline oxygenation tend to have a smaller fMRI signal and vice versa. For every 10% difference in baseline oxygenation across subjects, the BOLD and cerebral blood flow signal differ by -0.4% and -30.0%, respectively, when using visual stimulation. TRUST MRI is a useful measurement for fMRI studies to control for the modulatory effects of baseline oxygenation that are unique to each subject. PMID:18666103

  13. Modulator-free quadrature amplitude modulation signal synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhixin; Kakande, Joseph; Kelly, Brian; O’Carroll, John; Phelan, Richard; Richardson, David J.; Slavík, Radan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to generate high-speed on–off-keyed telecommunication signals by directly modulating a semiconductor laser’s drive current was one of the most exciting prospective applications of the nascent field of laser technology throughout the 1960s. Three decades of progress led to the commercialization of 2.5 Gbit s−1-per-channel submarine fibre optic systems that drove the growth of the internet as a global phenomenon. However, the detrimental frequency chirp associated with direct modulation forced industry to use external electro-optic modulators to deliver the next generation of on–off-keyed 10 Gbit s−1 systems and is absolutely prohibitive for today’s (>)100 Gbit s−1 coherent systems, which use complex modulation formats (for example, quadrature amplitude modulation). Here we use optical injection locking of directly modulated semiconductor lasers to generate complex modulation format signals showing distinct advantages over current and other currently researched solutions. PMID:25523757

  14. Amplitude-modulated circular-harmonic filter for pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Chen, X W; Chen, Z P

    1995-02-10

    An amplitude-modulated circular-harmonic filter is proposed for rotation-invariant pattern recognition. We investigate the filter characteristics by varying two design parameters, A(ρ) and B(ρ), and select optimum values to design an amplitude-modulated circular-harmonic filter. When compared with the phase-only circular-harmonic filter, the amplitude-modulated circular-harmonic filter is found to yield a sharper correlation peak, a better noise tolerance, and an improved correlation discrimination.

  15. Amplitude-modulation detection by gerbils in reverberant sound fields.

    PubMed

    Lingner, Andrea; Kugler, Kathrin; Grothe, Benedikt; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2013-08-01

    Reverberation can dramatically reduce the depth of amplitude modulations which are critical for speech intelligibility. Psychophysical experiments indicate that humans' sensitivity to amplitude modulation in reverberation is better than predicted from the acoustic modulation depth at the receiver position. Electrophysiological studies on reverberation in rabbits highlight the contribution of neurons sensitive to interaural correlation. Here, we use a prepulse-inhibition paradigm to quantify the gerbils' amplitude modulation threshold in both anechoic and reverberant virtual environments. Data show that prepulse inhibition provides a reliable method for determining the gerbils' AM sensitivity. However, we find no evidence for perceptual restoration of amplitude modulation in reverberation. Instead, the deterioration of AM sensitivity in reverberant conditions can be quantitatively explained by the reduced modulation depth at the receiver position. We suggest that the lack of perceptual restoration is related to physical properties of the gerbil's ear input signals and inner-ear processing as opposed to shortcomings of their binaural neural processing.

  16. Amplitude modulation reduces loudness adaptation to high-frequency tones

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, Dwight P.; George, Sahara E.; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Long-term loudness perception of a sound has been presumed to depend on the spatial distribution of activated auditory nerve fibers as well as their temporal firing pattern. The relative contributions of those two factors were investigated by measuring loudness adaptation to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated 12-kHz tones. The tones had a total duration of 180 s and were either unmodulated or 100%-modulated at one of three frequencies (4, 20, or 100 Hz), and additionally varied in modulation depth from 0% to 100% at the 4-Hz frequency only. Every 30 s, normal-hearing subjects estimated the loudness of one of the stimuli played at 15 dB above threshold in random order. Without any amplitude modulation, the loudness of the unmodulated tone after 180 s was only 20% of the loudness at the onset of the stimulus. Amplitude modulation systematically reduced the amount of loudness adaptation, with the 100%-modulated stimuli, regardless of modulation frequency, maintaining on average 55%–80% of the loudness at onset after 180 s. Because the present low-frequency amplitude modulation produced minimal changes in long-term spectral cues affecting the spatial distribution of excitation produced by a 12-kHz pure tone, the present result indicates that neural synchronization is critical to maintaining loudness perception over time. PMID:26233027

  17. Tip-surface forces, amplitude, and energy dissipation in amplitude-modulation (tapping mode) force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Álvaro San; García, Ricardo

    2001-11-01

    Amplitude-modulation (tapping mode) atomic force microscopy is a technique for high resolution imaging of a wide variety of surfaces in air and liquid environments. Here by using the virial theorem and energy conservation principles we have derived analytical relationships between the oscillation amplitude, phase shift, and average tip-surface forces. We find that the average value of the interaction force and oscillation and the average power dissipated by the tip-surface interaction are the quantities that control the amplitude reduction. The agreement obtained between analytical and numerical results supports the analytical method.

  18. Discriminating Simulated Vocal Tremor Source Using Amplitude Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Kathy M.; Lester, Rosemary A.; Story, Brad H.; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Sources of vocal tremor are difficult to categorize perceptually and acoustically. This paper describes a preliminary attempt to discriminate vocal tremor sources through the use of spectral measures of the amplitude envelope. The hypothesis is that different vocal tremor sources are associated with distinct patterns of acoustic amplitude modulations. Study Design Statistical categorization methods (discriminant function analysis) were used to discriminate signals from simulated vocal tremor with different sources using only acoustic measures derived from the amplitude envelopes. Methods Simulations of vocal tremor were created by modulating parameters of a vocal fold model corresponding to oscillations of respiratory driving pressure (respiratory tremor), degree of vocal fold adduction (adductory tremor) and fundamental frequency of vocal fold vibration (F0 tremor). The acoustic measures were based on spectral analyses of the amplitude envelope computed across the entire signal and within select frequency bands. Results The signals could be categorized (with accuracy well above chance) in terms of the simulated tremor source using only measures of the amplitude envelope spectrum even when multiple sources of tremor were included. Conclusions These results supply initial support for an amplitude-envelope based approach to identify the source of vocal tremor and provide further evidence for the rich information about talker characteristics present in the temporal structure of the amplitude envelope. PMID:25532813

  19. Amplitude-Modulated Bursting: A Novel Class of Bursting Rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Theodore; Kramer, Mark A.; Kaper, Tasso J.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the discovery of a novel class of bursting rhythms, called amplitude-modulated bursting (AMB), in a model for intracellular calcium dynamics. We find that these rhythms are robust and exist on open parameter sets. We develop a new mathematical framework with broad applicability to detect, classify, and rigorously analyze AMB. Here we illustrate this framework in the context of AMB in a model of intracellular calcium dynamics. In the process, we discover a novel family of singularities, called toral folded singularities, which are the organizing centers for the amplitude modulation and exist generically in slow-fast systems with two or more slow variables.

  20. Self-demodulation of amplitude-modulated signal components in amplitude-modulated bone-conducted ultrasonic hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kazuhito; Nakagawa, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    A novel hearing aid system utilizing amplitude-modulated bone-conducted ultrasound (AM-BCU) is being developed for use by profoundly deaf people. However, there is a lack of research on the acoustic aspects of AM-BCU hearing. In this study, acoustic fields in the ear canal under AM-BCU stimulation were examined with respect to the self-demodulation effect of amplitude-modulated signal components generated in the ear canal. We found self-demodulated signals with an audible sound pressure level related to the amplitude-modulated signal components of bone-conducted ultrasonic stimulation. In addition, the increases in the self-demodulated signal levels at low frequencies in the ear canal after occluding the ear canal opening, i.e., the positive occlusion effect, indicate the existence of a pathway by which the self-demodulated signals pass through the aural cartilage and soft tissue, and radiate into the ear canal.

  1. Contextual Modulation of N400 Amplitude to Lexically Ambiguous Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titone, Debra A.; Salisbury, Dean F.

    2004-01-01

    Through much is known about the N400 component, an event-related EEG potential that is sensitive to semantic manipulations, it is unclear whether modulations of N400 amplitude reflect automatic processing, controlled processing, or both. We examined this issue using a semantic judgment task that manipulated local and global contextual cues. Word…

  2. Superposed pulse amplitude modulation for visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Li, J F; Huang, Z T; Zhang, R Q; Zeng, F X; Jiang, M; Ji, Y F

    2013-12-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel modulation scheme called superposed pulse amplitude modulation (SPAM) which is low-cost, insensitive to non-linearity of light emitting diode (LED). Multiple optical pulses transmit parallelly from different spatial position in the LED array and overlap linearly in free space to realize SPAM. With LED arrangement, the experimental results show that using the modulation we proposed the data rate of 120 Mbit/s with BER 1 × 10(-3) can be achieved with an optical blue filter and RC post-equalization.

  3. 3D dynamic holographic display by modulating complex amplitude experimentally.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Liu, Juan; Jia, Jia; Pan, Yijie; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-09-09

    Complex amplitude modulation method is presented theoretically and performed experimentally for three-dimensional (3D) dynamic holographic display with reduced speckle using a single phase-only spatial light modulator. The determination of essential factors is discussed based on the basic principle and theory. The numerical simulations and optical experiments are performed, where the static and animated objects without refinement on the surfaces and without random initial phases are reconstructed successfully. The results indicate that this method can reduce the speckle in reconstructed images effectively; furthermore, it will not cause the internal structure in the reconstructed pixels. Since the complex amplitude modulation is based on the principle of phase-only hologram, it does not need the stringent alignment of pixels. This method can be used for high resolution imaging or measurement in various optical areas.

  4. Detection and rate discrimination of amplitude modulation in electrical hearing.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Monita; Oberzut, Cherish

    2011-09-01

    Three experiments were designed to examine temporal envelope processing by cochlear implant (CI) listeners. In experiment 1, the hypothesis that listeners' modulation sensitivity would in part determine their ability to discriminate between temporal modulation rates was examined. Temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) obtained in an amplitude modulation detection (AMD) task were compared to threshold functions obtained in an amplitude modulation rate discrimination (AMRD) task. Statistically significant nonlinear correlations were observed between the two measures. In experiment 2, results of loudness-balancing showed small increases in the loudness of modulated over unmodulated stimuli beyond a modulation depth of 16%. Results of experiment 3 indicated small but statistically significant effects of level-roving on the overall gain of the TMTF, but no impact of level-roving on the average shape of the TMTF across subjects. This suggested that level-roving simply increased the task difficulty for most listeners, but did not indicate increased use of intensity cues under more challenging conditions. Data obtained with one subject, however, suggested that the most sensitive listeners may derive some benefit from intensity cues in these tasks. Overall, results indicated that intensity cues did not play an important role in temporal envelope processing by the average CI listener.

  5. Response of plasmonic terahertz detectors to amplitude modulated signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupper, Greg; Rudin, Sergey; Shur, Michael

    2015-09-01

    We present theoretical study of the response of two-dimensional gated electron gas to an amplitude modulated signals with carrier frequency in the terahertz range. The model is based on complete hydrodynamic equations, and includes effects of viscosity, pressure gradients and thermal transport in the conduction channel of a high electron mobility semiconductor transistor (HEMT). The modulation response was evaluated as a function of modulation frequency fM for a wide range of mobility values. Maximum modulation frequency fMAX was evaluated as a function of channel mobility, with typical values of fMAX in the subterahertz range of frequencies. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime can meet all the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors and modulators in ultra high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  6. Residual amplitude modulation mechanisms in modulation transfer spectroscopy that use electro-optic modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaatinen, Esa; Hopper, David J.; Back, Julian

    2009-02-01

    Three independent mechanisms are described that contaminate the phase-modulated pump beam of an optical frequency reference stabilized by modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS) with residual amplitude modulation (RAM). The electro-optic modulator, the beam geometry and the absorption of the saturated medium all separately generate undesired RAM that degrades the accuracy of the optical frequency reference. An analysis is presented that shows how frequency shifts introduced by the different mechanisms can be evaluated in typical MTS set-ups and minimized. The analysis also shows how the detector phase can be used to measure the total RAM in the system and how the phase required to remove any remaining frequency offsets can be evaluated.

  7. Multiplexing technique using amplitude-modulated chirped fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Allan C. L.; Childs, Paul A.; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2007-07-01

    We propose a new multiplexing technique using amplitude-modulated chirped fiber Bragg gratings that have an identical center Bragg wavelength. Each grating is inscribed with a unique amplitude modulation that allows them to be multiplexed with complete overlapping within a certain bandwidth. To demodulate the multiplexed signal, the discrete wavelet transform is employed. Concurrently, a wavelet denoising technique is used to reduce the noise. This proposed multiplexing technique has been verified through strain measurements. Experimental results showed that for strains applied up to 1250 μɛ the absolute error and cross-talk are within ±20 μɛ and 16 μɛ, respectively. A strain resolution of 4 μɛ is obtained.

  8. Symbol rate identification for auxiliary amplitude modulation optical signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Junyu; Dong, Zhi; Huang, Zhiping; Zhang, Yimeng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we creatively propose and demonstrate a method for symbol rate identification (SRI) of auxiliary amplitude modulation (AAM) optical signal based on asynchronous delay-tap sampling (ADTS) and average magnitude difference function (AMDF). The method can accurately estimate symbol rate and has large transmission impairments tolerance. Furthermore, it can be realized in the digital signal processor (DSP) with low logical resources because of multiplication-free. In order to improve the accuracy of SRI, the peak to valley ratio (PTVR) of AMDF is introduced into our method for blind chromatic dispersion (CD) compensation. The results of the numerical simulations show that the overall maximum SRI error is smaller 0.079% for return-to-zero (RZ) on-off keying (OOK), RZ differential phase-shift keying (DPSK), RZ differential quadrature phase-shift keying (DQPSK) and RZ 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) with 50% duty cycles.

  9. Amplitude-modulation chirp imaging for contrast detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Lin; Kuo, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2010-09-01

    We propose an amplitude-modulation chirp imaging method for contrast detection with high-frequency ultrasound. Our proposed method detects microbubbles by extracting and then selectively compressing the component of the backscattered chirp signal modulated by changes in the radii of microbubbles at their resonance frequency. Microbubbles are sonicated simultaneously with a narrowband, low-frequency pumping signal at their resonance frequency and a wideband, high-frequency imaging chirp signal. Changes in the radii of the resonant microbubbles result in periodic changes in their acoustic cross section that modulate the amplitude of the backscattered imaging chirp signal, forming pumping and imaging frequency sum-and-difference chirp terms. The frequency-sum or -difference chirp component is then extracted by a bandpass filter (BPF). Because a long imaging pulse duration is required to obtain a sufficient modulation depth on the chirp for contrast detection and to facilitate frequency-sum-and-difference signal extraction with the BPF, a chirp with a longer-than-usual waveform is used so pulse compression of the extracted chirp signal can then be performed to maintain the axial resolution, and even further improve the signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-tissue ratio. Experiments performed on flow phantoms with and without a speckle-generating background were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed technique. These results indicate that our proposed method can potentially provide high-resolution contrast detection in the microvasculature.

  10. Research of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation with multi-frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuliang; Zhan, Sui; Geng, Yuanchao; Liu, Lanqin; Xu, Lixin; Ming, Hai

    2013-12-01

    For better performance of laser coupling in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), beam shaping of the focus spot is required. Among all the beam smoothing methods, the multi frequency modulation smoothing by spectral dispersion (MultiFM-SSD) proposed by LLE has the advantages of the faster smoothing and better operability. Strong frequency modulation to amplitude modulation conversion(FM-to-AM) will take place because of the complex spectrum imposed by the multi frequency modulators applied in the Multi FM-SSD method. The FM-to-AM effect is studied with numerical simulation including the polarization mode dispersion and group velocity dispersion. The results reveal that the modulation frequencies and bandwidths of multi modulators will influence the contrast degree of the FM-to-AM effect. The compensation of the FM-to-AM with arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) is also numerically simulated. The FM-to-AM effect is effectively suppressed, i.e. the non-uniformity of the pulse decreases substantially, by applying multiple intensity and phase compensation (the compensation function is obtained via G-S algorithm).

  11. Population transfer by an amplitude-modulated pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Vitanov, N.V.; Yatsenko, L.P.; Bergmann, K.

    2003-10-01

    We propose a technique for coherent population inversion of a two-state system, which uses an amplitude-modulated pulse. In the modulation-free adiabatic basis, the modulation introduces oscillating interaction between the adiabatic states. In a second rotating-wave approximation picture, this oscillating interaction induces a pair of level crossings between the energies of the adiabatic states if the modulation frequency is chosen appropriately. By suitably offsetting the modulation with respect to the center of the pulse, one can make the modulation act only in the vicinity of one of these crossings. In a higher-order adiabatic basis, this crossing shows up as an avoided crossing between the energies of the higher-order adiabatic states. As a result robust and efficient population transfer can be achieved between the adiabatic states, and hence, between the original bare states. We derive analytically the conditions on the interaction parameters for this technique and verify them with numerical simulations. Possible experimental implementations are discussed.

  12. Phase-shifting interferometry by wave amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Meneses-Fabian, Cruz; Rivera-Ortega, Uriel

    2011-07-01

    A new method for phase-shifting interferometry based on wave amplitude modulation is proposed and discussed. This proposal is based on the interference of three waves, where two waves attend as two reference waves and the other wave attends as a probe wave. Thereby, three interference terms are obtained, but because a phase difference of π/2 between the two references is kept constant, one of the three terms will be dropped, while the two remaining will be put in quadrature. Under these conditions, the resulting pattern is mathematically modeled by an interferogram of two waves, where an additional phase is given by the amplitude variations of the reference waves. In this Letter, both a theoretical model and some numerical simulations are presented.

  13. Dispersion interferometer using modulation amplitudes on LHD (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, T. Yasuhara, R.; Kawahata, K.; Okajima, S.; Nakayama, K.

    2014-11-15

    Since a dispersion interferometer is insensitive to mechanical vibrations, a vibration compensation system is not necessary. The CO{sub 2} laser dispersion interferometer with phase modulations on the Large Helical Device utilizes the new phase extraction method which uses modulation amplitudes and can improve a disadvantage of the original dispersion interferometer: measurement errors caused by variations of detected intensities. The phase variation within ±2 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} is obtained without vibration compensation system. The measured line averaged electron density with the dispersion interferometer shows good agreement with that with the existing far infrared laser interferometer. Fringe jump errors in high density ranging up to 1.5 × 10{sup 20} m{sup −3} can be overcome by a sufficient sampling rate of about 100 kHz.

  14. Dispersion interferometer using modulation amplitudes on LHD (invited).

    PubMed

    Akiyama, T; Yasuhara, R; Kawahata, K; Okajima, S; Nakayama, K

    2014-11-01

    Since a dispersion interferometer is insensitive to mechanical vibrations, a vibration compensation system is not necessary. The CO2 laser dispersion interferometer with phase modulations on the Large Helical Device utilizes the new phase extraction method which uses modulation amplitudes and can improve a disadvantage of the original dispersion interferometer: measurement errors caused by variations of detected intensities. The phase variation within ±2 × 10(17) m(-3) is obtained without vibration compensation system. The measured line averaged electron density with the dispersion interferometer shows good agreement with that with the existing far infrared laser interferometer. Fringe jump errors in high density ranging up to 1.5 × 10(20) m(-3) can be overcome by a sufficient sampling rate of about 100 kHz.

  15. Smart active multiwave sensing with zero background amplitude modulated probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.J.; Young, R.A.; Jelsma, L.

    1994-07-01

    Recently, a new approach to multi-wavelength remote sensing has been proposed based on the generation and detection of spectral ``pickets`` synthesized from the frequency filtered bandwidth of a modelocked laser. Using linear array liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) technology for spectral filtering permits real time grey scale control of individual picket amplitudes and phases, making it possible to independently modulate picket characteristics in the kHz to MHz regime. Due to the versatility of this approach, a whole suite of spectroscopies based on detection techniques that are similar to conventional sideband spectroscopies can be implemented. These techniques not only inherit the S/N advantages of their conventional counterparts, they can also be easily extended to simultaneous multi-wavelength operation using frequency multiplex techniques and configured for real time adaptive data acquisition. We report the laboratory demonstration and theoretical development of a new class of zero background AM modulated spectroscopic probes for differential absorption measurements. Preliminary detection sensitivities on the order of 10{sup {minus}6} can be inferred from our measurements. Application of this technique to realistic remote sensing scenarios, advantages over other modulation and direct detection approaches, as well as the present limitations and theoretical limits to detection sensitivity will be discussed.

  16. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in sound fields

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Kim, Duck O.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Anderson, Paul W.; Brandewie, Eugene; Srinivasan, Nirmal

    2011-01-01

    The temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) approach allows techniques from linear systems analysis to be used to predict how the auditory system will respond to arbitrary patterns of amplitude modulation (AM). Although this approach forms the basis for a standard method of predicting speech intelligibility based on estimates of the acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) between source and receiver, human sensitivity to AM as characterized by the TMTF has not been extensively studied under realistic listening conditions, such as in reverberant sound fields. Here, TMTFs (octave bands from 2 – 512 Hz) were obtained in 3 listening conditions simulated using virtual auditory space techniques: diotic, anechoic sound field, reverberant room sound field. TMTFs were then related to acoustical MTFs estimated using two different methods in each of the listening conditions. Both diotic and anechoic data were found to be in good agreement with classic results, but AM thresholds in the reverberant room were lower than predictions based on acoustical MTFs. This result suggests that simple linear systems techniques may not be appropriate for predicting TMTFs from acoustical MTFs in reverberant sound fields, and may be suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation during reverberant listening. PMID:22822417

  17. [The influence of amplitude modulation on the structure of call spectrum in marmots (Marmota, rodentia, sciuridae)].

    PubMed

    Nikol'skiĭ, A A

    2007-01-01

    A relationship was established between the amplitude modulation and the structure of call spectrum in animals by the example of alarm call in three marmots (Marmota sibirica, M. menzbieri, and M. caudata). In the case of amplitude modulation, side frequencies are produced higher and lower than the carrier frequencies. In the absence of amplitude modulation, no side frequencies are produced.

  18. Quadrature Amplitude Modulation Division for Multiuser MISO Broadcast Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zheng; Zhang, Yan-Yu; Zhang, Jian-Kang; Gao, Xiang-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    This paper considers a discrete-time multiuser multiple-input single-output (MISO) Gaussian broadcast channel~(BC), in which channel state information (CSI) is available at both the transmitter and the receivers. The flexible and explicit design of a uniquely decomposable constellation group (UDCG) is provided based on pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and rectangular quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) constellations. With this, a modulation division (MD) transmission scheme is developed for the MISO BC. The proposed MD scheme enables each receiver to uniquely and efficiently detect their desired signals from the superposition of mutually interfering cochannel signals in the absence of noise. In our design, the optimal transmitter beamforming problem is solved in a closed-form for two-user MISO BC using max-min fairness as a design criterion. Then, for a general case with more than two receivers, we develop a user-grouping-based beamforming scheme, where the grouping method, beamforming vector design and power allocation problems are addressed by using weighted max-min fairness. It is shown that our proposed approach has a lower probability of error compared with the zero-forcing (ZF) method when the Hermitian angle between the two channel vectors is small in a two-user case. In addition, simulation results also reveal that for the general channel model with more than two users, our user-grouping-based scheme significantly outperforms the ZF, time division (TD), minimum mean-square error (MMSE) and signal-to-leakage-and-noise ratio (SLNR) based techniques in moderate and high SNR regimes when the number of users approaches to the number of base station (BS) antennas and it degrades into the ZF scheme when the number of users is far less than the number of BS antennas in Rayleigh fading channels.

  19. 40-Gbaud 16-QAM transmitter using tandem IQ modulators with binary driving electronic signals.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guo-Wei; Sköld, Mats; Johannisson, Pontus; Zhao, Jian; Sjödin, Martin; Sunnerud, Henrik; Westlund, Mathias; Ellis, Andrew; Andrekson, Peter A

    2010-10-25

    We propose a novel 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) transmitter based on two cascaded IQ modulators driven by four separate binary electrical signals. The proposed 16-QAM transmitter features scalable configuration and stable performance with simple bias-control. Generation of 16-QAM signals at 40 Gbaud is experimentally demonstrated for the first time and visualized with a high speed constellation analyzer. The proposed modulator is also compared to two other schemes. We investigate the modulator bandwidth requirements and tolerance to accumulated chromatic dispersion through numerical simulations, and the minimum theoretical insertion attenuation is calculated analytically.

  20. Inhomogeneous phase-visibility modulating interferometry by space on-off non-quadrature amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Ortega, Uriel; Meneses-Fabian, Cruz; Rodriguez-Zurita, Gustavo

    2013-07-29

    A new method in interferometry based on on-off non-quadrature amplitude modulation for object phase retrieval is presented. Although the technique introduces inhomogeneous visibility and phase variations in the interferogram, it is shown that the phase retrieval of a given object is still possible. This method is implemented by using three beams and two Mach-Zehnder interferometers in series. One of the arms of the system is used as a probe beam and the other two are used as reference beams, yielding from their sum the conventional reference beam of a two-beam interferometer. We demonstrate that, if there is a phase difference within the range of (0,π) between these two beams, the effect of modulation in both amplitude and phase is generated for the case of on-off non-quadrature amplitude modulation. An analytical discussion is provided to sustain this method. Numerical and experimental results are also shown.

  1. Shuttle extravehicular activity signal processor pulse amplitude modulation decommutator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, D. E.; Conrad, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    To provide data with long-term stability and accuracy, the pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) decommutator was synchronized to the PAM-return to zero wavetrain, and each channel was sampled with a common sample and hold circuit and digitized sequentially. The digital value of each channel was then scaled by the digital value of the calibration channels. The corrected digital value of each channel was stored for one complete frame and then transferred to the multiplexer-demultiplexer at a high rate in one block of serial digital data. A test model was built to demonstrate this design approach taken for the PAM decom and performance data was provided. The accuracies obtained with various signal to noise ratios are shown.

  2. Residual amplitude modulation in interferometric gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Kokeyama, Keiko; Izumi, Kiwamu; Korth, William Z; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Arai, Koji; Adhikari, Rana X

    2014-01-01

    The effects of residual amplitude modulation (RAM) in laser interferometers using heterodyne sensing can be substantial and difficult to mitigate. In this work, we analyze the effects of RAM on a complex laser interferometer used for gravitational wave detection. The RAM introduces unwanted offsets in the cavity length signals and thereby shifts the operating point of the optical cavities from the nominal point via feedback control. This shift causes variations in the sensing matrix, and leads to degradation in the performance of the precision noise subtraction scheme of the multiple-degree-of-freedom control system. In addition, such detuned optical cavities produce an optomechanical spring, which also perturbs the sensing matrix. We use our simulations to derive requirements on RAM for the Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) detectors, and show that the RAM expected in aLIGO will not limit its sensitivity.

  3. Constant RMS versus constant peak modulation for the perceptual equivalence of sinusoidal amplitude modulated signals.

    PubMed

    Regele, Oliver B; Koivuniemi, Andrew S; Otto, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    Neuroprosthetics using intracortical microstimulation can potentially alleviate sensory deprivation due to injury or disease. However the information bandwidth of a single microstimulation channel remains largely unanswered. This paper presents three experiments that examine the importance of Peak Power/Charge and RMS Power/Charge for detection of acoustic and electrical Sinusoidal Amplitude Modulated stimuli by the auditory system. While the peripheral auditory system is sensitive to RMS power cues for the detection of acoustic stimuli, here we provide results that suggest that the auditory cortex is sensitive to peak charge cues for electrical stimuli. Varying the modulation frequency and depth do not change this effect for detection of modulated electrical stimuli.

  4. Characteristics of complex light modulation through an amplitude-phase double-layer spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungjae; Roh, Jinyoung; Kim, Soobin; Park, Juseong; Kang, Hoon; Hahn, Joonku; Jeon, Youngjin; Park, Shinwoong; Kim, Hwi

    2017-02-20

    The complex modulation characteristics of a light field through an amplitude-phase double-layer spatial light modulator are analyzed based on the wave-optic numerical model, and the structural conditions for the optimal double-layer complex modulation structure are investigated. The relationships of interlayer distance, pixel size, and complex light modulation performance are analyzed. The main finding of this study is that the optimal interlayer distance for the double-layer structure can be found at the Talbot effect condition. For validating the practical usefulness of our findings, a high quality reconstruction of the complex computer-generated holograms and the robustness of the angular tolerance of the complex modulation at the Talbot interlayer distance are numerically demonstrated.

  5. Modifications and lithography on iridovirus surface using amplitude modulated nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyuksyutov, Sergei; Paramonov, Pavel; Mayevska, Olga; Umemura, Kazuo; Vaia, Richard; Juhl, Shane; Waterhouse, Lynn

    2004-04-01

    The usage of electrostatic force on nanoscale proved to be very effective for pattering nanostructures in 20-30-nm thin polymer films using biased atomic force microscope tip (AFM) [1,2]. Similar approach can be applied to biological objects of several hundred nanometers size deposited on a smooth conductive substrate. This study demonstrates the first attempt modifying an iridovirus surface using amplitude-modulated nanolithography (AF-AFMEN) [2]. With this technique we mark an individual virus capsule by applying -10-30 V to an AFM conductive tip tapping the virus. The marks on the virus surface represent raises of 1-5 nm height. Similar to polymer molecules, the dense layer of iridovirus was subjected to AF-AFMEN technique producing distinct nanostructures (10-50 nm wide) formed of virus electrostatically attracted to the tip. Several physical reasons responsible for the virus manipulation and marking will be discussed. 1. S.F. Lyuksyutov, R.A. Vaia, P.B. Paramonov, S. Juhl, L. Waterhouse, R.M. Ralich, G. Sigalov, and E. Sancaktar, Nature Materials 2, 468 (2003) 2. S.F. Lyuksyutov, R.A. Vaia, P.B. Paramonov, and S. Juhl, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 4405 (2003)

  6. High-speed multilevel phase/amplitude spatial light modulator advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauchert, Kipp A.; Serati, Steven A.

    1999-03-01

    Recent and near-term advancements in our multi-level (analog) phase/amplitude liquid crystal spatial light modulators will be presented. These advancements include higher resolution, smaller pixel pitch, planarized pixel pads, and higher speed modulation for phase-only, amplitude-only, and phase- amplitude-coupled modulation. These devices have applications in optical processing, optical storage, holographic display, and beam steering. Design criteria and experimental data will be presented.

  7. Roles for Coincidence Detection in Coding Amplitude-Modulated Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Go; Kretzberg, Jutta; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Many sensory neurons encode temporal information by detecting coincident arrivals of synaptic inputs. In the mammalian auditory brainstem, binaural neurons of the medial superior olive (MSO) are known to act as coincidence detectors, whereas in the lateral superior olive (LSO) roles of coincidence detection have remained unclear. LSO neurons receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs driven by ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic stimuli, respectively, and vary their output spike rates according to interaural level differences. In addition, LSO neurons are also sensitive to binaural phase differences of low-frequency tones and envelopes of amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds. Previous physiological recordings in vivo found considerable variations in monaural AM-tuning across neurons. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of the observed temporal tuning properties of LSO and their sources of variability, we used a simple coincidence counting model and examined how specific parameters of coincidence detection affect monaural and binaural AM coding. Spike rates and phase-locking of evoked excitatory and spontaneous inhibitory inputs had only minor effects on LSO output to monaural AM inputs. In contrast, the coincidence threshold of the model neuron affected both the overall spike rates and the half-peak positions of the AM-tuning curve, whereas the width of the coincidence window merely influenced the output spike rates. The duration of the refractory period affected only the low-frequency portion of the monaural AM-tuning curve. Unlike monaural AM coding, temporal factors, such as the coincidence window and the effective duration of inhibition, played a major role in determining the trough positions of simulated binaural phase-response curves. In addition, empirically-observed level-dependence of binaural phase-coding was reproduced in the framework of our minimalistic coincidence counting model. These modeling results suggest that coincidence detection of excitatory

  8. Auditory stream segregation using amplitude modulated bandpass noise

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yingjiu; Nelson, Peggy B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of spectral overlap and amplitude modulation (AM) rate for stream segregation for noise signals, as well as to test the build-up effect based on these two cues. Segregation ability was evaluated using an objective paradigm with listeners' attention focused on stream segregation. Stimulus sequences consisted of two interleaved sets of bandpass noise bursts (A and B bursts). The A and B bursts differed in spectrum, AM-rate, or both. The amount of the difference between the two sets of noise bursts was varied. Long and short sequences were studied to investigate the build-up effect for segregation based on spectral and AM-rate differences. Results showed the following: (1). Stream segregation ability increased with greater spectral separation. (2). Larger AM-rate separations were associated with stronger segregation abilities. (3). Spectral separation was found to elicit the build-up effect for the range of spectral differences assessed in the current study. (4). AM-rate separation interacted with spectral separation suggesting an additive effect of spectral separation and AM-rate separation on segregation build-up. The findings suggest that, when normal-hearing listeners direct their attention towards segregation, they are able to segregate auditory streams based on reduced spectral contrast cues that vary by the amount of spectral overlap. Further, regardless of the spectral separation they are able to use AM-rate difference as a secondary/weaker cue. Based on the spectral differences, listeners can segregate auditory streams better as the listening duration is prolonged—i.e., sparse spectral cues elicit build-up segregation; however, AM-rate differences only appear to elicit build-up when in combination with spectral difference cues. PMID:26300831

  9. ERP responses to processing prosodic phrasing of sentences in amplitude modulated noise.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Rebecca; Ruigendijk, Esther

    2016-02-01

    Intonation phrase boundaries (IPBs) were hypothesized to be especially difficult to process in the presence of an amplitude modulated noise masker because of a potential rhythmic competition. In an event-related potential study, IPBs were presented in silence, stationary, and amplitude modulated noise. We elicited centro-parietal Closure Positive Shifts (CPS) in 23 young adults with normal hearing at IPBs in all acoustic conditions, albeit with some differences. CPS peak amplitudes were highest in stationary noise, followed by modulated noise, and lowest in silence. Both noise types elicited CPS delays, slightly more so in stationary compared to amplitude modulated noise. These data suggest that amplitude modulation is not tantamount to a rhythmic competitor for prosodic phrasing but rather supports an assumed speech perception benefit due to local release from masking. The duration of CPS time windows was, however, not only longer in noise compared to silence, but also longer for amplitude modulated compared to stationary noise. This is interpreted as support for additional processing load associated with amplitude modulation for the CPS component. Taken together, processing prosodic phrasing of sentences in amplitude modulated noise seems to involve the same issues that have been observed for the perception and processing of segmental information that are related to lexical items presented in noise: a benefit from local release from masking, even for prosodic cues, and a detrimental additional processing load that is associated with either stream segregation or signal reconstruction.

  10. Spectral broadening and inhibition of amplitude and frequency modulation in Nd: glass regenerative amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Pan, Xue; Wang, Jiangfeng; Li, Xuechun

    2014-11-01

    In order to broaden the spectrum of laser pulse and reduce the gain narrowing effect in Nd:glass regenerative amplifier to realize the ambition of inhibiting amplitude and frequency modulation, proper quartz birefringence crystal plate is inserted into the cavity. The influence factors of central wavelength, depth of modulation and range of modulation are obtained theoretically. The width of the spectrum is broadened by controlling all the factors. Two kinds of thickness, 5mm and 6mm, are inserted into the regenerative amplifier cavity. The results of theoretical calculation and experiment both show that the effect of spectrum widening is evident, which reduces the gain narrowing effect to some extent. The amplitude and frequency modulation resulted from gain narrowing effect is inhibited when the central wavelength deflects. The simulated results show that inhibited effect of amplitude and frequency modulation is remarkable. And the method is a potential effective technique for amplitude and frequency modulation inhibition.

  11. Calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy: symmetry approach and residual amplitude modulation normalization.

    PubMed

    Behera, Amiya; Wang, Anbo

    2016-06-01

    This paper offers a simple, practical strategy to implement wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with a tunable diode laser. It eliminates the need to pre-characterize the laser intensity parameters or make any design changes to a conventional WMS system. Consequently, sensitivity and signal strength remain the same as what can be obtained from a traditional WMS setup at low modulation amplitude. Like previously proposed calibration-free approaches, this new method also yields an absolute absorption line shape function. To recover residual amplitude modulation (RAM) contributions present in the first and second harmonic signals of WMS, we exploited their even or odd symmetric nature. We then used these isolated RAM signals to estimate the absolute line shape function, thus removing the impact of optical intensity fluctuations on measurement. We have also discussed uncertainties and noises associated with the estimated absolute line shape function and the applicability of this new method to detect several gases in the near infrared region. We used measurements of the 1650.96 nm absorption line for 1% and 8% methane concentration in the 60-100 kPa pressure range to validate the efficacy of this new RAM recovery technique and demonstrated a calibration-free system. Because this approach has minimal dependency on diode laser operating conditions, it is more robust and suitable for harsh industrial environments.

  12. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  13. Trellis-coded pulse amplitude modulation for indoor visible light communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Yang, Aiying; Wu, Yongsheng; Feng, Lihui; Sun, Yu-nan; Li, Yankun

    2013-12-01

    Trellis-coded pulse-amplitude modulation (TC-PAM) is applied in visible light communication (VLC) system using RGB-LED. Based on natural modulation, we propose a modified modulation to yield performance enhancement. Further, a decoding method of combing soft-decision Viterbi algorithm with most significant bit (MSB) decoding is developed. Finally, the results of Monte-Carlo simulation are presented to verify the best modulation and decoding method among the mentioned modulation and decoding techniques.

  14. Ultrabroadband radio-frequency arbitrary waveform generation with high-speed phase and amplitude modulation capability.

    PubMed

    Rashidinejad, Amir; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2015-05-04

    We introduce a novel photonic-assisted ultrabroadband radio-frequency arbitrary waveform generation setup capable of high-speed phase and amplitude modulation of the individual arbitrary waveforms. The waveform generator is based on an optical interferometer, within which a high-resolution optical pulse shaper and integrated optic phase and intensity modulators are placed, followed by frequency-to-time mapping. The phase and amplitude of each ultrabroadband waveform within the generated sequence can be continuously tuned by adjusting the driving voltages applied to the phase and intensity modulator pair, hence overcoming the slow update speed of conventional spatial light modulator-based pulse shapers. Moreover, this data modulation is completely independent from and does not interfere with RF waveform design. Programmable ultrabroadband RF sequences, spanning more than 4.7 octaves from 2 to 52 GHz, are modulated with real-time data in up to 16 level, M-ary phase-shift keying and quadrature amplitude modulation formats.

  15. High speed cross-amplitude modulation in concatenated SOA-EAM-SOA.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Ciaran S; Manning, Robert J

    2012-06-18

    We observe a near-ideal high speed amplitude impulse response in an SOA-EAM-SOA configuration under optimum conditions. Full amplitude recovery times as low as 10 ps with modulation depths of 70% were observed in pump-probe measurements. System behavior could be controlled by the choice of signal wavelength, SOA current biases and EAM reverse bias voltages. Experimental data and impulse response modelling indicated that the slow tail in the gain response of first SOA was negated by a combination of cross-absorption modulation between pump and modulated CW probe, and self-gain modulation of the modulated CW probe in both the EAM and second SOA.

  16. Beating frequency and amplitude modulation of the piano tone due to coupling of tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartling, Bo

    2005-04-01

    The influence on a piano tone from weak coexcitation of damped adjacent tones due to coupling via the bridge is studied. The frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound resulting from coexcitation of one strong and one or two weak tones is analyzed. One weak tone causes frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound, and two weak tones produce beating frequency and amplitude modulation, where the beatings of the two modulations are of opposite phase. By digital recording of the sound of piano tones, the appearance of these phenomena is verified. The audibility of the observed frequency and amplitude modulation is discussed in terms of previously determined detection thresholds. The beating character of both frequency and amplitude modulations, however, distinguishes the phenomena from those previously studied and prompts further psychoacoustic investigations. It is shown that detuning of unison strings may significantly increase the frequency deviation of the frequency modulation in conjunction with affected amplitude modulation. The modulatory effects of coupling to adjacent tones therefore may possibly be utilized in the tuning process. A coupling of tones analogous to the situation in a piano may arise in other stringed musical instruments transferring string vibrations to a soundboard via a bridge. .

  17. Quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) using binary-driven coupling-modulated rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimelahi, Samira; Sheikholeslami, Ali

    2016-05-01

    We propose and fully analyze a compact structure for DAC-free pure optical QAM modulation. The proposed structure is the first ring resonator-based DAC-free QAM modulator reported in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. The device consists of two segmented add-drop Mach Zehnder interferometer-assisted ring modulators (MZIARM) in an IQ configuration. The proposed architecture is investigated based on the parameters from SOI technology where various key design considerations are discussed. We have included the loss in the MZI arms in our analysis of phase and amplitude modulation using MZIARM for the first time and show that the imbalanced loss results in a phase error. The output level linearity is also studied for both QAM-16 and QAM-64 not only based on optimizing RF segment lengths but also by optimizing the number of segments. In QAM-16, linearity among levels is achievable with two segments while in QAM-64 an additional segment may be required.

  18. Amplitudes of solar modulation of low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Paizis, C.

    1982-01-01

    There have been differences of opinion regarding the origin and behavior of the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays. It has been shown that the return to solar maximum intensity levels beginning in early 1978 was dominated by Forbush decreases. These Forbush decreases were caused by radially moving interplanetary shocks resulting from large solar flares. The present investigation is concerned with solar modulation effects which were observed during the previous solar minimum. The effects were associated with high-speed streams in the solar wind. These streams caused the formation of corotating interaction regions with both forward and reverse shocks. The modulation effects seen near earth are intimately connected with these shocks.

  19. Envelope pulsed ultrasonic distance measurement system based upon amplitude modulation and phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y. P.; Wang, J. S.; Huang, K. N.; Ho, C. T.; Huang, J. D.; Young, M. S.

    2007-06-15

    A novel microcomputer-based ultrasonic distance measurement system is presented. This study proposes an efficient algorithm which combines both the amplitude modulation (AM) and the phase modulation (PM) of the pulse-echo technique. The proposed system can reduce error caused by inertia delay and amplitude attenuation effect when using the AM and PM envelope square wave form (APESW). The APESW ultrasonic driving wave form causes a phase inversion phenomenon in the relative wave form of the receiver. The phase inversion phenomenon sufficiently identifies the ''measurement pulse'' in the received wave forms, which can be used for accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. In addition, combining a countertechnique to compute the phase shifts of the last cycle for TOF, the presented system can obtain distance resolution of 0.1% of the wavelength corresponding to the 40 kHz frequency of the ultrasonic wave. The standard uncertainty of the proposed distance measurement system is found to be 0.2 mm at a range of 50-500 mm. The APESW signal generator and phase detector of this measuring system are designed on a complex programmable logic device, which is used to govern the TOF measurement and send the data to a personal computer for distance calibration and examination. The main advantages of this APESW system are high resolution, low cost, narrow bandwidth requirement, and ease of implementation.

  20. Envelope pulsed ultrasonic distance measurement system based upon amplitude modulation and phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y P; Wang, J S; Huang, K N; Ho, C T; Huang, J D; Young, M S

    2007-06-01

    A novel microcomputer-based ultrasonic distance measurement system is presented. This study proposes an efficient algorithm which combines both the amplitude modulation (AM) and the phase modulation (PM) of the pulse-echo technique. The proposed system can reduce error caused by inertia delay and amplitude attenuation effect when using the AM and PM envelope square wave form (APESW). The APESW ultrasonic driving wave form causes a phase inversion phenomenon in the relative wave form of the receiver. The phase inversion phenomenon sufficiently identifies the "measurement pulse" in the received wave forms, which can be used for accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. In addition, combining a countertechnique to compute the phase shifts of the last cycle for TOF, the presented system can obtain distance resolution of 0.1% of the wavelength corresponding to the 40 kHz frequency of the ultrasonic wave. The standard uncertainty of the proposed distance measurement system is found to be 0.2 mm at a range of 50-500 mm. The APESW signal generator and phase detector of this measuring system are designed on a complex programmable logic device, which is used to govern the TOF measurement and send the data to a personal computer for distance calibration and examination. The main advantages of this APESW system are high resolution, low cost, narrow bandwidth requirement, and ease of implementation.

  1. Amplitude modulation in δ Sct stars: statistics from an ensemble study of Kepler targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Dominic M.; Kurtz, Donald W.; Breger, Michel; Murphy, Simon J.; Holdsworth, Daniel L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a search for amplitude modulation of pulsation modes in 983 δ Sct stars, which have effective temperatures between 6400 ≤ Teff ≤ 10 000 K in the Kepler Input Catalogue and were continuously observed by the Kepler Space Telescope for 4 yr. We demonstrate the diversity in pulsational behaviour observed, in particular non-linearity, which is predicted for δ Sct stars. We analyse and discuss examples of δ Sct stars with constant amplitudes and phases; those that exhibit amplitude modulation caused by beating of close-frequency pulsation modes; those that exhibit pure amplitude modulation (with no associated phase variation); those that exhibit phase modulation caused by binarity; and those that exhibit amplitude modulation caused by non-linearity. Using models and examples of individual stars, we demonstrate that observations of the changes in amplitude and phase of pulsation modes can be used to distinguish among the different scenarios. We find that 603 δ Sct stars (61.3 per cent) exhibit at least one pulsation mode that varies significantly in amplitude over 4 yr. Conversely, many δ Sct stars have constant pulsation amplitudes so short-length observations can be used to determine precise frequencies, amplitudes and phases for the most coherent and periodic δ Sct stars. It is shown that amplitude modulation is not restricted to a small region on the HR diagram, therefore not necessarily dependent on stellar parameters such as Teff or log g. Our catalogue of 983 δ Sct stars will be useful for comparisons to similar stars observed by K2 and TESS, because the length of the 4-yr Kepler data set will not be surpassed for some time.

  2. Uncovering signals from measurement noise by electro mechanical amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droogendijk, H.; Sanders, R. G. P.; Krijnen, G. J. M.

    2013-05-01

    We present an electromechanical parametric scheme to improve the low-frequency signal-to-noise ratio of energy buffering type transducers. The method is based on periodic modulation of the stiffness in the sensory system which produces upconverted replicas of the signals of interest at frequencies where measurement is less troubled by noise or other detrimental effects. We demonstrate this principle by means of capacitive biomimetic hair flow sensors, where we modulate the rotational spring stiffness by periodic electrostatic spring softening, such that a replica of the original signal is formed around the modulation frequency. Using this replica we gain up to a 25-fold improvement of the low-frequency signal-to-noise ratio and sensing threshold. For transient measurements we demonstrate that tiny signals, which are below the noise-levels in the base-band, are revealed well when upconverted to higher frequencies.

  3. Correlation with a spatial light modulator having phase and amplitude cross coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    In correlation filtering a spatial light modulators is traditionally modeled as affecting only the phase or only the amplitude of light. Usually, however, a single operating parameter affects both phase and amplitude. An integral constraint is developed that is a necessary condition for optimizing a correlation filter having single parameter coupling between phase and amplitude. The phase-only filter is shown to be a special case.

  4. An amplitude modulated laser system for distance and displacement measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.; Heyman, Joseph S.; Holben, Milford S., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A laser distance and displacement measurement system is being developed to monitor small displacements in large space structures for strain analysis and structural control. The reflected laser beam is focused on a detector and the detected signal is mixed with the reference. Small displacements are indicated by a change in modulation frequency which is adjusted to maintain quadrature between the received signal and the reference signal from the voltage-controlled oscillator in a phase-locked loop. Measurement of absolute distance is accomplished by sweeping the modulation frequency from a quadrature lock point to an adjacent lock point.

  5. The Chandler wobble of the poles and its amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenkov, N.

    2015-08-01

    It is shown that the period of the Chandler wobble of the poles (CWP) is a combined oscillation caused by three periodic processes experienced by the Earth: (a) lunisolar tides, (b) the precession of the orbit of the Earth's monthly revolution around the barycenter of the Earth-Moon system, and (c) the motion of the perigee of this orbit. The addition of the 1.20 - year Chandler wobble to sidereal, anomalistic, and synodic lunar yearly forcing gives rise slow periodic variations in the CWP amplitude with periods of 32 to 51 years.

  6. Active cancellation of residual amplitude modulation in a frequency-modulation based Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinan; Wang, Yicheng; Pratt, Jon R.

    2016-03-01

    Residual amplitude modulation (RAM) is one of the most common noise sources known to degrade the sensitivity of frequency modulation spectroscopy. RAM can arise as a result of the temperature dependent birefringence of the modulator crystal, which causes the orientation of the crystal's optical axis to shift with respect to the polarization of the incident light with temperature. In the fiber-based optical interferometer used on the National Institute of Standards and Technology calculable capacitor, RAM degrades the measured laser frequency stability and correlates with the environmental temperature fluctuations. We have demonstrated a simple approach that cancels out excessive RAM due to polarization mismatch between the light and the optical axis of the crystal. The approach allows us to measure the frequency noise of a heterodyne beat between two lasers individually locked to different resonant modes of a cavity with an accuracy better than 0.5 ppm, which meets the requirement to further determine the longitudinal mode number of the cavity length. Also, this approach has substantially mitigated the temperature dependency of the measurements of the cavity length and consequently the capacitance.

  7. Nonlinear Optical Systems Interacting with Amplitude-Modulated Optical Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    We start with the rate equations for the excited-state population of the laser transition p, d ( ltp = - (I + I + I,)P + -LI, (C.1) and the equation...spectroscopy; lasers ; parametric resonances ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Please see Abstract on Pages v-vi. I...he conducted research in the fields of modulation spectroscopy and laser instability under the guidance of Professor Carlos R. Stroud, Jr. While at

  8. Inspection of complex amplitudes of spatial light modulators using moiré techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón-Hermosillo, C. Y.; Alcalá Ochoa, Noé; Noé Arias, E.; García-Márquez, J.

    2013-05-01

    We propose a method to get the phase and amplitude modes of an electrically driven spatial light modulator (SLM) device using the formation of moiré patterns. It is found to be a fast experimental method to visualize the complex amplitude of the SLM and it may be an excellent guide to find specific complex configurations of amplitude and phase. Experimental results and limitations of the proposal are presented using a reflective liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS SLM) modulator. With this method it has been found experimentally a phase-mostly configuration using only one polarizer, without an analyzer.

  9. Dissociable Neural Response Signatures for Slow Amplitude and Frequency Modulation in Human Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Molly J.; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Natural auditory stimuli are characterized by slow fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. However, the degree to which the neural responses to slow amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are capable of conveying independent time-varying information, particularly with respect to speech communication, is unclear. In the current electroencephalography (EEG) study, participants listened to amplitude- and frequency-modulated narrow-band noises with a 3-Hz modulation rate, and the resulting neural responses were compared. Spectral analyses revealed similar spectral amplitude peaks for AM and FM at the stimulation frequency (3 Hz), but amplitude at the second harmonic frequency (6 Hz) was much higher for FM than for AM. Moreover, the phase delay of neural responses with respect to the full-band stimulus envelope was shorter for FM than for AM. Finally, the critical analysis involved classification of single trials as being in response to either AM or FM based on either phase or amplitude information. Time-varying phase, but not amplitude, was sufficient to accurately classify AM and FM stimuli based on single-trial neural responses. Taken together, the current results support the dissociable nature of cortical signatures of slow AM and FM. These cortical signatures potentially provide an efficient means to dissect simultaneously communicated slow temporal and spectral information in acoustic communication signals. PMID:24205309

  10. Smooth Pursuit Saccade Amplitude Modulation During Exposure to Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Sayenko, D. G.; Sayenko, I.; Somers, J. T.; Paloski, W. H.

    2002-01-01

    Russian investigators have reported changes in pursuit tracking of a vertically moving point stimulus during space flight. Early in microgravity, changes were manifested by decreased eye movement amplitude (undershooting) and the appearance of correction saccades. As the flight progressed, pursuit of the moving point stimulus deteriorated while associated saccadic movements were unchanged. Immediately postflight there was an improved execution of active head movements indicating that the deficiencies in pursuit function noted in microgravity may be of central origin. In contrast, tests of two cosmonauts showed that horizontal and vertical smooth pursuit were unchanged inflight. However, results of corresponding saccadic tasks showed a tendency toward the overshooting of a horizontal target early inflight with high accuracy developing later inflight, accompanied by an increased saccade velocity and a trend toward decreased saccade latency. Based on these equivocal results, we have further investigated the effects of space flight on the smooth pursuit mechanism during and after short duration flight, and postflight on returning MIR crewmembers. Sinusoidal target movement was presented horizontally at frequencies of 0.33 and 1.0 Hz. Subjects were asked to perform two trials for each stimulus combination: (1) moving eyes-only (EO) and (2) moving eyes and head (EH) with the target motion. Peak amplitude was 30 deg for 0.33 Hz trials and 15 deg for the 1.0 Hz trials. The relationship between saccade amplitude and peak velocity were plotted as a main sequence for each phase of flight, and linear regression analysis allowed us to determine the slope of each main sequence plot. The linear slopes were then combined for each flight phase for each individual subject. The main sequence for both EO and EH trials at both the 0.33 and 1.0 Hz frequencies during flight for the short duration flyers showed a reduction in saccade velocity and amplitude when compared to the preflight

  11. Radio frequency path characterization for wide band quadrature amplitude modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.

    1998-12-31

    Remote, high speed, high explosive wave front monitoring requires very high bandwidth telemetry to allow transmission of diagnostic data before the explosion destroys the sensor system itself. The main motivation for this study is that no known existing implementation of this sort has been applied to realistic weapons environments. These facts have prompted the research and gathering of data that can be used to extrapolate towards finding the best modulation method for this application. In addition to research of similar existing analysis and testing operations, data was recently captured from a Joint Test Assembly (JTA) Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) flight.

  12. Diffusion-induced periodic transition between oscillatory modes in amplitude-modulated patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaodong; He, Yuxiu; Wang, Shaorong; Gao, Qingyu; Epstein, Irving R.; Wang, Qun

    2014-06-15

    We study amplitude-modulated waves, e.g., wave packets in one dimension, overtarget spirals and superspirals in two dimensions, under mixed-mode oscillatory conditions in a three-variable reaction-diffusion model. New transition zones, not seen in the homogeneous system, are found, in which periodic transitions occur between local 1{sup N−1} and 1{sup N} oscillations. Amplitude-modulated complex patterns result from periodic transition between (N − 1)-armed and N-armed waves. Spatial recurrence rates provide a useful guide to the stability of these modulated patterns.

  13. Miniature Surface Plasmon Polariton Amplitude Modulator by Beat Frequency and Polarization Control

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chu-En; Yu, Chih-Jen; Yeh, Ting-Tso; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of modulators keeps pace for the compact devices in optical applications. Here, we present a miniature surface plasmon polariton amplitude modulator (SPPAM) by directing and interfering surface plasmon polaritons on a nanofabricated chip. Our results show that this SPPAM enables two kinds of modulations. The first kind of modulation is controlled by encoding angular-frequency difference from a Zeeman laser, with a beat frequency of 1.66 MHz; the second of modulation is validated by periodically varying the polarization states from a polarization generator, with rotation frequencies of 0.5–10 k Hz. In addition, the normalized extinction ratio of our plasmonic structure reaches 100. Such miniaturized beat-frequency and polarization-controlled amplitude modulators open an avenue for the exploration of ultrasensitive nanosensors, nanocircuits, and other integrated nanophotonic devices. PMID:27558516

  14. Dynamic nonlinear focal shift in amplitude modulated moderately focused acoustic beams.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Noé; Camarena, Francisco; González-Salido, Nuria

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of the displacement of the position of the pressure, intensity and acoustic radiation force maxima along the axis of focused acoustic beams under increasing driving amplitudes (nonlinear focal shift) is studied for the case of a moderately focused beam excited with continuous and 25kHz amplitude modulated signals, both in water and tissue. We prove that in amplitude modulated beams the linear and nonlinear propagation effects coexist in a semi-period of modulation, giving place to a complex dynamic behavior, where the singular points of the beam (peak pressure, rarefaction, intensity and acoustic radiation force) locate at different points on axis as a function of time. These entire phenomena are explained in terms of harmonic generation and absorption during the propagation in a lossy nonlinear medium both for a continuous and an amplitude modulated beam. One of the possible applications of the acoustic radiation force displacement is the generation of shear waves at different locations by using a focused mono-element transducer excited by an amplitude modulated signal.

  15. Timbral Sharpness and Modulations in Frequency and Amplitude: Implications for the Fusion of Musical Sounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goad, Pamela Joy

    The fusion of musical voices is an important aspect of musical blend, or the mixing of individual sounds. Yet, little research has been done to explicitly determine the factors involved in fusion. In this study, the similarity of timbre and modulation were examined for their contribution to the fusion of sounds. It is hypothesized that similar timbres will fuse better than dissimilar timbres, and, voices with the same kind of modulation will fuse better than voices of different modulations. A perceptually-based measure, known as sharpness was investigated as a measure of timbre. The advantages of using sharpness are that it is based on hearing sensitivities and masking phenomena of inner ear processing. Five musical instrument families were digitally recorded in performances across a typical playing range at two extreme dynamic levels. Analyses reveal that sharpness is capable of uncovering subtle changes in timbre including those found in musical dynamics, instrument design, and performer-specific variations. While these analyses alone are insufficient to address fusion, preliminary calculations of timbral combinations indicate that sharpness has the potential to predict the fusion of sounds used in musical composition. Three experiments investigated the effects of modulation on the fusion of a harmonic major sixth interval. In the first experiment using frequency modulation, stimuli varied in deviation about a mean fundamental frequency and relative modulation phase between the two tones. Results showed smaller frequency deviations promoted fusion and relative phase differences had a minimal effect. In a second experiment using amplitude modulation, stimuli varied in deviation about a mean amplitude level and relative phase of modulation. Results showed smaller amplitude deviations promoted better fusion, but unlike frequency modulation, relative phase differences were also important. In a third experiment, frequency modulation, amplitude modulation and mixed

  16. Extending single molecule fluorescence observation time by amplitude-modulated excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisley, Lydia; Chang, Wei-Shun; Cooper, David; Mansur, Andrea P.; Landes, Christy F.

    2013-09-01

    We present a hardware-based method that can improve single molecule fluorophore observation time by up to 1500% and super-localization by 47% for the experimental conditions used. The excitation was modulated using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) synchronized to the data acquisition and inherent data conversion time of the detector. The observation time and precision in super-localization of four commonly used fluorophores were compared under modulated and traditional continuous excitation, including direct total internal reflectance excitation of Alexa 555 and Cy3, non-radiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) excited Cy5, and direct epi-fluorescence wide field excitation of Rhodamine 6G. The proposed amplitude-modulated excitation does not perturb the chemical makeup of the system or sacrifice signal and is compatible with multiple types of fluorophores. Amplitude-modulated excitation has practical applications for any fluorescent study utilizing an instrumental setup with time-delayed detectors.

  17. Encoding and decoding amplitude-modulated cochlear implant stimuli--a point process analysis.

    PubMed

    Goldwyn, Joshua H; Shea-Brown, Eric; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2010-06-01

    Cochlear implant speech processors stimulate the auditory nerve by delivering amplitude-modulated electrical pulse trains to intracochlear electrodes. Studying how auditory nerve cells encode modulation information is of fundamental importance, therefore, to understanding cochlear implant function and improving speech perception in cochlear implant users. In this paper, we analyze simulated responses of the auditory nerve to amplitude-modulated cochlear implant stimuli using a point process model. First, we quantify the information encoded in the spike trains by testing an ideal observer's ability to detect amplitude modulation in a two-alternative forced-choice task. We vary the amount of information available to the observer to probe how spike timing and averaged firing rate encode modulation. Second, we construct a neural decoding method that predicts several qualitative trends observed in psychophysical tests of amplitude modulation detection in cochlear implant listeners. We find that modulation information is primarily available in the sequence of spike times. The performance of an ideal observer, however, is inconsistent with observed trends in psychophysical data. Using a neural decoding method that jitters spike times to degrade its temporal resolution and then computes a common measure of phase locking from spike trains of a heterogeneous population of model nerve cells, we predict the correct qualitative dependence of modulation detection thresholds on modulation frequency and stimulus level. The decoder does not predict the observed loss of modulation sensitivity at high carrier pulse rates, but this framework can be applied to future models that better represent auditory nerve responses to high carrier pulse rate stimuli. The supplemental material of this article contains the article's data in an active, re-usable format.

  18. New asymmetric propagation invariant beams obtained by amplitude and phase modulation in frequency space.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Hernández, J; Arroyo Carrasco, M L; Méndez Otero, M M; Chávez-Cerda, S; Iturbe Castillo, M D

    2014-12-12

    In this paper, we demonstrate, numerically and experimentally that using the mask-lens setup used by Durnin to generate Bessel beams Durnin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1499 (1987)], it is possible to generate different kinds of propagation invariant beams. A modification in the amplitude or phase of the field that illuminates the annular slit is proposed that corresponds to modulation in frequency space. In particular, we characterize the new invariant beams that were obtained by modulating the amplitude of the annular mask and when the incident field was modulated with a one-dimensional quadratic or cubic phase. Experimental results using an amplitude mask are shown in order to corroborate the numerical predictions.

  19. New asymmetric propagation invariant beams obtained by amplitude and phase modulation in frequency space

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Hernández, J.; Arroyo Carrasco, M.L.; Méndez Otero, M.M.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Iturbe Castillo, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate, numerically and experimentally that using the mask-lens setup used by Durnin to generate Bessel beams Durnin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1499 (1987)], it is possible to generate different kinds of propagation invariant beams. A modification in the amplitude or phase of the field that illuminates the annular slit is proposed that corresponds to modulation in frequency space. In particular, we characterize the new invariant beams that were obtained by modulating the amplitude of the annular mask and when the incident field was modulated with a one-dimensional quadratic or cubic phase. Experimental results using an amplitude mask are shown in order to corroborate the numerical predictions. PMID:25705088

  20. Amplitude modulation of sound from wind turbines under various meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Conny; Öhlund, Olof

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine (WT) sound annoys some people even though the sound levels are relatively low. This could be because of the amplitude modulated "swishing" characteristic of the turbine sound, which is not taken into account by standard procedures for measuring average sound levels. Studies of sound immission from WTs were conducted continually between 19 August 2011 and 19 August 2012 at two sites in Sweden. A method for quantifying the degree and strength of amplitude modulation (AM) is introduced here. The method reveals that AM at the immission points occur under specific meteorological conditions. For WT sound immission, the wind direction and sound speed gradient are crucial for the occurrence of AM. Interference between two or more WTs could probably enhance AM. The mechanisms by which WT sound is amplitude modulated are not fully understood.

  1. Effect of noise on modulation amplitude and phase in frequency-domain diffusive imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We theoretically investigate the effect of noise on frequency-domain heterodyne and/or homodyne measurements of intensity-modulated beams propagating through diffusive media, such as a photon density wave. We assumed that the attenuated amplitude and delayed phase are estimated by taking the Fourier transform of the noisy, modulated output data. We show that the estimated amplitude and phase are biased when the number of output photons is small. We also show that the use of image intensifiers for photon amplification in heterodyne or homodyne measurements increases the amount of biases. Especially, it turns out that the biased estimation is independent of AC-dependent noise in sinusoidal heterodyne or homodyne outputs. Finally, the developed theory indicates that the previously known variance model of modulation amplitude and phase is not valid in low light situations. Monte-Carlo simulations with varied numbers of input photons verify our theoretical trends of the bias. PMID:22352660

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler δ Sct stars amplitude modulation (Bowman+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. M.; Kurtz, D. W.; Breger, M.; Murphy, S. J.; Holdsworth, D. L.

    2016-06-01

    We searched for amplitude modulation of pulsation modes in δ Sct stars observed by the Kepler Space Telescope. The number of pulsation modes out of a maximum of twelve that have constant amplitudes and variable amplitudes are given in the columns NoMod and AMod, respectively, along with stellar parameters from Huber et al. (2014, Cat. J/ApJS/211/2). Table 1 is the full version for all 983 δ Sct stars the abridged version of the paper. (1 data file).

  3. Effects of spanwise topographic heterogeneity on amplitude and frequency modulation of streamwise velocity fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Ankit; Subdberg, Matthew; Anderson, William

    2016-11-01

    We present results on the effects of topographic height, and spanwise heterogeneity, on amplitude and frequency modulation of small-scale structures in the roughness sublayer due to large-scale structures in the logarithmic region of turbulent channel flows. This work follows preceding contributions on amplitude and frequency modulation in smooth wall turbulent boundary layers. We have considered three topographic cases with different characteristics from homogeneous (sandpaper), to two spanwise heterogeneous cases where the height amplitude is increased (this topographic configuration induces turbulent secondary flows, which are known to alter the outer-layer flow characteristics). Indeed, pre-multiplied energy spectra across wavelength and elevation (so-called spectrograms) illustrate how turbulent energy is redistributed with systematic modification to the underlying topography. We have determined how the large-scale (low-pass filtered) streamwise velocity modulates the amplitude and frequency response of small-scale (high-pass filtered) signal. We find that outer-layer topographic-induced perturbations completely alter the intensity of amplitude and frequency modulation. This highlights the passive-actuator-like role of roughness heterogeneity, and underpins the need to incorporate such functional dependence in the development of wall models for LES. Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant # FA9550-14-1-0101.

  4. Detection of frequency modulation by hearing-impaired listeners: Effects of carrier frequency, modulation rate, and added amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Brian C. J.; Skrodzka, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that the detection of frequency modulation (FM) of sinusoidal carriers can be mediated by two mechanisms: a place mechanism based on FM-induced amplitude modulation (AM) in the excitation pattern, and a temporal mechanism based on phase-locking in the auditory nerve. The temporal mechanism appears to be ``sluggish'' and does not play a role for FM rates above about 10 Hz. It also does not play a role for high carrier frequencies (above about 5 kHz). This experiment examined FM detection in three young subjects with normal hearing and four elderly subjects with cochlear hearing loss. Carrier frequencies were 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 kHz and modulation rates were 2, 5, 10, and 20 Hz. FM detection thresholds were measured both in the absence of AM, and with AM of a fixed depth (m=0.33) added in both intervals of a forced-choice trial. The added AM was intended to disrupt cues based on FM-induced AM in the excitation pattern. Generally, the hearing-impaired subjects performed markedly more poorly than the normal-hearing subjects. For the normal-hearing subjects, the disruptive effect of the AM tended to increase with increasing modulation rate, for carrier frequencies below 6 kHz, as found previously by Moore and Sek [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2320-2331 (1996)]. For the hearing-impaired subjects, the disruptive effective of the AM was generally larger than for the normal-hearing subjects, and the magnitude of the disruption did not consistently increase with increasing modulation rate. The results suggest that cochlear hearing impairment adversely affects both temporal and excitation pattern mechanisms of FM detection.

  5. Human Neuromagnetic Steady-State Responses to Amplitude-Modulated Tones, Speech, and Music

    PubMed Central

    Parkkonen, Lauri; Hari, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Auditory steady-state responses that can be elicited by various periodic sounds inform about subcortical and early cortical auditory processing. Steady-state responses to amplitude-modulated pure tones have been used to scrutinize binaural interaction by frequency-tagging the two ears’ inputs at different frequencies. Unlike pure tones, speech and music are physically very complex, as they include many frequency components, pauses, and large temporal variations. To examine the utility of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) steady-state fields (SSFs) in the study of early cortical processing of complex natural sounds, the authors tested the extent to which amplitude-modulated speech and music can elicit reliable SSFs. Design: MEG responses were recorded to 90-s-long binaural tones, speech, and music, amplitude-modulated at 41.1 Hz at four different depths (25, 50, 75, and 100%). The subjects were 11 healthy, normal-hearing adults. MEG signals were averaged in phase with the modulation frequency, and the sources of the resulting SSFs were modeled by current dipoles. After the MEG recording, intelligibility of the speech, musical quality of the music stimuli, naturalness of music and speech stimuli, and the perceived deterioration caused by the modulation were evaluated on visual analog scales. Results: The perceived quality of the stimuli decreased as a function of increasing modulation depth, more strongly for music than speech; yet, all subjects considered the speech intelligible even at the 100% modulation. SSFs were the strongest to tones and the weakest to speech stimuli; the amplitudes increased with increasing modulation depth for all stimuli. SSFs to tones were reliably detectable at all modulation depths (in all subjects in the right hemisphere, in 9 subjects in the left hemisphere) and to music stimuli at 50 to 100% depths, whereas speech usually elicited clear SSFs only at 100% depth. The hemispheric balance of SSFs was toward the right hemisphere

  6. Micro-antennas for the phase and amplitude modulation of terahertz wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingwen; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Based on the localized surface plasmons (LSPs), a series of C-shaped slits antennas are designed to modulate the phase and amplitude of the cross-polarized transmitted wave in THz waveband. By adjusting the structure parameters of the antenna unit, arbitrary phase and amplitude modulation of the cross-polarized THz wave can be obtained. The C-shaped slit antenna units are designed at two operating frequencies f=0.8 THz and f=1.0 THz using a commercial software package (Lumerical Solutions), which is based on the finite-difference time-domain method. According to the simulated results, principles for modulating the phase and amplitude of THz wave are summarized as follows. Firstly, the operating wavelength depends on the effective length of the antenna and the operating wavelength increases as the effective length increases; Secondly, the phase of the cross-polarized wave can be modulated from 0 to 2π by changing the opening angle of the split; Thirdly, the amplitude transmittance of the cross-polarized wave can be changed from the extinction state to the maximum value by rotating the symmetry axis of the C-shaped slit. These principles can be used to direct the design of the field modulator in any other working frequency.

  7. Focusing through a turbid medium by amplitude modulation with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Weijia; Peng, Ligen; Shao, Xiaopeng

    2014-05-01

    Multiple scattering of light in opaque materials such as white paint and human tissue forms a volume speckle field, will greatly reduce the imaging depth and degrade the imaging quality. A novel approach is proposed to focus light through a turbid medium using amplitude modulation with genetic algorithm (GA) from speckle patterns. Compared with phase modulation method, amplitude modulation approach, in which the each element of spatial light modulator (SLM) is either zero or one, is much easier to achieve. Theoretical and experimental results show that, the advantage of GA is more suitable for low the signal to noise ratio (SNR) environments in comparison to the existing amplitude control algorithms such as binary amplitude modulation. The circular Gaussian distribution model and Rayleigh Sommerfeld diffraction theory are employed in our simulations to describe the turbid medium and light propagation between optical devices, respectively. It is demonstrated that the GA technique can achieve a higher overall enhancement, and converge much faster than others, and outperform all algorithms at high noise. Focusing through a turbid medium has potential in the observation of cells and protein molecules in biological tissues and other structures in micro/nano scale.

  8. Neurometric amplitude-modulation detection threshold in the guinea-pig ventral cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Sayles, Mark; Füllgrabe, Christian; Winter, Ian M

    2013-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is a pervasive feature of natural sounds. Neural detection and processing of modulation cues is behaviourally important across species. Although most ecologically relevant sounds are not fully modulated, physiological studies have usually concentrated on fully modulated (100% modulation depth) signals. Psychoacoustic experiments mainly operate at low modulation depths, around detection threshold (∼5% AM). We presented sinusoidal amplitude-modulated tones, systematically varying modulation depth between zero and 100%, at a range of modulation frequencies, to anaesthetised guinea-pigs while recording spikes from neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). The cochlear nucleus is the site of the first synapse in the central auditory system. At this locus significant signal processing occurs with respect to representation of AM signals. Spike trains were analysed in terms of the vector strength of spike synchrony to the amplitude envelope. Neurons showed either low-pass or band-pass temporal modulation transfer functions, with the proportion of band-pass responses increasing with increasing sound level. The proportion of units showing a band-pass response varies with unit type: sustained chopper (CS) > transient chopper (CT) > primary-like (PL). Spike synchrony increased with increasing modulation depth. At the lowest modulation depth (6%), significant spike synchrony was only observed near to the unit's best modulation frequency for all unit types tested. Modulation tuning therefore became sharper with decreasing modulation depth. AM detection threshold was calculated for each individual unit as a function of modulation frequency. Chopper units have significantly better AM detection thresholds than do primary-like units. AM detection threshold is significantly worse at 40 dB vs. 10 dB above pure-tone spike rate threshold. Mean modulation detection thresholds for sounds 10 dB above pure-tone spike rate threshold at best modulation

  9. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Summary We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode. PMID:22563531

  10. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Miriam; Martínez-Martín, David; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2012-01-01

    We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode.

  11. Resonant enhancement for amplitude-modulated laser filament induced magnetic field in an inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annou, R.; Tripathi, V. K.; Srivastava, M. P.

    1996-09-01

    The Tripathi-Liu [Phys. Plasmas 1, 990 (1994)] model of magnetic-field generation due to an amplitude-modulated laser in a plasma is revisited. At plasma resonance, where modulation frequency equals the plasma frequency, significant enhancement in the magnetic field is seen. The magnetic field is found to scale directly with laser intensity and plasma frequency, while scaling inversely with laser spot size.

  12. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

  13. Amplitude modulation of quantum-ion-acoustic wavepackets in electron-positron-ion plasmas: Modulational instability, envelope modes, extreme waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Ata-ur-; Kerr, Michael Mc Kourakis, Ioannis; El-Taibany, Wael F.; Qamar, A.

    2015-02-15

    A semirelativistic fluid model is employed to describe the nonlinear amplitude modulation of low-frequency (ionic scale) electrostatic waves in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma. Electrons and positrons are assumed to be degenerated and inertialess, whereas ions are warm and classical. A multiscale perturbation method is used to derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the envelope amplitude, based on which the occurrence of modulational instability is investigated in detail. Various types of localized ion acoustic excitations are shown to exist, in the form of either bright type envelope solitons (envelope pulses) or dark-type envelope solitons (voids, holes). The plasma configurational parameters (namely, the relativistic degeneracy parameter, the positron concentration, and the ionic temperature) are shown to affect the conditions for modulational instability significantly, in fact modifying the associated threshold as well as the instability growth rate. In particular, the relativistic degeneracy parameter leads to an enhancement of the modulational instability mechanism. Furthermore, the effect of different relevant plasma parameters on the characteristics (amplitude, width) of these envelope solitary structures is also presented in detail. Finally, the occurrence of extreme amplitude excitation (rogue waves) is also discussed briefly. Our results aim at elucidating the formation and dynamics of nonlinear electrostatic excitations in superdense astrophysical regimes.

  14. Broadcasting Stations of the World; Part II. Amplitude Modulation Broadcasting Stations According to Frequency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Washington, DC.

    This second part of "Broadcasting Stations of the World", which lists all reported radio broadcasting and television stations with the exception of those in the United States which broadcast on domestic channels, covers amplitude modulation broadcasting stations according to frequency in ascending order. Information included covers call letters,…

  15. Broadcasting Stations of the World; Part I. Amplitude Modulation Broadcasting Stations According to Country and City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Washington, DC.

    This first part of "Broadcasting Stations of the World", which lists all reported radio broadcasting and television stations, with the exception of those in the United States which broadcast on domestic channels, covers amplitude modulation broadcasting stations. Information is indexed alphabetically by country and city. Within a city, stations…

  16. Radar transponder operation with compensation for distortion due to amplitude modulation

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Tise, Bertice L.; Axline, Jr., Robert M.

    2011-01-04

    In radar transponder operation, a variably delayed gating signal is used to gate a received radar pulse and thereby produce a corresponding gated radar pulse for transmission back to the source of the received radar pulse. This compensates for signal distortion due to amplitude modulation on the retransmitted pulse.

  17. Differential Space-Time Coding Scheme Using Star Quadrature Amplitude Modulation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiangbin; Xu, DaZhuan; Bi, Guangguo

    2006-12-01

    Differential space-time coding (DSTC) has received much interest as it obviates the requirement of the channel state information at the receiver while maintaining the desired properties of space-time coding techniques. In this paper, by introducing star quadrature amplitude modulation (star QAM) method, two kinds of multiple amplitudes DSTC schemes are proposed. One is based on differential unitary space-time coding (DUSTC) scheme, and the other is based on differential orthogonal space-time coding (DOSTC) scheme. Corresponding bit-error-rate (BER) performance and coding-gain analysis are given, respectively. The proposed schemes can avoid the performance loss of conventional DSTC schemes based on phase-shift keying (PSK) modulation in high spectrum efficiency via multiple amplitudes modulation. Compared with conventional PSK-based DSTC schemes, the developed schemes have higher spectrum efficiency via carrying information not only on phases but also on amplitudes, and have higher coding gain. Moreover, the first scheme can implement low-complexity differential modulation and different code rates and be applied to any number of transmit antennas; while the second scheme has simple decoder and high code rate in the case of 3 and 4 antennas. The simulation results show that our schemes have lower BER when compared with conventional DUSTC and DOSTC schemes.

  18. Determination of nanovibration amplitudes using frequency-modulated semiconductor laser autodyne

    SciTech Connect

    Usanov, D A; Skripal, A V; Astakhov, E I

    2014-02-28

    The method for measuring nanovibration amplitudes using the autodyne signal of a semiconductor laser at several laser radiation wavelengths is described. The theoretical description of the frequency-modulated autodyne signal under harmonic vibrations of the reflector is presented and the relations for its spectral components are derived using the expansions into the Fourier and Bessel series. The results of numerical modelling based on the proposed method for measuring the reflector nanovibration amplitudes are presented that make use of the low-frequency spectrum of the autodyne signal from the frequency-modulated laser autodyne and the solution of the appropriate inverse problem. The experimental setup is described; the results of the measurements are presented for the nanovibration amplitudes and the autodyne signal spectra under the reflector nanovibrations. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. Instrument Reflections and Scene Amplitude Modulation in a Polychromatic Microwave Quadrature Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Chavers, Greg

    2003-01-01

    A polychromatic microwave quadrature interferometer has been characterized using several laboratory plasmas. Reflections between the transmitter and the receiver have been observed, and the effects of including reflection terms in the data reduction equation have been examined. An error analysis which includes the reflections, modulation of the scene beam amplitude by the plasma, and simultaneous measurements at two frequencies has been applied to the empirical database, and the results are summarized. For reflection amplitudes around 1096, the reflection terms were found to reduce the calculated error bars for electron density measurements by about a factor of 2. The impact of amplitude modulation is also quantified. In the complete analysis, the mean error bar for high- density measurements is 7.596, and the mean phase shift error for low-density measurements is 1.2". .

  20. Monocular 3D see-through head-mounted display via complex amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiankun; Liu, Juan; Han, Jian; Li, Xin

    2016-07-25

    The complex amplitude modulation (CAM) technique is applied to the design of the monocular three-dimensional see-through head-mounted display (3D-STHMD) for the first time. Two amplitude holograms are obtained by analytically dividing the wavefront of the 3D object to the real and the imaginary distributions, and then double amplitude-only spatial light modulators (A-SLMs) are employed to reconstruct the 3D images in real-time. Since the CAM technique can inherently present true 3D images to the human eye, the designed CAM-STHMD system avoids the accommodation-convergence conflict of the conventional stereoscopic see-through displays. The optical experiments further demonstrated that the proposed system has continuous and wide depth cues, which enables the observer free of eye fatigue problem. The dynamic display ability is also tested in the experiments and the results showed the possibility of true 3D interactive display.

  1. Cross-Modulated Amplitudes and Frequencies Characterize Interacting Components in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, Fabian; Schumann, Aicko Y.; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo

    2009-03-01

    The dynamics of complex systems is characterized by oscillatory components on many time scales. To study the interactions between these components we analyze the cross modulation of their instantaneous amplitudes and frequencies, separating synchronous and antisynchronous modulation. We apply our novel technique to brain-wave oscillations in the human electroencephalogram and show that interactions between the α wave and the δ or β wave oscillators as well as spatial interactions can be quantified and related with physiological conditions (e.g., sleep stages). Our approach overcomes the limitation to oscillations with similar frequencies and enables us to quantify directly nonlinear effects such as positive or negative frequency modulation.

  2. Amplitude concentration in a phase-modulated spectrum due to femtosecond filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J. V.; Zhokhov, P. A.; Springer, M. M.; Traverso, A. J.; Yakovlev, V. V.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Sokolov, A. V.; Scully, M. O.

    2017-01-01

    We present a method by which the spectral intensity of an ultrafast laser pulse can be accumulated at selected frequencies by a controllable amount. Using a 4-f pulse shaper we modulate the phase of the frequency components of a femtosecond laser. By inducing femtosecond filamentation with the modulated pulse, we can concentrate the spectral amplitude of the pulse at various frequencies. The phase mask applied by the pulse shaper determines the frequencies for which accumulation occurs, as well as the intensity of the spectral concentration. This technique provides a way to obtain pulses with adjustable amplitude using only phase modulation and the nonlinear response of a medium. This provides a means whereby information which is encoded into spectral phase jumps may be decoded into measurable spectral intensity spikes. PMID:28266540

  3. Amplitude concentration in a phase-modulated spectrum due to femtosecond filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. V.; Zhokhov, P. A.; Springer, M. M.; Traverso, A. J.; Yakovlev, V. V.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Sokolov, A. V.; Scully, M. O.

    2017-03-01

    We present a method by which the spectral intensity of an ultrafast laser pulse can be accumulated at selected frequencies by a controllable amount. Using a 4-f pulse shaper we modulate the phase of the frequency components of a femtosecond laser. By inducing femtosecond filamentation with the modulated pulse, we can concentrate the spectral amplitude of the pulse at various frequencies. The phase mask applied by the pulse shaper determines the frequencies for which accumulation occurs, as well as the intensity of the spectral concentration. This technique provides a way to obtain pulses with adjustable amplitude using only phase modulation and the nonlinear response of a medium. This provides a means whereby information which is encoded into spectral phase jumps may be decoded into measurable spectral intensity spikes.

  4. Coding of amplitude-modulated signals in the cochlear nucleus of a grass frog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikov, N. G.

    2002-07-01

    To study the mechanisms that govern the coding of temporal features of complex sound signals, responses of single neurons located in the dorsal nucleus of the medulla oblongata (the cochlear nucleus) of a curarized grass frog ( Rana temporaria) to pure tone bursts and amplitude modulated tone bursts with a modulation frequency of 20 Hz and modulation depths of 10 and 80% were recorded. The carrier frequency was equal to the characteristic frequency of a neuron, the average signal level was 20 30 dB above the threshold, and the signal duration was equal to ten full modulation periods. Of the 133 neurons studied, 129 neurons responded to 80% modulated tone bursts by discharges that were phase-locked with the envelope waveform. At this modulation depth, the best phase locking was observed for neurons with the phasic type of response to tone bursts. For tonic neurons with low characteristic frequencies, along with the reproduction of the modulation, phase locking with the carrier frequency of the signal was observed. At 10% amplitude modulation, phasic neurons usually responded to only the onset of a tone burst. Almost all tonic units showed a tendency to reproduce the envelope, although the efficiency of the reproduction was low, and for half of these neurons, it was below the reliability limit. Some neurons exhibited a more efficient reproduction of the weak modulation. For almost half of the neurons, a reliable improvement was observed in the phase locking of the response during the tone burst presentation (from the first to the tenth modulation period). The cooperative histogram of a set of neurons responding to 10% modulated tone bursts within narrow ranges of frequencies and intensities retains the information on the dynamics of the envelope variation. The data are compared with the results obtained from the study of the responses to similar signals in the acoustic midbrain center of the same object and also with the psychophysical effect of a differential

  5. NOTE ON TRAVEL TIME SHIFTS DUE TO AMPLITUDE MODULATION IN TIME-DISTANCE HELIOSEISMOLOGY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, R.; Kosovichev, A. G. E-mail: sasha@quake.stanford.ed

    2010-01-10

    Correct interpretation of acoustic travel times measured by time-distance helioseismology is essential to get an accurate understanding of the solar properties that are inferred from them. It has long been observed that sunspots suppress p-mode amplitude, but its implications on travel times have not been fully investigated so far. It has been found in test measurements using a 'masking' procedure, in which the solar Doppler signal in a localized quiet region of the Sun is artificially suppressed by a spatial function, and using numerical simulations that the amplitude modulations in combination with the phase-speed filtering may cause systematic shifts of acoustic travel times. To understand the properties of this procedure, we derive an analytical expression for the cross-covariance of a signal that has been modulated locally by a spatial function that has azimuthal symmetry and then filtered by a phase-speed filter typically used in time-distance helioseismology. Comparing this expression to the Gabor wavelet fitting formula without this effect, we find that there is a shift in the travel times that is introduced by the amplitude modulation. The analytical model presented in this paper can be useful also for interpretation of travel time measurements for the non-uniform distribution of oscillation amplitude due to observational effects.

  6. Numerical generation of a polarization singularity array with modulated amplitude and phase.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dong; Peng, Xinyu; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Yanru

    2016-09-01

    A point having no defined polarized ellipse azimuthal angle (circularly polarized) in a space-variant vector field is called a polarization singularity, and it has three types: Lemon, Monstar, and Star. Recently, the connection of polarization singularities has been performed. Inspired by this, we conduct a numerical generation of a polarization singularity array. Our method is based on two orthogonal linearly polarized light beams with modulated amplitude and phase. With appropriate distribution functions of amplitudes and phases we can control the polarized states of polarization singularities, which offer a possibility to simulate a polarization singularity array.

  7. Dynamic enhancement of autofocusing property for symmetric Airy beam with exponential amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiwei; Lu, Yao; Gong, Lei; Chu, Xiuxiang; Xue, Guosheng; Ren, Yuxuan; Zhong, Mincheng; Wang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Jinhua; Li, Yinmei

    2016-07-01

    A symmetric Airy beam (SAB) autofocuses during free space propagation. Such autofocusing SAB is useful in optical manipulation and biomedical imaging. However, its inherently limited autofocusing property may degrade the performance of the SAB in those applications. To enhance the autofocus, a symmetric apodization mask was proposed to regulate the SAB. In combination with the even cubic phase that shapes the SAB, this even exponential function mask with an adjustable parameter regulates the contribution of different frequency spectral components to the SAB. The propagation properties of this new amplitude modulated SAB (AMSAB) were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Simulation shows that the energy distribution and autofocusing property of an AMSAB can be adjusted by the exponential amplitude modulation. Especially, the beam energy will be more concentrated in the central lobe once the even cubic phase is modulated by the mask with a higher proportion of high-frequency spectral components. Consequently, the autofocusing property and axial gradient force of AMSABs are efficiently enhanced. The experimental generation and characterization for AMSABs were implemented by modulating the collimated beam with a phase-only spatial light modulator. The experimental results well supported the theoretical predictions. With the ability to enhance the autofocus, the proposed exponential apodization modulation will make SAB more powerful in various applications, including optical trapping, fluorescence imaging and particle acceleration.

  8. Discrimination of amplitude-modulated synthetic echo trains by an echolocating bottlenose dolphin.

    PubMed

    Dankiewicz, Lois A; Helweg, David A; Moore, Patrick W; Zafran, Justine M

    2002-10-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) have an acute ability to use target echoes to judge attributes such as size, shape, and material composition. Most target recognition studies have focused on features associated with individual echoes as opposed to information conveyed across echo sequences (feature envelope of the multi-echo train). One feature of aspect-dependent targets is an amplitude modulation (AM) across the return echoes in the echo train created by relative movement of the target and dolphin. The current study examined whether dolphins could discriminate targets with different AM envelopes. "Electronic echoes" triggered by a dolphin's outgoing echolocation clicks were manipulated to create sinusoidal envelopes with varying AM rate and depth. Echo trains were equated for energy, requiring the dolphin to extract and retain information from multiple echoes in order to detect and report the presence of AM. The dolphin discriminated amplitude-modulated echo trains from those that were not modulated. AM depth thresholds were approximately 0.8 dB, similar to other published amplitude limens. Decreasing the rate of modulation from approximately 16 to 2 cycles per second did not affect the dolphin's AM depth sensitivity. The results support multiple-echo processing in bottlenose dolphin echolocation. This capability provides additional theoretical justification for exploring synthetic aperture sonar concepts in models of animal echolocation that potentially support theories postulating formation of images as an ultimate means for target identification.

  9. A method of measuring the amplitude-modulated vacuum field near a conducting mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, Sun-Hyun; Lee, Jai-Hyung; Chang, Joon-Sung

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields of the vacuum mode near a conducting mirror are modified with respect to those in free space, with their amplitudes having a sinusoidal spatial dependence from the mirror. Therefore if we combine this spatially amplitude-modulated vacuum field mode and intense coherent light with a beam splitter, we may detect this fluctuation of the vacuum mode in a homodyne detection scheme. It will give a new method to produce squeezed states of light with a single mirror placed close to an unused port of a beam splitter. We show that the amplitude fluctuation of the combined light can be reduced by a factor of 2 below that of the coherent light. We also discuss the limitations due to the finite line width of the laser and the effective absorption length of the photodiodes.

  10. Measurement of phase and amplitude modulations in Sb-based films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, L. F.; Nalin, M.; Cescato, Lucila

    2009-08-01

    In this work we studied the changes of the optical constants of films in the binary system Sb2O3-Sb2S3 induced by light in the VIS-UV. The measurements were performed before and after homogeneous irradiation of the films to a Hg lamp and in real time during the holographic exposure of the samples (at 458nm). Changes of the absorption coefficient (amplitude grating) and refractive index (phase grating) were measured simultaneously using the self-diffraction using the holographic setup. Besides the films presented a strong photodarkening effect under homogeneous irradiation, the samples holographically exposed presented only refractive index modulations. None amplitude modulation was measured in real time for spatial frequencies of about 1000 l/mm.

  11. Parallel-coupled dual racetrack silicon micro-resonators for quadrature amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Integlia, Ryan A; Yin, Lianghong; Ding, Duo; Pan, David Z; Gill, Douglas M; Jiang, Wei

    2011-08-01

    A parallel-coupled dual racetrack silicon micro-resonator structure is proposed and analyzed for M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation. The over-coupled, critically coupled, and under-coupled scenarios are systematically studied. Simulations indicate that only the over-coupled structures can generate arbitrary M-ary quadrature signals. Analytic study shows that the large dynamic range of amplitude and phase of a modulated over-coupled structure stems from the strong cross-coupling between two resonators, which can be understood through a delicate balance between the direct sum and the "interaction" terms. Potential asymmetries in the coupling constants and quality factors of the resonators are systematically studied. Compensations for these asymmetries by phase adjustment are shown feasible.

  12. Quantitative security evaluation of optical encryption using hybrid phase- and amplitude-modulated keys.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Tamás; Koppa, Pál

    2012-02-20

    In the increasing number of system approaches published in the field of optical encryption, the security level of the system is evaluated by qualitative and empirical methods. To quantify the security of the optical system, we propose to use the equivalent of the key length routinely used in algorithmic encryption. We provide a calculation method of the number of independent keys and deduce the binary key length for optical data encryption. We then investigate and optimize the key length of the combined phase- and amplitude-modulated key encryption in the holographic storage environment, which is one of the promising solutions for the security enhancement of single- and double-random phase-encoding encryption and storage systems. We show that a substantial growth of the key length can be achieved by optimized phase and amplitude modulation compared to phase-only encryption. We also provide experimental confirmation of the model results.

  13. Propagation properties of apertured laser beams with amplitude modulations and phase fluctuations through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, X.; Li, X.

    2011-07-01

    The propagation properties of apertured laser beams with amplitude modulations (AMs) and phase fluctuations (PFs) through atmospheric turbulence are studied in detail both analytically and numerically. The analytical expressions for the average intensity, power in the bucket ( PIB) and Strehl ratio ( S R ) of apertured laser beams with AMs and PFs propagating through atmospheric turbulence are derived. It is found that the worse the phase fluctuation and the higher the amplitude modulation are, the less laser beams are affected by turbulence. Furthermore, apertured Gaussian beams are more sensitive to turbulence than apertured laser beams with AMs and PFs. The average intensity of apertured laser beams with AMs and PFs may be even larger than that of apertured Gaussian beams due to turbulence. In particular, the influence of turbulence on the average maximum intensity of apertured laser beams with PFs and AMs may become serious if an unsuitable truncated parameter is chosen, which should be avoided in practice.

  14. Improving the performance of bright quantum dot single photon sources using temporal filtering via amplitude modulation

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Serkan; Agha, Imad; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2013-01-01

    Single epitaxially-grown semiconductor quantum dots have great potential as single photon sources for photonic quantum technologies, though in practice devices often exhibit nonideal behavior. Here, we demonstrate that amplitude modulation can improve the performance of quantum-dot-based sources. Starting with a bright source consisting of a single quantum dot in a fiber-coupled microdisk cavity, we use synchronized amplitude modulation to temporally filter the emitted light. We observe that the single photon purity, temporal overlap between successive emission events, and indistinguishability can be greatly improved with this technique. As this method can be applied to any triggered single photon source, independent of geometry and after device fabrication, it is a flexible approach to improve the performance of systems based on single solid-state quantum emitters, which often suffer from excess dephasing and multi-photon background emission. PMID:23466520

  15. Velocity-Field Measurements of an Axisymmetric Separated Flow Subjected to Amplitude-Modulated Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosin, Barry James

    2007-01-01

    Active flow control was applied at the point of separation of an axisymmetric, backward-facing-step flow. The control was implemented by employing a Helmholtz resonator that was externally driven by an amplitude-modulated, acoustic disturbance from a speaker located upstream of the wind tunnel. The velocity field of the separating/reattaching flow region downstream of the step was characterized using hotwire velocity measurements with and without flow control. Conventional statistics of the data reveal that the separating/reattaching flow is affected by the imposed forcing. Triple decomposition along with conditional averaging was used to distinguish periodic disturbances from random turbulence in the fluctuating velocity component. A significant outcome of the present study is that it demonstrates that amplitude-modulated forcing of the separated flow alters the flow in the same manner as the more conventional method of periodic excitation.

  16. Phase and Amplitude Modulation Methods for Nonlinear Ultrasound Imaging With CMUTs.

    PubMed

    Satir, Sarp; Degertekin, F Levent

    2016-08-01

    Conventional amplitude and phase modulated pulse sequences for selective imaging of nonlinear tissue and ultrasound contrast agents are designed for piezoelectric transducers that behave linearly. Inherent nonlinearity of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs), especially during large-signal operation, renders these methods inapplicable. In this paper, we present different pulse sequences for nonlinear imaging that are valid for small- and large-signal CMUT operations. For small-signal operation, two-pulse amplitude and phase modulation methods for microbubble and tissue harmonic imaging are presented, where CMUT nonlinearity is compensated via subharmonic excitation. In the large-signal regime, using a nonlinear model, we first show that there is a simple linear relationship between the phases of each harmonic distortion component generated and the input drive signal. Based on this observation, we demonstrate a pulse sequence using N+1 consecutive phase modulated transmit events to extract N harmonics of the nonlinear contrast agent echo content uncorrupted by CMUT nonlinearity. The proposed methods assume no apriori information about the transducer and, therefore, are applicable to any CMUT. The phase modulation method is also valid for piezoelectric transducers and systems with nonlinearities described by Taylor series where the same phase relationship between the input signal and the harmonic content is valid. The proof of principle experiments using a commercial contrast agent validates the phase modulated pulse sequences for CMUTs, operating in a highly nonlinear collapse-snapback mode and for piezoelectric transducers.

  17. Amplitude modulation of vorticity and dissipation by large-scale motions in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yi-Chen; Deng, Bing-Qing; Huang, Wei-Xi; Xu, Chun-Xiao; Turbulence Research Team

    2015-11-01

    Amplitude modulation of both vorticity and dissipation by large-scale out-layer structures is studied using the DNS data of turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers up to Reτ = 1000. Carrier and modulated signals are scale decomposed in both streamwise and spanwise directions, and small-scale envelop is extracted by Hilbert transformation. Two-point amplitude modulation correlation is calculated at a range of wall-normal locations. The modulation strength on the vorticity and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy is found to be much stronger than on all the three components of velocity fluctuations. Distinct peak value of correlation is observed when large-scale signals are extracted from center log region and the corresponding modulated information from below y+ = 10. Also the strength of this peak value increases with Reynolds number, thus supporting the top-down mechanism that the near-wall layer is becoming more influenced by the large-scale structures which gradually emerge as Reynolds number increases. The work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11490551, 11132005, 11322221).

  18. Application of Multi-Frequency Modulation (MFM) for high-speed data communications to a voice frequency channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsman, Charles P.

    1990-06-01

    Multi-Frequency Modulation (MFM) has been developed at NPS using both differential quadrature-phase-shift-keying (DQPSK) and differential-quadrature-amplitude-modulation (DQAM) encoding formats. Previous applications of these encoding formats were on industry standard computers (PC) over a 16 to 20 kHz channel. This report discusses the implementation of MFM to a voice frequency channel of 200 to 3400 Hz, for possible future use with high-speed modems over switched telephone networks. Research and testing for this report included the DQPSK and differential 16 quadrature-amplitude-modulation (D16-QAM) encoding formats implemented on PCs. Experimental results of the implemented MFM signal were comparable to theory with acceptable bit error rates for input signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of 15 dB and higher.

  19. One-dimensional photonic crystals with an amplitude-modulated dielectric constant in the unit cell.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Ulibarrena, Manuel; Blaya, Salvador; Fimia, Antonio

    2004-05-10

    Photonic band structures of one-dimensional photonic crystals with an amplitude-modulated dielectric constant in the unit cell were studied. With this structure two bandgaps in the visible and one in the IR region were predicted. Experimental measurements of the two photonic bandgaps in the visible spectrum were made in a photonic crystal recorded in a holographic emulsion. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical results was obtained.

  20. Differential pulse amplitude modulation for multiple-input single-output OWVLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. H.; Kwon, D. H.; Kim, S. J.; Son, Y. H.; Han, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are widely used for lighting due to their energy efficiency, eco-friendly, and small size than previously light sources such as incandescent, fluorescent bulbs and so on. Optical wireless visible light communication (OWVLC) based on LED merges lighting and communications in applications such as indoor lighting, traffic signals, vehicles, and underwater communications because LED can be easily modulated. However, physical bandwidth of LED is limited about several MHz by slow time constant of the phosphor and characteristics of device. Therefore, using the simplest modulation format which is non-return-zero on-off-keying (NRZ-OOK), the data rate reaches only to dozens Mbit/s. Thus, to improve the transmission capacity, optical filtering and pre-, post-equalizer are adapted. Also, high-speed wireless connectivity is implemented using spectrally efficient modulation methods: orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) or discrete multi-tone (DMT). However, these modulation methods need additional digital signal processing such as FFT and IFFT, thus complexity of transmitter and receiver is increasing. To reduce the complexity of transmitter and receiver, we proposed a novel modulation scheme which is named differential pulse amplitude modulation. The proposed modulation scheme transmits different NRZ-OOK signals with same amplitude and unit time delay using each LED chip, respectively. The `N' parallel signals from LEDs are overlapped and directly detected at optical receiver. Received signal is demodulated by power difference between unit time slots. The proposed scheme can overcome the bandwidth limitation of LEDs and data rate can be improved according to number of LEDs without complex digital signal processing.

  1. Fuzzy control with amplitude/pulse-width modulation of nerve electrical stimulation for muscle force control.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C K; Liu, W-C; Chan, C-C; Ju, M-S

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to study the performance of fuzzy logic controllers combined with simplified hybrid amplitude/pulse-width (AM/PW) modulation to regulate muscle force via nerve electrical stimulation. The recruitment curves with AM/PW and AM modulations were constructed for the calf muscles of rabbits. Integrated with the modulation methods, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and three fuzzy logic controllers were designed and applied for the electrical stimulation of tibial nerves to control the ankle torque under isometric conditions. The performance of the two modulation methods combined with the four controllers was compared when the ankle was fixed at three positions for both in vivo experiments and model simulations using a nonlinear muscle model. For the animal experiments, AM/PW modulation performed better than AM modulation alone. The fuzzy PI controller performed marginally better and was resistant to external noises, though it tended to have a larger overshoot. The performance of the controllers had a similar trend in the three different joint positions, and the simulation results with the nonlinear model matched the experimental results well. In conclusion, AM/PW modulation improved controller performance, while the contribution of fuzzy logic was only marginal.

  2. Fast terahertz optoelectronic amplitude modulator based on plasmonic metamaterial antenna arrays and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessop, David S.; Sol, Christian W. O.; Xiao, Long; Kindness, Stephen J.; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Lin, Hungyen; Griffiths, Jonathan P.; Ren, Yuan; Kamboj, Varun S.; Hofmann, Stephan; Zeitler, J. Axel; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Degl'Innocenti, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    The growing interest in terahertz (THz) technologies in recent years has seen a wide range of demonstrated applications, spanning from security screening, non-destructive testing, gas sensing, to biomedical imaging and communication. Communication with THz radiation offers the advantage of much higher bandwidths than currently available, in an unallocated spectrum. For this to be realized, optoelectronic components capable of manipulating THz radiation at high speeds and high signal-to-noise ratios must be developed. In this work we demonstrate a room temperature frequency dependent optoelectronic amplitude modulator working at around 2 THz, which incorporates graphene as the tuning medium. The architecture of the modulator is an array of plasmonic dipole antennas surrounded by graphene. By electrostatically doping the graphene via a back gate electrode, the reflection characteristics of the modulator are modified. The modulator is electrically characterized to determine the graphene conductivity and optically characterization, by THz time-domain spectroscopy and a single-mode 2 THz quantum cascade laser, to determine the optical modulation depth and cut-off frequency. A maximum optical modulation depth of ~ 30% is estimated and is found to be most (least) sensitive when the electrical modulation is centered at the point of maximum (minimum) differential resistivity of the graphene. A 3 dB cut-off frequency > 5 MHz, limited only by the area of graphene on the device, is reported. The results agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, and demonstrate the first steps towards ultra-fast, graphene based THz optoelectronic devices.

  3. Experimental demonstration of high spectral-efficiency transmission with a novel non-interferometric vector modulator and custom DSP algorithms for coherent PON architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarou, I.; Spatharakis, C.; Katopodis, V.; Dris, S.; Bakopoulos, P.; Schrenk, B.; Avramopoulos, H.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate a flexible multi-format vector modulator for coherent passive optical network (PON) architectures based on a non-interferometric cascade of a Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA) and an Electro-Absorption Modulator (EAM) that exhibits increased simplicity and high energy-efficiency at low cost. 12- and 16- Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) constellations are generated, achieving modulation efficiencies of 3.6 and 4 bits/symbol respectively. The presented results demonstrate successful transmission over 25 km of fiber below the Forward Error Correction (FEC) limit, with sufficient compatible loss-budgets, making the proposed modulator concept an attractive candidate for urban network deployments, where high user density demands spectrally efficient formats. In addition, we describe the operation principle of the proposed modulator in detail and finally, the complete set of the digital signal processing (DSP) functionalities and algorithms that follow the standard coherent detection scheme is given, emphasizing on novel methods for QAM signal demodulation with uncommon constellation diagrams.

  4. Collinear laser spectroscopy of francium using online rubidium vapor neutralization and amplitude modulated lasers.

    PubMed

    Sell, J F; Gulyuz, K; Sprouse, G D

    2009-12-01

    Performing collinear laser spectroscopy on low intensity radioactive beams requires sensitive detection techniques. We explain our apparatus to detect atomic resonances in neutralized (208-210)Fr ion beams at beam energies of 5 keV and intensities of 10(5) s(-1). Efficient neutralization (> or = 80%) is accomplished by passing the beam through a dense Rb vapor. Increased detection efficiency is achieved by amplitude modulating the exciting laser to decrease the scattered light background, allowing fluorescence detection only when the laser is near its minimum in the modulation cycle. Using this technique in a collinear geometry we achieve a background reduction by a factor of 180 and a signal-to-noise increase of 2.2, with the lifetime of the atomic state playing a role in the efficiency of this process. Such laser modulation will also produce sidebands on the atomic spectra which we illustrate.

  5. Collinear laser spectroscopy of francium using online rubidium vapor neutralization and amplitude modulated lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, J. F.; Gulyuz, K.; Sprouse, G. D.

    2009-12-01

    Performing collinear laser spectroscopy on low intensity radioactive beams requires sensitive detection techniques. We explain our apparatus to detect atomic resonances in neutralized F208-210r ion beams at beam energies of 5 keV and intensities of 105 s-1. Efficient neutralization (≥80%) is accomplished by passing the beam through a dense Rb vapor. Increased detection efficiency is achieved by amplitude modulating the exciting laser to decrease the scattered light background, allowing fluorescence detection only when the laser is near its minimum in the modulation cycle. Using this technique in a collinear geometry we achieve a background reduction by a factor of 180 and a signal-to-noise increase of 2.2, with the lifetime of the atomic state playing a role in the efficiency of this process. Such laser modulation will also produce sidebands on the atomic spectra which we illustrate.

  6. Collinear laser spectroscopy of francium using online rubidium vapor neutralization and amplitude modulated lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sell, J. F.; Gulyuz, K.; Sprouse, G. D.

    2009-12-15

    Performing collinear laser spectroscopy on low intensity radioactive beams requires sensitive detection techniques. We explain our apparatus to detect atomic resonances in neutralized {sup 208-210}Fr ion beams at beam energies of 5 keV and intensities of 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}. Efficient neutralization ({>=}80%) is accomplished by passing the beam through a dense Rb vapor. Increased detection efficiency is achieved by amplitude modulating the exciting laser to decrease the scattered light background, allowing fluorescence detection only when the laser is near its minimum in the modulation cycle. Using this technique in a collinear geometry we achieve a background reduction by a factor of 180 and a signal-to-noise increase of 2.2, with the lifetime of the atomic state playing a role in the efficiency of this process. Such laser modulation will also produce sidebands on the atomic spectra which we illustrate.

  7. Behavioral limits of auditory temporal resolution in the rat: amplitude modulation and duration discrimination.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jack B; Cooke, James E; Gilbride, Patrick C; Mitchell, Craig; Zhang, Huiming

    2006-05-01

    Thresholds for detecting the presence of amplitude modulation in a noise carrier were determined for rats using conditioned avoidance procedures. There was a progressive increase in threshold with modulation rates between 5 Hz and 2 kHz. Further tests were conducted to determine difference thresholds for detecting an increase in modulation rate for standard rates of 10, 50, and 100 Hz. The size of the difference threshold increased progressively as the standard rate increased. In addition, thresholds for detecting an increase in the duration of a noise burst were determined for various standard durations. The difference thresholds were constant for values between 10 and 50 ms but increased progressively, with standard durations between 0.1 and 1.0 s.

  8. High Capacity Phase/Amplitude Modulated Optical Communication Systems and Nonlinear Inter-Channel Impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Vahid

    This thesis studies and mathematically models nonlinear interactions among channels of modern high bit rate (amplitude/) phase modulated optical systems. First, phase modulated analogue systems are studied and a differential receiving method is suggested with experimental validation. The main focus of the rest of the thesis is on digital advanced modulation format systems. Cross-talk due to fiber Kerr nonlinearity in two-format hybrid systems as well as 16-QAM systems is mathematically modelled and verified by simulation for different system parameters. A comparative study of differential receivers and coherent receivers is also given for hybrid systems. The model is based on mathematically proven assumptions and provides an intuitive analytical understanding of nonlinear cross-talk in such systems.

  9. Observer weighting of interaural cues in positive and negative envelope slopes of amplitude-modulated waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, I-Hui; Petrosyan, Agavni; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Hickok, Gregory; Saberi, Kourosh

    2011-01-01

    The auditory system can encode interaural delays in highpass-filtered complex sounds by phase locking to their slowly modulating envelopes. Spectrotemporal analysis of interaurally time delayed highpass waveforms reveals the presence of a concomitant interaural level cue. The current study systematically investigated the contribution of time and concomitant level cues carried by positive and negative envelope slopes of a modified sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) high-frequency carrier. The waveforms were generated from concatenation of individual modulation cycles whose envelope peaks were extended by the desired interaural delay, allowing independent control of delays in the positive and negative modulation slopes. In experiment 1, thresholds were measured using a 2-interval forced-choice adaptive task for interaural delays in either the positive or negative modulation slopes. In a control condition, thresholds were measured for a standard SAM tone. In experiment 2, decision weights were estimated using a multiple-observation correlational method in a single-interval forced-choice task for interaural delays carried simultaneously by the positive, and independently, negative slopes of the modulation envelope. In experiment 3, decision weights were measured for groups of 3 modulation cycles at the start, middle, and end of the waveform to determine the influence of onset dominance or recency effects. Results were consistent across experiments: Thresholds were equal for the positive and negative modulation slopes. Decision weights were positive and equal for the time cue in the positive and negative envelope slopes. Weights were also larger for modulations cycles near the waveform onset. Weights estimated for the concomitant interaural level cue were positive for the positive envelope slope and negative for the negative slope, consistent with exclusive use of time cues. PMID:21272630

  10. Amplitude modulation of hydromagnetic waves and associated rogue waves in magnetoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Sabry, R; Moslem, W M; Shukla, P K

    2012-09-01

    It is shown that the dynamics of amplitude-modulated compressional dispersive Alfvénic (CDA) waves in a collisional megnetoplasma is governed by a complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation. The nonlinear dispersion relation for the modulational instability of the CDA waves is derived and investigated numerically. It is found that the growth rate of the modulational instability decreases (increases) with the increase of the normalized electron-ion collision frequency α (the plasma β). The modulational instability criterion for the CGL equation is defined precisely and investigated numerically. The region of the modulational instability becomes narrower with the increase of α and β, indicating that the system dissipates the wave energy by collisions, and a stable CDA wave envelope packet in the form of a hole will be a dominant localized pulse. For a collisionless plasma, i.e., α=0, the CGL equation reduces to the standard nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. The latter is used to investigate the modulational (in)stability region for the CDA waves in a collisionless magnetoplasma. It is shown that, within unstable regions, a random set of nonlinearly interacting CDA perturbations leads to the formation of CDA rogue waves. In order to demonstrate that the characteristics of the CDA rogue waves are influenced by the plasma β, the relevant numerical analysis of the appropriate nonlinear solution of the NLS equation is presented. The application of our investigation to space and laboratory magnetoplasmas is discussed.

  11. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Jorge R.

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  12. Subharmonic excitation in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy in the presence of adsorbed water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Sergio; Barcons, Victor; Verdaguer, Albert; Chiesa, Matteo

    2011-12-01

    In ambient conditions, nanometric water layers form on hydrophilic surfaces covering them and significantly changing their properties and characteristics. Here we report the excitation of subharmonics in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy induced by intermittent water contacts. Our simulations show that there are several regimes of operation depending on whether there is perturbation of water layers. Single period orbitals, where subharmonics are never induced, follow only when the tip is either in permanent contact with the water layers or in pure noncontact where the water layers are never perturbed. When the water layers are perturbed subharmonic excitation increases with decreasing oscillation amplitude. We derive an analytical expression which establishes whether water perturbations compromise harmonic motion and show that the predictions are in agreement with numerical simulations. Empirical validation of our interpretation is provided by the observation of a range of values for apparent height of water layers when subharmonic excitation is predicted.

  13. An integrated Mach-Zehnder modulator bias controller based on eye-amplitude monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Hyeong; Jung, Hyun-Yong; Zimmermann, Lars; Choi, Woo-Young

    2016-03-01

    A novel integrated Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) bias controller based on eye-amplitude monitoring is demonstrated in IHP's 0.25-μm BiCMOS technology. The bias controller monitors the MZM output light, automatically moves the MZM bias voltage to the optimal value that produces the largest eye amplitude, and maintains it there even if the MZM transfer characteristics change due to thermal drift. The controller is based on the feedback loop consisting of Si photodetector, trans-impedance amplifier, rectifier, square amplifier, track-and-hold circuit, comparator, polarity changer, and charge-pump, all of which are monolithically integrated. The area of the controller is 0.083-mm2 and it consumes 92.5-mW. Our bias controller shows successful operation for a commercially-available 850-nm LiNbO3 MZM modulated with 3-Gbps PRBS data by maintaining a very clean eye for at least 30 minutes. Without the controller, the eye for the same MZM modulation becomes completely closed due to thermal drift. The data rate is limited by the Si PD integrated in the controller not by the controller architecture. Since our controller is based on the Si BiCMOS technology which can also provide integrated Si photonics devices on the same Si, it has a great potential for realizing a Si MZM with an integrated bias controller, which should fully demonstrate the advantage of electronic-photonic integrated circuit technology.

  14. A novel oscillation control for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes using a modified electromechanical amplitude modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei; Lin, Yiyu; Liu, Siqi; Zheng, Xudong; Jin, Zhonghe

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports a novel oscillation control algorithm for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes using a modified electromechanical amplitude modulation (MEAM) technique, which enhances the robustness against the frequency variation of the driving mode, compared to the conventional EAM (CEAM) scheme. In this approach, the carrier voltage exerted on the proof mass is frequency-modulated by the drive resonant frequency. Accordingly, the pick-up signal from the interface circuit involves a constant-frequency component that contains the amplitude and phase information of the vibration displacement. In other words, this informational detection signal is independent of the mechanical resonant frequency, which varies due to different batches, imprecise micro-fabrication and changing environmental temperature. In this paper, the automatic gain control loop together with the phase-locked loop are simultaneously analyzed using the averaging method and Routh-Hurwitz criterion, deriving the stability condition and the parameter optimization rules of the transient response. Then, a simulation model based on the real system is set up to evaluate the control algorithm. Further, the proposed MEAM method is tested using a field-programmable-gate-array based digital platform on a capacitive vibratory gyroscope. By optimizing the control parameters, the transient response of the drive amplitude reveals a settling time of 45.2 ms without overshoot, according well with the theoretical prediction and simulation results. The first measurement results show that the amplitude variance of the drive displacement is 12 ppm in an hour while the phase standard deviation is as low as 0.0004°. The mode-split gyroscope operating under atmospheric pressure demonstrates an outstanding performance. By virtue of the proposed MEAM method, the bias instability and angle random walk are measured to be 0.9° h-1 (improved by 2.4 times compared to the CEAM method) and 0.068° (√h)-1 (improved by 1.4 times

  15. Power optimized OSSB modulation to support multi-band OFDM services along hybrid long-reach WDM-PONs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Paulo; Silva, Henrique

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, optical single sideband (OSSB) transmission of multi-services based on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with different signal constellations is investigated through numerical simulation, when the modulation efficiency obtained with a dual-electrode Mach-Zehnder modulator (DE-MZM) is optimized by biasing it below its quadrature point. Furthermore, in order to overcome the intermodulation distortion resulting from modulation efficiency optimization, it is demonstrated that driving each electrical signal with a different electrical power is an effective solution for the signals considered. As result of the optimization, successful delivery after 130 km of a hybrid OSSB signal composed by a custom 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) OFDM gigabit Ethernet (GbE) signal, a 20 MHz 64-QAM LTE signal and three independent OFDM-UWB channels of the first group of ECMA-386 is demonstrated, with negligible power penalty.

  16. Construction of dark spherical spot array using an amplitude-modulated radially polarized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yanzhong; Li, Meng; Long, Li; Shangguan, Hongyuan

    2016-10-01

    A simple and flexible method is presented for constructing a dark spherical spot array with the prescribed spot number and interval along the optical axis. Through reversing the field radiated from a uniform magnetic current line source in combination with an electric current line source having a cosine-squared taper, the desired focal field can be realized in the 4Pi focusing system. The required incident field on the pupil plane can be obtained by solving the inverse problem and is found to be an amplitude-modulated radially polarized beam.

  17. Independent modulations of the transmission amplitudes and phases by using Huygens metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiang; Jia, Sheng Li; Cui, Tie Jun; Zhao, Yong Jiu

    2016-01-01

    We propose ultrathin Huygens metasurfaces to control transmission amplitudes and phases of electromagnetic waves independently, in which each unit cell is comprised of an electric dipole and a magnetic dipole. By altering the electric and magnetic responses of unit cells, arbitrary complex transmission coefficients with modulus values smaller than 0.85 are obtained. Two Huygens metasurfaces capable of controlling the diffraction orders are designed and fabricated by modulating the distributions of the complex transmission coefficients. More complicated functions such as holographic imaging can also be accomplished by using the proposed Huygens metasurfaces. PMID:27197759

  18. Detection of amplitude modulation with squeezed light for sensitivity beyond the shot-noise limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Wu, Ling-An; Kimble, H. J.

    1988-06-01

    An improvement in precision beyond the limit set by the vacuum-state or zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field is reported for the detection of amplitude modulation encoded on a weak signal beam. The improvement is achieved by employing the squeezed light from an optical parametric oscillator to reduce the level of fluctuations below the shot-noise limit. An increase in signal-to-noise ratio of 2.5 dB relative to the shot-noise limit is demonstrated.

  19. Quantum quadrature amplitude modulation system and its applicability to coherent-state quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kentaro; Hirota, Osamu

    2005-08-01

    The quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) signal of coherent state of light is applied to the quantum stream cipher by Y-00 protocol. We first discuss on the performance of the square-root measurement (SRM) for the QAM signals in comparison with the optimum receiver. It is shown that the quantum stream cipher with the QAM signals is designed by using the SRM, taking account of the ciphertext-only attack and the known/chosen plain attack. Furthermore, the modification of the quantum stream cipher with the QAM signals is considered.

  20. Generation of an axially super-resolved quasi-spherical focal spot using an amplitude-modulated radially polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Lin, Han; Jia, Baohua; Gu, Min

    2011-07-01

    An axially super-resolved quasi-spherical focal spot can be generated by focusing an amplitude-modulated radially polarized beam through a high numerical aperture objective. A method based on the unique depolarization properties of a circular focus is proposed to design the amplitude modulation. The generated focal spot shows a ratio of x:y:z=1:1:1.48 for the normalized FWHM in three dimensions, compared to that of x:y:z=1:0.74:1.72 under linear polarization (in the x direction) illumination. Moreover, the focusable light efficiency of the designed amplitude-modulated beam is 65%, which is more than 3 times higher than the optimized case under linear polarization and thus make the amplitude-modulated radial polarization beam more suitable for a wide range of applications.

  1. Sensitive detection of vortex-core resonance using amplitude-modulated magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaomin; Hu, Shaojie; Hidegara, Makoto; Yakata, Satoshi; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and manipulating the dynamic properties of the magnetic vortices stabilized in patterned ferromagnetic structures are of great interest owing to the superior resonant features with the high thermal stability and their flexible tunability. So far, numerous methods for investigating the dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex have been proposed and demonstrated. However, those techniques have some regulations such as spatial resolution, experimental facility and sensitivity. Here, we develop a simple and sensitive method for investigating the vortex-core dynamics by using the electrically separated excitation and detection circuits. We demonstrate that the resonant oscillation of the magnetic vortex induced by the amplitude- modulated alternating-sign magnetic field is efficiently picked up by the lock-in detection with the modulated frequency. By extending this method, we also investigate the size dependence and the influence of the magneto-static interaction in the resonant property of the magnetic vortex. PMID:26647840

  2. Nyquist 4-ary pulse amplitude modulation scheme based on electrical Nyquist pulse shaping and fiber Bragg grating filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Chen, Xue; Ju, Cheng; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Huitao

    2015-04-01

    Intensity modulation and direct detection signal are sensitive to power fading and nonlinear intersymbol interference (ISI) induced by modulator chirp, fiber dispersion, and square-law photo-detection. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a Nyquist 4-ary pulse amplitude modulation and direct detection scheme relying on pulse-shaping with an electrical filter and optical equalization with a vestigial-sideband (VSB) filter in the transmitter. The power fading could be eliminated by using the VSB filter. Compared with conventional 4-ary pulse amplitude modulation, the Nyquist signal has a stronger resistance to nonlinear ISI.

  3. General analytic solution for far-field phase and amplitude control, with a phase-only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lewis Z; O'Keeffe, Kevin; Lloyd, David T; Hooker, Simon M

    2014-04-01

    We present an analytical solution for the phase introduced by a phase-only spatial light modulator to generate far-field phase and amplitude distributions within a domain of interest. The solution is demonstrated experimentally and shown to enable excellent control of the far-field amplitude and phase.

  4. Generation of a widely spaced optical frequency comb using an amplitude modulator pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, Fatima C. G.; Ellis, Andrew D.

    2005-06-01

    Multi-wavelength sources are required for wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) optical communication systems, and typically a bank of DFB lasers is used. However, large costs are involved to provide wavelength selected sources and high precision wavelength lockers. Optical comb generation is attractive solution, minimizing the component count and improving wavelength stability. In addition, comb generation offers the potential for new WDM architectures, such as coherent WDM, as it preserves the phase relation between the generated channels. Complex comb generation systems have been introduced in the past, using fibre ring lasers [1] or non-linear effects within long fibres [2]. More recently, simpler set-ups were proposed, including hybrid amplitude-phase modulation schemes [3-5]. However, the narrow line spacing of these systems, typically 17 GHz, restricts their use to bit rates up to 10 Gbit/s. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a simple method of comb generation that is suitable for bit rates up to 42.667 Gbit/s. The comb generator was composed of two Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZM) in series, each being driven with a sinusoidal wave at 42.667 GHz with a well-defined phase relationship. As a result, 7 comb lines separated by 42.667 GHz were generated from a single source, when amplitude up to 2.2 Vp was applied to the modulators, giving flatness better than 1 dB. By passively multiplexing 8 source lasers with the comb generator and minimising inter-modulator dispersion, it was possible to achieve a multi-wavelength transmitter with 56 channels, with flatness better than 1.2 dB across 20 nm (2.4 THz).

  5. Reflection-type spatial amplitude modulation of visible light based on a sub-wavelength plasmonic absorber.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chi-Young; Yi, Yoonsik; Choi, Choon-Gi

    2016-03-01

    We present a method for reflection-type spatial amplitude modulation using a sub-wavelength plasmonic absorber structure that can operate in the visible region. We utilize a pixelated array of absorbing elements based on a two-dimensional sub-wavelength metal grating, and the reflectance of each pixel is controlled by simple structural modification. For the purpose of validation, numerical simulations were performed on an amplitude modulation hologram fabricated using our method.

  6. Habituation of Auditory Steady State Responses Evoked by Amplitude-Modulated Acoustic Signals in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Gutierrez, Pavel; Castro-Fariñas, Anisleidy; Morgado-Rodriguez, Lisbet; Velarde-Reyes, Ernesto; Martínez, Agustín D.; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Generation of the auditory steady state responses (ASSR) is commonly explained by the linear combination of random background noise activity and the stationary response. Based on this model, the decrease of amplitude that occurs over the sequential averaging of epochs of the raw data has been exclusively linked to the cancelation of noise. Nevertheless, this behavior might also reflect the non-stationary response of the ASSR generators. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the ASSR time course in rats with different auditory maturational stages. ASSR were evoked by 8-kHz tones of different supra-threshold intensities, modulated in amplitude at 115 Hz. Results show that the ASSR amplitude habituated to the sustained stimulation and that dishabituation occurred when deviant stimuli were presented. ASSR habituation increased as animals became adults, suggesting that the ability to filter acoustic stimuli with no-relevant temporal information increased with age. Results are discussed in terms of the current model of the ASSR generation and analysis procedures. They might have implications for audiometric tests designed to assess hearing in subjects who cannot provide reliable results in the psychophysical trials. PMID:26557360

  7. Improvement of the Spatial Amplitude Isotropy of a ^4He Magnetometer Using a Modulated Pumping Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chéron, B.; Gilles, H.; Hamel, J.; Moreau, O.; Noël, E.

    1997-08-01

    Optically pumped magnetometers are scalar magnetometers. Contrary to vectoriel magnetometers, they measure the total magnetic field whatever the direction of the sensor. However, for some orientations of the magnetometer with respect to the magnetic field direction, the resonant signal vanishes and the measurement is impossible. In this paper we present a simple solution to reduce the amplitude spatial anisotropy and apply it to a ^4He magnetometer developed in our Laboratory. Les magnétomètres à pompage optique sont des magnétomètres scalaires. Contrairement aux magnétomètres vectoriels, ils mesurent le module du champ magnétique quelle que soit l'orientation du capteur dans l'espace. Cependant, pour certaines orientations du magnétomètre par rapport à la direction du champ à mesurer, l'amplitude du signal de résonance s'annule et la mesure devient impossible. Dans cet article, nous présentons une solution simple pour réduire l'anisotropie spatiale d'amplitude et nous l'appliquons à un magnétomètre à hélium-4 développé dans notre Laboratoire.

  8. Amplitude-modulated stimuli reveal auditory-visual interactions in brain activity and brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Mark; Rees, Adrian; Vuong, Quoc C.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal congruence between auditory and visual signals coming from the same source can be a powerful means by which the brain integrates information from different senses. To investigate how the brain uses temporal information to integrate auditory and visual information from continuous yet unfamiliar stimuli, we used amplitude-modulated tones and size-modulated shapes with which we could manipulate the temporal congruence between the sensory signals. These signals were independently modulated at a slow or a fast rate. Participants were presented with auditory-only, visual-only, or auditory-visual (AV) trials in the fMRI scanner. On AV trials, the auditory and visual signal could have the same (AV congruent) or different modulation rates (AV incongruent). Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, we found that auditory regions showed increased functional connectivity predominantly with frontal regions for AV incongruent relative to AV congruent stimuli. We further found that superior temporal regions, shown previously to integrate auditory and visual signals, showed increased connectivity with frontal and parietal regions for the same contrast. Our findings provide evidence that both activity in a network of brain regions and their connectivity are important for AV integration, and help to bridge the gap between transient and familiar AV stimuli used in previous studies. PMID:26483710

  9. Propagation of shear waves generated by a modulated finite amplitude radiation force in a viscoelastic medium.

    PubMed

    Giannoula, Alexia; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2009-03-01

    An effective way to generate localized narrowband low-frequency shear waves within tissue noninvasively, is by the modulated radiation force, resulting from the interference of two confocal quasi-CW ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies. By using approximate viscoelastic Green's functions, investigations of the properties of the propagated shear-field component at the fundamental modulation frequency were previously reported by our group. However, high-amplitude source excitations may be needed to increase the signal-to-noise-ratio for shear-wave detection in tissue. This paper reports a study of the generation and propagation of dynamic radiation force components at harmonics of the modulation frequency for conditions that generally correspond to diagnostic safety standards. We describe the propagation characteristics of the resulting harmonic shear waves and discuss how they depend on the parameters of nonlinearity, focusing gain, and absorption. For conditions of high viscosity (believed to be characteristic of soft tissue) and higher modulation frequencies, the approximate shear wave Green's function is inappropriate. A more exact viscoelastic Green's function is derived in k-space, and using this, it is shown that the lowpass and dispersive effects, associated with a Voigt model of tissue, are more accurately represented. Finally, it is shown how the viscoelastic properties of the propagating medium can be estimated, based on several spectral components of the shearwave spectrum.

  10. Context-dependent modulation of cutaneous reflex amplitudes during forward and backward leg cycling.

    PubMed

    Zehr, E Paul; Hundza, Sandra R; Balter, Jaclyn E; Loadman, Pamela M

    2009-10-01

    We used amplitude modulation of cutaneous reflexes during leg cycling as a paradigm to investigate neural control mechanisms regulating forward (FWD) and backward (BWD) rhythmic limb movement. Our prediction was a simple reversal of reflex modulation during BWD leg cycling and context-dependent reflex modulation. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation delivered to the superficial peroneal (SP) and distal tibial (TIB) nerves at the ankle. EMG recordings were collected from muscles acting at the hip, knee, and ankle. Kinematic data were also collected at these joints. Cutaneous reflexes were analyzed according to the phase of movement in which they were evoked. When functional phases (i.e., flexion or extension) of cycling were matched between FWD and BWD, background EMG and reflex modulation patterns were generally similar. The reflex patterns when compared at similar functional phases presented as a simple reversal suggesting FWD and BWD cycling are regulated by similar neural mechanisms. The general reflex regulation of limb trajectory was maintained between cycling directions in accordance with the task requirements of the movement direction.

  11. Apoptosis induced by ultraviolet radiation is enhanced by amplitude modulated radiofrequency radiation in mutant yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Markkanen, Ari; Penttinen, Piia; Naarala, Jonne; Pelkonen, Jukka; Sihvonen, Ari-Pekka; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure affects cell death processes of yeast cells. Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells of the strains KFy417 (wild-type) and KFy437 (cdc48-mutant) were exposed to 900 or 872 MHz RF fields, with or without exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and incubated simultaneously with elevated temperature (+37 degrees C) to induce apoptosis in the cdc48-mutated strain. The RF exposure was carried out in a special waveguide exposure chamber where the temperature of the cell cultures can be precisely controlled. Apoptosis was analyzed using the annexin V-FITC method utilizing flow cytometry. Amplitude modulated (217 pulses per second) RF exposure significantly enhanced UV induced apoptosis in cdc48-mutated cells, but no effect was observed in cells exposed to unmodulated fields at identical time-average specfic absorption rates (SAR, 0.4 or 3.0 W/kg). The findings suggest that amplitude modulated RF fields, together with known damaging agents, can affect the cell death process in mutated yeast cells. Bioelectromagnetics 25:127-133, 2004.

  12. Amplitude-sensitive modulation thermography to measure moisture in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Walter; Buescher, Konstantin A.; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    1998-03-01

    There have been reports about moisture detection in building walls by reflective IR-thermography. Typically, only limited results could be obtained because of the emission coefficient variations, leaking radiation or inhomogeneous illumination of the object. In addition, the quantitative relation between remission spectra and the moisture has often been unclear. Reflectometry uses constant excitation illumination which is recorded by the IR camera. With the use of the 'lock-in-technology' a low frequency modulated signal of an IR radiation source is coupled with the thermo camera and a frequency and phase sensitive signal from the thermal images can be derived. The advantage is, that emission coefficient dependencies are eliminated and that leaking radiation does not have any influence on the measured signal. The selective water measurement is possible, because there is an interference filter mounted in front of the radiator which has its transmission maximum at the wavelength of an absorption band of water. The area investigated is therefore illuminated under well defined circumstances and quantitative moisture measurement on the surface of building materials becomes a possibility. The illumination modulation is done with a sine wave to facilitate the calculation of the temporal intensity behavior of the amplitude signal. Subsequently, the amplitude image is used to determine the distribution and the level of moisture quantitatively. Point measurements in the laboratory were carried out on several building materials with changing moisture levels. It could be shown that this method successfully eliminates disturbing contributions to the measured signal like surface effects or leaking radiation.

  13. Amplitude-Phase Modulation, Topological Horseshoe and Scaling Attractor of a Dynamical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Lai; Li, Wen; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Yuan-Xi; Zhao, Yi-Bo

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional autonomous chaotic system is discussed in this paper. Some basic dynamical properties of the system, including phase portrait, Poincaré map, power spectrum, Kaplan-Yorke dimension, Lyapunov exponent spectra, signal amplitude and topological horseshoe are studied theoretically and numerically. The main finding by analysis is that the signal amplitude can be modulated via controlling the coefficients of the linear term, cross-product term and squared term simultaneously or respectively, and the phase of x3 can be modulated by the product of the coefficients of the linear term and cross-product term. Furthermore, scaling chaotic attractors of this system are achieved by modified projective synchronization with an optimization-based linear coupling method, which is safer for secure communications than the existed synchronization scheme since the scaling factors can be regarded as the security encoding key. Supported by Hunan Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 2016JJ4036, University Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province under Grant No. 14KJB120007 and the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11504176 and 11602084

  14. Combined quadrature amplitude modulation and convolutional codes for cross-coupled multidimensional channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehrad, M.; Sundberg, C.-E.; McLane, P. J.

    The performance of cross-coupled, M-ary Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) systems is determined when bandwidth efficient trellis codes are used to combat interference. Performance with and without compensation for cross-coupled interference is presented. It is found that simple trellis codes can maintain the error probability at an acceptable level for cross-coupling parameters that render uncoded systems unusable. Up to two dimensional trellis codes are considered for four dimensional QAM signals. The average probability of the most likely error events is calculated by using the method of moments. The results are applicable to any digital communication system using multidimensional quadrature amplitude modulation, e.g., voiceband modems and cross-polarized radio systems. In the paper the analysis is restricted to nondispersive cross-coupling models. In most cases the coding gain is larger than in the absence of cross-coupling interference. Specifically, it is found that simple trellis codes have coding gains of more than 5 dB in cross-coupling interference compared to 3 dB for a Gaussian channel. This is obtained for schemes compared at equal bandwidth.

  15. Accurate Encoding and Decoding by Single Cells: Amplitude Versus Frequency Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Micali, Gabriele; Aquino, Gerardo; Richards, David M.; Endres, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Cells sense external concentrations and, via biochemical signaling, respond by regulating the expression of target proteins. Both in signaling networks and gene regulation there are two main mechanisms by which the concentration can be encoded internally: amplitude modulation (AM), where the absolute concentration of an internal signaling molecule encodes the stimulus, and frequency modulation (FM), where the period between successive bursts represents the stimulus. Although both mechanisms have been observed in biological systems, the question of when it is beneficial for cells to use either AM or FM is largely unanswered. Here, we first consider a simple model for a single receptor (or ion channel), which can either signal continuously whenever a ligand is bound, or produce a burst in signaling molecule upon receptor binding. We find that bursty signaling is more accurate than continuous signaling only for sufficiently fast dynamics. This suggests that modulation based on bursts may be more common in signaling networks than in gene regulation. We then extend our model to multiple receptors, where continuous and bursty signaling are equivalent to AM and FM respectively, finding that AM is always more accurate. This implies that the reason some cells use FM is related to factors other than accuracy, such as the ability to coordinate expression of multiple genes or to implement threshold crossing mechanisms. PMID:26030820

  16. Amplitude modulation schemes for enhancing acoustically-driven microcentrifugation and micromixing.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Hung, Yew M; Tan, Ming K

    2016-09-01

    The ability to drive microcentrifugation for efficient micromixing and particle concentration and separation on a microfluidic platform is critical for a wide range of lab-on-a-chip applications. In this work, we investigate the use of amplitude modulation to enhance the efficiency of the microcentrifugal recirculation flows in surface acoustic wave microfluidic systems, thus concomitantly reducing the power consumption in these devices for a given performance requirement-a crucial step in the development of miniaturized, integrated circuits for true portable functionality. In particular, we show that it is possible to obtain an increase of up to 60% in the acoustic streaming velocity in a microdroplet with kHz order modulation frequencies due to the intensification in Eckart streaming; the streaming velocity is increasing as the modulation index is increased. Additionally, we show that it is possible to exploit this streaming enhancement to effect improvements in the speed of particle concentration by up to 70% and the efficiency of micromixing by 50%, together with a modest decrease in the droplet temperature.

  17. Cochlear Gain Control Estimated from Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Evoked by Amplitude Modulated Tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shixiong; Bian, Lin

    2011-11-01

    It is known that cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) can provide dynamic feedback to the basilar membrane vibration. Nonlinearities in OHC activities can generate distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) measurable in the ear canal. If evoked by amplitude modulation (AM) signals, DPOAEs could provide a means to access the dynamic gain control of the cochlea. In this study, one of the primary stimuli was replaced with an AM tone to evoke DPOAEs in human ears. The results showed that the estimated cochlear gain decreased with the increase in stimulus level and the gain functions obtained from different AM tone levels were continuous. However, there was a difference in the gain functions depending on which primary was modulated. The gain showed a stronger compression when f2 was modulated. Considering that DPOAEs are mainly generated at the f2 place, it suggests that the cochlear gain control is more nonlinear for on-frequency signals. Using AM stimulus could provide clues on how dynamic signals are processed in the cochlea.

  18. Targeted treatment of cancer with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W; Jimenez, Hugo; Pennison, Michael J; Brezovich, Ivan; Morgan, Desiree; Mudry, Albert; Costa, Frederico P; Barbault, Alexandre; Pasche, Boris

    2013-11-01

    In the past century, there have been many attempts to treat cancer with low levels of electric and magnetic fields. We have developed noninvasive biofeedback examination devices and techniques and discovered that patients with the same tumor type exhibit biofeedback responses to the same, precise frequencies. Intrabuccal administration of 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), which are amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies, results in long-term objective responses in patients with cancer and is not associated with any significant adverse effects. Intrabuccal administration allows for therapeutic delivery of very low and safe levels of EMF throughout the body as exemplified by responses observed in the femur, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. In vitro studies have demonstrated that tumor-specific frequencies identified in patients with various forms of cancer are capable of blocking the growth of tumor cells in a tissue- and tumor-specific fashion. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-specific modulation frequencies regulate the expression of genes involved in migration and invasion and disrupt the mitotic spindle. This novel targeted treatment approach is emerging as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with advanced cancer given its excellent tolerability. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the anti-cancer effects of tumor-specific modulation frequencies is likely to lead to the discovery of novel pathways in cancer.

  19. The effect of amplitude modulation on subharmonic imaging with chirp excitation.

    PubMed

    Harput, Sevan; Arif, Muhammad; McLaughlan, James; Cowell, David M J; Freear, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Subharmonic generation from ultrasound contrast agents depends on the spectral and temporal properties of the excitation signal. The subharmonic response can be improved by using wideband and long-duration signals. However, for sinusoidal tone-burst excitation, the effective bandwidth of the signal is inversely proportional to the signal duration. Linear frequency-modulated (LFM) and nonlinear frequency-modulated (NLFM) chirp excitations allow independent control over the signal bandwidth and duration; therefore, in this study LFM and NLFM signals were used for the insonation of microbubble populations. The amplitude modulation of the excitation waveform was achieved by applying different window functions. A customized window was designed for the NLFM chirp excitation by focusing on reducing the spectral leakage at the subharmonic frequency and increasing the subharmonic generation from microbubbles. Subharmonic scattering from a microbubble population was measured for various excitation signals and window functions. At a peak negative pressure of 600 kPa, the generated subharmonic energy by ultrasound contrast agents was 15.4 dB more for NLFM chirp excitation with 40% fractional bandwidth when compared with tone-burst excitation. For this reason, the NLFM chirp with a customized window was used as an excitation signal to perform subharmonic imaging in an ultrasound flow phantom. Results showed that the NLFM waveform with a customized window improved the subharmonic contrast by 4.35 ± 0.42 dB on average over a Hann-windowed LFM excitation.

  20. A role for amplitude modulation phase relationships in speech rhythm perception.

    PubMed

    Leong, Victoria; Stone, Michael A; Turner, Richard E; Goswami, Usha

    2014-07-01

    Prosodic rhythm in speech [the alternation of "Strong" (S) and "weak" (w) syllables] is cued, among others, by slow rates of amplitude modulation (AM) within the speech envelope. However, it is unclear exactly which envelope modulation rates and statistics are the most important for the rhythm percept. Here, the hypothesis that the phase relationship between "Stress" rate (∼2 Hz) and "Syllable" rate (∼4 Hz) AMs provides a perceptual cue for speech rhythm is tested. In a rhythm judgment task, adult listeners identified AM tone-vocoded nursery rhyme sentences that carried either trochaic (S-w) or iambic patterning (w-S). Manipulation of listeners' rhythm perception was attempted by parametrically phase-shifting the Stress AM and Syllable AM in the vocoder. It was expected that a 1π radian phase-shift (half a cycle) would reverse the perceived rhythm pattern (i.e., trochaic → iambic) whereas a 2π radian shift (full cycle) would retain the perceived rhythm pattern (i.e., trochaic → trochaic). The results confirmed these predictions. Listeners judgments of rhythm systematically followed Stress-Syllable AM phase-shifts, but were unaffected by phase-shifts between the Syllable AM and the Sub-beat AM (∼14 Hz) in a control condition. It is concluded that the Stress-Syllable AM phase relationship is an envelope-based modulation statistic that supports speech rhythm perception.

  1. Optical-wireless-optical full link for polarization multiplexing quadrature amplitude/phase modulation signal transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan; Zhang, Junwen

    2013-11-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optical wireless integration system at the Q-band, in which up to 40 Gb/s polarization multiplexing multilevel quadrature amplitude/phase modulation (PM-QAM) signal can be first transmitted over 20 km single-mode fiber-28 (SMF-28), then delivered over a 2 m 2 × 2 multiple-input multiple-output wireless link, and finally transmitted over another 20 km SMF-28. The PM-QAM modulated wireless millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signal at 40 GHz is generated based on the remote heterodyning technique, and demodulated by the radio-frequency transparent photonic technique based on homodyne coherent detection and baseband digital signal processing. The classic constant modulus algorithm equalization is used at the receiver to realize polarization demultiplexing of the PM-QAM signal. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we realize the conversion of the PM-QAM modulated wireless mm-wave signal to the optical signal as well as 20 km fiber transmission of the converted optical signal.

  2. Targeted treatment of cancer with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W.; Jimenez, Hugo; Pennison, Michael J.; Brezovich, Ivan; Morgan, Desiree; Mudry, Albert; Costa, Frederico P.; Barbault, Alexandre; Pasche, Boris

    2013-01-01

    In the past century, there have been many attempts to treat cancer with low levels of electric and magnetic fields. We have developed noninvasive biofeedback examination devices and techniques and discovered that patients with the same tumor type exhibit biofeedback responses to the same, precise frequencies. Intrabuccal administration of 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), which are amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies, results in long-term objective responses in patients with cancer and is not associated with any significant adverse effects. Intrabuccal administration allows for therapeutic delivery of very low and safe levels of EMF throughout the body as exemplified by responses observed in the femur, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. In vitro studies have demonstrated that tumor-specific frequencies identified in patients with various forms of cancer are capable of blocking the growth of tumor cells in a tissue- and tumor-specific fashion. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-specific modulation frequencies regulate the expression of genes involved in migration and invasion and disrupt the mitotic spindle. This novel targeted treatment approach is emerging as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with advanced cancer given its excellent tolerability. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the anti-cancer effects of tumor-specific modulation frequencies is likely to lead to the discovery of novel pathways in cancer. PMID:24206915

  3. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Effects of prior listening exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Anderson, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 15, 050002 (2012)] has reported that for both broadband and narrowband noise carrier signals in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. These results may be suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening, although many details of this enhancement effect are unknown. Given recent findings that demonstrate improvements in speech understanding with prior exposure to reverberant listening environments, it is of interest to determine whether listening exposure to a reverberant room might also influence AM detection in the room, and perhaps contribute to the AM enhancement effect. Here, AM detection thresholds were estimated (using an adaptive 2-alternative forced-choice procedure) in each of two listening conditions: one in which consistent listening exposure to a particular room was provided, and a second that intentionally disrupted listening exposure by varying the room from trial-to-trial. Results suggest that consistent prior listening exposure contributes to enhanced AM sensitivity in rooms. [Work supported by the NIH/NIDCD.] PMID:24163718

  4. A multiple-input-multiple-output visible light communication system based on VCSELs and spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hai-Han; Lin, Ying-Pyng; Wu, Po-Yi; Chen, Chia-Yi; Chen, Min-Chou; Jhang, Tai-Wei

    2014-02-10

    A multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) visible light communication (VLC) system employing vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and spatial light modulators (SLMs) with 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM)-orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) modulating signal is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The transmission capacity of system is significantly increased by space-division demultiplexing scheme. With the assistance of low noise amplifier (LNA) and data comparator, good bit error rate (BER) performance, clear constellation map, and clear eye diagram are achieved for each optical channel. Such a MIMO VLC system would be attractive for providing services including data and telecommunication services. Our proposed system is suitably applicable to the lightwave communication system in wireless transmission.

  5. High-speed and reconfigurable all-optical signal processing for phase and amplitude modulated signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleghi, Salman

    Technology has empowered people in all walks of life to generate, store, and communicate enormous amounts of data. Recent technological advances in high-speed backbone data networks, together with the growing trend toward bandwidth-demanding applications such as data and video sharing, cloud computing, and data collection systems, have created a need for higher capacities in signal transmission and signal processing. Optical communication systems have long benefited from the large bandwidth of optical signals (beyond tera-hertz) to transmit information. Through the use of optical signal processing techniques, this Ph.D. dissertation explores the potential of very-high-speed optics to assist electronics in processing huge amounts of data at high speeds. Optical signal processing brings together various fields of optics and signal processing---nonlinear devices and processes, analog and digital signals, and advanced data modulation formats---to achieve high-speed signal processing functions that can potentially operate at the line rate of fiber optic communications. Information can be encoded in amplitude, phase, wavelength, polarization, and spatial features of an optical wave to achieve high-capacity transmission. Many advances in the key enabling technologies have led to recent research in optical signal processing for digital signals that are encoded in one or more of these dimensions. Optical Kerr nonlinearities have femto-second response times that have been exploited for fast processing of optical signals. Various optical nonlinearities and chromatic dispersions have enabled key sub-system applications such as wavelength conversion, multicasting, multiplexing, demultiplexing, and tunable optical delays. In this Ph.D. dissertation, we employ these recent advances in the enabling technologies for high-speed optical signal processing to demonstrate various techniques that can process phase- and amplitude-encoded optical signals at the line rate of optics. We use

  6. Suppression of phase and amplitude J(HH) modulations in HSQC experiments.

    PubMed

    Castañar, Laura; Sistaré, Eduard; Virgili, Albert; Williamson, R Thomas; Parella, Teodor

    2015-02-01

    The amplitude and the phase of cross peaks in conventional 2D HSQC experiments are modulated by both proton-proton, J(HH), and proton-carbon, (1)J(CH), coupling constants. It is shown by spectral simulation and experimentally that J(HH) interferences are suppressed in a novel perfect-HSQC pulse scheme that incorporates perfect-echo INEPT periods. The improved 2D spectra afford pure in-phase cross peaks with respect to (1)J(CH) and J(HH), irrespective of the experiment delay optimization. In addition, peak volumes are not attenuated by the influence of J(HH), rendering practical issues such as phase correction, multiplet analysis, and signal integration more appropriate.

  7. Resonance of a Metal Drop under the Effect of Amplitude-Modulated High Frequency Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiahong; Lei, Zuosheng; Zhu, Hongda; Zhang, Lijie; Magnetic Hydrodynamics(Siamm) Team; Magnetic Mechanics; Engineering(Smse) Team

    2016-11-01

    The resonance of a sessile and a levitated drop under the effect of high frequency amplitude-modulated magnetic field (AMMF) is investigated experimentally and numerically. It is a new method to excite resonance of a metal drop, which is different from the case in the presence of a low-frequency magnetic field. The transient contour of the drop is obtained in the experiment and the simulation. The numerical results agree with the experimental results fairly well. At a given frequency and magnetic flux density of the high frequency AMMF, the edge deformations of the drop with an azimuthal wave numbers were excited. A stability diagram of the shape oscillation of the drop and its resonance frequency spectrum are obtained by analysis of the experimental and the numerical data. The results show that the resonance of the drop has a typical character of parametric resonance. The National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51274237 and 11372174).

  8. Modulation of spin transfer torque amplitude in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Clément, P.-Y.; Baraduc, C. Chshiev, M.; Diény, B.; Ducruet, C.; Vila, L.

    2015-09-07

    Magnetization switching induced by spin transfer torque is used to write magnetic memories (Magnetic Random Access Memory, MRAM) but can be detrimental to the reading process. It would be quite convenient therefore to modulate the efficiency of spin transfer torque. A solution is adding an extra degree of freedom by using double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with two spin-polarizers, with controllable relative magnetic alignment. We demonstrate, for these structures, that the amplitude of in-plane spin transfer torque on the middle free layer can be efficiently tuned via the magnetic configuration of the electrodes. Using the proposed design could thus pave the way towards more reliable read/write schemes for MRAM. Moreover, our results suggest an intriguing effect associated with the out-of-plane (field-like) spin transfer torque, which has to be further investigated.

  9. Bit error probability of trellis-coded quadrature amplitude modulation over cross-coupled multidimensional channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehrad, Mohsen; Sundberg, Carl-Erik W.

    1987-04-01

    Average bit error probabilities for M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (MQAM) systems are evaluated using a truncated union bound to calculate an approximate upper bound on the average bit error probability. Coded BPSK and QSPK are studied in a dual-polarized channel with and without an interference compensator. Trellis-coded MQAM signals are also examined. A new technique, dual-channel polarization hopping, which provides diversity gains when applied to coded cross-coupled channels is proposed. Average bit error probabilities for convolutionally coded QAM schemes in cross-coupled interference channels are derived. It is concluded that trellis-coded QAM schemes give larger coding gains in cross-coupled interference channels than in Gaussian noise and the choice of optimum code for the trellis-coded QAM scheme depends on the expected interference level.

  10. Auditory steady-state responses reveal amplitude modulation gap detection thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Bernhard; Pantev, Christo

    2004-05-01

    Auditory evoked magnetic fields were recorded from the left hemisphere of healthy subjects using a 37-channel magnetometer while stimulating the right ear with 40-Hz amplitude modulated (AM) tone-bursts with 500-Hz carrier frequency in order to study the time-courses of amplitude and phase of auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs). The stimulus duration of 300 ms and the duration of the silent periods (3-300 ms) between succeeding stimuli were chosen to address the question whether the time-course of the ASSR can reflect both temporal integration and temporal resolution in the central auditory processing. Long lasting perturbations of the ASSR were found after gaps in the AM sound, even for gaps of short duration. These were interpreted as evidences for an auditory reset mechanism. Concomitant psycho-acoustical tests corroborated that gap durations perturbing the ASSR were in the same range as the threshold for AM gap detection. Magnetic source localizations estimated the ASSR sources in the primary auditory cortex, suggesting that the processing of temporal structures in the sound is performed at or below the cortical level.

  11. Sub-nanometer Resolution Imaging with Amplitude-modulation Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Piantanida, Luca; Cafolla, Clodomiro; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a well-established technique for nanoscale imaging of samples in air and in liquid. Recent studies have shown that when operated in amplitude-modulation (tapping) mode, atomic or molecular-level resolution images can be achieved over a wide range of soft and hard samples in liquid. In these situations, small oscillation amplitudes (SAM-AFM) enhance the resolution by exploiting the solvated liquid at the surface of the sample. Although the technique has been successfully applied across fields as diverse as materials science, biology and biophysics and surface chemistry, obtaining high-resolution images in liquid can still remain challenging for novice users. This is partly due to the large number of variables to control and optimize such as the choice of cantilever, the sample preparation, and the correct manipulation of the imaging parameters. Here, we present a protocol for achieving high-resolution images of hard and soft samples in fluid using SAM-AFM on a commercial instrument. Our goal is to provide a step-by-step practical guide to achieving high-resolution images, including the cleaning and preparation of the apparatus and the sample, the choice of cantilever and optimization of the imaging parameters. For each step, we explain the scientific rationale behind our choices to facilitate the adaptation of the methodology to every user's specific system. PMID:28060262

  12. A coronagraph based on two spatial light modulators for active amplitude apodizing and phase corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhao, Gang; Wu, Zhen; Chen, Rui; Liu, Chengchao; Yang, Feng; Yang, Chao

    2014-08-01

    Almost all high-contrast imaging coronagraphs proposed until now are based on passive coronagraph optical components. Recently, Ren and Zhu proposed for the first time a coronagraph that integrates a liquid crystal array (LCA) for the active pupil apodizing and a deformable mirror (DM) for the phase corrections. Here, for demonstration purpose, we present the initial test result of a coronagraphic system that is based on two liquid crystal spatial light modulators (SLM). In the system, one SLM is served as active pupil apodizing and amplitude correction to suppress the diffraction light; another SLM is used to correct the speckle noise that is caused by the wave-front distortions. In this way, both amplitude and phase error can be actively and efficiently compensated. In the test, we use the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to control two SLMs, which is based on the point spread function (PSF) sensing and evaluation and optimized for a maximum contrast in the discovery area. Finally, it has demonstrated a contrast of 10-6 at an inner working angular distance of ~6.2 λ/D, which is a promising technique to be used for the direct imaging of young exoplanets on ground-based telescopes.

  13. A Computational Model of Inferior Colliculus Responses to Amplitude Modulated Sounds in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rabang, Cal F.; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Venkataraman, Yamini; Fisher, Zachery L.; Gardner, Stephanie M.; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) receives ascending excitatory and inhibitory inputs from multiple sources, but how these auditory inputs converge to generate IC spike patterns is poorly understood. Simulating patterns of in vivo spike train data from cellular and synaptic models creates a powerful framework to identify factors that contribute to changes in IC responses, such as those resulting in age-related loss of temporal processing. A conductance-based single neuron IC model was constructed, and its responses were compared to those observed during in vivo IC recordings in rats. IC spike patterns were evoked using amplitude-modulated tone or noise carriers at 20–40 dB above threshold and were classified as low-pass, band-pass, band-reject, all-pass, or complex based on their rate modulation transfer function tuning shape. Their temporal modulation transfer functions were also measured. These spike patterns provided experimental measures of rate, vector strength, and firing pattern for comparison with model outputs. Patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic convergence to IC neurons were based on anatomical studies and generalized input tuning for modulation frequency. Responses of modeled ascending inputs were derived from experimental data from previous studies. Adapting and sustained IC intrinsic models were created, with adaptation created via calcium-activated potassium currents. Short-term synaptic plasticity was incorporated into the model in the form of synaptic depression, which was shown to have a substantial effect on the magnitude and time course of the IC response. The most commonly observed IC response sub-types were recreated and enabled dissociation of inherited response properties from those that were generated in IC. Furthermore, the model was used to make predictions about the consequences of reduction in inhibition for age-related loss of temporal processing due to a reduction in GABA seen anatomically with age. PMID:23129994

  14. An investigation of the influence of residual amplitude modulation in phase electro-optic modulator on the signal of fiber-optic gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelaya, D. A.; Smolovik, M. A.; Strigalev, V. E.; Aleynik, A. S.; Deyneka, I. G.

    2016-08-01

    The investigation is devoted to residual amplitude modulation (RAM) of phase electro-optic modulator, which guides are made in LiNbO3 crystal by Ti diffusion technology. An analysis is presented that shows influence of RAM on the signal of fiber-optic gyroscope. The RAM compensation method is offered.

  15. Shaping symmetric Airy beam through binary amplitude modulation for ultralong needle focus

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhao-Xiang; Gong, Lei; Ren, Yu-Xuan; Vaveliuk, Pablo; Chen, Yue; Lu, Rong-De

    2015-11-28

    Needle-like electromagnetic field has various advantages for the applications in high-resolution imaging, Raman spectroscopy, as well as long-distance optical transportation. The realization of such field often requires high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens and the transmission masks. We demonstrate an ultralong needle-like focus in the optical range produced with an ordinary lens. This is achieved by focusing a symmetric Airy beam (SAB) generated via binary spectral modulation with a digital micromirror device. Such amplitude modulation technique is able to shape traditional Airy beams, SABs, as well as the dynamic transition modes between the one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) symmetric Airy modes. The created 2D SAB was characterized through measurement of the propagating fields with one of the four main lobes blocked by an opaque mask. The 2D SAB was verified to exhibit self-healing property against propagation with the obstructed major lobe reconstructed after a certain distance. We further produced an elongated focal line by concentrating the SAB via lenses with different NAs and achieved an ultralong longitudinal needle focus. The produced long needle focus will be applied in optical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  16. State-dependent representation of amplitude-modulated noise stimuli in rat auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Marguet, Stephan L.; Harris, Kenneth D.

    2011-01-01

    Cortical responses can vary greatly between repeated presentations of an identical stimulus. Here we report that both trial-to-trial variability and faithfulness of auditory cortical stimulus representations depend critically on brain state. A frozen amplitude-modulated white noise stimulus was repeatedly presented while recording neuronal populations and local field potentials (LFPs) in auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized rats. An information-theoretic measure was used to predict neuronal spiking activity from either the stimulus envelope or simultaneously recorded LFP. Evoked LFPs and spiking more faithfully followed high-frequency temporal modulations when the cortex was in a “desynchronized” state. In the “synchronized” state, neural activity was poorly predictable from the stimulus envelope, but the spiking of individual neurons could still be predicted from the ongoing LFP. Our results suggest that although auditory cortical activity remains coordinated as a population in the synchronized state, the ability of continuous auditory stimuli to control this activity is greatly diminished. PMID:21525282

  17. EEG amplitude modulation analysis for semi-automated diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Tiago H.; Fraga, Francisco J.; Trambaiolli, Lucas; Anghinah, Renato

    2012-12-01

    Recent experimental evidence has suggested a neuromodulatory deficit in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this paper, we present a new electroencephalogram (EEG) based metric to quantitatively characterize neuromodulatory activity. More specifically, the short-term EEG amplitude modulation rate-of-change (i.e., modulation frequency) is computed for five EEG subband signals. To test the performance of the proposed metric, a classification task was performed on a database of 32 participants partitioned into three groups of approximately equal size: healthy controls, patients diagnosed with mild AD, and those with moderate-to-severe AD. To gauge the benefits of the proposed metric, performance results were compared with those obtained using EEG spectral peak parameters which were recently shown to outperform other conventional EEG measures. Using a simple feature selection algorithm based on area-under-the-curve maximization and a support vector machine classifier, the proposed parameters resulted in accuracy gains, relative to spectral peak parameters, of 21.3% when discriminating between the three groups and by 50% when mild and moderate-to-severe groups were merged into one. The preliminary findings reported herein provide promising insights that automated tools may be developed to assist physicians in very early diagnosis of AD as well as provide researchers with a tool to automatically characterize cross-frequency interactions and their changes with disease.

  18. Sustained selective attention to competing amplitude-modulations in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Riecke, Lars; Scharke, Wolfgang; Valente, Giancarlo; Gutschalk, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Auditory selective attention plays an essential role for identifying sounds of interest in a scene, but the neural underpinnings are still incompletely understood. Recent findings demonstrate that neural activity that is time-locked to a particular amplitude-modulation (AM) is enhanced in the auditory cortex when the modulated stream of sounds is selectively attended to under sensory competition with other streams. However, the target sounds used in the previous studies differed not only in their AM, but also in other sound features, such as carrier frequency or location. Thus, it remains uncertain whether the observed enhancements reflect AM-selective attention. The present study aims at dissociating the effect of AM frequency on response enhancement in auditory cortex by using an ongoing auditory stimulus that contains two competing targets differing exclusively in their AM frequency. Electroencephalography results showed a sustained response enhancement for auditory attention compared to visual attention, but not for AM-selective attention (attended AM frequency vs. ignored AM frequency). In contrast, the response to the ignored AM frequency was enhanced, although a brief trend toward response enhancement occurred during the initial 15 s. Together with the previous findings, these observations indicate that selective enhancement of attended AMs in auditory cortex is adaptive under sustained AM-selective attention. This finding has implications for our understanding of cortical mechanisms for feature-based attentional gain control.

  19. Comparison of discrete multi-tone and pulse amplitude modulation for beyond 100 Gbps short-reach application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Masato; Kai, Yutaka; Tanaka, Toshiki; Takahara, Tomoo; Li, Lei; Yan, Weizhen; Liu, Bo; Tao, Zhenning; Rasmussen, Jens C.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced multi-level modulation is an attractive modulation technique for beyond 100 Gbps short reach optical transmission system. Above all, discrete multi-tone (DMT) technique and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) technique are the strong candidates. We compared the 100 Gbps transmission characteristics of DMT and PAM by simulation and experiment. The comparison was done by using same devices and only the digital signal processing was changed. We studied the transmission distance dependence for 0.5 to 40 km and the impact of the frequency responses of the optical devices. Finally we discuss the features of the both modulation techniques.

  20. Age-related Shifts in Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Peak-ratios and Amplitude Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is an important temporal cue for precise speech and complex sound recognition. However, functional decline of the auditory periphery as well as degradation of central auditory processing due to aging can reduce the salience and resolution of temporal cues. Age-related deficits in central temporal processing have previously been observed at more rapid AM frequencies and various AM depths. These centrally observed changes result from cochlear changes compounded with changes along the ascending auditory pathway. In fact, a decrease in ability to detect temporally modulated sounds accurately could originate from changes in cochlear filtering properties and in cochlear mechanics due to aging. Nonetheless, few studies have examined cochlear mechanisms in AM detection. To assess integrity of the mechanical properties of the auditory periphery, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are a tool commonly used in clinics and in research. In this study, we measured DPOAEs to reveal age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and degradation in AM detection by basilar membrane vibration. Two tones (f1 and f2, f2>f1) at various f2/f1 ratios and simultaneous presentation of one AM and one pure tone were used as stimuli to evoke DPOAEs. In addition of observing reduced DPOAE amplitudes and steeper slopes in the input-output DPOAE functions, higher peak f2/f1 ratios and broader f2/f1 tuning were also observed in aged animals. Aged animals generally had lower distortion product (DP) and first sideband (SB 1) responses evoked by an f1 pure tone and an f2 AM tone, regardless of whether the AM frequency was 45 Hz or 128 Hz. SB 1 thresholds, which corresponds to the smallest stimulus AM depth that can induce cochlear vibrations at the DP generator locus, were higher in aged animals as well. The results suggest that age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and AM detection by basilar membrane vibration are consistent with a reduction in endocochlear

  1. Heteronuclear refocusing by nonlinear phase and amplitude modulation on a single transmitter channel.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jay; Colón, Raul D; Tadanki, Sasidhar; Waddell, Kevin W

    2014-08-01

    The application of low magnetic fields to heteronuclear NMR has expanded recently alongside the emergence of methods for achieving near unity polarization of spin ensembles, independent of magnetic field strength. The parahydrogen induced hyperpolarization methods in particular, often use a hybrid arrangement where a high field spectrometer is used to detect or image polarized molecules that have been conjured on a separate, dedicated polarizer instrument operating at fields in the mT regime where yields are higher. For controlling polarizer chemistry, spare TTL channels of portable NMR spectrometers can be used to pulse program reaction timings in synchrony with heteronuclear RF transformations. The use of a spectrometer as a portable polarizer control module has the advantage of allowing detection in situ, simplifying the process of optimizing polarization yields prior to in vivo experimental trials. Suitable heteronuclear spectrometers compatible with this application are becoming more common, but are still sparsely available in comparison to a large existing infrastructure of single channel NMR consoles. With the goal of expanding the range of these systems to multinuclear applications, the feasibility of rotating a pair of heteronuclear spins ((13)C and (1)H) at 12mT was investigated in this study. Nonlinear phase and amplitude modulated waveforms designed to simultaneously refocus magnetization at 128kHz ((13)C) and 510kHz ((1)H) were generated numerically with optimal control. Although precise quantitative comparisons were not attempted due to limitations of the experimental setup, signals refocused at heteronuclear frequencies with this PANORAMIC approach (Precession And Nutation for Observing Rotation At Multiple Intervals about the Carrier) yielded amplitudes comparable to signals which were refocused using traditional block pulses on heteronuclear channels. Using this PANORAMIC approach to heteronuclear NMR at low field would reduce expense as well as

  2. Electron density in amplitude modulated microwave atmospheric plasma jet as determined from microwave interferometry and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltýnek, J.; Hnilica, J.; Kudrle, V.

    2017-01-01

    Time resolved electron density in an atmospheric pressure amplitude modulated microwave plasma jet is determined using the microwave interferometry method, refined by numerical modelling of the propagation of non-planar electromagnetic waves in the vicinity of a small diameter, dense collisional plasma filament. The results are compared to those from the Stark broadening of the {{\\text{H}}β} emission line. Both techniques show, both qualitatively and quantitatively, a similar temporal evolution of electron density during one modulation period.

  3. Comparison of perceptual properties of auditory streaming between spectral and amplitude modulation domains.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Shimpei; Otsuka, Sho; Furukawa, Shigeto; Kashino, Makio

    2017-03-18

    The two-tone sequence (ABA_), which comprises two different sounds (A and B) and a silent gap, has been used to investigate how the auditory system organizes sequential sounds depending on various stimulus conditions or brain states. Auditory streaming can be evoked by differences not only in the tone frequency ("spectral cue": ΔFTONE, TONE condition) but also in the amplitude modulation rate ("AM cue": ΔFAM, AM condition). The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between the perceptual properties of auditory streaming for the TONE and AM conditions. A sequence with a long duration (400 repetitions of ABA_) was used to examine the property of the bistability of streaming. The ratio of feature differences that evoked an equivalent probability of the segregated percept was close to the ratio of the Q-values of the auditory and modulation filters, consistent with a "channeling theory" of auditory streaming. On the other hand, for values of ΔFAM and ΔFTONE evoking equal probabilities of the segregated percept, the number of perceptual switches was larger for the TONE condition than for the AM condition, indicating that the mechanism(s) that determine the bistability of auditory streaming are different between or sensitive to the two domains. Nevertheless, the number of switches for individual listeners was positively correlated between the spectral and AM domains. The results suggest a possibility that the neural substrates for spectral and AM processes share a common switching mechanism but differ in location and/or in the properties of neural activity or the strength of internal noise at each level.

  4. Correlation of neural responses in the cochlear nucleus with low-frequency noise amplitude modulation of a tonal signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikov, N. G.

    2014-09-01

    The responses of single neurons of the cochlear nucleus of a grass frog to long tonal signals amplitude-modulated by repeat intervals of low-frequency noise have been studied. The carrier frequency always corresponded to the characteristic frequency of the studied cell (a range of 0.2 kHz-2 kHz); the modulated signal was noise in the ranges 0-15 Hz, 0-50 Hz, or 0-150 Hz. We obtained the correlation functions of the cyclic histogram reflecting the change in probability of a neuron pulse discharge (spike) during the modulation period with the shape of the signal envelope in the same period. The form of the obtained correlation functions usually does not change qualitatively with a change in carrier level or modulation depth; however, this could essentially depend of the frequency component of the modulating function. In the majority of cases, comparison of the cyclic histogram of the reaction with only the current amplitude value does not adequately reveal the signal's time features that determine the reaction of a neuron. The response is also determined by the other sound features, primarily by the rate of the change in amplitude. The studied neurons differed among themselves, both in preference toward a certain range of modulated frequencies and in the features of the envelope that caused the cell's response.

  5. Observations of amplitude saturation in ELF/VLF wave generation by modulated HF heating of the auroral electrojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. C.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    2006-06-01

    We present detailed observations of the onset of amplitude saturation in ELF/VLF waves generated via modulated HF heating of naturally-forming, large-scale current systems, such as the auroral electrojet. Broadband ELF/VLF measurements at a ground-based receiver located near the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska, exhibit variations in signal amplitude which are qualitatively consistent with a hard-limiting approximation of the saturation process. A method to approximate the saturation curve as a function of HF power from experimental data is presented, and the results indicate that a ~5-10% reduction in generated ELF signal amplitude is typical at the maximum radiated HF power level (771 kW) for modulation frequencies between 1225 Hz and 3365 Hz. For HF transmissions using sinusoidal amplitude modulation, the saturation dominantly affects the second harmonic of the generated ELF/VLF signal, with amplitudes on average 16% lower than expected at the maximum HF power level.

  6. Digital services using quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) over CATV analog DWDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, JengRong; Selker, Mark D.; Trail, J.; Piehler, David; Levi, Israel

    2000-04-01

    Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) has recently gained great popularity as it provides a cost effective way to increase the transmission capacity of the existing fiber cable plant. For a long time, Dense WDM was exclusively used for baseband digital applications, predominantly in terrestrial long haul networks and in some cases in metropolitan and enterprise networks. Recently, the performance of DWDM components and frequency-stabilized lasers has substantially improved while the costs have down significantly. This makes a variety of new optical network architectures economically viable. The first commercial 8- wavelength DWDM system designed for Hybrid Fiber Coax networks was reported in 1998. This type of DWDM system utilizes Sub-Carrier Multiplexing (SCM) of Quadrature Amplitude Modulated (QAM) signals to transport IP data digital video broadcast and Video on Demand on ITU grid lightwave carriers. The ability of DWDM to provide scalable transmission capacity in the optical layer with SCM granularity is now considered by many to be the most promising technology for future transport and distribution of broadband multimedia services.

  7. Enhanced 16 Spiral quadrature amplitude modulation scheme for coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jing; Li, Chong; Chen, Lin; Chen, Ming

    2014-09-01

    We propose an enhanced 16 Spiral quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) (16 E-Spiral QAM) scheme to overcome the laser phase noise in a coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) system. Considering both additive white Gaussian noise and large phase noise, 16 E-Spiral QAM schemes have a better transmission performance compared to conventional 16 QAM CO-OFDM systems. The simulated results show that the required optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) of the proposed 16 QAM is, respectively, 0.8 and 2.3 dB less than 16 Spiral and conventional 16 QAM at a bit error rate (BER) of 10-3 in a back-to-back case. After 800-km transmission over a single-mode fiber, the tolerance for the laser linewidth of the 16 E-Spiral QAM can improve about 30 kHz with an OSNR of 18 dB compared to that of a conventional 16 QAM.

  8. The pulse-train auditory aftereffect and the perception of rapid amplitude modulations.

    PubMed

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Micheyl, Christophe; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2008-02-01

    Prolonged listening to a pulse train with repetition rates around 100 Hz induces a striking aftereffect, whereby subsequently presented sounds are heard with an unusually "metallic" timbre [Rosenblith et al., Science 106, 333-335 (1947)]. The mechanisms responsible for this auditory aftereffect are currently unknown. Whether the aftereffect is related to an alteration of the perception of temporal envelope fluctuations was evaluated. Detection thresholds for sinusoidal amplitude modulation (AM) imposed onto noise-burst carriers were measured for different AM frequencies (50-500 Hz), following the continuous presentation of a periodic pulse train, a temporally jittered pulse train, or an unmodulated noise. AM detection thresholds for AM frequencies of 100 Hz and above were significantly elevated compared to thresholds in quiet, following the presentation of the pulse-train inducers, and both induced a subjective auditory aftereffect. Unmodulated noise, which produced no audible aftereffect, left AM detection thresholds unchanged. Additional experiments revealed that, like the Rosenblith et al. aftereffect, the effect on AM thresholds does not transfer across ears, is not eliminated by protracted training, and can last several tens of seconds. The results suggest that the Rosenblith et al. aftereffect is related to a temporary alteration in the perception of fast temporal envelope fluctuations in sounds.

  9. Envelope Interactions in Multi-Channel Amplitude Modulation Frequency Discrimination by Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Previous cochlear implant (CI) studies have shown that single-channel amplitude modulation frequency discrimination (AMFD) can be improved when coherent modulation is delivered to additional channels. It is unclear whether the multi-channel advantage is due to increased loudness, multiple envelope representations, or to component channels with better temporal processing. Measuring envelope interference may shed light on how modulated channels can be combined. Methods In this study, multi-channel AMFD was measured in CI subjects using a 3-alternative forced-choice, non-adaptive procedure (“which interval is different?”). For the reference stimulus, the reference AM (100 Hz) was delivered to all 3 channels. For the probe stimulus, the target AM (101, 102, 104, 108, 116, 132, 164, 228, or 256 Hz) was delivered to 1 of 3 channels, and the reference AM (100 Hz) delivered to the other 2 channels. The spacing between electrodes was varied to be wide or narrow to test different degrees of channel interaction. Results Results showed that CI subjects were highly sensitive to interactions between the reference and target envelopes. However, performance was non-monotonic as a function of target AM frequency. For the wide spacing, there was significantly less envelope interaction when the target AM was delivered to the basal channel. For the narrow spacing, there was no effect of target AM channel. The present data were also compared to a related previous study in which the target AM was delivered to a single channel or to all 3 channels. AMFD was much better with multiple than with single channels whether the target AM was delivered to 1 of 3 or to all 3 channels. For very small differences between the reference and target AM frequencies (2–4 Hz), there was often greater sensitivity when the target AM was delivered to 1 of 3 channels versus all 3 channels, especially for narrowly spaced electrodes. Conclusions Besides the increased loudness, the present results

  10. Retrieval of the pulse amplitude and phase from cross-phase modulation spectrograms using the simulated annealing method.

    PubMed

    Honzatko, Pavel; Kanka, J; Vrany, B

    2004-11-29

    The simulated annealing method is used for retrieving the amplitude and phase from cross-phase modulation spectrograms. The method allows us to take into account the birefringence of the measurement fiber and resolution of the optical spectrum analyzer. The influence of the birefringence and analyzer resolution are discussed.

  11. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, quantum decoherence and amplitude modulation in mesoscopic InGaAs/InAlAs rings.

    PubMed

    Ren, S L; Heremans, J J; Gaspe, C K; Vijeyaragunathan, S; Mishima, T D; Santos, M B

    2013-10-30

    Low-temperature Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in the magnetoresistance of mesoscopic interferometric rings patterned on an InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure are investigated for their dependence on excitation current and temperature. The rings have an average radius of 650 nm, and a lithographic arm width of 300 nm, yielding pronounced interference oscillations over a wide range of magnetic fields. Apart from a current and temperature dependence, the oscillation amplitude also shows a quasi-periodic modulation with applied magnetic field. The phase coherence length is extracted by analysis of the fundamental and higher Fourier components of the oscillations, and by direct analysis of the amplitude and its dependence on parameters. It is concluded that the Thouless energy forms the measure of excitation energies for quantum decoherence. The amplitude modulation finds an explanation in the effect of the magnetic flux threading the finite width of the interferometer arms.

  12. Experimental evidence of signal-optical noise interferencelike effect in underwater amplitude-modulated laser optical radar systems.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, L; De Dominicis, L; Ferri de Collibus, M; Fornetti, G; Francucci, M; Guarneri, M; Nuvoli, M; Paglia, E; Ricci, R

    2008-11-15

    We report experimental evidence that in an amplitude-modulated laser optical radar system for underwater 3D imaging the observed contrast oscillations as a function of the modulation frequency originate from an interference-like effect between target signal VT and water backscattered radiation VW. The demonstration relies on the ability to perform a direct measurement of VW in a 25 m long test tank. The proposed data processing method enables one to remove the contribution of water backscattering from the detected signal and drastically reduce signal fluctuations due to the medium. Experiments also confirm the possibility to improve the signal to optical noise ratio and contrast by increasing the modulation frequency.

  13. Spatiotemporal reconstruction of auditory steady-state responses to acoustic amplitude modulations: Potential sources beyond the auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Ehsan Darestani; Goossens, Tine; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2017-03-01

    Investigating the neural generators of auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), i.e., auditory evoked brain responses, with a wide range of screening and diagnostic applications, has been the focus of various studies for many years. Most of these studies employed a priori assumptions regarding the number and location of neural generators. The aim of this study is to reconstruct ASSR sources with minimal assumptions in order to gain in-depth insight into the number and location of brain regions that are activated in response to low- as well as high-frequency acoustically amplitude modulated signals. In order to reconstruct ASSR sources, we applied independent component analysis with subsequent equivalent dipole modeling to single-subject EEG data (young adults, 20-30 years of age). These data were based on white noise stimuli, amplitude modulated at 4, 20, 40, or 80Hz. The independent components that exhibited a significant ASSR were clustered among all participants by means of a probabilistic clustering method based on a Gaussian mixture model. Results suggest that a widely distributed network of sources, located in cortical as well as subcortical regions, is active in response to 4, 20, 40, and 80Hz amplitude modulated noises. Some of these sources are located beyond the central auditory pathway. Comparison of brain sources in response to different modulation frequencies suggested that the identified brain sources in the brainstem, the left and the right auditory cortex show a higher responsiveness to 40Hz than to the other modulation frequencies.

  14. Sensitivity evaluation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to uranium by pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry.

    PubMed

    Herlory, Olivier; Bonzom, Jean-Marc; Gilbin, Rodolphe

    2013-09-15

    Although ecotoxicological studies tend to address the toxicity thresholds of uranium in freshwaters, there is a lack of information on the effects of the metal on physiological processes, particularly in aquatic plants. Knowing that uranium alters photosynthesis via impairment of the water photo-oxidation process, we determined whether pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry was a relevant tool for assessing the impact of uranium on the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and investigated how and to what extent uranium hampered photosynthetic performance. Photosynthetic activity and quenching were assessed from fluorescence induction curves generated by PAM fluorometry, after 1 and 5h of uranium exposure in controlled conditions. The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII was identified as the primary action site of uranium, through alteration of the water photo-oxidation process as revealed by F0/Fv. Limiting re-oxidation of the plastoquinone pool, uranium impaired the electron flux between the photosystems until almost complete inhibition of the PSII quantum efficiency ( [Formula: see text] , EC50=303 ± 64 μg UL(-1) after 5h of exposure) was observed. Non-photochemical quenching (qN) was identified as the most sensitive fluorescence parameter (EC50=142 ± 98 μg UL(-1) after 5h of exposure), indicating that light energy not used in photochemistry was dissipated in non-radiative processes. It was shown that parameters which stemmed from fluorescence induction kinetics are valuable indicators for evaluating the impact of uranium on PSII in green algae. PAM fluorometry provided a rapid and reasonably sensitive method for assessing stress response to uranium in microalgae.

  15. Influence of stimulus parameters on amplitude-modulated stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissionsa

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tiffany A.; Beshaler, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the influence of suppressor frequency (fs) and level (Ls) on stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) recorded using the amplitude-modulated (AM) suppressor technique described by Neely et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 2124-2127 (2005a)]. Data were collected in normal-hearing subjects, with data collection occurring in two phases. In phase 1, SFOAEs were recorded with probe frequency (fp) = 1, 2, and 4 kHz and probe levels (Lp) ranging from 0 to 60 dB sound pressure level (SPL). At each fp, Ls ranged from Ls = Lp to Ls = Lp + 30 dB. Additionally, nine relationships between fs and fp were evaluated, ranging from fs/fp = 0.80 to fs/fp = 1.16. Results indicated that for low suppressor levels, suppressors higher in frequency than fp (fs > fp) resulted in higher AM-SFOAE levels than suppressors lower in frequency than fp (fs < fp). At higher suppressor levels, suppressors both higher and lower in frequency than fp produced similar AM-SFOAE levels, and, in many cases, low-frequency suppressors produced the largest response. Recommendations for stimulus parameters that maximize AM-SFOAE level were derived from these data. In phase 2, AM-SFOAEs were recorded using these parameters for fp = 0.7-8 kHz and Lp = 20-60 dB SPL. Robust AM-SFOAE responses were recorded in this group of subjects using the parameters developed in phase 1. PMID:23927112

  16. Resolving the contribution of the uncoupled phycobilisomes to cyanobacterial pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry signals.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Alonso M; Snellenburg, Joris J; Gwizdala, Michal; Kirilovsky, Diana; van Grondelle, Rienk; van Stokkum, Ivo H M

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry is extensively used to characterize photosynthetic organisms on the slow time-scale (1-1000 s). The saturation pulse method allows determination of the quantum yields of maximal (F(M)) and minimal fluorescence (F(0)), parameters related to the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus. Also, when the sample undergoes a certain light treatment during the measurement, the fluorescence quantum yields of the unquenched and the quenched states can be determined. In the case of cyanobacteria, however, the recorded fluorescence does not exclusively stem from the chlorophyll a in photosystem II (PSII). The phycobilins, the pigments of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting complexes, the phycobilisomes (PB), also contribute to the PAM signal, and therefore, F(0) and F(M) are no longer related to PSII only. We present a functional model that takes into account the presence of several fluorescent species whose concentrations can be resolved provided their fluorescence quantum yields are known. Data analysis of PAM measurements on in vivo cells of our model organism Synechocystis PCC6803 is discussed. Three different components are found necessary to fit the data: uncoupled PB (PB(free)), PB-PSII complexes, and free PSI. The free PSII contribution was negligible. The PB(free) contribution substantially increased in the mutants that lack the core terminal emitter subunits allophycocyanin D or allophycocyanin F. A positive correlation was found between the amount of PB(free) and the rate constants describing the binding of the activated orange carotenoid protein to PB, responsible for non-photochemical quenching.

  17. Phase retrieval via spatial light modulator phase modulation in 4f optical setup: numerical inverse imaging with sparse regularization for phase and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Katkovnik, Vladimir; Astola, Jaakko

    2012-01-01

    The 4f optical setup is considered with a wave field modulation by a spatial light modulator located in the focal plane of the first lens. Phase as well as amplitude of the wave field are reconstructed from noisy multiple-intensity observations. The reconstruction is optimal due to a constrained maximum likelihood formulation of the problem. The proposed algorithm is iterative with decoupling of the inverse of the forward propagation of the wave field and the filtering of phase and amplitude. The sparse modeling of phase and amplitude enables the advanced high-accuracy filtering and sharp imaging of the complex-valued wave field. Artifacts typical for the conventional algorithms (wiggles, ringing, waves, etc.) and attributed to optical diffraction can be suppressed by the proposed algorithm.

  18. Determination of refractive index and absorbance modulation amplitudes from angular selectivity of holograms in polymer material with phenanthrenequinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Vladimir; Veniaminov, Andrey

    2015-10-01

    Amplitude and phase contributions to mixed volume holographic gratings were extracted from measured contours of angular selectivity. Holograms for the investigation were recorded in the glassy polymer material with phenan-threnequinone (PQ) using the DPSS CW laser (532 nm) and then self-developed due to molecular diffusion of PQ, reaching diffraction efficiency about 40%. Refractive index and absorbance modulation amplitudes of those holograms were obtained as adjustable parameters from theoretical equations by fitting angular dependencies of zeros and 1st orders diffraction efficiency measured at 450, 473, 532, and 633 nm at the different stages of hologram development. Mixed gratings manifest themselves in asymmetrical transmittance selectivity contours with one minimum and one maximum shifted with respect to the Bragg angle, while symmetrical contours with a minimum or a maximum at the Bragg angle are characteristic of pure phase and amplitude gratings, respectively. In the course of a hologram development, it converts from a predominantly amplitude-mixed to almost purely phase one in the case of readout using a light within the absorption band of PQ and maintains the phase nature besides it. The value of refractive index amplitude is ranging from 5×10-6 to 10-4 and the value of absorbance amplitude is up to 140 m-1.

  19. Emphasis of spatial cues in the temporal fine structure during the rising segments of amplitude-modulated sounds

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Mathias; Marquardt, Torsten; Salminen, Nelli H.; McAlpine, David

    2013-01-01

    The ability to locate the direction of a target sound in a background of competing sources is critical to the survival of many species and important for human communication. Nevertheless, brain mechanisms that provide for such accurate localization abilities remain poorly understood. In particular, it remains unclear how the auditory brain is able to extract reliable spatial information directly from the source when competing sounds and reflections dominate all but the earliest moments of the sound wave reaching each ear. We developed a stimulus mimicking the mutual relationship of sound amplitude and binaural cues, characteristic to reverberant speech. This stimulus, named amplitude modulated binaural beat, allows for a parametric and isolated change of modulation frequency and phase relations. Employing magnetoencephalography and psychoacoustics it is demonstrated that the auditory brain uses binaural information in the stimulus fine structure only during the rising portion of each modulation cycle, rendering spatial information recoverable in an otherwise unlocalizable sound. The data suggest that amplitude modulation provides a means of “glimpsing” low-frequency spatial cues in a manner that benefits listening in noisy or reverberant environments. PMID:23980161

  20. On the solar cycle dependence of the amplitude modulation characterizing the mid-latitude sporadic E layer diurnal periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzopane, M.; Pignalberi, A.; Pietrella, M.

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analyses are employed to investigate how the diurnal periodicity of the critical frequency of the sporadic E (Es) layer varies with solar activity. The study is based on ionograms recorded at the ionospheric station of Rome (41.8°N, 12.5°E), Italy, from 1976 to 2009, a period of time covering three solar cycles. It was confirmed that the diurnal periodicity is always affected by an amplitude modulation with periods of several days, which is the proof that Es layers are affected indirectly by planetary waves through their nonlinear interaction with atmospheric tides at lower altitudes. The most striking features coming out from this study is however that this amplitude modulation is greater for high-solar activity than for low-solar activity.

  1. Arbitrary shaping of on-axis amplitude of femtosecond Bessel beams with a single phase-only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Giust, Remo; Froehly, Luc; Jacquot, Maxime; Furfaro, Luca; Dudley, John M; Courvoisier, Francois

    2016-05-30

    Arbitrary shaping of the on-axis intensity of Bessel beams requires spatial modulation of both amplitude and phase. We develop a non-iterative direct space beam shaping method to generate Bessel beams with high energy throughput from direct space with a single phase-only spatial light modulator. For this purpose, we generalize the approach of Bolduc et al. to non-uniform input beams. We point out the physical limitations imposed on the on-axis intensity profile for unidirectional beams. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are provided.

  2. Triggerable electro-optic amplitude modulator bias stabilizer for integrated optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Conder, A.D.; Haigh, R.E.; Hugenberg, K.F.

    1995-09-26

    An improved Mach-Zehnder integrated optical electro-optic modulator is achieved by application and incorporation of a DC bias box containing a laser synchronized trigger circuit, a DC ramp and hold circuit, a modulator transfer function negative peak detector circuit, and an adjustable delay circuit. The DC bias box ramps the DC bias along the transfer function curve to any desired phase or point of operation at which point the RF modulation takes place. 7 figs.

  3. Triggerable electro-optic amplitude modulator bias stabilizer for integrated optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Haigh, Ronald E.; Hugenberg, Keith F.

    1995-01-01

    An improved Mach-Zehnder integrated optical electro-optic modulator is achieved by application and incorporation of a DC bias box containing a laser synchronized trigger circuit, a DC ramp and hold circuit, a modulator transfer function negative peak detector circuit, and an adjustable delay circuit. The DC bias box ramps the DC bias along the transfer function curve to any desired phase or point of operation at which point the RF modulation takes place.

  4. Cortical activities of single-trial P300 amplitudes modulated by memory load using simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiushi; Zhao, Xiaojie; Zhu, Chaozhe; Yang, Xueqian; Yao, Li

    2015-03-01

    The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) researches on working memory have found that activation of cortical areas appeared dependent on memory load, and event-related potentials (ERP) studies have demonstrated that amplitudes of P300 decreased significantly when working memory load increased. However, the cortical activities related with P300 amplitudes under different memory loads remains unclear. Joint fMRI and EEG analysis which fusions the time and spatial information in simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording can reveal the regional activation at each ERP time point. In this paper, we first used wavelet transform to obtain the single-trial amplitudes of P300 caused by a digital N-back task in the simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording as the ERP feature sequences. Then the feature sequences in 1-back condition and 3-back condition were introduced into general linear model (GLM) separately as parametric modulations to compare the cortical activation under different memory loads. The results showed that the average amplitudes of P300 in 3-back significantly decreased than that in 1-back, and the activities induced by ERP feature sequences in 3-back also significantly decreased than that in the 1-back, including the insular, anterior cingulate cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal gyrus, which were relevant to the storage, monitoring, and manipulation of information in working memory task. Moreover, the difference in the activation caused by ERP feature showed a positive correlation with the difference in behavioral performance. These findings demonstrated the locations of P300 amplitudes differences modulated by the memory load and its relationship with the behavioral performance.

  5. Shaping perfect optical vortex with amplitude modulated using a digital micro-mirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chonglei; Min, Changjun; Yuan, X.-C.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a technique to generate of perfect optical vortex (POV) via Fourier transformation of Bessel-Gauss (BG) beams through encoding of the amplitude of the optical field with binary amplitude digital micro-mirrors device (DMD). Furthermore, we confirm the correct phase patterns of the POV with the method of Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Our approach to generate the POV has the advantages that rapidly switch among the different modes, wide spectral regions and high energy tolerance. Since the POV possess propagation properties that not shape-invariant, we therefore suppose that our proposed approach will find potential applications in optical microscopy, optical fabrication, and optical communication.

  6. Performance improvement by orthogonal pulse amplitude modulation and discrete multitone modulation signals in hybrid fiber-visible laser light communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangliu; He, Jing; Deng, Rui; Chen, Qinghui; Chen, Lin

    2016-10-01

    A modulation format, orthogonal pulse amplitude modulation and discrete multitone modulation (O-PAM-DMT), is experimentally demonstrated in a hybrid fiber-visible laser light communication (fiber-VLLC) system using a cost-effective directly modulated laser and blue laser diode. In addition, low overhead is achieved by utilizing only one training sequence to implement synchronization and channel estimation. Through adjusting the ratio of PAM and DMT signal, three types of O-PAM-DMT signals are investigated. After transmission over a 20-km standard single-mode fiber and 5-m free-space VLLC, the receiver sensitivity for 4.36-Gbit/s O-PAM-DMT signals can be improved by 0.4, 1.4, and 2.7 dB, respectively, at a bit error rate of 1×10-3, compared with a conventional DMT signal.

  7. [Modulating effect of dopamine on amplitude of GABA-produced chemocontrolled currents in multipolar spinal cord neurons of ammocaete].

    PubMed

    Bukinich, A A

    2010-01-01

    By using the patch-clamp method in the whole cell configuration, modulating effect of dopamine on GABA-activated currents has been studied on isolated multipolar spinal cord neurons of the ammocaete (larva of the lamprey Lampetra planeri). At application of dopamine (5 microM), there was observed in some cases a decrease of the GABA-activated current, on average, by 33.3 +/- 8.7 (n = 8, p < 0.01), in other cases--an increase of the amplitude, on average, by 37.3 +/- 11.8% (n = 5, p < 0.01). Concentration of GABA amounted to 2 mM. Study of action of agonists of D1- and D2-receptors on amplitude of che-mocontrolled currents has shown that agonist of D1-receptors (+)-SKF-38393 (5 microM) decreases the GABA-activated current amplitude, on average, by 63.1 +/- 11.7% (n = 8, p < 0.01); the agonist of D2-receptors (-)-quinpirole (5 microM) produces in various cells the dopamine-like effects: an increase of the GABA-activated current amplitude, on average, by 61.0 +/- 13.8% (n = 8, p < 0.01) and a decrease of amplitude, on average, by 55.7 +/- 2.0 % (n = 6, p < 0.01). It has been shown that antagonist of D2-receptors sulpiride (5 microM) does not block effects produced by dopamine. The dopamine effects were partially blocked by antagonist of D1-receptors (+)-SCH-23390 (5 microM): a decrease of the GABA-activated amplitude current amounted, on average, to 11.7 +/- 1.8 % (n = 7, p < 0.01), while an increase of amplitude--8.3 +/- 2.0 % (n = 5,p < 0.01). At the same time, effects of agonist of D1-receptors quinpirole (5 microM) were partially blocked by antagonist of D1-receptors (+)-SCH-23390: a decrease of the GABA-activated current amplitude amounted, on average, to 9.2 +/- 3.4 % (n = 6, p < 0.01) and an increase of amplitude--6.3 +/- 1.8 % (n = 10, p < 0.01). The obtained data indicate differences of mechanisms of the receptor-mediated effect of agonists of dopamine receptors on GABA-activated and potential-activated currents of multipolar neurons of the ammocaete spinal

  8. The onion fly modulates the adult eclosion time in response to amplitude of temperature cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Watari, Yasuhiko

    2011-08-01

    To confirm whether the amplitude of diel temperature cycles causes a phase shift of adult eclosion rhythm of the onion fly, Delia antiqua, the peak time ( Ø E) of adult eclosion was determined under various thermoperiods with a fixed temperature either in the warm or cool phase and temperature differences ranging from 1°C to 4°C between the two phases. Irrespective of the temperature level during the warm or cool phase, Ø E occurred earlier with decreasing amplitude of the temperature cycle. The results strongly support the previous conclusion of Tanaka and Watari (Naturwissenschaften 90:76-79, 2003) that D. antiqua responds to the amplitude of temperature cycle as a cue for the circadian adult eclosion timing. The phase advance was larger in thermoperiods with a fixed warm-phase temperature than in those with a fixed cool-phase temperature. This might be ascribed to the interaction between the amplitude and level of temperature in the thermoperiodic regimes.

  9. The relationship between geophysical conditions and ELF amplitude in modulated heating experiments at HAARP: Modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, G.; Spasojevic, M.; Cohen, M. B.; Inan, U. S.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2011-07-01

    Experiments for generating extremely low frequency (ELF) radio waves using modulated HF heating of the auroral ionosphere have been conducted and refined at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility at Gakona, Alaska. Because this technique is dependent on strength of the naturally generated electrojet current system, the amplitude of the generated ELF changes with geophysical conditions. Past work has shown that electrojet current strength as measured by magnetometers often correlates with generated ELF amplitude, but there are periods of poor or negative correlation. We attempt to use additional diagnostics from a radar, riometer, ionosonde, and magnetometer chain to understand how ionospheric conditions affect ELF generation. We then present the results of a statistical model that shows that ELF amplitude is roughly proportional to magnetometer measurements for a fixed value of riometer absorption and that the proportionality constant decreases as riometer absorption increases. Theoretical simulations of modulated heating are conducted for a variety of ionospheric density profiles to verify that denser profiles result in smaller gains for ELF generation as a function of electrojet current at a given electric field.

  10. Homocysteine reduces NMDAR desensitization and differentially modulates peak amplitude of NMDAR currents, depending on GluN2 subunit composition

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Marnie A.; Constantine-Paton, Martha

    2013-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) have been linked to schizophrenia because agents that bind the receptor, like ketamine and phencyclidine, are capable of inducing schizophrenia-like symptoms. Here we show that the amino acid homocysteine (HCY), which is increased in the blood of schizophrenia patients, reduces desensitization of NMDARs in cultured mouse neurons, human embryonic kidney cells transfected with GluN1 + GluN2A, GluN2B, or GluN2D subunits, and hippocampal slices. HCY also alters the peak amplitude of NMDAR currents, depending on the GluN2 subunit the receptor contains; GluN1 + GluN2A-containing NMDARs show an increase in peak amplitude when exposed to HCY, while GluN1 + GluN2B-containing NMDARs show a decrease in peak amplitude. Both peak amplitude and desensitization effects of HCY can be occluded by saturating the NMDAR with glycine. Since glycine concentrations are not saturating in the brain, HCY could play an NMDAR-modulating role in the nervous system. We also show that HCY shares characteristics with glutamate and suggest that HCY affects both the agonist and co-agonist site of the NMDAR. PMID:23864370

  11. Psychometric functions for sentence recognition in sinusoidally amplitude-modulated noises

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Manzano, Nicole K.; Richards, Virginia M.

    2015-01-01

    Listeners' speech reception is better when speech is masked by a modulated masker compared to an unmodulated masker with the same long-term root-mean-square level. It has been suggested that listeners take advantage of brief periods of quiescence in a modulated masker to extract speech information. Two experiments examined the contribution of such “dip-listening” models. The first experiment estimated psychometric functions for speech intelligibility using sentences masked by sinusoidally modulated and unmodulated speech-shaped noises and the second experiment estimated detection thresholds for a tone pip added at the central dip in the masker. Modulation rates ranging from 1 to 64 Hz were tested. In experiment 1 the slopes of the psychometric functions were shallower for lower modulation rates and the pattern of speech reception thresholds as a function of modulation rate was nonmonotonic with a minimum near 16 Hz. In contrast, the detection thresholds from experiment 2 increased monotonically with modulation rate. The results suggest that the benefits of listening to speech in temporally fluctuating maskers cannot be solely ascribed to the temporal acuity of the auditory system. PMID:26723318

  12. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-03-15

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  13. Characterization of pulse amplitude and pulse rate modulation for a human vestibular implant during acute electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; DiGiovanna, J.; Cavuscens, S.; Ranieri, M.; Guinand, N.; van de Berg, R.; Carpaneto, J.; Kingma, H.; Guyot, J.-P.; Micera, S.; Perez Fornos, A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The vestibular system provides essential information about balance and spatial orientation via the brain to other sensory and motor systems. Bilateral vestibular loss significantly reduces quality of life, but vestibular implants (VIs) have demonstrated potential to restore lost function. However, optimal electrical stimulation strategies have not yet been identified in patients. In this study, we compared the two most common strategies, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and pulse rate modulation (PRM), in patients. Approach. Four subjects with a modified cochlear implant including electrodes targeting the peripheral vestibular nerve branches were tested. Charge-equivalent PAM and PRM were applied after adaptation to baseline stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movement responses were recorded to evaluate stimulation efficacy during acute clinical testing sessions. Main results. PAM evoked larger amplitude eye movement responses than PRM. Eye movement response axes for lateral canal stimulation were marginally better aligned with PRM than with PAM. A neural network model was developed for the tested stimulation strategies to provide insights on possible neural mechanisms. This model suggested that PAM would consistently cause a larger ensemble firing rate of neurons and thus larger responses than PRM. Significance. Due to the larger magnitude of eye movement responses, our findings strongly suggest PAM as the preferred strategy for initial VI modulation.

  14. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-03-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  15. Unilateral Auditory Cortex Lesions Impair or Improve Discrimination Learning of Amplitude Modulated Sounds, Depending on Lesion Side

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Holger; Deutscher, Anke; Tziridis, Konstantin; Scheich, Henning

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental principle of brain organization is bilateral symmetry of structures and functions. For spatial sensory and motor information processing, this organization is generally plausible subserving orientation and coordination of a bilaterally symmetric body. However, breaking of the symmetry principle is often seen for functions that depend on convergent information processing and lateralized output control, e.g. left hemispheric dominance for the linguistic speech system. Conversely, a subtle splitting of functions into hemispheres may occur if peripheral information from symmetric sense organs is partly redundant, e.g. auditory pattern recognition, and therefore allows central conceptualizations of complex stimuli from different feature viewpoints, as demonstrated e.g. for hemispheric analysis of frequency modulations in auditory cortex (AC) of mammals including humans. Here we demonstrate that discrimination learning of rapidly but not of slowly amplitude modulated tones is non-uniformly distributed across both hemispheres: While unilateral ablation of left AC in gerbils leads to impairment of normal discrimination learning of rapid amplitude modulations, right side ablations lead to improvement over normal learning. These results point to a rivalry interaction between both ACs in the intact brain where the right side competes with and weakens learning capability maximally attainable by the dominant left side alone. PMID:24466338

  16. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-01-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology. PMID:26976199

  17. Prestimulus amplitudes modulate P1 latencies and evoked traveling alpha waves

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstoss, Nicole A.; Brötzner, Christina P.; Zauner, Andrea; Kerschbaum, Hubert H.; Gruber, Walter; Lechinger, Julia; Klimesch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Traveling waves have been well documented in the ongoing, and more recently also in the evoked EEG. In the present study we investigate what kind of physiological process might be responsible for inducing an evoked traveling wave. We used a semantic judgment task which already proved useful to study evoked traveling alpha waves that coincide with the appearance of the P1 component. We found that the P1 latency of the leading electrode is significantly correlated with prestimulus amplitude size and that this event is associated with a transient change in alpha frequency. We assume that cortical background excitability, as reflected by an increase in prestimulus amplitude, is responsible for the observed change in alpha frequency and the initiation of an evoked traveling trajectory. PMID:26074804

  18. Optical Correlation Based Pose Estimation Using Bipolar Amplitude Spatial Light Modulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-22

    value • HMED Realizable value Re Figure 3-2 MED mapping for binary SLM For a ternary SLM device, its MED mapping is: 29 "Mkü +1, +0.5<Re(//) 0...below in Figure 3-4. Im \\ -l o H computed value • HM,,D realizable value Re Figure 3-3 MED mapping for AOSLM For coupled amplitude/phase

  19. Calcium modulates the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the bobtail skink.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A; Sienknecht, Ulrike; Köppl, Christine

    2004-11-01

    Active processes in the inner ear of lizards can be monitored using spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE) measured outside the eardrum. In the Australian bobtail lizard, SOAE are generated by an active motility process in the hair-cell bundle. This mechanism has been shown to be sensitive to the calcium-chelating agent 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid and is presumed to be related to the calcium-sensitive transduction-channel motor implicated in other nonmammalian hair cell systems. In studies of frog saccular and turtle auditory papillar hair cells in vitro, the frequency and amplitude of bundle oscillations depend on the concentration of calcium in the bathing solutions. In the present study, the calcium concentration in the endolymph was changed in vivo in the Australian bobtail lizard Tiliqua rugosa, and SOAE were monitored. Glass pipettes with large tips and containing different calcium concentrations in their fluids were introduced into scala media, and their contents were allowed to passively flow into the endolymph. Low calcium concentrations resulted in a downward shift in the frequency of SOAE spectral peaks and generally an increase in their amplitudes. Calcium concentrations > 2 mM resulted in increases in frequency of SOAE peaks and generally a loss in amplitude. These frequency shifts were consistent with in vitro data on the frequencies and amplitudes of spontaneous oscillation of hair cell bundles and thus also implicate calcium ions in the generation of active motility in nonmammalian hair cells. The data also suggest that in this lizard species, the ionic calcium concentration in the cochlear endolymph is > or = 1 mM.

  20. Blocked versus randomized presentation modes differentially modulate feedback-related negativity and P3b amplitudes

    PubMed Central

    Pfabigan, Daniela M.; Zeiler, Michael; Lamm, Claus; Sailer, Uta

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electrophysiological studies on feedback processing typically use a wide range of feedback stimuli which might not always be comparable. The current study investigated whether two indicators of feedback processing – feedback-related negativity (FRN) and P3b – differ for feedback stimuli with explicit (facial expressions) or assigned valence information (symbols). In addition, we assessed whether presenting feedback in either a trial-by-trial or a block-wise fashion affected these ERPs. Methods EEG was recorded in three experiments while participants performed a time estimation task and received two different types of performance feedback. Results Only P3b amplitudes varied consistently in response to feedback type for both presentation types. Moreover, the blocked feedback type presentation yielded more distinct FRN peaks, higher effect sizes, and a significant relation between FRN amplitudes and behavioral task performance measures. Conclusion Both stimulus type and presentation mode may provoke systematic changes in feedback-related ERPs. The current findings point at important potential confounds that need to be controlled for when designing FRN or P3b studies. Significance Studies investigating P3b amplitudes using mixed types of stimuli have to be interpreted with caution. Furthermore, we suggest implementing a blocked presentation format when presenting different feedback types within the same experiment. PMID:24144779

  1. Identification of Buried Objects in GPR Using Amplitude Modulated Signals Extracted from Multiresolution Monogenic Signal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Lihong; Qin, Yao; Ren, Xiaozhen; Wang, Qifu

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to detect the target reflections in ground penetrating radar (GPR) images, so that surface metal targets can be identified successfully. In order to accurately locate buried metal objects, a novel method called the Multiresolution Monogenic Signal Analysis (MMSA) system is applied in ground penetrating radar (GPR) images. This process includes four steps. First the image is decomposed by the MMSA to extract the amplitude component of the B-scan image. The amplitude component enhances the target reflection and suppresses the direct wave and reflective wave to a large extent. Then we use the region of interest extraction method to locate the genuine target reflections from spurious reflections by calculating the normalized variance of the amplitude component. To find the apexes of the targets, a Hough transform is used in the restricted area. Finally, we estimate the horizontal and vertical position of the target. In terms of buried object detection, the proposed system exhibits promising performance, as shown in the experimental results. PMID:26690146

  2. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Carrier bandwidth effects and binaural versus monaural comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Kim, Duck O.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Anderson, Paul W.; Brandewie, Eugene; Collecchia, Regina; Srinivasan, Nirmal

    2012-01-01

    Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 12, 050005 (2011)] has reported that for a broadband noise carrier signal in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the broadband acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. Interpretation of this result was complicated by the fact that acoustical MTFs of rooms are often quite different for different carrier frequency regions, and listeners may have selectively responded to advantageous carrier frequency regions where the effective acoustic modulation loss due to the room was less than indicated by a broadband acoustic MTF analysis. Here, AM sensitivity testing and acoustic MTF analyses were expanded to include narrowband noise carriers (1-octave and 1/3-octave bands centered at 4 kHz), as well as monaural and binaural listening conditions. Narrowband results were found to be consistent with broadband results: In a reverberant sound field, human AM sensitivity is higher than indicated by the acoustical MTFs. The effect was greatest for modulation frequencies above 32 Hz and was present whether the stimulation was monaural or binaural. These results are suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening. PMID:23437416

  3. A scheme for maintaining phase modulation amplitude at best value of fiber optic sensors using phase generated carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhui; Zhang, Min; Liao, Yanbiao; Kuang, Wu; Wang, Liwei

    2005-11-01

    This article firstly gives out when the phase modulation amplitude is at best value of homodyne demodulation using phase generated carrier, and then presents three methods that can be realized to get the best value. Some differences based on practicality are made among them, and a method which is easy to be implemented by digital circuits, is chosen to be carried out by digital circuits. Also this paper gives out simulation analysis and real experiment results. The error range is from -3.80% to 2.11% with real system. The origins of the error limiting the accuracy are discussed.

  4. Using active resonator impedance matching for shot-noise limited, cavity enhanced amplitude modulated laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chow, Jong H; Littler, Ian C M; Rabeling, David S; McClelland, David E; Gray, Malcolm B

    2008-05-26

    We introduce a closed-loop feedback technique to actively control the coupling condition of an optical cavity, by employing amplitude modulation of the interrogating laser. We show that active impedance matching of the cavity facilitates optimal shot-noise sensing performance in a cavity enhanced system, while its control error signal can be used for intra-cavity absorption or loss signal extraction. We present the first demonstration of this technique with a fiber ring cavity, and achieved shot-noise limited loss sensitivity. We also briefly discuss further use of impedance matching control as a tool for other applications.

  5. Multiplexing technique using amplitude-modulated chirped fibre Bragg gratings with applications in two-parameter sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Allan C. L.; Childs, Paul A.; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2007-11-01

    A multiplexing technique using amplitude-modulated chirped fibre Bragg gratings (AMCFBGs) is presented. This technique realises the multiplexing of spectrally overlapped AMCFBGs with identical centre Bragg wavelength and bandwidth. Since it is fully compatible with the wavelength division multiplexing scheme, the number of gratings that can be multiplexed can be increased by several times. The discrete wavelet transform is used to demodulate such multiplexed signal. A wavelet denoising technique is applied to the multiplexed signal in conjunction with the demodulation. Strain measurements are performed to experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of this multiplexing technique. The absolute error and crosstalk are measured. An application to simultaneous two-parameter sensing is also demonstrated.

  6. The effect of microphone wind noise on the amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise and its mitigation.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Paul; von Hünerbein, Sabine; Cox, Trevor J

    2016-07-01

    Microphone wind noise can corrupt outdoor recordings even when wind shields are used. When monitoring wind turbine noise, microphone wind noise is almost inevitable because measurements cannot be made in still conditions. The effect of microphone wind noise on two amplitude modulation (AM) metrics is quantified in a simulation, showing that even at low wind speeds of 2.5 m/s errors of over 4 dBA can result. As microphone wind noise is intermittent, a wind noise detection algorithm is used to automatically find uncorrupted sections of the recording, and so recover the true AM metrics to within ±2/±0.5 dBA.

  7. Effect on the immune system of mice exposed chronically to 50 Hz amplitude-modulated 2.45 GHz microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Elekes, E.; Thuroczy, G.; Szabo, L.D.

    1996-12-01

    The effect of continuous (CW; 2.45 GHz carrier frequency) or amplitude-modulated (AM; 50 Hz square wave) microwave radiation on the immune response was tested. CW exposures (6 days, 3 h/day) induced elevations of the number of antibody-producing cells in the spleen of male Balb/c mice (+37%). AM microwave exposure induced elevation of the spleen index (+15%) and antibody-producing cell number (+55%) in the spleen of male mice. No changes were observed in female mice. It is concluded that both types of exposure conditions induced moderate elevation of antibody production only in male mice.

  8. Experience Drives Synchronization: The phase and Amplitude Dynamics of Neural Oscillations to Musical Chords Are Differentially Modulated by Musical Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Pallesen, Karen Johanne; Bailey, Christopher J.; Brattico, Elvira; Gjedde, Albert; Palva, J. Matias; Palva, Satu

    2015-01-01

    Musical expertise is associated with structural and functional changes in the brain that underlie facilitated auditory perception. We investigated whether the phase locking (PL) and amplitude modulations (AM) of neuronal oscillations in response to musical chords are correlated with musical expertise and whether they reflect the prototypicality of chords in Western tonal music. To this aim, we recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) while musicians and non-musicians were presented with common prototypical major and minor chords, and with uncommon, non-prototypical dissonant and mistuned chords, while watching a silenced movie. We then analyzed the PL and AM of ongoing oscillations in the theta (4–8 Hz) alpha (8–14 Hz), beta- (14–30 Hz) and gamma- (30–80 Hz) bands to these chords. We found that musical expertise was associated with strengthened PL of ongoing oscillations to chords over a wide frequency range during the first 300 ms from stimulus onset, as opposed to increased alpha-band AM to chords over temporal MEG channels. In musicians, the gamma-band PL was strongest to non-prototypical compared to other chords, while in non-musicians PL was strongest to minor chords. In both musicians and non-musicians the long-latency (> 200 ms) gamma-band PL was also sensitive to chord identity, and particularly to the amplitude modulations (beats) of the dissonant chord. These findings suggest that musical expertise modulates oscillation PL to musical chords and that the strength of these modulations is dependent on chord prototypicality. PMID:26291324

  9. Predictions of psychophysical measurements for sinusoidal amplitude modulated (SAM) pulse-train stimuli from a stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifang; Collins, Leslie M

    2007-08-01

    Two approaches have been proposed to reduce the synchrony of the neural response to electrical stimuli in cochlear implants. One approach involves adding noise to the pulse-train stimulus, and the other is based on using a high-rate pulse-train carrier. Hypotheses regarding the efficacy of the two approaches can be tested using computational models of neural responsiveness prior to time-intensive psychophysical studies. In our previous work, we have used such models to examine the effects of noise on several psychophysical measures important to speech recognition. However, to date there has been no parallel analytic solution investigating the neural response to the high-rate pulse-train stimuli and their effect on psychophysical measures. This work investigates the properties of the neural response to high-rate pulse-train stimuli with amplitude modulated envelopes using a stochastic auditory nerve model. The statistics governing the neural response to each pulse are derived using a recursive method. The agreement between the theoretical predictions and model simulations is demonstrated for sinusoidal amplitude modulated (SAM) high rate pulse-train stimuli. With our approach, predicting the neural response in modern implant devices becomes tractable. Psychophysical measurements are also predicted using the stochastic auditory nerve model for SAM high-rate pulse-train stimuli. Changes in dynamic range (DR) and intensity discrimination are compared with that observed for noise-modulated pulse-train stimuli. Modulation frequency discrimination is also studied as a function of stimulus level and pulse rate. Results suggest that high rate carriers may positively impact such psychophysical measures.

  10. The role of envelope beat cues in the detection and discrimination of second-order amplitude modulation (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllgrabe, Christian; Lorenzi, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The present study extends previous work from Lorenzi et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 2470-2478 (2001)] by investigating the respective contribution of two temporal cues (fast modulation sideband and slow envelope beat cues) to the detection and discrimination of ``second-order'' sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM). Second-order SAM detection and rate discrimination abilities were measured at low beat rates (fm'<=128 Hz) with a ``carrier'' modulation rate fixed at a high value (fm=256 Hz). The second-order SAM data were compared with first-order SAM detection and rate discrimination thresholds measured in similar conditions at rates fm between 1 and 256 Hz. The results showed that (1) through 64 Hz, first- and second-order SAM detection thresholds increased similarly when stimulus duration decreased from 2 s to 250 ms, whereas first-order SAM detection thresholds remained unaffected by changes in duration when fm>=128 Hz, and (2) through 32 Hz, first- and second-order SAM rate discrimination thresholds were similar and substantially lower than first-order SAM rate discrimination thresholds measured at fm>=128 Hz. These data demonstrate that the perception of second-order SAM is mainly based on the slow envelope beat cues. They also suggest a substantial contribution of the slow envelope beat cues appearing at the output of modulation filters tuned to or near fm to the perception of second-order SAM.

  11. Operational modes of a ferroelectric LCoS modulator for displaying binary polarization, amplitude, and phase diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Antonio; Moreno, Ignacio; Sánchez-López, María M; García-Martínez, Pascuala

    2009-05-20

    We analyze the performance of a ferroelectric liquid crystal on silicon display (FLCoS) as a binary polarization diffraction grating. We analyze the correspondence between the two polarization states emerging from the displayed grating and the polarization and intensity of the diffracted orders generated at the Fourier diffraction plane. This polarization-diffraction analysis leads, in a simple manner, to configurations yielding binary amplitude or binary phase modulation by incorporating an analyzer on the reflected beam. Based on this analysis, we present two useful variations of the polarization configuration. The first is a simplification using a single polarizer, which provides equivalent results for amplitude or phase modulation as the more general operational mode involving two polarizers. The second variation is proposed to compensate the reduction of the diffraction efficiency when the operating wavelength differs from the design one (for which the FLCoS liquid-crystal layer acts as a half-wave plate). In this situation we show how the ideal grating performance can be recovered in spite of the phase-shift mismatch originated by chromatic dispersion. In all cases, we provide experimental results that verify the theoretical analyses.

  12. Phase-amplitude coupling characteristics in directly modulated quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Osiński, M.; Even, J.; Grillot, F.

    2014-12-01

    We present a semi-analytical model for studying the phase-amplitude coupling (α-factor) in quantum dot (QD) semiconductor lasers, which takes into account the influence of carrier populations in the excited state and in the two-dimensional carrier reservoir on the refractive index change. Calculations of the α-factor based on the amplified spontaneous emission method and on the “FM/AM” technique are both investigated. It is shown that the α-factor of a QD laser strongly depends on the energy separation between the ground state and the off-resonant states. Through band structure engineering, the α-factor can be reduced by enlarging this energy separation.

  13. Amplitude-modulated laser range-finder for 3D imaging with multi-sensor data integration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, L.; Ferri de Collibus, M.; Fornetti, G.; Guarneri, M.; Paglia, E.; Poggi, C.; Ricci, R.

    2005-06-01

    A high performance Amplitude Modulated Laser Rangefinder (AM-LR) is presented, aimed at accurately reconstructing 3D digital models of real targets, either single objects or complex scenes. The scanning system enables to sweep the sounding beam either linearly across the object or circularly around it, by placing the object on a controlled rotating platform. Both phase shift and amplitude of the modulating wave of back-scattered light are collected and processed, resulting respectively in an accurate range image and a shade-free, high resolution, photographic-like intensity image. The best performances obtained in terms of range resolution are ~100 μm. Resolution itself can be made to depend mainly on the laser modulation frequency, provided that the power of the backscattered light reaching the detector is at least a few nW. 3D models are reconstructed from sampled points by using specifically developed software tools, optimized so as to take advantage of the system peculiarities. Special procedures have also been implemented to perform precise matching of data acquired independently with different sensors (LIF laser sensors, thermographic cameras, etc.) onto the 3D models generated using the AM-LR. The system has been used to scan different types of real surfaces (stone, wood, alloys, bones) and ca be applied in various fields, ranging from industrial machining to medical diagnostics, vision in hostile environments cultural heritage conservation and restoration. The relevance of this technology in cultural heritage applications is discussed in special detail, by providing results obtained in different campaigns with an emphasis on the system's multi-sensor data integration capabilities.

  14. Chroma key without color restrictions based on asynchronous amplitude modulation of background illumination on retroreflective screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Borja; Lafuente, Juan A.

    2016-03-01

    A simple technique to avoid color limitations in image capture systems based on chroma key video composition using retroreflective screens and light-emitting diodes (LED) rings is proposed and demonstrated. The combination of an asynchronous temporal modulation onto the background illumination and simple image processing removes the usual restrictions on foreground colors in the scene. The technique removes technical constraints in stage composition, allowing its design to be purely based on artistic grounds. Since it only requires adding a very simple electronic circuit to widely used chroma keying hardware based on retroreflective screens, the technique is easily applicable to TV and filming studios.

  15. Amplitude modulation of alpha-band rhythm caused by mimic collision: MEG study.

    PubMed

    Yokosawa, Koichi; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Kikuzawa, Daichi; Aoyama, Gakuto; Takahashi, Makoto; Kuriki, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Detection of a collision risk and avoiding the collision are important for survival. We have been investigating neural responses when humans anticipate a collision or intend to take evasive action by applying collision-simulating images in a predictable manner. Collision-simulating images and control images were presented in random order to 9 healthy male volunteers. A cue signal was also given visually two seconds before each stimulus to enable each participant to anticipate the upcoming stimulus. Magnetoencephalograms (MEG) were recorded with a 76-ch helmet system. The amplitude of alpha band (8-13 Hz) rhythm when anticipating the upcoming collision-simulating image was significantly smaller than that when anticipating control images even just after the cue signal. This result demonstrates that anticipating a negative (dangerous) event induced event-related desynchronization (ERD) of alpha band activity, probably caused by attention. The results suggest the feasibility of detecting endogenous brain activities by monitoring alpha band rhythm and its possible applications to engineering systems, such as an automatic collision evasion system for automobiles.

  16. Self-amplitude and self-phase modulation of the charcoal mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Lo, Jui-Yung; Tseng, Wei-Hsuan; Wu, Chih-I; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-10-21

    With the intra-cavity nano-scale charcoal powder based saturable absorber, the 455-fs passive mode-locking of an L-band erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) is demonstrated. The size reduction of charcoal nano-particle is implemented with a simple imprinting-exfoliation-wiping method, which assists to increase the transmittance up to 0.91 with corresponding modulation depth of 26%. By detuning the power gain from 17 to 21 dB and cavity dispersion from -0.004 to -0.156 ps² of the EDFL, the shortening of mode-locked pulsewidth from picosecond to sub-picosecond by the transformation of the pulse forming mechanism from self-amplitude modulation (SAM) to the combining effect of self-phase modulation (SPM) and group delay dispersion (GDD) is observed. A narrower spectrum with 3-dB linewidth of 1.83-nm is in the SAM case, whereas the spectral linewidth broadens to 5.86 nm with significant Kelly sideband pair can be observed if the EDFL enters into the SPM regime. The mode-locking mechanism transferred from SAM to SPM/GDD dominates the pulse shortening procedure in the EDFL, whereas the intrinsic defects in charcoal nano-particle only affect the pulse formation at initial stage. The minor role of the saturable absorber played in the EDFL cavity with strongest SPM is observed.

  17. Average symbol error rate for M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation in generalized atmospheric turbulence and misalignment errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prabhat Kumar

    2016-11-01

    A framework is presented for the analysis of average symbol error rate (SER) for M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation in a free-space optical communication system. The standard probability density function (PDF)-based approach is extended to evaluate the average SER by representing the Q-function through its Meijer's G-function equivalent. Specifically, a converging power series expression for the average SER is derived considering the zero-boresight misalignment errors in the receiver side. The analysis presented here assumes a unified expression for the PDF of channel coefficient which incorporates the M-distributed atmospheric turbulence and Rayleigh-distributed radial displacement for the misalignment errors. The analytical results are compared with the results obtained using Q-function approximation. Further, the presented results are supported by the Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Low-cost bidirectional hybrid fiber-visible laser light communication system based on carrier-less amplitude phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jing; Dong, Huan; Deng, Rui; Chen, Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a bidirectional hybrid fiber-visible laser light communication (fiber-VLC) system. To reduce the cost of the system, the cheap and easy integration red vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, low-complexity carrier-less amplitude phase modulation format, and wavelength reuse technique are utilized. Meanwhile, the automatic gain control amplifier voltage and bias voltage for downlink and uplink are optimized. The simulation results show that, by using the proposed system, the bit error rate of 3.8×10-3 can be achieved for 16-Gbps CAP signal after 30-km standard single mode fiber and 8-m VLC bidirectional transmission. Therefore, it indicates the feasibility and potential of proposed system for indoor access network.

  19. Complex linear minimum mean-squared-error equalization of spatially quadrature-amplitude-modulated signals in holographic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takanori; Kanno, Kazutaka; Bunsen, Masatoshi

    2016-09-01

    We applied complex linear minimum mean-squared-error equalization to spatially quadrature-amplitude-modulated signals in holographic data storage (HDS). The equalization technique can improve dispersion in constellation outputs due to intersymbol interference. We confirm the effectiveness of the equalization technique in numerical simulations and basic optical experiments. Our numerical results have shown that intersymbol interference of a retrieved signal in a HDS system can be improved by using the equalization technique. In our experiments, a mean squared error (MSE), which indicates the deviation from an ideal signal, has been used for quantitatively evaluating the dispersion of equalized signals. Our equalization technique has been able to improve the MSE. However, symbols in the equalized signal have remained inseparable. To further improve the MSE and make the symbols separable, reducing errors in repeated measurements is our future task.

  20. High resolution imaging of immunoglobulin G antibodies and other biomolecules using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy in air.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sergio; Thomson, Neil H

    2011-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a very versatile tool for studying biological samples at -nanometre-scale resolution. The resolution one achieves depends on many factors, including the sample properties, the imaging environment, the AFM tip and cantilever probe characteristics, and the signal detection and feedback control mechanism, to name a few. This chapter describes how to routinely achieve the highest possible spatial resolution on isolated protein molecules on mica surfaces. This is illustrated with Immunoglobulin G antibodies but the methods apply equally well to any other globular multi-subunit protein, as well as other biomolecules. Double-stranded DNA is used as a model sample to illustrate the effects of the force regime in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM AFM) on the image resolution and contrast. AM control is a widely used technique in biological AFM for reasons which are discussed.

  1. Phase-locking and amplitude modulations of EEG alpha: Two measures reflect different cognitive processes in a working memory task.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Christoph S; Senkowski, Daniel; Röttger, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in numerous experiments that oscillatory EEG responses in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) increase with memory load during the retention interval in working memory tasks. However, the findings diverge with respect to which measurement of alpha activity is influenced by memory processes. Here, we differentiate between evoked and total alpha activity in order to separate effects of phase-locking and amplitude modulation. We present data from a delayed-matching-to-sample task (S1-S2 paradigm) for which we compared EEG alpha responses between a perception and a memory condition. Increased total alpha activity was found in the retention interval for the memory as compared to the perception condition. Evoked alpha activity, however, did not differentiate between memory and perception conditions but, instead, was increased for the more complex condition of processing non-Kanizsa figures as compared to Kanizsa figures. Thus, our results demonstrate a functional differentiation between evoked and total alpha activity. While alpha phase locking seemed to be influenced mainly by task complexity, alpha amplitude clearly reflected memory demands in our paradigm.

  2. Bi-stability of amplitude modulation AFM in air: deterministic and stochastic outcomes for imaging biomolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sergio; Barcons, Victor; Font, Josep; Thomson, Neil H

    2010-06-04

    The dynamics of the oscillating microcantilever for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM AFM) operating in air is well understood theoretically but the experimental outcomes are still emerging. We use double-stranded DNA on mica as a model biomolecular system for investigating the connection between theory and experiment. A demonstration that the switching between the two cantilever oscillation states is stochastic in nature is achieved, and it can be induced by means of topographical anomalies on the surface. Whether one or the other attractor basin is accessed depends on the tip-sample separation history used to achieve the imaging conditions, and we show that the behaviour is reproducible when the tip is stable and well characterized. Emergence of background noise occurs in certain regions of parameter space regardless of whether two cantilever oscillation states coexist. The low state has been explored in detail and we note that at low to intermediate values of the free amplitude, noise-free imaging is achieved. The outcomes shown here are general and demonstrate that a thorough and systematic experimental approach in conjunction with standard modelling gives insight into the mechanisms behind image contrast formation in AM AFM in air.

  3. An approximate nonlinear model for time gain compensation of amplitude modulated images of ultrasound contrast agent perfusion.

    PubMed

    Mari, Jean; Hibbs, Kathryn; Stride, Eleanor; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng

    2010-04-01

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents allow blood perfusion to be imaged at the cost of an increased attenuation that is not properly handled by existing time gain compensation methods. An automatic TGC has been developed that is able to account for different microbubble concentrations. The technique is an extension of a previously tested approach for modeling the nonlinear dependence of microbubble backscattering upon insonating pressure. The proposed method involves modeling in amplitude of the nonlinear attenuation for both forward and backward propagation, and the solution is achieved through an approximation set to overestimate the attenuation. The resulting equations are used to model and compensate amplitude modulation (AM) images; they are tested on radiofrequency data acquired using a clinical scanner from a gelatin tissue-mimicking phantom submerged in a contrast agent solution in the 0.08 MI to 0.51 MI range at 2 MHz. The nonlinear estimation equation presented here provides a significantly improved amplification profile compared with standard TGC algorithms, resulting in more accurate attenuation correction of the AM image.

  4. Effect of doping on amplitude modulation of space-charge wave in semiconductor quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sreyasi; Ghosh, Basudev

    2017-04-01

    To describe the modulational instability of space-charge waves in an n-type compensated semiconductor plasma, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation has been derived by using quantum hydrodynamical model and standard multiple scale perturbation technique. It has been shown that compensation factor (i.e. relative proportion of donor, acceptor and intrinsic carrier concentrations) and quantum diffraction parameter play important role in generating bright and dark envelope solitons within the semiconductor. Instability growth rate is also found to depend sensitively on the compensation factor and quantum diffraction parameter. From the linear dispersion relation it has been found that inclusion of quantum parameter gives rise to two new wave modes of purely quantum origin. Further the effect of compensation factor and quantum diffraction parameter on the linear dispersion characteristics has been analyzed. It has also been found that due to parabolicity of conduction band the group velocity of space-charge wave becomes dependent on compensation factor and quantum diffraction parameter.

  5. Multiple transmitter performance with appropriate amplitude modulation for free-space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Jason A.; Schmidt, Jason D.

    2011-08-01

    The propagation of a free-space optical communications signal through atmospheric turbulence experiences random fluctuations in intensity, including signal fades, which negatively impact the performance of the communications link. The gamma--gamma probability density function is commonly used to model the scintillation of a single beam. One proposed method to reduce the occurrence of scintillation-induced fades at the receiver plane involves the use of multiple beams propagating through independent paths, resulting in a sum of independent gamma--gamma random variables. Recently an analytical model for the probability distribution of irradiance from the sum of multiple independent beams was developed. Because truly independent beams are practically impossible to create, we present here a more general but approximate model for the distribution of beams traveling through partially correlated paths. This model compares favorably with wave-optics simulations and highlights the reduced scintillation as the number of transmitted beams is increased. Additionally, a pulse-position modulation scheme is used to reduce the impact of signal fades when they occur. Analytical and simulated results showed significantly improved performance when compared to fixed threshold on/off keying.

  6. Noninvasive Focused Ultrasound Stimulation Can Modulate Phase-Amplitude Coupling between Neuronal Oscillations in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yi; Yan, Jiaqing; Ma, Zhitao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive focused ultrasound stimulation (FUS) can be used to modulate neural activity with high spatial resolution. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) between neuronal oscillations is tightly associated with cognitive processes, including learning, attention, and memory. In this study, we investigated the effect of FUS on PAC between neuronal oscillations and established the relationship between the PAC index and ultrasonic intensity. The rat hippocampus was stimulated using focused ultrasound at different spatial-average pulse-average ultrasonic intensities (3.9, 9.6, and 19.2 W/cm2). The local field potentials (LFPs) in the rat hippocampus were recorded before and after FUS. Then, we analyzed PAC between neuronal oscillations using a PAC calculation algorithm. Our results showed that FUS significantly modulated PAC between the theta (4–8 Hz) and gamma (30–80 Hz) bands and between the alpha (9–13 Hz) and ripple (81–200 Hz) bands in the rat hippocampus, and PAC increased with incremental increases in ultrasonic intensity. PMID:27499733

  7. Antibody responses of mice exposed to low-power microwaves under combined, pulse-and-amplitude modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Veyret, B.; Bouthet, C.; Deschaux, P.; de Seze, R.; Geffard, M.; Joussot-Dubien, J.; le Diraison, M.; Moreau, J.M.; Caristan, A.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation by pulsed microwaves (9.4 GHz, 1 microsecond pulses at 1,000/s), both with and without concurrent amplitude modulation (AM) by a sinusoid at discrete frequencies between 14 and 41 MHz, was assessed for effects on the immune system of Balb/C mice. The mice were immunized either by sheep red blood cells (SRBC) or by glutaric-anhydride conjugated bovine serum albumin (GA-BSA), then exposed to the microwaves at a low rms power density (30 microW/cm2; whole-body-averaged SAR approximately 0.015 W/kg). Sham exposure or microwave irradiation took place during each of five contiguous days, 10 h/day. The antibody response was evaluated by the plaque-forming cell assay (SRBC experiment) or by the titration of IgM and IgG antibodies (GA-BSA experiment). In the absence of AM, the pulsed field did not greatly alter immune responsiveness. In contrast, exposure to the field under the combined-modulation condition resulted in significant, AM-frequency-dependent augmentation or weakening of immune responses.

  8. Gas Phase Photoacoustic Sensor at 8.41 mu m Using Quartz Tuning Forks and Amplitude Modulated Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Michael D.; Phillips, Mark C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2006-10-01

    We demonstrate the performance of a novel long-wave infrared photoacoustic laser absorbance spectrometer for gas-phase species using an amplitude modulated (AM) quantum cascade (QC) laser and a quartz tuning fork microphone. Photoacoustic signal was generated by focusing the output of a Fabry-Perot QC laser operating at 8.41 ?m between the legs of a quartz tuning fork which served as a transducer for the transient acoustic pressure wave. The QC laser was modulated at the resonant frequency of the tuning fork (32.8 kHz) and delivered a modest 5.3 mW at the tuning fork. This spectrometer was calibrated using the infrared absorber Freon-134a by performing a simultaneous absorption measurement using a 35 cm absorption cell. The NEAS of this instrument was determined to be 2 x 10{sup -8} W cm-1 Hz{sup -1/2}. A corresponding theoretical analysis of the instrument sensitivity is presented and is capable of quantitatively reproducing the experimental NEAS, indicating that the fundamental sensitivity of this technique is limited by the noise floor of the tuning fork itself.

  9. Bounds and Simulation Results of 32-ary and 64-ary Quadrature Amplitude Modulation for Broadband-ISDN via Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kifle, Muli; Vanderaar, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Union bounds and Monte Carlo simulation Bit-Error-Rate (BER) performance results are presented for various 32-ary and 64-ary Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) schemes. Filtered and unfiltered modulation formats are compared for the best packing arrangement in peak power limited systems. It is verified that circular constellations which populate as many symbols as possible at the peak magnitude offer the best performance. For example: a 32-ary QAM scheme based on concentric circles offers about 1.05 dB better peak power improvement at a BER of 10(exp -6) over the scheme optimized for average power using triangular symbol packing. This peak power improvement increases to 1.25 dB for comparable 64-ary QAM schemes. This work serves as a precursor to determine the feasibility of a combined modem/codec that can accommodate Broadband Integrated Services Digital Network (B-ISDN) at a rate of 155.52 Mbps through typical transponder bandwidths of 36 MHz and 54 MHz.

  10. Auditory Distance Coding in Rabbit Midbrain Neurons and Human Perception: Monaural Amplitude Modulation Depth as a Cue

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Carney, Laurel H.; Bishop, Brian B.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying sound source distance localization are not well understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that a novel mechanism can create monaural distance sensitivity: a combination of auditory midbrain neurons' sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) depth and distance-dependent loss of AM in reverberation. We used virtual auditory space (VAS) methods for sounds at various distances in anechoic and reverberant environments. Stimulus level was constant across distance. With increasing modulation depth, some rabbit inferior colliculus neurons increased firing rates whereas others decreased. These neurons exhibited monotonic relationships between firing rates and distance for monaurally presented noise when two conditions were met: (1) the sound had AM, and (2) the environment was reverberant. The firing rates as a function of distance remained approximately constant without AM in either environment and, in an anechoic condition, even with AM. We corroborated this finding by reproducing the distance sensitivity using a neural model. We also conducted a human psychophysical study using similar methods. Normal-hearing listeners reported perceived distance in response to monaural 1 octave 4 kHz noise source sounds presented at distances of 35–200 cm. We found parallels between the rabbit neural and human responses. In both, sound distance could be discriminated only if the monaural sound in reverberation had AM. These observations support the hypothesis. When other cues are available (e.g., in binaural hearing), how much the auditory system actually uses the AM as a distance cue remains to be determined. PMID:25834060

  11. Gas Phase Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in the long-wave IR using Quartz Tuning Forks and Amplitude Modulated Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Michael D.; Phillips, Mark C.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2006-12-31

    A paper to accompany a 20 minute talk about the progress of a DARPA funded project called LPAS. ABSTRACT: We demonstrate the performance of a novel long-wave infrared photoacoustic laser absorbance spectrometer for gas-phase species using an amplitude modulated (AM) quantum cascade (QC) laser and a quartz tuning fork microphone. Photoacoustic signal was generated by focusing the output of a Fabry-Perot QC laser operating at 8.41 micron between the legs of a quartz tuning fork which served as a transducer for the transient acoustic pressure wave. The QC laser was modulated at the resonant frequency of the tuning fork (32.8 kHz). This sensor was calibrated using the infrared absorber Freon-134a by performing a simultanious absorption measurement using a 35 cm absorption cell. The NEAS of this instrument was determined to be 2 x 10^-8 W cm^-1 /Hz^1/2 and the fundamental sensitivity of this technique is limited by the noise floor of the tuning fork itself.

  12. The Duration of Motor Responses Evoked with Intracortical Microstimulation in Rats Is Primarily Modulated by Stimulus Amplitude and Train Duration

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Meghan; Sawan, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Microstimulation of brain tissue plays a key role in a variety of sensory prosthetics, clinical therapies and research applications, however the effects of stimulation parameters on the responses they evoke remain widely unknown. In particular, the effects of parameters when delivered in the form of a stimulus train as opposed to a single pulse are not well understood despite the prevalence of stimulus train use. We aimed to investigate the contribution of each parameter of a stimulus train to the duration of the motor responses they evoke in forelimb muscles. We used constant-current, biphasic, square wave pulse trains in acute terminal experiments under ketamine anaesthesia. Stimulation parameters were systematically tested in a pair-wise fashion in the caudal forelimb region of the motor cortex in 7 Sprague-Dawley rats while motor evoked potential (MEP) recordings from the forelimb were used to quantify the influence of each parameter in the train. Stimulus amplitude and train duration were shown to be the dominant parameters responsible for increasing the total duration of the MEP, while interphase interval had no effect. Increasing stimulus frequency from 100–200 Hz or pulse duration from 0.18–0.34 ms were also effective methods of extending response durations. Response duration was strongly correlated with peak time and amplitude. Our findings suggest that motor cortex intracortical microstimulations are often conducted at a higher frequency rate and longer train duration than necessary to evoke maximal response duration. We demonstrated that the temporal properties of the evoked response can be both predicted by certain response metrics and modulated via alterations to the stimulation signal parameters. PMID:27442588

  13. Low-Complexity, Digital Encoder/Modulator Developed for High-Data-Rate Satellite B-ISDN Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Space Electronics Division at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing advanced electronic technologies for the space communications and remote sensing systems of tomorrow. As part of the continuing effort to advance the state-of-the-art in satellite communications and remote sensing systems, Lewis developed a low-cost, modular, programmable, and reconfigurable all-digital encoder-modulator (DEM) for medium- to high-data-rate radiofrequency communication links. The DEM is particularly well suited to high-data-rate downlinks to ground terminals or direct data downlinks from near-Earth science platforms. It can support data rates up to 250 megabits per second (Mbps) and several modulation schemes, including the traditional binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) and quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) modes, as well as higher order schemes such as 8 phase-shift keying (8PSK) and 16 quadrature amplitude modulation (16QAM). The DEM architecture also can precompensate for channel disturbances and alleviate amplitude degradations caused by nonlinear transponder characteristics.

  14. Despeckle Filtering for Multiscale Amplitude-Modulation Frequency-Modulation (AM-FM) Texture Analysis of Ultrasound Images of the Intima-Media Complex

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, C. P.; Murray, V.; Pattichis, M. S.; Pantziaris, M.; Nicolaides, A. N.; Pattichis, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    The intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery (CCA) is widely used as an early indicator of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Typically, the IMT grows with age and this is used as a sign of increased risk of CVD. Beyond thickness, there is also clinical interest in identifying how the composition and texture of the intima-media complex (IMC) changed and how these textural changes grow into atherosclerotic plaques that can cause stroke. Clearly though texture analysis of ultrasound images can be greatly affected by speckle noise, our goal here is to develop effective despeckle noise methods that can recover image texture associated with increased rates of atherosclerosis disease. In this study, we perform a comparative evaluation of several despeckle filtering methods, on 100 ultrasound images of the CCA, based on the extracted multiscale Amplitude-Modulation Frequency-Modulation (AM-FM) texture features and visual image quality assessment by two clinical experts. Texture features were extracted from the automatically segmented IMC for three different age groups. The despeckle filters hybrid median and the homogeneous mask area filter showed the best performance by improving the class separation between the three age groups and also yielded significantly improved image quality. PMID:24734038

  15. Emphasis of spatial cues in the temporal fine structure during the rising segments of amplitude-modulated sounds II: single-neuron recordings

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Torsten; Stange, Annette; Pecka, Michael; Grothe, Benedikt; McAlpine, David

    2014-01-01

    Recently, with the use of an amplitude-modulated binaural beat (AMBB), in which sound amplitude and interaural-phase difference (IPD) were modulated with a fixed mutual relationship (Dietz et al. 2013b), we demonstrated that the human auditory system uses interaural timing differences in the temporal fine structure of modulated sounds only during the rising portion of each modulation cycle. However, the degree to which peripheral or central mechanisms contribute to the observed strong dominance of the rising slope remains to be determined. Here, by recording responses of single neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) of anesthetized gerbils and in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anesthetized guinea pigs to AMBBs, we report a correlation between the position within the amplitude-modulation (AM) cycle generating the maximum response rate and the position at which the instantaneous IPD dominates the total neural response. The IPD during the rising segment dominates the total response in 78% of MSO neurons and 69% of IC neurons, with responses of the remaining neurons predominantly coding the IPD around the modulation maximum. The observed diversity of dominance regions within the AM cycle, especially in the IC, and its comparison with the human behavioral data suggest that only the subpopulation of neurons with rising slope dominance codes the sound-source location in complex listening conditions. A comparison of two models to account for the data suggests that emphasis on IPDs during the rising slope of the AM cycle depends on adaptation processes occurring before binaural interaction. PMID:24554782

  16. Shear wave elastography using amplitude-modulated acoustic radiation force and phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Arnal, Bastien; Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Investigating the elasticity of ocular tissue (cornea and intraocular lens) could help the understanding and management of pathologies related to biomechanical deficiency. In previous studies, we introduced a setup based on optical coherence tomography for shear wave elastography (SWE) with high resolution and high sensitivity. SWE determines tissue stiffness from the propagation speed of shear waves launched within tissue. We proposed acoustic radiation force to remotely induce shear waves by focusing an ultrasound (US) beam in tissue, similar to several elastography techniques. Minimizing the maximum US pressure is essential in ophthalmology for safety reasons. For this purpose, we propose a pulse compression approach. It utilizes coded US emissions to generate shear waves where the energy is spread over a long emission, and then numerically compressed into a short, localized, and high-energy pulse. We used a 7.5-MHz single-element focused transducer driven by coded excitations where the amplitude is modulated by a linear frequency-swept square wave (1 to 7 kHz). An inverse filter approach was used for compression. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing shear wave elastography measurements in tissue-mimicking phantoms at low US pressures (mechanical index <0.6). PMID:25554970

  17. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Nielsen, Anders B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization (RESPIRATIONCP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the RESPIRATIONCP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous 15N → 13CO and 15N → 13Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability.

  18. Determination of electrostatic force and its characteristics based on phase difference by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kesheng; Cheng, Jia; Yao, Shiji; Lu, Yijia; Ji, Linhong; Xu, Dengfeng

    2016-12-01

    Electrostatic force measurement at the micro/nano scale is of great significance in science and engineering. In this paper, a reasonable way of applying voltage is put forward by taking an electrostatic chuck in a real integrated circuit manufacturing process as a sample, applying voltage in the probe and the sample electrode, respectively, and comparing the measurement effect of the probe oscillation phase difference by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy. Based on the phase difference obtained from the experiment, the quantitative dependence of the absolute magnitude of the electrostatic force on the tip-sample distance and applied voltage is established by means of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The results show that the varying characteristics of the electrostatic force with the distance and voltage at the micro/nano scale are similar to those at the macroscopic scale. Electrostatic force gradually decays with increasing distance. Electrostatic force is basically proportional to the square of applied voltage. Meanwhile, the applicable conditions of the above laws are discussed. In addition, a comparison of the results in this paper with the results of the energy dissipation method shows the two are consistent in general. The error decreases with increasing distance, and the effect of voltage on the error is small.

  19. Global characterization of a nematic liquid crystal display LCX038ARA using the retarder-rotor model in the modulation amplitude regime-coupled without applied voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas Cely, C. J.; Acevedo, C. H.; Torres Moreno, Y.

    2017-01-01

    This work shows experimental and theoretical results of the characterization of a nematic liquid-crystal spatial light modulator Sony model LCX038ARA for the parameters angle of molecular rotation, the birefringence and angle of the molecular axis, using the retarder-rotor model without electric field applied in the amplitude regime-coupled.

  20. Dissociation of psychophysical and EEG steady-state response measures of cross-modal temporal correspondence for amplitude modulated acoustic and vibrotactile stimulation.

    PubMed

    Timora, Justin R; Budd, Timothy W

    2013-09-01

    Research examining multisensory integration suggests that the correspondence of stimulus characteristics across modalities (cross-modal correspondence) can have a dramatic influence on both neurophysiological and perceptual responses to multimodal stimulation. The current study extends prior research by examining the cross-modal correspondence of amplitude modulation rate for simultaneous acoustic and vibrotactile stimulation using EEG and perceptual measures of sensitivity to amplitude modulation. To achieve this, psychophysical thresholds and steady-state responses (SSRs) were measured for acoustic and vibrotactile amplitude modulated (AM) stimulation for 21 and 40 Hz AM rates as a function of the cross-modal correspondence. The study design included three primary conditions to determine whether the changes in the SSR and psychophysical thresholds were due to the cross-modal temporal correspondence of amplitude modulated stimuli: NONE (AM in one modality only), SAME (the same AM rate for each modality) and DIFF (different AM rates for each modality). The results of the psychophysical analysis showed that AM detection thresholds for the simultaneous AM conditions (i.e., SAME and DIFF) were significantly higher (i.e., lower sensitivity) than AM detection thresholds for the stimulation of a single modality (i.e., NONE). SSR results showed significant effects of SAME and DIFF conditions on SSR activity. The different pattern of results for perceptual and SSR measures of cross-modal correspondence of AM rate indicates a dissociation between entrained cortical activity (i.e., SSR) and perception.

  1. Reconstructing 3-D maps of the local viscoelastic properties using a finite-amplitude modulated radiation force.

    PubMed

    Giannoula, Alexia; Cobbold, Richard; Bezerianos, Anastasios

    2014-02-01

    A modulated acoustic radiation force, produced by two confocal tone-burst ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies (i.e. 2.0 MHz ± Δf/2, where Δf is the difference frequency), can be used to remotely generate modulated low-frequency (Δf ≤ 500 Hz) shear waves in attenuating media. By appropriately selecting the duration of the two beams, the energy of the generated shear waves can be concentrated around the difference frequency (i.e., Δf ± Δf/2). In this manner, neither their amplitude nor their phase information is distorted by frequency-dependent effects, thereby, enabling a more accurate reconstruction of the viscoelastic properties. Assuming a Voigt viscoelastic model, this paper describes the use of a finite-element-method model to simulate three-dimensional (3-D) shear-wave propagation in viscoelastic media containing a spherical inclusion. Nonlinear propagation is assumed for the two ultrasound beams, so that higher harmonics are developed in the force and shear spectrum. Finally, an inverse reconstruction algorithm is used to extract 3-D maps of the local shear modulus and viscosity from the simulated shear-displacement fields based on the fundamental and second-harmonic component. The quality of the reconstructed maps is evaluated using the contrast between the inclusion and the background and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). It is shown that the shear modulus can be accurately reconstructed based on the fundamental component, such that the observed contrast deviates from the true contrast by a root-mean-square-error (RMSE) of only 0.38 and the CNR is greater than 30 dB. If the second-harmonic component is used, the RMSE becomes 1.54 and the corresponding CNR decreases by approximately 10-15 dB. The reconstructed shear viscosity maps based on the second harmonic are shown to be of higher quality than those based on the fundamental. The effects of noise are also investigated and a fusion operation between the two spectral components is

  2. Electrode Position and Current Amplitude Modulate Impulsivity after Subthalamic Stimulation in Parkinsons Disease—A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mandali, Alekhya; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Rajan, Roopa; Sarma, Sankara; Kishore, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation (STN-DBS) is highly effective in alleviating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) which are not optimally controlled by dopamine replacement therapy. Clinical studies and reports suggest that STN-DBS may result in increased impulsivity and de novo impulse control disorders (ICD). Objective/Hypothesis: We aimed to compare performance on a decision making task, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), in healthy conditions (HC), untreated and medically-treated PD conditions with and without STN stimulation. We hypothesized that the position of electrode and stimulation current modulate impulsivity after STN-DBS. Methods: We built a computational spiking network model of basal ganglia (BG) and compared the model's STN output with STN activity in PD. Reinforcement learning methodology was applied to simulate IGT performance under various conditions of dopaminergic and STN stimulation where IGT total and bin scores were compared among various conditions. Results: The computational model reproduced neural activity observed in normal and PD conditions. Untreated and medically-treated PD conditions had lower total IGT scores (higher impulsivity) compared to HC (P < 0.0001). The electrode position that happens to selectively stimulate the part of the STN corresponding to an advantageous panel on IGT resulted in de-selection of that panel and worsening of performance (P < 0.0001). Supratherapeutic stimulation amplitudes also worsened IGT performance (P < 0.001). Conclusion(s): In our computational model, STN stimulation led to impulsive decision making in IGT in PD condition. Electrode position and stimulation current influenced impulsivity which may explain the variable effects of STN-DBS reported in patients. PMID:27965590

  3. Amplitude modulation drive to rectangular-plate linear ultrasonic motors with vibrators dimensions 8 mm x 2.16 mm X 1 mm.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yang; Hanson, Ben; Levesley, Martin C; Walker, Peter G; Watterson, Kevin G

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, to exploit the contribution from not only the stators but also from other parts of miniature ultrasonic motors, an amplitude modulation drive is proposed to drive a miniature linear ultrasonic motor consisting of two rectangular piezoelectric ceramic plates. Using finite-element software, the first longitudinal and second lateral-bending frequencies of the vibrator are shown to be very close when its dimensions are 8 mm x 2.16 mm x 1 mm. So one single frequency power should be able to drive the motor. However, in practice the motor is found to be hard to move with a single frequency power because of its small vibration amplitudes and big frequency difference between its longitudinal and bending resonance, which is induced by the boundary condition variation. To drive the motor effectively, an amplitude modulation drive is used by superimposing two signals with nearly the same frequencies, around the resonant frequency of the vibrators of the linear motor. When the amplitude modulation frequency is close to the resonant frequency of the vibrator's surroundings, experimental results show that the linear motor can move back and forward with a maximum thrust force (over 0.016 N) and a maximum velocity (over 50 mm/s).

  4. Low-amplitude rotational modulation rather than pulsations in the CoRoT B-type supergiant HD 46769

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, C.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Catala, C.; Neiner, C.; Briquet, M.; Castro, N.; Schmid, V. S.; Scardia, M.; Rainer, M.; Poretti, E.; Pápics, P. I.; Degroote, P.; Bloemen, S.; Østensen, R. H.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Baudin, F.; Michel, E.; Samadi, R.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We aim to detect and interpret photometric and spectroscopic variability of the bright CoRoT B-type supergiant target HD 46769 (V = 5.79). We also attempt to detect a magnetic field in the target. Methods: We analyse a 23-day oversampled CoRoT light curve after detrending and spectroscopic follow-up data using standard Fourier analysis and phase dispersion minimization methods. We determine the fundamental parameters of the star, as well as its abundances from the most prominent spectral lines. We perform a Monte Carlo analysis of spectropolarimetric data to obtain an upper limit of the polar magnetic field, assuming a dipole field. Results: In the CoRoT data, we detect a dominant period of 4.84 d with an amplitude of 87 ppm and some of its (sub-)multiples. Given the shape of the phase-folded light curve and the absence of binary motion, we interpret the dominant variability in terms of rotational modulation, with a rotation period of 9.69 d. Subtraction of the rotational modulation signal does not reveal any sign of pulsations. Our results are consistent with the absence of variability in the Hipparcos light curve. The spectroscopy leads to a projected rotational velocity of 72 ± 2 km s-1 and does not reveal periodic variability or the need to invoke macroturbulent line broadening. No signature of a magnetic field is detected in our data. A field stronger than ~500 G at the poles can be excluded, unless the possible non-detected field were more complex than dipolar. Conclusions: The absence of pulsations and macroturbulence of this evolved B-type supergiant is placed into the context of instability computations and of observed variability of evolved B-type stars. Based on CoRoT space-based photometric data; the CoRoT space mission was developed and operated by the French space agency CNES, with the participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain. Based on observations collected at La Silla Observatory, ESO

  5. Encoding of the amplitude modulation of pulsatile electrical stimulation in the feline cochlear nucleus by neurons in the inferior colliculus; effects of stimulus pulse rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor; Yadav, Kamal; Pannu, Satinderpall

    2013-10-01

    Objectives. Persons without a functional auditory nerve cannot benefit from cochlear implants, but some hearing can be restored by an auditory brainstem implant (ABI) with stimulating electrodes implanted on the surface of the cochlear nucleus (CN). Most users benefit from their ABI, but speech recognition tends to be poorer than for users of cochlear implants. Psychophysical studies suggest that poor modulation detection may contribute to the limited performance of ABI users. In a cat model, we determined how the pulse rate of the electrical stimulus applied within or on the CN affects temporal and rate encoding of amplitude modulation (AM) by neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). Approach. Stimulating microelectrodes were implanted chronically in and on the cats' CN, and multi-site recording microelectrodes were implanted chronically into the ICC. Encoding of AM pulse trains by neurons in the ICC was characterized as vector strength (VS), the synchrony of neural activity with the AM, and as the mean rate of neuronal action potentials (neuronal spike rate (NSR)). Main results. For intranuclear microstimulation, encoding of AM as VS was up to 3 dB greater when stimulus pulse rate was increased from 250 to 500 pps, but only for neuronal units with low best acoustic frequencies, and when the electrical stimulation was modulated at low frequencies (10-20 Hz). For stimulation on the surface of the CN, VS was similar at 250 and 500 pps, and the dynamic range of the VS was reduced for pulse rates greater than 250 pps. Modulation depth was encoded strongly as VS when the maximum stimulus amplitude was held constant across a range of modulation depth. This ‘constant maximum’ protocol allows enhancement of modulation depth while preserving overall dynamic range. However, modulation depth was not encoded as strongly as NSR. Significance. The findings have implications for improved sound processors for present and future ABIs. The performance of

  6. Efficient frequency-domain channel equalization methods for dual-polarization orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing/offset quadrature amplitude modulation-passive optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bangjiang; Fang, Xi; Tang, Xuan; Lin, Chun; Li, Yiwei; Zhang, Shihao; Wu, Yi; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    We present dual-polarization orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing/offset quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM/OQAM) transmission for passive optical network (PON) with intensity modulation and direct detection, which has high spectral efficiency and high robustness against chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization mode dispersion (PMD). The frequency-domain optical fiber channel transmission model for dual-polarization OFDM/OQAM-PON with the CD- and PMD-induced intrinsic imaginary interference (IMI) effect is systemically deduced. The intrasymbol frequency-domain averaging (ISFA) and minimum mean-squared error (MMSE) with the full loaded (FL) and half loaded (HL) preamble structures are used to mitigate the IMI effect. Compared with the conventional interference approximation method, the ISFA and MMSE offer improved receiver sensitivity. For channel estimation, the FL method is more effective than the HL method in mitigating the IMI effect and optical noise.

  7. Molecular-resolution imaging of lead phthalocyanine molecules by small amplitude frequency modulation atomic force microscopy using second flexural mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichii, Takashi; Hosokawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2009-03-01

    Lead phthalocyanine molecules on MoS2(0001) substrates were imaged using an ultrahigh-vacuum AFM apparatus equipped with an optical beam deflection (OBD) sensor. The second flexural mode was employed to utilize its high effective spring constant in order to reduce the oscillation amplitude to 0.5 nm without oscillation instability. Submolecular-resolution images were obtained when a shorter cantilever, which had a very high resonance frequency and a low noise equivalent deflection in the OBD sensor, was used.

  8. Interlinked add-drop filter with amplitude modulation routing a fiber-optic microring to a lithium niobate microwaveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Suxu; Dong, Jiangli; He, Donghui; Wang, Yuan; Qiu, Wentao; Yu, Jianhui; Guan, Heyuan; Zhu, Wenguo; Zhong, Yongchun; Luo, Yunhan; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhe; Lu, Huihui

    2017-04-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new electro-optically controllable add-drop filter based on light coupling between a microfiber knot ring (MKR) and a lithium niobate (LN) microwaveguide. In our design, the MKR works as a resonator and routes the resonant light into the LN microwaveguide. The LN microwaveguide, as an excellent intermediary between electronics and optics, is a robust platform that not only enables stable support and manipulation of the MKR but also provides amplitude tunability taking advantage of its electro-optic property. Two add-drop filters with different diameters of the MKR, 1.12 mm, and 560 μm respectively, are studied, and a maximum amplitude tunability of ∼0.139  dB/V is obtained. The results show that this design can be a solution to interconnect a microstructured optical fiber with a microstructured on-chip device and provide an effective method to realize the active on-chip integration of the conventional fiber system.

  9. CoRoT light curves of Blazhko RR Lyrae stars. Evidence of a strong correlation between phase and amplitude modulations of CoRoT ID 0105288363

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadid, M.; Perini, C.; Bono, G.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Weiss, W. W.; Deboscher, J.

    2011-03-01

    Context. The CoRoT - Convection Rotation and planetary Transits - space mission provides a unique opportunity to monitor RR Lyrae stars with excellent time-sampling, unprecedented photometric precision, and a long time base of 150 days. Aims: The pulsation characteristics of RR Lyrae stars rely on robust physics, but we still lack a firm quantitative understanding of the physical mechanisms driving the Blazhko modulation and the long-term changes in their pulsation behavior. We use the high-precision space data of an unknown RR Lyrae star CoRoT ID 0105288363 observed during a second long run centered on the Galaxy - LRc02 -, to improve our understanding of the pulsation properties of RR Lyrae stars. Methods: The CoRoT data were corrected using a jump and trend filtering code. We applied different period-finding techniques including Period04, MuFrAn, PDM, and SigSpec. Amplitude and phase modulation were investigated using an analytical function method as well as traditional O-C diagrams. Results: For the first time, we detect significant cycle-to-cycle changes in the Blazhko modulation, which appear to be analogous to those predicted by Stothers - owing to the suppression of turbulent convection - to explain this phenomenon. We discuss the clear correlations between the phase and the amplitude of the bump, and the skewness and acuteness of the light curve during different Blazhko cycles. We find that these quantities are strongly anticorrelated with the fundamental pulsation period. This provides a strong support to the slow convective cycle model suggested by Stothers. We also detect a long-term modulation period in the maximum brightness spectrum. A more extended coverage of the long-term modulation is required to constrain its period. Seventh-order side peaks of the pulsation multiplet structure are also visible with the left-side peak amplitudes being higher than those of the right. This has never previously been detected. Future theoretical investigations are

  10. The evaluation of eccentricity-related amplitude modulation and bundling in paleoclimate data: An inverse approach for astrochronologic testing and time scale optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    2015-12-01

    Cyclostratigraphic analysis has produced fundamental advancements in our understanding of climate change, paleoceanography, celestial mechanics, geochronology, and chronostratigraphy. Of central importance to this success has been the development of astrochronologic testing methods for the evaluation of astronomical-climate influence on sedimentation. Most pre-Pleistocene astrochronologic testing methods fall into one of two categories: (1) those that test for expected amplitude or frequency modulation imposed by an astronomical signal or (2) those that test for bedding hierarchies (frequency ratios or bundling) that are predicted by the dominant astronomical periods. In this study, a statistical methodology for combining these complementary approaches is developed, which identifies the time scale that simultaneously optimizes eccentricity amplitude modulation of the precession band, and the concentration of power at precession (carrier) and eccentricity (modulator) frequencies. The technique is demonstrated to have high statistical power—it is capable of identifying astronomical cycles when present—under a wide range of conditions, and its application to synthetic models illuminates a range of potential pitfalls that are encountered when more conventional nonoptimization approaches are used. The method is also independent from the interpretation of power spectrum peak significance, resolving previous concerns regarding appropriate confidence level assessment and "multiple testing." As two case studies, the algorithm is applied to Miocene strata of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 926B, and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum-Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 interval at ODP Site 1262. The results verify published cyclostratigraphic interpretations and support the theoretical astronomical solutions. This new astrochronologic testing approach can be used to evaluate cyclostratigraphic records spanning the Phanerozoic and potentially beyond.

  11. Suppressing the relaxation oscillation noise of injection-locked WRC-FPLD for directly modulated OFDM transmission.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min-Chi; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Li, Yi-Cheng; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2014-06-30

    By up-shifting the relaxation oscillation peak and suppressing its relative intensity noise in a weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode (WRC-FPLD) under intense injection-locking, the directly modulated transmission of optical 16 quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) data-stream is demonstrated. The total bit rate of up to 20 Gbit/s within 5-GHz bandwidth is achieved by using the OFDM subcarrier pre-leveling technique. With increasing the injection-locking power from -12 to -3 dBm, the effective reduction on threshold current of the WRC-FPLD significantly shifts its relaxation oscillation frequency from 5 to 7.5 GHz. This concurrently induces an up-shift of the peak relative intensity noise (RIN) of the WRC-FPLD, and effectively suppresses the background RIN level to -104 dBc/Hz within the OFDM band between 3 and 6 GHz. The enhanced signal-to-noise ratio from 16 to 20 dB leads to a significant reduction of bit-error-rate (BER) of the back-to-back transmitted 16-QAM-OFDM data from 1.3 × 10(-3) to 5 × 10(-5), which slightly degrades to 1.1 × 10(-4) after 25-km single-mode fiber (SMF) transmission. However, the enlarged injection-locking power from -12 to -3 dBm inevitably declines the modulation throughput and increases its negative throughput slope from -0.8 to -1.9 dBm/GHz. After pre-leveling the peak amplitude of the OFDM subcarriers to compensate the throughput degradation of the directly modulated WRC-FPLD, the BER under 25-km SMF transmission can be further improved to 3 × 10(-5) under a receiving power of -3 dBm.

  12. Amplitude modulated chirp excitation to reduce grating lobes and maintain ultrasound intensity at the focus of an array.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Chandra P; Oelze, Michael L

    2013-09-01

    During application of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with therapy arrays, the existence of grating lobes can cause heating at unintended tissue regions. Therefore, the reduction of grating lobes in therapeutic arrays is an important goal. One way to reduce the grating lobes in therapy arrays is to excite the arrays with broadband signals (defined here as >10% fractional bandwidth). To achieve a reduction in grating lobe levels in an ultrasonic array, coded waveforms can be utilized that reduce the grating lobe levels while maintaining the spatial peak temporal average intensity. In this study, a 5-MHz, 9-element, 1.25 mm inter-elemental spacing linear array was excited by a sinusoidal waveform, a conventional linear chirp, and a modified linear chirp. Both chirps spanned the -3-dB bandwidth of the transducer. The conventional chirp was a broadband signal with a linear sweep of frequencies between 2.5 and 7.5 MHz, with all frequency components excited with equal amplitude. The modified chirp signal also swept the frequencies between 2.5 and 7.5 MHz, but the amplitude was weighted such that the edges (low and high frequencies of the band) were excited with more energy than the center of the band. In simulations, the field patterns for the sinusoidal, conventional chirp and modified chirp excitations were produced from the array using Field II and compared. For experiments, the beam pattern from a 5-MHz single-element transducer was mapped using a hydrophone for the sinusoidal, conventional chirp and modified chirp excitation. Each field from the transducer was repeated and summed to produce a field from an array of 9 elements. The difference in the time averaged intensity (in dB) in the main lobe and grating lobes were estimated for each excitation and compared. The results demonstrated that the chirp signals resulted in decreases in grating lobe levels compared to the main lobe, i.e. 10 dB down for focusing and 6 dB down for focusing and steering. A

  13. Arsenic toxicity in the water weed Wolffia arrhiza measured using Pulse Amplitude Modulation Fluorometry (PAM) measurements of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Raymond J; Mekjinda, Nutsara

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of arsenic in plants is a serious South-east Asian environmental problem. Photosynthesis in the small aquatic angiosperm Wolffia arrhiza is very sensitive to arsenic toxicity, particularly in water below pH 7 where arsenite (As (OH)3) (AsIII) is the dominant form; at pH >7 AsO4(2-) (As(V) predominates). A blue-diode PAM (Pulse Amplitude Fluorometer) machine was used to monitor photosynthesis in Wolffia. Maximum gross photosynthesis (Pgmax) and not maximum yield (Ymax) is the most reliable indicator of arsenic toxicity. The toxicity of arsenite As(III) and arsenate (H2AsO4(2-)) As(V) vary with pH. As(V) was less toxic than As(III) at both pH 5 and pH 8 but both forms of arsenic were toxic (>90% inhibition) at below 0.1molm(-3) when incubated in arsenic for 24h. Arsenite toxicity was apparent after 1h based on Pgmax and gradually increased over 7h but there was no apparent effect on Ymax or photosynthetic efficiency (α0).

  14. The Temporal Order of Word Presentation Modulates the Amplitudes of P2 and N400 during Recognition of Causal Relations

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiuling; Xiao, Feng; Wu, Lijun; Chen, Qingfei; Lei, Yi; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The processing of causal relations has been constantly found to be asymmetrical once the roles of cause and effect are assigned to objects in interactions. We used a relationship recognition paradigm and recorded electroencephalographic (EEG) signals to explore the neural mechanism underlying the asymmetrical representations of causal relations in semantic memory. The results revealed that the verification of causal relations is faster if two words appear in “cause-effect” order (e.g., virus-epidemic) than if they appear in “effect-cause” order (e.g., epidemic-virus), whereas no such asymmetrical representation was found for the verification of hierarchical relations with reverse orders (e.g., bird-sparrow vs. sparrow-bird) in Experiment 1. Furthermore, the P2 amplitude elicited by “superordinate-subordinate” order was larger than that when in reverse order, whereas the N400 effect elicited by “cause-effect” order was smaller (more positive) than when in reverse order. However, no such asymmetry, as well as P2 and N400 components, were observed when verifying the existence of a general associative relation in Experiment 2. We suggested that the smaller N400 in cause-effect order indicates their increased salience in semantic memory relative to the effect-cause order. These results provide evidence for dissociable neural processes, which are related to role binding, contributing to the generation of causal asymmetry. PMID:27994564

  15. Simulation study of amplitude-modulated (AM) harmonic motion imaging (HMI) for stiffness contrast quantification with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Maleke, Caroline; Luo, Jianwen; Gamarnik, Viktor; Lu, Xin L; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study is to show that Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) can be used as a reliable tumor-mapping technique based on the tumor's distinct stiffness at the early onset of disease. HMI is a radiation-force-based imaging method that generates a localized vibration deep inside the tissue to estimate the relative tissue stiffness based on the resulting displacement amplitude. In this paper, a finite-element model (FEM) study is presented, followed by an experimental validation in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide gels and excised human breast tumors ex vivo. This study compares the resulting tissue motion in simulations and experiments at four different gel stiffnesses and three distinct spherical inclusion diameters. The elastic moduli of the gels were separately measured using mechanical testing. Identical transducer parameters were used in both the FEM and experimental studies, i.e., a 4.5-MHz single-element focused ultrasound (FUS) and a 7.5-MHz diagnostic (pulse-echo) transducer. In the simulation, an acoustic pressure field was used as the input stimulus to generate a localized vibration inside the target. Radiofrequency (rf) signals were then simulated using a 2D convolution model. A one-dimensional cross-correlation technique was performed on the simulated and experimental rf signals to estimate the axial displacement resulting from the harmonic radiation force. In order to measure the reliability of the displacement profiles in estimating the tissue stiffness distribution, the contrast-transfer efficiency (CTE) was calculated. For tumor mapping ex vivo, a harmonic radiation force was applied using a 2D raster-scan technique. The 2D HMI images of the breast tumor ex vivo could detect a malignant tumor (20 x 10 mm2) surrounded by glandular and fat tissues. The FEM and experimental results from both gels and breast tumors ex vivo demonstrated that HMI was capable of detecting and mapping the tumor or stiff inclusion with various diameters or

  16. Recognition of Frequency Modulated Whistle-Like Sounds by a Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and Humans with Transformations in Amplitude, Duration and Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Branstetter, Brian K.; DeLong, Caroline M.; Dziedzic, Brandon; Black, Amy; Bakhtiari, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) use the frequency contour of whistles produced by conspecifics for individual recognition. Here we tested a bottlenose dolphin’s (Tursiops truncatus) ability to recognize frequency modulated whistle-like sounds using a three alternative matching-to-sample paradigm. The dolphin was first trained to select a specific object (object A) in response to a specific sound (sound A) for a total of three object-sound associations. The sounds were then transformed by amplitude, duration, or frequency transposition while still preserving the frequency contour of each sound. For comparison purposes, 30 human participants completed an identical task with the same sounds, objects, and training procedure. The dolphin’s ability to correctly match objects to sounds was robust to changes in amplitude with only a minor decrement in performance for short durations. The dolphin failed to recognize sounds that were frequency transposed by plus or minus ½ octaves. Human participants demonstrated robust recognition with all acoustic transformations. The results indicate that this dolphin’s acoustic recognition of whistle-like sounds was constrained by absolute pitch. Unlike human speech, which varies considerably in average frequency, signature whistles are relatively stable in frequency, which may have selected for a whistle recognition system invariant to frequency transposition. PMID:26863519

  17. Color image encryption by using Yang-Gu mixture amplitude-phase retrieval algorithm in gyrator transform domain and two-dimensional Sine logistic modulation map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Liansheng; Liu, Benqing; Wang, Qiang; Li, Ye; Liang, Junli

    2015-12-01

    A color image encryption scheme is proposed based on Yang-Gu mixture amplitude-phase retrieval algorithm and two-coupled logistic map in gyrator transform domain. First, the color plaintext image is decomposed into red, green and blue components, which are scrambled individually by three random sequences generated by using the two-dimensional Sine logistic modulation map. Second, each scrambled component is encrypted into a real-valued function with stationary white noise distribution in the iterative amplitude-phase retrieval process in the gyrator transform domain, and then three obtained functions are considered as red, green and blue channels to form the color ciphertext image. Obviously, the ciphertext image is real-valued function and more convenient for storing and transmitting. In the encryption and decryption processes, the chaotic random phase mask generated based on logistic map is employed as the phase key, which means that only the initial values are used as private key and the cryptosystem has high convenience on key management. Meanwhile, the security of the cryptosystem is enhanced greatly because of high sensitivity of the private keys. Simulation results are presented to prove the security and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  18. Four-fold increase in users of time-wavelength division multiplexing (TWDM) passive optical network (PON) by delayed optical amplitude modulation (AM) upstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachhatiya, Vivek; Prince, Shanthi

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we have proposed and simulated optical time division multiplexed passive optical network (TDM-PON) using delayed optical amplitude modulation (AM). Eight upstream wavelengths are demonstrated to show optical time wavelength division multiplexed (TWDM) by combining optical network units (ONU) users data at the remote node (RN). Each ONU generates 2.5 Gb/s user data, and it is modulated using novel return to zero (RZ) delayed AM. Optical TDM aggregates 10 Gb/s data per wavelength from four 2.5 Gb/s upstream user data, which facilitates four different ONU data on the same wavelength as 10 Gb/s per upstream wavelength and, simplify the laser requirements (2.5 Gb/s) at each optical network unit (ONU) transmitter. Upstream optical TWDM-PON is investigated for eight wavelengths with wavelength spacing of 100 GHz. Novel optical TDM for upstream increased the number of the simultaneous user to fourfold from conventional TWDM-PON using delayed AM with a high-quality-factor of received signal. Despite performance degradation due to different fiber reach and dispersion compensation technique, Optical TWDM link shows significant improvement regarding receiver sensitivity when compared with common TWDM link. Hence, it offers optimistic thinking to show optical TDM at this phase as one of the future direction, where complex digital signal processing (DSP) and coherent optical communication are frequently demonstrated to serve the access network. Downstream side conventional TWDM eight wavelengths are multiplexed at the OLT and sent downstream to serve distributed tunable ONU receivers through an optical distribution network (ODN). Each downstream wavelengths are modulated at the peak rate of 10 Gb/s using non-return to zero external modulation (NRZ-EM). The proposed architecture is cost efficient and supports high data rates as well as "pay as you grow" network for both service providers and the users perspectives. Users are classified into two categories viz home

  19. Amplitude-modulation detection by recreational-noise-exposed humans with near-normal hearing thresholds and its medium-term progression

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Michael A.; Moore, Brian C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Noise exposure can affect the functioning of cochlear inner and outer hair cells (IHC/OHC), leading to multiple perceptual changes. This work explored possible changes in detection of amplitude modulation (AM) at three Sensation Levels (SL) for carrier frequencies of 3, 4 and 6 kHz. There were two groups of participants, aged 19 to 24 (Young) and 26 to 35 (Older) years. All had near-normal audiometric thresholds. Participants self-assessed exposure to high-level noise in recreational settings. Each group was sub-grouped into low-noise (LN) or high-noise (HN) exposure. AM detection thresholds were worse for the HN than for the LN sub-group at the lowest SL, for the males only of the Young group and for both genders for the Older group, despite no significant difference in absolute threshold at 3 and 4 kHz between sub-groups. AM detection at the lowest SL, at both 3 and 4 kHz, generally improved with increasing age and increasing absolute threshold, consistent with a recruitment-like process. However, poorer AM detection was correlated with increasing exposure at 3 kHz in the Older group. It is suggested that high-level noise exposure produces both IHC- and OHC-related damage, the balance between the two varying across frequency. However, the use of AM detection offers poor sensitivity as a measure of the effects. PMID:25260433

  20. Seasonal and diel changes in photosynthetic activity of the snow alga Chlamydomonas nivalis (Chlorophyceae) from Svalbard determined by pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Elster, Josef; Sabacká, Marie; Kastovská, Klára

    2007-02-01

    The seasonal and diel dynamics of the physiological state and photosynthetic activity of the snow alga Chlamydomonas nivalis were investigated in a snowfield in Svalbard. The snow surface represents an environment with very high irradiation intensities along with stable low temperatures close to freezing point. Photosynthetic activity was measured using pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry. Three types of cell (green biflagellate vegetative cells, orange spores clustered by means of mucilaginous sheaths, and purple spores with thick cell walls) were found, all of them photosynthetically active. The pH of snow ranged between 5.0 and 7.5, and the conductivity ranged between 5 and 75 microS cm(-1). The temperature of snow was stable (-0.1 to +0.1 degrees C), and the incident radiation values ranged from 11 to 1500 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1). The photosynthetic activity had seasonal and diel dynamics. The Fv/Fm values ranged between 0.4 and 0.7, and generally declined over the course of the season. A dynamic response of Fv/Fm to the irradiance was recorded. According to the saturating photon fluence values Ek, the algae may have obtained saturating light as deep as 3 cm in the snow when there were higher-light conditions, whereas they were undersaturated at prevalent low light even if on the surface.

  1. Examination of humidity effects on measured thickness and interfacial phenomena of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide via amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jinkins, K.; Farina, L.; Wu, Y.; Camacho, J.

    2015-12-14

    The properties of Few-Layer Graphene (FLG) change with the number of layers and Amplitude Modulation (AM) Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is commonly used to determine the thickness of FLG. However, AFM measurements have been shown to be sensitive to environmental conditions such as relative humidity (RH). In the present study, AM-AFM is used to measure the thickness and loss tangent of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) as RH is increased from 10% to 80%. We show that the measured thickness of graphene is dependent on RH. The loss tangent values of the graphene and oxide regions are both affected by humidity, with generally higher loss tangent for graphene than SiO{sub 2}. As RH increases, we observe the loss tangent of both materials approaches the same value. We hypothesize that there is a layer of water trapped between the graphene and SiO{sub 2} substrate to explain this observation. Using this interpretation, the loss tangent images also indicate movement and change in this trapped water layer as RH increases, which impacts the measured thickness of graphene using AM-AFM.

  2. Negative response of photosynthesis to natural and projected high seawater temperatures estimated by pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry in a temperate coral

    PubMed Central

    Caroselli, Erik; Falini, Giuseppe; Goffredo, Stefano; Dubinsky, Zvy; Levy, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Balanophyllia europaea is a shallow water solitary zooxanthellate coral, endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. Extensive field studies across a latitudinal temperature gradient highlight detrimental effects of rising temperatures on its growth, demography, and skeletal characteristics, suggesting that depression of photosynthesis at high temperatures might cause these negative effects. Here we test this hypothesis by analyzing, by means of pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry, the photosynthetic efficiency of B. europaea specimens exposed in aquaria to the annual range of temperatures experienced in the field (13, 18, and 28°C), and two extreme temperatures expected for 2100 as a consequence of global warming (29 and 32°C). The indicators of photosynthetic performance analyzed (maximum and effective quantum yield) showed that maximum efficiency was reached at 20.0–21.6°C, slightly higher than the annual mean temperature in the field (18°C). Photosynthetic efficiency decreased from 20.0 to 13°C and even more strongly from 21.6 to 32°C. An unusual form of bleaching was observed, with a maximum zooxanthellae density at 18°C that strongly decreased from 18 to 32°C. Chlorophyll a concentration per zooxanthellae cell showed an opposite trend as it was minimal at 18°C and increased from 18 to 32°C. Since the areal chlorophyll concentration is the product of the zooxanthellae density and its cellular content, these trends resulted in a homogeneous chlorophyll concentration per coral surface across temperature treatments. This confirms that B. europaea photosynthesis is progressively depressed at temperatures >21.6°C, supporting previous hypotheses raised by the studies on growth and demography of this species. This study also confirms the threats posed to this species by the ongoing seawater warming. PMID:26582993

  3. Super-oscillatory focusing of circularly polarized light by ultra-long focal length planar lens based on binary amplitude-phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Li, Yuyan; Yu, Anping; Wen, Zhongquan; Dai, Luru; Chen, Li; Zhang, Zhihai; Jiang, Senlin; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Xianyou; Lin, Feng

    2016-06-29

    In traditional optics, the focal spot size of a conventional lens is restricted to the diffraction limit 0.5λ/NA, where λ is the wavelength in vacuum and NA is the numerical aperture of the lens. Recently, various sub-diffraction focusing optical devices have been demonstrated, but they usually have short focal length and high numerical aperture. Moreover, they always suffer the problem of huge sidelobes near the focal spot and small field of view, especially when the focal spot size is less than the super-oscillation criteria 0.38λ/NA. To address the problem, here, we reported a far-field sub-diffraction point-focusing lens based on binary phase and amplitude modulation with ultra-long focal length 252.8 μm (399.5λ) and small numerical aperture 0.78, and experimentally demonstrated a super-oscillatory focusing of circularly polarized light with spot size 287 nm (0.454λ), smaller than the diffraction limit 0.64λ and the super-oscillation criterion 0.487λ. What's more, on the focal plane, in the measured area within the radius of 142λ, the largest sidelobe intensity is less than 26% of the central lobe intensity. Such ultra-long distance super-oscillatory focusing with small sidelobes and large field of view has great potential applications in far-field super-resolution microscopy, ultra-high-density optical storage and nano-fabrication.

  4. Super-oscillatory focusing of circularly polarized light by ultra-long focal length planar lens based on binary amplitude-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Li, Yuyan; Yu, Anping; Wen, Zhongquan; Dai, Luru; Chen, Li; Zhang, Zhihai; Jiang, Senlin; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Xianyou; Lin, Feng

    2016-06-01

    In traditional optics, the focal spot size of a conventional lens is restricted to the diffraction limit 0.5λ/NA, where λ is the wavelength in vacuum and NA is the numerical aperture of the lens. Recently, various sub-diffraction focusing optical devices have been demonstrated, but they usually have short focal length and high numerical aperture. Moreover, they always suffer the problem of huge sidelobes near the focal spot and small field of view, especially when the focal spot size is less than the super-oscillation criteria 0.38λ/NA. To address the problem, here, we reported a far-field sub-diffraction point-focusing lens based on binary phase and amplitude modulation with ultra-long focal length 252.8 μm (399.5λ) and small numerical aperture 0.78, and experimentally demonstrated a super-oscillatory focusing of circularly polarized light with spot size 287 nm (0.454λ), smaller than the diffraction limit 0.64λ and the super-oscillation criterion 0.487λ. What’s more, on the focal plane, in the measured area within the radius of 142λ, the largest sidelobe intensity is less than 26% of the central lobe intensity. Such ultra-long distance super-oscillatory focusing with small sidelobes and large field of view has great potential applications in far-field super-resolution microscopy, ultra-high-density optical storage and nano-fabrication.

  5. Optical 16-QAM-52-OFDM transmission at 4 Gbit/s by directly modulating a coherently injection-locked colorless laser diode.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu-Chieh; Li, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Huai-Yung; Peng, Peng-Chun; Lu, Hai-Han; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2012-08-27

    Coherently injection-locked and directly modulated weak-resonant-cavity laser diode (WRC-FPLD) for back-to-back optical 16-quadrature-amplitude-modulation (QAM) and 52-subcarrier orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission with maximum bit rate up to 4 Gbit/s at carrier frequency of 2.5 GHz is demonstrated. The WRC-FPLD transmitter source is a specific design with very weak-resonant longitudinal modes to preserve its broadband gain spectral characteristics for serving as a colorless WDM-PON transmitter. Under coherent injection-locking, the relative-intensity noise (RIN) of the injection-locked WRC-FPLD can be suppressed to ?105 dBc/Hz and the error vector magnitude of the received optical OFDM data is greatly reduced with the amplitude error suppressed down 5.5%. Such a coherently injection-locked single-mode WRC-FPLD can perform both the back-to-back and the 25-km-SMF 16-QAM-52-OFDM transmissions with a symbol rate of 20-MSa/s in each OFDM subcarrier. After coherent injection locking, the BER of the back-to-back transmitted 16-QAM-52-OFDM data is reduced to 2.5 × 10(-5) at receiving power of ?10 dBm. After propagating along a 25-km-long SMF, a receiving power sensitivity of ?7.5 dBm is required to obtain a lowest BER of 2.5 × 10(-5), and a power penalty of 2.7 dB is observed when comparing with the back-to-back transmission.

  6. Syzygies probing scattering amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Liu, Junyu; Xie, Ruofei; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Yehao

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new efficient algorithm to obtain the locally minimal generating set of the syzygies for an ideal, i.e. a generating set whose proper subsets cannot be generating sets. Syzygy is a concept widely used in the current study of scattering amplitudes. This new algorithm can deal with more syzygies effectively because a new generation of syzygies is obtained in each step and the irreducibility of this generation is also verified in the process. This efficient algorithm can also be applied in getting the syzygies for the modules. We also show a typical example to illustrate the potential application of this method in scattering amplitudes, especially the Integral-By-Part(IBP) relations of the characteristic two-loop diagrams in the Yang-Mills theory.

  7. Amplitudes of Spiral Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosbol, P.; Patsis, P. A.

    2014-03-01

    It has proven very difficult to estimate the amplitudes of spiral perturbations in disk galaxies from observations due to the variation of mass-to-light ratio and extinction across spiral arms. Deep, near-infrared images of grand-design spiral galaxies obtained with HAWK-I/VLT were used to analyze the azimuthal amplitude and shape of arms, which, even in the K-band may, be significantly biased by the presence of young stellar populations. Several techniques were applied to evaluate the relative importance of young stars across the arms, such as surface brightness of the disk with light from clusters subtracted, number density of clusters detected, and texture of the disk. The modulation of the texture measurement, which correlates with the number density of faint clusters, yields amplitudes of the spiral perturbation in the range 0.1-0.2. This estimate gives a better estimate of the mass perturbation in the spiral arms, since it is dominated by old clusters.

  8. Modulation of VLF signal amplitudes from 5 different transmitters during a C9.3-class solar flare as observed from a single receiving station in India: modeling with an ion chemistry model and LWPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Pal, Sujay; Das, Bakul; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) signal at any location on Earth's surface is strongly dependent on the interference of various modes. The modulation effects on VLF signal due to any terrestrial or extra-terrestrial events vary widely from one propagation path to another depending on the interference patterns along these paths. The task of predicting or reproducing the modulation in the values of signal amplitudes or phase between any two transmitting and receiving stations is challenging. In this work we present results of modeling of the VLF signal amplitudes from five different transmitters as observed at a single receiving station in India during a C9.3 class solar flare. In this model we simulate the ionization rates at lower ionospheric heights from actual flare spectra with the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code and find the equilibrium ion densities with a D-region ion-chemistry model. We find the signal amplitude variation along different propagation paths with the LWPC code. Such efforts are essential for an appropriate understanding of the VLF propagation in Earth's ionosphere waveguide and to achieve desired accuracy while using Earth's ionosphere as an efficient detector of such extra-terrestrial ionization events.

  9. Performance of Complex Spreading MIMO Systems With Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    16- QAM ) and 64-quadrature amplitude modulation (64- QAM ). We also investigate the performances of the previous systems for multiple-input...such as quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK), 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (16- QAM ) and 64-quadrature amplitude modulation (64- QAM ). We also...the equivalent constellation diagrams. In [9], a study of adaptive quadrature amplitude modulation ( QAM ) with complex spreading for high-speed

  10. Schematic-based 4/16/64 order quadrature amplitude modulation mapper-demapper implementation for 256 subchannel orthogonal frequency division multiplexing model on FPGA Xilinx SPARTAN 3E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaduddin, .; Setiyanto, Budi; Litasari, .

    2010-05-01

    Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) is a modulation technique which provides higher bit rate and efficient bandwidth. This paper presents an implementation of a 4/16/64 Order Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) Mapper-Demapper for 256 Sub channel OFDM Model on Xilinx SPARTAN 3E Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) series, using schematic approach. This QAMOFDM model is reconfigurable in term of its QAM order. The result shows that under the clock frequency around 262 MHz, the implementation works well, high precision is achieved at its serial output. A precision process conducted at 20 ns internal clock input period, with the 25 Mbps input bit rate requires 81.94 μs QAM processing-time. The implementation consumes about 80 % of the total FPGA slices (3736 slices).

  11. Phase and amplitude errors in FM radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Hugh D.

    The constraints on phase and amplitude errors are determined for various types of FM radar by calculating the range sidelobe levels on the point target response due to the phase and amplitude modulation of the target echo. It is shown that under certain circumstances the constraints on phase linearity appropriate for conventional pulse compression radars are unnecessarily stringent, and quite large phase errors can be tolerated provided the relative delay of the local oscillator with respect to the target echo is small compared with the periodicity of the phase error characteristic. The constraints on amplitude flatness, however, are severe under almost all circumstances.

  12. Using a 1.2 GHz bandwidth reflective semiconductor optical amplifier with seeding light by 64-quadrature amplitude modulation orthogonal frequency division multiplexing modulation to achieve a 10-gbits/s upstream rate in long-reach passive optical network access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Wu, Yu-Fu

    2012-01-01

    We use a commercially available 1.2 GHz bandwidth reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA)--based optical network unit (ONU) to achieve 10-gbits/s upstream traffic for an optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) long-reach passive optical network (LR-PON). This is the first time the 64--quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) OFDM format has been applied to RSOA-ONU to achieve a 75 km fiber transmission length. In the proposed LR-PON, the upstream power penalty of 5.2 dB at the bit error rate of 3.8×10-3 is measured by using a 64-QAM OFDM modulation after the 75 km fiber transmission without dispersion compensation.

  13. Microprocessor Controlled Pulse Amplitude Modulation Decommutator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-28

    821760DAT 5 - LINE I NALOG PARALLEL PARALLEL AAO BCD DATA CONVERTERSTIME PORT Cn ND I CAT R SSEIGAL / - FPU FONETE tKIMIATO ,,,PNE C0 SINA .MCOPO E R FVAEO...Analog to Digital Converter Interface 10 5. BCD Time Code Generator Interface 12 6. Thumbwheel Switch Interface 13 7. Analog Output Latch/DAC 15 8...also appear on analog output No. 1. See Figure 5 for interface wiring. A low on the PB1 line selects the MSD switch and a positive true BCD code

  14. Two-fold transmission reach enhancement enabled by transmitter-side digital backpropagation and optical frequency comb-derived information carriers.

    PubMed

    Temprana, E; Myslivets, E; Liu, L; Ataie, V; Wiberg, A; Kuo, B P P; Alic, N; Radic, S

    2015-08-10

    We demonstrate a two-fold reach extension of 16 GBaud 16-Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) system based on erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA)-only amplified standard and single mode fiber -based link. The result is enabled by transmitter-side digital backpropagation and frequency referenced carriers drawn from a parametric comb.

  15. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire—KrF laser. Part 2. Accumulation of plasma electrons and electric discharge control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    The problem of the production of extended (~1 m) plasma channels is studied in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated laser pulses of UV radiation, which are a superposition of a subpicosecond USP train amplified in a regenerative KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator and a quasi-stationary lasing pulse. The USPs possess a high (0.2-0.3 TW) peak power and efficiently ionise oxygen molecules due to multiphoton ionisation, and the quasi-stationary lasing pulse, which has a relatively long duration (~100 ns), maintains the electron density at a level ne = (3-5) × 1014 cm—3 by suppressing electron attachment to oxygen. Experiments in laser triggering of high-voltage electric discharges suggest that the use of combined pulses results in a significant lowering of the breakdown threshold and enables controlling the discharge trajectory with a higher efficiency in comparison with smooth pulses. It was shown that controlled breakdowns may develop with a delay of tens of microseconds relative to the laser pulse, which is many orders of magnitude greater than the lifetime of free electrons in the laser-induced plasma. We propose a mechanism for this breakdown, which involves speeding-up of the avalanche ionisation of the air by negative molecular oxygen ions with a low electron binding energy (~0.5 eV) and a long lifetime (~1 ms), which are produced upon cessation of the laser pulse.

  16. Monitoring a high-amplitude δ Scuti star for 152 days: discovery of 12 additional modes and modulation effects in the light curve of CoRoT 101155310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Weiss, W. W.; Bognár, Zs.; Moya, A.; Niemczura, E.; Suárez, J. C.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Baudin, F.; Benkő, J. M.; Debosscher, J.; Garrido, R.; Mantegazza, L.; Paparó, M.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: The detection of small-amplitude nonradial modes in high-amplitude δ Sct (HADS) variables has been very elusive until at least five of them were detected in the light curve of V974 Oph obtained from ground-based observations. The combination of radial and nonradial modes has a high asteroseismic potential, thanks to the strong constraints we can put in the modelling. The continuous monitoring of ASAS 192647-0030.0 ≡ CoRoT 101155310 (P = 0.1258 d, V = 13.4) ensured from space by the CoRoT (COnvection, ROtation and planetary Transits) mission constitutes a unique opportunity to exploit such potential. Methods: The 22270 CoRoT measurements were performed in the chromatic mode. They span 152 d and cover 1208 consecutive cycles. After the correction for one jump and the long-term drift, the level of the noise turned out to be 29 μmag. The phase shifts and amplitude ratios of the coloured CoRoT data, the HARPS spectra, and the period-luminosity relation were used to determine a self-consistent physical model. In turn, it allowed us to model the oscillation spectrum, also giving feedback on the internal structure of the star. Results: In addition to the fundamental radial mode f1 = 7.949 d-1 with harmonics up to 10f1, we detected 12 independent terms. Linear combinations were also found and the light curve was solved by means of 61 frequencies (smallest amplitude 0.10 mmag). The newest result is the detection of a periodic modulation of the f1 mode (triplets at ± 0.193 d-1 centred on f1 and 2f1), discussed as a rotational effect or as an extension of the Blazhko effect to HADS stars. The physical model suggests that CoRoT 101155310 is an evolved star, with a slight subsolar metallic abundance, close to the terminal age main sequence. All the 12 additional terms are identified with mixed modes in the predicted overstable region. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with the participation of ESA's RSSD and Science

  17. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Greenblatt, M.H.

    1958-03-25

    This patent pertains to pulse amplitude analyzers for sorting and counting a serles of pulses, and specifically discloses an analyzer which ls simple in construction and presents the puise height distribution visually on an oscilloscope screen. According to the invention, the pulses are applied to the vertical deflection plates of an oscilloscope and trigger the horizontal sweep. Each pulse starts at the same point on the screen and has a maximum amplitude substantially along the same vertical line. A mask is placed over the screen except for a slot running along the line where the maximum amplitudes of the pulses appear. After the slot has been scanned by a photocell in combination with a slotted rotating disk, the photocell signal is displayed on an auxiliary oscilloscope as vertical deflection along a horizontal time base to portray the pulse amplitude distribution.

  18. Real topological string amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narain, K. S.; Piazzalunga, N.; Tanzini, A.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the physical superstring correlation functions in type I theory (or equivalently type II with orientifold) that compute real topological string amplitudes. We consider the correlator corresponding to holomorphic derivative of the real topological amplitude G_{χ } , at fixed worldsheet Euler characteristic χ. This corresponds in the low-energy effective action to N=2 Weyl multiplet, appropriately reduced to the orientifold invariant part, and raised to the power g' = -χ + 1. We show that the physical string correlator gives precisely the holomorphic derivative of topological amplitude. Finally, we apply this method to the standard closed oriented case as well, and prove a similar statement for the topological amplitude F_g.

  19. Periodic amplitude variations in Jovian continuum radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of periodic variations in the amplitude of continuum radiation near 3 kHz trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere shows structure with periods near both five and ten hours. Contrary to a plausible initial idea, the continuum amplitudes are not organized by position of the observer relative to the dense plasma sheet. Instead, there seem to be preferred orientations of system III longitude with respect to the direction to the sun which account for the peaks. This implies a clock-like modulation of the continuum radiation intensity as opposed to a searchlight effect. The importance of the dipole longitude-solar wind alignment to the amplitude of the continuum radiation implies the source region of the radiation is near the magnetopause and may indirectly tie the generation of the radio waves to the clocklike modulation of energetic electron fluxes from Jupiter.

  20. Protostring scattering amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorn, Charles B.

    2016-11-01

    We calculate some tree-level scattering amplitudes for a generalization of the protostring, which is a novel string model implied by the simplest string bit models. These bit models produce a light-cone world sheet which supports s integer moded Grassmann fields. In the generalization we supplement this Grassmann world-sheet system with d =24 -s transverse coordinate world-sheet fields. The protostring corresponds to s =24 and the bosonic string to s =0 . The interaction vertex is a simple overlap with no operator insertions at the break/join point. Assuming that s is even we calculate the multistring scattering amplitudes by bosonizing the Grassmann fields, each pair equivalent to one compactified bosonic field, and applying Mandelstam's interacting string formalism to a system of s /2 compactified and d uncompactified bosonic world-sheet fields. We obtain all amplitudes for open strings with no oscillator excitations and for closed strings with no oscillator excitations and zero winding number. We then study in detail some simple special cases. Multistring processes with maximal helicity violation have much simpler amplitudes. We also specialize to general four-string amplitudes and discuss their high energy behavior. Most of these models are not covariant under the full Lorentz group O (d +1 ,1 ). The exceptions are the bosonic string whose Lorentz group is O (25 ,1 ) and the protostring whose Lorentz group is O (1 ,1 ). The models in between only enjoy an O (1 ,1 )×O (d ) spacetime symmetry.

  1. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire-KrF laser. Part 2. Accumulation of plasma electrons and electric discharge control

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V D; Ionin, Andrei A; Levchenko, A O; Mesyats, Gennadii A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Smetanin, Igor V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Ustinovskii, N N; Shutov, A V

    2013-04-30

    The problem of the production of extended ({approx}1 m) plasma channels is studied in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated laser pulses of UV radiation, which are a superposition of a subpicosecond USP train amplified in a regenerative KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator and a quasi-stationary lasing pulse. The USPs possess a high (0.2-0.3 TW) peak power and efficiently ionise oxygen molecules due to multiphoton ionisation, and the quasi-stationary lasing pulse, which has a relatively long duration ({approx}100 ns), maintains the electron density at a level n{sub e} = (3-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} by suppressing electron attachment to oxygen. Experiments in laser triggering of high-voltage electric discharges suggest that the use of combined pulses results in a significant lowering of the breakdown threshold and enables controlling the discharge trajectory with a higher efficiency in comparison with smooth pulses. It was shown that controlled breakdowns may develop with a delay of tens of microseconds relative to the laser pulse, which is many orders of magnitude greater than the lifetime of free electrons in the laser-induced plasma. We propose a mechanism for this breakdown, which involves speeding-up of the avalanche ionisation of the air by negative molecular oxygen ions with a low electron binding energy ({approx}0.5 eV) and a long lifetime ({approx}1 ms), which are produced upon cessation of the laser pulse. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  2. Amplitudes of Field Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Bo

    2007-11-20

    In this talk, we will present recent progresses in perturbative calculations of scattering amplitudes at tree and one-loop levels. At tree level, we will discuss MHV-diagram method and on-shell recursion relation. At one-loop level, we will establish the framework of Unitarity cut method.

  3. Reinforcing Saccadic Amplitude Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paeye, Celine; Madelain, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Saccadic endpoint variability is often viewed as the outcome of neural noise occurring during sensorimotor processing. However, part of this variability might result from operant learning. We tested this hypothesis by reinforcing dispersions of saccadic amplitude distributions, while maintaining constant their medians. In a first experiment we…

  4. Planar amplitude ammonia sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasinski, Pawel; Rogozinski, Roman

    2004-09-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation involving the influence of the change of launching conditions on the characteristics of amplitude ammonia sensors produced with the application of strip waveguides of different refractive profiles. Strip waveguides were produced using ion exchange technique, and the absorption sensitive films were produced using sol-gel technology.

  5. Phase and Pupil Amplitude Recovery for JWST Space-Optics Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, B. H.; Zielinski, T. P.; Smith, J. S.; Bolcar, M. R.; Aronstein, D. L.; Fienup, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the phase and pupil amplitude recovery for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam). It includes views of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), the NIRCam, examples of Phase Retrieval Data, Ghost Irradiance, Pupil Amplitude Estimation, Amplitude Retrieval, Initial Plate Scale Estimation using the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Pupil Amplitude Estimation vs lambda, Pupil Amplitude Estimation vs. number of Images, Pupil Amplitude Estimation vs Rotation (clocking), and Typical Phase Retrieval Results Also included is information about the phase retrieval approach, Non-Linear Optimization (NLO) Optimized Diversity Functions, and Least Square Error vs. Starting Pupil Amplitude.

  6. Weak boson production amplitude zeros; equalities of the helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Fizuli

    2002-08-01

    We investigate the radiation amplitude zeros exhibited by many standard model amplitudes for triple weak gauge boson production processes. We show that WZγ production amplitudes have an especially rich structure in terms of zeros; these amplitudes have zeros originating from several different sources. It is also shown that the type-I current null zone is the special case of the equality of the specific helicity amplitudes.

  7. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Gray, G.W.; Jensen, A.S.

    1957-10-22

    A pulse-height analyzer system of improved design for sorting and counting a series of pulses, such as provided by a scintillation detector in nuclear radiation measurements, is described. The analyzer comprises a main transmission line, a cathode-ray tube for each section of the line with its deflection plates acting as the line capacitance; means to bias the respective cathode ray tubes so that the beam strikes a target only when a prearranged pulse amplitude is applied, with each tube progressively biased to respond to smaller amplitudes; pulse generating and counting means associated with each tube to respond when the beam is deflected; a control transmission line having the same time constant as the first line per section with pulse generating means for each tube for initiating a pulse on the second transmission line when a pulse triggers the tube of corresponding amplitude response, the former pulse acting to prevent successive tubes from responding to the pulse under test. This arrangement permits greater deflection sensitivity in the cathode ray tube and overcomes many of the disadvantages of prior art pulse-height analyzer circuits.

  8. Coronagraphic Amplitude and Phase Correction for Detecting Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.; Bowers, Charles W.

    2003-01-01

    Detection of earth-like planets around other stars using coronagraphy requires the optical beam into the coronagraph to be extremely uniform in both phase and amplitude. Errors in phase can be corrected using a deformable mirror, and error in amplitude can be corrected using a spatial light modulator, both in the pupil plan,a. These corrections can be combined using a Michelson interferometer. If amplitude corrections of only a few percent range are needed, the required accuracy of 10 (circumflex) -4 can be obtained with spatial light modulators with the modest dynamic range of 8 bits.

  9. Broadband metasurface holograms: toward complete phase and amplitude engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-09-01

    As a revolutionary three-dimensional imaging technique, holography has attracted wide attention for its ability to photographically record a light field. However, traditional phase-only or amplitude-only modulation holograms have limited image quality and resolution to reappear both amplitude and phase information required of the objects. Recent advances in metasurfaces have shown tremendous opportunities for using a planar design of artificial meta-atoms to shape the wave front of light by optimal control of both its phase and amplitude. Inspired by the concept of designer metasurfaces, we demonstrate a novel amplitude-phase modulation hologram with simultaneous five-level amplitude modulation and eight-level phase modulation. Such a design approach seeks to turn the perceived disadvantages of the traditional phase or amplitude holograms, and thus enable enhanced performance in resolution, homogeneity of amplitude distribution, precision, and signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, the unique holographic approach exhibits broadband characteristics. The method introduced here delivers more degrees of freedom, and allows for encoding highly complex information into designer metasurfaces, thus having the potential to drive next-generation technological breakthroughs in holography.

  10. Broadband metasurface holograms: toward complete phase and amplitude engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-01-01

    As a revolutionary three-dimensional imaging technique, holography has attracted wide attention for its ability to photographically record a light field. However, traditional phase-only or amplitude-only modulation holograms have limited image quality and resolution to reappear both amplitude and phase information required of the objects. Recent advances in metasurfaces have shown tremendous opportunities for using a planar design of artificial meta-atoms to shape the wave front of light by optimal control of both its phase and amplitude. Inspired by the concept of designer metasurfaces, we demonstrate a novel amplitude-phase modulation hologram with simultaneous five-level amplitude modulation and eight-level phase modulation. Such a design approach seeks to turn the perceived disadvantages of the traditional phase or amplitude holograms, and thus enable enhanced performance in resolution, homogeneity of amplitude distribution, precision, and signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, the unique holographic approach exhibits broadband characteristics. The method introduced here delivers more degrees of freedom, and allows for encoding highly complex information into designer metasurfaces, thus having the potential to drive next-generation technological breakthroughs in holography. PMID:27615519

  11. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  12. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  13. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  14. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    SciTech Connect

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  15. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  16. PULSE AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION RECORDER

    DOEpatents

    Cowper, G.

    1958-08-12

    A device is described for automatica1ly recording pulse annplitude distribution received from a counter. The novelty of the device consists of the over-all arrangement of conventional circuit elements to provide an easy to read permanent record of the pulse amplitude distribution during a certain time period. In the device a pulse analyzer separates the pulses according to annplitude into several channels. A scaler in each channel counts the pulses and operates a pen marker positioned over a drivable recorder sheet. Since the scalers in each channel have the sanne capacity, the control circuitry permits counting of the incoming pulses until one scaler reaches capacity, whereupon the input is removed and an internal oscillator supplies the necessary pulses to fill up the other scalers. Movement of the chart sheet is initiated wben the first scaler reaches capacity to thereby give a series of marks at spacings proportional to the time required to fill the remaining scalers, and accessory equipment marks calibration points on the recorder sheet to facilitate direct reading of the number of external pulses supplied to each scaler.

  17. All-optical tunable multilevel amplitude regeneration based on coherent wave mixing using a polarizer.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiari, Zahra; Sawchuk, Alexander A

    2015-04-20

    We describe and demonstrate an all-optical tunable phase- preserving scheme for multilevel amplitude regeneration based on coherent optical wave mixing using a polarizer for optical star 8-quadrature-amplitude modulation (star-8QAM) and star-16QAM signals with a power ratio of 1:5. Amplitude noise can be efficiently suppressed on both amplitude levels. A regeneration factor of nearly 5 for the higher-amplitude level of star-8QAM and 3 for lower-amplitude level are achieved. The system robustness against nonlinear phase noise originating from the Gordon-Mollenauer effect in a 150 km transmission line is investigated using the proposed amplitude regenerator.

  18. Bekki-Nozaki Amplitude Holes in Hydrothermal Nonlinear Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Chaté, Hugues; Daviaud, François; Mukolobwiez, Nathalie

    1999-04-01

    We present and analyze experimental results on the dynamics of hydrothermal waves occurring in a laterally heated fluid layer. We argue that the large-scale modulations of the waves are governed by a one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE). We determine quantitatively all the coefficients of this amplitude equation using the localized amplitude holes observed in the experiment, which we show to be well described as Bekki-Nozaki hole solutions of the CGLE.

  19. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire—KrF laser. Part 1. Regenerative amplification of subpicosecond pulses in a wide-aperture electron beam pumped KrF amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    Regenerative amplification of single and multiple ultrashort subpicosecond UV pulses in a wide-aperture KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator was investigated on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid laser system. Amplitude-modulated 100-ns long UV radiation pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were obtained at the output of the system. The pulses were a combination of a quasi-stationary oscillation pulse and a train of amplified ultrashort pulses (USPs) with a peak power of 0.2-0.3 TW, which exceeded the power of free-running lasing pulse by three orders of magnitude. The population inversion recovery time in the active KrF laser medium was estimated: τc <= 2.0 ns. Trains of USPs spaced at an interval Δt ≈ τc were shown to exhibit the highest amplification efficiency. The production of amplitude-modulated UV pulses opens up the way to the production and maintenance of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air.

  20. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire-KrF laser. Part 1. Regenerative amplification of subpicosecond pulses in a wide-aperture electron beam pumped KrF amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V D; Ionin, Andrei A; Levchenko, A O; Mesyats, Gennadii A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Smetanin, Igor V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Ustinovskii, N N; Shutov, A V

    2013-04-30

    Regenerative amplification of single and multiple ultrashort subpicosecond UV pulses in a wide-aperture KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator was investigated on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid laser system. Amplitude-modulated 100-ns long UV radiation pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were obtained at the output of the system. The pulses were a combination of a quasi-stationary oscillation pulse and a train of amplified ultrashort pulses (USPs) with a peak power of 0.2-0.3 TW, which exceeded the power of free-running lasing pulse by three orders of magnitude. The population inversion recovery time in the active KrF laser medium was estimated: {tau}{sub c} {<=} 2.0 ns. Trains of USPs spaced at an interval {Delta}t Almost-Equal-To {tau}{sub c} were shown to exhibit the highest amplification efficiency. The production of amplitude-modulated UV pulses opens up the way to the production and maintenance of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  1. Presynaptic spike broadening reduces junctional potential amplitude.

    PubMed

    Spencer, A N; Przysiezniak, J; Acosta-Urquidi, J; Basarsky, T A

    1989-08-24

    Presynaptic modulation of action potential duration may regulate synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such synaptic plasticity is brought about by modifications to membrane currents at presynaptic release sites, which, in turn, lead to changes in the concentration of cytosolic calcium available for mediating transmitter release. The 'primitive' neuromuscular junction of the jellyfish Polyorchis penicillatus is a useful model of presynaptic modulation. In this study, we show that the durations of action potentials in the motor neurons of this jellyfish are negatively correlated with the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials. We present data from in vitro voltage-clamp experiments showing that short duration voltage spikes, which elicit large excitatory junctional potentials in vivo, produce larger and briefer calcium currents than do long duration action potentials, which elicit small excitatory junctional potentials.

  2. CHY formula and MHV amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Jian; Teng, Fei; Wu, Yong-Shi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the relation between the Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula and the maximal-helicity-violating (MHV) amplitudes of Yang-Mills and gravity in four dimensions. We prove that only one special rational solution of the scattering equations found by Weinzierl supports the MHV amplitudes. Namely, localized at this solution, the integrated CHY formula produces the Parke-Taylor formula for MHV Yang-Mills amplitudes as well as the Hodges formula for MHV gravitational amplitudes, with an arbitrary number of external gluons/gravitons. This is achieved by developing techniques, in a manifestly Möbius covariant formalism, to explicitly compute relevant reduced Pfaffians/determinants. We observe and prove two interesting properties (or identities), which facilitate the computations. We also check that all the other ( n - 3)! - 1 solutions to the scattering equations do not support the MHV amplitudes, and prove analytically that this is indeed true for the other special rational solution proposed by Weinzierl, that actually supports the anti-MHV amplitudes. Our results reveal a mysterious feature of the CHY formalism that in Yang-Mills and gravity theory, solutions of scattering equations, involving only external momenta, somehow know about the configuration of external polarizations of the scattering amplitudes.

  3. Off-shell CHY amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, C. S.; Yao, York-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula for on-shell scattering amplitudes is extended off-shell. The off-shell amplitudes (amputated Green's functions) are Möbius invariant, and have the same momentum poles as the on-shell amplitudes. The working principles which drive the modifications to the scattering equations are mainly Möbius covariance and energy momentum conservation in off-shell kinematics. The same technique is also used to obtain off-shell massive scalars. A simple off-shell extension of the CHY gauge formula which is Möbius invariant is proposed, but its true nature awaits further study.

  4. The pulsed amplitude unit for the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, J.; Browne, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.

    1987-02-01

    There is a recurring requirement in the SLC for the control of devices such as magnets, phase shifters, and attenuators on a beam-by-beam basis. The Pulsed Amplitude Unit (PAU) is a single width CAMAC module developed for this purpose. It provides digitally programmed analog output voltages on a beam-by-beam basis. Up to 32 preprogrammed values of output voltage are available from the single analog output of the module, and any of these values can be associated with any of the 256 possible SLC beam definitions. A 12-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) digitizes an analog input signal at the appropriate beam time and stores it in a buffer memory. This feature is normally used to monitor the response of the device being controlled by the PAU at each beam time. Initial application of the PAU is a part of the system that controls the output of Klystrons in the SLC. The PAU combines several different functions in a single module. In order to accommodate these functions in a single width CAMAC module, field programmed logic is used extensively. Field Programmable Logic Arrays, Programmed Array Logic, and a Field Programmable Logic Sequencer are employed.

  5. Tunable metasurfaces via subwavelength phase shifters with uniform amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Colburn, Shane; Zhan, Alan; Majumdar, Arka

    2017-01-01

    Metasurfaces with tunable spatial phase functions could benefit numerous applications. Currently, most approaches to tuning rely on mechanical stretching which cannot control phase locally, or by modulating the refractive index to exploit rapid phase changes with the drawback of also modulating amplitude. Here, we propose a method to realize phase modulation at subwavelength length scales while maintaining unity amplitude. Our device is inspired by an asymmetric Fabry-Perot resonator, with pixels comprising a scattering nanopost on top of a distributed Bragg reflector, capable of providing a nearly 2π nonlinear phase shift with less than 2% refractive index modulation. Using the designed pixels, we simulate a tunable metasurface composed of an array of moderately coupled nanopost resonators, realizing axicons, vortex beam generators, and aspherical lenses with both variable focal length and in-plane scanning capability, achieving nearly diffraction-limited performance. The experimental feasibility of the proposed method is also discussed. PMID:28054662

  6. Tunable metasurfaces via subwavelength phase shifters with uniform amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colburn, Shane; Zhan, Alan; Majumdar, Arka

    2017-01-01

    Metasurfaces with tunable spatial phase functions could benefit numerous applications. Currently, most approaches to tuning rely on mechanical stretching which cannot control phase locally, or by modulating the refractive index to exploit rapid phase changes with the drawback of also modulating amplitude. Here, we propose a method to realize phase modulation at subwavelength length scales while maintaining unity amplitude. Our device is inspired by an asymmetric Fabry-Perot resonator, with pixels comprising a scattering nanopost on top of a distributed Bragg reflector, capable of providing a nearly 2π nonlinear phase shift with less than 2% refractive index modulation. Using the designed pixels, we simulate a tunable metasurface composed of an array of moderately coupled nanopost resonators, realizing axicons, vortex beam generators, and aspherical lenses with both variable focal length and in-plane scanning capability, achieving nearly diffraction-limited performance. The experimental feasibility of the proposed method is also discussed.

  7. Tunable metasurfaces via subwavelength phase shifters with uniform amplitude.

    PubMed

    Colburn, Shane; Zhan, Alan; Majumdar, Arka

    2017-01-05

    Metasurfaces with tunable spatial phase functions could benefit numerous applications. Currently, most approaches to tuning rely on mechanical stretching which cannot control phase locally, or by modulating the refractive index to exploit rapid phase changes with the drawback of also modulating amplitude. Here, we propose a method to realize phase modulation at subwavelength length scales while maintaining unity amplitude. Our device is inspired by an asymmetric Fabry-Perot resonator, with pixels comprising a scattering nanopost on top of a distributed Bragg reflector, capable of providing a nearly 2π nonlinear phase shift with less than 2% refractive index modulation. Using the designed pixels, we simulate a tunable metasurface composed of an array of moderately coupled nanopost resonators, realizing axicons, vortex beam generators, and aspherical lenses with both variable focal length and in-plane scanning capability, achieving nearly diffraction-limited performance. The experimental feasibility of the proposed method is also discussed.

  8. Small amplitude quasibreathers and oscillons

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, Gyula; Lukacs, Arpad; Forgacs, Peter; Horvath, Zalan

    2008-07-15

    Quasibreathers (QB) are time-periodic solutions with weak spatial localization introduced in G. Fodor et al. in [Phys. Rev. D 74, 124003 (2006)]. QB's provide a simple description of oscillons (very long-living spatially localized time dependent solutions). The small amplitude limit of QB's is worked out in a large class of scalar theories with a general self-interaction potential, in D spatial dimensions. It is shown that the problem of small amplitude QB's is reduced to a universal elliptic partial differential equation. It is also found that there is the critical dimension, D{sub crit}=4, above which no small amplitude QB's exist. The QB's obtained this way are shown to provide very good initial data for oscillons. Thus these QB's provide the solution of the complicated, nonlinear time dependent problem of small amplitude oscillons in scalar theories.

  9. Tempo and amplitude in growth.

    PubMed

    Hermanussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Growth is defined as an increase of size over time with time usually defined as physical time. Yet, the rigid metric of physical time is not directly relevant to the internal dynamics of growth. Growth is linked to maturation. Children and adolescents differ in the tempo at which they mature. One calendar year differs in its meaning in a fast maturing, and in a slow maturing child. The slow child needs more calendar years for completing the same stage of maturity. Many characteristics in the human growth curve are tempo characteristics. Tempo - being fast or slow maturing - has to be carefully separated from amplitude - being tall or short. Several characteristic phenomena such as catch-up growth after periods of illness and starvation are largely tempo phenomena, and do usually not affect the amplitude component of growth. Applying Functional Data Analysis and Principal Component Analysis, the two main sources of height variance: tempo and amplitude can statistically be separate and quantified. Tempo appears to be more sensitive than amplitude to nutrition, health and environmental stress. An appropriate analysis of growth requires disentangling its two major components: amplitude and tempo. The assessment of the developmental tempo thus is an integral part of assessing child and adolescent growth. Though an Internet portal is currently available to process small amounts of height data (www.willi-will-wachsen.com) for separately determining amplitude and tempo in growth, there is urgent need of better and practical solutions for analyzing individual growth.

  10. Bidirectional 16-QAM OFDM in-building network over SMF and free-space VLC transport.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yi; Wu, Po-Yi; Lu, Hai-Han; Lin, Ying-Pyng; Wen, Jian-Ying; Hu, Fu-Chih

    2013-07-01

    A bidirectional 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) in-building network over 20 km single-mode fiber (SMF) and 15 m free-space visible light communication (VLC) transport is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Good bit error rate performances and clear constellation maps are obtained for 16-QAM OFDM applications in our proposed in-building networks.

  11. Cross-Channel Amplitude Sweeps Are Crucial to Speech Intelligibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Garreth; Green, Gary G. R.

    2012-01-01

    Classical views of speech perception argue that the static and dynamic characteristics of spectral energy peaks (formants) are the acoustic features that underpin phoneme recognition. Here we use representations where the amplitude modulations of sub-band filtered speech are described, precisely, in terms of co-sinusoidal pulses. These pulses are…

  12. Frequency, phase, and amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, Claude; Diener, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation, which are induced by the modulation of the cavity resonant frequency, are considered. The results obtained apply specifically to one of the H-maser cavity autotuning methods which is actually implemented, namely the cavity frequency-switching method. The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes are analyzed theoretically. The phase and the amplitude variations are measured experimentally. It is shown, in particular, that the phase of oscillation is subjected to abrupt jumps at the times of the cavity frequency switching, whose magnitude is specified. The results given can be used for the design of a phase-locked loop (PLL) aimed at minimizing the transfer of the phase modulation to the slaved VCXO.

  13. Computing Maximally Supersymmetric Scattering Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankowicz, James Michael, Jr.

    This dissertation reviews work in computing N = 4 super-Yang--Mills (sYM) and N = 8 maximally supersymmetric gravity (mSUGRA) scattering amplitudes in D = 4 spacetime dimensions in novel ways. After a brief introduction and overview in Ch. 1, the various techniques used to construct amplitudes in the remainder of the dissertation are discussed in Ch. 2. This includes several new concepts such as d log and pure integrand bases, as well as how to construct the amplitude using exactly one kinematic point where it vanishes. Also included in this chapter is an outline of the Mathematica package on shell diagrams and numerics.m (osdn) that was developed for the computations herein. The rest of the dissertation is devoted to explicit examples. In Ch. 3, the starting point is tree-level sYM amplitudes that have integral representations with residues that obey amplitude relations. These residues are shown to have corresponding residue numerators that allow a double copy prescription that results in mSUGRA residues. In Ch. 4, the two-loop four-point sYM amplitude is constructed in several ways, showcasing many of the techniques of Ch. 2; this includes an example of how to use osdn. The two-loop five-point amplitude is also presented in a pure integrand representation with comments on how it was constructed from one homogeneous cut of the amplitude. On-going work on the two-loop n-point amplitude is presented at the end of Ch. 4. In Ch. 5, the three-loop four-point amplitude is presented in the d log representation and in the pure integrand representation. In Ch. 6, there are several examples of four- through seven-loop planar diagrams that illustrate how considerations of the singularity structure of the amplitude underpin dual-conformal invariance. Taken with the previous examples, this is additional evidence that the structure known to exist in the planar sector extends to the full theory. At the end of this chapter is a proof that all mSUGRA amplitudes have a pole at

  14. Startle Modulation Studies in Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornitz, Edward M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of 54 autistic patients and 72 controls found no intergroup differences in startle modulation by inhibitory or facilitatory prestimulation, short-term habituation of startle amplitude, long-term habituation of startle amplitude or latency, or unmodulated startle amplitude. Differences included prolongation of unmodulated startle onset…

  15. Lorentzian proper vertex amplitude: Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan; Vilensky, Ilya; Zipfel, Antonia

    2016-09-01

    In previous work, the Lorentzian proper vertex amplitude for a spin-foam model of quantum gravity was derived. In the present work, the asymptotics of this amplitude are studied in the semiclassical limit. The starting point of the analysis is an expression for the amplitude as an action integral with action differing from that in the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) case by an extra "projector" term. This extra term scales linearly with spins only in the asymptotic limit, and is discontinuous on a (lower dimensional) submanifold of the integration domain in the sense that its value at each such point depends on the direction of approach. New tools are introduced to generalize stationary phase methods to this case. For the case of boundary data which can be glued to a nondegenerate Lorentzian 4-simplex, the asymptotic limit of the amplitude is shown to equal the single Feynman term, showing that the extra term in the asymptotics of the EPRL amplitude has been eliminated.

  16. Sensitivity to changes in amplitude envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallun, Erick; Hafter, Ervin R.; Bonnel, Anne-Marie

    2002-05-01

    Detection of a brief increment in a tonal pedestal is less well predicted by energy-detection (e.g., Macmillan, 1973; Bonnel and Hafter, 1997) than by sensitivity to changes in the stimulus envelope. As this implies a mechanism similar to an envelope extractor (Viemeister, 1979), sinusoidal amplitude modulation was used to mask a single ramped increment (10, 45, or 70 ms) added to a 1000-ms pedestal with carrier frequency (cf)=477 Hz. As in informational masking (Neff, 1994) and ``modulation-detection interference'' (Yost and Sheft, 1989), interference occurred with masker cfs of 477 and 2013 Hz. While slight masking was found with modulation frequencies (mfs) from 16 to 96 Hz, masking grew inversely with still lower mfs, being greatest for mf=4 Hz. This division is reminiscent of that said to separate sensations of ``roughness'' and ``beats,'' respectively (Terhardt, 1974), with the latter also being related to durations associated with auditory groupings in music and speech. Importantly, this result held for all of the signal durations and onset-offset ramps tested, suggesting that an increment on a pedestal is treated as a single auditory object whose detection is most difficult in the presence of other objects (in this case, ``beats'').

  17. Factorization of chiral string amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-tin; Siegel, Warren; Yuan, Ellis Ye

    2016-09-01

    We re-examine a closed-string model defined by altering the boundary conditions for one handedness of two-dimensional propagators in otherwise-standard string theory. We evaluate the amplitudes using Kawai-Lewellen-Tye factorization into open-string amplitudes. The only modification to standard string theory is effectively that the spacetime Minkowski metric changes overall sign in one open-string factor. This cancels all but a finite number of states: as found in earlier approaches, with enough supersymmetry (e.g., type II) the tree amplitudes reproduce those of the massless truncation of ordinary string theory. However, we now find for the other cases that additional fields, formerly thought to be auxiliary, describe new spin-2 states at the two adjacent mass levels (tachyonic and tardyonic). The tachyon is always a ghost, but can be avoided in the heterotic case.

  18. Multilevel recording of complex amplitude data pages in a holographic data storage system using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Teruyoshi; Nomura, Takanori

    2016-09-05

    A holographic data storage system using digital holography is proposed to record and retrieve multilevel complex amplitude data pages. Digital holographic techniques are capable of modulating and detecting complex amplitude distribution using current electronic devices. These techniques allow the development of a simple, compact, and stable holographic storage system that mainly consists of a single phase-only spatial light modulator and an image sensor. As a proof-of-principle experiment, complex amplitude data pages with binary amplitude and four-level phase are recorded and retrieved. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed holographic data storage system.

  19. CESR feedback system using a constant amplitude pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Codner, G.; Billing, M.; Meller, R.; Patten, R.; Rogers, J.; Sikora, J.; Sloand, M.; Strohman, C.

    1998-12-10

    Particle beam feedback system using constant-amplitude, 1000 V, 12 ns pulses has been built to provide longitudinal and horizontal feedback for stabilizing 14 ns spaced bunches for use in CESR (Cornell Electron Storage Ring). The pulse rate is modulated to obtain proportional amplitude control and the pulse arrival time is modulated to obtain both positive and negative kicks. The average repetition rate is limited by pulser power dissipation, but the instantaneous rate may be increased to full duty cycle for short periods of time to handle transients. The pulser drives a 50-ohm stripline kicker so the equivalent peak power at 1000 V is 10 kW. The characteristics of the pulser and its modulator will be described along with the system's operation.

  20. Toward complete pion nucleon amplitudes

    DOE PAGES

    Mathieu, Vincent; Danilkin, Igor V.; Fernández-Ramírez, Cesar; ...

    2015-10-05

    We compare the low-energy partial wave analyses πN scattering with a high-energy data via finite energy sum rules. We also construct a new set of amplitudes by matching the imaginary part from the low-energy analysis with the high-energy, Regge parametrization and then reconstruct the real parts using dispersion relations.

  1. Large amplitude drop shape oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study of large amplitude drop shape oscillation was conducted in immiscible liquids systems and with levitated free liquid drops in air. In liquid-liquid systems the results indicate the existence of familiar characteristics of nonlinear phenomena. The resonance frequency of the fundamental quadrupole mode of stationary, low viscosity Silicone oil drops acoustically levitated in water falls to noticeably low values as the amplitude of oscillation is increased. A typical, experimentally determined relative frequency decrease of a 0.5 cubic centimeters drop would be about 10% when the maximum deformed shape is characterized by a major to minor axial ratio of 1.9. On the other hand, no change in the fundamental mode frequency could be detected for 1 mm drops levitated in air. The experimental data for the decay constant of the quadrupole mode of drops immersed in a liquid host indicate a slight increase for larger oscillation amplitudes. A qualitative investigation of the internal fluid flows for such drops revealed the existence of steady internal circulation within drops oscillating in the fundamental and higher modes. The flow field configuration in the outer host liquid is also significantly altered when the drop oscillation amplitude becomes large.

  2. Genus dependence of superstring amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Simon

    2006-11-15

    The problem of the consistency of the finiteness of the supermoduli space integral in the limit of vanishing super-fixed point distance and the genus-dependence of the integral over the super-Schottky coordinates in the fundamental region containing a neighborhood of |K{sub n}|=0 is resolved. Given a choice of the categories of isometric circles representing the integration region, the exponential form of bounds for superstring amplitudes is derived.

  3. Phase variation of hadronic amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Dedonder, J.-P.; Gibbs, W. R.; Nuseirat, Mutazz

    2008-04-15

    The phase variation with angle of hadronic amplitudes is studied with a view to understanding the underlying physical quantities that control it and how well it can be determined in free space. We find that unitarity forces a moderately accurate determination of the phase in standard amplitude analyses but that the nucleon-nucleon analyses done to date do not give the phase variation needed to achieve a good representation of the data in multiple scattering calculations. Models are examined that suggest its behavior near forward angles is related to the radii of the real and absorptive parts of the interaction. The dependence of this phase on model parameters is such that if these radii are modified in the nuclear medium (in combination with the change due to the shift in energy of the effective amplitude in the medium) then the larger magnitudes of the phase needed to fit the data might be attainable but only for negative values of the phase variation parameter.

  4. Crisis in Amplitude Control Hides in Multistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunbiao; Sprott, Julien Clinton; Xing, Hongyan

    2016-12-01

    A crisis of amplitude control can occur when a system is multistable. This paper proposes a new chaotic system with a line of equilibria to demonstrate the threat to amplitude control from multistability. The new symmetric system has two coefficients for amplitude control, one of which is a partial amplitude controller, while the other is a total amplitude controller that simultaneously controls the frequency. The amplitude parameter rescales the basins of attraction and triggers a state switch among different states resulting in a failure of amplitude control to the desired state.

  5. Calculation of multi-loop superstring amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    The multi-loop interaction amplitudes in the closed, oriented superstring theory are obtained by the integration of local amplitudes. The local amplitude is represented by a sum over the spinning string local amplitudes. The spinning string local amplitudes are given explicitly through super-Schottky group parameters and through interaction vertex coordinates on the (1| 1) complex, non-split supermanifold. The obtained amplitudes are free from divergences. They are consistent with the world-sheet spinning string symmetries. The vacuum amplitude vanishes along with 1-, 2- and 3-point amplitudes of massless states. The vanishing of the above-mentioned amplitude occurs after the integration of the corresponding local amplitude has been performed over the super-Schottky group limiting points and over interaction vertex coordinate, except for those (3| 2) variables which are fixed due to SL(2)-symmetry.

  6. Cavity enhanced terahertz modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Born, N.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, M.

    2014-03-10

    We present a versatile concept for all optical terahertz (THz) amplitude modulators based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor cavity design. Employing the high reflectivity of two parallel meta-surfaces allows for trapping selected THz photons within the cavity and thus only a weak optical modulation of the semiconductor absorbance is required to significantly damp the field within the cavity. The optical switching yields to modulation depths of more than 90% with insertion efficiencies of 80%.

  7. Amplitude modulated Lorentz force MEMS magnetometer with picotesla sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Varun; Ramezany, Alireza; Mahdavi, Mohammad; Pourkamali, Siavash

    2016-10-01

    This paper demonstrates ultra-high sensitivities for a Lorentz force resonant MEMS magnetometer enabled by internal-thermal piezoresistive vibration amplification. A detailed model of the magneto-thermo-electro-mechanical internal amplification is described and is in good agreement with the experimental results. Internal amplification factors up to ~1620 times have been demonstrated by artificially boosting the effective quality factor of the resonator from 680 to 1.14  ×  106 by tuning the bias current. The increase in the resonator bias current in addition to the improvement in the quality factor of the device led to a sensitivity enhancement by ~2400 times. For a bias current of 7.245 mA, where the effective quality factor of the device and consequently the sensitivity is maximum (2.107 mV nT-1), the noise floor is measured to be as low as 2.8 pT (√Hz)-1. This is by far the most sensitive Lorentz force MEMS magnetometer demonstrated to date.

  8. Observing rapid quasi-wave ionospheric disturbance using amplitude charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkin, Vladimir; Laryunin, Oleg; Podlesnyi, Alexey

    Data from vertical (quasi-vertical) sounding are traditionally used for determining a number of ionospheric parameters such as critical frequencies of E and F layers, peaks of these layers, and for reconstructing electron density profiles. In this respect, radio sounding is not used to its full capacity. Modern ionosondes provide additional information encoded in ionospheric echoes, including information on reflected-signal amplitude. The time dependence of the amplitude-frequency characteristic of reflected signal has been named "amplitude chart" (A-chart). Ionosondes used by the ISTP SB RAS Geophysical Observatory for constructing A-charts employ the frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) signal in a range 1.3-15 MHz. One-minute sounding interval allows a more detailed study of dynamic processes in the ionosphere. The ionosonde has a direct digital synthesizer and direct sampling receiver without automatic gain control (AGC). The absence of AGC and the high dynamic range enable determination of the relative field strength at a receiving point and registration of relative long-term variations in reflected-signal amplitude over the entire range of operating frequencies of the ionosonde. We have revealed that the passage of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TID) along with height-frequency distortion modulates amplitude characteristics of signal. The characteristic depth of the modulation reaches 40 dB. The pronounced alternate vertical stripes typical for A-charts are likely to be associated with focusing properties of TID. In order to examine the space-time structure of TID able to induce such a focusing of the radio waves, we performed ray tracing simulations. We used geometrical-optics approximation, took magneto-ionic effects into account and prescribed electron density to be a stratified electron density profile on which an undulating disturbance was superimposed. This work was supported by the RFBR grant №14-05-00259-а.

  9. Amplitude-weighted quadrature phase shift keying using SAW technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkerdid, M. A.; Malocha, D. C.

    1985-09-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) convolvers are capable of performing programmable matched filtering with the desirable properties of large processing gain, good dynamic range, broad bandwidth, small size and weight, and low power requirements. Equally powerful are the SAW-based modulators, which produce the desired pseudo-random code sequence for secure transmission in a spread-spectrum system. The SAW filter provides precise reproducible pulse shaping of the coded waveform with the same advantages of the convolver. It is very important as spectrum space becomes more crowded to optimize the spectral efficiency of transmitted information. Quadrature phase (QPSK) and minimum phase shift keying (MSK) are the two more popular quadrature modulation schemes. A new modulation technique that is composed of several amplitude-weighted QPSK signals (AWQPSK) and exhibits better bandwidth efficiency than OPSK or MSK is introduced. System analysis and performance parameters are presented for evaluation. A SAW modulator implementation is discussed and proposed.

  10. Quasidistribution amplitude of heavy quarkonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yu; Xiong, Xiaonu

    2016-11-01

    The recently proposed quasidistributions point out a promising direction for lattice QCD to investigate the light-cone correlators, such as parton distribution functions and distribution amplitudes (DAs), directly in the x space. Owing to its excessive simplicity, heavy quarkonium can serve as an ideal theoretical laboratory to ascertain certain features of quasi-DAs. In the framework of nonrelativistic QCD factorization, we compute the order-αs correction to both light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) and quasi-DAs associated with the lowest-lying quarkonia, with the transverse-momentum UV cutoff interpreted as the renormalization scale. We confirm analytically that the quasi-DA of a quarkonium does reduce to the respective LCDA in the infinite-momentum limit. We also observe that, provided that the momentum of a charmonium reaches about 2-3 times its mass, the quasi-DAs already converge to the LCDAs to a decent level. These results might provide some useful guidance for the future lattice study of quasidistributions.

  11. All-digital QPSK modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, R. W.; Julian, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit consisting to only four components (2 IC chips and 2 time delay devices) modulates RF signal with 2 asynchronous digital data signals. Digital modulator is virtually free of amplitude modulation, is not subject to temperature effects from other components, dissipates less power, and is far simpler than its analog predecessors.

  12. Design of optimal binary phase and amplitude filters for maximization of correlation peak sharpness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Current binary-phase filters used for optical correlation are usually assumed to have uniform amplitude transmission. Here, a new type of filter is studied, the binary-phase-and-amplitude filter. If binary phase values of 0 and pi are assumed, the amplitude transmittance values of this type of filter can be optimized to maximize the peak sharpness. For a polarization-encoded binary-phase filter this can be translated into optimization of the rotation angle of the output polarizer following the filter-spatial-light modulator. An analytic expression is presented for the optimum polarizer angle and thus for the optimum binary-phase-and-amplitude filter design.

  13. Large amplitude relativistic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Timothy

    2010-05-15

    Relativistic, longitudinal plasma oscillations are studied for the case of a simple water bag distribution of electrons having cylindrical symmetry in momentum space with the axis of the cylinder parallel to the velocity of wave propagation. The plasma is required to obey the relativistic Vlasov-Poisson equations, and solutions are sought in the wave frame. An exact solution for the plasma density as a function of the electrostatic field is derived. The maximum electric field is presented in terms of an integral over the known density. It is shown that when the perpendicular momentum is neglected, the maximum electric field approaches infinity as the wave phase velocity approaches the speed of light. It is also shown that for any nonzero perpendicular momentum, the maximum electric field will remain finite as the wave phase velocity approaches the speed of light. The relationship to previously published solutions is discussed as is some recent controversy regarding the proper modeling of large amplitude relativistic plasma waves.

  14. Phase and amplitude characteristics of InP:Fe modified interdigitated gap photoconductive microwave switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, Ingmar L.; Eng, Sverre T.

    1989-01-01

    The transmission amplitude and phase characteristics of InP:Fe modified interdigitated gap photoconductive microwave switches are reported. Measurements in the 0.1-1 GHz frequency range show that the phase is shifted about 90 deg and that the corresponding change in amplitude ranges from 43 dB at 0.1 GHz to 23 dB at 1 GHz when the illumination-induced conductance is switched from a low OFF-state value (aboit 4 x 10 to the -8 S) to a high ON-state value (5 mS). The observed characteristics can be described by a phase-shifting region and an amplitude modulation region. In the phase-shifting region the phase strongly depends on the conductance, and the amplitude is almost constant. In the amplitude modulation region both the amplitude and the phase depend on the conductance but the effect on the amplitude is much more pronounced. A lumped-element model describing the device performance is presented. It is concluded that these optoelectronic microwave switching devices are suitable for high-speed amplitude modulation but are not promising as high-speed phase shifters.

  15. Constructing Amplitudes from Their Soft Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher-Veronneau, Camille; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The existence of universal soft limits for gauge-theory and gravity amplitudes has been known for a long time. The properties of the soft limits have been exploited in numerous ways; in particular for relating an n-point amplitude to an (n-1)-point amplitude by removing a soft particle. Recently, a procedure called inverse soft was developed by which 'soft' particles can be systematically added to an amplitude to construct a higher-point amplitude for generic kinematics. We review this procedure and relate it to Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion. We show that all tree-level amplitudes in gauge theory and gravity up through seven points can be constructed in this way, as well as certain classes of NMHV gauge-theory amplitudes with any number of external legs. This provides us with a systematic procedure for constructing amplitudes solely from their soft limits.

  16. Detection of modulated tones in modulated noise by non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Peter; Dylla, Margit; Timms, Courtney; Ramachandran, Ramnarayan

    2014-10-01

    In natural environments, many sounds are amplitude-modulated. Amplitude modulation is thought to be a signal that aids auditory object formation. A previous study of the detection of signals in noise found that when tones or noise were amplitude-modulated, the noise was a less effective masker, and detection thresholds for tones in noise were lowered. These results suggest that the detection of modulated signals in modulated noise would be enhanced. This paper describes the results of experiments investigating how detection is modified when both signal and noise were amplitude-modulated. Two monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to detect amplitude-modulated tones in continuous, amplitude-modulated broadband noise. When the phase difference of otherwise similarly amplitude-modulated tones and noise were varied, detection thresholds were highest when the modulations were in phase and lowest when the modulations were anti-phase. When the depth of the modulation of tones or noise was varied, detection thresholds decreased if the modulations were anti-phase. When the modulations were in phase, increasing the depth of tone modulation caused an increase in tone detection thresholds, but increasing depth of noise modulations did not affect tone detection thresholds. Changing the modulation frequency of tone or noise caused changes in threshold that saturated at modulation frequencies higher than 20 Hz; thresholds decreased when the tone and noise modulations were in phase and decreased when they were anti-phase. The relationship between reaction times and tone level were not modified by manipulations to the nature of temporal variations in the signal or noise. The changes in behavioral threshold were consistent with a model where the brain subtracted noise from signal. These results suggest that the parameters of the modulation of signals and maskers heavily influence detection in very predictable ways. These results are consistent with some results in humans and avians

  17. Frequency domain optoacoustic tomography using amplitude and phase

    PubMed Central

    Mohajerani, Pouyan; Kellnberger, Stephan; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    We introduce optoacoustic tomographic imaging using intensity modulated light sources and collecting amplitude and phase information in the frequency domain. Imaging is performed at multiple modulation frequencies. The forward modeling uses the Green's function solution to the pressure wave equation in frequency domain and the resulting inverse problem is solved using regularized least squares minimization. We study the effect of the number of frequencies and of the bandwidth employed on the image quality achieved. The possibility of employing an all-frequency domain optoacoustic imaging for experimental measurements is studied as a function of noise. We conclude that frequency domain optoacoustic tomography may evolve to a practical experimental method using light intensity modulated sources, with advantages over time-domain optoacoustics. PMID:25431755

  18. Optical free-space wavelength-division-multiplexing transport system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Ying-Pyng; Lu, Hai-Han; Chen, Chia-Yi; Jhang, Tai-Wei; Chen, Min-Chou

    2014-01-15

    An optical free-space wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) transport system employing vertical cavity surface emitting lasers and spatial light modulators with 16-quadrature amplitude modulation orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing modulating signals over a 17.5 m free-space link is proposed and demonstrated. With the help of a low-noise amplifier and data comparator, good bit error rate performance is obtained for each optical channel. Such an optical free-space WDM transport system would be attractive for providing services including data and telecommunication services.

  19. Feelings of helplessness increase ERN amplitudes in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Pfabigan, D M; Pintzinger, N M; Siedek, D R; Lamm, C; Derntl, B; Sailer, U

    2013-03-01

    Experiencing feelings of helplessness has repeatedly been reported to contribute to depressive symptoms and negative affect. In turn, depression and negative affective states are associated, among others, with impairments in performance monitoring. Thus, the question arises whether performance monitoring is also affected by feelings of helplessness. To this end, after the induction of feelings of helplessness via an unsolvable reasoning task, 37 participants (20 females) performed a modified version of a Flanker task. Based on a previously validated questionnaire, 17 participants were classified as helpless and 20 as not-helpless. Behavioral measures revealed no differences between helpless and not-helpless individuals. However, we observed enhanced Error-Related Negativity (ERN) amplitude differences between erroneous and correct responses in the helpless compared to the not-helpless group. Furthermore, correlational analysis revealed that higher scores of helplessness were associated with increased ERN difference scores. No influence of feelings of helplessness on later stages of performance monitoring was observed as indicated by Error-Positivity (Pe) amplitude. The present study is the first to demonstrate that feelings of helplessness modulate the neuronal correlates of performance monitoring. Thus, even a short-lasting subjective state manipulation can lead to ERN amplitude variation, probably via modulation of mesencephalic dopamine activity.

  20. Discontinuities of multi-Regge amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. S.

    2015-04-01

    In the BFKL approach, discontinuities of multiple production amplitudes in invariant masses of produced particles are discussed. It turns out that they are in evident contradiction with the BDS ansatz for n-gluon amplitudes in the planar N = 4 SYM at n ≥ 6. An explicit expression for the NLO discontinuity of the two-to-four amplitude in the invariant mass of two produced gluons is is presented.

  1. Minimal Basis for Gauge Theory Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2009-10-16

    Identities based on monodromy for integrations in string theory are used to derive relations between different color-ordered tree-level amplitudes in both bosonic and supersymmetric string theory. These relations imply that the color-ordered tree-level n-point gauge theory amplitudes can be expanded in a minimal basis of (n-3)exclamation amplitudes. This result holds for any choice of polarizations of the external states and in any number of dimensions.

  2. Gravity and Yang-Mills amplitude relations

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Soendergaard, Thomas; FengBo

    2010-11-15

    Using only general features of the S matrix and quantum field theory, we prove by induction the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye relations that link products of gauge theory amplitudes to gravity amplitudes at tree level. As a bonus of our analysis, we provide a novel and more symmetric form of these relations. We also establish an infinite tower of new identities between amplitudes in gauge theories.

  3. DVCS amplitude with kinematical twist-3 terms

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, A.V.; Weiss, C.

    2000-08-01

    The authors compute the amplitude of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) using the calculus of QCD string operators in coordinate representation. To restore the electromagnetic gauge invariance (transversality) of the twist-2 amplitude they include the operators of twist-3 which appear as total derivatives of twist-2 operators. The results are equivalent to a Wandzura-Wilczek approximation for twist-3 skewed parton distributions. They find that this approximation gives a finite result for the amplitude of a longitudinally polarized virtual photon, while the amplitude for transverse polarization is divergent, i.e., factorization breaks down in this term.

  4. Effects of injustice sensitivity and sex on the P3 amplitude during deception.

    PubMed

    Leue, Anja; Beauducel, André

    2015-07-01

    In deception tasks, personality traits like the sensitivity to injustice (SI) modulate the P3 amplitude, which is an indicator of stimulus salience. Based on findings that demonstrated women to be more injustice sensitive than men, we expected sex to modulate effects of SI in deception tasks. We analyzed the P3 amplitudes of 57 participants in a deception task that comprised probe, target, and irrelevant pictures. Larger P3 amplitudes occurred for probes (known pictures that required deceptive responses) than for irrelevant pictures (unknown pictures that required truthful responses). Women with higher SI scores demonstrated larger P3 differences between probes and irrelevant stimuli. The findings suggest that women and men have different ways to process ethically-salient information and that SI modulates stimulus salience during deception. The effects of sex and personality have implications for the linkage between forensic psychophysiology and psychological assessment, because assessment is often based on individual differences.

  5. Cross-Modulation Interference with Lateralization of Mixed-Modulated Waveforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, I-Hui; Petrosyan, Agavni; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Hickok, Gregory; Saberi, Kourosh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the ability to use spatial information in mixed-modulated (MM) sounds containing concurrent frequency-modulated (FM) and amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds by exploring patterns of interference when different modulation types originated from different loci as may occur in a multisource acoustic field. Method:…

  6. Space-Time Variations in Tidal Stress and Cascadia Tremor Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, A. J.; Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J.; Wech, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new analysis of the influence of tidal stresses on the amplitude of non-volcanic tremor in Washington State. Tremor counts (Thomas et al., 2009), tremor amplitude (Rubinstein et al., 2008), and strain (Hawthorne and Rubin, 2010) are modulated by tidal stresses in Cascadia as well as in California. However, tremor amplitudes have not yet been extensively studied in Cascadia. Furthermore, Hawthorne and Rubin's Cascadia-wide tidal stress model (2010) allows us to look at the tremor-tide relationship in more detail than ever before. The ability to look at the tidal modulation of tremor amplitude in space as well as time will increase our understanding of this phenomenon and may provide information about the frictional properties of the plate interface. We focus on the August 2010 episodic tremor and slip (ETS) event recorded by the Array of Arrays, a seismic experiment on the Olympic Peninsula. The instrument response is deconvolved, seismograms band-pass filtered at 1.5-5.5 Hz and envelopes are made in 5-minute windows. An inverse problem compensates for site corrections and source-receiver distances to produce, for any given time, a single amplitude measurement at the source. Source locations are determined using an envelope waveform cross-correlation method. Then, we compare the amplitudes, catalog of tremor locations, and the tidal stress at the desired location and time. Amplitudes during the August 2010 ETS event are clearly modulated by tidal stresses. Viewed in the frequency domain, there are clear peaks in the tremor amplitude spectrum at several tidal periods, most prominently the 12.4 and 24 hour periods. Comparison with Hawthorne and Rubin's tidal stress model shows that higher amplitudes are associated with positive shear stress in the downdip direction and, less strongly, with more compressional normal stress.

  7. Magnetospheric chorus - Amplitude and growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burtis, W. J.; Helliwell, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A new study of the amplitude of magnetospheric chorus with 1966-1967 data from the Stanford University/Stanford Research Institute VLF receivers on Ogo 1 and Ogo 3 has confirmed the band-limited character of magnetospheric chorus in general and the double-banding of near-equatorial chorus. Chorus amplitude tended to be inversely correlated with frequency, implying lower intensities at lower L values. Individual chorus emissions often showed a characteristic amplitude variation, with rise times of 10 to 300 ms, a short duration at peak amplitude, and decay times of 100 to 3000 msec. Growth was often approximately exponential, with rates from 200 to nearly 2000 dB/sec. Rate of change of frequency was found in many cases to be independent of emission amplitude, in agreement with the cyclotron feedback theory of chorus (Helliwell, 1967, 1970).

  8. Amplitude image processing by diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, Manuel P; Valle, Pedro J; Canales, V F

    2016-02-22

    In contrast to the standard digital image processing, which operates over the detected image intensity, we propose to perform amplitude image processing. Amplitude processing, like low pass or high pass filtering, is carried out using diffractive optics elements (DOE) since it allows to operate over the field complex amplitude before it has been detected. We show the procedure for designing the DOE that corresponds to each operation. Furthermore, we accomplish an analysis of amplitude image processing performances. In particular, a DOE Laplacian filter is applied to simulated astronomical images for detecting two stars one Airy ring apart. We also check by numerical simulations that the use of a Laplacian amplitude filter produces less noisy images than the standard digital image processing.

  9. Thermal cracking and amplitude dependent attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.H.; Toksoez, M.N.

    1980-02-10

    The role of crack and grain boundary contacts in determining seismic wave attenuation in rock is investigated by examining Q as a function of thermal cycling (cracking) and wave strain amplitude. Q values are obtained using a longitudinal resonant bar technique in the 10- to 20-kHz range for maximum strain amplitudes varying from roughly 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/. The samples studied include the Berea and Navajo sandstones, Plexiglas, Westerly granite, Solenhofen limestone, and Frederick diabase, the latter two relatively crack free in their virgin state. Measurements were made at room temperature and pressure in air. Q values for both sandstones are constant at low strains (<10/sup -6/) but decrease rapidly with amplitude at higher strains. There is no hysteresis of Q with amplitude. Q values for Plexiglas show no indication of amplitude dependent behavior. The granite, limestone, and diabase are thermally cycled at both fast and slow heating rates in order to induce cracking. Samples slowly cycled at 400/sup 0/C show a marked increase in Q that cannot be entirely explained by outgassing of volatiles. Cycling may also widen thin cracks and grain boundaries, reducing contact areas. Samples heated beyond 400/sup 0/C, or rapidly heated, result in generally decreasing Q values. The amplitude dependence of Q is found to be coupled to the effects of thermal cycling. For rock slowly cycled 400)C or less, the transition from low-amplitude contant Q to high-amplitude variable Q behavior decreases to lower amplitudes as a function of maximum temperature. Above 400/sup 0/C, and possibly in th rapidly heated samples also, the transition moves to higher amplitudes.

  10. Amplitude- and rise-time-compensated filters

    DOEpatents

    Nowlin, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    An amplitude-compensated rise-time-compensated filter for a pulse time-of-occurrence (TOOC) measurement system is disclosed. The filter converts an input pulse, having the characteristics of random amplitudes and random, non-zero rise times, to a bipolar output pulse wherein the output pulse has a zero-crossing time that is independent of the rise time and amplitude of the input pulse. The filter differentiates the input pulse, along the linear leading edge of the input pulse, and subtracts therefrom a pulse fractionally proportional to the input pulse. The filter of the present invention can use discrete circuit components and avoids the use of delay lines.

  11. A link representation for gravity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Song

    2013-10-01

    We derive a link representation for all tree amplitudes in supergravity, from a recent conjecture by Cachazo and Skinner. The new formula explicitly writes amplitudes as contour integrals over constrained link variables, with an integrand naturally expressed in terms of determinants, or equivalently tree diagrams. Important symmetries of the amplitude, such as supersymmetry, parity and (partial) permutation invariance, are kept manifest in the formulation. We also comment on rewriting the formula in a GL( k)-invariant manner, which may serve as a starting point for the generalization to possible Grassmannian contour integrals.

  12. The Effect of Phase and Amplitude Imbalance on the Performance of Offset Quadrature Phase-Shift-Keyed (OQPSK) Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, H.

    1998-07-01

    The balanced modulator, which comprises two amplitude-modulation modules, is widely used in phase-modulated communication systems. In practice, the balance between these amplitude-modulation modules is difficult to maintain, and the amplitude and phase imbalances can cause distortion in the signal constellation and introduce undesired interfering tone signal components when such an imperfect modulator is used to modulate the data directly onto the RF carrier. The rendered imperfection inevitably degrades the receiver performance and, in a quadrature phase-shift-keyed (QPSK) system, causes cross talk between the in-phase and quadrature-phase channels. This article summarizes an analysis of the impact of these modulator imbalances on an offset QPSK (OQPSK) communication system in which an OQPSK signal is coherently demodulated by using a carrier reference extracted from a modified QPSK carrier tracking loop. Both carrier-suppression level and bit-error performance are analyzed in this article. The results show that the current Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommendations of 2-deg maximum permissible phase imbalance and 0.2-dB amplitude imbalance are sufficient to provide a 25-dB or more carrier suppression and a system degradation of 1 dB or less at the bit-error probability of 10±4 when the OQPSK system is operated in a reasonable loop SNR region.

  13. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics. PMID:27108847

  14. Large Amplitude Oscillations of a Double Pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerres, Jeffrey M.; Jacobs, Robert M.; Kasun, Sara F.; Bacon, Margaret E.; Nagolu, Chakravarthi M.; Owens, Erin L.; Siehl, Kevin F.; Thomsen, Marshall; Troyer, Jon S.

    2008-03-01

    The nature of the normal modes of oscillation in the small angle regime of a double pendulum is well established. However, for large amplitude oscillations, a closed form solution of the differential equations of motion does not exist. Using Lagrange formalism, we explore both the in-phase and out-of-phase normal modes of oscillation of a double pendulum as a function of the mass ratio of the two bobs and their initial angular positions. We conduct the analysis using MatLab, where we initially verify our code in the known small amplitude limit. Among our results we find that certain symmetries between the in-phase and out-of-phase normal modes that exist in the small amplitude limit are no longer present at large amplitudes.

  15. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics.

  16. Modulation for terrestrial broadcasting of digital HDTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Elliott S.

    1991-12-01

    The digital modulation methods used by the DigiCipher, DSC-HDTV, ADTV, and ATVA-P digital high-definition television (HDTV) systems are discussed. Three of the systems use a quadrature amplitude modulation method, and the fourth uses a vestigial sideband modulation method. The channel equalization and spectrum sharing of the digital HDTV systems is discussed.

  17. Modulation for terrestrial broadcasting of digital HDTV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohn, Elliott S.

    1991-01-01

    The digital modulation methods used by the DigiCipher, DSC-HDTV, ADTV, and ATVA-P digital high-definition television (HDTV) systems are discussed. Three of the systems use a quadrature amplitude modulation method, and the fourth uses a vestigial sideband modulation method. The channel equalization and spectrum sharing of the digital HDTV systems is discussed.

  18. 47 CFR 78.115 - Modulation limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Modulation limits. 78.115 Section 78.115 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.115 Modulation limits. (a) If amplitude modulation is...

  19. 47 CFR 78.115 - Modulation limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Modulation limits. 78.115 Section 78.115 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.115 Modulation limits. (a) If amplitude modulation is...

  20. 47 CFR 78.115 - Modulation limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Modulation limits. 78.115 Section 78.115 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.115 Modulation limits. (a) If amplitude modulation is...

  1. 47 CFR 78.115 - Modulation limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Modulation limits. 78.115 Section 78.115 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.115 Modulation limits. (a) If amplitude modulation is...

  2. Feynman amplitudes and limits of heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, O.; Bloch, S. J.; Burgos Gil, J. I.; Fresán, J.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate from a mathematical perspective how Feynman amplitudes appear in the low-energy limit of string amplitudes. In this paper, we prove the convergence of the integrands. We derive this from results describing the asymptotic behaviour of the height pairing between degree-zero divisors, as a family of curves degenerates. These are obtained by means of the nilpotent orbit theorem in Hodge theory.

  3. Amplitude Metrics for Cellular Circadian Bioluminescence Reporters

    PubMed Central

    St. John, Peter C.; Taylor, Stephanie R.; Abel, John H.; Doyle, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence rhythms from cellular reporters have become the most common method used to quantify oscillations in circadian gene expression. These experimental systems can reveal phase and amplitude change resulting from circadian disturbances, and can be used in conjunction with mathematical models to lend further insight into the mechanistic basis of clock amplitude regulation. However, bioluminescence experiments track the mean output from thousands of noisy, uncoupled oscillators, obscuring the direct effect of a given stimulus on the genetic regulatory network. In many cases, it is unclear whether changes in amplitude are due to individual changes in gene expression level or to a change in coherence of the population. Although such systems can be modeled using explicit stochastic simulations, these models are computationally cumbersome and limit analytical insight into the mechanisms of amplitude change. We therefore develop theoretical and computational tools to approximate the mean expression level in large populations of noninteracting oscillators, and further define computationally efficient amplitude response calculations to describe phase-dependent amplitude change. At the single-cell level, a mechanistic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model is used to calculate the transient response of each cell to a perturbation, whereas population-level dynamics are captured by coupling this detailed model to a phase density function. Our analysis reveals that amplitude changes mediated at either the individual-cell or the population level can be distinguished in tissue-level bioluminescence data without the need for single-cell measurements. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by modeling experimental bioluminescence profiles of light-sensitive fibroblasts, reconciling the conclusions of two seemingly contradictory studies. This modeling framework allows a direct comparison between in vitro bioluminescence experiments and in silico ordinary

  4. Bootstrapping One-Loop QCD Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Carola F.; /SLAC

    2006-09-08

    We review the recently developed bootstrap method for the computation of high-multiplicity QCD amplitudes at one loop. We illustrate the general algorithm step by step with a six-point example. The method combines (generalized) unitarity with on-shell recursion relations to determine the not cut-constructible, rational terms of these amplitudes. Our bootstrap approach works for arbitrary configurations of gluon helicities and arbitrary numbers of external legs.

  5. Amplitude metrics for cellular circadian bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    St John, Peter C; Taylor, Stephanie R; Abel, John H; Doyle, Francis J

    2014-12-02

    Bioluminescence rhythms from cellular reporters have become the most common method used to quantify oscillations in circadian gene expression. These experimental systems can reveal phase and amplitude change resulting from circadian disturbances, and can be used in conjunction with mathematical models to lend further insight into the mechanistic basis of clock amplitude regulation. However, bioluminescence experiments track the mean output from thousands of noisy, uncoupled oscillators, obscuring the direct effect of a given stimulus on the genetic regulatory network. In many cases, it is unclear whether changes in amplitude are due to individual changes in gene expression level or to a change in coherence of the population. Although such systems can be modeled using explicit stochastic simulations, these models are computationally cumbersome and limit analytical insight into the mechanisms of amplitude change. We therefore develop theoretical and computational tools to approximate the mean expression level in large populations of noninteracting oscillators, and further define computationally efficient amplitude response calculations to describe phase-dependent amplitude change. At the single-cell level, a mechanistic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model is used to calculate the transient response of each cell to a perturbation, whereas population-level dynamics are captured by coupling this detailed model to a phase density function. Our analysis reveals that amplitude changes mediated at either the individual-cell or the population level can be distinguished in tissue-level bioluminescence data without the need for single-cell measurements. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by modeling experimental bioluminescence profiles of light-sensitive fibroblasts, reconciling the conclusions of two seemingly contradictory studies. This modeling framework allows a direct comparison between in vitro bioluminescence experiments and in silico ordinary

  6. Quartic Amplitudes for Minkowski Higher Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Anders K. H.

    The old problem of finding general quartic interaction terms between fields of higher helicities on the light-front is discussed from the point of view of calculating the corresponding amplitudes directly from the cubic vertices using BCFW recursion. Amplitude based no-go results that has appeared in the literature are reviewed and discussed and it is pointed out how they may perhaps be circumvented.

  7. Twistor-strings and gravity tree amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Tim; Mason, Lionel

    2013-04-01

    Recently we discussed how Einstein supergravity tree amplitudes might be obtained from the original Witten and Berkovits twistor-string theory when external conformal gravitons are restricted to be Einstein gravitons. Here we obtain a more systematic understanding of the relationship between conformal and Einstein gravity amplitudes in that twistor-string theory. We show that although it does not in general yield Einstein amplitudes, we can nevertheless obtain some partial twistor-string interpretation of the remarkable formulae recently been found by Hodges and generalized to all tree amplitudes by Cachazo and Skinner. The Hodges matrix and its higher degree generalizations encode the world sheet correlators of the twistor string. These matrices control both Einstein amplitudes and those of the conformal gravity arising from the Witten and Berkovits twistor-string. Amplitudes in the latter case arise from products of the diagonal elements of the generalized Hodges matrices and reduced determinants give the former. The reduced determinants arise if the contractions in the worldsheet correlator are restricted to form connected trees at MHV. The (generalized) Hodges matrices arise as weighted Laplacian matrices for the graph of possible contractions in the correlators and the reduced determinants of these weighted Laplacian matrices give the sum of the connected tree contributions by an extension of the matrix-tree theorem.

  8. Self-tuning bistable parametric feedback oscillator: Near-optimal amplitude maximization without model information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David J.; Sutas, Andrius; Vijayakumar, Sethu

    2017-01-01

    Theory predicts that parametrically excited oscillators, tuned to operate under resonant condition, are capable of large-amplitude oscillation useful in diverse applications, such as signal amplification, communication, and analog computation. However, due to amplitude saturation caused by nonlinearity, lack of robustness to model uncertainty, and limited sensitivity to parameter modulation, these oscillators require fine-tuning and strong modulation to generate robust large-amplitude oscillation. Here we present a principle of self-tuning parametric feedback excitation that alleviates the above-mentioned limitations. This is achieved using a minimalistic control implementation that performs (i) self-tuning (slow parameter adaptation) and (ii) feedback pumping (fast parameter modulation), without sophisticated signal processing past observations. The proposed approach provides near-optimal amplitude maximization without requiring model-based control computation, previously perceived inevitable to implement optimal control principles in practical application. Experimental implementation of the theory shows that the oscillator self-tunes itself near to the onset of dynamic bifurcation to achieve extreme sensitivity to small resonant parametric perturbations. As a result, it achieves large-amplitude oscillations by capitalizing on the effect of nonlinearity, despite substantial model uncertainties and strong unforeseen external perturbations. We envision the present finding to provide an effective and robust approach to parametric excitation when it comes to real-world application.

  9. Robust phase-shift-keying silicon photonic modulator.

    PubMed

    Adams, Donald; Aboketaf, Abdelsalam; Preble, Stefan

    2012-07-30

    Here we propose a robust silicon modulator that seamlessly generates phase shift keyed data. The modulator has very low insertion loss and is robust against electrical amplitude variations in the modulating signal; specifically a 50%-200% variation in modulating amplitude leads to only a π/9 variation in output optical phase, corresponding to only ± 10% variation in the differentially detected signal. This yields a ~2.5dB enhancement in SNR over OOK (on-off-keying) formats.

  10. Single SOA based simultaneous amplitude regeneration for WDM-PDM RZ-PSK signals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenhan; Yu, Yu; Zou, Bingrong; Yang, Weili; Zhang, Xinliang

    2013-03-25

    We propose and demonstrate all-optical amplitude regeneration for the wavelength division multiplexing and polarization division multiplexing (WDM-PDM) return-to-zero phase shift keying (RZ-PSK) signals using a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and subsequent filtering. The regeneration is based on the cross phase modulation (XPM) effect in the saturated SOA and the subsequent narrow filtering. The spectrum of the distorted signal can be broadened due to the phase modulation induced by the synchronous optical clock signal. A narrow band pass filter is utilized to extract part of the broadened spectrum and remove the amplitude noise, while preserving the phase information. The working principle for multi-channel and polarization orthogonality preserving is analyzed. 4-channel dual polarization signals can be simultaneously amplitude regenerated without introducing wavelength and polarization demultiplexing. An average power penalty improvement of 1.75dB can be achieved for the WDM-PDM signals.

  11. Diurnal cortisol amplitude and fronto-limbic activity in response to stressful stimuli.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Bussel, Amy C; Root, James C; Butler, Tracy; Tuescher, Oliver; Pan, Hong; Epstein, Jane; Weisholtz, Daniel S; Pavony, Michelle; Silverman, Michael E; Goldstein, Martin S; Altemus, Margaret; Cloitre, Marylene; Ledoux, Joseph; McEwen, Bruce; Stern, Emily; Silbersweig, David

    2009-06-01

    The development and exacerbation of many psychiatric and neurologic conditions are associated with dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis as measured by aberrant levels of cortisol secretion. Here we report on the relationship between the amplitude of diurnal cortisol secretion, measured across 3 typical days in 18 healthy individuals, and blood oxygen level dependant (BOLD) response in limbic fear/stress circuits, elicited by in-scanner presentation of emotionally negative stimuli, specifically, images of the World Trade Center (WTC) attack. Results indicate that subjects who secrete a greater amplitude of cortisol diurnally demonstrate less brain activation in limbic regions, including the amygdala and hippocampus/parahippocampus, and hypothalamus during exposure to traumatic WTC-related images. Such initial findings can begin to link our understanding, in humans, of the relationship between the diurnal amplitude of a hormone integral to the stress response, and those neuroanatomical regions that are implicated as both modulating and being modulated by that response.

  12. Cut-constructible part of QCD amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Ruth; Feng Bo; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo

    2006-05-15

    Unitarity cuts are widely used in analytic computation of loop amplitudes in gauge theories such as QCD. We expand upon the technique introduced in hep-ph/0503132 to carry out any finite unitarity cut integral. This technique naturally separates the contributions of bubble, triangle and box integrals in one-loop amplitudes and is not constrained to any particular helicity configurations. Loop momentum integration is reduced to a sequence of algebraic operations. We discuss the extraction of the residues at higher-order poles. Additionally, we offer concise algebraic formulas for expressing coefficients of three-mass triangle integrals. As an application, we compute all remaining coefficients of bubble and triangle integrals for nonsupersymmetric six-gluon amplitudes.

  13. Analytic representations of Yang-Mills amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Bourjaily, Jacob L.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Feng, Bo

    2016-12-01

    Scattering amplitudes in Yang-Mills theory can be represented in the formalism of Cachazo, He and Yuan (CHY) as integrals over an auxiliary projective space-fully localized on the support of the scattering equations. Because solving the scattering equations is difficult and summing over the solutions algebraically complex, a method of directly integrating the terms that appear in this representation has long been sought. We solve this important open problem by first rewriting the terms in a manifestly Möbius-invariant form and then using monodromy relations (inspired by analogy to string theory) to decompose terms into those for which combinatorial rules of integration are known. The result is the foundations of a systematic procedure to obtain analytic, covariant forms of Yang-Mills tree-amplitudes for any number of external legs and in any number of dimensions. As examples, we provide compact analytic expressions for amplitudes involving up to six gluons of arbitrary helicities.

  14. A description of seismic amplitude techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadlow, James

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of seismic data is a non-invasive technique used for determining the sub surface geology. Changes in lithology and fluid fill affect the seismic wavelet. Analysing seismic data for direct hydrocarbon indicators (DHIs), such as full stack amplitude anomalies, or amplitude variation with offset (AVO), can help a seismic interpreter relate the geophysical response to real geology and, more importantly, to distinguish the presence of hydrocarbons. Inversion is another commonly used technique that attempts to tie the seismic data back to the geology. Much has been written about these techniques, and attempting to gain an understanding on the theory and application of them by reading through various journals can be quite daunting. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline DHI analysis, including full stack amplitude anomalies, AVO and inversion and show the relationship between all three. The equations presented have been included for completeness, but the reader can pass over the mathematical detail.

  15. Modulation axis performs circular motion in a 45° dual-drive symmetric photoelastic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. W.; Wang, L. M.; Zhang, R.; Wang, Z. B.

    2016-12-01

    A 45° dual-drive symmetric photoelastic modulator is demonstrated. Two piezoelectric actuators are connected to a symmetric photoelastic crystal at an angle of 45°. When the amplitudes of the stress standing waves induced by the two piezoelectric actuators are equal and the phase difference between the two stress standing waves is /π 2 , the modulation axis performs circular motion with a frequency of half of the photoelastic modulator's resonant frequency, while the retardation remains a constant that is determined at the driving voltage amplitudes. This reveals a new polarization modulation method. We have theoretically analyzed and experimentally observed the new polarization modulation, and the retardation calibration is also reported.

  16. Modulation axis performs circular motion in a 45° dual-drive symmetric photoelastic modulator.

    PubMed

    Li, K W; Wang, L M; Zhang, R; Wang, Z B

    2016-12-01

    A 45° dual-drive symmetric photoelastic modulator is demonstrated. Two piezoelectric actuators are connected to a symmetric photoelastic crystal at an angle of 45°. When the amplitudes of the stress standing waves induced by the two piezoelectric actuators are equal and the phase difference between the two stress standing waves is π2, the modulation axis performs circular motion with a frequency of half of the photoelastic modulator's resonant frequency, while the retardation remains a constant that is determined at the driving voltage amplitudes. This reveals a new polarization modulation method. We have theoretically analyzed and experimentally observed the new polarization modulation, and the retardation calibration is also reported.

  17. Modified π π amplitude with σ pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bydžovský, P.; Kamiński, R.; Nazari, V.

    2014-12-01

    A set of well-known once subtracted dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition is used to modify unitary multichannel S (π π , K K ¯, and η η ) and P (π π , ρ 2 π , and ρ σ ) wave amplitudes mostly below 1 GeV. Before the modifications, these amplitudes significantly did not satisfy the crossing symmetry condition and did not describe the π π threshold region. Moreover, the pole of the S wave amplitude related with the f0(500 ) meson (former f0(600 ) or σ ) had much smaller imaginary part and bigger real one in comparison with those in the newest Particle Data Group Tables. Here, these amplitudes are supplemented by near threshold expansion polynomials and refitted to the experimental data in the effective two pion mass from the threshold to 1.8 GeV and to the dispersion relations up to 1.1 GeV. In result the self consistent, i.e., unitary and fulfilling the crossing symmetry condition, S and P wave amplitudes are formed and the σ pole becomes much narrower and lighter. To eliminate doubts about the uniqueness of the so obtained sigma pole position short and purely mathematical proof of the uniqueness of the results is also presented. This analysis is addressed to a wide group of physicists and aims at providing a very effective and easy method of modification of, many presently used, π π amplitudes with a heavy and broad σ meson without changing of their original mathematical structure.

  18. High Amplitude Events in relation to Interplanetary disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rajesh Kumar; Agarwal Mishra, Rekha

    2012-07-01

    The Sun emits the variable solar wind which interacts with the very local interstellar medium to form the heliosphere. Hence variations in solar activity strongly influence interplanetary space, from the Sun's surface out to the edge of the heliosphere. Superimposed on the solar wind are mass ejections from the Sun and/or its corona which, disturb the interplanetary medium - hence the name "interplanetary disturbances". Interplanetary disturbances are the sources of large-scale particle acceleration, of disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere, of modulations of galactic cosmic rays in short, they are the prime focus for space weather studies. The investigation deals with the study of cosmic ray intensity, solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field parameters variation due to interplanetary disturbances (magnetic clouds) during an unusual class of days i.e. high amplitude anisotropic wave train events. The high amplitude anisotropic wave train events in cosmic ray intensity has been identified using the data of ground based Goose Bay neutron monitor and studied during the period 1981-94. Even though, the occurrence of high amplitude anisotropic wave trains does not depend on the onset of interplanetary magnetic clouds. But the possibility of occurrence of these events cannot be overlooked during the periods of interplanetary magnetic cloud events. It is observed that solar wind velocity remains higher (> 300) than normal and interplanetary magnetic field B remains lower than normal on the onset of interplanetary magnetic cloud during the passage of these events. It is also noted from the superposed epoch analysis of cosmic ray intensity and geomagnetic activity for high amplitude anisotropic wave train events during the onset of interplanetary magnetic clouds that the increase in cosmic ray intensity and decrease in geomagnetic activity start not at the onset of magnetic clouds but after few days. The north south component of IMF (Bz), IMF (B), proton

  19. Online tracking of instantaneous frequency and amplitude of dynamical system response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank Pai, P.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a sliding-window tracking (SWT) method for accurate tracking of the instantaneous frequency and amplitude of arbitrary dynamic response by processing only three (or more) most recent data points. Teager-Kaiser algorithm (TKA) is a well-known four-point method for online tracking of frequency and amplitude. Because finite difference is used in TKA, its accuracy is easily destroyed by measurement and/or signal-processing noise. Moreover, because TKA assumes the processed signal to be a pure harmonic, any moving average in the signal can destroy the accuracy of TKA. On the other hand, because SWT uses a constant and a pair of windowed regular harmonics to fit the data and estimate the instantaneous frequency and amplitude, the influence of any moving average is eliminated. Moreover, noise filtering is an implicit capability of SWT when more than three data points are used, and this capability increases with the number of processed data points. To compare the accuracy of SWT and TKA, Hilbert-Huang transform is used to extract accurate time-varying frequencies and amplitudes by processing the whole data set without assuming the signal to be harmonic. Frequency and amplitude trackings of different amplitude- and frequency-modulated signals, vibrato in music, and nonlinear stationary and non-stationary dynamic signals are studied. Results show that SWT is more accurate, robust, and versatile than TKA for online tracking of frequency and amplitude.

  20. Singularity structure of maximally supersymmetric scattering amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Bourjaily, Jacob L; Cachazo, Freddy; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2014-12-31

    We present evidence that loop amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric (N=4) Yang-Mills theory (SYM) beyond the planar limit share some of the remarkable structures of the planar theory. In particular, we show that through two loops, the four-particle amplitude in full N=4 SYM has only logarithmic singularities and is free of any poles at infinity--properties closely related to uniform transcendentality and the UV finiteness of the theory. We also briefly comment on implications for maximal (N=8) supergravity theory (SUGRA).

  1. Topographic quantitative EEG amplitude in recovered alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Pollock, V E; Schneider, L S; Zemansky, M F; Gleason, R P; Pawluczyk, S

    1992-05-01

    Topographic measures of electroencephalographic (EEG) amplitude were used to compare recovered alcoholics (n = 14) with sex- and age-matched control subjects. Delta, alpha, and beta activity did not distinguish the groups, but regional differences in theta distribution did. Recovered alcoholics showed more uniform distributions of theta amplitudes in bilateral anterior and posterior regions compared with controls. Because a minimum of 5 years had elapsed since the recovered alcoholic subjects fulfilled DSM-III-R criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence, it is unlikely these EEG theta differences reflect the effects of withdrawal.

  2. Dual amplitude pulse generator for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Hoggan, Jerry M.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Johnson, Larry O.

    2001-01-01

    A pulsing circuit for producing an output signal having a high amplitude pulse and a low amplitude pulse may comprise a current source for providing a high current signal and a low current signal. A gate circuit connected to the current source includes a trigger signal input that is responsive to a first trigger signal and a second trigger signal. The first trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the high current signal to a pulse output terminal whereas the second trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the low current signal to the pulse output terminal.

  3. Amplitude Models for Discrimination and Yield Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, William Scott

    2016-09-01

    This seminar presentation describes amplitude models and yield estimations that look at the data in order to inform legislation. The following points were brought forth in the summary: global models that will predict three-component amplitudes (R-T-Z) were produced; Q models match regional geology; corrected source spectra can be used for discrimination and yield estimation; three-component data increase coverage and reduce scatter in source spectral estimates; three-component efforts must include distance-dependent effects; a community effort on instrument calibration is needed.

  4. Amplitude for N-gluon superstring scattering.

    PubMed

    Stieberger, Stephan; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2006-11-24

    We consider scattering processes involving N gluonic massless states of open superstrings with a certain Regge slope alpha'. At the semiclassical level, the string world-sheet sweeps a disk and N gluons are created or annihilated at the boundary. We present exact expressions for the corresponding amplitudes, valid to all orders in alpha', for the so-called maximally helicity violating configurations, with N = 4, 5 and N = 6. We also obtain the leading O(alpha '2) string corrections to the zero-slope N-gluon Yang-Mills amplitudes.

  5. Amplitude for N-Gluon Superstring Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Stieberger, Stephan; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2006-11-24

    We consider scattering processes involving N gluonic massless states of open superstrings with a certain Regge slope {alpha}{sup '}. At the semiclassical level, the string world-sheet sweeps a disk and N gluons are created or annihilated at the boundary. We present exact expressions for the corresponding amplitudes, valid to all orders in {alpha}{sup '}, for the so-called maximally helicity violating configurations, with N=4, 5 and N=6. We also obtain the leading O({alpha}{sup '2}) string corrections to the zero-slope N-gluon Yang-Mills amplitudes.

  6. Coherent quantum states from classical oscillator amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, John S.; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    In the first days of quantum mechanics Dirac pointed out an analogy between the time-dependent coefficients of an expansion of the Schrödinger equation and the classical position and momentum variables solving Hamilton's equations. Here it is shown that the analogy can be made an equivalence in that, in principle, systems of classical oscillators can be constructed whose position and momenta variables form time-dependent amplitudes which are identical to the complex quantum amplitudes of the coupled wave function of an N-level quantum system with real coupling matrix elements. Hence classical motion can reproduce quantum coherence.

  7. Nonlinear (super)symmetries and amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallosh, Renata

    2017-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in nonlinear supersymmetries in cosmological model building. Independently, elegant expressions for the all-tree amplitudes in models with nonlinear symmetries, like D3 brane Dirac-Born-Infeld-Volkov-Akulov theory, were recently discovered. Using the generalized background field method we show how, in general, nonlinear symmetries of the action, bosonic and fermionic, constrain amplitudes beyond soft limits. The same identities control, for example, bosonic E 7(7) scalar sector symmetries as well as the fermionic goldstino symmetries.

  8. Modulation and detection of optical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of information is presented which is related to the modulation and detection of information on optical carriers. It emphasizes the treatment of information transfer through an entire system. The most common configurations are considered: intensity modulation, amplitude modulation, frequency or phase modulation, and both direct and coherent detection. In assessing these configurations information capacity and message signal-to-noise ratio are used as a basis of comparison. The physical and geometric treatment of optical heterodyne (or coherent) detection is given.

  9. From intentions to actions: Neural oscillations encode motor processes through phase, amplitude and phase-amplitude coupling.

    PubMed

    Combrisson, Etienne; Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Soto, Juan Lp; Alamian, Golnoush; Kahane, Philippe; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe; Guillot, Aymeric; Jerbi, Karim

    2017-02-15

    Goal-directed motor behavior is associated with changes in patterns of rhythmic neuronal activity across widely distributed brain areas. In particular, movement initiation and execution are mediated by patterns of synchronization and desynchronization that occur concurrently across distinct frequency bands and across multiple motor cortical areas. To date, motor-related local oscillatory modulations have been predominantly examined by quantifying increases or suppressions in spectral power. However, beyond signal power, spectral properties such as phase and phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) have also been shown to carry information with regards to the oscillatory dynamics underlying motor processes. Yet, the distinct functional roles of phase, amplitude and PAC across the planning and execution of goal-directed motor behavior remain largely elusive. Here, we address this question with unprecedented resolution thanks to multi-site intracerebral EEG recordings in human subjects while they performed a delayed motor task. To compare the roles of phase, amplitude and PAC, we monitored intracranial brain signals from 748 sites across six medically intractable epilepsy patients at movement execution, and during the delay period where motor intention is present but execution is withheld. In particular, we used a machine-learning framework to identify the key contributions of various neuronal responses. We found a high degree of overlap between brain network patterns observed during planning and those present during execution. Prominent amplitude increases in the delta (2-4Hz) and high gamma (60-200Hz) bands were observed during both planning and execution. In contrast, motor alpha (8-13Hz) and beta (13-30Hz) power were suppressed during execution, but enhanced during the delay period. Interestingly, single-trial classification revealed that low-frequency phase information, rather than spectral power change, was the most discriminant feature in dissociating action from

  10. Second-order temporal modulation transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, C; Soares, C; Vonner, T

    2001-08-01

    Detection thresholds were measured for a sinusoidal modulation applied to the modulation depth of a sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) white noise carrier as a function of the frequency of the modulation applied to the modulation depth (referred to as f'm). The SAM noise acted therefore as a "carrier" stimulus of frequency fm, and sinusoidal modulation of the SAM-noise modulation depth generated two additional components in the modulation spectrum: fm-f'm and fm+f'm. The tracking variable was the modulation depth of the sinusoidal variation applied to the "carrier" modulation depth. The resulting "second-order" temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) measured on four listeners for "carrier" modulation frequencies fm of 16, 64, and 256 Hz display a low-pass segment followed by a plateau. This indicates that sensitivity to fluctuations in the strength of amplitude modulation is best for fluctuation rates f'm below about 2-4 Hz when using broadband noise carriers. Measurements of masked modulation detection thresholds for the lower and upper modulation sideband suggest that this capacity is possibly related to the detection of a beat in the sound's temporal envelope. The results appear qualitatively consistent with the predictions of an envelope detector model consisting of a low-pass filtering stage followed by a decision stage. Unlike listeners' performance, a modulation filterbank model using Q values > or = 2 should predict that second-order modulation detection thresholds should decrease at high values of f'm due to the spectral resolution of the modulation sidebands (in the modulation domain). This suggests that, if such modulation filters do exist, their selectivity is poor. In the latter case, the Q value of modulation filters would have to be less than 2. This estimate of modulation filter selectivity is consistent with the results of a previous study using a modulation-masking paradigm [S. D. Ewert and T. Dau, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181

  11. Particle Distribution Modification by Low Amplitude Modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2009-08-28

    Modification of a high energy particle distribution by a spectrum of low amplitude modes is investigated using a guiding center code. Only through resonance are modes effective in modifying the distribution. Diagnostics are used to illustrate the mode-particle interaction and to find which effects are relevant in producing significant resonance, including kinetic Poincare plots and plots showing those orbits with time averaged mode-particle energy transfer. Effects of pitch angle scattering and drag are studied, as well as plasma rotation and time dependence of the equilibrium and mode frequencies. A specific example of changes observed in a DIII-D deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude experimentally validated Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes is examined in detail. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam profile modification, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold.

  12. The CMU Baryon Amplitude Analysis Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, Matt

    2007-05-01

    The PWA group at Carnegie Mellon University has developed a comprehensive approach and analysis package for the purpose of extracting the amplitudes for photoproduced baryon resonances. The end goal is to identify any missing resonances that are predicted by the constituent quark model, but not definitively observed in experiments. The data comes from the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab.

  13. Audio steganography by amplitude or phase modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Kaliappan; Wenndt, Stanley J.; Adams, Scott F.; Haddad, Darren M.

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents the results of embedding short covert message utterances on a host, or cover, utterance by modifying the phase or amplitude of perceptually masked or significant regions of the host. In the first method, the absolute phase at selected, perceptually masked frequency indices was changed to fixed, covert data-dependent values. Embedded bits were retrieved at the receiver from the phase at the selected frequency indices. Tests on embedding a GSM-coded covert utterance on clean and noisy host utterances showed no noticeable difference in the stego compared to the hosts in speech quality or spectrogram. A bit error rate of 2 out of 2800 was observed for a clean host utterance while no error occurred for a noisy host. In the second method, the absolute phase of 10 or fewer perceptually significant points in the host was set in accordance with covert data. This resulted in a stego with successful data retrieval and a slightly noticeable degradation in speech quality. Modifying the amplitude of perceptually significant points caused perceptible differences in the stego even with small changes of amplitude made at five points per frame. Finally, the stego obtained by altering the amplitude at perceptually masked points showed barely noticeable differences and excellent data recovery.

  14. Travel-Time and Amplitude Sensitivity Kernels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    amplitude sensitivity kernels shown in the lower panels concentrate about the corresponding eigenrays . Each 3D kernel exhibits a broad negative...in 2 and 3 dimensions have similar 11 shapes to corresponding travel-time sensitivity kernels (TSKs), centered about the respective eigenrays

  15. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  16. Connected formulas for amplitudes in standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Song; Zhang, Yong

    2017-03-01

    Witten's twistor string theory has led to new representations of S-matrix in massless QFT as a single object, including Cachazo-He-Yuan formulas in general and connected formulas in four dimensions. As a first step towards more realistic processes of the standard model, we extend the construction to QCD tree amplitudes with massless quarks and those with a Higgs boson. For both cases, we find connected formulas in four dimensions for all multiplicities which are very similar to the one for Yang-Mills amplitudes. The formula for quark-gluon color-ordered amplitudes differs from the pure-gluon case only by a Jacobian factor that depends on flavors and orderings of the quarks. In the formula for Higgs plus multi-parton amplitudes, the massive Higgs boson is effectively described by two additional massless legs which do not appear in the Parke-Taylor factor. The latter also represents the first twistor-string/connected formula for form factors.

  17. Optical bistable device with one sinusoidal amplitude grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenping; Orriols, G.

    1994-07-01

    A novel type of optical bistable device (OBD) based the Abble theory is proposed, in which the modulation is realized by moving one sinusoidal amplitude grating. When the parameters of this system are chosen properly this system can be a one-channel or two-channel optical bistable device. The mathematical models which describe the optically bistability are obtained. Numerical simulations on the optical bistabilities and the stability analysis on this system for two cases are given. The two-channel OBD may work as a 1 × 2 optical switch or a stable filter for wavelength division multiplexing, and may be applied in code-division multiple access networks and optical recovery circuit.

  18. Clinical application of amplitude processing of echocardiographic images.

    PubMed Central

    Logan-Sinclair, R; Wong, C M; Gibson, D G

    1981-01-01

    In order to assess the possible clinical value of measuring regional amplitude of ultrasound reflected from intracardiac structures, two-dimensional echocardiographic images from 20 normal subjects and 70 patients with heart disease were processed by modulation of both colour and intensity to represent grey scale. Maximum echo intensity was consistently recorded from the pericardial interface behind the posterior left ventricular wall, and this was taken as 100 per cent. In the normal heart, central fibrous body reflected at 64 +/- 5 per cent, and mitral and aortic valves at 35 +/- 5 per cent and 36 +/- 8 per cent, respectively. Normal septal myocardium gave a valve of 33 +/- 8 per cent and posterior wall of 23 +/- 6 per cent. Consistent increases were recorded from prosthetic mitral valves in 20 patients, and also from the anterior cusp of the mitral valve (54 +/- 11%) in 20 patients with rheumatic heart diseases. In all of 15 patients with left ventricular involvement caused by coronary artery disease, septal echo amplitude was increased in all to 71 +/- 11 per cent, and localised increases were also noted in the posterior wall, subendocardially, or in one or both papillary muscles. Similar focal changes were noted in five, and increases in septal density in 10 of 15 patients with left ventricular hypertrophy and in 12 of those with mitral valve disease. Thus, measurement of regional echo amplitude is possible without degradation of the quality from standard two-dimensional cardiac images. Abnormalities are particularly common in left ventricular disease where their distribution corresponds to that described for fibrous tissue. Images PMID:6455136

  19. Differentiating speech and nonspeech sounds via amplitude envelope cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnhoff, Robert J.; Strange, Winifred; Long, Glenis

    2001-05-01

    Recent evidence from neuroscience and behavioral speech science suggests that the temporal modulation pattern of the speech signal plays a distinctive role in speech perception. As a first step in exploring the nature of the perceptually relevant information in the temporal pattern of speech, this experiment examined whether speech versus nonspeech environmental sounds could be differentiated on the basis of their amplitude envelopes. Conversational speech was recorded from native speakers of six different languages (French, German, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, and Russian) along with samples of their English. Nonspeech sounds included animal vocalizations, water sounds, and other environmental sounds (e.g., thunder). The stimulus set included 30 2-s speech segments and 30 2-s nonspeech events. Frequency information was removed from all stimuli using a technique described by Dorman et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102 (1997)]. Nine normal-hearing adult listeners participated in the experiment. Subjects decided whether each sound was (originally) speech or nonspeech and rated their confidence (7-point Likert scale). Overall, subjects differentiated speech from nonspeech very accurately (84% correct). Only 12 stimuli were not correctly categorized at greater than chance levels. Acoustical analysis is underway to determine what parameters of the amplitude envelope differentiate speech from nonspeech sounds.

  20. Differentiating speech and nonspeech sounds via amplitude envelope cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnhoff, Robert J.; Strange, Winifred; Long, Glenis

    2004-05-01

    Recent evidence from neuroscience and behavioral speech science suggests that the temporal modulation pattern of the speech signal plays a distinctive role in speech perception. As a first step in exploring the nature of the perceptually relevant information in the temporal pattern of speech, this experiment examined whether speech versus nonspeech environmental sounds could be differentiated on the basis of their amplitude envelopes. Conversational speech was recorded from native speakers of six different languages (French, German, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, and Russian) along with samples of their English. Nonspeech sounds included animal vocalizations, water sounds, and other environmental sounds (e.g., thunder). The stimulus set included 30 2-s speech segments and 30 2-s nonspeech events. Frequency information was removed from all stimuli using a technique described by Dorman et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102 (1997)]. Nine normal-hearing adult listeners participated in the experiment. Subjects decided whether each sound was (originally) speech or nonspeech and rated their confidence (7-point Likert scale). Overall, subjects differentiated speech from nonspeech very accurately (84% correct). Only 12 stimuli were not correctly categorized at greater than chance levels. Acoustical analysis is underway to determine what parameters of the amplitude envelope differentiate speech from nonspeech sounds.

  1. ABJM amplitudes and the positive orthogonal Grassmannian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-tin; Wen, CongKao

    2014-02-01

    A remarkable connection between perturbative scattering amplitudes of four dimensional planar SYM, and the stratification of the positive Grassmannian, was revealed in the seminal work of Arkani-Hamed et al. Similar extension for three-dimensional ABJM theory was proposed. Here we establish a direct connection between planar scattering amplitudes of ABJM theory, and singularities thereof, to the stratification of the positive orthogonal Grassmannian. In particular, scattering processes are constructed through on-shell diagrams, which are simply iterative gluing of the fundamental four-point amplitude. Each diagram is then equivalent to the merging of fundamental OG2 orthogonal Grassmannian to form a larger OG k , where 2 k is the number of external particles. The invariant information that is encoded in each diagram is precisely this stratification. This information can be easily read off via permutation paths of the on-shell diagram, which also can be used to derive a canonical representation of OG k that manifests the vanishing of consecutive minors as the singularity of all on-shell diagrams. Quite remarkably, for the BCFW recursion representation of the tree-level amplitudes, the on-shell diagram manifests the presence of all physical factorization poles, as well as the cancellation of the spurious poles. After analytically continuing the orthogonal Grassmannian to split signature, we reveal that each on-shell diagram in fact resides in the positive cell of the orthogonal Grassmannian, where all minors are positive. In this language, the amplitudes of ABJM theory is simply an integral of a product of d log forms, over the positive orthogonal Grassmannian.

  2. Is the effect of tinnitus on auditory steady-state response amplitude mediated by attention?

    PubMed Central

    Diesch, Eugen; Andermann, Martin; Rupp, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Auditory steady-state response (ASSR) amplitude enhancement effects have been reported in tinnitus patients. As ASSR amplitude is also enhanced by attention, the effect of tinnitus on ASSR amplitude could be interpreted as an effect of attention mediated by tinnitus. As N1 attention effects are significantly larger than those on the ASSR, if the effect of tinnitus on ASSR amplitude were due to attention, there should be similar amplitude enhancement effects in tinnitus for the N1 component of the auditory-evoked response. Methods: MEG recordings which were previously examined for the ASSR (Diesch et al., 2010a) were analyzed with respect to the N1m component. Like the ASSR previously, the N1m was analyzed in the source domain (source space projection). Stimuli were amplitude-modulated (AM) tones with one of three carrier frequencies matching the tinnitus frequency or a surrogate frequency 1½ octave above the audiometric edge frequency in controls, the audiometric edge frequency, and a frequency below the audiometric edge. Single AM-tones were presented in a single condition and superpositions of three AM-tones differing in carrier and modulation frequency in a composite condition. Results: In the earlier ASSR study (Diesch et al., 2010a), the ASSR amplitude in tinnitus patients, but not in controls, was significantly larger in the (surrogate) tinnitus condition than in the edge condition. Patients showed less evidence than controls of reciprocal inhibition of component ASSR responses in the composite condition. In the present study, N1m amplitudes elicited by stimuli located at the audiometric edge and at the (surrogate) tinnitus frequency were smaller than N1m amplitudes elicited by sub-edge tones both in patients and controls. The relationship of the N1m response in the composite condition to the N1m response in the single condition indicated that reciprocal inhibition among component N1m responses was reduced in patients compared against controls

  3. Amplitude and frequency demodulation analysis for fault diagnosis of planet bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Ma, Haoqun; Zuo, Ming J.

    2016-11-01

    The vibration signals of planet bearings feature more complex amplitude modulation and frequency modulation (AM-FM) than those of fixed-axis bearings, due to the effects of time-varying vibration transfer path, load zone passing and time-varying angles between gear pair mesh lines of action and impact force vector, in addition to that of bearing fault. Their Fourier spectra have a complex sideband structure, leading to difficulty in feature extraction and fault diagnosis. In order to address this issue, a joint amplitude and frequency demodulation analysis method is proposed to reveal the fault features, by considering the modulation characteristics. To thoroughly understand planet bearing vibration characteristics, the explicit equations for amplitude and frequency demodulated spectra of outer race, rolling element and inner race fault cases are derived, and the fault symptoms are summarized respectively. The signal is firstly decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition (EMD), thus meeting the mono-component requirement by instantaneous frequency calculation. Then a sensitive component with the instantaneous frequency fluctuating around the resonance frequency is chosen for further frequency demodulation analysis. Finally, planet bearing fault can be diagnosed by matching the peaks identified in amplitude and frequency demodulated spectra with the theoretical fault characteristic frequencies. The proposed method is validated with both numerical simulated and lab experimental signal analyses.

  4. Correction of amplitude distortions for truncated Bessel beam and SER estimation for 4ASK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyyuboğlu, Halil T.

    2016-08-01

    We apply amplitude corrections to a truncated Bessel beam that has propagated through turbulent atmosphere modelled by random phase screens. These corrections are realized via transmitting an unmodulated beam in parallel to the one carrying the 4 amplitude shift keying (ASK) modulated message signal. On the receiver side, the amplitude corrections are obtained by dividing the intensity of the unmodulated beam by its free space equivalence. The corrections are then used to restore the amplitude distortions of the beam carrying the 4ASK modulated message signal and in the determination of decision boundaries for the received 4ASK symbols. The success of the system is visually inspected by comparing the received intensity profiles before and after the application of corrections. Furthermore, simulation analysis of symbol error rate (SER) is made, where the proposed set-up is found to be quite insensitive to wavelength difference between the unmodulated and modulated beams. On the other hand, the difference in the structure constant values of these two beams seems to have profound effect on system performance.

  5. The amplitude and phase control of the ALS Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.C.; Taylor, B.; Baptiste, K.

    1995-03-01

    A 500MHz, 300KW Klystron power amplifier provides RF power to the ALS Storage Ring. In order to accommodate the amplitude and phase changes during beam stacking and decay, which demand continuously varying power levels from the Klystron, four loops are used to keep the system operating properly, with two of those loops dedicated to keeping the two cavity tuners on tune. Description of the control loops and their performance data will be given. Using the modulation anode of the Klystron in the amplitude loop will be discussed.

  6. Parametric instabilities of large amplitude Alfven waves with obliquely propagating sidebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief report on properties of the parametric decay and modulational, filamentation, and magnetoacoustic instabilities of a large amplitude, circularly polarized Alfven wave. We allow the daughter and sideband waves to propagate at an arbitrary angle to the background magnetic field so that the electrostatic and electromagnetic characteristics of these waves are coupled. We investigate the dependance of these instabilities on dispersion, plasma/beta, pump wave amplitude, and propagation angle. Analytical and numerical results are compared with numerical simulations to investigate the full nonlinear evolution of these instabilities.

  7. Ultra-Linear Polymer Modulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    29 Figure 45: Coupling, ( Kappa ), between eigenmodes as a function of optical propagation (z) .... 31 Figure 46: SFDR Calculation...frequency electrode structures for radio frequency (RF) modulation of light Two-tone third-order inter-modulation distortion in integrated optic amplitude...verify lambda max of the electro-optic chromophore in thin films as well as the index of refraction and dispersion for all the polymer layers in a

  8. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  9. Frequencies and amplitudes of high-degree solar oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, James Morris

    Measurements of some of the properties of high-degree solar p- and f-mode oscillations are presented. Using high-resolution velocity images from Big Bear Solar Observatory, we have measured mode frequencies, which provide information about the composition and internal structure of the Sun, and mode velocity amplitudes (corrected for the effects of atmospheric seeing), which tell us about the oscillation excitation and damping mechanisms. We present a new and more accurate table of the Sun's acoustic vibration frequencies, nunl, as a function of radial order n and spherical harmonic degree l. These frequencies are averages over azimuthal order m and approximate the normal mode frequencies of a nonrotating spherically symmetric Sun near solar minimum. The frequencies presented here are for solar p- and f-modes with 180 less than or = l less than or = 1920, 0 less than or = n less than or = 8, and 1.7 mHz less than or = nunl less than or = 5.3 mHz. The uncertainties, sigmanl, in the frequencies areas are as low as 3.1 micro-Hz. The theoretically expected f-mode frequencies are given by omega squared = gkh approx. = gl/R, where g is the gravitational acceleration at the surface, kh is the horizontal component of the wave vector, and R is the radius of the Sun. We find that the observed frequencies are significantly less than expected for l greater than 1000, for which we have no explanation. Observations of high-degree oscillations, which have very small spatial features, suffer from the effects of atmospheric image blurring and image motion (or 'seeing'), thereby reducing the amplitudes of their spatial-frequency components. In an attempt to correct the velocity amplitudes for these effects, we simultaneously measured the atmospheric modulation transfer function (MTF) by looking at the effects of seeing on the solar limb. We are able to correct the velocity amplitudes using the MTF out to l approx. = 1200. We find that the frequency of the peak velocity power (as a

  10. Constructing QCD one-loop amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Forde, Darren; /SLAC /UCLA

    2008-02-22

    In the context of constructing one-loop amplitudes using a unitarity bootstrap approach we discuss a general systematic procedure for obtaining the coefficients of the scalar bubble and triangle integral functions of one-loop amplitudes. Coefficients are extracted after examining the behavior of the cut integrand as the unconstrained parameters of a specifically chosen parameterization of the cut loop momentum approach infinity. Measurements of new physics at the forthcoming experimental program at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will require a precise understanding of processes at next-to-leading order (NLO). This places increased demands for the computation of new one-loop amplitudes. This in turn has spurred recent developments towards improved calculational techniques. Direct calculations using Feynman diagrams are in general inefficient. Developments of more efficient techniques have usually centered around unitarity techniques [1], where tree amplitudes are effectively 'glued' together to form loops. The most straightforward application of this method, in which the cut loop momentum is in D = 4, allows for the computation of 'cut-constructible' terms only, i.e. (poly)logarithmic containing terms and any related constants. QCD amplitudes contain, in addition to such terms, rational pieces which cannot be derived using such cuts. These 'missing' rational parts can be extracted using cut loop momenta in D = 4-2 {var_epsilon}. The greater difficulty of such calculations has restricted the application of this approach, although recent developments [3, 4] have provided new promise for this technique. Recently the application of on-shell recursion relations [5] to obtaining the 'missing' rational parts of one-loop processes [6] has provided an alternative very promising solution to this problem. In combination with unitarity methods an 'on-shell bootstrap' approach provides an efficient technique for computing complete one-loop QCD amplitudes [7]. Additionally

  11. Amplitudes of MHD Waves in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Aimee Ann; Cally, Paul; Baldner, Charles; Kleint, Lucia; Tarbell, Theodore D.; De Pontieu, Bart; Scherrer, Philip H.; Rajaguru, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of p-modes into MHD waves by strong magnetic fields occurs mainly in the sub-photospheric layers. The photospheric signatures of MHD waves are weak due to low amplitudes at the beta=1 equipartion level where mode-conversion occurs. We report on small amplitude oscillations observed in the photosphere with Hinode SOT/SP in which we analyze time series for sunspots ARs 12186 (11.10.2014) and 12434 (17.10.2015). No significant magnetic field oscillations are recovered in the umbra or penumbra in the ME inversion. However, periodicities in the inclination angle are found at the umbral/penumbral boundary with 5 minute periods. Upward propagating waves are indicated in the intensity signals correlated between HMI and AIA at different heights. We compare SP results with the oscillations observed in HMI data. Simultaneous IRIS data shows transition region brightening above the umbral core.

  12. Multilayered models for electromagnetic reflection amplitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.

    1976-01-01

    The remote sensing of snowpack characteristics with surface installations or with an airborne system could have important applications in water resource management and flood prediction. To derive some insight into such applications, the electromagnetic response of multilayer snow models is analyzed. Normally incident plane waves are assumed at frequencies ranging from 10 to the 6th power to 10 to the 10th power Hz, and amplitude reflection coefficients are calculated for models having various snow-layer combinations, including ice sheets. Layers are defined by a thickness, permittivity, and conductivity; the electrical parameters are constant or prescribed functions of frequency. To illustrate the effect of various layering combinations, results are given in the form of curves of amplitude reflection coefficients, versus frequency for a variety of models. Under simplifying assumptions, the snow thickness and effective dielectric constant can be estimated from the reflection coefficient variations as a function of frequency.

  13. Modulations in the light of the firefly.

    PubMed

    Barua, Anurup Gohain

    2013-03-01

    Continuous light could be produced from the firefly by making it inhale vapours of ethyl acetate. Here we perform such a control experiment on the Indian species of the firefly Luciola praeusta Kiesenwetter 1874 (Coleoptera : Lampyridae : Luciolinae), and analyse the light in the microsecond time scale. The amplitude of the continuous train of triangular pulses is apparently altered in accordance with the instantaneous values of a hypothetical signal, which exhibits pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). In addition to sampling in amplitude, this scheme apparently provides sampling in time, representing pulse width modulation (PWM). A Fourier transform spectrum of this waveform shows the 'carrier' frequency and the accompanying 'side bands'.

  14. Large Amplitude Oscillatory Shear near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Brian; Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Somfai, Ellak; van Hecke, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Jammed solids such as foams and emulsions can be driven with oscillatory shear at finite strain amplitude and frequency. On a macro scale, this induces nonlinearities such as strain softening and shear thinning. On the micro scale one observes the onset of irreversibility, caging, and long-time diffusion. Using simulations of soft viscous spheres, we systematically vary the distance to the jamming transition. We correlate crossovers in the microscopic and macroscopic response, and construct scaling arguments to explain their relationships.

  15. Amplitude calibration experiment for SIR-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Held, D. N.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives, approach, and expected results of the amplitude calibration experiment for the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) are outlined. Specific objectives include: (1) the determination of the repeatability (stability) of the SIR-B; (2) the absolute and relative calibration of the system; and (3) the ground truth verification of the calibration accuracy using measurements made by a ground spectrometer and an airborne synthetic aperture radar.

  16. Chiral extrapolation of SU(3) amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Gerhard

    2011-05-23

    Approximations of chiral SU(3) amplitudes at NNLO are proposed to facilitate the extrapolation of lattice data to the physical meson masses. Inclusion of NNLO terms is essential for investigating convergence properties of chiral SU(3) and for determining low-energy constants in a controllable fashion. The approximations are tested with recent lattice data for the ratio of decay constants F{sub K}/F{sub {pi}}.

  17. Understanding the amplitudes of noise correlation measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Cross correlation of ambient seismic noise is known to result in time series from which station-station travel-time measurements can be made. Part of the reason that these cross-correlation travel-time measurements are reliable is that there exists a theoretical framework that quantifies how these travel times depend on the features of the ambient noise. However, corresponding theoretical results do not currently exist to describe how the amplitudes of the cross correlation depend on such features. For example, currently it is not possible to take a given distribution of noise sources and calculate the cross correlation amplitudes one would expect from such a distribution. Here, we provide a ray-theoretical framework for calculating cross correlations. This framework differs from previous work in that it explicitly accounts for attenuation as well as the spatial distribution of sources and therefore can address the issue of quantifying amplitudes in noise correlation measurements. After introducing the general framework, we apply it to two specific problems. First, we show that we can quantify the amplitudes of coherency measurements, and find that the decay of coherency with station-station spacing depends crucially on the distribution of noise sources. We suggest that researchers interested in performing attenuation measurements from noise coherency should first determine how the dominant sources of noise are distributed. Second, we show that we can quantify the signal-to-noise ratio of noise correlations more precisely than previous work, and that these signal-to-noise ratios can be estimated for given situations prior to the deployment of seismometers. It is expected that there are applications of the theoretical framework beyond the two specific cases considered, but these applications await future work.

  18. Zeroing in on Supersymmetric Radiation Amplitude Zeros

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne L.; Ismail, Ahmed; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    Radiation amplitude zeros have long been used to test the Standard Model. Here, we consider the supersymmetric radiation amplitude zero in chargino-neutralino associated production, which can be observed at the luminosity upgraded LHC. Such an amplitude zero only occurs if the neutralino has a large wino fraction and hence this observable can be used to determine the neutralino eigenstate content. We find that this observable can be measured by comparing the p{sub T} spectrum of the softest lepton in the trilepton {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 2}{sup 0} decay channel to that of a control process such as {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup +} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup -} or {tilde {chi}}{sub 2}{sup 0} {tilde {chi}}{sub 2}{sup 0}. We test this technique on a previously generated model sample of the 19 dimensional parameter space of the phenomenological MSSM, and find that it is effective in determining the wino content of the neutralino.

  19. Continuous phase and amplitude holographic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for producing a phase hologram using e-beam lithography provides n-ary levels of phase and amplitude by first producing an amplitude hologram on a transparent substrate by e-beam exposure of a resist over a film of metal by exposing n is less than or equal to m x m spots of an array of spots for each pixel, where the spots are randomly selected in proportion to the amplitude assigned to each pixel, and then after developing and etching the metal film producing a phase hologram by e-beam lithography using a low contrast resist, such as PMMA, and n-ary levels of low doses less than approximately 200 micro-C/sq cm and preferably in the range of 20-200 micro-C/sq cm, and aggressive development using pure acetone for an empirically determined time (about 6 s) controlled to within 1/10 s to produce partial development of each pixel in proportion to the n-ary level of dose assigned to it.

  20. Injection coupling with high amplitude transverse modes: Experimentation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mery, Yoann; Ducruix, Sébastien; Scouflaire, Philippe; Candel, Sébastien

    2009-06-01

    High frequency combustion instabilities have technical importance in the design of liquid rocket engines. These phenomena involve a strong coupling between transverse acoustic modes and combustion. They are currently being investigated by combining experimentation and numerical simulations. On the experimental level, the coupling is examined in a model scale system featuring a multiple injector combustor (MIC) comprising five coaxial injectors fed with liquid oxygen and gaseous methane. This system is equipped with a novel VHAM actuator (Very High Amplitude Modulator) which comprises two nozzles and a rotating toothed wheel blocking the nozzles in an alternate fashion. This device was designed to obtain the highest possible levels of transverse oscillation in the MIC. After a brief review of the VHAM, this article reports cold flow experiments using this modulator. Velocity maps obtained under resonant conditions using the VHAM are examined at different instants during a cycle of oscillation. Experimental data are compared with numerical pressure and velocity fields obtained from an acoustic solver. The good agreement observed in the nozzle vicinity indicates that numerical simulations can be used to analyze the complex flow field generated by the VHAM. To cite this article: Y. Mery et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  1. 47 CFR 78.115 - Modulation limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.115 Modulation limits. (a) If amplitude modulation is employed..., frequencies 78.36 Cross reference to other rules 78.3 D Definitions 78.5 E Eligibility for license 78.13 Emission designator 78.104 Emissions; emission limitations 78.103 Equal employment opportunities...

  2. 47 CFR 95.637 - Modulation standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... that transmits emission types F1D, G1D, or G3E must not exceed a peak frequency deviation of plus or minus 5 kHz. A GMRS transmitter that transmits emission type F3E must not exceed a peak frequency... amplitude modulation and frequency or phase modulation of a transmitter are not permitted. (d) When...

  3. Waveform Sampler CAMAC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, D.R.; Haller, G.M.; Kang, H.; Wang, J.

    1985-09-01

    A Waveform Sampler Module (WSM) for the measurement of signal shapes coming from the multi-hit drift chambers of the SLAC SLC detector is described. The module uses a high speed, high resolution analog storage device (AMU) developed in collaboration between SLAC and Stanford University. The AMU devices together with high speed TTL clocking circuitry are packaged in a hybrid which is also suitable for mounting on the detector. The module is in CAMAC format and provides eight signal channels, each recording signal amplitude versus time in 512 cells at a sampling rate of up to 360 MHz. Data are digitized by a 12-bit ADC with a 1 ..mu..s conversion time and stored in an on-board memory accessible through CAMAC.

  4. Advanced time average holographic method for measurement in extensive vibration amplitude range with quantitative single-pixel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít.; Vojtíšek, Petr; Václavík, Jan; Doleček, Roman; Mokrý, Pavel

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we propose a time average digital holographical arrangement employing frequency shift of reference wave and its phase modulation. It results in Phase Modulated Frequency Shifted Time Average Digital Holography PMFSTADH method. This method has a potential to extend currently using frequency shifted time average digital holography to possibility of numerical analysis. It is primarily useful for measurement of great or very small amplitudes of vibration. Moreover we use acusto-optical modulators to realize frequency as well as phase modulation so we need no additional hardware in our experimental setup.

  5. Extended Kalman filtering for joint mitigation of phase and amplitude noise in coherent QAM systems.

    PubMed

    Pakala, Lalitha; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2016-03-21

    We numerically investigate our proposed carrier phase and amplitude noise estimation (CPANE) algorithm using extend Kalman filter (EKF) for joint mitigation of linear and non-linear phase noise as well as amplitude noise on 4, 16 and 64 polarization multiplexed (PM) quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) 224 Gb/s systems. The results are compared to decision directed (DD) carrier phase estimation (CPE), DD phase locked loop (PLL) and universal CPE (U-CPE) algorithms. Besides eliminating the necessity of phase unwrapping function, EKF-CPANE shows improved performance for both back-to-back (BTB) and transmission scenarios compared to the aforementioned algorithms. We further propose a weighted innovation approach (WIA) of the EKF-CPANE which gives an improvement of 0.3 dB in the Q-factor, compared to the original algorithm.

  6. A high-bandwidth amplitude estimation technique for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Karvinen, K. S. Moheimani, S. O. R.

    2014-02-15

    While often overlooked, one of the prerequisites for high-speed amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is a high-bandwidth amplitude estimation technique. Conventional techniques, such as RMS to DC conversion and the lock-in amplifier, have proven useful, but offer limited measurement bandwidth and are not suitable for high-speed imaging. Several groups have developed techniques, but many of these are either difficult to implement or lack robustness. In this contribution, we briefly outline existing amplitude estimation methods and propose a new high-bandwidth estimation technique, inspired by techniques employed in microwave and RF circuit design, which utilizes phase cancellation to significantly improve the performance of the lock-in amplifier. We conclude with the design and implementation of a custom circuit to experimentally demonstrate the improvements and discuss its application in high-speed and multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

  7. Improvement of a large-amplitude sinusoidal pressure generator for dynamic calibration of pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Results of research on the improvement of a sinusoidal pressure generator are presented. The generator is an inlet-area-modulated, gas-flow-through device (siren type) which was developed to dynamically calibrate pressure transducers and pressure probes. Tests were performed over a frequency range of 100 Hz to 20 kHz at average chamber pressures (bias pressure) between 30 and 50 psia (21 and 35 N/sq cm abs) and between 150 and 300 psia (104 and 207 N/sq cm abs). Significant improvements in oscillation pressure waveform were obtained but with reduction in available generator oscillation pressure amplitude range. Oscillation pressure amplitude, waveform, and waveform spectral content are given as functions of frequency for the two bias pressure conditions. The generator and instrumentation for frequency, amplitude, and spectrum measurements are described.

  8. Imbalance of group velocities for amplitude and phase pulses propagating in a resonant atomic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basalaev, M. Yu.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of light pulses with amplitude and phase modulations is investigated for a medium of resonant two-level atoms. It is shown that the pulse-like variations of the phase can be also described in terms of group velocity. It is found that in the nonlinear regime of atom-field interaction, the group velocities of amplitude and phase pulses can have a large imbalance. Namely, amplitude pulses travel at a velocity less than c , whereas the group velocity of phase pulses is greater than the velocity of light in free space or it is even negative. The predicted imbalance of the group velocities can be important in the case of chirped pulses propagating in a resonant medium.

  9. Nonlinear amplitude approximation for bilinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chulwoo; D'Souza, Kiran; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2014-06-01

    An efficient method to predict vibration amplitudes at the resonant frequencies of dynamical systems with piecewise-linear nonlinearity is developed. This technique is referred to as bilinear amplitude approximation (BAA). BAA constructs a single vibration cycle at each resonant frequency to approximate the periodic steady-state response of the system. It is postulated that the steady-state response is piece-wise linear and can be approximated by analyzing the response over two time intervals during which the system behaves linearly. Overall the dynamics is nonlinear, but the system is in a distinct linear state during each of the two time intervals. Thus, the approximated vibration cycle is constructed using linear analyses. The equation of motion for analyzing the vibration of each state is projected along the overlapping space spanned by the linear mode shapes active in each of the states. This overlapping space is where the vibratory energy is transferred from one state to the other when the system switches from one state to the other. The overlapping space can be obtained using singular value decomposition. The space where the energy is transferred is used together with transition conditions of displacement and velocity compatibility to construct a single vibration cycle and to compute the amplitude of the dynamics. Since the BAA method does not require numerical integration of nonlinear models, computational costs are very low. In this paper, the BAA method is first applied to a single-degree-of-freedom system. Then, a three-degree-of-freedom system is introduced to demonstrate a more general application of BAA. Finally, the BAA method is applied to a full bladed disk with a crack. Results comparing numerical solutions from full-order nonlinear analysis and results obtained using BAA are presented for all systems.

  10. Phase amplitude conformal symmetry in Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, S.

    2015-04-01

    For the Fourier transform ℑ : L2(R) → L2(R) of a complex-valued even or odd function ψ, it is found that the amplitude invariance |ℑψ| = |ψ| leads to a phase invariance or inversion as arg(ℑψ) = ±argψ + θ (θ = constant). The converse holds unless arg ψ = constant. The condition |ψ| = |ℑψ| is required in dealing with, for example, the minimum uncertainty relation between position and momentum. Without the evenness or oddness of ψ, |ℑψ| = |ψ| does not necessarily imply arg(ℑψ) = ±argψ + θ, nor is the converse.

  11. In-Medium Pion Valence Distribution Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, K.; de Melo, J. P. B. C.

    2017-03-01

    After a brief review of the quark-based model for nuclear matter, and some pion properties in medium presented in our previous works, we report new results for the pion valence wave function as well as the valence distribution amplitude in medium, which are presented in our recent article. We find that both the in-medium pion valence distribution and the in-medium pion valence wave function, are substantially modified at normal nuclear matter density, due to the reduction in the pion decay constant.

  12. Fatigue damage analysis under variable amplitude cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leis, B. N.; Forte, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper explores the suitability of a recently proposed mean stress parameter and introduces a nonlinear damage accumulation procedure. Data covering a range of positive and negative stress ratios from +0.6 to -2.66, for several aluminum alloys and steels, are assembled and shown to be well correlated by a simple damage parameter. A nonlinear damage accumulation postulate is advanced to replace the usual linear procedure. Results of critical experiments performed to assess the suitability of the postulate are introduced and shown to support a non-linear criterion. The implications of this work related to variable amplitude life prediction are discussed.

  13. Loop-quantum-gravity vertex amplitude.

    PubMed

    Engle, Jonathan; Pereira, Roberto; Rovelli, Carlo

    2007-10-19

    Spin foam models are hoped to provide the dynamics of loop-quantum gravity. However, the most popular of these, the Barrett-Crane model, does not have the good boundary state space and there are indications that it fails to yield good low-energy n-point functions. We present an alternative dynamics that can be derived as a quantization of a Regge discretization of Euclidean general relativity, where second class constraints are imposed weakly. Its state space matches the SO(3) loop gravity one and it yields an SO(4)-covariant vertex amplitude for Euclidean loop gravity.

  14. Stochastic aspects of nuclear large amplitude motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomietz, V.M.

    1995-08-01

    A consistent description of the macroscopic large amplitude dynamics and processes of internal excitation of a nucleus is suggested. The cranking model approach is used for the calculation of the response function of the nucleus in a moving frame. Using spectral statistics smearing, the collective mass, friction, and diffusion coefficients are derived. The relation of the response function in a moving frame to the correlation function in a classical chaotic system is established. The rate of dissipation due to the Landau-Zener transitions and through the Kubo mechanism is considered.

  15. Fatigue crack growth under variable amplitude loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidawi, Jihad A.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on an Fe 510 E C-Mn steel and a submerged arc welded joint from the same material under constant, variable, and random loading amplitudes. Paris-Erdogan's crack growth rate law was tested for the evaluation of m and C using the stress intensity factor K, the J-integral, the effective stress intensity factor K(sub eff), and the root mean square stress intensity factor K(sub rms) fracture mechanics concepts. The effect of retardation and residual stresses resulting from welding was also considered. It was found that all concepts gave good life predictions in all cases.

  16. Binaural modulation detection interference.

    PubMed

    Sheft, S; Yost, W A

    1997-09-01

    The ability to detect amplitude modulation (AM) of a tonal probe can be disrupted by the presence of modulated masking tones. Two experiments examined whether a disparity in the interaural parameters of the probe and masker can reduce the amount of interference. In the first experiment, the effects of interaural time and intensity differences were studied in separate sets of conditions. With low-frequency carriers, the detection of 10-Hz probe modulation in the presence of 10-Hz masker modulation was not significantly affected by interaural time differences. With higher-frequency carriers, dichotic stimuli were generated through combinations of diotic, dichotic, or monotic probe and masker presentations in which the probe and masker did not share a common interaural intensity difference. In these conditions, the amount of interference was affected by the interaural configuration. However, monotic level differences between the probe and masker may have contributed to the effect of interaural configuration. In the second experiment, the probe and masker were presented through separate speakers in an enclosed listening environment. Spatial separation between the sources for the probe and masker led to a small reduction in the amount of interference. When the masker modulation rate was varied with the probe AM rate fixed at 10 Hz, the extent of tuning in the modulation domain in the sound-field conditions was similar to that obtained with diotic stimulus presentation over headphones.

  17. Characterization and reduction of the amplitude-to-phase conversion effects in telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, J.; García-Márquez, J.; Alexandre, C.; Truong, D.; Wallerand, J.-P.

    2015-08-01

    We are developing a telemeter based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by an RF sine wave during its propagation in air. This wave is carried by a laser beam by an intensity modulation. The main limitation of this technique lies in amplitude-to-phase conversion occurring in the detection of this modulation. Therefore, we characterize this phenomenon for a given telemetric system and discuss how to reduce its effects on the resolution and the accuracy of the distance measurement. Finally, a solution is implemented and tested outdoors in real conditions of use.

  18. Meridional Flow Variations in Cycles 23 and 24: Active Latitude Control of Sunspot Cycle Amplitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the meridional motions of magnetic elements observed in the photosphere over sunspot cycles 23 and 24 using magnetograms from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. Our measurements confirm the finding of Komm, Howard, and Harvey (1993) that the poleward meridional flow weakens at cycle maxima. Our high spatial and temporal resolution analyses show that this variation is in the form of a superimposed inflow toward the active latitudes. This inflow is weaker in cycle 24 when compared to the inflow in 23, the stronger cycle. This systematic modulation of the meridional flow can modulate the amplitude of the following sunspot cycle through its influence on the Sun's polar fields.

  19. Wrist Proprioception: Amplitude or Position Coding?

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    This work examines physiological mechanisms underlying the position sense of the wrist, namely, the codification of proprioceptive information related to pointing movements of the wrist toward kinesthetic targets. Twenty-four healthy subjects participated to a robot-aided assessment of their wrist proprioceptive acuity to investigate if the sensorimotor transformation involved in matching targets located by proprioceptive receptors relies on amplitude or positional cues. A joint position matching test was performed in order to explore such dichotomy. In this test, the wrist of a blindfolded participant is passively moved by a robotic device to a preset target position and, after a removal movement from this position, the participant has to actively replicate and match it as accurately as possible. The test involved two separate conditions: in the first, the matching movements started from the same initial location; in the second one, the initial location was randomly assigned. Target matching accuracy, precision, and bias in the two conditions were then compared. Overall results showed a consistent higher performance in the former condition than in the latter, thus supporting the hypothesis that the joint position sense is based on vectorial or amplitude coding rather than positional. PMID:27807417

  20. Small-amplitude synchrotron tune near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The separatrices of the rf buckets near transition are mapped when the synchronous phase is neither 0 or {pi}. The small-amplitude synchronous tune is derived when the rf frequency is changed. Synchrotron radiation is present in all electron storage ring. As a result, the synchronous phase is always offset from {phi}{sub s} = {pi} to compensate for the power loss. Even for proton storage rings with negligible synchrotron radiation, the synchronous phase is also required to be offset from {phi}{sub s} = 0 or {pi} slightly to compensate for beam loading. Thus for all storage rings operating near transition, beam particles reside in accelerating buckets instead of stationary bucket. It is of interest to map these buckets and see how they evolve near transition. When the rf frequency is varied, the closed orbit is pushed radially inward or outward. The momentum of the particle synchronous with the rf is thus changed. By measuring the small-amplitude synchrotron tune as a function of the rf frequency, the lowest first few orders of the slip factor can be inferred. Here, we derive this relationship up to the lowest first three orders of the slip factor when the particle velocity is not ultra-relativistic.

  1. Amplitude enhancement by a gold dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xin; Wang, Jingxin; Jin, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    The unique optical properties such as brightness, non-bleaching, good bio-compatibility make gold particles ideal label candidates for molecular probes. Due to the strongly enhanced field, aggregation of gold nanoparticles finds themselves plenty of applications in bio-imaging. But limited by its small cross-section associated with nanometer sized particle, it is a big challenge to employ it in a single molecular detection. The field enhancement results from the effect of plasmonic coupling between two closely attached gold nanoparticle under the right excitation condition. With the aim to apply the gold dimer probe to find the molecules in our recently established optical detection method, we compared of the amplitude enhancement by the dimer relative to a single particle. The amplitude distribution under a highly focused illumination objective was calculated, whose results suggest that at the optimized excitation condition, the local field can be enhanced 190 fold. In consequence, experimental detection was carried out. Gold dimers were linked together by the hybridization of two single chain DNAs. Dimer and single particle probes were mixed together in one detection. Overwhelming contrast between these two kinds of probes were clearly exhibited in the experimental detection image. This method can provide a way to a high specific detection in early diagnosis.

  2. Color-kinematic duality in ABJM theory without amplitude relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Allic

    2017-01-01

    We explicitly show that the Bern-Carrasco-Johansson color-kinematic duality holds at tree level through at least eight points in Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena theory with gauge group SU(N) × SU(N). At six points we give the explicit form of numerators in terms of amplitudes, displaying the generalized gauge freedom that leads to amplitude relations. However, at eight points no amplitude relations follow from the duality, so the diagram numerators are fixed unique functions of partial amplitudes. We provide the explicit amplitude-numerator decomposition and the numerator relations for eight-point amplitudes.

  3. Spurious cross-frequency amplitude-amplitude coupling in nonstationary, nonlinear signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hu, Kun

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies of brain activities show that cross-frequency coupling (CFC) plays an important role in memory and learning. Many measures have been proposed to investigate the CFC phenomenon, including the correlation between the amplitude envelopes of two brain waves at different frequencies - cross-frequency amplitude-amplitude coupling (AAC). In this short communication, we describe how nonstationary, nonlinear oscillatory signals may produce spurious cross-frequency AAC. Utilizing the empirical mode decomposition, we also propose a new method for assessment of AAC that can potentially reduce the effects of nonlinearity and nonstationarity and, thus, help to avoid the detection of artificial AACs. We compare the performances of this new method and the traditional Fourier-based AAC method. We also discuss the strategies to identify potential spurious AACs.

  4. Formulation of Zeeman modulation as a signal filter.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Robert D; Hustedt, Eric J; Beth, Albert H; Robinson, Bruce H

    2004-10-01

    The Bloch equation containing a Zeeman modulation field is solved analytically by treating the Zeeman modulation frequency as a perturbation. The absorption and dispersion signals at both 0 degrees and 90 degrees modulation phase are obtained. The solutions are valid to first order in the modulation frequency, but are otherwise valid for any value of modulation amplitude or microwave amplitude. A first order treatment of modulation frequency is shown to be a valid approximation over a wide range of typical experimental EPR conditions. The solutions derived from the Bloch equation suggest that the effect of over-modulation on first and second harmonic EPR spectra can be formulated as a mathematical filter that smoothes and broadens the under-modulated signal. The only adjustable filter parameter is a width that is equivalent to the applied peak-to-peak modulation amplitude. The true spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation rates are completely determined from the under-modulated spectrum. The filters derived from the analytic solutions of the Bloch equation in the linear limit of modulation frequency are tested against numerical solutions of the Bloch equation that are valid for any modulation frequency to show their applicability. The filters are further tested using experimental EPR spectra. Experimental under-modulated spectra are mathematically filtered and compared with the experimental over-modulated spectra. The application of modulation filters to STEPR spectra is explored and limitations are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of influences of frequency and amplitude on image degradation caused by satellite vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Yi-Bing; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Li-Jun; Zheng, Cheng; Wang, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Satellite vibrations during exposure will lead to pixel aliasing of remote sensors, resulting in the deterioration of image quality. In this paper, we expose the problem and discuss the characteristics of satellite vibrations, and then present a pixel mixing model. The idea of mean mixing ratio (MMR) is proposed. MMR computations for different frequencies are implemented. In the mixing model, a coefficient matrix is introduced to estimate each mixed pixel. Thus, the simulation of degraded image can be performed when the vibration attitudes are known. The computation of MMR takes into consideration the influences of various frequencies and amplitudes. Therefore, the roles of these parameters played in the degradation progress are identified. Computations show that under the same vibration amplitude, the influence of vibrations fluctuates with the variation of frequency. The fluctuation becomes smaller as the frequency rises. Two kinds of vibration imaging experiments are performed: different amplitudes with the same frequency and different frequencies with the same amplitude. Results are found to be in very good agreement with the theoretical results. MMR has a better description of image quality than modulation transfer function (MTF). The influence of vibrations is determined mainly by the amplitude rather than the frequency. The influence of vibrations on image quality becomes gradually stable with the increase of frequency. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB329202) and the Basic Industrial Technology Project of China (Grant No. J312012B002).

  6. Modulation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Bandwidth efficient digital modulation techniques, proposed for use on and/or applied to satellite channels, are reviewed. In a survey of recent works on digital modulation techniques, the performance of several schemes operating in various environments are compared. Topics covered include: (1) quadrature phase shift keying; (2) offset - QPSK and MSK; (3) combined modulation and coding; and (4) spectrally efficient modulation techniques.

  7. Solitary Alfven wave envelopes and the modulational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, C.F.

    1987-06-01

    The derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation describes the modulational instability of circularly polarized dispersive Alfven wave envelopes. It also may be used to determine the properties of finite amplitude localized stationary wave envelopes. Such envelope solitons exist only in conditions of modulational stability. This leaves open the question of whether, and if so, how, the modulational instability produces envelope solitons. 12 refs.

  8. Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnov, Oksana; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Three existing and two new excitation magnitude scaling options for active separation control at Reynolds numbers below one Million. The physical background for the scaling options was discussed and their relevance was evaluated using two different sets of experimental data. For F+ approx. 1, 2D excitation: a) The traditional VR and C(mu) - do not scale the data. b) Only the Re*C(mu) is valid. This conclusion is also limited for positive lift increment.. For F+ > 10, 3D excitation, the Re corrected C(mu), the St corrected velocity ratio and the vorticity flux coefficient, all scale the amplitudes equally well. Therefore, the Reynolds weighted C(mu) is the preferred choice, relevant to both excitation modes. Incidence also considered, using Ue from local Cp.

  9. Evaluation of new spin foam vertex amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavkine, Igor

    2009-06-01

    The Christensen-Egan algorithm is extended and generalized to efficiently evaluate new spin foam vertex amplitudes proposed by Engle, Pereira and Rovelli and Freidel and Krasnov, with or without (factored) boundary states. A concrete pragmatic proposal is made for comparing the different models using uniform methodologies, applicable to the behavior of large spin asymptotics and of expectation values of specific semiclassical observables. The asymptotics of the new models exhibit non-oscillatory, power-law decay similar to that of the Barrett-Crane model, though with different exponents. Also, an analysis of the semiclassical wave packet propagation problem indicates that the Magliaro, Rovelli and Perini's conjecture of good semiclassical behavior of the new models does not hold for generic factored states, which neglect spin-spin correlations.

  10. Low Amplitude Impact of Damaged PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idar, Deanne

    1999-06-01

    Low amplitude impact tests on damaged, baseline and aged, PBX 9501 specimens have been performed to determine the critical impact-velocity threshold for violent reaction. Tests were performed using 3.0-in. diameter, 2 kg. mild-steel projectiles launched from a spigot gun at lightly confined modified Steven targets. Prior damage on the seven targets was induced by a single impact ranging in velocity from 36.9 to 52.7 m/s. External blast gauge data were coupled with ballistic pendulum data to evaluate the level of reaction violence relative to a steady-state detonation. Strain gage data were used to evaluate the response of the explosive to impact and characterize subsequent reaction profiles. The effect of PBX 9501 lots, age, and prior level of damage on threshold behavior will be discussed and compared to single impact test results.

  11. Bootstrapping an NMHV amplitude through three loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Lance J.; von Hippel, Matt

    2014-10-01

    We extend the hexagon function bootstrap to the next-to-maximally-helicity-violating (NMHV) configuration for six-point scattering in planar = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory at three loops. Constraints from the differential equation, from the operator product expansion (OPE) for Wilson loops with operator insertions, and from multi-Regge factorization, lead to a unique answer for the three-loop ratio function. The three-loop result also predicts additional terms in the OPE expansion, as well as the behavior of NMHV amplitudes in the multi-Regge limit at one higher logarithmic accuracy (NNLL) than was used as input. Both predictions are in agreement with recent results from the flux-tube approach. We also study the multi-particle factorization of multi-loop amplitudes for the first time. We find that the function controlling this factorization is purely logarithmic through three loops. We show that a function U , which is closely related to the parity-even part of the ratio function V , is remarkably simple; only five of the nine possible final entries in its symbol are non-vanishing. We study the analytic and numerical behavior of both the parity-even and parity-odd parts of the ratio function on simple lines traversing the space of cross ratios ( u, v, w), as well as on a few two-dimensional planes. Finally, we present an empirical formula for V in terms of elements of the coproduct of the six-gluon MHV remainder function R 6 at one higher loop, which works through three loops for V (four loops for R 6).

  12. Amplitudes of Bernstein waves transmitted in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Gordon

    Bernstein or electron-cyclotron waves (ECWs) were transmitted over magnetic-field-aligned sep-arations of hundreds of metres in the OEDIPUS-C (OC) sounding-rocket experiment. Signals were observed at harmonic frequencies nfc of the electron cyclotron frequency fc, where n was 2, 3, and 4, fc 1.25 MHz, and the electron plasma frequency was less than half of fc. Historically, ECW propagation was first conceived as perpendicular to the magnetic induction field B0. In the present low-density conditions, solutions of the full electromagnetic hot-plasma dispersion relation show that undamped ray directions exist from perpendicular to B0 to within about 1 degree of the B0 axis. It was thus possible for ECW propagation to link the OC emitter and receiver directly. Hot-plasma theoretical signal delays of the order of 1 ms for emitter-receiver separations of a few hundred metres agree with observations for frequencies in the 2fc band. The received signals of the second-harmonic ECWs exhibited distinct amplitude modulation with spin orientation of both the emitting and receiving subpayloads. The electric fields ra-diated by the emitting dipoles have been computed from the inhomogeneous Maxwell wave equation. Using the electromagnetic hot-plasma theory to evaluate the relative permittivity tensor, a Green's function has been derived, based partly on numerical inversion and facilitated by simplifications possible with the given frequency and plasma parameters. Under the as-sumption of straight-line rays, it is found that: a) the observed voltage modulation has a more complicated shape than expected from the dipole directionality alone; and, b) the computed absolute voltage levels induced on the receiving dipoles are of the same order of magnitude as the observed levels.

  13. Compositions of bosonic string amplitudes with cylinder topology

    SciTech Connect

    Trisnadi, J.I.

    1989-01-01

    Many issues in string theory are conveniently addressed and handled in a quantum fleld theoretical framework, from which Feynman rules can then be derived. Although at present a generally acceptable quantum field theory of closed strings does not yet exist, the Feynman rules are known. This is due to another development in string theory, namely, the Polyakov path integral approach. In this approach, scattering amplitudes are calculated directly without appealing to the quantum fleld theoretical description. It is therefore important to examine if the scattering amplitude can be reconstructed by composing propagators and vertices. In general, the author is interested in knowing if Polyakov amplitudes can be consistently composed. Composition of amplitudes in general has been studied formally. Explicit composition, however, is limited to amplitudes that have been calculated explicitly. Among them is the amplitude with cylinder topology. In this dissertation, the author will rederive this cylinder amplitude. The author uses the action principle in the evaluation of the path integral. This way, the contributions of the ghost zero modes, which are usually introduced by hand, come out automatically. Then, the author studies three compositions of the cylinder amplitude: two cylinder amplitudes into one, a single cylinder amplitude into a torus amplitude, and a cylinder amplitude into a Klein-bottle amplitude. The author shows that the resulting amplitudes agree with known results. Using the cylinder amplitude, the author also demonstrates the derivation of the (imaginary time) Schrodinger equation for the free closed bosonic string. Finally, the author applies the techniques to derive the composable transition amplitude of gravity in a Friedmann-RobertsonWalker cosmology.

  14. Chiral closed strings: four massless states scattering amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Marcelo M.; Siegel, Warren

    2017-01-01

    We compute the scattering amplitudes of four massless states for chiral (closed) bosonic and type II superstrings using the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye ( KLT ) factorization method. The amplitude in the chiral bosonic case is identical to a field theory amplitude corresponding to the spin-2 tachyon, massless gravitational sector and massive spin-2 tardyon states of the spectrum. Chiral type II superstrings amplitude only possess poles associated with the massless gravitational sector. We briefly discuss the extension of the calculation to heterotic superstrings.

  15. 47 CFR 73.1570 - Modulation levels: AM, FM, TV and Class A TV aural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1570 Modulation... amplitude modulation of the carrier wave exceed 100% on negative peaks of frequent recurrence, or 125%...

  16. 47 CFR 73.1570 - Modulation levels: AM, FM, TV and Class A TV aural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1570 Modulation... amplitude modulation of the carrier wave exceed 100% on negative peaks of frequent recurrence, or 125%...

  17. 47 CFR 73.1570 - Modulation levels: AM, FM, TV and Class A TV aural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1570 Modulation... amplitude modulation of the carrier wave exceed 100% on negative peaks of frequent recurrence, or 125%...

  18. 47 CFR 73.1570 - Modulation levels: AM, FM, TV and Class A TV aural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1570 Modulation... amplitude modulation of the carrier wave exceed 100% on negative peaks of frequent recurrence, or 125%...

  19. 47 CFR 73.1570 - Modulation levels: AM, FM, TV and Class A TV aural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1570 Modulation... amplitude modulation of the carrier wave exceed 100% on negative peaks of frequent recurrence, or 125%...

  20. Modulation of whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon', V. P.; Bogdanov, V. V.; Druzhin, G. I.; Cherneva, N. V.; Kubyshkin, A. V.; Sannikov, D. V.; Agranat, I. V.

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of the experimental data obtained at Paratunka observatory (53.02° N, 158.65° E; L = 2.3) has revealed a nonstandard form of whistlers involving spectral lines that are symmetric with respect to the whistler. We have shown that this form is most likely due to the amplitude modulation of whistlers by electromagnetic pulses with a length of around 1 s and carrier frequency of around 1.1 kHz. We have suggested that these pulses could be emitted by the auroral electrojet modified by heating radiation from the HAARP facility (62.30° N, 145.30° W; L > 4.2).

  1. Leading Wave Amplitude of a Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, U.

    2015-12-01

    Okal and Synolakis (EGU General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts-Vol. 17-7622) recently discussed that why the maximum amplitude of a tsunami might not occur for the first wave. Okal and Synolakis list observations from 2011 Japan tsunami, which reached to Papeete, Tahiti with a fourth wave being largest and 72 min later after the first wave; 1960 Chilean tsunami reached Hilo, Hawaii with a maximum wave arriving 1 hour later with a height of 5m, first wave being only 1.2m. Largest later waves is a problem not only for local authorities both in terms of warning to the public and rescue efforts but also mislead the public thinking that it is safe to return shoreline or evacuated site after arrival of the first wave. Okal and Synolakis considered Hammack's (1972, Ph.D. Dissertation, Calif. Inst. Tech., 261 pp., Pasadena) linear dispersive analytical solution with a tsunami generation through an uplifting of a circular plug on the ocean floor. They performed parametric study for the radius of the plug and the depth of the ocean since these are the independent scaling lengths in the problem. They identified transition distance, as the second wave being larger, regarding the parameters of the problem. Here, we extend their analysis to an initial wave field with a finite crest length and, in addition, to a most common tsunami initial wave form of N-wave as presented by Tadepalli and Synolakis (1994, Proc. R. Soc. A: Math. Phys. Eng. Sci., 445, 99-112). We compare our results with non-dispersive linear shallow water wave results as presented by Kanoglu et al. (2013, Proc. R. Soc. A: Math. Phys. Eng. Sci., 469, 20130015), investigating focusing feature. We discuss the results both in terms of leading wave amplitude and tsunami focusing. Acknowledgment: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no 603839 (Project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy and Risk

  2. 16-QAM optical packet switching and real-time self-homodyne detection using polarization-multiplexed pilot-carrier.

    PubMed

    Shinada, Satoshi; Nakamura, Moriya; Kamio, Yukiyoshi; Wada, Naoya

    2012-12-10

    We demonstrated 20-Gbit/s 16 quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) optical packet switching and real-time detection using self-homodyne. A prototype modulator consisting of an in-phase and quadrature (I-Q) modulator and monolithically integrated polarization beam splitters generated modulated signals and polarization-multiplexed pilot-carriers simultaneously. Self-homodyne detection using the pilot-carrier was resilient to phase noise and self-phase modulation, and the constellation was obtained in real time without digital signal processing. A low-polarization-dependent (Pb,La)(Zr,La)O(3) (PLZT) optical switch in the optical packet switch handled both 16-QAM optical packets and the polarization multiplexed pilot-carrier. Even after packet switching, a clear constellation diagram was obtained, and error-free operation was confirmed in real-time using a packet bit-error rate tester (BERT).

  3. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOEpatents

    Yu, D.U.L.; Conway, P.H.

    1994-11-15

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system. 11 figs.

  4. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.; Conway, Patrick H.

    1994-01-01

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The Phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system.

  5. Joint amplitude and frequency demodulation analysis based on local mean decomposition for fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Zuo, Ming J.; Qu, Jian; Tian, Tao; Liu, Zhiliang

    2013-10-01

    The vibration signals of faulty planetary gearboxes have complicated spectral structures due to the amplitude modulation and frequency modulation (AMFM) nature of gear damage induced vibration and the additional multiplicative amplitude modulation (AM) effect caused by the time-varying vibration transfer paths (for local gear damage case) and the passing planets (for distributed gear damage case). The spectral complexity leads to the difficulty in fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes. Observing that both the amplitude envelope and the instantaneous frequency of planetary gearbox vibration signals are associated with the characteristic frequency of the faulty gear, a joint amplitude and frequency demodulation method is proposed for fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes. In order to satisfy the mono-component requirement by instantaneous frequency estimation, a signal is firstly decomposed into product functions (PF) using the local mean decomposition (LMD) method. Then, the earliest extracted PF that has an instantaneous frequency fluctuating around the gear meshing frequency or its harmonics is chosen for further analysis, because it contains most of the information about the gear fault. The amplitude demodulation analysis can be accomplished through Fourier transforming the amplitude envelope of the chosen PF. For the frequency demodulation analysis, Fourier transform is applied to the estimated instantaneous frequency of the chosen PF to reveal its fluctuating frequency, thus obtaining the spectrum of the instantaneous frequency. By joint application of the amplitude and frequency demodulation methods, planetary gearbox faults can be diagnosed by matching the dominant peaks in the envelope spectrum and the spectrum of instantaneous frequency with the theoretical characteristic frequencies of faulty gears. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated by simulated signal analysis, and is validated by experimental signal analysis of a lab planetary

  6. Simultaneous shaping of amplitude and phase of light in the entire output plane with a phase-only hologram

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Cheng, Shubo; Tao, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    An iterative beam shaping algorithm is proposed to simultaneously shape the amplitude and phase of an optical beam. The proposed algorithm consists of one input plane and two completely overlapped output planes which refer to the output plane in real space. The two output planes are imposed with both amplitude and phase constraints, and the constrained areas in the two output planes are complementary. As a result, both the amplitude and phase in the entire output plane are controllable and arbitrary target complex amplitudes can be achieved with the proposed algorithm. The computing result of the proposed algorithm is a phase-only distribution which can be conveniently realized with a spatial light modulator or a fabricated diffractive optical element. Both simulations and experiments have verified the high performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26486183

  7. Amplitude interpretation and visualization of three-dimensional reflection data

    SciTech Connect

    Enachescu, M.E. )

    1994-07-01

    Digital recording and processing of modern three-dimensional surveys allow for relative good preservation and correct spatial positioning of seismic reflection amplitude. A four-dimensional seismic reflection field matrix R (x,y,t,A), which can be computer visualized (i.e., real-time interactively rendered, edited, and animated), is now available to the interpreter. The amplitude contains encoded geological information indirectly related to lithologies and reservoir properties. The magnitude of the amplitude depends not only on the acoustic impedance contrast across a boundary, but is also strongly affected by the shape of the reflective boundary. This allows the interpreter to image subtle tectonic and structural elements not obvious on time-structure maps. The use of modern workstations allows for appropriate color coding of the total available amplitude range, routine on-screen time/amplitude extraction, and late display of horizon amplitude maps (horizon slices) or complex amplitude-structure spatial visualization. Stratigraphic, structural, tectonic, fluid distribution, and paleogeographic information are commonly obtained by displaying the amplitude variation A = A(x,y,t) associated with a particular reflective surface or seismic interval. As illustrated with several case histories, traditional structural and stratigraphic interpretation combined with a detailed amplitude study generally greatly enhance extraction of subsurface geological information from a reflection data volume. In the context of three-dimensional seismic surveys, the horizon amplitude map (horizon slice), amplitude attachment to structure and [open quotes]bright clouds[close quotes] displays are very powerful tools available to the interpreter.

  8. Efficient reverse time migration with amplitude encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiangtao; Wang, Huazhong; Zhao, Lei; Shao, Yu; Wang, Meixia; Osen, Are

    2015-08-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is an accurate seismic imaging method for imaging the complex subsurface structure. Traditional common shot RTM suffers from low efficiency due to the large number of single shot gathers, especially for marine seismic data. Phase encoding is commonly used to reduce the computational cost of RTM. Phase encoding in the frequency domain is usually related to time shift in the time domain. Therefore, phase-encoding-based RTM needs time padding to avoid information loss which degrades the efficiency of the time-domain wavefield extrapolator. In this paper, an efficient time-domain RTM scheme based on the amplitude encoding is proposed. This scheme uses the orthogonal cosine basis as the encoding function, which has similar physical meaning to plane wave encoding (i.e. plane-wave components with different surface shooting angles). The proposed scheme can generate a qualified imaging result as well as common shot RTM but with less computational cost. Since this scheme does not need time padding, it is more efficient than the phase encoding schemes and can be conveniently implemented in the time domain. Numerical examples on the Sigsbee2a synthetic dataset demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  9. Nonlinear amplitude dynamics in flagellar beating

    PubMed Central

    Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    The physical basis of flagellar and ciliary beating is a major problem in biology which is still far from completely understood. The fundamental cytoskeleton structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, a cylindrical array of microtubule doublets connected by passive cross-linkers and dynein motor proteins. The complex interplay of these elements leads to the generation of self-organized bending waves. Although many mathematical models have been proposed to understand this process, few attempts have been made to assess the role of dyneins on the nonlinear nature of the axoneme. Here, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of flagella by considering an axonemal sliding control mechanism for dynein activity. This approach unveils the nonlinear selection of the oscillation amplitudes, which are typically either missed or prescribed in mathematical models. The explicit set of nonlinear equations are derived and solved numerically. Our analysis reveals the spatio-temporal dynamics of dynein populations and flagellum shape for different regimes of motor activity, medium viscosity and flagellum elasticity. Unstable modes saturate via the coupling of dynein kinetics and flagellum shape without the need of invoking a nonlinear axonemal response. Hence, our work reveals a novel mechanism for the saturation of unstable modes in axonemal beating.

  10. Modulation Index Adjustment for Recovery of Pure Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy Second Harmonic Signal Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Chang, Jun; Wang, Qiang; Qin, Zengguang

    2017-01-01

    A new technique of modulation index adjustment for pure wavelength modulation spectroscopy second harmonic signal waveforms recovery is presented. As the modulation index is a key parameter in determining the exact form of the signals generated by the technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy, the method of modulation index adjustment is applied to recover the second harmonic signal with wavelength modulation spectroscopy. By comparing the measured profile with the theoretical profile by calculation, the relationship between the modulation index and average quantities of the scanning wavelength can be obtained. Furthermore, when the relationship is applied in the experimental setup by point-by-point modulation index modification for gas detection, the results show good agreement with the theoretical profile and signal waveform distortion (such as the amplitude modulation effect caused by diode laser) can be suppressed. Besides, the method of modulation index adjustment can be used in many other aspects which involve profile improvement. In practical applications, when the amplitude modulation effect can be neglected and the stability of the detection system is limited by the sampling rate of analog-to-digital, modulation index adjustment can be used to improve detection into softer inflection points and solve the insufficient sampling problem. As a result, measurement stability is improved by 40%. PMID:28098842

  11. Optimizing binary phase and amplitude filters for PCE, SNR, and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Binary phase-only filters (BPOFs) have generated much study because of their implementation on currently available spatial light modulator devices. On polarization-rotating devices such as the magneto-optic spatial light modulator (SLM), it is also possible to encode binary amplitude information into two SLM transmission states, in addition to the binary phase information. This is done by varying the rotation angle of the polarization analyzer following the SLM in the optical train. Through this parameter, a continuum of filters may be designed that span the space of binary phase and amplitude filters (BPAFs) between BPOFs and binary amplitude filters. In this study, we investigate the design of optimal BPAFs for the key correlation characteristics of peak sharpness (through the peak-to-correlation energy (PCE) metric), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and discrimination between in-class and out-of-class images. We present simulation results illustrating improvements obtained over conventional BPOFs, and trade-offs between the different performance criteria in terms of the filter design parameter.

  12. Theoretical and numerical studies of density modulated whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2004-09-01

    Recently, observations from laboratory experiments, which are relevant to space observations as well, have conclusively revealed the amplitude modulation of whistlers by low-frequency perturbations. Our objective here is to present theoretical and simulation studies of amplitude modulated whistler packets on account of their interaction with background low-frequency density perturbations that are reinforced by the whistler ponderomotive force. Specifically, we show that nonlinear interactions between whistlers and finite amplitude density perturbations are governed by a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the modulated whistlers, and a set of equations for arbitrary large amplitude density perturbations in the presence of the whistler ponderomotive force. The governing equations are solved numerically to show the existence of large scale density perturbations that are self-consistently created by localized modulated whistler wavepackets. Our numerical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental results, as well as have relevance to observations from magnetized space plasmas.

  13. Obliquity Modulation of the Incoming Solar Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han-Shou; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Based on a basic principle of orbital resonance, we have identified a huge deficit of solar radiation induced by the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity as possibly the causal mechanism for ice age glaciation. Including this modulation effect on solar radiation, we have performed model simulations of climate change for the past 2 million years. Simulation results show that: (1) For the past 1 million years, temperature fluctuation cycles were dominated by a 100-Kyr period due to amplitude-frequency resonance effect of the obliquity; (2) From 2 to 1 million years ago, the amplitude-frequency interactions. of the obliquity were so weak that they were not able to stimulate a resonance effect on solar radiation; (3) Amplitude and frequency modulation analysis on solar radiation provides a series of resonance in the incoming solar radiation which may shift the glaciation cycles from 41-Kyr to 100-Kyr about 0.9 million years ago. These results are in good agreement with the marine and continental paleoclimate records. Thus, the proposed climate response to the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity may be the key to understanding the glaciation puzzles in paleoclimatology.

  14. Amplitude- and Velocity-Dependency of Rigidity Measured at the Wrist in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Douglas; Threlkeld, A. Joseph; Fang, Xiang; Muthumani, Anburaj; Xia, Rui-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Objective Quantify the effects of increased amplitude and rate of muscle stretch on parkinsonian rigidity. Methods Eighteen subjects with Parkinson’s disease participated in this study. Subjects’ tested hand was passively displaced through 60° and 90° ranges of wrist flexion and extension at velocities of 50°/s and 280°/s in both treated and untreated conditions. Joint angular position, resistance torque, and surface electromyography (EMG) of the wrist flexors and extensors were recorded. Rigidity was quantified by normalized work scores and normalized angular impulses for flexion and extension, separately. Reflex responses of stretched and shortened muscles were quantified by mean EMG and EMG ratio. A series of ANOVAs was performed to determine the effect of amplitude, velocity and medication on selected variables. Results Both work scores and angular impulses revealed that the larger displacement amplitude and the higher velocity were associated with significantly greater rigidity, increased EMG ratio and mean EMG of stretched muscles. Dopaminergic medication was not associated with a reduction in rigidity. Conclusions Parkinsonian rigidity is modulated by the amplitude and rate of muscle stretch. Significance These findings shed light on the biomechanical underpinnings and physiological characteristics of rigidity and may inform clinical rigidity assessment in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:21890404

  15. Achieving modulated oscillations by feedback control.

    PubMed

    Ge, Tian; Tian, Xiaoying; Kurths, Jürgen; Feng, Jianfeng; Lin, Wei

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach to achieve either frequency or amplitude modulation of an oscillator merely through feedback control. We present and implement a unified theory of our approach for any finite-dimensional continuous dynamical system that exhibits oscillatory behavior. The approach is illustrated not only for the normal forms of dynamical systems but also for representative biological models, such as the isolated and coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of our approach to uncover the mechanisms of frequency and amplitude modulations experimentally observed in a wide range of real systems.

  16. Achieving modulated oscillations by feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Tian; Tian, Xiaoying; Kurths, Jürgen; Feng, Jianfeng; Lin, Wei

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach to achieve either frequency or amplitude modulation of an oscillator merely through feedback control. We present and implement a unified theory of our approach for any finite-dimensional continuous dynamical system that exhibits oscillatory behavior. The approach is illustrated not only for the normal forms of dynamical systems but also for representative biological models, such as the isolated and coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of our approach to uncover the mechanisms of frequency and amplitude modulations experimentally observed in a wide range of real systems.

  17. Pressure Modulated Sonic Jet in Supersonic Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossmann, Tobias

    2014-11-01

    Sonic transverse jets in supersonic crossflow are modulated using high-amplitude variations in jet stagnation pressure to enhance jet penetration and mixing. An injection/modulation apparatus combining a powered resonance tube and acoustic resonator is used to create low momentum ratio jets (J = 1 , 2) in a supersonic cross-stream (M = 3 . 5). The injector has the capability to modulate the jet supply pressure at sufficiently high frequency (> 15 kHz) and amplitude (up to 190 dB) to access relevant Strouhal numbers (St = 0 - 0 . 3) and amplitudes (up to 10% of the jet stagnation pressure) related to mixing enhancement. Planar laser Mie scattering in both side and end views allows for instantaneous imaging of the jet fluid to quantify jet trajectory, spread, and mixing behavior. For modulated J = 2 transverse jets, the recirculation zone directly downstream of the injection location is eliminated and significantly faster centerline signal decay rates are seen. For the J = 1 modulated jets, substantial increases in centerline penetration, jet spread, and centerline signal decay rate are shown. Additionally, PDF analysis of the instantaneous jet fluid signal values is performed to compare local mixing efficiencies between the modulated and un-modulated cases.

  18. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  19. Image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-bin; Wu, Zhi-qun; Zhu, Jian-ping; He, Jian-guo; Liu, Guang-min

    2013-10-01

    The paper proposes a method to measure vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn which is a very important component in the spindle for micro-electrical-chemical discharging machining. The method of image measuring amplitude on high frequency vibration is introduced. Non-contact measurement system based on vision technology is constructed. High precision location algorithm on image centroid, quadratic location algorithm, is presented to find the center of little light spot. Measurement experiments have been done to show the effect of image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn. In the experiments, precise calibration of the vision system is implemented using a normal graticule to obtain the scale factor between image pixel and real distance. The vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn is changed by modifying the voltage amplitude of pulse power supply. The image of feature on ultrasonic horn is captured and image processing is carried out. The vibration amplitudes are got at different voltages.

  20. N >= 4 Supergravity Amplitudes from Gauge Theory at One Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.; Boucher-Veronneau, C.; Johansson, H.; /Saclay

    2011-08-19

    We expose simple and practical relations between the integrated four- and five-point one-loop amplitudes of N {ge} 4 supergravity and the corresponding (super-)Yang-Mills amplitudes. The link between the amplitudes is simply understood using the recently uncovered duality between color and kinematics that leads to a double-copy structure for gravity. These examples provide additional direct confirmations of the duality and double-copy properties at loop level for a sample of different theories.