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Sample records for 16-row ct scanner

  1. A method for benchmarking CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Al-Farsi, A; Michael, G; Thiele, D

    2005-09-01

    This study involved the development of an objective method to compare the performance of five CT scanners for the purpose of benchmarking. The method used to assess the scanners was to determine the dose-normalised noise at a spatial resolution of 5.5 cm(-1). This gave a dose-normalised percent noise between 0.37% and 0.76%. The scanners were also assessed for radiation dose to patients undergoing abdomen and head CT examinations. Patients' dose-length product (DLP) for the abdomen clinical examinations varied from 305 to 685 mGy-cm, and for the head clinical examinations from 333 to 900 mGy-cm. The study results demonstrated that the comparison of dose and spatial resolution normalised percent noise levels is a useful method of comparing CT scanner performance.

  2. CT densitometry of the lungs: Scanner performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kemerink, G.J.; Lamers, R.J.S.; Thelissen, G.R.P.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to establish the reproducibility and accuracy of the CT scanner in densitometry of the lungs. Scanner stability was assessed by analysis of daily quality checks. Studies using a humanoid phantom and polyethylene foams for lung were performed to measure reproducibility and accuracy. The dependence of the CT-estimated density on reconstruction filter, zoom factor, slice thickness, table height, data truncation, and objects outside the scan field was determined. Stability of the system at air density was within {approx}1 HU and at water density within {approx}2 HU. Reproducibility and accuracy for densities found for lung were within 2-3%. Dependence on the acquisition and reconstruction parameters was neglible, with the exceptions of the ultra high resolution reconstruction algorithm in the case of emphysema, and objects outside the scan field. The performance of the CT scanner tested is quite adequate for densitometry of the lungs. 26 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. PET/CT scanner instrumentation, challenges, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E; Cheng, Phillip M; Vesselle, Hubert; Karp, Joel S

    2004-11-01

    PET/CT scanners offer a hardware solution for aligning and viewing functional and anatomic images that is immune to many of the errors in strictly software registration techniques. Moreover, PET attenuation-corrected emission scans benefit from the use of the onboard CT for fast, low-noise attenuation correction. Along with the significant improved localization and reduced acquisition time, PET/CT scanners also introduce new instrumentation challenges ranging from patient movement to quantitative attenuation correction. This article provides an overview of current PET/CT scanner technology, a discussion of challenges faced by these systems, and pending solutions.

  4. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  5. PET/CT scanners: a hardware approach to image fusion.

    PubMed

    Townsend, David W; Beyer, Thomas; Blodgett, Todd M

    2003-07-01

    New technology that combines positron tomography with x-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) is available from all major vendors of PET imaging equipment: CTI, Siemens, GE, Philips. Although not all vendors have made the same design choices as those described in this review all have in common that their high performance design places a commercial CT scanner in tandem with a commercial PET scanner. The level of physical integration is actually less than that of the original prototype design where the CT and PET components were mounted on the same rotating support. There will undoubtedly be a demand for PET/CT technology with a greater level of integration, and at a reduced cost. This may be achieved through the design of a scanner specifically for combined anatomical and functional imaging, rather than a design combining separate CT and PET scanners, as in the current approaches. By avoiding the duplication of data acquisition and image reconstruction functions, for example, a more integrated design should also allow cost savings over current commercial PET/CT scanners. The goal is then to design and build a device specifically for imaging the function and anatomy of cancer in the most optimal and effective way, without conceptualizing it as combined PET and CT. The development of devices specifically for imaging a particular disease (eg, cancer) differs from the conventional approach of, for example, an all-purpose anatomical imaging device such as a CT scanner. This new concept targets more of a disease management approach rather than the usual division into the medical specialties of radiology (anatomical imaging) and nuclear medicine (functional imaging). PMID:12931321

  6. CT scanner x-ray spectrum estimation from transmission measurements

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In diagnostic CT imaging, multiple important applications depend on the knowledge of the x-ray spectrum, including Monte Carlo dose calculations and dual-energy material decomposition analysis. Due to the high photon flux involved, it is difficult to directly measure spectra from the x-ray tube of a CT scanner. One potential method for indirect measurement involves estimating the spectrum from transmission measurements. The expectation maximization (EM) method is an accurate and robust method to solve this problem. In this article, this method was evaluated in a commercial CT scanner. Methods: Two step-wedges (polycarbonate and aluminum) were used to produce different attenuation levels. Transmission measurements were performed on the scanner and the measured data from the scanner were exported to an external computer to calculate the spectra. The EM method was applied to solve the equations that represent the attenuation processes of polychromatic x-ray photons. Estimated spectra were compared to the spectra simulated using a software provided by the manufacturer of the scanner. To test the accuracy of the spectra, a verification experiment was performed using a phantom containing different depths of water. The measured transmission data were compared to the transmission values calculated using the estimated spectra. Results: Spectra of 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp from a dual-source CT scanner were estimated. The estimated and simulated spectra were well matched. The differences of mean energies were less than 1 keV. In the verification experiment, the measured and calculated transmission values were in excellent agreement. Conclusions: Spectrum estimation using transmission data and the EM method is a quantitatively accurate and robust technique to estimate the spectrum of a CT system. This method could benefit studies relying on accurate knowledge of the x-ray spectra from CT scanner. PMID:21452736

  7. Development of a Head Scanner for Proton CT

    PubMed Central

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Johnson, R. P.; Macafee, S.; Plumb, A.; Steinberg, D.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Hurley, V. Bashkirov, F.; Schulte, R.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new head scanner developed for Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) in support of proton therapy treatment planning, aiming at reconstructing an accurate map of the stopping power (S.P.) in a phantom and, in the future, in patients. The system consists of two silicon telescopes which track the proton before and after the phantom/patient, and an energy detector which measures the residual energy or range of the proton to reconstruct the Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) in the phantom. Based on the experience of the existing prototype and extensive Geant4 simulations and CT reconstructions, the new pCT scanner will support clinically useful proton fluxes. PMID:23264711

  8. Development of a head scanner for proton CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Johnson, R. P.; Macafee, S.; Plumb, A.; Steinberg, D.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Bashkirov, V. A.; Hurley, R. F.; Schulte, R. W.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new head scanner developed for Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) in support of proton therapy treatment planning, aiming at reconstructing an accurate map of the stopping power (S.P.) in a phantom and, in the future, in patients. The system consists of two silicon telescopes which track the proton before and after the phantom/patient, and an energy detector which measures the residual energy or range of the proton to reconstruct the Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) in the phantom. Based on the experience of the existing prototype and extensive Geant4 simulations and CT reconstructions, the new pCT scanner will support clinically useful proton fluxes.

  9. Development of a 3D CT scanner using cone beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masahiro; Kamagata, Nozomu; Sato, Kazumasa; Hattori, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Shigeo; Mizuno, Shinichi; Jimbo, Masao; Kusakabe, Masahiro

    1995-05-01

    In order to acquire 3D data of high contrast objects such as bone, lung and vessels enhanced by contrast media for use in 3D image processing, we have developed a 3D CT-scanner using cone beam x ray. The 3D CT-scanner consists of a gantry and a patient couch. The gantry consists of an x-ray tube designed for cone beam CT and a large area two-dimensional detector mounted on a single frame and rotated around an object in 12 seconds. The large area detector consists of a fluorescent plate and a charge coupled device video camera. The size of detection area was 600 mm X 450 mm capable of covering the total chest. While an x-ray tube was rotated around an object, pulsed x ray was exposed 30 times a second and 360 projected images were collected in a 12 second scan. A 256 X 256 X 256 matrix image (1.25 mm X 1.25 mm X 1.25 mm voxel) was reconstructed by a high-speed reconstruction engine. Reconstruction time was approximately 6 minutes. Cylindrical water phantoms, anesthetized rabbits with or without contrast media, and a Japanese macaque were scanned with the 3D CT-scanner. The results seem promising because they show high spatial resolution in three directions, though there existed several point to be improved. Possible improvements are discussed.

  10. PIXSCAN: Pixel detector CT-scanner for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpierre, P.; Debarbieux, F.; Basolo, S.; Berar, J. F.; Bonissent, A.; Boudet, N.; Breugnon, P.; Caillot, B.; Cassol Brunner, F.; Chantepie, B.; Clemens, J. C.; Dinkespiler, B.; Khouri, R.; Koudobine, I.; Mararazzo, V.; Meessen, C.; Menouni, M.; Morel, C.; Mouget, C.; Pangaud, P.; Peyrin, F.; Rougon, G.; Sappey-Marinier, D.; Valton, S.; Vigeolas, E.

    2007-02-01

    The PIXSCAN is a small animal CT-scanner based on hybrid pixel detectors. These detectors provide very large dynamic range of photons counting at very low detector noise. They also provide high counting rates with fast image readout. Detection efficiency can be optimized by selecting the sensor medium according to the working energy range. Indeed, the use of CdTe allows a detection efficiency of 100% up to 50 keV. Altogether these characteristics are expected to improve the contrast of the CT-scanner, especially for soft tissues, and to reduce both the scan duration and the absorbed dose. A proof of principle has been performed by assembling into a PIXSCAN-XPAD2 prototype the photon counting pixel detector initially built for detection of X-ray synchrotron radiations. Despite the relatively large pixel size of this detector (330×330 μm 2), we can present three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of mice at good contrast and spatial resolution. A new photon counting chip (XPAD3) is designed in sub-micronique technology to achieve 130×130 μm 2 pixels. This improved circuit has been equipped with an energy selection circuit to act as a band-pass emission filter. Furthermore, the PIXSCAN-XPAD3 hybrid pixel detectors will be combined with the Lausanne ClearPET scanner demonstrator. CT image reconstruction in this non-conventional geometry is under study for this purpose.

  11. Operation of the preclinical head scanner for proton CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Geoghegan, T.; Harvey, E.; Johnson, R. P.; Plautz, T. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Hurley, R. F.; Piersimoni, P.; Schulte, R. W.; Karbasi, P.; Schubert, K. E.; Schultze, B.; Giacometti, V.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the operation and performance tests of a preclinical head scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT). After extensive preclinical testing, pCT is intended to be employed in support of proton therapy treatment planning and pre-treatment verification in patients undergoing particle-beam therapy. In order to assess the performance of the scanner, we have performed CT scans with 200 MeV protons from both the synchrotron of the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) and the cyclotron of the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center (NMCPC). The very high sustained rate of data acquisition, exceeding one million protons per second, allowed a full 360° scan to be completed in less than 7 min. The reconstruction of various phantoms verified accurate reconstruction of the proton relative stopping power (RSP) and the spatial resolution in a variety of materials. The dose for an image with better than 1% uncertainty in the RSP is found to be close to 1 mGy.

  12. An evaluation of a prototype proton CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plautz, Tia Elizabeth

    Since the 1990s, the number of clinical proton therapy facilities around the world has been growing exponentially. Because of this, and the lack of imaging support for proton therapy in the treatment room, a renewed interest in proton radiography and computed tomography (CT) has emerged. This imaging modality was largely abandoned in the 1970s and '80s in favor of the already successful x-ray CT, for reasons including long acquisition times and inadequate spatial resolution. Protons are particularly useful for radiotherapy because of their well-defined range in matter and their favorable energy profile which facilitates greater conformality than other radiotherapies; however, in order to realize the full potential of proton radiotherapy, the range of protons in the patient must be precisely known. Presently, proton therapy treatment planning is accomplished by taking x-ray CTs of the patient and converting each voxel into proton relative stopping power with respect to water (RSP) via a stoichiometrically-acquired calibration curve. However, since there is no unique relationship between Hounsfield values and RSP, this procedure has inherent uncertainties of a few percent in the proton range, requiring additional distal uncertainty margins in proton treatment plans. In contrast to x-ray CT, proton CT measures the RSP of an object directly, eliminating the need for Hounsfield-value-to-RSP conversion. In the prototype proton CT scanner that we have developed, a low-intensity beam of 200 MeV protons traverses a patient, entirely, and stops in a downstream energy/range detector. The entry and exit vectors of each proton are measured in order to determine a most-likely path of the proton through the object, and the response of the energy/range detector is converted to the water-equivalent path length of each proton in the object. These measurements are made at many angles between 0 and 360 degrees in order to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of proton RSP in the object

  13. A novel cone beam breast CT scanner: system evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cai, Weixing; Betancourt-Benitez, Ricardo; Lu, Xianghua

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to characterize the imaging performance of the recently built novel cone beam breast CT (CBBCT) scanner. This CBBCT scanner system has one x-ray source and one flat panel detector (Varian's PaxScan 4030CB) mounted on a rotating assembly. A patient table is mounted above the rotating tube/detector assembly. The table has a hole through it that allows a woman's breast to hang pendant in the imaging volume at the rotation axis. The tube/detector assembly rotates around the rotation axis and acquires multiple 2D projection images of the uncompressed breast located at the rotation axis in 10 seconds. Slip ring technology allows continuous rotation of the x-ray tube/detector assembly concentric to the opening in the table to achieve multiple circle scans. Also, it has a controlled vertical motion during the rotation to perform a spiral scan over 20 cm of travel. The continuous 360° rotation is designed to have speeds up to 1 rev/sec. This system was validated through a series of breast-imaging phantom studies and and patient studies. The results show that the image quality of the CBBCT scanner is excellent and all phantom masses (tissue-equivalent carcinomas) and calcifications as well as human subjects' masses, calcifications and abnormalities can be detected faithfully using the CBBCT technique with a glandular dose level less than or equal to that of a single two-view mammography exam. The results indicate that the CBBCT imaging system has much better detectability of small breast tumors compared to the conventional mammography system.

  14. SU-E-T-70: Commissioning a Multislice CT Scanner for X-Ray CT Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H; Hilts, M; Jirasek, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). Methods: Commissioning was performed for a 16-slice CT scanner using images acquired through a 1L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine for comparison purposes. The variability in CT number associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background image subtraction technique. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by comparing image noise and uniformity to that of the single slice machine. The consistency in CT number across slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also evaluated. Finally, the variability in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load was measured for the multislice scanner and compared to the tube load effects observed on the single slice machine. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in CT number across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image quality for the multislice machine was found to be comparable to that of the single slice scanner. Further study showed CT number was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thickness examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Conclusion: A multislice CT scanner has been commissioning for CT PGD, allowing images of an entire dose distribution to be acquired in a matter of minutes. Funding support provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering

  15. A z gain nonuniformity correction for multislice volumetric CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Besson, G; Hu, H; Xie, M; He, D; Seidenschnur, G; Bromberg, N

    2000-05-01

    This paper presents a calibration and correction method for detector cell gain variations. A key functionality of current CT scanners is to offer variable slice thickness to the user. To provide this capability in multislice volumetric scanners, while minimizing costs, it is necessary to combine the signals of several detector cells in z, when the desired slice thickness is larger than the minimum provided by a single cell. These combined signals are then pre-amplified, digitized, and transmitted to the system for further processing. The process of combining the output of several detector cells with nonuniform gains can introduce numerical errors when the impinging x-ray signal presents a variation along z over the range of combined cells. These numerical errors, which by nature are scan dependent, can lead to artifacts in the reconstructed images, particularly when the numerical errors vary from channel-to-channel (as the filtered-backprojection filter includes a high-pass filtering along the channel direction, within a given slice). A projection data correction algorithm has been developed to subtract the associated numerical errors. It relies on the ability of calibrating the individual cell gains. For effectiveness and data flow reasons, the algorithm works on a single slice basis, without slice-to-slice exchange of information. An initial error vector is calculated by applying a high-pass filter to the projection data. The essence of the algorithm is to correlate that initial error vector, with a calibration vector obtained by applying the same high-pass filter to various z combinations of the cell gains (each combination representing a basis function for a z expansion). The solution of the least-square problem, obtained via singular value decomposition, gives the coefficients of a polynomial expansion of the signal z slope and curvature. From this information, and given the cell gains, the final error vector is calculated and subtracted from the projection

  16. Performance of an improved first generation optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Adamovics, John; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2013-12-01

    Performance analysis of a modified 3D dosimetry optical scanner based on the first generation optical CT scanner OCTOPUS is presented. The system consists of PRESAGE™ dosimeters, the modified 3D scanner, and a new developed in-house user control panel written in Labview program which provides more flexibility to optimize mechanical control and data acquisition technique. The total scanning time has been significantly reduced from initial 8 h to ∼2 h by using the modified scanner. The functional performance of the modified scanner has been evaluated in terms of the mechanical integrity uncertainty of the data acquisition process. Optical density distribution comparison between the modified scanner, OCTOPUS and the treatment plan system has been studied. It has been demonstrated that the agreement between the modified scanner and treatment plans is comparable with that between the OCTOPUS and treatment plans.

  17. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  18. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan T M; Shrimpton, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990's. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10's of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners. PMID:27362736

  19. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan T M; Shrimpton, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990's. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10's of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  20. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  1. [Intraoperative CT imaging system using a mobile CT scanner gantry mounted on floor-embedded rails for neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Kabuto, M; Kubota, T; Kobayashi, H; Handa, Y; Sato, K; Ishii, H; Takeuchi, H; Uno, H; Arishima, H; Ido, K; Ueda, Y; Adachi, M; Ishida, M; Hasegawa, Y; Yanagimoto, M; Goto, Y

    1998-11-01

    Many neurosurgeons prefer to use intraoperative computed tomographic (CT) scanning, when possible, to check whether there is residual lesion or unexpected bleeding. We report a practical intraoperative CT imaging system using a high-speed CT scanner installed in the operating room along with a digitally controlled neurosurgical operating table. We designed a rail-track system to mobilize the CT gantry. The gantry is fixed onto a motorized carrier that can be moved smoothly on a rail-track embedded in the floor and with a maximum reach of 2.85 m from the room's wall to the operating table. The longitudinal motion of the operating table is easily adjusted by a foot switch from manual control to automatic control directly from the CT scanner's computer like an ordinary CT scanner bed in increments of 2, 5 or 10 mm during CT scanning. Either a carbon-made radiolucent head frame or carbon-made head plate is used as a headrest. Using this CT scanner system, pre- and intraoperative CT scannings were performed on 46 patients with brain tumors, cervical lesions or other intracranial lesions. We could operate on the patient with enough working space between the mobile CT gantry and the operating table for microneurosurgery. We could obtain intraoperative CT imaging of a patient on the operating table while the surgical wound remained open, the surgical drapes kept in place, and the surgical position unchanged, saving time in intraoperative CT scanning and preparation for further surgery when needed. This intraoperative CT imaging system installed in the operating room should be useful for neurosurgery. PMID:9866126

  2. Selecting a CT scanner for cardiac imaging: the heart of the matter.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Maria A; Pascoal, Ana; Keevil, Stephen F; Lewis, Cornelius A

    2016-09-01

    Coronary angiography to assess the presence and degree of arterial stenosis is an examination now routinely performed on CT scanners. Although developments in CT technology over recent years have made great strides in improving the diagnostic accuracy of this technique, patients with certain characteristics can still be "difficult to image". The various groups will benefit from different technological enhancements depending on the type of challenge they present. Good temporal and spatial resolution, wide longitudinal (z-axis) detector coverage and high X-ray output are the key requirements of a successful CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scan. The requirement for optimal patient dose is a given. The different scanner models recommended for CTCA all excel in different aspects. The specification data presented here for these scanners and the explanation of the impact of the different features should help in making a more informed decision when selecting a scanner for CTCA.

  3. CT Hounsfield Numbers of Soft Tissues on Unenhanced Abdominal CT Scans: Variability Between Two Different Manufacturers’ MDCT Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P.; Corwin, Michael T.; Li, Chin-Shang; Tran, Tien; Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT of the same patient vary on repeat scans done on two different manufacturers’ MDCT scanners. MATERIALS AND METHODS A database search was performed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent unenhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed both on a Volume CT (GE Healthcare) and a Definition AS Plus (Siemens Healthcare) 64-MDCT scanner within 12 months of each other. After excluding those patients for whom Hounsfield unit measurements would be affected by mitigating factors, 48 patients (mean age, 58.8 years) were identified. Hounsfield unit measurements were obtained in nine different soft-tissue anatomic locations on each scan, and the location of these sites was kept identical on each scan pair. Data were analyzed to evaluate Hounsfield unit differences between these scanners. RESULTS In general, there was a low consistency in the Hounsfield unit measurements for each of these sites on scans obtained by the two scanners, with the subcutaneous fat in the left posterolateral flank showing the lowest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.198). There were differences in the Hounsfield unit measurements obtained in all anatomic sites on scans obtained by both scanners. Mean Hounsfield unit measurements obtained on the Definition AS Plus scanner were lower than those obtained on the Volume CT scanner, with the intriguing exception of the anterior midline subcutaneous fat Hounsfield unit measurements, which were higher on the Definition AS Plus scanner. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION Hounsfield unit measurements for unenhanced abdominal soft tissues of the same patient vary between scanners of two common MDCT manufacturers. PMID:25341139

  4. Development of CT scanner models for patient organ dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianwei

    There is a serious and growing concern about the CT dose delivered by diagnostic CT examinations or image-guided radiation therapy imaging procedures. To better understand and to accurately quantify radiation dose due to CT imaging, Monte Carlo based CT scanner models are needed. This dissertation describes the development, validation, and application of detailed CT scanner models including a GE LightSpeed 16 MDCT scanner and two image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners, kV CBCT and MV CBCT. The modeling process considered the energy spectrum, beam geometry and movement, and bowtie filter (BTF). The methodology of validating the scanner models using reported CTDI values was also developed and implemented. Finally, the organ doses to different patients undergoing CT scan were obtained by integrating the CT scanner models with anatomically-realistic patient phantoms. The tube current modulation (TCM) technique was also investigated for dose reduction. It was found that for RPI-AM, thyroid, kidneys and thymus received largest dose of 13.05, 11.41 and 11.56 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. For RPI-AF, thymus, small intestine and kidneys received largest dose of 10.28, 12.08 and 11.35 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. The dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. For MDCT with TCM schemas, the fetal dose can be reduced with 14%-25%. To demonstrate the applicability of the method proposed in this dissertation for modeling the CT scanner, additional MDCT scanner was modeled and validated by using the measured CTDI values. These results demonstrated that the

  5. Design and construction of the 1{sup st} proton CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Rykalin, V.; Bashkirov, V.; Hurley, F.; Schulte, R.; Johnson, R.; Sadrozinski, H.

    2013-04-19

    This paper discusses the design and operation of the 1{sup st} proton CT scanner for 3D imaging. Reduction of proton range uncertainties and improved dose accuracy in the patient for treatment planning are central goals. A central CT slice acquired by reconstruction of 134 million proton tracks through a 14 cm spherical polystyrene phantom with high and low density inserts is presented.

  6. First results from a hybrid prototype CT scanner for exploring benefits of quantum-counting in clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, S.; Hannemann, T.; Kraft, E.; Kreisler, B.; Niederloehner, D.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2012-03-01

    μWe introduce a novel hybrid prototype scanner built to explore benefits of the quantum-counting technique in the context of clinical CT. The scanner is equipped with two measurement systems. One is a CdTe-based counting detector with 22cm field-of-view. Its revised ASIC architecture allows configuration of the counter thresholds of the 225m small sub-pixels in chess patterns, enabling data acquisition in four energy bins or studying high-flux scenarios with pile-up trigger. The other one is a conventional GOS-based energy-integrating detector from a clinical CT scanner. The integration of both detection technologies in one CT scanner provides two major advantages. It allows direct comparison of image quality and contrast reproduction as well as instantaneous quantification of the relative dose usage and material separation performance achievable with counting techniques. In addition, data from the conventional detector can be used as complementary information during reconstruction of the images from the counting device. In this paper we present CT images acquired with the hybrid prototype scanner, illustrate its underlying conceptual methods, and provide first experimental results quantifying clinical benefits of quantum-counting CT.

  7. Nondestructive Evaluation of Composites Using Micro-Focused X-Ray CT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Sunao; Aoki, Takuya; Iwahori, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2005-04-09

    Micro-Focused X-Ray CT (Micro CT) Scanner has been used for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite materials at Institute of Space Technology and Aeronautics, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Some successful examples of NDE of composites using Micro CT will be presented in this presentation. One example is debonding of fiber/matrix interface, splitting of fiber bundle and matrix crack in carbon/carbon composite. Another example is NDE of stitched CFRP. It was easy to evaluate state of stitch fiber. It has been demonstrated that Micro CT is a powerful device for detecting small damage/flaw in composites, such as delamination, matrix crack and void.

  8. Technology as an Occasion for Structuring: Evidence from Observations of CT Scanners and the Social Order of Radiology Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barley, Stephen R.

    1986-01-01

    New technologies such as the CT scanner are challenging traditional role relations among radiology workers and may be altering the organizational and occupational structure of radiological work. This paper expands recent sociological thought by showing how identical CT scanners occasion similar structuring processes and created divergent forms of…

  9. Technical Note: Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using radiochromic film

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Politte, David G.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a noninvasive technique to measure the intensity profile of the fan beam in a computed tomography (CT) scanner that is cost effective and easily implemented without the need to access proprietary scanner information or service modes. Methods: The fabrication of an inexpensive aperture is described, which is used to expose radiochromic film in a rotating CT gantry. A series of exposures is made, each of which is digitized on a personal computer document scanner, and the resulting data set is analyzed to produce a self-consistent calibration of relative radiation exposure. The bow tie profiles were analyzed to determine the precision of the process and were compared to two other measurement techniques, direct measurements from CT gantry detectors and a dynamic dosimeter. Results: The radiochromic film method presented here can measure radiation exposures with a precision of ∼6% root-mean-square relative error. The intensity profiles have a maximum 25% root-mean-square relative error compared with existing techniques. Conclusions: The proposed radiochromic film method for measuring bow tie profiles is an inexpensive (∼$100 USD + film costs), noninvasive method to measure the fan beam intensity profile in CT scanners.

  10. Dosimetric and image quality assessment of different acquisition protocols of a novel 64-slice CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vite, Cristina; Mangini, Monica; Strocchi, Sabina; Novario, Raffaele; Tanzi, Fabio; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Conte, Leopoldo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-03-01

    Dose and image quality assessment in computed tomography (CT) are almost affected by the vast variety of CT scanners (axial CT, spiral CT, low-multislice CT (2-16), high-multislice CT (32-64)) and imaging protocols in use. Very poor information is at the moment available on 64 slices CT scanners. Aim of this work is to assess image quality related to patient dose indexes and to investigate the achievable dose reduction for a commercially available 64 slices CT scanner. CT dose indexes (weighted computed tomography dose index, CTDI w and Dose Length Product, DLP) were measured with a standard CT phantom for the main protocols in use (head, chest, abdomen and pelvis) and compared with the values displayed by the scanner itself. The differences were always below 7%. All the indexes were below the Diagnostic Reference Levels defined by the European Council Directive 97/42. Effective doses were measured for each protocol with thermoluminescent dosimeters inserted in an anthropomorphic Alderson Rando phantom and compared with the same values computed by the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator software code and corrected by a factor taking in account the number of slices (from 16 to 64). The differences were always below 25%. The effective doses range from 1.5 mSv (head) to 21.8 mSv (abdomen). The dose reduction system of the scanner was assessed comparing the effective dose measured for a standard phantom-man (a cylinder phantom, 32 cm in diameter) to the mean dose evaluated on 46 patients. The standard phantom was considered as no dose reduction reference. The dose reduction factor range from 16% to 78% (mean of 46%) for all protocols, from 29% to 78% (mean of 55%) for chest protocol, from 16% to 76% (mean of 42%) for abdomen protocol. The possibility of a further dose reduction was investigated measuring image quality (spatial resolution, contrast and noise) as a function of CTDI w. This curve shows a quite flat trend decreasing the dose approximately to 90% and a

  11. Water calibration for CT scanners with tube voltage modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschl, Ludwig; Bergner, Frank; Fleischmann, Christof; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2010-07-01

    X-ray CT measures the attenuation of polychromatic x-rays through an object of interest. The CT data acquired are the negative logarithm of the relative x-ray intensity after absorption. These data must undergo water precorrection to linearize the measured data and convert them into line integrals through the patient that can be reconstructed to yield the final CT image. The function to linearize the measured projection data depends on the tube voltage U. In most circumstances, CT scans are carried out with a constant tube voltage. For those cases there are dozens of different techniques to carry out water precorrection. In our case the tube voltage is rather modulated as a function of the object. We propose an empirical cupping correction (ECCU) algorithm to correct for CT cupping artifacts that are induced by nonlinearities in the projection data. The method is rawdata based, empirical and requires neither knowledge of the x-ray spectrum nor of the attenuation coefficients. It aims at linearizing the attenuation data using a precorrection function of polynomial form in the polychromatic attenuation data q and in the tube voltage U. The coefficients of the polynomial are determined once using a calibration scan of a homogeneous phantom. The coefficients are computed in the image domain by fitting a series of basis images to a template image. The template image is obtained directly from the uncorrected phantom image and no assumptions on the phantom size or of its positioning are made. Rawdata are precorrected by passing them through the once-determined polynomial. Numerical examples are shown to demonstrate the quality of the precorrection. ECCU is achieved to remove the cupping artifacts and to obtain well-calibrated CT values. A combination of ECCU with analytical techniques yielding a hybrid cupping correction method is possible and allows for channel-dependent correction functions.

  12. Use of a portable CT scanner during resection of subcortical supratentorial astrocytomas of childhood.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, R; Cleary, K; Medlock, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of intraoperative imaging has made it possible to visualize shifting brain structures during surgery, and may allow greater intraoperative discrimination of normal and abnormal tissue. This may provide greater confidence to the neurosurgeon to proceed with a more extensive resection while decreasing postoperative morbidity. We investigated the intraoperative use of a portable CT scanner in the resection of 4 cases of supratentorial, subcortical astrocytomas of childhood to assess its usefulness in determining the endpoint of the dissection. We operated on 4 patients, ages 3-17, with astrocytomas. Three were thalamic, and 1 was based primarily in the caudate nucleus. The approach to the basal ganglia was transcallosal in 3 and transtemporal in 1. Specific observations on the intraoperative use of the portable CT scanner included its overall facility, any additional operative time required, the overall quality of the images, intraoperative decisions made based on the images and problems associated with its use. These observations are presented with a review of intraoperative imaging as it pertains to deep pediatric brain tumors. The CT scanner was helpful in limiting the dissection of the hypothalamic and midbrain regions and in localizing remaining abnormal tissue. The scans allowed informed decisions about leaving margins of the tumor which were adjacent to vital structures, but dit not prove to be a decisive factor in providing a complete resection. The following observations are worth noting: (1) average imaging time was 20 min per scan; (2) the extent and location of residual enhancing tumor was easily identified despite other materials in the surgical bed; (3) air/tissue interfaces limit resolution; (4) tumors retain contrast long enough to obtain multiple scans without additional dye, and (5) the cost profile of a mobile CT scanner is superior to that of a fixed intraoperative CT scanner.

  13. Performance of a commercial optical CT scanner and polymer gel dosimeters for 3-D dose verification

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Wuu, C.-S.; Maryanski, Marek J.

    2004-11-01

    Performance analysis of a commercial three-dimensional (3-D) dose mapping system based on optical CT scanning of polymer gels is presented. The system consists of BANG{sup reg}3 polymer gels (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT), OCTOPUS{sup TM} laser CT scanner (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT), and an in-house developed software for optical CT image reconstruction and 3-D dose distribution comparison between the gel, film measurements and the radiation therapy treatment plans. Various sources of image noise (digitization, electronic, optical, and mechanical) generated by the scanner as well as optical uniformity of the polymer gel are analyzed. The performance of the scanner is further evaluated in terms of the reproducibility of the data acquisition process, the uncertainties at different levels of reconstructed optical density per unit length and the effects of scanning parameters. It is demonstrated that for BANG{sup registered}3 gel phantoms held in cylindrical plastic containers, the relative dose distribution can be reproduced by the scanner with an overall uncertainty of about 3% within approximately 75% of the radius of the container. In regions located closer to the container wall, however, the scanner generates erroneous optical density values that arise from the reflection and refraction of the laser rays at the interface between the gel and the container. The analysis of the accuracy of the polymer gel dosimeter is exemplified by the comparison of the gel/OCT-derived dose distributions with those from film measurements and a commercial treatment planning system (Cadplan, Varian Corporation, Palo Alto, CA) for a 6 cmx6 cm single field of 6 MV x rays and a 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plan. The gel measurements agree with the treatment plans and the film measurements within the '3%-or-2 mm' criterion throughout the usable, artifact-free central region of the gel volume. Discrepancies among the three data sets are analyzed.

  14. Development of CCD-based optical computed tomography and comparison with single-beam optical CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on the development of CCD-based optical computed tomography (CT) CT-s2. A commercially available 10× fast optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUSTM-10X, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) was used for comparison. NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter was used to validate the performance of CT-s2. The gamma pass rate can reach 96.00% when using a 3% dose difference and 3 mm dose-to-agreement criteria. The results of CT-s2 are as good as those of the single-beam optical-CT scanner, but the scanning time of CT-s2 is only one-tenth of that of the single-beam optical-CT scanner.

  15. Dosimetric characterization and image quality evaluation of the AIRO mobile CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Weir, Victor J; Zhang, Jie; Bruner, Angela P

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose and image quality from a recently introduced mobile CT imaging system are presented. Radiation dose was measured using a conventional 100 mm pencil ionization chamber and CT polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) body and head phantoms. Image quality was evaluated with a CATPHAN 500 phantom. Spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), and Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) were analyzed. Radiation dose and image quality were compared to those from a multi-detector CT scanner (Siemens Sensation 64). Under identical technique factors radiation dose (mGy/mAs) from the AIRO mobile CT system (AIRO) is higher than that from a 64 slice CT scanner. Based on MTF analysis, both Soft and Standard filters of the AIRO system lost resolution quickly compared to the Sensation 64 slice CT. The Siemens scanner had up to 7 lp/cm for the head FOV and H40 kernel and up to 5 lp/cm at body FOV for the B40f kernel. The Standard kernel in the AIRO system was evaluated to have 3 lp/cm and 4 lp/cm for the body and head FOVs respectively. NNPS of the AIRO shows low frequency noise due to ring-like artifacts which may be caused by detector calibration or lack of artifact reducing image post-processing. Due to a higher dose in terms of mGy/mAs at both head and body FOV, the contrast to noise ratio is higher in the AIRO system than in the Siemens scanner. However detectability of the low contrast objects is poorer in the AIRO due to the presence of ring artifacts in the location of the targets. PMID:26410470

  16. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R; Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  17. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    SciTech Connect

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  18. Development and performance evaluation of an experimental fine pitch detector multislice CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Yasuhiro; Nukui, Masatake; Ishihara, Yotaro; Fujishige, Takashi; Ogata, Kentaro; Moritake, Masahiro; Kurochi, Haruo; Ogata, Tsuyoshi; Yahata, Mitsuru; Tang Xiangyang

    2009-04-15

    The authors have developed an experimental fine pitch detector multislice CT scanner with an ultrasmall focal spot x-ray tube and a high-density matrix detector through current CT technology. The latitudinal size of the x-ray tube focal spot was 0.4 mm. The detector dimension was 1824 channels (azimuthal direction)x32 rows (longitudinal direction) at row width of 0.3125 mm, in which a thinner reflected separator surrounds each detector cell coupled with a large active area photodiode. They were mounted on a commercial 64-slice CT scanner gantry while the scan field of view (50 cm) and gantry rotation speed (0.35 s) can be maintained. The experimental CT scanner demonstrated the spatial resolution of 0.21-0.22 mm (23.8-22.7 lp/cm) with the acrylic slit phantom and in-plane 50%-MTF 9.0 lp/cm and 10%-MTF 22.0 lp/cm. In the longitudinal direction, it demonstrated the spatial resolution of 0.24 mm with the high-resolution insert of the CATPHAN phantom and 0.34 mm as the full width at half maximum of the slice sensitivity profile. In low-contrast detectability, 3 mm at 0.3% was visualized at the CTDI{sub vol} of 47.2 mGy. Two types of 2.75 mm diameter vessel phantoms with in-stent stenosis at 25%, 50%, and 75% stair steps were scanned, and the reconstructed images can clearly resolve the stenosis at each case. The experimental CT scanner provides high-resolution imaging while maintaining low-contrast detectability, demonstrating the potentiality for clinical applications demanding high spatial resolution, such as imaging of inner ear, lung, and bone, or low-contrast detectability, such as imaging of coronary artery.

  19. Comparison of rankings for lean meat based on results from a CT scanner and a video image analysis system.

    PubMed

    Jay, N P; van de Ven, R J; Hopkins, D L

    2014-10-01

    Coopworth cross lambs born over three years were examined in this study. Differences between two machines; a computer tomography (CT) scanner and a VIAScan® system for the estimation of carcase lean weight in lamb carcases was examined. The CT scanner provided a significantly higher estimate of carcase lean. The rank correlation (0.84) between the CT scanner and the VIAScan® system for the prediction of carcase lean was significant, but there was a different ranking for carcase lean depending on which machine was used. This has important ramifications for the use of VIAScan® data in the New Zealand Sheep Improvement Ltd genetic programme.

  20. Implementation and characterization of a 320-slice volumetric CT scanner for simulation in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, C.; Breen, S.; Purdie, T. G.; Owrangi, A.; Publicover, J.; Bartolac, S.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Effective target definition and broad employment of treatment response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in radiation oncology requires increased speed and coverage for use within a single bolus injection. To this end, a novel volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Tochigi Pref., Japan) has been installed at the Princess Margaret Hospital for implementation into routine CT simulation. This technology offers great advantages for anatomical and functional imaging in both scan speed and coverage. The aim of this work is to investigate the system's imaging performance and quality as well as CT quantification accuracy which is important for radiotherapy dose calculations. Methods: The 320-slice CT scanner uses a 160 mm wide-area (2D) solid-state detector design which provides the possibility to acquire a volumetric axial length of 160 mm without moving the CT couch. This is referred to as ''volume'' and can be scanned with a rotation speed of 0.35-3 s. The scanner can also be used as a 64-slice CT scanner and perform conventional (axial) and helical acquisitions with collimation ranges of 1-32 and 16-32 mm, respectively. Commissioning was performed according to AAPM Reports TG 66 and 39 for both helical and volumetric imaging. Defrise and other cone-beam image analysis tests were performed. Results: Overall, the imaging spatial resolution and geometric efficiency (GE) were found to be very good (>10 lp/mm, <1 mm spatial integrity and GE{sub 160mm}=85%) and within the AAPM guidelines as well as IEC recommendations. Although there is evidence of some cone-beam artifacts when scanning the Defrise phantom, image quality was found to be good and sufficient for treatment planning (soft tissue noise <10 HU). Measurements of CT number stability and contrast-to-noise values across the volume indicate clinically acceptable scan accuracy even at the field edge. Conclusions: Initial experience with this exciting new technology confirms its accuracy for

  1. Dual-energy CT with single- and dual-source scanners: current applications in evaluating the genitourinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F; Cohan, Richard H; Caoili, Elaine M; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M; Wasnik, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Several promising clinical applications for dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in genitourinary imaging have been reported. Dual-energy CT not only provides excellent morphologic detail but also can supply material-specific and quantitative information that may be particularly useful in genitourinary imaging. Dual-energy CT has unique capabilities for characterizing renal lesions by quantifying iodine content and helping identify the mineral contents of renal stones, information that is important for patient care. Virtual unenhanced images reconstructed from dual-energy CT datasets can be useful for detecting calculi within the iodine-filled urinary collecting system, potentially reducing the need for an unenhanced scanning phase at CT urography. Although the underlying principles of dual-energy CT are the same regardless of scanner type, single-source dual-energy scanners with fast kilovoltage switching differ from dual-source dual-energy scanners both in image data acquisition and in processing methods; an understanding of these differences may help optimize dual-energy CT genitourinary protocols. Dual-energy CT performed with a dual-source scanner or with a single-source scanner with fast kilovoltage switching also has some important limitations. Further advances in scanning protocols and refinement of processing techniques to reduce image noise may lead to more widespread use of dual-energy CT.

  2. Performance assessment of a pendant-geometry CT scanner for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, John M.; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Nelson, Thomas R.; Shah, Nikula; Burkett, George; Seibert, J. A.; Lindfors, Karen K.; Roos, Gerhardt

    2005-04-01

    While mammography is the gold standard for breast cancer screening worldwide, it is widely recognized that mammography has limitations, especially in women with dense breasts. In response to the need for a more sensitive approach to breast cancer screening, a CT scanner specifically for breast imaging in the pendant geometry was designed, fabricated, and is currently in clinical evaluation. The spatial resolution and noise properties are discussed, and breast images from a normal volunteer and a patient with breast cancer demonstrate very promising breast CT image quality from a qualitative perspective.

  3. Transportation or CT scanners: a theory and method of health resources allocation.

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, H P; Woodward, J M; Berg, D H

    1979-01-01

    Cost containment and access to appropriate care are the two most frequently discussed issues in contemporary health policy. Conceiving of the health services available in specific regions as "packages" of diverse items, the authors of this article consider the economic trade-offs among the various resources needed for appropriate care. In the discussion that follows, we examine the trade-offs between two divergent offering of the health care system: high technology medicine and support services. Specifically, we examine several strategies designed to achieve an optimal mix of investments in CT scanners and transportation resources in the South Chicago region. Using linear programming as a method for examining these options, the authors found that 1) the proper location of CT scanners is as important for cost containment as optimal number, and 2) excess capacity in the utilization of a single resource--CT scanners--need not imply inefficiency in the overall delivery of the service. These findings help demonstrate the importance of viewing health care as a package of interrelated services, both for achieving cost containment and for providing access to appropriate care. PMID:391772

  4. CT imaging of the internal human ear: Test of a high resolution scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettuzzi, M.; Brancaccio, R.; Morigi, M. P.; Gallo, A.; Strolin, S.; Casali, F.; Lamanna, Ernesto; Ariù, Marilù

    2011-08-01

    During the course of 2009, in the framework of a project supported by the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, a number of tests were carried out at the Department of Physics of the University of Bologna in order to achieve a good quality CT scan of the internal human ear. The work was carried out in collaboration with the local “S. Orsola” Hospital in Bologna and a company (CEFLA) already involved in the production and commercialization of a CT scanner dedicated to dentistry. A laboratory scanner with a simple concept detector (CCD camera-lens-mirror-scintillator) was used to see to what extent it was possible to enhance the quality of a conventional CT scanner when examining the internal human ear. To test the system, some conventional measurements were made, such as the spatial resolution calculation with the MTF and dynamic range evaluation. Different scintillators were compared to select the most suitable for the purpose. With 0.5 mm thick structured cesium iodide and a field of view of 120×120 mm2, a spatial resolution of 6.5l p/mm at 5% MTF was obtained. The CT of a pair of human head phantoms was performed at an energy of 120 kVp. The first phantom was a rough representation of the human head shape, with soft tissue made of coarse slabs of Lucite. Some inserts, like small aluminum cylinders and cubes, with 1 mm diameter drilled holes, were used to simulate the channels that one finds inside the human inner ear. The second phantom is a plastic PVC fused head with a real human cranium inside. The bones in the cranium are well conserved and the inner ear features, such as the cochlea and semicircular channels, are clearly detectable. After a number of CT tests we obtained good results as far as structural representation and channel detection are concerned. Some images of the 3D rendering of the CT volume are shown below. The doctors of the local hospital who followed our experimentation expressed their satisfaction. The CT was compared to a virtual

  5. Magnitude and effects of x-ray scatter in a 256-slice CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Masahiro; Mori, Shinichiro; Tsunoo, Takanori; Miyazaki, Hiroaki

    2006-09-15

    We developed a prototype 256-slice CT scanner that employs continuous rotation of a cone-beam with a larger cone angle than conventional multidetector CTs (MDCT) to ensure a wide field of view. However, a larger cone angle may result in image deterioration due to increased x-ray scatter. Scattered radiation causes the detected signals to deviate from the true measurement of primary x-ray intensity and may result in artifacts (e.g., cupping and streak artifacts), quantitative inaccuracy in reconstructed CT number, and degradation of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). To reduce the effects of scatter, the 256-slice scanner incorporates an antiscatter collimator. Here, we estimated the magnitude of x-ray scatter in the prototype 256-slice CT scanner under clinical scan conditions and quantified the effects of this scatter on CT number accuracy, image noise, uniformity, and low contrast detectability. Although most experiments were performed with the antiscatter collimator, we also estimated the magnitude of x-ray scatter without the collimator to evaluate the scatter rejection efficiency of the collimator. The scatter-to-primary energy fluence ratio (SPR) without the collimator increased as cone angle increased, with estimated values of 49.7% for a 138 mm beam width with a phantom of 200 mm diameter, and 78.5% for a 320 mm diameter phantom. Estimated SPR was drastically decreased with the collimator, with an SPR reduction rate (ratio of SPR with and without the collimator) of 12.7% and 16.8% for the 200 and 320 mm diameter phantoms, respectively. The reduction in x-ray scatter by the collimator resulted in a considerable reduction in scatter effects. The measured uniformity was good and was independent of scatter amount. Although scatter still affected CT number accuracy, this could be corrected by rescaling. Further, although the CNR was decreased, in theory at least, the change was so subtle that it had no substantial effect on low-contrast detectability.

  6. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  7. First small-animal in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, B.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Liu, X.; Tapfer, A.; Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Sasov, A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a compact grating-based in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT system with a rotating gantry. The 50 W microfocus x-ray source operates with 20 to 50 kV peak energy. The length of the rotating interferometer is around 47 cm. Pixel size in the object is 30 micron; the field of view is approx. 35 mm in diameter, suited to image a mouse. The interferometer consists of three gratings: an absorption grating close to the x-ray source, a phase grating to introduce a π/2 phase shift and an absorption analyzer grating positioned at the first fractional Talbot distance. Numerous drives and actuators are used to provide angular and linear grating alignment, phase stepping and object/gantry precision positioning. Phantom studies were conducted to investigate performance, accuracy and stability of the scanner. In particular, the influences of gantry rotation and of temperature fluctuations on the interferometric image acquisition were characterized. Also dose measurements were performed. The first imaging results obtained with the system show the complementary nature of phase-contrast micro-CT images with respect to absorption-based micro-CT. Future improvements, necessary to optimize the scanner for in-vivo small-animal CT scanning on a regular and easy-to-use basis, are also discussed.

  8. Model based predictive design of post patient collimation for whole body CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Prakhar; Boudry, John

    2015-03-01

    Scatter presents as a significant source of image artifacts in cone beam CT (CBCT) and considerable effort has been devoted to measuring the magnitude and influence of scatter. Scatter management includes both rejection and correction approaches, with anti-scatter grids (ASGs) commonly employed as a scatter rejection strategy. This work employs a Geant41,2 driven Monte Carlo model to investigate the impact of different ASG designs on scatter rejection performance across a range of scanner coverage along the patient axis. Scatter rejection is quantified in terms of scatter to primary ratio (SPR). One-dimensional (1D) ASGs (grid septa running parallel to patient axis) are compared across a range of septa height, septa width and septa material. Results indicate for a given septa width and patient coverage, SPR decreases with septa height but demonstrates diminishing returns for larger height values. For shorter septa heights, higher Z materials (e.g., Tungsten) exhibit superior scatter rejection to relatively lower Z materials (e.g., Molybdenum). For taller septa heights, the material difference is not as significant. SPR has a relatively weak dependence on septa width, with thicker septa giving lower SPR values at a given scanner coverage. The results are intended to serve as guide for designing post patient collimation for whole body CT scanners. Since taller grids with high Z materials pose a significant manufacturing cost, it is necessary to evaluate optimal ASG designs to minimize material and machining costs and to meet scatter rejection specifications at given patient coverage.

  9. Three-dimensional contrasted visualization of pancreas in rats using clinical MRI and CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ting; Coudyzer, Walter; Peeters, Ronald; Liu, Yewei; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Feng, Yuanbo; Xia, Qian; Yu, Jie; Jiang, Yansheng; Dymarkowski, Steven; Huang, Gang; Chen, Feng; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to visualize the pancreas in post-mortem rats with local contrast medium infusion by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) using clinical imagers. A total of 16 Sprague Dawley rats of about 300 g were used for the pancreas visualization. Following the baseline imaging, a mixed contrast medium dye called GadoIodo-EB containing optimized concentrations of Gd-DOTA, iomeprol and Evens blue was infused into the distally obstructed common bile duct (CBD) for post-contrast imaging with 3.0 T MRI and 128-slice CT scanners. Images were post-processed with the MeVisLab software package. MRI findings were co-registered with CT scans and validated with histomorphology, with relative contrast ratios quantified. Without contrast enhancement, the pancreas was indiscernible. After infusion of GadoIodo-EB solution, only the pancreatic region became outstandingly visible, as shown by 3D rendering MRI and CT and proven by colored dissection and histological examinations. The measured volume of the pancreas averaged 1.12 ± 0.04 cm(3) after standardization. Relative contrast ratios were 93.28 ± 34.61% and 26.45 ± 5.29% for MRI and CT respectively. We have developed a multifunctional contrast medium dye to help clearly visualize and delineate rat pancreas in situ using clinical MRI and CT scanners. The topographic landmarks thus created with 3D demonstration may help to provide guidelines for the next in vivo pancreatic MRI research in rodents.

  10. Dosimetric impact of image artifact from a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent; Podgorsak, Matthew B.; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Malhotra, Harish K.; Wang, Iris Z.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Traditional computed tomography (CT) units provide a maximum scan field-of-view (sFOV) diameter of 50 cm and a limited bore size, which cannot accommodate a large patient habitus or an extended simulation setup in radiation therapy (RT). Wide-bore CT scanners with increased bore size were developed to address these needs. Some scanners have the capacity to reconstruct the CT images at an extended FOV (eFOV), through data interpolation or extrapolation, using projection data acquired with a conventional sFOV. Objects that extend past the sFOV for eFOV reconstruction may generate image artifacts resulting from truncated projection data; this may distort CT numbers and structure contours in the region beyond the sFOV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of image artifacts from eFOV reconstruction with a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. Methods: Testing phantoms (i.e., a mini CT phantom with equivalent tissue inserts, a set of CT normal phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms of the thorax and the pelvis) were used to evaluate eFOV artifacts. Reference baseline images of these phantoms were acquired with the phantom centrally positioned within the sFOV. For comparison, the phantoms were then shifted laterally and scanned partially outside the sFOV, but still within the eFOV. Treatment plans were generated for the thoracic and pelvic anthropomorphic phantoms utilizing the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) to study the potential effects of eFOV artifacts on dose calculations. All dose calculations of baseline and test treatment plans were carried out using the same MU. Results: Results show that both body contour and CT numbers are altered by image artifacts in eFOV reconstruction. CT number distortions of up to -356 HU for bone tissue and up to 323 HU for lung tissue were observed in the mini CT phantom. Results from the large body normal phantom, which is close to a clinical patient size, show

  11. Computer-aided lung nodule detection and assessment by using a hybrid PET/CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franquiz, Juan; Vaddadi, Sulohita; Soler, George

    2004-04-01

    In this study we present an automatic algorithm for the detection and functional assessment of lung nodules on three-dimensional slices derived from a hybrid PET/CT scanner. In addition to differentiate malignant from benign lesions, the algorithm was mainly designed for assessing the response of lung cancer to therapy. The automated algorithm involves three major steps. First, the lung region is segmented from low resolution multislice CT images. Once the lung is segmented on CT images, a search of seed pixels with maximum activity of 18FDG is undertaken into the lung regions of the electronically registered PET images. A 3D growing algorithm identified the lesion pixels around the maximum 18FDG activity seed pixels. In the third step, the total activity (Bq), concentration (Bq/ml), metabolically active volume (ml) and standard uptake values (SUV) were calculated for lesions on PET images. A threshold and filtering method was applied to high resolution CT scans to determine the CT volume of these lesions identified on PET images. All PET images were corrected for attenuation and partial volume effect and cross calibrated with a standard activity measured in a dose calibrator. Studies were performed using a hybrid PET/CT Discovery LS (GE Medical Systems). The feasibility and robustness of the automatic algorithm was demonstrated in studies with a lung-chest phantom and by retrospective analysis of clinical studies.

  12. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  13. Water-equivalent path length calibration of a prototype proton CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, R. F.; Schulte, R. W.; Bashkirov, V. A.; Wroe, A. J.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Rykalin, V.; Coutrakon, G.; Koss, P.; Patyal, B.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The authors present a calibration method for a prototype proton computed tomography (pCT) scanner. The accuracy of these measurements depends upon careful calibration of the energy detector used to measure the residual energy of the protons that passed through the object. Methods: A prototype pCT scanner with a cesium iodide (CsI(Tl)) crystal calorimeter was calibrated by measuring the calorimeter response for protons of 200 and 100 MeV initial energies undergoing degradation in polystyrene plates of known thickness and relative stopping power (RSP) with respect to water. Calibration curves for the two proton energies were obtained by fitting a second-degree polynomial to the water-equivalent path length versus calorimeter response data. Using the 100 MeV calibration curve, the RSP values for a variety of tissue-equivalent materials were measured and compared to values obtained from a standard depth-dose range shift measurement using a water-tank. A cylindrical water phantom was scanned with 200 MeV protons and its RSP distribution was reconstructed using the 200 MeV calibration. Results: It is shown that this calibration method produces measured RSP values of various tissue-equivalent materials that agree to within 0.5% of values obtained using an established water-tank method. The mean RSP value of the water phantom reconstruction was found to be 0.995 {+-} 0.006. Conclusions: The method presented provides a simple and reliable procedure for calibration of a pCT scanner.

  14. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is

  15. Why do commercial CT scanners still employ traditional, filtered back-projection for image reconstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaochuan; Sidky, Emil Y; Vannier, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Despite major advances in x-ray sources, detector arrays, gantry mechanical design and especially computer performance, one component of computed tomography (CT) scanners has remained virtually constant for the past 25 years—the reconstruction algorithm. Fundamental advances have been made in the solution of inverse problems, especially tomographic reconstruction, but these works have not been translated into clinical and related practice. The reasons are not obvious and seldom discussed. This review seeks to examine the reasons for this discrepancy and provides recommendations on how it can be resolved. We take the example of field of compressive sensing (CS), summarizing this new area of research from the eyes of practical medical physicists and explaining the disconnection between theoretical and application-oriented research. Using a few issues specific to CT, which engineers have addressed in very specific ways, we try to distill the mathematical problem underlying each of these issues with the hope of demonstrating that there are interesting mathematical problems of general importance that can result from in depth analysis of specific issues. We then sketch some unconventional CT-imaging designs that have the potential to impact on CT applications, if the link between applied mathematicians and engineers/physicists were stronger. Finally, we close with some observations on how the link could be strengthened. There is, we believe, an important opportunity to rapidly improve the performance of CT and related tomographic imaging techniques by addressing these issues. PMID:20376330

  16. Image reconstruction for PET/CT scanners: past achievements and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Shan; Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    PET is a medical imaging modality with proven clinical value for disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring. The integration of PET and CT on modern scanners provides a synergy of the two imaging modalities. Through different mathematical algorithms, PET data can be reconstructed into the spatial distribution of the injected radiotracer. With dynamic imaging, kinetic parameters of specific biological processes can also be determined. Numerous efforts have been devoted to the development of PET image reconstruction methods over the last four decades, encompassing analytic and iterative reconstruction methods. This article provides an overview of the commonly used methods. Current challenges in PET image reconstruction include more accurate quantitation, TOF imaging, system modeling, motion correction and dynamic reconstruction. Advances in these aspects could enhance the use of PET/CT imaging in patient care and in clinical research studies of pathophysiology and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21339831

  17. NEMA and clinical evaluation of a novel brain PET-CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, Kira S.; Toole, Terrence; Ouyang, Jinsong; Zhu, Xuping; Normandin, Marc; Johnson, Keith; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Fakhri, Georges El

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the performance of a novel mobile human brain/small animal PET-CT system, developed by Photo Diagnostic Systems Inc. The scanner has a 35.7-cm diameter bore and a 22-cm axial extent. The detector ring has 7 modules each with 3×4 cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate crystal blocks, each consisting of 22×22 outer layer and 21×21 inner layer crystals, each layer 1 cm thick. Light is collected by 12×12 SiPMs. The integrated CT can be used for attenuation correction and anatomical localization. The scanner was designed as a low-cost device that nevertheless produces high-quality PET images with the unique capability of battery-powered propulsion, enabling use in many settings. Methods Spatial resolution, sensitivity and noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) were measured based on the National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-2012 procedures. Reconstruction was done with tight energy and timing cuts: 400-650 keV and 7ns, and loose cuts: 350-700 keV and 10ns. Additional image quality measurements were made from phantoms, human, and animal studies. Performance was compared to a reference scanner (ECAT Exact HR+) with comparable imaging properties. Results The full-width half-max transverse resolution at 1 cm (10 cm) radius is 3.2 mm (5.2 mm radial, 3.1 mm tangential) and the axial resolution is 3.5 mm (4.0 mm). For tight (loose) cuts, a sensitivity of 7.5 (11.7) kcps/MBq at the center increases to 8.8 (13.9) kcps/MBq at a 10 cm radial offset. The maximum NECR of 19.5 (22.7) kcps was achieved for an activity concentration of 2.9 kBq/ml. Contrast recovery for 4:1 hot cylinder to warm background was 76% for the 25 mm diameter cylinder, but decreased with decreasing cylinder size. The quantitation agrees within 2% of the known activity distribution and concentration. Brain phantom and human scans have shown agreement in SUV values and image quality with the HR+. Conclusion We have characterized the performance of the NeuroPET/CT

  18. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  19. Comparison of methods for assessing geometric efficiency on multi-detector CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Berris, Theocharis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E; Damilakis, John

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the film method against the method based on a new CT slice detector in assessing geometric efficiency (GE) of x-ray beams utilized by a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Measurements of GE were performed using radiographic films and a solid state CT slice detector for all beam qualities, collimations and focal spot sizes available on an MDCT scanner. Repeatability of GE measurements was assessed. The radiographic film and the solid state detector methods were compared to each other in regard to efficacy in measuring free-in-air GE. The values of GE determined using the radiographic film method were found to range between 48.5% and 90.6%. Differences between values obtained with the radiographic film method and corresponding values obtained with the solid state detector were less than 10% exceeding 5% for only one case. Both methods show that wide beams have higher GE values compared to thin ones. The use of large instead of small focal spot was found to deteriorate GE values by up to 23.1%. Beam quality did not seem to influence GE of the various collimations. When thin beam collimations are employed, a considerable amount of the radiation is wasted for non-imaging purposes. Both film and solid state probe methods are capable of measuring GE of thin as well as wide collimations. The solid state detector is the easiest to use, however its usefulness is reduced by the fact that it cannot measure dose profiles of beam collimations available for step-and-shoot mode of operation.

  20. Stationary table CT dosimetry and anomalous scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol}

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Boone, John M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Anomalous, scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol} for stationary phantom/table protocols (having elevated values of CTDI{sub vol} over 300% higher than the actual dose to the phantom) have been observed; which are well-beyond the typical accuracy expected of CTDI{sub vol} as a phantom dose. Recognition of these outliers as “bad data” is important to users of CT dose index tracking systems (e.g., ACR DIR), and a method for recognition and correction is provided. Methods: Rigorous methods and equations are presented which describe the dose distributions for stationary-table CT. A comparison with formulae for scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol} clearly identifies the source of these anomalies. Results: For the stationary table, use of the CTDI{sub 100} formula (applicable to a moving phantom only) overestimates the dose due to extra scatter and also includes an overbeaming correction, both of which are nonexistent when the phantom (or patient) is held stationary. The reported DLP remains robust for the stationary phantom. Conclusions: The CTDI-paradigm does not apply in the case of a stationary phantom and simpler nonintegral equations suffice. A method of correction of the currently reported CTDI{sub vol} using the approach-to-equilibrium formula H(a) and an overbeaming correction factor serves to scale the reported CTDI{sub vol} values to more accurate levels for stationary-table CT, as well as serving as an indicator in the detection of “bad data.”.

  1. Design and Development of a Megavoltage CT Scanner for Radiation Therapy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Tai

    A Varian 4 MeV isocentric therapy accelerator has been modified to perform also as a CT scanner. The goal is to provide low cost computed tomography capability for use in radiotherapy. The system will have three principal uses. These are (i) to provide 2- and 3-dimensional maps of electron density distribution for CT assisted therapy planning, (ii) to aid in patient set up by providing sectional views of the treatment volume and high contrast scout-mode verification images and (iii) to provide a means for periodically checking the patients anatomical conformation against what was used to generate the original therapy plan. The treatment machine was modified by mounting an array of detectors on a frame bolted to the counter weight end of the gantry in such a manner as to define a 'third generation' CT Scanner geometry. The data gathering is controlled by a Z-80 based microcomputer system which transfers the x-ray transmission data to a general purpose PDP 11/34 for processing. There a series of calibration processes and a logarithmic conversion are performed to get projection data. After reordering the projection data to an equivalent parallel beam sinogram format a convolution algorithm is employed to construct the image from the equivalent parallel projection data. Results of phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2.6 mm and an electron density discrimination of less than 1% which are sufficiently good for accurate therapy planning. Results also show that the system is linear to within the precision of our measurement ((DBLTURN).75%) over a wide range of electron densities corresponding to those found in body tissues. Animal and human images are also presented to demonstrate that the system's imaging capability is sufficient to allow the necessary visualization of anatomy.

  2. Design and development of a megavoltage CT scanner for radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.T.

    1982-01-01

    A Varian 4 MeV isocentric therapy accelerator has been modified to perform also as a CT scanner. The goal is to provide low cost computed tomography capability for use in radiotherapy. The system will have three principal uses. These are 1) to provide 2- and 3- dimensional maps of electron density distribution for CT assisted therapy planning, 2) to aid in patient set up by providing sectional views of the treatment volume and high contrast scout-mode verification images, and 3) to provide a means for periodically checking the patients anatomical conformation against what was used to generate the original therapy plan. The treatment machine was modified by mounting an array of detectors on a frame bolted to the counter weight end of the gantry in such a manner as to define a third generation CT Scanner geometry. The data gathering is controlled by a Z-80 based microcomputer system which transfers the x-ray transmission data to a general purpose PDP 11/34 for processing. There a series of calibration processes and a logarithmic conversion were performed to get projection data. After reordering the projection data to an equivalent parallel beam sinogram format a convolution algorithm was employed to construct the image from the equivalent parallel projection data. Results of phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2.6 mm and an electron density discrimination of less than 1% which are sufficiently good for accurate therapy planning. Results also show that the system is linear to within the precision of our measurement (approx. =.75%) over a wide range of electron densities corresponding to those found in body tissues. Animal and human images are also presented to demonstrate that the system's imaging capability is sufficient to allow the necessary visualization of anatomy.

  3. SU-E-I-21: Dosimetric Characterization and Image Quality Evaluation of the AIRO Mobile CT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J; Bruner, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The AIRO Mobile CT system was recently introduced which overcomes the limitations from existing CT, CT fluoroscopy, and intraoperative O-arm. With an integrated table and a large diameter bore, the system is suitable for cranial, spine and trauma procedures, making it a highly versatile intraoperative imaging system. This study is to investigate radiation dose and image quality of the AIRO and compared with those from a routine CT scanner. Methods: Radiation dose was measured using a conventional 100mm pencil ionization chamber and CT polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) body and head phantoms. Image quality was evaluated with a CATPHAN 500 phantom. Spatial resolution, low contrast resolution (CNR), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), and Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) were analyzed. Results: Under identical technique conditions, radiation dose (mGy/mAs) from the AIRO mobile CT system (AIRO) is higher than that from a 64 slice CT scanner. MTFs show that both Soft and Standard filters of the AIRO system lost resolution quickly compared to the Sensation 64 slice CT. With the Standard kernel, the spatial resolutions of the AIRO system are 3lp/cm and 4lp/cm for the body and head FOVs, respectively. NNPSs show low frequency noise due to ring-like artifacts. Due to a higher dose in terms of mGy/mAs at both head and body FOV, CNR of the AIRO system is higher than that of the Siemens scanner. However detectability of the low contrast objects is poorer in the AIRO due to the presence of ring artifacts in the location of the targets. Conclusion: For image guided surgery applications, the AIRO has some advantages over a routine CT scanner due to its versatility, large bore size, and acceptable image quality. Our evaluation of the physical performance helps its future improvements.

  4. Evaluation of x-ray scatter properties in a dedicated cone-beam breast CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Alexander L.C.; Boone, John M.; Shah, Nikula

    2005-09-15

    The magnitude of scatter contamination on a first-generation prototype breast computed tomography (CT) scanner was evaluated using the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) metric. The SPR was measured and characterized over a wide range of parameters relevant to breast CT imaging, including x-ray beam energy, breast diameter, breast composition, isocenter-to-detector distance, collimated slot thickness, and grid ratio. The results demonstrated that in the absence of scatter reduction techniques, the SPR levels for the average breast (e.g., 14 cm diameter 50/50 composition cylindrical phantom) are quite high ({approx}0.5 at the center of the phantom for 80 kVp in true cone-beam CT geometry), and increases as the diameter of the phantom is increased (to {approx}1.0 at the center of a 18 cm diameter 50/50 phantom). The x-ray beam energy and the phantom compositions had only minimal impact on the measured SPR. When an ideal bowtie filter was used, the SPRs at the central axis of the 14 and 18 cm cylindrical phantoms were reduced while the SPRs at the edge of the phantoms were increased. Lastly, collimation in the vertical direction had a significant impact on the SPRs at the central axis of the phantoms. These high SPR levels might lead to cupping artifacts and increased noise in the reconstructed CT images, and this suggests that efficient scatter rejection and/or correction techniques may be required to improve the quality and accuracy of cone beam CT images.

  5. Development Of A Flash X-Ray Scanner For Stereoradiography And CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endorf, Robert J.; DiBianca, Frank A.; Fritsch, Daniel S.; Liu, Wen-Ching; Burns, Charles B.

    1989-05-01

    We are developing a flash x-ray scanner for stereoradiography and CT which will be able to produce a stereoradiograph in 30 to 70 ns and a complete CT scan in one microsecond. This type of imaging device will be valuable in studying high speed processes, high acceleration, and traumatic events. We have built a two channel flash x-ray system capable of producing stereo radiographs with stereo angles of from 15 to 165 degrees. The dynamic and static Miff 's for the flash x-ray system were measured and compared with similar MIT's measured for a conventional medical x-ray system. We have written and tested a stereo reconstruction algorithm to determine three dimensional space points from corresponding points in the two stereo images. To demonstrate the ability of the system to image traumatic events, a radiograph was obtained of a bone undergoing a fracture. The effects of accelerations of up to 600 g were examined on radiographs taken of human kidney tissue samples in a rapidly rotating centrifuge. Feasibility studies of CT reconstruction have been performed by making simulated Cr images of various phantoms for larger flash x-ray systems of from 8 to 29 flash x-ray tubes.

  6. Diagnostic applications of cardiac multislice CT with sixteen-row scanner: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Tognini, Giuseppe; Arisi, Arianna; Ferrozzi, Francesco; De Blasi, Mario; De Filippo, Massimo; Paoli, Giorgia; Patti, Arianna; Bnà, Claudio; Zompatori, Maurizio; Ardissimo, Diego; Gherli, Tiziano

    2004-01-01

    Coronary angiography is nowadays the diagnostic standard in the evaluation of coronary artery anatomy, in the identification of stenoses and in the follow-up of revascularization procedures (PTCA-stenting, bypass). The limitations of such technique in terms of invasivity and high cost has targeted research efforts towards the development of non invasive diagnostic tools. Technological evolution in the field of helical CT has provided 2, 4, 8 and 16 detector-row multislice scanners characterized by progressive improvements in terms of spatial and temporal resolution that have made them increasingly suitable for the analysis of moving structures with high quality anatomic detail. The main cardiologic applications of multislice CT include coronary calcium scoring, the evaluation of coronary vascular anatomy and disease, follow-up of revascularization procedures (stenting, bypass), and the evaluation of cardiac walls and chambers. The aim of this paper is to describe the applications of sixteen detector-row multisclice CT in non invasive evaluation of cardiac and coronary diseases.

  7. [Radiation to the orbits during computer tomography with the emi scanner ct 1010 (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schneider, G; Sager, W D; Spreizer, H

    1978-06-01

    Radiation dose to the lens during examinations with the EMI scanner CT 1010 depends on the region examined, on the angle of swing, duration of scan and the plane of the examination. In the most common position (horizontal, 180 degrees and 60 seconds) lens dose during examination of the orbit is about 900 mR., and for examination of the skull about 300 mR. Longer durations of scan and greater swings may increase the dose to the lens to 9 R. Even in the most unfavourable cases, the dose to the lens is less than would be obtained from skull tomography and skull angiography in two planes. Nevertheless, axial computer tomography used under certain conditions, and particularly when repeated, will have to be considered as a possible cause of damage to the lens.

  8. Small Animal Imaging with Compact Micro-Ct Scanner with Timepix Quad Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudak, Jan; Zemlicka, Jan; Krejci, Frantisek; Polansky, Stepan; Mrzilkova, Jana; Turecek, Daniel; Jakubek, Jan; Jakubek, Martin; Svoboda, Zdenek; Zach, Petr; Andel, Michal

    2014-06-01

    X-ray microtomography is currently one of the leading approaches in high resolution imaging providing information about the internal structure of the investigated objects. In biological imaging, this method is, however, still limited by low contrast of soft tissue. This limitation can be in some cases overcome by the application of contrast agents. The other possibility is based on the use of a new generation of noiseless particle counting detectors providing wide dynamic range which enable to detect even slight intensity changes induced by soft tissue in the transmitted beam. In this work, we demonstrate the performance of a redesigned MARS CT scanner equipped with the Timepix detector. Results of X-ray microtomographies of several biological samples demonstrating improved soft tissue sensitivity are presented.

  9. Overbeaming and overlapping of volume-scan CT with tube current modulation in a 320-detector row CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yan-Shi; Lai, Nan-Ku; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of volume scan tube current modulation (VS-ATCM) with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) technique in abdomen CT examinations. We scanned an elliptical cone-shaped phantom utilizing AIDR3D technique combined with VS-ATCM mode in a 320-detector row CT scanner. The image noise distributions with conventional filtered back-projction (FBP) technique and those with AIDR3D technique were compared. The radiation dose profile and tube current time product (mAs) in three noise levels of VS-ATCM modes were compared. The radiation beam profiles of five preset scan lengths were measured using Gafchromic film strips to assess the effects of overbeaming and everlapping. The results indicated that the image noises with AIDR3D technique was 13-74% lower than those in FBP technique. The mAs distributions can be a prediction for various abdominal sizes when undergoing a VS-ATCM mode scan. Patients can receive the radiation dose of overbeaming and overlapping during the VS-ATCM mode scans.

  10. Dosimetry concepts for scanner quality assurance and tissue dose assessment in micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hupfer, Martin; Kolditz, Daniel; Nowak, Tristan; Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: At present, no established methods exist for dosimetry in micro computed tomography (micro-CT). The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate practical concepts for both dosimetric scanner quality assurance and tissue dose assessment for micro-CT. Methods: The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was adapted to micro-CT and measurements of the CTDI both free in air and in the center of cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 20 and 32 mm diameter were performed in a 6 month interval with a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber calibrated for low tube voltages. For tissue dose assessment, z-profile measurements using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) were performed and both profile and CTDI measurements were compared to Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to validate an existing MC tool for use in micro-CT. The consistency of MC calculations and TLD measurements was further investigated in two mice cadavers. Results: CTDI was found to be a reproducible quantity for constancy tests on the micro-CT system under study, showing a linear dependence on tube voltage and being by definition proportional to mAs setting and z-collimation. The CTDI measured free in air showed larger systematic deviations after the 6 month interval compared to the CTDI measured in PMMA phantoms. MC calculations were found to match CTDI measurements within 3% when using x-ray spectra measured at our micro-CT installation and better than 10% when using x-ray spectra calculated from semi-empirical models. Visual inspection revealed good agreement for all z-profiles. The consistency of MC calculations and TLD measurements in mice was found to be better than 10% with a mean deviation of 4.5%. Conclusions: Our results show the CTDI implemented for micro-CT to be a promising candidate for dosimetric quality assurance measurements as it linearly reflects changes in tube voltage, mAs setting, and collimation used during the scan, encouraging further studies on a variety of

  11. Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using a real-time dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Politte, David G.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Several areas of computed tomography (CT) research require knowledge about the intensity profile of the x-ray fan beam that is introduced by a bow tie filter. This information is considered proprietary by CT manufacturers, so noninvasive measurement methods are required. One method using real-time dosimeters has been proposed in the literature. A commercially available dosimeter was used to apply that method, and analysis techniques were developed to extract fan beam profiles from measurements. Methods: A real-time ion chamber was placed near the periphery of an empty CT gantry and the dose rate versus time waveform was recorded as the x-ray source rotated about the isocenter. In contrast to previously proposed analysis methods that assumed a pointlike detector, the finite-size ion chamber received varying amounts of coverage by the collimated x-ray beam during rotation, precluding a simple relationship between the source intensity as a function of fan beam angle and measured intensity. A two-parameter model for measurement intensity was developed that included both effective collimation width and source-to-detector distance, which then was iteratively solved to minimize the error between duplicate measurements at corresponding fan beam angles, allowing determination of the fan beam profile from measured dose-rate waveforms. Measurements were performed on five different scanner systems while varying parameters such as collimation, kVp, and bow tie filters. On one system, direct measurements of the bow tie profile were collected for comparison with the real-time dosimeter technique. Results: The data analysis method for a finite-size detector was found to produce a fan beam profile estimate with a relative error between duplicate measurement intensities of <5%. It was robust over a wide range of collimation widths (e.g., 1–40 mm), producing fan beam profiles that agreed with a relative error of 1%–5%. Comparison with a direct measurement technique on

  12. Degradation of the z- resolution due to a longitudinal motion with a 64-channel CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Grosjean, Romain; Sauer, Benoît; Guerra, Rui Matias; Blum, Alain; Felblinger, Jacques; Hubert, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Isotropic acquisitions are routinely achievable with 64- channel CT scanners,. As it predecessors, it includes MultiPlanar Reformation (MPR) projection for the reconstruction of two-dimensional images and volume rendering for the creation of three dimensional images. The accuracy of images obtained with these postprocessing methods depends on the spatial resolution of image data acquired along the long axis of the patient (ie longitudinal, or z-inis spatial resolution). But physiologic motions can appear during a Computed Tomography (CT) exam and can leacd to a degradation of this spatial resolution. By using two different phantoms and a dynamic platform, we have studied the influence of a z-axis linear motion on the MPR images quality. Our results show that the corruption of the data results in the loss of information about the form, the contrast and/or the size of the scanned object. This corruption of data can lead to diagnostic errors by mimicking diseases or by masking physiologic details.

  13. SU-E-I-85: Absorbed Dose Estimation for a Commercially Available MicroCT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y; Ren, L; Liu, H; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the simulated absorbed dose delivered for a typical scan from a commercially available microCT scanner in order to aid in the dose estimation. Methods: The simulations were conducted using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit (version 10) with the standard electromagnetic classes. The Quantum FX microCT scanner (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA) was modeled incorporating the energy fluence and angular distributions of generated photons, spatial dimensions of nominal source-to-object and source-to-detector distances. The energy distribution was measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., Bedford, USA) with a 300 angular spread from the source for the 90 kVp X-ray beams with no additional filtration. The nominal distances from the source to object consisted of three setups: 154.0 mm, 104.0 mm, and 51.96 mm. Our simulations recorded the dose absorbed in a cylindrical phantom of PMMA with a fixed length of 2 cm and varying radii (10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using 100 million incident photons. The averaged absorbed dose in the object was then quantified for all setups. An exposure measurement of 417 mR was taken using a Radcal 9095 system utilizing 10×9–180 ion chamber with the given technique of 90 kVp, 63 μA, and 12 s. The exposure rate was also simulated with same setup to calculate the conversion factor of the beam current and the number of incident photons. Results: For a typical cone-beam scan with non-filtered 90kVp, the dose coefficients (the absorbed dose per mAs) were 2.614, 2.549 and 2.467 μGy/mAs under source to object distance of 104 mm for the object diameters of 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm, respectively. Conclusion: A look-up table was developed where an investigator can estimate the delivered dose using this particular microCT given the scanning protocol (kVp and mAs) as well as the size of the scanned object.

  14. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good

  15. SU-E-E-12: Validation of the Implementation of Different CT Scanners in Proton Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes, C Llina; Geismer, D; Christiaens, M; Vermeren, X; Ding, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of the relationship of CT number and Relative Stopping Power (RSP) among different CT-scanners in the evaluation of dose distribution, for different tumor sites and proton therapy modalities like Pencil Beam and Uniform Scanning. Methods: The same tissue characterization phantom was used to analyze the difference in the X-rays energy spectra of 2 CT scanners of the same vendor. One CT is for planning and the other for treatment verification. The Hounsfield unit (HU) variations and associated dosimetric uncertainty were investigated in uniform scanning and pencil beam treatment plans of different sites. At the same time comparisons of the CT calibration curve were done using the same acquisition protocols. The phantom was imaged on a 16 multi-row CT scanner, with energies of 120 and 140 kVp,currents of 263 and 245 mA and slice thickness of 2 and 3mm respectively. The dosimetric uncertainty of the plans was evaluated in a homogeneus phantom comparing DVHs, gamma index criteria 3% 3mm, and range between them. Results: The variation of HU was within the standard deviation of the average for each tissue substitute. The curves fitted with a bilinear interpolation show a maximum deviation in high density materials like cortical bone and solid water, where the HU values deviated more than 0,6% for the 120kVp protocol. For the others curves the deviation was more than 2% for low densities materials. The gamma index uncertainty criteria passed in all the cases. Conclusion: The HU variations for the different scanners were ≤3%. Lower than the 3,5% uncertainties considered in our treatment planning system. The dosimetric analysis shows that the X-ray spectrum has a small effect on the HU-RSP curve, allowing the use of a single tissue characterization curve in our proton treatment planning system for plans verifications.

  16. Feasibility study using MRI and two optical CT scanners for readout of polymer gel and PresageTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, H.; Skyt, P. S.; Ceberg, S.; Doran, S.; Muren, L. P.; Balling, P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Bäck, S. Å. J.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the conventional combination of three-dimensional dosimeter (nPAG gel) and readout method (MRI) with other combinations of three-dimensional dosimeters (nPAG gel/PresageTM) and readout methods (optical CT scanners). In the first experiment, the dose readout of a gel irradiated with a four field-box technique was performed with both an Octopus IQ scanner and MRI. It was seen that the MRI readout agreed slightly better to the TPS. In another experiment, a gel and a PresageTM sample were irradiated with a VMAT field and read out using MRI and a fast laser scanner, respectively. A comparison between the TPS and the volumes revealed that the MRI/gel readout had closer resemblance to the TPS than the optical CT/PresageTM readout. There are clearly potential in the evaluated optical CT scanners, but more time has to be invested in the particular scanning scenario than was possible in this study.

  17. Optimization of a fast optical CT scanner for nPAG gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; DeDeene, Yves

    2009-05-01

    A fast laser scanning optical CT scanner was constructed and optimized at the Ghent university. The first images acquired were contaminated with several imaging artifacts. The origins of the artifacts were investigated. Performance characteristics of different components were measured such as the laser spot size, light attenuation by the lenses and the dynamic range of the photo-detector. The need for a differential measurement using a second photo-detector was investigated. Post processing strategies to compensate for hardware related errors were developed. Drift of the laser and of the detector was negligible. Incorrectly refractive index matching was dealt with by developing an automated matching process. When scratches on the water bath and phantom container are present, these pose a post processing challenge to eliminate the resulting artifacts from the reconstructed images Secondary laser spots due to multiple reflections need to be further investigated. The time delay in the control of the galvanometer and detector was dealt with using black strips that serve as markers of the projection position. Still some residual ringing artifacts are present. Several small volumetric test phantoms were constructed to obtain an overall picture of the accuracy.

  18. Performance comparison of two commercial BGO-based PET/CT scanners using NEMA NU 2-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bolard, Gregory; Prior, John O.; Modolo, Luca; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Kosinski, Marek; Wastiel, Claude; Malterre, Jerome; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, Francois; Verdun, Francis R.

    2007-07-15

    Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners play a major role in medicine for in vivo imaging in an increasing number of diseases in oncology, cardiology, neurology, and psychiatry. With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes other than {sup 18}F and newer scanners, there is a need to optimize radioisotope activity and acquisition protocols, as well as to compare scanner performances on an objective basis. The Discovery-LS (D-LS) was among the first clinical PET/CT scanners to be developed and has been extensively characterized with older National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA) NU 2-1994 standards. At the time of publication of the latest version of the standards (NU 2-2001) that have been adapted for whole-body imaging under clinical conditions, more recent models from the same manufacturer, i.e., Discovery-ST (D-ST) and Discovery-STE (D-STE), were commercially available. We report on the full characterization both in the two- and three-dimensional acquisition mode of the D-LS according to latest NEMA NU 2-2001 standards (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, accuracy of count losses, and random coincidence correction and image quality), as well as a detailed comparison with the newer D-ST widely used and whose characteristics are already published.

  19. Practical considerations for noise power spectra estimation for clinical CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Steven; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Anastasio, Mark; Mutic, Sasa; Li, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Local noise power spectra (NPS) have been commonly calculated to represent the noise properties of CT imaging systems, but their properties are significantly affected by the utilized calculation schemes. In this study, the effects of varied calculation parameters on the local NPS were analyzed, and practical suggestions were provided regarding the estimation of local NPS for clinical CT scanners. The uniformity module of a Catphan phantom was scanned with a Philips Brilliance 64 slice CT simulator with varied scanning protocols. Images were reconstructed using FBP and iDose4 iterative reconstruction with noise reduction levels 1, 3, and 6. Local NPS were calculated and compared for varied region of interest (ROI) locations and sizes, image background removal methods, and window functions. Additionally, with a predetermined NPS as a ground truth, local NPS calculation accuracy was compared for computer simulated ROIs, varying the aforementioned parameters in addition to ROI number. An analysis of the effects of these varied calculation parameters on the magnitude and shape of the NPS was conducted. The local NPS varied depending on calculation parameters, particularly at low spatial frequencies below ~ 0.15 mm-1. For the simulation study, NPS calculation error decreased exponentially as ROI number increased. For the Catphan study the NPS magnitude varied as a function of ROI location, which was better observed when using smaller ROI sizes. The image subtraction method for background removal was the most effective at reducing low-frequency background noise, and produced similar results no matter which ROI size or window function was used. The PCA background removal method with a Hann window function produced the closest match to image subtraction, with an average percent difference of 17.5%. Image noise should be analyzed locally by calculating the NPS for small ROI sizes. A minimum ROI size is recommended based on the chosen radial bin size and image pixel

  20. Practical considerations for noise power spectra estimation for clinical CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Steven; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Anastasio, Mark; Mutic, Sasa; Li, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Local noise power spectra (NPS) have been commonly calculated to represent the noise properties of CT imaging systems, but their properties are significantly affected by the utilized calculation schemes. In this study, the effects of varied calculation parameters on the local NPS were analyzed, and practical suggestions were provided regarding the estimation of local NPS for clinical CT scanners. The uniformity module of a Catphan phantom was scanned with a Philips Brilliance 64 slice CT simulator with varied scanning protocols. Images were reconstructed using FBP and iDose4 iterative reconstruction with noise reduction levels 1, 3, and 6. Local NPS were calculated and compared for varied region of interest (ROI) locations and sizes, image background removal methods, and window functions. Additionally, with a predetermined NPS as a ground truth, local NPS calculation accuracy was compared for computer simulated ROIs, varying the aforementioned parameters in addition to ROI number. An analysis of the effects of these varied calculation parameters on the magnitude and shape of the NPS was conducted. The local NPS varied depending on calculation parameters, particularly at low spatial frequencies below ~ 0.15 mm-1. For the simulation study, NPS calculation error decreased exponentially as ROI number increased. For the Catphan study the NPS magnitude varied as a function of ROI location, which was better observed when using smaller ROI sizes. The image subtraction method for background removal was the most effective at reducing low-frequency background noise, and produced similar results no matter which ROI size or window function was used. The PCA background removal method with a Hann window function produced the closest match to image subtraction, with an average percent difference of 17.5%. Image noise should be analyzed locally by calculating the NPS for small ROI sizes. A minimum ROI size is recommended based on the chosen radial bin size and image pixel

  1. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Warren G.; Rudko, D. A.; Braam, Nicolas A.; Jirasek, Andrew; Wells, Derek M.

    2013-06-15

    flask registration technique was shown to achieve submillimetre and subdegree placement accuracy. Dosimetry protocol investigations emphasize the need to allow gel dosimeters to cool gradually and to be scanned while at room temperature. Preliminary tests show that considerable noise reduction can be achieved with sinogram filtering and by binning image pixels into more clinically relevant grid sizes. Conclusions: This paper describes a new optical CT scanner for 3D radiation dosimetry. Tests demonstrate that it is capable of imaging both absorption-based and scatter-based samples of high opacities. Imaging protocol and gel dosimeter manufacture techniques have been adapted to produce optimal reconstruction results. These optimal results will require suitable filtering and binning techniques for noise reduction purposes.

  2. Experimental validation of a method characterizing bow tie filters in CT scanners using a real-time dose probe

    SciTech Connect

    McKenney, Sarah E.; Nosratieh, Anita; Gelskey, Dale; Yang Kai; Huang Shinying; Chen Lin; Boone, John M.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Beam-shaping or ''bow tie'' (BT) filters are used to spatially modulate the x-ray beam in a CT scanner, but the conventional method of step-and-shoot measurement to characterize a beam's profile is tedious and time-consuming. The theory for characterization of bow tie relative attenuation (COBRA) method, which relies on a real-time dosimeter to address the issues of conventional measurement techniques, was previously demonstrated using computer simulations. In this study, the feasibility of the COBRA theory is further validated experimentally through the employment of a prototype real-time radiation meter and a known BT filter. Methods: The COBRA method consisted of four basic steps: (1) The probe was placed at the edge of a scanner's field of view; (2) a real-time signal train was collected as the scanner's gantry rotated with the x-ray beam on; (3) the signal train, without a BT filter, was modeled using peak values measured in the signal train of step 2; and (4) the relative attenuation of the BT filter was estimated from filtered and unfiltered data sets. The prototype probe was first verified to have an isotropic and linear response to incident x-rays. The COBRA method was then tested on a dedicated breast CT scanner with a custom-designed BT filter and compared to the conventional step-and-shoot characterization of the BT filter. Using basis decomposition of dual energy signal data, the thickness of the filter was estimated and compared to the BT filter's manufacturing specifications. The COBRA method was also demonstrated with a clinical whole body CT scanner using the body BT filter. The relative attenuation was calculated at four discrete x-ray tube potentials and used to estimate the thickness of the BT filter. Results: The prototype probe was found to have a linear and isotropic response to x-rays. The relative attenuation produced from the COBRA method fell within the error of the relative attenuation measured with the step-and-shoot method

  3. Task-based modeling and optimization of a cone-beam CT scanner for musculoskeletal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, P.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G. J.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This work applies a cascaded systems model for cone-beam CT imaging performance to the design and optimization of a system for musculoskeletal extremity imaging. The model provides a quantitative guide to the selection of system geometry, source and detector components, acquisition techniques, and reconstruction parameters. Methods: The model is based on cascaded systems analysis of the 3D noise-power spectrum (NPS) and noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) combined with factors of system geometry (magnification, focal spot size, and scatter-to-primary ratio) and anatomical background clutter. The model was extended to task-based analysis of detectability index (d') for tasks ranging in contrast and frequency content, and d' was computed as a function of system magnification, detector pixel size, focal spot size, kVp, dose, electronic noise, voxel size, and reconstruction filter to examine trade-offs and optima among such factors in multivariate analysis. The model was tested quantitatively versus the measured NPS and qualitatively in cadaver images as a function of kVp, dose, pixel size, and reconstruction filter under conditions corresponding to the proposed scanner. Results: The analysis quantified trade-offs among factors of spatial resolution, noise, and dose. System magnification (M) was a critical design parameter with strong effect on spatial resolution, dose, and x-ray scatter, and a fairly robust optimum was identified at M {approx} 1.3 for the imaging tasks considered. The results suggested kVp selection in the range of {approx}65-90 kVp, the lower end (65 kVp) maximizing subject contrast and the upper end maximizing NEQ (90 kVp). The analysis quantified fairly intuitive results--e.g., {approx}0.1-0.2 mm pixel size (and a sharp reconstruction filter) optimal for high-frequency tasks (bone detail) compared to {approx}0.4 mm pixel size (and a smooth reconstruction filter) for low-frequency (soft-tissue) tasks. This result suggests a specific protocol for

  4. Fast, high-resolution 3D dosimetry utilizing a novel optical-CT scanner incorporating tertiary telecentric collimation.

    PubMed

    Sakhalkar, H S; Oldham, M

    2008-01-01

    This study introduces a charge coupled device (CCD) area detector based optical-computed tomography (optical-CT) scanner for comprehensive verification of radiation dose distributions recorded in nonscattering radiochromic dosimeters. Defining characteristics include: (i) a very fast scanning time of approximately 5 min to acquire a complete three-dimensional (3D) dataset, (ii) improved image formation through the use of custom telecentric optics, which ensures accurate projection images and minimizes artifacts from scattered and stray-light sources, and (iii) high resolution (potentially 50 microm) isotropic 3D dose readout. The performance of the CCD scanner for 3D dose readout was evaluated by comparison with independent 3D readout from the single laser beam OCTOPUS-scanner for the same PRESAGE dosimeters. The OCTOPUS scanner was considered the "gold standard" technique in light of prior studies demonstrating its accuracy. Additional comparisons were made against calculated dose distributions from the ECLIPSE treatment-planning system. Dose readout for the following treatments were investigated: (i) a single rectangular beam irradiation to investigate small field and very steep dose gradient dosimetry away from edge effects, (ii) a 2-field open beam parallel-opposed irradiation to investigate dosimetry along steep dose gradients, and (iii) a 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation to investigate dosimetry for complex treatment delivery involving modulation of fluence and for dosimetry along moderate dose gradients. Dose profiles, dose-difference plots, and gamma maps were employed to evaluate quantitative estimates of agreement between independently measured and calculated dose distributions. Results indicated that dose readout from the CCD scanner was in agreement with independent gold-standard readout from the OCTOPUS-scanner as well as the calculated ECLIPSE dose distribution for all treatments, except in regions within a few

  5. Measurement of scattered radiation in a volumetric 64-slice CT scanner using three experimental techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarzadeh, A.; Ay, M. R.; Ghadiri, H.; Sarkar, S.; Zaidi, H.

    2010-04-01

    Compton scatter poses a significant threat to volumetric x-ray computed tomography, bringing cupping and streak artefacts thus impacting qualitative and quantitative imaging procedures. To perform appropriate scatter compensation, it is necessary to estimate the magnitude and spatial distribution of x-ray scatter. The aim of this study is to compare three experimental methods for measurement of the scattered radiation profile in a 64-slice CT scanner. The explored techniques involve the use of collimator shadow, a single blocker (a lead bar that suppresses the primary radiation) and an array blocker. The latter was recently proposed and validated by our group. The collimator shadow technique was used as reference for comparison since it established itself as the most accurate experimental procedure available today. The mean relative error of measurements in all tube voltages was 3.9 ± 5.5% (with a maximum value of 20%) for the single blocker method whereas it was 1.4 ± 1.1% (with a maximum value of 5%) for the proposed blocker array method. The calculated scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) using the blocker array method for the tube voltages of 140 kVp and 80 kVp was 0.148 and 1.034, respectively. For a larger polypropylene phantom, the maximum SPR achieved was 0.803 and 6.458 at 140 kVp and 80 kVp, respectively. Although the three compared methods present a reasonable accuracy for calculation of the scattered profile in the region corresponding to the object, the collimator shadow method is by far the most accurate empirical technique. Nevertheless, the blocker array method is relatively straightforward for scatter estimation providing minor additional radiation exposure to the patient.

  6. Objective characterization of GE Discovery CT750 HD scanner: Gemstone spectral imaging mode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Da; Li Xinhua; Liu, Bob

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To objectively characterize the performance of the gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) mode of GE CT750 HD scanner from a user's perspective. Methods: A regular scan protocol that approximates the adult abdomen scan protocol frequently used in the authors' institute was selected as the baseline, and a GSI protocol (preset 11) that is similar to the regular protocol and has a moderate dose level (CTDI{sub vol}=26.27 mGy) was compared to the baseline protocol. The resolving power of both protocols was characterized in terms of modulation transfer functions and high contrast resolution bar readings. Their noise characteristics were studied through noise power spectra, and their low contrast detectability was compared via contrast-to-noise ratio. Material decomposition capability of GSI was evaluated by scanning iodine solutions of 9-24 mg/ml iodine concentration in a Gammex CT phantom and by examining the estimated iodine concentration. In addition, a formula describing the dependency of HU in iodine enhanced area on GSI monochromatic energies and iodine concentrations was provided and the theoretical values were compared with the measured results. Results: The resolutions levels of 50%, 10%, and 5% MTF of GSI monochromatic images at 65 keV agree with those of the regular protocol within 0.1 lp/cm. GSI monochromatic images at 65 keV demonstrated the lowest noise level among GSI images of different monochromatic energies and showed very similar noise magnitude and noise power distribution as compared to the regular protocol images. The CNR of 60 and 65 keV GSI monoimages are approximately 100% of those of the regular protocol images. Estimated iodine concentration levels agreed with the actual values within 2% when the iodine solutions were placed at 3, 9, 12 o'clock positions of the phantom; when iodine solutions were placed at the phantom center and at 6 o'clock position, higher discrepancies of 2%-10% were observed. The observed dependency of HU on keV and

  7. How Much Is the Dose Varying between Follow-Up CT-Examinations Performed on the Same Scanner with the Same Imaging Protocol?

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, Franz Ferdinand; Guberina, Nika; Ringelstein, Adrian; Schlosser, Thomas; Theysohn, Jens Matthias; Forsting, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the dose variation between follow-up CT examinations, when a patient is examined several times on the same scanner with the identical scan protocol which comprised automated exposure control. Material and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the local ethics committee. The volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) and the dose-length-product (DLP) were recorded for 60 cancer patients (29 male, 31 female, mean age 60.1 years), who received 3 follow-up CT examinations each composed of a non-enhanced scan of the liver (LI-CT) and a contrast-enhanced scan of chest (CH-CT) and abdomen (AB-CT). Each examination was performed on the same scanner (Siemens Definition FLASH) equipped with automated exposure control (CARE Dose 4D and CARE KV) using the identical scan protocol. Results The median percentage difference in DLP between follow-up examinations was 9.6% for CH-CT, 10.3% for LI-CT, and 10.1% for AB-CT; the median percentage difference in CTDIvol 8.3% for CH-CT, 7.4% for LI-CT and 7.7% for AB-CT (p<0.0001 for all values). The maximum difference in DLP between follow-up examinations was 67.5% for CH-CT, 50.8% for LI-CT and 74.3% for AB-CT; the maximum difference in CTDIvol 62.9% for CH-CT, 47.2% for LI-CT, and 49% for AB-CT. Conclusion A significant variance in the radiation dose occurs between follow-up CT examinations when the same CT scanner and the identical imaging protocol are used in combination with automated exposure control. PMID:27050659

  8. SU-E-I-31: Differences Observed in Radiation Doses Across 2 Similar CT Scanners From Adult Brain-Neck CT Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K; McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the difference in radiation doses from adult Brain-Neck CT angiography (CTA) between two CT scanners. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol, DLP) from adult Brain-Neck CTA performed with two CT scanners (Sensation 64 (S64) and Definition AS (AS), Siemens Healthcare) performed at two of our facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. X-ray dose management software (Radmetrics, Bayer Healthcare) was used to mine these data. All exams were performed with Tube Current Modulation (Care Dose 4D), tube voltage of 120 kVp, quality reference mAs of 300, beam collimation of 64*0.6 mm. The rotation time was set to 0.5 sec for S64 and 1.0 sec for AS. We also scanned an anthropomorphic skull and chest phantom under routine Brain-Neck CTA protocol with the two scanners and extracted the tube current values from the raw projection data. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP in Brain-Neck CTA was 72 mGy and 2554 mGy*cm for AS, which was substantially larger than the mean values of 46 mGy and 1699 mGy*cm for S64. The maximum tube current was 583 mA for most cases on the S64 while the maximum was 666 mA for AS even though the rotation time set for AS was 1.0 sec. Measurements obtained with the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the tube current reached 583 mA at the shoulder region for S64 while it reached to 666 mA for AS. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that substantially different CT doses can Result from Brain-Neck CTA protocols even when similar scanners and similar settings are used. Though both scanners have a similar maximum mA rating, differences in mA were observed through the shoulders, resulting in substantially different CTDIvol values.

  9. Effect of light source instability on uniformity of 3D reconstructions from a cone beam optical CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Begg, J; Taylor, M L; Holloway, L; Kron, T; Franich, R D

    2014-12-01

    Temporally varying light intensity during acquisition of projection images in an optical CT scanner can potentially be misinterpreted as physical properties of the sample. This work investigated the impact of LED light source intensity instability on measured attenuation coefficients. Different scenarios were investigated by conducting one or both of the reference and data scans in a 'cold' scanner, where the light source intensity had not yet stabilised. Uniform samples were scanned to assess the impact on measured uniformity. The orange (590 nm) light source decreased in intensity by 29 % over the first 2 h, while the red (633 nm) decreased by 9 %. The rates of change of intensity at 2 h were 0.1 and 0.03 % respectively over a 5 min period-corresponding to the scan duration. The normalisation function of the reconstruction software does not fully account for the intensity differences and discrepancies remain. Attenuation coefficient inaccuracies of up to 8 % were observed for data reconstructed from projection images acquired with a cold scanner. Increased noise was observed for most cases where one or both of the scans was acquired without sufficient warm-up. The decrease in accuracy and increase in noise were most apparent for data reconstructed from reference and data scans acquired with a cold scanner on different days. PMID:25262165

  10. Fast, high-resolution 3D dosimetry utilizing a novel optical-CT scanner incorporating tertiary telecentric collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Sakhalkar, H. S.; Oldham, M.

    2008-01-15

    This study introduces a charge coupled device (CCD) area detector based optical-computed tomography (optical-CT) scanner for comprehensive verification of radiation dose distributions recorded in nonscattering radiochromic dosimeters. Defining characteristics include: (i) a very fast scanning time of {approx}5 min to acquire a complete three-dimensional (3D) dataset, (ii) improved image formation through the use of custom telecentric optics, which ensures accurate projection images and minimizes artifacts from scattered and stray-light sources, and (iii) high resolution (potentially 50 {mu}m) isotropic 3D dose readout. The performance of the CCD scanner for 3D dose readout was evaluated by comparison with independent 3D readout from the single laser beam OCTOPUS-scanner for the same PRESAGE dosimeters. The OCTOPUS scanner was considered the 'gold standard' technique in light of prior studies demonstrating its accuracy. Additional comparisons were made against calculated dose distributions from the ECLIPSE treatment-planning system. Dose readout for the following treatments were investigated: (i) a single rectangular beam irradiation to investigate small field and very steep dose gradient dosimetry away from edge effects, (ii) a 2-field open beam parallel-opposed irradiation to investigate dosimetry along steep dose gradients, and (iii) a 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation to investigate dosimetry for complex treatment delivery involving modulation of fluence and for dosimetry along moderate dose gradients. Dose profiles, dose-difference plots, and gamma maps were employed to evaluate quantitative estimates of agreement between independently measured and calculated dose distributions. Results indicated that dose readout from the CCD scanner was in agreement with independent gold-standard readout from the OCTOPUS-scanner as well as the calculated ECLIPSE dose distribution for all treatments, except in regions within a few millimeters of

  11. 200 MeV proton radiography studies with a hand phantom using a prototype proton CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V; Feng, V; Hurley, F; Johnson, R P; Leary, C; Macafee, S; Plumb, A; Rykalin, V; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Schubert, K; Schulte, R; Schultze, B; Steinberg, D; Witt, M; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2014-04-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton computed tomography (CT) scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality.

  12. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V.; Feng, V.; Hurley, F.; Johnson, R.P.; Leary, C.; Macafee, S.; Plumb, A.; Rykalin, V.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Schubert, K.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, B.; Steinberg, D.; Witt, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton CT scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality. PMID:24710156

  13. TH-C-18A-06: Combined CT Image Quality and Radiation Dose Monitoring Program Based On Patient Data to Assess Consistency of Clinical Imaging Across Scanner Models

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, O; Winslow, J; Samei, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: One of the principal challenges of clinical imaging is to achieve an ideal balance between image quality and radiation dose across multiple CT models. The number of scanners and protocols at large medical centers necessitates an automated quality assurance program to facilitate this objective. Therefore, the goal of this work was to implement an automated CT image quality and radiation dose monitoring program based on actual patient data and to use this program to assess consistency of protocols across CT scanner models. Methods: Patient CT scans are routed to a HIPPA compliant quality assurance server. CTDI, extracted using optical character recognition, and patient size, measured from the localizers, are used to calculate SSDE. A previously validated noise measurement algorithm determines the noise in uniform areas of the image across the scanned anatomy to generate a global noise level (GNL). Using this program, 2358 abdominopelvic scans acquired on three commercial CT scanners were analyzed. Median SSDE and GNL were compared across scanner models and trends in SSDE and GNL with patient size were used to determine the impact of differing automatic exposure control (AEC) algorithms. Results: There was a significant difference in both SSDE and GNL across scanner models (9–33% and 15–35% for SSDE and GNL, respectively). Adjusting all protocols to achieve the same image noise would reduce patient dose by 27–45% depending on scanner model. Additionally, differences in AEC methodologies across vendors resulted in disparate relationships of SSDE and GNL with patient size. Conclusion: The difference in noise across scanner models indicates that protocols are not optimally matched to achieve consistent image quality. Our results indicated substantial possibility for dose reduction while achieving more consistent image appearance. Finally, the difference in AEC methodologies suggests the need for size-specific CT protocols to minimize variability in image

  14. High-resolution dynamic CT scanner based on a variable-zoom XRII and a linear photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drangova, Maria; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    1993-09-01

    We have developed a CT scanner with high temporal and spatial resolution which can be used to acquire dynamic images of objects undergoing periodic motion. Our system comprises of an x-ray image intensifier (XRII) optically coupled to a linear photo-diode array (PDA) camera. The XRII has been modified to vary electronically the magnification of the image continuously over fields-of-view (FOV) ranging between 8 and 24 cm, and thus increasing the resolution from 1.4 mm-1 to 3.8 mm-1. In this way, we can select a magnification which maximizes the image resolution for a given object.

  15. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization.

  16. Gated cardiac imaging using a continuously rotating CT scanner: clinical evaluation of 91 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Y.; Uji, T.; Hirayama, T.; Inada, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Fujii, M.

    1984-05-01

    To produce electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated computed tomographic (CT) image of the heart, a post-data-acquisition ECG correlation technique was used in which data for missing angular projections are derived from the original scan data to complete 360 angular projections. Improved image quality and clinical usefulness were demonstrated compared with routine nongated CT and two-dimensional echocardiography. The equipment required for CT gating is of low cost, but the examination time is lengthy and less conveniently performed than echocardiography. However, when echocardiography is indecisive or suspected to be falsely negative, gated CT imaging of the heart is recommended.

  17. Effects of the difference in tube voltage of the CT scanner on dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Dong Joo; Kim, Sung-woo; Jeong, Dong Hyeok; Moon, Young Min; Kim, Jung Ki

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) measures the attenuation coefficient of an object and converts the value assigned to each voxel into a CT number. In radiation therapy, the CT number, which is directly proportional to the linear attenuation coefficient, must be converted to an electron density for radiation dose calculations for cancer treatment. However, if various tube voltages are applied to take the patient's CT image without applying the specific CT number to the electron density conversion curve, the accuracy of the dose calculation is not assured. In this study, changes in CT numbers for different materials due to changes in the tube voltage were demonstrated, and the dose calculation errors in the percentage depth dose (PDD), along with a clinical case were analyzed. The maximum dose difference in the PDD from the treatment planning system (TPS) dose calculation and from the Monte Carlo simulation were 1.3% and 1.1%, respectively, when applying the same CT number to the electron density conversion curve for the 80-kVp and 140-kVp images. In the clinical case, different CT number to electron density conversion curves at tube voltage of 80 kVp and 140 kVp were applied to the same image and the maximum differences in the mean, maximum, and minimum doses were 1.1%, 1.2%, and 1.0%, respectively, at the central region of the phantom and 0.6%, 0.9%, and 0.8%, respectively, at the peripheral region of the phantom.

  18. Radiation exposure of ovarian cancer patients: contribution of CT examinations performed on different MDCT (16 and 64 slices) scanners and image quality evaluation: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality.CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability.Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients' weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality.The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P < 0.0001) than 16-slice CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P < 0.0001). Objective noise was comparable for the 2 CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT.Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams. PMID:25929914

  19. Radiation Exposure of Ovarian Cancer Patients: Contribution of CT Examinations Performed on Different MDCT (16 and 64 Slices) Scanners and Image Quality Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality. CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability. Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients’ weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality. The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P < 0.0001) than 16-slice CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P < 0.0001). Objective noise was comparable for the 2 CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT. Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams. PMID:25929914

  20. Monitor hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in living mouse tail using photoacoustic CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use PCT spectroscopy scanner to monitor the hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation change of living mouse by imaging the artery and veins in a mouse tail. Materials and Methods: One mouse tail was scanned using the PCT small animal scanner at the isosbestic wavelength (796nm) to obtain its hemoglobin concentration. Immediately after the scan, the mouse was euthanized and its blood was extracted from the heart. The true hemoglobin concentration was measured using a co-oximeter. Reconstruction correction algorithm to compensate the acoustic signal loss due to the existence of bone structure in the mouse tail was developed. After the correction, the hemoglobin concentration was calculated from the PCT images and compared with co-oximeter result. Next, one mouse were immobilized in the PCT scanner. Gas with different concentrations of oxygen was given to mouse to change the oxygen saturation. PCT tail vessel spectroscopy scans were performed 15 minutes after the introduction of gas. The oxygen saturation values were then calculated to monitor the oxygen saturation change of mouse. Results: The systematic error for hemoglobin concentration measurement was less than 5% based on preliminary analysis. Same correction technique was used for oxygen saturation calculation. After correction, the oxygen saturation level change matches the oxygen volume ratio change of the introduced gas. Conclusion: This living mouse tail experiment has shown that NIR PCT-spectroscopy can be used to monitor the oxygen saturation status in living small animals.

  1. Hyoid bone development: An assessment of optimal CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Meghan M.; Whyms, Brian J.; Kelly, Michael P.; Doherty, Benjamin M.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Bersu, Edward T.; Vorperian, Houri K.

    2015-01-01

    The hyoid bone anchors and supports the vocal tract. Its complex shape is best studied in three dimensions, but it is difficult to capture on computed tomography (CT) images and three-dimensional volume renderings. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning and rendering parameters to accurately measure the growth and developmental anatomy of the hyoid and to determine whether it is feasible and necessary to use these parameters in the measurement of hyoids from in vivo CT scans. Direct linear and volumetric measurements of skeletonized hyoid bone specimens were compared to corresponding CT images to determine the most accurate scanning parameters and three-dimensional rendering techniques. A pilot study was undertaken using in vivo scans from a retrospective CT database to determine feasibility of quantifying hyoid growth. Scanning parameters and rendering technique affected accuracy of measurements. Most linear CT measurements were within 10% of direct measurements; however, volume was overestimated when CT scans were acquired with a slice thickness greater than 1.25 mm. Slice-by-slice thresholding of hyoid images decreased volume overestimation. The pilot study revealed that the linear measurements tested correlate with age. A fine-tuned rendering approach applied to small slice thickness CT scans produces the most accurate measurements of hyoid bones. However, linear measurements can be accurately assessed from in vivo CT scans at a larger slice thickness. Such findings imply that investigation into the growth and development of the hyoid bone, and the vocal tract as a whole, can now be performed using these techniques. PMID:25810349

  2. Performance evaluation of the Ingenuity TF PET/CT scanner with a focus on high count-rate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Su, Kuan-Hao; Grover, Anu; Narayanan, Manoj; Jordan, David W.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging performance of the Ingenuity TF 128 PET/computed tomography (CT) scanner which has a PET component that was designed to support a wider radioactivity range than is possible with those of Gemini TF PET/CT and Ingenuity TF PET/MR. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate characteristics and image quality were evaluated according to the NEMA NU 2-2007 standard and ACR phantom accreditation procedures; these were supplemented by additional measurements intended to characterize the system under conditions that would be encountered during quantitative cardiac imaging with 82Rb. Image quality was evaluated using a hot spheres phantom, and various contrast recovery and noise measurements were made from replicated images. Timing and energy resolution, dead time, and the linearity of the image activity concentration, were all measured over a wide range of count rates. Spatial resolution (4.8-5.1 mm FWHM), sensitivity (7.3 cps kBq-1), peak noise-equivalent count rate (124 kcps), and peak trues rate (365 kcps) were similar to those of the Gemini TF PET/CT. Contrast recovery was higher with a 2 mm, body-detail reconstruction than with a 4 mm, body reconstruction, although the precision was reduced. The noise equivalent count rate peak was broad (within 10% of peak from 241-609 MBq). The activity measured in phantom images was within 10% of the true activity for count rates up to those observed in 82Rb cardiac PET studies.

  3. Personnel radiation dose considerations in the use of an integrated PET-CT scanner for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Carson, K J; Young, V A L; Cosgrove, V P; Jarritt, P H; Hounsell, A R

    2009-11-01

    The acquisition of radiotherapy planning scans on positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scanners requires the involvement of radiotherapy radiographers. This study assessed the radiation dose received by these radiographers during this process. Radiotherapy planning (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET-CT scans were acquired for 28 non-small cell lung cancer patients. In order to minimise the radiation dose received, a two-stage process was used in which the most time-consuming part of the set-up was performed before the patient received their (18)F-FDG injection. Throughout this process, the radiographers wore electronic personal dosemeters and recorded the doses received at different stages of the process. The mean total radiation dose received by a radiotherapy radiographer was 5.1+/-2.6 microSv per patient. The use of the two-stage process reduced the time spent in close proximity to the patient by approximately a factor of four. The two-stage process was effective in keeping radiation dose to a minimum. The use of a pre-injection set-up session reduces the radiation dose to the radiotherapy radiographers because of their involvement in PET-CT radiotherapy treatment planning scans by approximately a factor of three. PMID:19332513

  4. Design and performance of a multi-pinhole collimation device for small animal imaging with clinical SPECT and SPECT-CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Difilippo, Frank P

    2008-08-01

    A multi-pinhole collimation device is developed that uses the gamma camera detectors of a clinical SPECT or SPECT-CT scanner to produce high-resolution SPECT images. The device consists of a rotating cylindrical collimator having 22 tungsten pinholes with 0.9 mm diameter apertures and an animal bed inside the collimator that moves linearly to provide helical or ordered-subsets axial sampling. CT images also may be acquired on a SPECT-CT scanner for purposes of image co-registration and SPECT attenuation correction. The device is placed on the patient table of the scanner without attaching to the detectors or scanner gantry. The system geometry is calibrated in-place from point source data and is then used during image reconstruction. The SPECT imaging performance of the device is evaluated with test phantom scans. Spatial resolution from reconstructed point source images is measured to be 0.6 mm full width at half maximum or better. Micro-Derenzo phantom images demonstrate the ability to resolve 0.7 mm diameter rod patterns. The axial slabs of a Micro-Defrise phantom are visualized well. Collimator efficiency exceeds 0.05% at the center of the field of view, and images of a uniform phantom show acceptable uniformity and minimal artifact. The overall simplicity and relatively good imaging performance of the device make it an interesting low-cost alternative to dedicated small animal scanners.

  5. MO-E-17A-08: Attenuation-Based Size Adjusted, Scanner-Independent Organ Dose Estimates for Head CT Exams: TG 204 for Head CT

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M; Zankl, M; DeMarco, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 204 described size specific dose estimates (SSDE) for body scans. The purpose of this work is to use a similar approach to develop patient-specific, scanner-independent organ dose estimates for head CT exams using an attenuation-based size metric. Methods: For eight patient models from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms, dose to brain and lens of the eye was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations of contiguous axial scans for 64-slice MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers. Organ doses were normalized by scannerspecific 16 cm CTDIvol values and averaged across all scanners to obtain scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients for each patient model. Head size was measured at the first slice superior to the eyes; patient perimeter and effective diameter (ED) were measured directly from the GSF data. Because the GSF models use organ identification codes instead of Hounsfield units, water equivalent diameter (WED) was estimated indirectly. Using the image data from 42 patients ranging from 2 weeks old to adult, the perimeter, ED and WED size metrics were obtained and correlations between each metric were established. Applying these correlations to the GSF perimeter and ED measurements, WED was calculated for each model. The relationship between the various patient size metrics and CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients was then described. Results: The analysis of patient images demonstrated the correlation between WED and ED across a wide range of patient sizes. When applied to the GSF patient models, an exponential relationship between CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients and the WED size metric was observed with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.77 for the brain and lens of the eye, respectively. Conclusion: Strong correlation exists between CTDIvol normalized brain dose and WED. For the lens of the eye, a lower correlation is observed, primarily due to surface dose variations. Funding

  6. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott; Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W.; Sloan, Andrew

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A

  7. Feasibility of a dual wavelength laser optical CT scanner with in-air gel readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramm, D.; Rutten, T. P.

    2015-01-01

    Net optical attenuation in optical CT scanning is usually determined by pre and postirradiation scans. Replacement of the pre-irradiation scan by a scan of different wavelength, acquired concurrently with the post irradiation scan is proposed. This would result in greater practicality of gel dosimetry and potentially improved image quality. This study indicates that the approach may be viable, however experimental investigation is required for analysis of the prospective benefits of removing inter-scan variations.

  8. NIPAM polymer gel dosimetry for IMRT four-field box irradiation using optical-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, C. H.; Hsu, W. T.; Hsu, S. M.; Ma, P. Y. L.; Hsieh, B. T.; Chang, Y. J.

    2013-06-01

    The study assessed the dosimetric characteristics of the N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel dosimeter. Experiments on the intra-dosimeter consistency and reproducibility of NIPAM polymer gels were performed. A cylindrical NIPAM gel phantom measuring 10 cm (diameter) by 10 cm (height) by 3 mm (thickness) was irradiated using the four-field box treatment with a field size of 3 cm × 3 cm. A fast, optical computerized tomography scanner was used to scan the gel phantoms. The results showed that the dose profiles were consistent at various depths. The isodose lines agreed quantitatively with the calculated TPS dose and the measured NIPAM polymer gel dose within the 30 to 90 percentage isodose lines. In addition, the Gamma pass rates were determined to be 94.9%, 95.2%, and 95.7% at depths of 40 mm, 45 mm, and 50 mm, respectively, using 5% dose difference and 5 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Using the same Gamma criteria, the Gamma pass rates were 95.1%, 95.3%, and 95.7% for the three replicated. The results indicated that the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter was stable and reliable. The dosimetric characteristics highlighted the potential of NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter in radiotherapy.

  9. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  10. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  11. Practical considerations in the calibration of CT scanners for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Ainsley, Christopher G; Yeager, Caitlyn M

    2014-01-01

    Treatment planning systems for proton therapy require a CT calibration curve relating Hounsfield units to proton stopping powers. An understanding of the accuracy of this curve, together with its limitations, is of utmost importance because the calibration underpins the calculated dose distribution of every patient preparing to undergo proton therapy, independent of delivery technique. The most common approach to the calibration is the stoichiometric method, which is well-defined and, in principle, straightforward to perform. Nevertheless, care must be taken when implementing it in the clinic in order to avoid introducing proton range uncertainties into treatment plans that are larger than the 3.5% that target margins are typically designed to account for. This work presents a variety of aspects related to the user-specific implementation of the stoichiometric calibration, from both a measurement setup and a data-handling point of view, and evaluates the potential impact of each for treatment planning purposes. We demonstrate that two alternative commercial vendors' tissue phantoms yield consistent results, that variable CT slice thickness is unimportant, and that, for a given cross-sectional size, all phantom data can, with today's state-of-the-art beam hardening-related artifact reduction software, be acquired quickly and easily with a single scan, such that the resulting curve describes the calibration well at different positions across the imaging plane. We also show that one should be cautious of using metals in the calibration procedure and of using a single curve for anatomical sites differing widely in size. Further, we suggest that the quality of the parametric fit to the measurement data can be improved by performing a constrained, weighted linear regression. These observations, based on the 40 separate curves that were calculated, should help the medical physicist at any new proton therapy facility in deciding which considerations are worth particular

  12. Radiation Exposure to Staff in Intensive Care Unit with Portable CT Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhichao; Liao, Xuelian; Zhang, Jiangqian; Jia, Lingli

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bedside radiological procedures pose a risk of radiation exposure to ICU staff. The perception of risk may increase the degree of caution among the health care staff and raise new barriers preventing patients from obtaining prompt care. Objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the annual cumulative radiation dose to individual ICU staff. Methods. In this prospective study, forty subjects were required to wear thermoluminescent dosimeter badges during their working hours. The badges were analyzed to determine the exposure after 3 months. Results. A total of 802 radiological procedures were completed at bedside during the study period. The estimated annual dosage to doctors and nurses on average was 0.99 mSv and 0.88 mSv (p < 0.001), respectively. Residents were subjected to the highest radiation exposure (1.04 mSv per year, p = 0.002). The radiation dose was correlated with day shift working hours (r = 0.426; p = 0.006) and length of service (r = −0.403; p < 0.01). Conclusions. With standard precautions, bedside radiological procedures—including portable CT scans—do not expose ICU staff to high dose of ionizing radiation. The level of radiation exposure is related to the daytime working hours and length of service. PMID:27556036

  13. Experimental proof of an idea for a CT-scanner with dose reduction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Hugo; Tischenko, Oleg; Renger, Bernhard; Xu, Yuan; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2008-03-01

    Preliminary results for a new CT scanning device with dose-reduction potential were presented at the SPIE Medical Imaging conference 2007. The new device acquires the Radon data after the X-ray beam is collimated through a special mask. This mask is combined with a new and efficient data collection geometry; thus the device has the potential of reducing the dose by a factor of two. In this work, we report the first complete proof of the idea using the same simplified mask of 197 detectors as last year, and a clinical C-arm with a flat panel detector to simulate the gantry. This addition enables the acquisition of two independent and complementary data sets for reconstruction. Moreover, this clinical set-up enables the acquisition of data for clinically relevant phantoms. Phantom data were acquired using both detector sets and were reconstructed with the robust algorithm OPED. The independent sinograms were matched to a single one, and from this a diagnostic image was reconstructed successfully. This image has improved resolution, as well as less noise and artifacts compared to each single independent reconstruction. The results obtained are highly promising, even though the current device acquires only 197 views. Dose comparisons can be carried out in the future with a more precise prototype, comparable to current clinical devices with respect to imaging performance.

  14. Development of a Beam Hardening Correction Method for a microCT Scanner Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Kikushima, J.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.

    2010-12-07

    The radiographic projections acquired with a microCT were simulated and then corrected for beam hardening effects using the linearized signal to equivalent thickness (LSET) method. This procedure requires a calibration signal for each pixel obtained from a set of images with filters of increasing thickness. The projections are corrected by converting the signal to an equivalent thickness using interpolation over the calibration images. The method was validated using simulated projections of different phantoms. Two calibration sets were simulated using aluminum and water filters of thicknesses ranging from 0 to 5 mm and from 0 to 50 mm, respectively. A simulation of the phantoms' projections using a monoenergetic beam was also obtained to establish the relative intensity on the tomographic images when no cupping artifacts are present. Comparison between corrected and uncorrected tomographic images shows that the LSET method effectively corrects the cupping artifact. Streaking artifacts correction with the LSET method shows better results than with the traditional water correction method. Results are independent of the two calibration materials used.

  15. Development of a Beam Hardening Correction Method for a microCT Scanner Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikushima, J.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.

    2010-12-01

    The radiographic projections acquired with a microCT were simulated and then corrected for beam hardening effects using the linearized signal to equivalent thickness (LSET) method. This procedure requires a calibration signal for each pixel obtained from a set of images with filters of increasing thickness. The projections are corrected by converting the signal to an equivalent thickness using interpolation over the calibration images. The method was validated using simulated projections of different phantoms. Two calibration sets were simulated using aluminum and water filters of thicknesses ranging from 0 to 5 mm and from 0 to 50 mm, respectively. A simulation of the phantoms' projections using a monoenergetic beam was also obtained to establish the relative intensity on the tomographic images when no cupping artifacts are present. Comparison between corrected and uncorrected tomographic images shows that the LSET method effectively corrects the cupping artifact. Streaking artifacts correction with the LSET method shows better results than with the traditional water correction method. Results are independent of the two calibration materials used.

  16. Image reconstruction and image quality evaluation for a 64-slice CT scanner with z-flying focal spot

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T.G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Ulzheimer, S.; Bruder, H.; Primak, A.N.; McCollough, C.H.

    2005-08-15

    We present a theoretical overview and a performance evaluation of a novel z-sampling technique for multidetector row CT (MDCT), relying on a periodic motion of the focal spot in the longitudinal direction (z-flying focal spot) to double the number of simultaneously acquired slices. The z-flying focal spot technique has been implemented in a recently introduced MDCT scanner. Using 32x0.6 mm collimation, this scanner acquires 64 overlapping 0.6 mm slices per rotation in its spiral (helical) mode of operation, with the goal of improved longitudinal resolution and reduction of spiral artifacts. The longitudinal sampling distance at isocenter is 0.3 mm. We discuss in detail the impact of the z-flying focal spot technique on image reconstruction. We present measurements of spiral slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) and of longitudinal resolution, both in the isocenter and off-center. We evaluate the pitch dependence of the image noise measured in a centered 20 cm water phantom. To investigate spiral image quality we present images of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and patient scans. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the spiral SSPs shows only minor variations as a function of the pitch, measured values differ by less than 0.15 mm from the nominal values 0.6, 0.75, 1, 1.5, and 2 mm. The measured FWHM of the smallest slice ranges between 0.66 and 0.68 mm at isocenter, except for pitch 0.55 (0.72 mm). In a centered z-resolution phantom, bar patterns up to 15 lp/cm can be visualized independent of the pitch, corresponding to 0.33 mm longitudinal resolution. 100 mm off-center, bar patterns up to 14 lp/cm are visible, corresponding to an object size of 0.36 mm that can be resolved in the z direction. Image noise for constant effective mAs is almost independent of the pitch. Measured values show a variation of less than 7% as a function of the pitch, which demonstrates correct utilization of the applied radiation dose at any pitch. The product of image noise and square

  17. Pilot study for compact microbeam radiation therapy using a carbon nanotube field emission micro-CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Hadsell, Mike Cao, Guohua; Zhang, Jian; Burk, Laurel; Schreiber, Torsten; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Schreiber, Eric; Chang, Sha

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is defined as the use of parallel, microplanar x-ray beams with an energy spectrum between 50 and 300 keV for cancer treatment and brain radiosurgery. Up until now, the possibilities of MRT have mainly been studied using synchrotron sources due to their high flux (100s Gy/s) and approximately parallel x-ray paths. The authors have proposed a compact x-ray based MRT system capable of delivering MRT dose distributions at a high dose rate. This system would employ carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission technology to create an x-ray source array that surrounds the target of irradiation. Using such a geometry, multiple collimators would shape the irradiation from this array into multiple microbeams that would then overlap or interlace in the target region. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of attaining a high dose rate and parallel microbeam beams using such a system. Methods: The microbeam dose distribution was generated by our CNT micro-CT scanner (100μm focal spot) and a custom-made microbeam collimator. An alignment assembly was fabricated and attached to the scanner in order to collimate and superimpose beams coming from different gantry positions. The MRT dose distribution was measured using two orthogonal radiochromic films embedded inside a cylindrical phantom. This target was irradiated with microbeams incident from 44 different gantry angles to simulate an array of x-ray sources as in the proposed compact CNT-based MRT system. Finally, phantom translation in a direction perpendicular to the microplanar beams was used to simulate the use of multiple parallel microbeams. Results: Microbeams delivered from 44 gantry angles were superimposed to form a single microbeam dose distribution in the phantom with a FWHM of 300μm (calculated value was 290 μm). Also, during the multiple beam simulation, a peak to valley dose ratio of ∼10 was found when the phantom translation distance was roughly 4x the beam width

  18. Design and characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner for detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has substantial clinical impact in diagnosis and treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury. This paper describes the design, development, and preliminary performance characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner prototype for imaging of acute ICH. Methods: A task-based image quality model was used to analyze the detectability index as a function of system configuration, and hardware design was guided by the results of this model-based optimization. A robust artifact correction pipeline was developed using GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) scatter simulation, beam hardening corrections, detector veiling glare, and lag deconvolution. An iterative penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework with weights adjusted for artifact-corrected projections was developed. Various bowtie filters were investigated for potential dose and image quality benefits, with a MC-based tool providing estimates of spatial dose distribution. Results: The initial prototype will feature a source-detector distance of 1000 mm and source-axis distance of 550 mm, a 43x43 cm2 flat panel detector, and a 15° rotating anode x-ray source with 15 kW power and 0.6 focal spot size. Artifact correction reduced image nonuniformity by ~250 HU, and PWLS reconstruction with modified weights improved the contrast to noise ratio by 20%. Inclusion of a bowtie filter can potentially reduce dose by 50% and improve CNR by 25%. Conclusions: A dedicated CBCT system capable of imaging millimeter-scale acute ICH was designed. Preliminary findings support feasibility of point-of-care applications in TBI and stroke imaging, with clinical studies beginning on a prototype.

  19. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  20. SU-D-9A-04: Brain PET/CT Imaging On a Scanner with a Large Axial Field-Of-View

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Gerbaudo, V; Hamberg, L; Seaver, K; Kijewski, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Large axial field-of-view (FOV) PET/CT scanners are valued for high sensitivity. Brain PET image quality may depend on the head position within the FOV. We investigated the precision of activity estimation for brain PET imaging when the brain was positioned at the end (END) and in the middle (CEN) of the FOV. The additional CT dose for the CEN position was recorded. Methods: An image quality (Jaszczak) phantom and a striatal phantom were filled with F-18 and positioned in END and CEN locations. For each phantom and each location, we acquired a ∼1-hr listmode PET, rebinned the data into 10 frames with equal number of coincidence events, and reconstructed each frame using an iterative algorithm. For the striatal phantom, END and CEN were compared by drawing on each image three regions of interest (ROI) in axially separated uniform areas. The standard deviation of the activity estimation within each ROI was averaged over the 10 images. The coefficient of variation (CV) for activity estimation was calculated at each position. Image quality was assessed by inspecting the resolution bar pattern in the Jaszczak phantom at two different head positions. Results: The CV was the lowest for ROIs near the center of the FOV. For slices near the end, not only was the CV highest, but also the resolution pattern was degraded. CTDIvol summarized in the dose report indicated that the CT dose was ∼ 10% higher for CEN as compared to END position. Conclusion: Positioning the brain in the middle of the FOV in a large FOV PET/CT scanner allows more precise measurement of tracer uptake and better image quality at the cost of increased CT dose. For the end location longer scan times may minimize image quality degradation without any additional CT dose.

  1. The effect of CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques on the accuracy of linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Whyms, B.J.; Vorperian, H.K.; Gentry, L.R.; Schimek, E.M.; Bersu, E.T.; Chung, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effect of scanning parameters on the accuracy of measurements from three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3D-CT) mandible renderings. A broader range of acceptable parameters can increase the availability of CT studies for retrospective analysis. Study Design Three human mandibles and a phantom object were scanned using 18 combinations of slice thickness, field of view, and reconstruction algorithm and three different threshold-based segmentations. Measurements of 3D-CT models and specimens were compared. Results Linear and angular measurements were accurate, irrespective of scanner parameters or rendering technique. Volume measurements were accurate with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, but not 2.5 mm. Surface area measurements were consistently inflated. Conclusions Linear, angular and volumetric measurements of mandible 3D-CT models can be confidently obtained from a range of parameters and rendering techniques. Slice thickness is the primary factor affecting volume measurements. These findings should also apply to 3D rendering using cone-beam-CT. PMID:23601224

  2. In situ visualization on cores with different boundary conditions through X-ray computed tomography scanner (CT-Scanner) during spontaneous imbibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Kovscek, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous imbibition (SI) is defined as displacement of non-wetting phase by wetting phase through the action of capillary forces in porous media. Spontaneous imbibition may occur as countercurrent or cocurrent multiphase flow. SI is an important test of rock wettability and is relevant to oil recovery from rocks of many different types of wettability. The rate of SI depends on permeability and water/oil relative permeability, medium shapes and boundary conditions, fluid viscosity, interfacial tension, and wettability, among other factors. This study investigates the effect of characteristic length (CL), boundary conditions (BC), and initial water saturation on the rate of spontaneous imbibition. We conduct countercurrent and cocurrent SI tests using cylindrical Berea sandstone (water-wet) and Indiana limestone (weakly wetting) through an X-ray computed tomography scanner and an imbibition cell with different boundary conditions and initial water saturations. Brine (1 wt% NaCl) is used as the wetting fluid. Also, decane (n-C10) and Blandol are used as non-wetting fluids, respectively to compare the effect of mobility ratio. The observed 2-D and 3-D saturation profile histories within each rock show clearly different imbibition patterns for each boundary condition. Also, low permeability limestones have more heterogeneous features than sandstones. The effect of characteristic length (CL) on the imbibition recovery curve was investigated using dimensionless time (tD). CL had an inverse effect on the rate of spontaneous imbibition within the same core samples. In addition, we used three different boundary conditions (BC) including (1) all faces open (AFO), (2) two ends open (TEO, i.e., inlet and outlet face), and (3) one end open (OEO, i.e., one face of the core) systems. BC experiments showed the effect of total open surface area for the oil production rate of spontaneous imbibition with different Swi. In addition, the generalized correlation (Aronofsy's equation

  3. Ga-68-DOTATOC: Feasibility of high throughput screening by small animal PET using a clinical high-resolution PET/CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Michael; Weitzel, Thilo; Krause, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    As radio peptide tracers have been developed in recent years for the high sensitive detection of neuroendocrine tumors, still the broad application of other peptides to breast and prostate cancer is missing. A rapid screening of new peptides can, in theory, be based on in vivo screening in animals by PET/CT. To test this hypothesis and to asses the minimum screening time needed per animal, we used the application of Ga-68-DOTATOC PET/CT in rats as test system. The Ga-68-DOTATOC yields in a hot spot imaging with minimal background. To delineate liver and spleen, we performed PET/CT of 10 animals on a SIEMENS Biograph 16 LSO HIGHREZ after intravenous injection of 1.5 MBq Ga-68-DOTATOC per animal. Animals were mounted in an '18 slot' holding device and scanned for a single-bed position. The emission times for the PET scan was varied from 1 to 20 min. The images were assessed first for "PET only" and afterwards in PET/CT fusion mode. The detection of the two organs was good at emission times down to 1 min in PET/CT fusion mode. In the "PET only" scans, the liver was clearly to be identified down to 1 min emission in all animals. But the spleen could only be delineated only by 1 min of emission in the PET/CT-fusion mode. In conclusion the screening of "hot spot" enriching peptides is feasible. "PET only" is in terms of delineation of small organs by far inferior to PET/CT fusion. If animal tumors are above a diameter of 10 mm small, animal PET/CT using clinical high resolution scanners will enable rapid screening. Even the determination of bio-distributions becomes feasible by using list mode tools. The time for the whole survey of 18 animals including anesthesia, preparation and mounting was approximately 20 min. By use of several holding devices mounted simultaneously, a survey time of less than 1 h for 180 animals can be expected.

  4. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  5. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  6. Novel detector design for reducing intercell x-ray cross-talk in the variable resolution x-ray CT scanner: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Arabi, Hosein; Asl, Ali Reza Kamali; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Zaidi, Habib

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The variable resolution x-ray (VRX) CT scanner provides substantial improvement in the spatial resolution by matching the scanner's field of view (FOV) to the size of the object being imaged. Intercell x-ray cross-talk is one of the most important factors limiting the spatial resolution of the VRX detector. In this work, a new cell arrangement in the VRX detector is suggested to decrease the intercell x-ray cross-talk. The idea is to orient the detector cells toward the opening end of the detector. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were used for performance assessment of the oriented cell detector design. Previously published design parameters and simulation results of x-ray cross-talk for the VRX detector were used for model validation using the GATE Monte Carlo package. In the first step, the intercell x-ray cross-talk of the actual VRX detector model was calculated as a function of the FOV. The obtained results indicated an optimum cell orientation angle of 28 deg. to minimize the x-ray cross-talk in the VRX detector. Thereafter, the intercell x-ray cross-talk in the oriented cell detector was modeled and quantified. Results: The intercell x-ray cross-talk in the actual detector model was considerably high, reaching up to 12% at FOVs from 24 to 38 cm. The x-ray cross-talk in the oriented cell detector was less than 5% for all possible FOVs, except 40 cm (maximum FOV). The oriented cell detector could provide considerable decrease in the intercell x-ray cross-talk for the VRX detector, thus leading to significant improvement in the spatial resolution and reduction in the spatial resolution nonuniformity across the detector length. Conclusions: The proposed oriented cell detector is the first dedicated detector design for the VRX CT scanners. Application of this concept to multislice and flat-panel VRX detectors would also result in higher spatial resolution.

  7. Characterization of Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids in Soils Using a Medical X-ray CT Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, S.; Haghighi, S. K.; Goldstein, L.

    2006-12-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) provides three-dimensional images of the interior features of objects based on density differences. X-ray CT technology has been used traditionally in the medical sciences, but is being increasingly used in the areas of geology, environmental science and petroleum engineering for measurements of porous media properties and fluid phase behavior in porous media. An X-ray CT scanning technique for accurate, three-dimensional, and non-destructive characterization of the volume and distribution of non- aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in contaminated soil cores has been developed in our laboratory. The knowledge of the mobility, distribution and morphology of NAPLs such as petroleum liquids, chlorinated solvents and coal tars in the subsurface may facilitate our ability to effectively assess the long-term impacts of the NAPL discharge on groundwater quality and, to remediate impacted sites. X-ray CT data were analyzed by an image subtraction technique to obtain three-dimensional arrays of soil porosity, NAPL saturation, and NAPL volume in packed columns, at a spatial resolution of approximately 0.35 mm in the scan plane. X-ray CT derived NAPL volume is subject to errors ranging from 3 - 16%, depending on the density of the NAPL. The experimental technique was used to determine how freezing and freeze-and-thaw conditions, commonly encountered in cold climates, influences the morphology, displacement and migration of gasoline NAPL in subsurface soils. Significant mobility of the residual NAPL, and changes in the morphology of NAPL blobs were observed when the NAPL-contaminated packed column was subjected to a freeze-thaw cycle. In some sections of the column, NAPL volume fractions changed by as much as 150% during the freeze-thaw cycle. The mobilization and the change in morphology of NAPL blobs during freeze-thaw were associated with porosity changes in the soil.

  8. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  9. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, W.; Santos, W. S.; Paschoal, C. M. M.; Souza, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current-time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  10. Respiratory-gated segment reconstruction for radiation treatment planning using 256-slice CT-scanner during free breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Kohno, Ryosuke; Minohara, Shinichi; Kohno, Kazutoshi; Asakura, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya

    2005-04-01

    The conventional respiratory-gated CT scan technique includes anatomic motion induced artifacts due to the low temporal resolution. They are a significant source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning for the thorax and upper abdomen. Temporal resolution and image quality are important factors to minimize planning target volume margin due to the respiratory motion. To achieve high temporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio, we developed a respiratory gated segment reconstruction algorithm and adapted it to Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm (FDK) with a 256-detector row CT. The 256-detector row CT could scan approximately 100 mm in the cranio-caudal direction with 0.5 mm slice thickness in one rotation. Data acquisition for the RS-FDK relies on the assistance of the respiratory sensing system by a cine scan mode (table remains stationary). We evaluated RS-FDK in phantom study with the 256-detector row CT and compared it with full scan (FS-FDK) and HS-FDK results with regard to volume accuracy and image noise, and finally adapted the RS-FDK to an animal study. The RS-FDK gave a more accurate volume than the others and it had the same signal-to-noise ratio as the FS-FDK. In the animal study, the RS-FDK visualized the clearest edges of the liver and pulmonary vessels of all the algorithms. In conclusion, the RS-FDK algorithm has a capability of high temporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore it will be useful when combined with new radiotherapy techniques including image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and 4D radiation therapy.

  11. A New Automated Way to Measure Polyethylene Wear in THA Using a High Resolution CT Scanner: Method and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.; Noz, Marilyn E.; Olivecrona, Henrik; Zeleznik, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    As the most advantageous total hip arthroplasty (THA) operation is the first, timely replacement of only the liner is socially and economically important because the utilization of THA is increasing as younger and more active patients are receiving implants and they are living longer. Automatic algorithms were developed to infer liner wear by estimating the separation between the acetabular cup and femoral component head given a computed tomography (CT) volume. Two series of CT volumes of a hip phantom were acquired with the femoral component head placed at 14 different positions relative to the acetabular cup. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of the diameter of the acetabular cup and femoral component head, in addition to the range of error in the expected wear values and the repeatability of all the measurements, were calculated. The algorithms resulted in a mean (±SD) for the diameter of the acetabular cup of 54.21 (±0.011) mm and for the femoral component head of 22.09 (±0.02) mm. The wear error was ±0.1 mm and the repeatability was 0.077 mm. This approach is applicable clinically as it utilizes readily available computed tomography imaging systems and requires only five minutes of human interaction. PMID:24587727

  12. Top-level design and pilot analysis of low-end CT scanners based on linear scanning for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenglin; Yu, Hengyong; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    The goal is to develop new architectures for computed tomography (CT) which are at an ultra-low-cost for developing countries, especially in rural areas. The proposed general scheme is inspired by the recently developed compressive sensing and interior tomography techniques, where the data acquisition system targets a region of interest (ROI) to acquire limited and truncated data. Similar to linear tomosynthesis, the source and detector are translated in opposite directions but in contrast to conventional tomosynthesis, our proposal is for either ROI reconstruction with one or more localized linear scans or global reconstruction by combining multiple ROI reconstructions. In other words, the popular slip ring is replaced by a translation based setup, and the instrumentation cost is reduced by a relaxation of the imaging speed requirement. The various translational scanning modes are theoretically analyzed, and the scanning parameters are optimized. The numerical simulation results from different numbers of linear scans confirm the feasibility of the proposed scheme, and suggest two preferred low-end systems for horizontal and vertical patient positions respectively. Ultra-low-cost x-ray CT is feasible with our proposed combination of linear scanning, compressive sensing, and interior tomography. The proposed architecture can be tailored into permanent, movable, or reconfigurable systems as desirable. Advanced image registration and spectral imaging features can be included as well.

  13. Comparison of physical quality assurance between Scanora 3D and 3D Accuitomo 80 dental CT scanners

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ahmed S.; Fteita, Dareen; Kulmala, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dentistry has proven to be useful in the diagnosis and treatment planning of several oral and maxillofacial diseases. The quality of the resulting image is dictated by many factors related to the patient, unit, and operator. Materials and methods In this work, two dental CBCT units, namely Scanora 3D and 3D Accuitomo 80, were assessed and compared in terms of quantitative effective dose delivered to specific locations in a dosimetry phantom. Resolution and contrast were evaluated in only 3D Accuitomo 80 using special quality assurance phantoms. Results Scanora 3D, with less radiation time, showed less dosing values compared to 3D Accuitomo 80 (mean 0.33 mSv, SD±0.16 vs. 0.18 mSv, SD±0.1). Using paired t-test, no significant difference was found in Accuitomo two scan sessions (p>0.05), while it was highly significant in Scanora (p>0.05). The modulation transfer function value (at 2 lp/mm), in both measurements, was found to be 4.4%. The contrast assessment of 3D Accuitomo 80 in the two measurements showed few differences, for example, the grayscale values were the same (SD=0) while the noise level was slightly different (SD=0 and 0.67, respectively). Conclusions The radiation dose values in these two CBCT units are significantly less than those encountered in systemic CT scans. However, the dose seems to be affected more by changing the field of view rather than the voltage or amperage. The low doses were at the expense of the image quality produced, which was still acceptable. Although the spatial resolution and contrast were inferior to the medical images produced in systemic CT units, the present results recommend adopting CBCTs in maxillofacial imaging because of low radiation dose and adequate image quality. PMID:26091832

  14. Scanner Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  15. The effect of activity outside the field of view on image quality for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Della Monica, P; Leva, L; Sacchetti, G; Inglese, E; Brambilla, M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of outside field of view (FOV) activity concentration (A(c)(,out)) on the noise equivalent count rate (NECR), scatter fraction (SF) and image quality of a 3D LSO whole-body PET/CT scanner. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was the figure of merit used to characterize the image quality of PET scans. A modified International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) phantom was used to obtain SF and counting rates similar to those found in average patients. A scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the modified IEC phantom to simulate an activity that extends beyond the scanner. The modified IEC phantom was filled with (18)F (11 kBq mL(-1)) and the spherical targets, with internal diameter (ID) ranging from 10 to 37 mm, had a target-to-background ratio of 10. PET images were acquired with background activity concentrations into the FOV (A(c)(,bkg)) about 11, 9.2, 6.6, 5.2 and 3.5 kBq mL(-1). The emission scan duration (ESD) was set to 1, 2, 3 and 4 min. The tube inside the scatter phantom was filled with activities to provide A(c)(,out) in the whole scatter phantom of zero, half, unity, twofold and fourfold the one of the modified IEC phantom. Plots of CNR versus the various parameters are provided. Multiple linear regression was employed to study the effects of A(c)(,out) on CNR, adjusted for the presence of variables (sphere ID, A(c)(,bkg) and ESD) related to CNR. The presence of outside FOV activity at the same concentration as the one inside the FOV reduces peak NECR of 30%. The increase in SF is marginal (1.2%). CNR diminishes significantly with increasing outside FOV activity, in the range explored. ESD and A(c)(,out) have a similar weight in accounting for CNR variance. Thus, an experimental law that adjusts the scan duration to the outside FOV activity can be devised. Recovery of CNR loss due to an elevated A(c)(,out) activity seems feasible by modulating the ESD in individual bed positions according to A(c)(,out).

  16. Modeling and design of a cone-beam CT head scanner using task-based imaging performance optimization.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Dang, H; Stayman, J W; Wang, X; Foos, D H; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V E; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-21

    Detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is important for diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injury, stroke, postoperative bleeding, and other head and neck injuries. This paper details the design and development of a cone-beam CT (CBCT) system developed specifically for the detection of low-contrast ICH in a form suitable for application at the point of care. Recognizing such a low-contrast imaging task to be a major challenge in CBCT, the system design began with a rigorous analysis of task-based detectability including critical aspects of system geometry, hardware configuration, and artifact correction. The imaging performance model described the three-dimensional (3D) noise-equivalent quanta using a cascaded systems model that included the effects of scatter, scatter correction, hardware considerations of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and flat-panel detectors (FPDs), and digitization bit depth. The performance was analyzed with respect to a low-contrast (40-80 HU), medium-frequency task representing acute ICH detection. The task-based detectability index was computed using a non-prewhitening observer model. The optimization was performed with respect to four major design considerations: (1) system geometry (including source-to-detector distance (SDD) and source-to-axis distance (SAD)); (2) factors related to the x-ray source (including focal spot size, kVp, dose, and tube power); (3) scatter correction and selection of an antiscatter grid; and (4) x-ray detector configuration (including pixel size, additive electronics noise, field of view (FOV), and frame rate, including both CMOS and a-Si:H FPDs). Optimal design choices were also considered with respect to practical constraints and available hardware components. The model was verified in comparison to measurements on a CBCT imaging bench as a function of the numerous design parameters mentioned above. An extended geometry (SAD = 750 mm, SDD  = 1100 mm) was found to be

  17. Modeling and design of a cone-beam CT head scanner using task-based imaging performance optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is important for diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injury, stroke, postoperative bleeding, and other head and neck injuries. This paper details the design and development of a cone-beam CT (CBCT) system developed specifically for the detection of low-contrast ICH in a form suitable for application at the point of care. Recognizing such a low-contrast imaging task to be a major challenge in CBCT, the system design began with a rigorous analysis of task-based detectability including critical aspects of system geometry, hardware configuration, and artifact correction. The imaging performance model described the three-dimensional (3D) noise-equivalent quanta using a cascaded systems model that included the effects of scatter, scatter correction, hardware considerations of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and flat-panel detectors (FPDs), and digitization bit depth. The performance was analyzed with respect to a low-contrast (40-80 HU), medium-frequency task representing acute ICH detection. The task-based detectability index was computed using a non-prewhitening observer model. The optimization was performed with respect to four major design considerations: (1) system geometry (including source-to-detector distance (SDD) and source-to-axis distance (SAD)); (2) factors related to the x-ray source (including focal spot size, kVp, dose, and tube power); (3) scatter correction and selection of an antiscatter grid; and (4) x-ray detector configuration (including pixel size, additive electronics noise, field of view (FOV), and frame rate, including both CMOS and a-Si:H FPDs). Optimal design choices were also considered with respect to practical constraints and available hardware components. The model was verified in comparison to measurements on a CBCT imaging bench as a function of the numerous design parameters mentioned above. An extended geometry (SAD  =  750 mm, SDD  =  1100

  18. Cylindrical Scanner

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to sendmore » data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.« less

  19. Single scan parameterization of space-variant point spread functions in image space via a printed array: the impact for two PET/CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Matthews, J. C.; Angelis, G. I.; Noonan, P. J.; Jackson, A.; Price, P.; Lionheart, W. R.; Reader, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    Incorporation of a resolution model during statistical image reconstruction often produces images of improved resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. A novel and practical methodology to rapidly and accurately determine the overall emission and detection blurring component of the system matrix using a printed point source array within a custom-made Perspex phantom is presented. The array was scanned at different positions and orientations within the field of view (FOV) to examine the feasibility of extrapolating the measured point source blurring to other locations in the FOV and the robustness of measurements from a single point source array scan. We measured the spatially-variant image-based blurring on two PET/CT scanners, the B-Hi-Rez and the TruePoint TrueV. These measured spatially-variant kernels and the spatially-invariant kernel at the FOV centre were then incorporated within an ordinary Poisson ordered subset expectation maximization (OP-OSEM) algorithm and compared to the manufacturer's implementation using projection space resolution modelling (RM). Comparisons were based on a point source array, the NEMA IEC image quality phantom, the Cologne resolution phantom and two clinical studies (carbon-11 labelled anti-sense oligonucleotide [11C]-ASO and fluorine-18 labelled fluoro-l-thymidine [18F]-FLT). Robust and accurate measurements of spatially-variant image blurring were successfully obtained from a single scan. Spatially-variant resolution modelling resulted in notable resolution improvements away from the centre of the FOV. Comparison between spatially-variant image-space methods and the projection-space approach (the first such report, using a range of studies) demonstrated very similar performance with our image-based implementation producing slightly better contrast recovery (CR) for the same level of image roughness (IR). These results demonstrate that image-based resolution modelling within reconstruction is a valid alternative to projection

  20. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Lee, J; Kim, H; Kim, I; Ye, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield.

  1. Optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkel, Mitchell W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner for imaging lines in an object plane onto a linear array in a focal plane either continuously or discretely is described. The scanner consists of a set of four mutually perpendicularly oriented plane corner mirrors which provide a reflecting path that describes a parallelogram. In addition, there is a plane parallel scanning mirror with a front and back reflecting surface located midway between the first and fourth corner mirrors. It is oriented so that in the mid-scan position it is parallel to the first corner mirror, and therefore perpendicular to the fourth corner mirror. As the scan mirror rotates, rays incident from a plurality of lines in the object plane are selectively directed through the optical system arriving at a common intersection on the back surface of the scanning mirror where the rays are colinearly directed toward a lens and then imaged onto the linear array in the focal plane. A set of compensating mirrors may be introduced just before the imaging lens to compensate for a small and generally negligible path difference delta sub l between the axial and marginal rays.

  2. Design and characterization of a multi-beam micro-CT scanner based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rui

    In this dissertation, I will present the results for my Ph.D. research for the past five years. My project mainly focuses on advanced imaging applications with a multi-beam x-ray source array based on carbon nanotube field emission technology. In the past few years, research in carbon nanotubes gradually changed from the raw material science to its application. Field emission x-ray application is one of the hottest research areas for carbon nanotube. Compared to traditional thermionic x-ray sources, the carbon nanotube field emission x-ray source has some natural advantages over traditional thermionic x-ray sources such as instantaneous x-ray generation, programmability and miniaturization. For the past few years, the research and development of carbon nanotube field emission x-ray has shifted from single x-ray beam applications to spatially distributed multi-beam x-ray sources. Previously in Zhou group, we have already built a gated micro-CT system with single beam micro-focus x-ray tube for higher spatial and temporal resolution as required in live animal imaging and a multi-beam tomosynthesis system targeting for faster and more stable breast imaging. Now my project mainly focused on the design, characterization and optimization of a multi-beam micro-CT imaging system. With the increase of gantry rotation speed approaching the mechanical limit, it is getting more and more difficult to further speed up the CT scanning. My new system promises a potential solution for the problem, and it serves as a great test platform for truly stationary micro-CT geometry. The potential capabilities it showed during the characterization and imaging measurements was promising. The dissertation is composed of five chapters. In Chapter 1, I will generally review the physics principles of x-ray generation and interaction with matter. Then the discovery of carbon nanotube and its great potential to serve as an excellent field emission electron source will be introduced in the second

  3. The effect of z overscanning on radiation burden of pediatric patients undergoing head CT with multidetector scanners: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Damilakis, John

    2006-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of z overscanning on eye lens dose and effective dose received by pediatric patients undergoing head CT examinations. A pediatric patient study was carried out to obtain the exposure parameters and data regarding the eye lens position with respect to imaged volume boundaries. This information was used to simulate CT exposures by Monte Carlo code. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code and five mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patient, were employed in the current study. To estimate effective dose, the weighted computed tomography dose index was calculated by cylindrical polymethyl-methacrylate phantoms of 9.7, 13.1, 15.4, 16.1, and 16.9 cm in diameter representing the pediatric head of newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old individuals, respectively. The validity of the Monte Carlo calculated approach was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. For all patients studied, the eye lenses were located in the region -1 to 3 cm from the first slice of the imaged volume. Doses from axial scans were always lower than those from corresponding helical examinations. The percentage differences in normalized eye lens absorbed dose between contiguous axial and helical examinations with pitch=1 were found to be up to 10.9%, when the eye lenses were located inside the region to be imaged. When the eye lenses were positioned 0-3 cm far from the first slice of region to be imaged, the normalized dose to the lens from contiguous axial examinations was up to 11 times lower than the corresponding values from helical mode with pitch=1. The effective dose from axial examinations was up to 24% lower than corresponding values from helical examinations with pitch=1. In conclusion, it is more dose efficient to use axial mode acquisition rather than helical scan

  4. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the colon using a hand-held squeeze bulb. Sometimes an electronic pump is used to deliver ... When you enter the CT scanner room, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  5. Image scanner technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montuori, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Three classes of scanning devices are evaluated against a hypothetical set of requirements for a digital mapping system: electronic scanners, which may use cathode ray tubes (CRT), vidicon or image dissector tubes; electro-optical scanners, which may use lasers, light-emitting diodes, or conventional lamps as sources of illumination; and solid-state scanners, which may use charge-coupled devices (CCD), charge injection devices (CID), charge-coupled photodiode devices (CCPD), or self-scanned photodiode devices (SSPD). The major performance criteria for digital mapping application are resolution, format accommodation, data rates, geometric accuracy, photometric accuracy and dynamic range. Systems adaptable to all these requirements include: drumtype laser scanners, rotating-mirror laser scanners, and solid-state scanners comprised of a series of optically butted linear arrays. These requirements, as well as the operating environment (i.e., production or research and development), must be evaluated before the appropriate technology can be selected and a system design recommended.

  6. Prospects for in vivo estimation of photon linear attenuation coefficients using postprocessing dual-energy CT imaging on a commercial scanner: Comparison of analytic and polyenergetic statistical reconstruction algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Joshua D. Yu, Yaduo; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Whiting, Bruce R.; O’Sullivan, Joseph A.; Politte, David G.; Klahr, Paul H.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Accurate patient-specific photon cross-section information is needed to support more accurate model-based dose calculation for low energy photon-emitting modalities in medicine such as brachytherapy and kilovoltage x-ray imaging procedures. A postprocessing dual-energy CT (pDECT) technique for noninvasivein vivo estimation of photon linear attenuation coefficients has been experimentally implemented on a commercial CT scanner and its accuracy assessed in idealized phantom geometries. Methods: Eight test materials of known composition and density were used to compare pDECT-estimated linear attenuation coefficients to NIST reference values over an energy range from 10 keV to 1 MeV. As statistical image reconstruction (SIR) has been shown to reconstruct images with less random and systematic error than conventional filtered backprojection (FBP), the pDECT technique was implemented with both an in-house polyenergetic SIR algorithm, alternating minimization (AM), as well as a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm. Improvement from increased spectral separation was also investigated by filtering the high-energy beam with an additional 0.5 mm of tin. The law of propagated uncertainty was employed to assess the sensitivity of the pDECT process to errors in reconstructed images. Results: Mean pDECT-estimated linear attenuation coefficients for the eight test materials agreed within 1% of NIST reference values for energies from 1 MeV down to 30 keV, with mean errors rising to between 3% and 6% at 10 keV, indicating that the method is unbiased when measurement and calibration phantom geometries are matched. Reconstruction with FBP and AM algorithms conferred similar mean pDECT accuracy. However, single-voxel pDECT estimates reconstructed on a 1 × 1 × 3 mm{sup 3} grid are shown to be highly sensitive to reconstructed image uncertainty; in some cases pDECT attenuation coefficient estimates exhibited standard deviations on the order of 20% around the mean

  7. Technical aspects of CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Maravilla, K R; Pastel, M S

    1978-01-01

    The advent of computed tomography (CT) has initiated a technological revolution which continues to the present time. A brief review of basic principles of CT scanning is presented, and the evolution of modern CT scanner systems is traced. Some early indications of future trends are also presented.

  8. Coronary Events and Anatomy After Arterial Switch Operation for Transposition of the Great Arteries: Detection by 16-Row Multislice Computed Tomography Angiography in Pediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Oztunc, Funda Baris, Safa; Adaletli, Ibrahim Onol, Nurper Onder Olgun, Deniz Cebi; Guezeltas, Alper Ozyilmaz, Isa Ozdil, Mine; Kurugoglu, Sebuh; Eroglu, Ayse Gueler

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of multislice computed tomographic (MSCT) angiography as a noninvasive method for detecting ostial, proximal, and middle segment coronary stenosis or occlusion and anatomy in patients with transposition of the great arteries who had undergone arterial switch operation (ASO). Sixteen-detector-row MSCT angiography was performed in 16 patients treated with ASO for transposition of the great arteries. The median age was 10.3 years (range, 6.2-16.3 years). Sixteen-detector-row MSCT angiography was performed in 16 patients who had undergone ASO. CT imaging was performed in the craniocaudal direction from 2 cm above the carina up to the heart basis. Noninvasive assessment of coronary artery stenosis and anatomy were investigated by MSCT angiography. Two patients were excluded from the study because of artifacts. Of 14 evaluated patients, 1 patient had ostial stenosis (7.1%). A coronary artery anatomy variant was present in six patients: left main artery (LMA) and right coronary artery (RCA) originating from the right sinus as a single orifice (n = 2); left circumflex artery (LCX) originating from the RCA (n = 1); LMA and RCA, after branching to the LCX, originating separately from the right sinus (n = 1); and LMA (n = 1) and left anterior descending artery (LADA; n = 1) originating directly from the right sinus. Intramural bridging in the LAD (n = 2) was detected. Five patients were normal. In conclusion, MSCT angiography, as a noninvasive, feasible technique for assessing coronary stenosis or occlusion and anatomy, can be used in the follow-up of patients who have undergone ASO.

  9. Do we really need to thank the Beatles for the financing of the development of the computed tomography scanner?

    PubMed

    Maizlin, Zeev V; Vos, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the revenues from the selling of the Beatles' records by Electric and Musical Industries (EMI) allowed the company to develop the computed tomography (CT) scanner. Some went to define this as the Beatles' gift to medicine. However, significant controversies and discrepancies arise from analysis of this statement, making its correctness doubtful. The details of financing required for the CT development and the part of EMI in financial input have never been publicly announced. This work analyzes the financial contributions to the CT development and investigates if the revenues received from the sales of the Beatles' records were used for the creation of the CT scanner. Timeline of the development of the EMI CT scanner and the financial inputs of EMI and British Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) were assessed. Without salary expenses to Godfrey Hounsfield and his team, the development of the CT scanner cost EMI approximately £100,000. The British DHSS's expenses were £606,000. Hence, the financial contribution of DHSS into the development of the CT scanner was significantly bigger than that of EMI. Accordingly, British tax payers and officials of British DHSS are to be thanked for the CT scanner. The Beatles' input into the world's culture is valuable and does not require decoration by nonexistent connection to the development of CT. A positive aspect to this misconception is that it keeps in public memory the name of the company that developed the CT scanner. PMID:22446352

  10. Biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Belgovskiy, Alexander I.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2001-01-01

    A biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips or biochips and method of use are provided. The biochip scanner device includes a laser for emitting a laser beam. A modulator, such as an optical chopper modulates the laser beam. A scanning head receives the modulated laser beam and a scanning mechanics coupled to the scanning head moves the scanning head relative to the biochip. An optical fiber delivers the modulated laser beam to the scanning head. The scanning head collects the fluorescence light from the biochip, launches it into the same optical fiber, which delivers the fluorescence into a photodetector, such as a photodiode. The biochip scanner device is used in a row scanning method to scan selected rows of the biochip with the laser beam size matching the size of the immobilization site.

  11. Portable biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Sharonov, Alexei; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2002-01-01

    A portable biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips (biochips) is provided. The portable biochip scanner device employs a laser for emitting an excitation beam. An optical fiber delivers the laser beam to a portable biochip scanner. A lens collimates the laser beam, the collimated laser beam is deflected by a dichroic mirror and focused by an objective lens onto a biochip. The fluorescence light from the biochip is collected and collimated by the objective lens. The fluorescence light is delivered to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) via an emission filter and a focusing lens. The focusing lens focuses the fluorescence light into a pinhole. A signal output of the PMT is processed and displayed.

  12. Hybrid Dispersion Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Goda, K.; Mahjoubfar, A.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2012-01-01

    Laser scanning technology is one of the most integral parts of today's scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and biomedicine. In many applications, high-speed scanning capability is essential for scanning a large area in a short time and multi-dimensional sensing of moving objects and dynamical processes with fine temporal resolution. Unfortunately, conventional laser scanners are often too slow, resulting in limited precision and utility. Here we present a new type of laser scanner that offers ∼1,000 times higher scan rates than conventional state-of-the-art scanners. This method employs spatial dispersion of temporally stretched broadband optical pulses onto the target, enabling inertia-free laser scans at unprecedented scan rates of nearly 100 MHz at 800 nm. To show our scanner's broad utility, we use it to demonstrate unique and previously difficult-to-achieve capabilities in imaging, surface vibrometry, and flow cytometry at a record 2D raster scan rate of more than 100 kHz with 27,000 resolvable points. PMID:22685627

  13. Freestanding Complex Optical Scanners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisbie, David A.

    A complex freestanding optical mark recognition (OMR) scanner is one which is not on-line to an external processor; it has intelligence stemming from an internal processor located within the unit or system. The advantages and disadvantages of a complex OMR can best be assessed after identifying the scanning needs and constraints of the potential…

  14. Development of a computed tomographic scanner for radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Smith, V; Parker, D L; Stanley, J H; Phillips, T L; Boyd, D P; Kan, P T

    1980-08-01

    The authors describe a low-cost CT scanner integrated with a radiotherapy simulator and designed for treatment planning. The standard rotational gantry and x-ray tube of the simulator are used with a multiwire xenon lonization chamber and simple current-proportional readout system to measure patient attenuation, avoiding problems associated with diagnostic CT scanners in treatment planning. Although design constraints limit performance, software compensation techniques have reduced artifacts and given satisfactory images.

  15. LIGA Scanner Control Software

    1999-02-01

    The LIGA Scanner Software is a graphical user interface package that facilitates controlling the scanning operation of x-rays from a synchrotron and sample manipulation for making LIGA parts. The process requires scanning of the LIGA mask and the PMMA resist through a stationary x-ray beam to provide an evenly distributed x-ray exposure over the wafer. This software package has been written specifically to interface with Aerotech motor controllers.

  16. High throughput optical scanner

    DOEpatents

    Basiji, David A.; van den Engh, Gerrit J.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  17. 51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner building 105 from upper catwalk level showing emanating waveguides from upper switch (upper one-fourth of photograph) and emanating waveguides from lower radar scanner switch in vertical runs. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. Integrated display scanner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-12-21

    A display scanner includes an optical panel having a plurality of stacked optical waveguides. The waveguides define an inlet face at one end and a screen at an opposite end, with each waveguide having a core laminated between cladding. A projector projects a scan beam of light into the panel inlet face for transmission from the screen as a scan line to scan a barcode. A light sensor at the inlet face detects a return beam reflected from the barcode into the screen. A decoder decodes the return beam detected by the sensor for reading the barcode. In an exemplary embodiment, the optical panel also displays a visual image thereon.

  19. SERI laser scanner system

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, R.J.; Cannon, T.W.

    1980-10-01

    A Laser Scanner System (LSS) produces a photoresponse map and can be used for the nondestructive detection of nonuniformities in the photoresponse of a semiconductor device. At SERI the photoresponse maps are used to identify solar cell faults including microcracks, metallization breaks, regions of poor contact between metallization and the underlying emitter surface, and variations in emitter sheet resistance. The SERI LSS is patterned after the LSS unit documented in the NBS Special Publication 400-24 A Laser Scanner for Semiconductor Devices by D.E. Sawyer and D.W. Berning. Assuming reader familiarity with the above publication, the modifications introduced by SERI are specified with the intention that the two reports can be used to reproduce the SERI LSS. The optical and electronic systems are reviewed, briefly discussing the significant items of each. The most notable difference between the two systems is the SERI substitution of commercially available state-of-the-art modular electronics for the discreet component circuitry used in the NBS LSS.

  20. Multispectral scanner optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, R. C.; Koch, N. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An optical system for use in a multispectral scanner of the type used in video imaging devices is disclosed. Electromagnetic radiation reflected by a rotating scan mirror is focused by a concave primary telescope mirror and collimated by a second concave mirror. The collimated beam is split by a dichroic filter which transmits radiant energy in the infrared spectrum and reflects visible and near infrared energy. The long wavelength beam is filtered and focused on an infrared detector positioned in a cryogenic environment. The short wavelength beam is dispersed by a pair of prisms, then projected on an array of detectors also mounted in a cryogenic environment and oriented at an angle relative to the optical path of the dispersed short wavelength beam.

  1. A character string scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enison, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program called Character String Scanner (CSS), is presented. It is designed to search a data set for any specified group of characters and then to flag this group. The output of the CSS program is a listing of the data set being searched with the specified group of characters being flagged by asterisks. Therefore, one may readily identify specific keywords, groups of keywords or specified lines of code internal to a computer program, in a program output, or in any other specific data set. Possible applications of this program include the automatic scan of an output data set for pertinent keyword data, the editing of a program to change the appearance of a certain word or group of words, and the conversion of a set of code to a different set of code.

  2. Space-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2004-05-01

    A low-loss two-dimensional optical beam scanner that is capable of delivering large (e.g., > 10 degrees) angular scans along the elevation as well as the azimuthal direction is presented. The proposed scanner is based on a space-switched parallel-serial architecture that employs a coarse-scanner module and a fine-scanner module that produce an ultrahigh scan space-fill factor, e.g., 900 x 900 distinguishable beams in a 10 degrees (elevation) x 10 degrees (azimuth) scan space. The experimentally demonstrated one-dimensional version of the proposed scanner has a supercontinuous scan, 100 distinguishable beam spots in a 2.29 degrees total scan range, and 1.5-dB optical insertion loss.

  3. Space-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2004-05-01

    A low-loss two-dimensional optical beam scanner that is capable of delivering large (e.g., > 10 degrees) angular scans along the elevation as well as the azimuthal direction is presented. The proposed scanner is based on a space-switched parallel-serial architecture that employs a coarse-scanner module and a fine-scanner module that produce an ultrahigh scan space-fill factor, e.g., 900 x 900 distinguishable beams in a 10 degrees (elevation) x 10 degrees (azimuth) scan space. The experimentally demonstrated one-dimensional version of the proposed scanner has a supercontinuous scan, 100 distinguishable beam spots in a 2.29 degrees total scan range, and 1.5-dB optical insertion loss. PMID:15130010

  4. A Wiki Based CT Protocol Management System.

    PubMed

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P; Rubert, Nicholas; Belden, Daryn; Ciano, Amanda; Duplissis, Andrew; Hermanns, Ashley; Monette, Stephen; Saldivar, Elliott Janssen

    2015-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin Madison Department of Radiology, CT protocol management requires maintenance of thousands of parameters for each scanner. Managing CT protocols is further complicated by the unique configurability of each scanner. Due to recent Joint Commission requirements, now all CT protocol changes must be documented and reviewed by a site's CT protocol optimization team. The difficulty of managing the CT protocols was not in assembling the protocols, but in managing and implementing changes. This is why a wiki based solution for protocol management was implemented. A wiki inherently keeps track of all changes, logging who made the changes and when, allowing for editing and viewing permissions to be controlled, as well as allowing protocol changes to be instantly relayed to all scanner locations.

  5. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Muramatsu, Yukio; Gomi, Shiho; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Hirobumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Aso, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Tochigi, Naobumi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Sugihara, Naoki; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Saito, Yasuo; Kazama, Masahiro; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Awai, Kazuo; Honda, Osamu; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Naoya; Komoto, Daisuke; Moriya, Hiroshi; Oda, Seitaro; Oshiro, Yasuji; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Asamura, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm x 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm x 16 or 0.5 mm x 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images from both scanners were reconstructed at 0.1-mm intervals; the slice thickness was 0.25 mm for the U-HRCT scanner and 0.5 mm for the C-HRCT scanners. For both scanners, the display field of view was 80 mm. The image noise of each scanner was evaluated using a phantom. U-HRCT and C-HRCT images of 53 images selected from 37 lung nodules were then observed and graded using a 5-point score by 10 board-certified thoracic radiologists. The images were presented to the observers randomly and in a blinded manner. Results The image noise for U-HRCT (100.87 ± 0.51 Hounsfield units [HU]) was greater than that for C-HRCT (40.41 ± 0.52 HU; P < .0001). The image quality of U-HRCT was graded as superior to that of C-HRCT (P < .0001) for all of the following parameters that were examined: margins of subsolid and solid nodules, edges of solid components and pulmonary vessels in subsolid nodules, air bronchograms, pleural indentations, margins of pulmonary vessels, edges of bronchi, and interlobar fissures. Conclusion Despite a larger image noise, the prototype U-HRCT scanner had a significantly better image quality than the C-HRCT scanners. PMID:26352144

  6. Side scanner for supermarkets: a new scanner design standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Charles K.; Cheng, J. K.

    1996-09-01

    High speed UPC bar code has become a standard mode of data capture for supermarkets in the US, Europe, and Japan. The influence of the ergonomics community on the design of the scanner is evident. During the past decade the ergonomic issues of cashier in check-outs has led to occupational hand-wrist cumulative trauma disorders, in most cases causing carpal tunnel syndrome, a permanent hand injury. In this paper, the design of a side scanner to resolve the issues is discussed. The complex optical module and the sensor for aforesaid side scanner is described. The ergonomic advantages offer the old counter mounted vertical scanner has been experimentally proved by the industrial funded study at an independent university.

  7. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  8. MSS D Multispectral Scanner System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauletta, A. M.; Johnson, R. L.; Brinkman, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The development and acceptance testing of the 4-band Multispectral Scanners to be flown on LANDSAT D and LANDSAT D Earth resources satellites are summarized. Emphasis is placed on the acceptance test phase of the program. Test history and acceptance test algorithms are discussed. Trend data of all the key performance parameters are included and discussed separately for each of the two multispectral scanner instruments. Anomalies encountered and their resolutions are included.

  9. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  10. Multispectral Scanner for Monitoring Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Nahum

    2004-01-01

    A multispectral scanner has been adapted to capture spectral images of living plants under various types of illumination for purposes of monitoring the health of, or monitoring the transfer of genes into, the plants. In a health-monitoring application, the plants are illuminated with full-spectrum visible and near infrared light and the scanner is used to acquire a reflected-light spectral signature known to be indicative of the health of the plants. In a gene-transfer- monitoring application, the plants are illuminated with blue or ultraviolet light and the scanner is used to capture fluorescence images from a green fluorescent protein (GFP) that is expressed as result of the gene transfer. The choice of wavelength of the illumination and the wavelength of the fluorescence to be monitored depends on the specific GFP.

  11. [Scanner examination of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Richard, F; Khoury, S; Parienty, R; Ducellier, R; Fourcade, R; Küss, R

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of a large series of documents, the authors participate in establishment of the classification of scanner appearances of urological diseases of the kidney : peripheral or parapelvic sub-capsular cysts, carcinomas and their spread, multiple tumours but of different nature in the same kidney, angiomyolipomas, polycystic disease, renal abscess, hydated cyst, non-invasive exploration of kidneys showed to be non-functioning by I.V.U., tumours of the intrarenal excretory system, lumbar trauma, long-term surveillance of the retroperitoneal space in individuals undergoing surgery for a urological malignant renoureteric tumour. The authors suggest a new chronological arrangement of investigations in the presence of a renal mass discovered by I.V.U. Scanner has its place between echotomography and renal arteriography. Investigations may be stopped at renal echotomography when this examination offers definite evidence of the fluid nature of the mass. Solid or doubtful nature of the mass necessitates the use of a scanner examination.

  12. What Scanner products are available?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... the ERBE scanner CD which gives all the S4G monthly mean 2.5 degree gridded data from both single satellite and combined-satellite product in ASCII format. Also, ordering the S4G HDF data online and using the ncdump utility to perform a straight ASCII dump is another ...

  13. Scanner as a Fine Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2008-01-01

    Not every art department is fortunate enough to have access to digital cameras and image-editing software, but if a scanner, computer, and printer are available, students can create some imaginative and surreal work. This high-school level lesson begins with a discussion of self-portraits, and then moves to students creating images by scanning…

  14. Improvements to Existing Jefferson Lab Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    McCaughan, Michael D.; Tiefenback, Michael G.; Turner, Dennis L.

    2013-06-01

    This poster will detail the augmentation of selected existing CEBAF wire scanners with commercially available hardware, PMTs, and self created software in order to improve the scanners both in function and utility.

  15. Measurement of regional cerebral blood volume using the EMI 1010 scanner.

    PubMed

    Ladurner, G; Zilkha, E; Sager, W D; Iliff, L D; Lechner, H; Du Boulay, G H

    1979-05-01

    Regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) was measured in 14 patients with normal CT scans. An EMI CT 1010 scanner was used in combination with a computer subtraction technique. The mean CBV in the cortex was 5.0 ml/100 ml of tissue and 2.2 in the white matter. Regional differences were not significant and no difference was found between the right and left hemispheres.

  16. Dynamic 3D computed tomography scanner for vascular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mark K.; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    2000-04-01

    A 3D dynamic computed-tomography (CT) scanner was developed for imaging objects undergoing periodic motion. The scanner system has high spatial and sufficient temporal resolution to produce quantitative tomographic/volume images of objects such as excised arterial samples perfused under physiological pressure conditions and enables the measurements of the local dynamic elastic modulus (Edyn) of the arteries in the axial and longitudinal directions. The system was comprised of a high resolution modified x-ray image intensifier (XRII) based computed tomographic system and a computer-controlled cardiac flow simulator. A standard NTSC CCD camera with a macro lens was coupled to the electro-optically zoomed XRII to acquire dynamic volumetric images. Through prospective cardiac gating and computer synchronized control, a time-resolved sequence of 20 mm thick high resolution volume images of porcine aortic specimens during one simulated cardiac cycle were obtained. Performance evaluation of the scanners illustrated that tomographic images can be obtained with resolution as high as 3.2 mm-1 with only a 9% decrease in the resolution for objects moving at velocities of 1 cm/s in 2D mode and static spatial resolution of 3.55 mm-1 with only a 14% decrease in the resolution in 3D mode for objects moving at a velocity of 10 cm/s. Application of the system for imaging of intact excised arterial specimens under simulated physiological flow/pressure conditions enabled measurements of the Edyn of the arteries with a precision of +/- kPa for the 3D scanner. Evaluation of the Edyn in the axial and longitudinal direction produced values of 428 +/- 35 kPa and 728 +/- 71 kPa, demonstrating the isotropic and homogeneous viscoelastic nature of the vascular specimens. These values obtained from the Dynamic CT systems were not statistically different (p less than 0.05) from the values obtained by standard uniaxial tensile testing and volumetric measurements.

  17. Improvement of the cine-CT based 4D-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Sun Xiaojun; Luo Dershan

    2007-11-15

    An improved 4D-CT utility has been developed on the GE LightSpeed multislice CT (MSCT) and Discovery PET/CT scanners, which have the cine CT scan capability. Two new features have been added in this 4D-CT over the commercial Advantage 4D-CT from GE. One feature was a new tool for disabling parts of the respiratory signal with irregular respiration and improving the accuracy of phase determination for the respiratory signal from the Varian real-time positioning and monitoring (RPM) system before sorting of the cine CT images into the 4D-CT images. The second feature was to allow generation of the maximum-intensity-projection (MIP), average (AVG) and minimum-intensity-projection (mip) CT images from the cine CT images without a respiratory signal. The implementation enables the assessment of tumor motion in treatment planning with the MIP, AVG, and mip CT images on the GE MSCT and PET/CT scanners without the RPM and the Advantage 4D-CT with a GE Advantage windows workstation. Several clinical examples are included to illustrate this new application.

  18. Effects of injected dose, BMI and scanner type on NECR and image noise in PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tingting; Chang, Guoping; Kohlmyer, Steve; Clark, John W., Jr.; Rohren, Eric; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2011-08-01

    Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and image noise are two different but related metrics that have been used to predict and assess image quality, respectively. The aim of this study is to investigate, using patient studies, the relationships between injected dose (ID), body mass index (BMI) and scanner type on NECR and image noise measurements in PET imaging. Two groups of 90 patients each were imaged on a GE DSTE and a DRX PET/CT scanner, respectively. The patients in each group were divided into nine subgroups according to three BMI (20-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-45 kg m-2) and three ID (296-444, 444-555, 555-740 MBq) ranges, resulting in ten patients/subgroup. All PET data were acquired in 3D mode and reconstructed using the VuePoint HD® fully 3D OSEM algorithm (2 iterations, 21(DRX) or 20 (DSTE) subsets). NECR and image noise measurements for bed positions covering the liver were calculated for each patient. NECR was calculated from the trues, randoms and scatter events recorded in the DICOM header of each patient study, while image noise was determined as the standard deviation of 50 non-neighboring voxels in the liver of each patient. A t-test compared the NECR and image noise for different scanners but with the same BMI and ID. An ANOVA test on the other hand was used to compare the results of patients with different BMI but the same ID and scanner type as well as different ID but the same BMI and scanner type. As expected the t-test showed a significant difference in NECR between the two scanners for all BMI and ID subgroups. However, contrary to what is expected no such findings were observed for image noise measurement. The ANOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in both NECR and image noise among the different BMI for each ID and scanner subgroup. However, there was no statistically significant difference in NECR and image noise across different ID for each BMI and scanner subgroup. Although the GE DRX PET/CT scanner has better count rate

  19. A Simple X-Y Scanner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halse, M. R.; Hudson, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an X-Y scanner used to create acoustic holograms. Scanner is computer controlled and can be adapted to digitize pictures. Scanner geometry is discussed. An appendix gives equipment details. The control program in ATOM BASIC and 6502 machine code is available from the authors. (JM)

  20. Distinction of Internal Tissue of Raw Ginseng Root Using a Computed Tomography Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Jung, In-Chan; Jeong, In Soo; Kim, Cheon-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Raw ginseng root of Panax ginseng is graded according to its shape and the quality of its internal tissue. A variety of grades are sold with prices according to grade. If an inferior raw ginseng is purchased, the consumer experience an economic loss. This research was conducted in order to explore the possibility of developing a noninvasive method for investigating raw ginseng’s internal tissue. It has been determined that computed tomography (CT) scanner images agreed with actual cross-sections of raw ginseng. CT images were obtained to assess the internal portions of raw ginseng, and CT scans of raw ginseng were thoroughly measured using the Hounsfield unit (HU) system, since it allows for a more detailed analysis compared to nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. HU is a measure of attenuation used for CT images, with each pixel being assigned a value using a scale on which air is defined as -1000, water as 0 and compact bone as +1000. It takes about one second to process are slice and produce an image of the raw ginseng by a one channel CT scanner. An image good enough to discriminate the internal tissues can be obtained in 1/24 seconds with a one-channel CT scanner. Using this method, images of raw ginseng can be obtained and the characteristics of the internal tissues can be observed in a short time. PMID:23717151

  1. Simulation of LANDSAT multispectral scanner spatial resolution with airborne scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    A technique for simulation of low spatial resolution satellite imagery by using high resolution scanner data is described. The scanner data is convolved with the approximate point spread function of the low resolution data and then resampled to emulate low resolution imagery. The technique was successfully applied to Daedalus airborne scanner data to simulate a portion of a LANDSAT multispectra scanner scene.

  2. Coronary calcium mass scores measured by identical 64-slice MDCT scanners are comparable: a cardiac phantom study.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Greuter, Marcel J W; Groen, Jaap M; Vliegenthart-Proença, Rozemarijn; Renema, Klaasjan W K; de Lange, Frank; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    scores obtained in the same scan mode are comparable between identical 64-slice CT scanners and identical 64-slice CT scanners on different sites can be used in follow-up studies. Furthermore, for all systems significant differences were found between mass scores and the physical calcium mass; however, the differences were relatively small and consistent. PMID:19768572

  3. Validation of Computed Tomography-based Attenuation Correction of Deviation between Theoretical and Actual Values in Four Computed Tomography Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Yada, Nobuhiro; Onishi, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): In this study, we aimed to validate the accuracy of computed tomography-based attenuation correction (CTAC), using the bilinear scaling method. Methods: The measured attenuation coefficient (μm) was compared to the theoretical attenuation coefficient (μt), using four different CT scanners and an RMI 467 phantom. The effective energy of CT beam X-rays was calculated, using the aluminum half-value layer method and was used in conjunction with an attenuation coefficient map to convert the CT numbers to μm values for the photon energy of 140 keV. We measured the CT number of RMI 467 phantom for each of the four scanners and compared the μm and μt values for the effective energies of CT beam X-rays, effective atomic numbers, and physical densities. Results: The μm values for CT beam X-rays with low effective energies decreased in high construction elements, compared with CT beam X-rays of high effective energies. As the physical density increased, the μm values elevated linearly. Compared with other scanners, the μm values obtained from the scanner with CT beam X-rays of maximal effective energy increased once the effective atomic number exceeded 10.00. The μm value of soft tissue was equivalent to the μt value. However, the ratios of maximal difference between μm and μt values were 25.4% (lung tissue) and 21.5% (bone tissue), respectively. Additionally, the maximal difference in μm values was 6.0% in the bone tissue for each scanner. Conclusion: The bilinear scaling method could accurately convert CT numbers to μ values in soft tissues. PMID:27408896

  4. Vacuum Attachment for XRF Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Vacuum apparatuses have been developed for increasing the range of elements that can be identified by use of x-ray fluorescent (XRF) scanners of the type mentioned in the two immediately preceding articles. As a consequence of the underlying physical principles, in the presence of air, such an XRF scanner is limited to analysis of chlorine and elements of greater atomic number. When the XRF scanner is operated in a vacuum, it extends the range of analysis to lower atomic numbers - even as far as aluminum and sodium. Hence, more elements will be available for use in XRF labeling of objects as discussed in the two preceding articles. The added benefits of the extended capabilities also have other uses for NASA. Detection of elements of low atomic number is of high interest to the aerospace community. High-strength aluminum alloys will be easily analyzed for composition. Silicon, a major contaminant in certain processes, will be detectable before the process is begun, possibly eliminating weld or adhesion problems. Exotic alloys will be evaluated for composition prior to being placed in service where lives depend on them. And in the less glamorous applications, such as bolts and fasteners, substandard products and counterfeit items will be evaluated at the receiving function and never allowed to enter the operation

  5. An electronic reticle generator for use with CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Wooten, E C; Friauf, W S

    1980-02-01

    A simple electronic device for superimposing a dot grid of known spacing on a TV monitor used for the display of computed tomography images is described. The device connects directly to the cable leading to the TV monitor and requires no other system interconnection. PMID:7354169

  6. Clinical experience with the first combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanner in Australia.

    PubMed

    Lau, W F Eddie; Binns, David S; Ware, Robert E; Ramdave, Shakher; Cachin, Florent; Pitman, Alexander G; Hicks, Rodney J

    2005-02-21

    Metabolic imaging with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is increasing rapidly worldwide because of superior accuracy compared with conventional non-invasive techniques used for evaluating cancer. Limited anatomical information from FDG-PET images alone dictates that complementary use with structural imaging is required to optimise benefit. Recently, combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners have overtaken standalone PET scanners as the most commonly purchased PET devices. We describe our experience of over 5500 scans performed since the first PET/CT scanner in Australia was commissioned at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (PMCC), Melbourne, in January 2002. Clinical indications for PET/CT scans performed at PMCC largely reflect current Medicare reimbursement policy. Advantages of PET/CT include greater patient comfort and higher throughput, greater diagnostic certainty and accuracy, improved biopsy methods, and better treatment planning. We believe PET/CT will underpin more effective and efficient imaging paradigms for many common tumours, and lead to a decrease in imaging costs. PMID:15720173

  7. Determining organ doses from computed tomography scanners using cadaveric subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griglock, Thomas M.

    The use of computed tomographic (CT) imaging has increased greatly since its inception in 1972. Technological advances have increased both the applicability of CT exams for common health problems as well as the radiation doses used to perform these exams. The increased radiation exposures have garnered much attention in the media and government agencies, and have brought about numerous attempts to quantify the amount of radiation received by patients. While the overwhelming majority of these attempts have focused on creating models of the human body (physical or computational), this research project sought to directly measure the radiation inside an actual human being. Three female cadaveric subjects of varying sizes were used to represent live patients. Optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters were used to measure the radiation doses. A dosimeter placement system was developed, tested, and optimized to allow accurate and reproducible placement of the dosimeters within the cadaveric subjects. A broad-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner was utilized to perform all CT exams, including five torso exams, four cardiac exams, and three organ perfusion exams. Organ doses ranged in magnitude from less than 1 to over 120 mGy, with the largest doses measured for perfusion imaging. A methodology has been developed that allows fast and accurate measurement of actual organ doses resulting from CT exams. The measurements made with this methodology represent the first time CT organ doses have been directly measured within a human body. These measurements are of great importance because they allow comparison to the doses measured using previous methods, and can be used to more accurately assess the risks from CT imaging.

  8. Coastal zone color scanner retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, B. Greg

    1994-04-01

    The following special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research is dedicated to a retrospective of scientific studies using the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) instrument. The CZCS was launched in late 1978 aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite as a "proof-of-concept" instrument to demonstrate the feasibility of using satellite platforms to monitor the distribution of oceanic phytoplankton in the world's oceans. It provided data until the middle of 1986. Phytoplankton primary production contributes approximately one half of the global biospheric fixation of organic matter by photosynthesis, thereby forming the base of the oceanic food web and providing a major sink for atmospheric CO2.

  9. The solar cell laser scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. L.; Chern, S.-S.; Shumka, A.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the Low Cost Solar Array Program at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, failure analyses have been performed on over 300 photovoltaic modules from thirty different manufacturers and five countries. Because of the volume of work and the variety of module types encountered, it has been necessary to develop non-destructive techniques to rapidly locate the failure sites. This paper will present design details and results obtained with one instrument developed specifically for this purpose, the Solar Cell Laser Scanner (SCLS). The effects of applying a bias current to the modules will also be discussed, based upon experimental observations and computer generated predictions.

  10. EUV mask particle adders during scanner exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Yoonsuk; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Kyuyoung; Koo, Sunyoung; Kim, SeoMin; Kim, Youngsik; Lim, Changmoon; Kwak, Nohjung

    2015-03-01

    As EUV reaches high volume manufacturing, scanner source power and reticle defectivity attract a lot of attention. Keeping a EUV mask clean after mask production is as essential as producing a clean EUV mask. Even though EUV pellicle is actively investigated, we might expose EUV masks without EUV pellicle for some time. To keep clean EUV mask under pellicle-less lithography, EUV scanner cleanliness needs to meet the requirement of high volume manufacturing. In this paper, we will show the cleanliness of EUV scanners in view of mask particle adders during scanner exposure. From this we will find several tendencies of mask particle adders depending on mask environment in scanner. Further we can categorize mask particle adders, which could show the possible causes of particle adders during exposure in scanners.

  11. Creation of sophisticated test objects for quality assurance of optical computed tomography scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. T. Abdul; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Brochard, Thierry; Adamovics, John; Clowes, Steve; Bradley, David; Doran, Simon

    2010-11-01

    Optical computed tomography (CT) shows great potential for radiation therapy dose verification in 3D. However, an effective quality assurance regime for the various scanners currently available still remains to be developed. We show how the favourable properties of the PRESAGETM radiochromic polymer may be exploited to create highly sophisticated QA phantoms. Five 60 mm-diameter cylindrical PRESAGETM samples were irradiated using the x-ray microbeam radiation therapy facility on the ID17 biomedical beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Samples were then imaged on the University of Surrey parallel-beam optical CT scanner and were designed to allow a variety of tests to be performed, including linearity, MTF (three independent measurements) and an assessment of geometric distortion. A small sample of these results is presented. It is clear that, although the method produces extremely high quality test objects, it is not practical on a routine basis, because of its reliance of a highly specialised radiation source. Hence, we investigated a second possibility. Two PRESAGETM samples were illuminated with ultraviolet light of wavelength 365 nm, using cheap masks created by laser-printing patterns onto overhead projector acetate sheets. There was good correlation between optical density (OD) measured by the CT scanner and the expected UV "dose" delivered. The results are highly encouraging and a proposal is made for a scanner test regime based on calibrated and well characterised PRESAGETM samples.

  12. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  13. Standardized CT protocols and nomenclature: better, but not yet there.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2014-10-01

    Radiation dose associated with CT is an important safety concern in patient care, especially in children. Technical advancements in multidetector-row CT scanner technology offer several advantages for clinical applications; these advancements have considerably increased CT utilization and enhanced the complexity of CT scanning protocols. Furthermore there are several scan manufacturers spearheading these technical advancements, leading to different commercial names causing confusion among the users, especially at imaging sites with scanners from different vendors. Several scientific studies and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have shown variation in CT radiation doses for same body region and similar scanning protocols. Therefore there is a need for standardization of scanning protocols and nomenclature of scan parameters. The following material reviews the status and challenges in standardization of CT scanning and nomenclature. PMID:25304702

  14. Small-animal CT: Its difference from, and impact on, clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritman, Erik L.

    2007-10-01

    For whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of small rodents, a voxel resolution of at least 10 -3 mm 3 is needed for scale-equivalence to that currently achieved in clinical CT scanners (˜1 mm 3) in adult humans. These "mini-CT" images generally require minutes rather than seconds to complete a scan. The radiation exposure resulting from these mini-CT scans, while higher than clinical CT scans, is below the level resulting in acute tissue damage. Hence, these scans are useful for performing clinical-type diagnostic and monitoring scans for animal models of disease and their response to treatment. "Micro-CT", with voxel size <10 -5 mm 3, has been useful for imaging isolated, intact organs at an almost cellular level of resolution. Micro-CT has the great advantage over traditional microscopic methods in that it generates detailed three-dimensional images in relatively large, opaque volumes such as an intact rodent heart or kidney. The radiation exposure needed in these scans results in acute tissue damage if used in living animals. Experience with micro-CT is contributing to exploration of new applications for clinical CT imaging by providing insights into different modes of X-ray image formation as follows: Spatial resolution should be sufficient to detect an individual Basic Functional Unit (BFU, the smallest collection of diverse cells, such as hepatic lobule, that behaves like the organ), which requires voxels ˜10 -3 mm 3 in volume, so that the BFUs can be counted. Contrast resolution sufficient to allow quantitation of: New microvascular growth, which manifests as increased tissue contrast due to X-ray contrast agent in those vessels' lumens during passage of injected contrast agent in blood. Impaired endothelial integrity which manifests as increased opacification and delayed washout of contrast from tissues. Discrimination of pathological accumulations of metals such as Fe and Ca, which occur in the arterial wall following hemorrhage or tissue damage

  15. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  16. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  17. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  18. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification....

  19. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... fluorescent scanner is a device intended to measure the induced fluorescent radiation in the body by...

  20. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... fluorescent scanner is a device intended to measure the induced fluorescent radiation in the body by...

  1. Scanner Art and Links to Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, David

    2005-01-01

    A photocopier or scanner can be used to produce not only the standard motion graphs of physics, but a variety of other graphs that resemble gravitational and electrical fields. This article presents a starting point for exploring scanner graphics, which brings together investigation in art and design, physics, mathematics, and information…

  2. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  3. A comparison of film and phosphor scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Chancellor, T.; Morris, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and spatial distortions have been measured for three types of scanners: the Molecular Dynamics (MD) and DuPont film scanners and the MD phosphor scanner. The MD film scanner is a deployable and compact scanner that gives a peak SNR of 110 for low (< 2.0) optical densities (ODs), but the spatial distortions across the digitized film plane are significant. The authors compare this with the DuPont film scanner, which has equally good SNRs at low ODs, but very low spatial distortions. The DuPont also allows the user to define an OD range and contains a prescan function to find the suitable range if the user cannot input such a value; its scan times are quick, and the hardware allows for internal data averaging before being stored to disk. The MD phosphor imager has excellent low-dose capability, producing usable images at a 10-{mu}rad dose (from a 150-pkeV source) but its SNRs are low compared to the film scanner, but they can be increased by adjusting the photomultiplier tube voltage and laser radius across the scan arc.

  4. Optical CT scanning of PRESAGETM polyurethane samples with a CCD-based readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, S. J.; Krstajic, N.; Adamovics, J.; Jenneson, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    This article demonstrates the resolution capabilities of the CCD scanner under ideal circumstances and describes the first CCD-based optical CT experiments on a new class of dosimeter, known as PRESAGETM (Heuris Pharma, Skillman, NJ).

  5. Eddy current X-Y scanner system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Nondestructive Evaluation Branch of the Materials and Processes Laboratory became aware of a need for a miniature, portable X-Y scanner capable of performing eddy current or other nondestructive testing scanning operations such as ultrasonic, or small areas of flat plate. The technical description and operational theory of the X-Y scanner system designed and built to fulfill this need are covered. The scanner was given limited testing and performs according to its design intent, which is to scan flat plate areas of approximately 412 sq cm (64 sq in) during each complete cycle of scanning.

  6. Pulsed Doppler lidar airborne scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimarzio, C. A.; Mcvicker, D. B.; Morrow, C. E.; Negus, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    This report covers the work accomplished during the reporting period on Pulsed Doppler Lidar Airborne Scanner and describes plans for the next reporting period. The objectives during the current phase of the contract are divided into four phases. Phase 1 includes ground testing of the system and analysis of data from the 1981 Severe Storms Test Flights. Phase 2 consists of preflight preparation and planning for the 1983 flight series. The flight test itself will be performed during Phase 3, and Phase 4 consists of post-flight analysis and operation of the system after that flight test. The range profile from five samples taken during Flight 10, around 1700 Z is given. The lowest curve is taken from data collected upwind of Mt. Shasta at about 10,000 feet of altitude, in a clear atmosphere, where no signals were observed. It thus is a good representation of the noise level as a function of range. The next curve was taken downwind of the mountain, and shows evidence of atmospheric returns. There is some question as to whether the data are valid at all ranges, or some ranges are contaminated by the others.

  7. Flexure pivots for oscillatory scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David C.; Pruyn, Kristopher

    2002-06-01

    Flexures are quite ancient, and their use as pivots is also ancient. Long before the use of the most primitive sleeve bearings leather strap flexures were used as trunk lidhinges and the like. Early engines of war, including the ballista of the Romans, technically advanced hand bows, and the cross bows of the fourteenth century all employ flexure pivots as their enabling technology. Designers of modern scientific instruments, including optical and laser scanning equipment exploit the same attributes of the flexure which appealed to their forefathers: simplicity, reliability, lack of internal clearance, long service life, ease of construction, and often, it's high mechanical Q. A special case of the flexure pivot, the torsional pivot, has made possible very long lived scanners at speeds which are far out of the reach of other bearing types. Since success with flexures requires consideration of some simple but non-intuitive issues such as stress distribution and stress corrosion, this talk will emphasize the practicum of flexure design and application.

  8. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fluorescent scanner is a device intended to measure the induced fluorescent radiation in the body by exposing the body to certain x-rays or low-energy gamma rays. This generic type of device may include...

  9. High voltage battery cell scanner development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepisto, J. W.; Decker, D. K.; Graves, J.

    1983-01-01

    Battery cell voltage scanners have been previously used in low voltage spacecraft applications. In connection with future missions involving an employment of high-power high voltage power subsystems and/or autonomous power subsystem management for unattended operation, it will be necessary to utilize battery cell voltage scanners to provide battery cell voltage information for early detection of impending battery cell degradation/failures. In preparation for such missions, a novel battery cell voltage scanner design has been developed. The novel design makes use of low voltage circuit modules which can be applied to high voltage batteries in a building block fashion. A description is presented of the design concept and test results of the high voltage battery cell scanner, and its operation with an autonomously managed power subsystem is discussed.

  10. Information extraction techniques for multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Crane, R. B.; Turner, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The applicability of recognition-processing procedures for multispectral scanner data from areas and conditions used for programming the recognition computers to other data from different areas viewed under different measurement conditions was studied. The reflective spectral region approximately 0.3 to 3.0 micrometers is considered. A potential application of such techniques is in conducting area surveys. Work in three general areas is reported: (1) Nature of sources of systematic variation in multispectral scanner radiation signals, (2) An investigation of various techniques for overcoming systematic variations in scanner data; (3) The use of decision rules based upon empirical distributions of scanner signals rather than upon the usually assumed multivariate normal (Gaussian) signal distributions.

  11. Hand-held optical fuel pin scanner

    DOEpatents

    Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

    1980-12-07

    An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane perpendicular to an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image to a stationary photodiode array.

  12. Hand-held optical fuel pin scanner

    DOEpatents

    Kirchner, Tommy L.; Powers, Hurshal G.

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane perpendicular to an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image to a stationary photodiode array.

  13. Image quality assessment for CT used on small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Isabela Paredes; Agulles-Pedrós, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Image acquisition on a CT scanner is nowadays necessary in almost any kind of medical study. Its purpose, to produce anatomical images with the best achievable quality, implies the highest diagnostic radiation exposure to patients. Image quality can be measured quantitatively based on parameters such as noise, uniformity and resolution. This measure allows the determination of optimal parameters of operation for the scanner in order to get the best diagnostic image. A human Phillips CT scanner is the first one minded for veterinary-use exclusively in Colombia. The aim of this study was to measure the CT image quality parameters using an acrylic phantom and then, using the computational tool MatLab, determine these parameters as a function of current value and window of visualization, in order to reduce dose delivery by keeping the appropriate image quality.

  14. Overview of multisource CT systems and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Lu, Yang; Zhuang, Tiange; Wang, Ge

    2010-09-01

    Multiple-source cone-beam scanning is a promising mode for dynamic volumetric CT/micro-CT. The first dynamic CT system is the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR) built in 1979. The pursuance for higher temporal resolution has largely driven the development of CT technology, and recently led to the emergence of Siemens dual-source CT scanner. Given the impact and limitation of dual-source cardiac CT, triple-source cone-beam CT seems a natural extension for future cardiac CT. Our work shows that trinity (triple-source architecture) is superior to duality (dual-source architecture) for helical cone-beam CT in terms of exact reconstruction. In particular, a triple-source helical scan allows a perfect mosaic of longitudinally truncated cone-beam data to satisfy the Orlov condition and yields better noise performance than the dual-source counterpart. In the (2N+1)-source helical CT case, the more sources, the higher temporal resolution. In the N-source saddle CT case, a triple-source scan offers the best temporal resolution for continuous dynamic exact reconstruction of a central volume. The recently developed multi-source cone-beam algorithms include an exact backprojection-filtration (BPF) approach and a "slow" exact filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for (2N+1)-source helical CT, two fast quasi-exact FBP algorithms for triple-source helical CT, as well as a fast exact FBP algorithm for triple-source saddle CT. Some latest ideas will be also discussed, such as multi-source interior tomography and multi-beam field-emission x-ray CT.

  15. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  16. Uncertainty Propagation for Terrestrial Mobile Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezian, c.; Vallet, Bruno; Soheilian, Bahman; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanners are used more and more in mobile mapping systems. They provide 3D point clouds that are used for object reconstruction and registration of the system. For both of those applications, uncertainty analysis of 3D points is of great interest but rarely investigated in the literature. In this paper we present a complete pipeline that takes into account all the sources of uncertainties and allows to compute a covariance matrix per 3D point. The sources of uncertainties are laser scanner, calibration of the scanner in relation to the vehicle and direct georeferencing system. We suppose that all the uncertainties follow the Gaussian law. The variances of the laser scanner measurements (two angles and one distance) are usually evaluated by the constructors. This is also the case for integrated direct georeferencing devices. Residuals of the calibration process were used to estimate the covariance matrix of the 6D transformation between scanner laser and the vehicle system. Knowing the variances of all sources of uncertainties, we applied uncertainty propagation technique to compute the variance-covariance matrix of every obtained 3D point. Such an uncertainty analysis enables to estimate the impact of different laser scanners and georeferencing devices on the quality of obtained 3D points. The obtained uncertainty values were illustrated using error ellipsoids on different datasets.

  17. [Radiation dosage of various CT techniques in diagnostic lung imaging].

    PubMed

    Heinz-Peer, G; Weninger, F; Nowotny, R; Herold, C J

    1996-06-01

    Introduction of the computed tomography index CTDI and the multiple scan average dose (MSAD) has led to standardization of the dose description in CT examinations. Despite the use of these dose parameters, many different dosages are reported in the literature for different CT methods. In addition, there is still a wide range of radiation dosimetry results reported for conventional CT, helical CT, and HRCT used in chest examinations. The variations in dosage are mainly due to differences in factors affecting the dose, i.e. beam geometry, beam quality, scanner geometry ("generation"), and operating parameters. In addition, CT dosimetry instrumentation and methodology make a contribution to dosages. Recent studies calculating differences in factors affecting dosage and CT dosimetry and using similar operating parameters, show similar results in CT dosimetry for conventional and helical CT. On the other hand, dosages for HRCT were greatly reduced. This was mainly caused by narrow beam collimation and increasing section spacing.

  18. Preoperative staging of colorectal cancer: CT vs. integrated FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Min, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Chung, Tae Woong; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2008-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging is essential in determining the optimal therapeutic planning for individual patients. The computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer, even if controversial, may be useful for planning surgery and/or neoadjuvant therapy, particularly when local tumor extension into adjacent organs or distant metastases are detected. There have been significant changes in the CT technology with the advent of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanner. Advances in CT technology have raised interest in the potential role of CT for detection and staging of colorectal cancer. In recent studies, MDCT with MPR images has shown promising accuracy in the evaluation of local extent and nodal involvement of colorectal cancer. Combined PET/CT images have significant advantages over either alone because it provides both functional and anatomical data. Therefore, it is natural to expect that PET/CT would improve the accuracy of preoperative staging of colorectal cancer. The most significant additional information provided by PET/CT relates to the accurate detection of distant metastases. For the evaluation of patients with colorectal cancer, CT has relative advantages over PET/CT in regard to the depth of tumor invasion through the wall, extramural extension, and regional lymph node metastases. PET/CT should be performed on selected patients with suggestive but inconclusive metastatic lesions with CT. In addition, PET/CT with dedicated CT protocols, such as contrast-enhanced PET/CT and PET/CT colonography, may replace the diagnostic CT for the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer.

  19. Technical evaluation of different respiratory monitoring systems used for 4D CT acquisition under free breathing.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Christian; Reiner, Michael; Belka, Claus; Walter, Franziska; Söhn, Matthias

    2015-03-08

    Respiratory monitoring systems are required to supply CT scanners with information on the patient's breathing during the acquisition of a respiration-correlated computer tomography (RCCT), also referred to as 4D CT. The information a respiratory monitoring system has to provide to the CT scanner depends on the specific scanner. The purpose of this study is to compare two different respiratory monitoring systems (Anzai Respiratory Gating System; C-RAD Sentinel) with respect to their applicability in combination with an Aquilion Large Bore CT scanner from Toshiba. The scanner used in our clinic does not make use of the full time dependent breathing signal, but only single trigger pulses indicating the beginning of a new breathing cycle. Hence the attached respiratory monitoring system is expected to deliver accurate online trigger pulse for each breathing cycle. The accuracy of the trigger pulses sent to the CT scanner has to be ensured by the selected respiratory monitoring system. Since a trigger pulse (output signal) of a respiratory monitoring system is a function of the measured breathing signal (input signal), the typical clinical range of the input signal is estimated for both examined respiratory monitoring systems. Both systems are analyzed based on the following parameters: time resolution, signal amplitude, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), signal linearity, trigger compatibility, and clinical examples. The Anzai system shows a better SNR (≥ 28 dB) than the Sentinel system (≥ 14.6 dB). In terms of compatibility with the cycle-based image sorting algorithm of the Toshiba CT scanner, the Anzai system benefits from the possibility to generate cycle-based triggers, whereas the Sentinel system is only able to generate amplitude-based triggers. In clinical practice, the combination of a Toshiba CT scanner and the Anzai system will provide better results due to the compatibility of the image sorting and trigger release methods.

  20. Reliability of attenuation measurements in CT of the lumbar spine: evaluation with an anthropomorphic phantom.

    PubMed

    Moström, U; Ytterbergh, C

    1988-01-01

    A phantom was constructed with the intention of simulating the clinical situation at examination of the spine. Artifacts from bony vertebral structures were analyzed and the uniformity in a body-shaped object was studied. Tests were carried out on eight CT scanners. A considerable variation in uniformity was found between the tested scanner models. The CT numbers within the spinal canal and in a region anterior to the spine were elevated for most of the scanners. The deviation varied considerably, however, between models.

  1. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  2. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  3. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates

  4. [CT-expo--a novel program for dose evaluation in CT].

    PubMed

    Stamm, G; Nagel, H D

    2002-12-01

    CT-Expo is a novel MS Excel application for assessing the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing CT examinations, based on computational methods that were used to analyze the data collected in the German survey on CT practice in 1999. The program enables the calculation of all dose quantities of practical value, such as axial dose free-in-air, weighted CTDI, dose-length product, effective dose and uterine dose. In contrast to existing programs for CT dose assessment, CT-Expo offers a number of unique features, such as gender-specific dose calculation for all age groups (adults, children, newborns), applicability to all existing scanner models including correction of scanner-specific influences, and the possibility of comparison with the results from the German CT survey on CT practice. Three different application modules offer free and standardized dose calculations as well as a comprehensive benchmarking section including guidance on dose optimization. The program is available as shareware in both German and English version. Additional information and a demo version free of charge can be requested via e-mail from the author's address stamm.georg@mh-hannover. de) or from the web page http://www.mh-hannover.de/kliniken/radiologie/str_04.html.

  5. [Application of computed tomography (CT) examination for forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Urbanik, Andrzej; Chrzan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a own experiences in usage of post mortem CT examination for forensic medicine. With the help of 16-slice CT scanner 181 corpses were examined. Obtained during acquisition imaging data are later developed with dedicated programmes. Analyzed images were extracted from axial sections, multiplanar reconstructions as well as 3D reconstructions. Gained information helped greatly when classical autopsy was performed by making it more accurate. A CT scan images recorded digitally enable to evaluate corpses at any time, despite processes of putrefaction or cremation. If possible CT examination should precede classical autopsy.

  6. [Application of computed tomography (CT) examination for forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Urbanik, Andrzej; Chrzan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a own experiences in usage of post mortem CT examination for forensic medicine. With the help of 16-slice CT scanner 181 corpses were examined. Obtained during acquisition imaging data are later developed with dedicated programmes. Analyzed images were extracted from axial sections, multiplanar reconstructions as well as 3D reconstructions. Gained information helped greatly when classical autopsy was performed by making it more accurate. A CT scan images recorded digitally enable to evaluate corpses at any time, despite processes of putrefaction or cremation. If possible CT examination should precede classical autopsy. PMID:23944089

  7. LANSCE-R WIRE-SCANNER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The National Instruments cRIO platform is used for the new LANSCE-R wire-scanner systems. All wire-scanner electronics are integrated into a single BiRa BiRIO 4U cRIO chassis specifically designed for the cRIO crate and all interface electronics. The BiRIO chassis, actuator and LabVIEW VIs provide a complete wire-scanner system integrated with EPICS. The new wire-scanner chassis includes an 8-slot cRIO crate with Virtex-5 LX 110 FPGA and Power-PC real-time controller, the LANL-developed cRIO 2-axis wire-sensor analog interface module (AFE), NI9222 cRIO 4-channel 16-bit digitizer, cRIO resolver demodulator, cRIO event receiver, front-panel touch panel display, motor driver, and all necessary software, interface wiring, connectors and ancillary components. This wirescanner system provides a complete, turn-key, 2-axis wire-scanner system including 2-channel low-noise sensewire interface with variable DC wire bias and wireintegrity monitor, 16-bit signal digitizers, actuator motor drive and control, actuator position sensing, limit-switch interfaces, event receiver, LabVIEW and EPICS interface, and both remote operation and full stand-alone operation using the touch panel.

  8. Cognition for robot scanner based remote welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thombansen, U.; Ungers, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The effort for reduced cycle times in manufacturing has supported the development of remote welding systems which use a combination of scanners for beam delivery and robots for scanner positioning. Herein, close coupling of both motions requires a precise command of the robot trajectory and the scanner positioning to end up with a combined beam delivery. Especially the path precision of the robot plays a vital role in this kinematic chain. In this paper, a sensor system is being presented which allows tracking the motion of the laser beam against the work piece. It is based on a camera system which is coaxially connected to the scanner thus observing the relative motion of the laser beam relative to the work piece. The acquired images are processed with computer vision algorithms from the field of motion detection. The suitability of the algorithms is being demonstrated with a motion tracking tool which visualizes the homogeneity of the tracking result. The reported solution adds cognitive capabilities to manufacturing systems for robot scanner based materials processing. It allows evaluation of the relative motion between work piece and the laser beam. Moreover, the system can be used to adapt system programming during set-up of a manufacturing task or to evaluate the functionality of a manufacturing system during production. The presented sensor system will assist in optimizing manufacturing processes.

  9. New horizons in cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    den Harder, A M; Willemink, M J; de Jong, P A; Schilham, A M R; Rajiah, P; Takx, R A P; Leiner, T

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) was associated with considerable radiation doses. The introduction of tube current modulation and automatic tube potential selection as well as high-pitch prospective ECG-triggering and iterative reconstruction offer the ability to decrease dose with approximately one order of magnitude, often to sub-millisievert dose levels. In parallel, advancements in computational technology have enabled the measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) from CCTA data (FFRCT). This technique shows potential to replace invasively measured FFR to select patients in need of coronary intervention. Furthermore, developments in scanner hardware have led to the introduction of dual-energy and photon-counting CT, which offer the possibility of material decomposition imaging. Dual-energy CT reduces beam hardening, which enables CCTA in patients with a high calcium burden and more robust myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Future-generation CT systems will be capable of counting individual X-ray photons. Photon-counting CT is promising and may result in a substantial further radiation dose reduction, vastly increased spatial resolution, and the introduction of a whole new class of contrast agents. PMID:26932775

  10. Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

    2011-02-15

    CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

  11. Laser scanners: from industrial to biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2013-11-01

    We present a brief overview of our contributions in the field of laser scanning technologies, applied for a variety of applications, from industrial, dimensional measurements to high-end biomedical imaging, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Polygon Mirror (PM) scanners are presented, as applied from optical micrometers to laser sources scanned in frequency for Swept Sources (SSs) OCT. Galvanometer-based scanners (GSs) are approached to determine the optimal scanning function in order to obtain the highest possible duty cycle. We demonstrated that this optimal scanning function is linear plus parabolic, and not linear plus sinusoidal, as it has been previously considered in the literature. Risley prisms (rotational double wedges) scanners are pointed out, with our exact approach to determine and simulate their scan patterns in order to optimize their use in several types of applications, including OCT. A discussion on the perspectives of scanning in biomedical imaging, with a focus on OCT concludes the study.

  12. CT Image Processing Using Public Digital Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Azzawi, Yu-Ming; Quinn, John F.; Glenn, William V.; Rothman, Stephen L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nationwide commercial computer communication is now commonplace for those applications where digital dialogues are generally short and widely distributed, and where bandwidth does not exceed that of dial-up telephone lines. Image processing using such networks is prohibitive because of the large volume of data inherent to digital pictures. With a blend of increasing bandwidth and distributed processing, network image processing becomes possible. This paper examines characteristics of a digital image processing service for a nationwide network of CT scanner installations. Issues of image transmission, data compression, distributed processing, software maintenance, and interfacility communication are also discussed. Included are results that show the volume and type of processing experienced by a network of over 50 CT scanners for the last 32 months.

  13. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  14. Multispectral scanner imagery for plant community classification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, R. S.; Spencer, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    Optimum channel selection among 12 channels of multispectral scanner imagery identified six as providing the best information for computerized classification of 11 plant communities and two nonvegetation classes. Intensive preprocessing of the spectral data was required to eliminate bidirectional reflectance effects of the spectral imagery caused by scanner view angle and varying geometry of the plant canopy. Generalized plant community types - forest, grassland, and hydrophytic systems - were acceptably classified based on ecological analysis. Serious, but soluble, errors occurred with attempts to classify specific community types within the grassland system. However, special clustering analyses provided for improved classification of specific grassland communities.

  15. Infrared scanner concept verification test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachtel, F. D.

    1980-01-01

    The test results from a concept verification test conducted to assess the use of an infrared scanner as a remote temperature sensing device for the space shuttle program are presented. The temperature and geometric resolution limits, atmospheric attenuation effects including conditions with fog and rain, and the problem of surface emissivity variations are included. It is concluded that the basic concept of using an infrared scanner to determine near freezing surface temperatures is feasible. The major problem identified is concerned with infrared reflections which result in significant errors if not controlled. Action taken to manage these errors result in design and operational constraints to control the viewing angle and surface emissivity.

  16. Metal Optics For Laser Profile Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauke, T.; Hock, F.

    1987-01-01

    Laser scanners are a valuable tool for qualitiy control in hostile hot and vibrating environments. Their high measuring speed allows time minimisation of disturbing influences. The loss of accuracy of systems due to thermal distortion could be minimised by designing mechanical-optical systems with low temperature gradients and small differences between thermal expansions of the components. For application in the forging production a laser scanner measuring in situ a series of profile lines describing the hot forging tools has been designed using aluminium for all distortion sensitive mechanical and optical components.

  17. Miniature rotating transmissive optical drum scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert (Inventor); Parrington, Lawrence (Inventor); Rutberg, Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A miniature rotating transmissive optical scanner system employs a drum of small size having an interior defined by a circumferential wall rotatable on a drum axis, an optical element positioned within the interior of the drum, and a light-transmissive lens aperture provided at an angular position in the circumferential wall of the drum for scanning a light beam to or from the optical element in the drum along a beam azimuth angle as the drum is rotated. The miniature optical drum scanner configuration obtains a wide scanning field-of-view (FOV) and large effective aperture is achieved within a physically small size.

  18. Medical imaging with a microwave tomographic scanner.

    PubMed

    Jofre, L; Hawley, M S; Broquetas, A; de los Reyes, E; Ferrando, M; Elias-Fusté, A R

    1990-03-01

    A microwave tomographic scanner for biomedical applications is presented. The scanner consists of a 64 element circular array with a useful diameter of 20 cm. Electronically scanning the transmitting and receiving antennas allows multiview measurements with no mechanical movement. Imaging parameters are appropriate for medical use: a spatial resolution of 7 mm and a contrast resolution of 1% for a measurement time of 3 s. Measurements on tissue-simulating phantoms and volunteers, together with numerical simulations, are presented to assess the system for absolute imaging of tissue distribution and for differential imaging of physiological, pathological, and induced changes in tissues. PMID:2329003

  19. Bone mineral computation with a rectilinear scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, J.; Brown, S.; Silverstein, A.; Vogel, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    A portable rectilinear transmission scanner and associated computerized data reduction techniques for estimating bone mineral content are described. This unit can be easily disassembled for transport to various measurement sites and has been used to estimate the bone mineral content of the os calcis, radius, and ulna in the Apollo and Skylab astronauts. The scanner is used to obtain multiple rows of data from which a bone profile is derived. Bone edges are determined with the aid of a digital computer program which employs an algorithm that determines the greatest rate of change of the counting rate.

  20. LANSCE Wire Scanner System Prototype: Switchyard Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillo, James D

    2012-04-11

    On November 19, 2011, the beam diagnostics team of Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE accelerator facility conducted a test of a prototype wire scanner system for future deployment within the accelerator's switchyard area. The primary focus of this test was to demonstrate the wire scanner control system's ability to extend its functionality beyond acquiring lower energy linac beam profile measurements to acquiring data in the switchyard. This study summarizes the features and performance characteristics of the electronic and mechanical implementation of this system with details focusing on the test results.

  1. Evaluation of the quality of CT-like images obtained using a commercial flat panel detector system

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, JM; Sutton, DG; Houston, JG

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The development of flat panel detector technology has resulted in renewed interest in the possibility of generating CT-like images from rotational angiographic acquisitions. At least two commercial products now use cone beam reconstruction software in conjunction with flat panel detectors to produce such images. The purpose of the work presented here is to report on image quality obtained from one such system in objective and subjective terms and to compare it with the quality of images obtained from a modern multi-detector CT scanner. Method The Image quality was assessed using a CATPHAN 500 model and an AAPM CT Performance Phantom model. Image noise, CT number accuracy, CT number consistency, Low Contrast Resolution, surface dose and Modulation Transfer Function were assessed for the flat panel detector and compared with results obtained from a 4 slice CT scanner. Results As expected image quality obtained from the CT scanner was much better than from the flat panel detector. Low contrast resolution was much worse and the surface dose was higher for the flat panel detector than the CT scanner. There was an inaccuracy in CT number determination and the noise was greater by a factor of two or three. Limiting resolution was better on images from the CT scanner. Conclusion The poor low contrast resolution from flat panel detector was expected given the expected resolution of ±10 Hounsfield Units. These systems should not be considered as diagnostic CT scanners. However, the remaining performance figures indicate that the CT-like images obtained from this type of equipment are of sufficient quality for at least some clinical applications, such as detection of brain haemorrhages in the vascular suite. PMID:21614331

  2. Performance evaluation of the General Electric eXplore CT 120 micro-CT using the vmCT phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, M. A.; Warnock, G.; Plenevaux, A.; Choquet, P.; Constantinesco, A.; Salmon, E.; Luxen, A.; Seret, A.

    2011-08-01

    The eXplore CT 120 is the latest generation micro-CT from General Electric. It is equipped with a high-power tube and a flat-panel detector. It allows high resolution and high contrast fast CT scanning of small animals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the eXplore CT 120 with that of the eXplore Ultra, its predecessor for which the methodology using the vmCT phantom has already been described [1].The phantom was imaged using typical a rat (fast scan or F) or mouse (in vivo bone scan or H) scanning protocols. With the slanted edge method, a 10% modulation transfer function (MTF) was observed at 4.4 (F) and 3.9-4.4 (H) mm-1 corresponding to 114 μm resolution. A fairly larger MTF was obtained by the coil method with the MTF for the thinnest coil (3.3 mm-1) equal to 0.32 (F) and 0.34 (H). The geometric accuracy was better than 0.3%. There was a highly linear (R2>0.999) relationship between measured and expected CT numbers for both the CT number accuracy and linearity sections of the phantom. A cupping effect was clearly seen on the uniform slices and the uniformity-to-noise ratio ranged from 0.52 (F) to 0.89 (H). The air CT number depended on the amount of polycarbonate surrounding the area where it was measured; a difference as high as approximately 200 HU was observed. This hindered the calibration of this scanner in HU. This is likely due to the absence of corrections for beam hardening and scatter in the reconstruction software. However in view of the high linearity of the system, the implementation of these corrections would allow a good quality calibration of the scanner in HU. In conclusion, the eXplore CT 120 achieved a better spatial resolution than the eXplore Ultra (based on previously reported specifications) and future software developments will include beam hardening and scatter corrections that will make the new generation CT scanner even more promising.

  3. TH-C-18A-08: A Management Tool for CT Dose Monitoring, Analysis, and Protocol Review

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Chan, F; Newman, B; Larson, D; Leung, A; Fleischmann, D; Molvin, L; Marsh, D; Zorich, C; Phillips, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a customizable tool for enterprise-wide managing of CT protocols and analyzing radiation dose information of CT exams for a variety of quality control applications Methods: All clinical CT protocols implemented on the 11 CT scanners at our institution were extracted in digital format. The original protocols had been preset by our CT management team. A commercial CT dose tracking software (DoseWatch,GE healthcare,WI) was used to collect exam information (exam date, patient age etc.), scanning parameters, and radiation doses for all CT exams. We developed a Matlab-based program (MathWorks,MA) with graphic user interface which allows to analyze the scanning protocols with the actual dose estimates, and compare the data to national (ACR,AAPM) and internal reference values for CT quality control. Results: The CT protocol review portion of our tool allows the user to look up the scanning and image reconstruction parameters of any protocol on any of the installed CT systems among about 120 protocols per scanner. In the dose analysis tool, dose information of all CT exams (from 05/2013 to 02/2014) was stratified on a protocol level, and within a protocol down to series level, i.e. each individual exposure event. This allows numerical and graphical review of dose information of any combination of scanner models, protocols and series. The key functions of the tool include: statistics of CTDI, DLP and SSDE, dose monitoring using user-set CTDI/DLP/SSDE thresholds, look-up of any CT exam dose data, and CT protocol review. Conclusion: our inhouse CT management tool provides radiologists, technologists and administration a first-hand near real-time enterprise-wide knowledge on CT dose levels of different exam types. Medical physicists use this tool to manage CT protocols, compare and optimize dose levels across different scanner models. It provides technologists feedback on CT scanning operation, and knowledge on important dose baselines and thresholds.

  4. Computer simulations to estimate organ doses from clinically validated cardiac, neuro, and pediatric protocols for multiple detector computed tomography scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Monica

    Recent advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology, particularly that of multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanning, have provided increased utilization and more diverse clinical applications including more advanced vascular and cardiac exams, perfusion imaging, and screening exams. Notwithstanding the benefits to the patient undergoing a CT study, the fundamental concern in radiation protection is the minimization of the radiation exposure delivered as well as the implementation of structures to prevent inappropriate ordering and clinical use of these advanced studies. This research work developed a computational methodology for routine clinical use to assess patient organ doses from MDCT scanners. To support the methodology, a computer code (DXS-Diagnostic X-ray Spectra) was developed to accurately and conveniently generate x-ray spectra in the diagnostic energy range (45-140 keV). The two accepted standard radiation transport calculation methods namely, deterministic and Monte Carlo, have been preliminarily investigated for their capability and readiness to support the proposed goal of the work. Thorough tests demonstrated that the lack of appropriate discrete photon interaction coefficients in the aforementioned diagnostic energy range impedes the applicability of the deterministic approach to routine clinical use; improvements in the multigroup treatment may make it more viable. Thus, the open source Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, was adapted to appropriately model an MDCT scan. For this, a new method, entirely based on routine clinical CT measurements, was developed and validated to generate an "equivalent source and filtration" model that obviates the need of proprietary information for a given CT scanner. Computer simulations employing the Monte Carlo methodology and UF's tomographic human phantoms were performed to assess, compare, and optimize pediatric, cardiac and neuro-imaging protocols for the new 320-slice scanner at Shands/UF based on dose considerations

  5. Limits of Ultra-Low Dose CT Attenuation Correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2010-01-29

    We present an analysis of the effects of ultra-low dose X-ray computerized tomography (CT) based attenuation correction for positron emission tomography (PET). By ultra low dose we mean less than approximately 5 mAs or 0.5 mSv total effective whole body dose. The motivation is the increased interest in using respiratory motion information acquired during the CT scan for both phase-matched CT-based attenuation correction and for motion estimation. Since longer duration CT scans are desired, radiation dose to the patient can be a limiting factor. In this study we evaluate the impact of reducing photon flux rates in the CT data on the reconstructed PET image by using the CATSIM simulation tool for the CT component and the ASIM simulation tool for the PET component. The CT simulation includes effects of the x-ray tube spectra, beam conditioning, bowtie filter, detector noise, and bean hardening correction. The PET simulation includes the effect of attenuation and photon counting. Noise and bias in the PET image were evaluated from multiple realizations of test objects. We show that techniques can be used to significantly reduce the mAs needed for CT based attenuation correction if the CT is not used for diagnostic purposes. The limiting factor, however, is not the noise in the CT image but rather the bias introduced by CT sinogram elements with no detected flux. These results constrain the methods that can be used to lower CT dose in a manner suitable for attenuation correction of PET data. We conclude that ultra-low-dose CT for attenuation correction of PET data is feasible with current PET/CT scanners.

  6. Miniature 'Wearable' PET Scanner Ready for Use

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Vaska

    2016-07-12

    Scientists from BNL, Stony Brook University, and collaborators have demonstrated the efficacy of a "wearable," portable PET scanner they've developed for rats. The device will give neuroscientists a new tool for simultaneously studying brain function and behavior in fully awake, moving animals.

  7. Wire scanner software and firmware issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John Doug

    2008-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility presently has 110 slow wire scanning profile measurement instruments located along its various beam lines. These wire scanners were developed and have been operating for at least 30 years. While the wire scanners solved many problems to operate and have served the facility well they have increasingly suffered from several problems or limitations, such as maintenance and reliability problems, antiquated components, slow data acquisition, and etc. In order to refurbish these devices, these wire scanners will be replaced with newer versions. The replacement will consist of a completely new beam line actuator, new cables, new electronics and brand new software and firmware. This note describes the functions and modes of operation that LabVIEW VI software on the real time controller and FPGA LabVIEW firmware will be required. It will be especially interesting to understand the overall architecture of these LabVIEW VIs. While this note will endeavor to describe all of the requirements and issues for the wire scanners, undoubtedly, there will be missing details that will be added as time progresses.

  8. Bottled liquid explosive scanner by near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    A bottled liquid explosive scanner has been developed using near infrared technology for glass or PET bottles and ultrasound technology for metal cans. It has database of near infrared absorbance spectra and sound velocities of various liquids. Scanned liquids can be identified by using this database. This device has been certified by ECAC and installed at Japanese international airport.

  9. Learning and Teaching with a Computer Scanner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, G.; Gregorcic, B.; Etkina, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the readers to simple inquiry-based activities (experiments with supporting questions) that one can do with a computer scanner to help students learn and apply the concepts of relative motion in 1 and 2D, vibrational motion and the Doppler effect. We also show how to use these activities to help students think like…

  10. MRI Scanners Guide Therapy to Tumors.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    A new study shows that MRI scanners can direct magnetically labeled macrophages bearing an oncolytic virus toward primary and metastatic tumors in mice. Researchers hope this approach, called magnetic resonance targeting, can be scaled for use in humans, to improve the delivery of cell-based cancer therapy. PMID:26370155

  11. Miniature 'Wearable' PET Scanner Ready for Use

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Vaska

    2011-03-09

    Scientists from BNL, Stony Brook University, and collaborators have demonstrated the efficacy of a "wearable," portable PET scanner they've developed for rats. The device will give neuroscientists a new tool for simultaneously studying brain function and behavior in fully awake, moving animals.

  12. Ultrasonic Scanner Control and Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, John

    2002-01-01

    The research accomplishments under this grant were very extensive in the areas of ULTRASONIC SCANNER CONTROL AND DATA ACQUISITION. Rather than try to summarize all this research I have enclosed research papers and reports which were completed with the hnding provided by the grant. These papers and reports are listed below:

  13. Method for transforming CT images for attenuation correction in PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Jonathan P.J.; Townsend, David W.; Rappoport, Vitaliy; Bendriem, Bernard

    2006-04-15

    A tube-voltage-dependent scheme is presented for transforming Hounsfield units (HU) measured by different computed tomography (CT) scanners at different x-ray tube voltages (kVp) to 511 keV linear attenuation values for attenuation correction in positron emission tomography (PET) data reconstruction. A Gammex 467 electron density CT phantom was imaged using a Siemens Sensation 16-slice CT, a Siemens Emotion 6-slice CT, a GE Lightspeed 16-slice CT, a Hitachi CXR 4-slice CT, and a Toshiba Aquilion 16-slice CT at kVp ranging from 80 to 140 kVp. All of these CT scanners are also available in combination with a PET scanner as a PET/CT tomograph. HU obtained for various reference tissue substitutes in the phantom were compared with the known linear attenuation values at 511 keV. The transformation, appropriate for lung, soft tissue, and bone, yields the function 9.6x10{sup -5}{center_dot}(HU+1000) below a threshold of {approx}50 HU and a{center_dot}(HU+1000)+b above the threshold, where a and b are fixed parameters that depend on the kVp setting. The use of the kVp-dependent scaling procedure leads to a significant improvement in reconstructed PET activity levels in phantom measurements, resolving errors of almost 40% otherwise seen for the case of dense bone phantoms at 80 kVp. Results are also presented for patient studies involving multiple CT scans at different kVp settings, which should all lead to the same 511 keV linear attenuation values. A linear fit to values obtained from 140 kVp CT images using the kVp-dependent scaling plotted as a function of the corresponding values obtained from 80 kVp CT images yielded y=1.003x-0.001 with an R{sup 2} value of 0.999, indicating that the same values are obtained to a high degree of accuracy.

  14. 24. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER -- MWOC IN OPEARATION AT 1924 ZULU TIME. 26 OCTOBER, 1999. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  15. 23. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING RADAR CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - RADAR CONTROL INTERFACE "RCL NO. 2" WITH COMPUTER CONTROL DISC DRIVE UNITS IN FOREGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  16. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  17. 13. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING "B" FACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - "B" FACE LOADING DOCK AND PERSONNEL ACCESS RAMP TO FALLOUT SHELTER. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  18. 11. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING EVAPORATIVE COOLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - EVAPORATIVE COOLING TOWER SYSTEM IN FOREGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  19. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  20. Validation of calculation algorithms for organ doses in CT by measurements on a 5 year old paediatric phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabin, Jérémie; Mencarelli, Alessandra; McMillan, Dayton; Romanyukha, Anna; Struelens, Lara; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-06-01

    Many organ dose calculation tools for computed tomography (CT) scans rely on the assumptions: (1) organ doses estimated for one CT scanner can be converted into organ doses for another CT scanner using the ratio of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) between two CT scanners; and (2) helical scans can be approximated as the summation of axial slices covering the same scan range. The current study aims to validate experimentally these two assumptions. We performed organ dose measurements in a 5 year-old physical anthropomorphic phantom for five different CT scanners from four manufacturers. Absorbed doses to 22 organs were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters for head-to-torso scans. We then compared the measured organ doses with the values calculated from the National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT (NCICT) computer program, developed at the National Cancer Institute. Whereas the measured organ doses showed significant variability (coefficient of variation (CoV) up to 53% at 80 kV) across different scanner models, the CoV of organ doses normalised to CTDIvol substantially decreased (12% CoV on average at 80 kV). For most organs, the difference between measured and simulated organ doses was within  ±20% except for the bone marrow, breasts and ovaries. The discrepancies were further explained by additional Monte Carlo calculations of organ doses using a voxel phantom developed from CT images of the physical phantom. The results demonstrate that organ doses calculated for one CT scanner can be used to assess organ doses from other CT scanners with 20% uncertainty (k  =  1), for the scan settings considered in the study.

  1. Calibration and equivalency analysis of image plate scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. Jackson Maddox, Brian R.; Chen, Hui; Kojima, Sadaoki; Millecchia, Matthew

    2014-11-15

    A universal procedure was developed to calibrate image plate scanners using radioisotope sources. Techniques to calibrate scanners and sources, as well as cross-calibrate scanner models, are described to convert image plate dosage into physical units. This allows for the direct comparison of quantitative data between any facility and scanner. An empirical relation was also derived to establish sensitivity response settings for arbitrary gain settings. In practice, these methods may be extended to any image plate scanning system.

  2. Calibration and equivalency analysis of image plate scanners.

    PubMed

    Williams, G Jackson; Maddox, Brian R; Chen, Hui; Kojima, Sadaoki; Millecchia, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    A universal procedure was developed to calibrate image plate scanners using radioisotope sources. Techniques to calibrate scanners and sources, as well as cross-calibrate scanner models, are described to convert image plate dosage into physical units. This allows for the direct comparison of quantitative data between any facility and scanner. An empirical relation was also derived to establish sensitivity response settings for arbitrary gain settings. In practice, these methods may be extended to any image plate scanning system. PMID:25430350

  3. Reference standard and statistical model for intersite and temporal comparisons of CT attenuation in a multicenter quantitative lung study

    PubMed Central

    Sieren, J. P.; Newell, J. D.; Judy, P. F.; Lynch, D. A.; Chan, K. S.; Guo, J.; Hoffman, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to detect and analyze anomalies between a large number of computed tomography (CT) scanners, tracked over time, utilized to collect human pulmonary CT data for a national multicenter study: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease genetic epidemiology study (COPDGene). Methods: A custom designed CT reference standard “Test Object” has been developed to evaluate the relevant differences in CT attenuation between CT scanners in COPDGene. The materials used in the Test Object to assess CT scanner accuracy and precision included lung equivalent foam (−856 HU), internal air (−1000 HU), water (0 HU), and acrylic (120 HU). Nineteen examples of the Test Object were manufactured. Initially, all Test Objects were scanned on the same CT scanner before the Test Objects were sent to the 20 specific sites and 42 individual CT scanners that were used in the study. The Test Objects were scanned over 17 months while the COPDGene study continued to recruit subjects. A mixed linear effect statistical analysis of the CT scans on the 19 Test Objects was performed. The statistical model reflected influence of reconstruction kernels, tube current, individual Test Objects, CT scanner models, and temporal consistency on CT attenuation. Results: Depending on the Test Object material, there were significant differences between reconstruction kernels, tube current, individual Test Objects, CT scanner models, and temporal consistency. The two Test Object materials of most interest were lung equivalent foam and internal air. With lung equivalent foam, there were significant (p < 0.05) differences between the Siemens B31 (−856.6, ±0.82; mean ± SE) and the GE Standard (−856.6 ± 0.83) reconstruction kernel relative to the Siemens B35 reference standard (−852.5 ± 1.4). Comparing lung equivalent foam attenuation there were also significant differences between CT scanner models (p < 0.01), tube current (p < 0.005), and in temporal consistency (p

  4. Development of an algorithm to measure defect geometry using a 3D laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilambi, S.; Tipton, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    Current fatigue life prediction models for coiled tubing (CT) require accurate measurements of the defect geometry. Three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging has shown promise toward becoming a nondestructive, non-contacting method of surface defect characterization. Laser imaging provides a detailed photographic image of a flaw, in addition to a detailed 3D surface map from which its critical dimensions can be measured. This paper describes algorithms to determine defect characteristics, specifically depth, width, length and projected cross-sectional area. Curve-fitting methods were compared and implicit algebraic fits have higher probability of convergence compared to explicit geometric fits. Among the algebraic fits, the Taubin circle fit has the least error. The algorithm was able to extract the dimensions of the flaw geometry from the scanned data of CT to within a tolerance of about 0.127 mm, close to the tolerance specified for the laser scanner itself, compared to measurements made using traveling microscopes. The algorithm computes the projected surface area of the flaw, which could previously only be estimated from the dimension measurements and the assumptions made about cutter shape. Although shadows compromised the accuracy of the shape characterization, especially for deep and narrow flaws, the results indicate that the algorithm with laser scanner can be used for non-destructive evaluation of CT in the oil field industry. Further work is needed to improve accuracy, to eliminate shadow effects and to reduce radial deviation.

  5. Applications of Optical Scanners in an Academic Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinari, Carol; Tannenbaum, Robert S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes optical scanners, including how the technology works; applications in data management and research; development of instructional materials; and providing community services. Discussion includes the three basic types of optical scanners: optical character recognition (OCR), optical mark readers (OMR), and graphic scanners. A sidebar…

  6. Scanner show-through reduction using reflective optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-fan

    2003-12-01

    Document scanners are used to convert paper documents to digital format for document distribution or archiving. Scanners are also used in copier and fax machine to convert document to electrical signal in analog and digital format. Most document scanners use white backing to avoid black border or black hole in scanned images. One problem with white backing is that show-through from the backside is visible for duplex printed (two sided) documents. This paper describes an optical method to eliminate show-through without reverting back to the black border or black hole. The scanner cover is made into a saw-tooth shaped mirror surface. The surface is oriented so that it reflects the light from the scanner lamp to the scanner lens. When scanning the scanner cover as in the case of a hole in the paper, it reflects light (specular reflection) from the scanner lamp directly to the scanner lens. Because the scanner lamp is much brighter than the reflected light from the document, only a small portion of the reflected light is needed to have the same output as scanning a piece of white paper. Radiometric calculation shows that this new approach can reduce the overall reflection from the scanner cover to 8% when scanning a document, and yet, appear to be white when no document is in between the cover and scan bar. The show-through is greatly reduced due to this reduced overall reflection from the scanner cover.

  7. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear rectilinear scanner. 892.1300 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1300 Nuclear rectilinear scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution...

  16. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882.1925 Section 882.1925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test...

  17. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. (Modern "spiral" scanners can perform ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. ...

  18. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. (Modern "spiral" scanners can perform ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. ...

  19. Traceable micro-CT scaling accuracy phantom for applications requiring exact measurement of distances or volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Waring, C.S.; Bax, J.S.; Samarabandu, A.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Fenster, A.; Lacefield, J.C.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Volumetric x-ray microcomputed tomography (CT) can be employed in a variety of quantitative research applications such as image-guided interventions or characterization of medical devices. To ensure the highest geometric fidelity of images for these applications, a phantom and image processing algorithm have been developed to calibrate the scaling accuracy of micro-CT scanners to a traceable standard and provide corrections to image voxel sizing. Methods: The calibration phantom contains six borosilicate beads whose separations have been measured to a traceable standard. An image processing algorithm compares the known separations of the beads to their separations in micro-CT images. A least-squares solution is used to determine linear scaling correction factors along each of the three scanner axes to minimize errors in the bead separations within the images by correcting the image voxel size. The correction factors were applied to images of a similar phantom with beads at different positions to evaluate the ability of the correction factors to reduce errors at points independent of the fiducial locations in the calibration phantom. The calibration phantom was used to evaluate the scaling accuracy of five different micro-CT scanners representing four different scanner models. Results: In two of the five scanners evaluated, the correction factors significantly reduced the mean error in bead separations in the images from 0.17% to 0.05% and from 0.37% to 0.07% of the actual bead separations, respectively. Scanners yielding similar voxel sizes possessed comparable geometric errors after correction using the phantom. Conclusions: Although the magnitude of the corrections is small, such corrections can be important for demanding micro-CT applications. Even if no voxel size correction is required, the phantom provides an easily implemented method to verify the geometric fidelity of micro-CT scanners to a traceable standard of measurement.

  20. Construction and Test of Low Cost X-Ray Tomography Scanner for Physical-Chemical Analysis and Nondestructive Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Jose Martins Jr. de; Martins, Antonio Cesar Germano

    2009-06-03

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe the development of a low cost micro-CT X-ray scanner that is being developed for nondestructive testing. This tomograph operates using a microfocus X-ray source and contains a silicon photodiode as detectors. The performance of the system, by its spatial resolution, has been estimated through its Modulation Transfer Function-MTF and the obtained value at 10% of MTF is 661 {mu}m. It was built as a general purpose nondestructive testing device.

  1. Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schyler, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois; Volkow, Nora

    2006-10-24

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

  2. The Galileo star scanner observations at Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieseler, Paul D.; Adams, Olen W.; Vandermey, Nancy; Theilig, E. E.; Schimmels, Kathryn A.; Lewis, George D.; Ardalan, Shadan M.; Alexander, Claudia J.

    2004-06-01

    In November of 2002, the Galileo spacecraft passed within 250 km of Jupiter's moon Amalthea. An onboard telescope, the star scanner, observed a series of bright flashes near the moon. It is believed that these flashes represent sunlight reflected from 7 to 9 small moonlets located within about 3000 km of Amalthea. From star scanner geometry considerations and other arguments, we can constrain the diameter of the observed bodies to be between 0.5 m to several tens of kilometers. In September of 2003, while crossing Amalthea's orbit just prior to Galileo's destruction in the jovian atmosphere, a single additional body seems to have been observed. It is suspected that these bodies are part of a discrete rocky ring embedded within Jupiter's Gossamer ring system.

  3. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  4. Ghost Signals In Allison Emittance Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R. F.

    2005-03-15

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  5. Electrothermal MEMS fiber scanner for optical endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong-Hyeon; Hwang, Kyungmin; Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-02-22

    We report a novel MEMS fiber scanner with an electrothermal silicon microactuator and a directly mounted optical fiber. The microactuator comprises double hot arm and cold arm structures with a linking bridge and an optical fiber is aligned along a silicon fiber groove. The unique feature induces separation of resonant scanning frequencies of a single optical fiber in lateral and vertical directions, which realizes Lissajous scanning during the resonant motion. The footprint dimension of microactuator is 1.28 x 7 x 0.44 mm3. The resonant scanning frequencies of a 20 mm long optical fiber are 239.4 Hz and 218.4 Hz in lateral and vertical directions, respectively. The full scanned area indicates 451 μm x 558 μm under a 16 Vpp pulse train. This novel laser scanner can provide many opportunities for laser scanning endomicroscopic applications.

  6. Performance evaluation of fluorescence tomography in a Siemens Inveon multimodality scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yujie; Darne, Chinmay; Tan, I.-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-05-01

    A tri-modal (PET/CT/Optical) small animal tomographic imaging system was developed by integrating our advanced non-contact intensified CCD (ICCD) frequency-domain fluorescence imaging components into a Siemens Inveon scanner. We performed a performance evaluation of the developed imaging system by using the developed regularization-free high-order radiative-transfer-based reconstruction algorithm and custom solid phantoms. Our results show that frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) fluorescence tomography can achieve better tomographic images with less artifacts and more precise fluorescent source localization compared to the continuous-wave counterpart. The developed multimodal tomographic imaging system provides a powerful tool for translational biomedical research.

  7. A compact vertical scanner for atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hong; Shim, Jaesool; Lee, Dong-Yeon

    2010-01-01

    A compact vertical scanner for an atomic force microscope (AFM) is developed. The vertical scanner is designed to have no interference with the optical microscope for viewing the cantilever. The theoretical stiffness and resonance of the scanner are derived and verified via finite element analysis. An optimal design process that maximizes the resonance frequency is performed. To evaluate the scanner's performance, experiments are performed to evaluate the travel range, resonance frequency, and feedback noise level. In addition, an AFM image using the proposed vertical scanner is generated.

  8. Learning and teaching with a computer scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinsic, G.; Gregorcic, B.; Etkina, E.

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces the readers to simple inquiry-based activities (experiments with supporting questions) that one can do with a computer scanner to help students learn and apply the concepts of relative motion in 1 and 2D, vibrational motion and the Doppler effect. We also show how to use these activities to help students think like scientists. They will conduct simple experiments, construct different explanations for their observations, test their explanations in new experiments and represent their ideas in multiple ways.

  9. Point Relay Scanner Utilizing Ellipsoidal Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhart, Paul K. (Inventor); Pagano, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A scanning system uses a polygonal mirror assembly with each facet of the polygon having an ellipsoidal mirror located thereon. One focal point of each ellipsoidal mirror is located at a common point on the axis of rotation of the polygonal mirror assembly. As the mirror assembly rotates. a second focal point of the ellipsoidal mirrors traces out a scan line. The scanner can be utilized for scanned output display of information or for scanning information to be detected.

  10. Implementation and evaluation of a protocol management system for automated review of CT protocols.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Joshua; Leng, Shuai; Zhang, Yi; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-09-08

    Protocol review is important to decrease the risk of patient injury and increase the consistency of CT image quality. A large volume of CT protocols makes manual review labor-intensive, error-prone, and costly. To address these challenges, we have developed a software system for automatically managing and monitoring CT proto-cols on a frequent basis. This article describes our experiences in the implementation and evaluation of this protocol monitoring system. In particular, we discuss various strategies for addressing each of the steps in our protocol-monitoring workflow, which are: maintaining an accurate set of master protocols, retrieving protocols from the scanners, comparing scanner protocols to master protocols, reviewing flagged differences between the scanner and master protocols, and updating the scanner and/or master protocols. In our initial evaluation focusing only on abdo-men and pelvis protocols, we detected 309 modified protocols in a 24-week trial period. About one-quarter of these modified protocols were determined to contain inappropriate (i.e., erroneous) protocol parameter modifications that needed to be corrected on the scanner. The most frequently affected parameter was the series description, which was inappropriately modified 47 times. Two inappropriate modifications were made to the tube current, which is particularly important to flag as this parameter impacts both radiation dose and image quality. The CT protocol changes detected in this work provide strong motivation for the use of an automated CT protocol quality control system to ensure protocol accuracy and consistency.

  11. Implementation and evaluation of a protocol management system for automated review of CT protocols.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Joshua; Leng, Shuai; Zhang, Yi; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Protocol review is important to decrease the risk of patient injury and increase the consistency of CT image quality. A large volume of CT protocols makes manual review labor-intensive, error-prone, and costly. To address these challenges, we have developed a software system for automatically managing and monitoring CT proto-cols on a frequent basis. This article describes our experiences in the implementation and evaluation of this protocol monitoring system. In particular, we discuss various strategies for addressing each of the steps in our protocol-monitoring workflow, which are: maintaining an accurate set of master protocols, retrieving protocols from the scanners, comparing scanner protocols to master protocols, reviewing flagged differences between the scanner and master protocols, and updating the scanner and/or master protocols. In our initial evaluation focusing only on abdo-men and pelvis protocols, we detected 309 modified protocols in a 24-week trial period. About one-quarter of these modified protocols were determined to contain inappropriate (i.e., erroneous) protocol parameter modifications that needed to be corrected on the scanner. The most frequently affected parameter was the series description, which was inappropriately modified 47 times. Two inappropriate modifications were made to the tube current, which is particularly important to flag as this parameter impacts both radiation dose and image quality. The CT protocol changes detected in this work provide strong motivation for the use of an automated CT protocol quality control system to ensure protocol accuracy and consistency. PMID:27685112

  12. A near-infrared confocal scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Yoo, Hongki

    2014-06-01

    In the semiconductor industry, manufacturing of three-dimensional (3D) packages or 3D integrated circuits is a high-performance technique that requires combining several functions in a small volume. Through-silicon vias, which are vertical electrical connections extending through a wafer, can be used to direct signals between stacked chips, thus increasing areal density by stacking and connecting multiple patterned chips. While defect detection is essential in the semiconductor manufacturing process, it is difficult to identify defects within a wafer or to monitor the bonding results between bonded surfaces because silicon and many other semiconductor materials are opaque to visible wavelengths. In this context, near-infrared (NIR) imaging is a promising non-destructive method to detect defects within silicon chips, to inspect bonding between chips and to monitor the chip alignment since NIR transmits through silicon. In addition, a confocal scanner provides high-contrast, optically-sectioned images of the specimen due to its ability to reject out-of-focus noise. In this study, we report an NIR confocal scanner that rapidly acquires high-resolution images with a large field of view through silicon. Two orthogonal line-scanning images can be acquired without rotating the system or the specimen by utilizing two orthogonally configured resonant scanning mirrors. This NIR confocal scanner can be efficiently used as an in-line inspection system when manufacturing semiconductor devices by rapidly detecting defects on and beneath the surface.

  13. Telescope with a wide field of view internal optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, III, John James (Inventor); Zheng, Yunhui (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A telescope with internal scanner utilizing either a single optical wedge scanner or a dual optical wedge scanner and a controller arranged to control a synchronous rotation of the first and/or second optical wedges, the wedges constructed and arranged to scan light redirected by topological surfaces and/or volumetric scatterers. The telescope with internal scanner further incorporates a first converging optical element that receives the redirected light and transmits the redirected light to the scanner, and a second converging optical element within the light path between the first optical element and the scanner arranged to reduce an area of impact on the scanner of the beam collected by the first optical element.

  14. In-house CT service: the next clinical engineering crossroads.

    PubMed

    Judd, T M; Short, W A

    1983-01-01

    Most acute-care hospitals in the United States own at least one computed tomography scanner. Service contracts offered by scanner manufacturers cost approximately 10% of the equipment's purchase price. Equivalent service support can be provided at a lower cost to scanner owners by a CT scanner service group, in which a program director and a senior biomedical equipment technician in a central office oversee purchase of replacement parts and supervise and train biomedical equipment technicians assigned to each participating hospital. The service group saves money by purchasing replacement parts in quantity from a less expensive source than the CT manufacturer, and by employing a technician at each hospital rather than having one BMET travel between several hospitals. Scanner downtime is significantly reduced because the staff technician is available immediately in the event of equipment failure and routine preventive maintenance tasks can be performed after business hours. By encouraging communication and cooperation the service group enables the technicians to keep abreast of the latest technology. PMID:6669106

  15. Improvement in CT image resolution due to the use of focal spot deflection and increased sampling.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Nicholas; Szczykutowicz, Timothy; Ranallo, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When patient anatomy is positioned away from a CT scanner's isocenter, scans of limited diagnostic value may result. Yet in some cases, positioning of patient anatomy far from isocenter is unavoidable. This study examines the effect of posi-tion and reconstruction algorithm on image resolution achieved by a CT scanner operating in a high resolution (HR) scan mode which incorporates focal spot deflection and acquires an increased number of projections per rotation. Images of a metal bead contained in a phantom were acquired on a GE CT750 HD scanner with multiple reconstruction algorithms, in the normal and HR scan mode, and at two positions, scanner isocenter and 15 cm directly above isocenter. The images of the metal bead yielded two-dimensional point spread functions which were averaged along two perpendicular directions to yield line spread functions. Fourier transforms of the line spread functions yielded radial and azimuthal modulation transfer functions (MTFs). At isocenter, the radial and azimuthal MTFs were aver-aged. MTF improvement depended on image position and modulation direction. The results from a single algorithm, Edge, can be generalized to other algorithms. At isocenter, the 10% MTF cutoff was 14.4 cycles/cm in normal and HR mode. At 15 cm above isocenter, the 10% cutoff was 6.0 and 8.5 cycles/cm for the azimuthal and radial MTFs in normal mode. In HR mode, the azimuthal and radial MTF 10% cutoff was 8.3 and 10.3 cycles/cm. Our results indicate that the best image resolu-tion is achieved at scanner isocenter and that the azimuthal resolution degrades more significantly than the radial resolution. For the GE CT750 HD CT scanner, the resolution is significantly enhanced by the HR scan mode away from scanner isocenter, and the use of the HR scan mode has much more of an impact on image resolution away from isocenter than the choice of algorithm.

  16. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  17. The solid state area scanner photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakos, K. D.

    The design and operation of a solid-state area-scanner photometer for observations of binaries are reported. Tracking and seeing errors are shown to be more significant than photoelectron statistics in determining overall accuracy; hence a system using individually recorded short scans and computer processing is adopted. A linear self-scanned photodiode array comprising 128 discrete Si photodiodes arranged on a 2.5 x 3.2-mm surface with virtually no dead space and having 80-percent quantum efficiency is used on a 1-m telescope at 1-sec integration time with thermoelectric cooling to -30 C. Good accuracy is obtained for binaries of magnitude 10 or less.

  18. A laser scanner for 35mm film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, W. R.; Weaver, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a laser scanning system is described. The scanner was designed to deliver a scanned beam over a 2.54 cm by 2.54 cm or a 5.08 cm by 5.08 cm format. In order to achieve a scan resolution and rate comparable to that of standard television, an acousto-optic deflector was used for one axis of the scan, and a light deflecting galvanometer for deflection along the other axis. The acoustic optic deflector has the capability of random access scan controlled by a digital computer.

  19. LAPR: An experimental aircraft pushbroom scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, S. W.; Irons, J. I.; Heugel, F.

    1980-01-01

    A three band Linear Array Pushbroom Radiometer (LAPR) was built and flown on an experimental basis by NASA at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The functional characteristics of the instrument and the methods used to preprocess the data, including radiometric correction, are described. The radiometric sensitivity of the instrument was tested and compared to that of the Thematic Mapper and the Multispectral Scanner. The radiometric correction procedure was evaluated quantitatively, using laboratory testing, and qualitatively, via visual examination of the LAPR test flight imagery. Although effective radiometric correction could not yet be demonstrated via laboratory testing, radiometric distortion did not preclude the visual interpretation or parallel piped classification of the test imagery.

  20. An all-nickel magnetostatic MEMS scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Niklas; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    The design, fabrication and detailed characterization of a fully electroplated, magnetostatic low-cost MEMS scanning mirror are presented. By electroplating bright nickel on a sacrificial substrate, robust soft-magnetic micromirrors may be fabricated. The technology is simpler and cheaper than the standard process using bulk silicon micromachining of silicon-on-insulator wafers for fabricating magnetostatic scanners. The presented Ni mirrors exhibit deflection angles of ±7° at resonance for small external magnetic fields of 0.23 mT. Such magnetic fields are easily generated by miniaturized solenoids, making integration, for instance, into endoscopic systems possible.

  1. Ocean color imagery: Coastal zone color scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovis, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations into the feasibility of sensing ocean color from high altitude for determination of chlorophyll and sediment distributions were carried out using sensors on NASA aircraft, coordinated with surface measurements carried out by oceanographic vessels. Spectrometer measurements in 1971 and 1972 led to development of an imaging sensor now flying on a NASA U-2 and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner to fly on Nimbus G in 1978. Results of the U-2 effort show the imaging sensor to be of great value in sensing pollutants in the ocean.

  2. Biomedical applications of a real-time terahertz color scanner.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Markus; Fujio, Makoto; Minami, Masaaki; Miura, Jiro; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    A real-time THz color scanner has the potential to further expand the application scope of THz spectral imaging based on its rapid image acquisition rate. We demonstrated three possible applications of a THz color scanner in the biomedical field: imaging of pharmaceutical tablets, human teeth, and human hair. The first application showed the scanner's potential in total inspection for rapid quality control of pharmaceutical tablets moving on a conveyor belt. The second application demonstrated that the scanner can be used to identify a potential indicator for crystallinity of dental tissue. In the third application, the scanner was successfully used to visualize the drying process of wet hairs. These demonstrations indicated the high potential of the THz color scanner for practical applications in the biomedical field. PMID:21258472

  3. Phantom based evaluation of CT to CBCT image registration for proton therapy dose recalculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Dedes, George; Zöllner, Christoph; Handrack, Josefine; Janssens, Guillaume; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Reiner, Michael; Paganelli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Kamp, Florian; Söhn, Matthias; Wilkens, Jan J.; Baroni, Guido; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perform dose recalculation on the anatomy of the day is important in the context of adaptive proton therapy. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of deformable image registration (DIR) and cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging to generate the daily stopping power distribution of the patient. We investigated the deformation of the planning CT scan (pCT) onto daily CBCT images to generate a virtual CT (vCT) using a deformable phantom designed for the head and neck (H & N) region. The phantom was imaged at a planning CT scanner in planning configuration, yielding a pCT and in deformed, treatment day configuration, yielding a reference CT (refCT). The treatment day configuration was additionally scanned at a CBCT scanner. A Morphons DIR algorithm was used to generate a vCT. The accuracy of the vCT was evaluated by comparison to the refCT in terms of corresponding features as identified by an adaptive scale invariant feature transform (aSIFT) algorithm. Additionally, the vCT CT numbers were compared to those of the refCT using both profiles and regions of interest and the volumes and overlap (DICE coefficients) of various phantom structures were compared. The water equivalent thickness (WET) of the vCT, refCT and pCT were also compared to evaluate proton range differences. Proton dose distributions from the same initial fluence were calculated on the refCT, vCT and pCT and compared in terms of proton range. The method was tested on a clinical dataset using a replanning CT scan acquired close in time to a CBCT scan as reference using the WET evaluation. Results from the aSIFT investigation suggest a deformation accuracy of 2-3 mm. The use of the Morphon algorithm did not distort CT number intensity in uniform regions and WET differences between vCT and refCT were of the order of 2% of the proton range. This result was confirmed by proton dose calculations. The patient results were consistent with phantom observations. In conclusion, our phantom

  4. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Mark Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-15

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  5. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  6. Integrated Electro-optical Laser-Beam Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boord, Warren T.

    1990-01-01

    Scanners using solid-state devices compact, consume little power, and have no moving parts. Integrated electro-optical laser scanner, in conjunction with external lens, points outgoing beam of light in any number of different directions, depending on number of upper electrodes. Offers beam-deflection angles larger than those of acousto-optic scanners. Proposed for such diverse applications as nonimpact laser printing, color imaging, ranging, barcode reading, and robotic vision.

  7. 52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  8. Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu; Duan, Jianghui; Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of −950 Hu in inspiration and −950 to −890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under −930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 ± 9.66 and 13.95 ± 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the −950 to −890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

  9. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination.

    PubMed

    Kaloshin, Gennady; Lukin, Igor

    2016-01-21

    In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5-10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km.

  10. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination

    PubMed Central

    Kaloshin, Gennady; Lukin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5–10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km. PMID:26805841

  11. Antenna Near-Field Probe Station Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz J. (Inventor); Lee, Richard Q. (Inventor); Darby, William G. (Inventor); Barr, Philip J. (Inventor); Lambert, Kevin M (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized antenna system is characterized non-destructively through the use of a scanner that measures its near-field radiated power performance. When taking measurements, the scanner can be moved linearly along the x, y and z axis, as well as rotationally relative to the antenna. The data obtained from the characterization are processed to determine the far-field properties of the system and to optimize the system. Each antenna is excited using a probe station system while a scanning probe scans the space above the antenna to measure the near field signals. Upon completion of the scan, the near-field patterns are transformed into far-field patterns. Along with taking data, this system also allows for extensive graphing and analysis of both the near-field and far-field data. The details of the probe station as well as the procedures for setting up a test, conducting a test, and analyzing the resulting data are also described.

  12. Quest for an open MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Bertora, Franco; Borceto, Alice; Viale, Andrea; Sandini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    A study of the motor cortex during the programming, execution and mental representation of voluntary movement is of great relevance; its evaluation in conditions close to reality is necessary, given the close integration of the visuomotor, sensory feedback and proprioceptive systems, as of yet, a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanner allowing a human subject to maintain erect stance, observe the surroundings and conserve limb freedom is still a dream. The need for high field suggests a solenoid magnet geometry that forces an unnatural posture that affects the results, particularly when the motor cortex is investigated. In contrast in a motor functional study, the scanner should allow the subject to sit or stand, with unobstructed sight and unimpeded movement. Two approaches are presented here to solve this problem. In the first approach, an increased field intensity in an open magnet is obtained lining the "back wall" of the cavity with a sheet of current: this boosts the field intensity at the cost of the introduction of a gradient, which has to be canceled by the introduction of an opposite gradient; The second approach is an adaptation of the "double doughnut" architecture, in which the cavity widens at the center to provide additional room for the subject. The detailed design of this kind of structure has proven the feasibility of the solution.

  13. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination.

    PubMed

    Kaloshin, Gennady; Lukin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5-10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km. PMID:26805841

  14. Efficiency of antiscatter grids for flat-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi

    2007-10-01

    Flat-panel detector CT (FD-CT) scanners offer large volume coverage, but as a consequence are more susceptible to scatter artifacts than standard clinical CT scanners with smaller cone angles. FD-CT scanners can employ antiscatter grids as a scatter rejection technique. We evaluated three standard fluoroscopic antiscatter grids for two different field sizes with respect to scatter suppression efficiency and image quality improvement. The evaluations included simulations and measurements. Regarding the simulation a hybrid model combining deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations was used combined with an analytical calculation of grid transmission. The scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) was measured using an adapted collimator technique in order to validate our simulations. The SPR obtained by simulations and measurements with and without antiscatter grids were in agreement typically within 10%. The employment of a grid does not generally provide a significant improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Antiscatter grids led to a significant reduction of cupping artifacts in all cases. There is a trade-off between the SNR and the reduction of the scatter intensity described by the signal-to-noise improvement factor (SNRif). For low- or medium-scatter conditions the increase in noise caused by the reduced primary transmission through the grid has to be compensated by a higher exposure. For high scatter conditions SNRif is significantly greater than 1; i.e. a decrease of dose of up to 50% can be reached.

  15. Three-dimensional multi-detector row CT portal venography in the evaluation of portosystemic collateral vessels in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Choi, Jun Ho; Choi, Song; Chung, Tae Woong; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Jae Kyu; Yoon, Woong; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2002-01-01

    Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) offers distinct advantages over traditional spiral CT. Multi-detector row CT scanners are faster and allow thinner collimation than single-detector row spiral CT scanners. The use of multi-detector row CT combined with postprocessing of the imaging data with a variety of three-dimensional reformatting techniques (eg, maximum intensity projection, shaded surface display, volume rendering) allows creation of vascular maps whose quality equals or exceeds that of maps created at classic angiography for many applications. Three-dimensional multi-detector row CT portal venography can help determine the extent and location of portosystemic collateral vessels (eg, left gastric vein, short gastric vein, esophageal and paraesophageal varices, splenorenal and gastrorenal shunts, paraumbilical and abdominal wall veins) in patients with liver cirrhosis and is probably the optimal imaging technique in this setting.

  16. Quantifying and Reducing the Effect of Calibration Error on Variability of PET/CT Standardized Uptake Value Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Catherine M.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Alessio, Adam M.; McDougald, Wendy A.; Doot, Robert K.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the errors introduced by regular calibration of PET/CT scanners and to minimize the effect of calibration error on standardized uptake value measurements. Methods Global calibration factors from 2 PET/CT scanners were recorded for 3.5 and 1.8 y, comparing manufacturer-recommended protocols with modified protocols to evaluate error contributions due to operator-influenced procedures. Dose calibrator measurements were evaluated using National Institute of Standards and Technology–traceable sources. Results Dose calibrator variability was less than 1%, although there was a consistent bias. Global scaling variability was reduced from 6% to 4% for scanner 1 and from 11% to 4% for scanner 2 when quality assurance and quality control procedures were applied to the calibration protocol. When calibrations were done using a 68Ge/68Ga phantom, the variability for both scanners was reduced to approximately 3%. Conclusion Applying quality assurance and quality control procedures to scanner calibration reduces variability, but there is a still a residual longitudinal scanner variability of 3%–4%. The procedures proposed here reduce the impact of operator error on scanner calibration and thereby minimize longitudinal variability in standarized uptake value measurements. PMID:21233174

  17. Design of an industrial CT system for very large composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Pierre; Morisseau, Philippe

    1991-07-01

    A priority of the design offices of motor cases, (made of advanced composites), is their reliability. For this reason the cylindrical tanks are thoroughly examined along the production line with NDT (Nondestructive Tests) methods to guarantee that every motor case is defect free. Present NDT methods include Infrared Thermography (IT), Holographic Interferometry (HI) and Tangential Film Radiography (TFR). It is hoped that a Computed Tomography (CT) system would allow full automatic control to be achieved. Before making the final decision to order a CT scanner a series of tests were performed on some specific specimens. These tests are described and a description of the scanner is given.

  18. Brain Imaging Using Mobile CT: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    John, Seby; Stock, Sarah; Cerejo, Russell; Uchino, Ken; Winners, Stacey; Russman, Andrew; Masaryk, Thomas; Rasmussen, Peter; Hussain, Muhammad S

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an invaluable tool in the diagnosis of many clinical conditions. Several advancements in biomedical engineering have achieved increase in speed, improvements in low-contrast detectability and image quality, and lower radiation. Portable or mobile CT constituted one such important advancement. It is especially useful in evaluating critically ill, intensive care unit patients by scanning them at bedside. A paradigm shift in utilization of mobile CT was its installation in ambulances for the management of acute stroke. Given the time sensitive nature of acute ischemic stroke, Mobile stroke units (MSU) were developed in Germany consisting of an ambulance equipped with a CT scanner, point of care laboratory system, along with teleradiological support. In a radical reconfiguration of stroke care, the MSU would bring the CT scanner to the stroke patient, without waiting for the patient at the emergency room. Two separate MSU projects in Saarland and Berlin demonstrated the safety and feasibility of this concept for prehospital stroke care, showing increased rate of intravenous thrombolysis and significant reduction in time to treatment compared to conventional care. MSU also improved the triage of patients to appropriate and specialized hospitals. Although multiple issues remain yet unanswered with the MSU concept including clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness, the MSU venture is visionary and enables delivery of life-saving and enhancing treatment for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In this review, we discuss the development of mobile CT and its applications, with specific focus on its use in MSUs along with our institution's MSU experience.

  19. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  20. Operational radiation safety for PET-CT, SPECT-CT, and cyclotron facilities.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat; Dauer, Lawrence; St Germain, Jean

    2008-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are well- established and indispensable imaging modalities in modern medicine. State-of-the-art computed tomography (CT) scanners have now been integrated into multi-modality PET-CT and SPECT-CT devices, and these devices, particularly PET-CT scanners, are dramatically impacting clinical practice. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), by far the most widely used radiopharmaceutical for clinical PET imaging in general and oncologic PET imaging in particular, is highly accurate in detecting (approximately 90%) and staging many types of tumors, monitoring therapy response, and differentiating benign from malignant lesions. Several factors, including the relatively high administered activities [e.g., 370-740 MBq (10-20 mCi) of FDG], the high patient throughput (up to 30 patients per d), and in particular, the uniquely high energies (for a diagnostic setting) of the 511-keV positron-negatron annihilation photons, make shielding requirements, workflow, and other radiation protection issues important considerations in the design of a PET or PET-CT facility. The Report of Task Group 108 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) provides a comprehensive summary of shielding design and related considerations, along with illustrative calculations. Whether in the form of a PET-CT or a SPECT-CT device, the introduction of CT scanners into a nuclear medicine setting has created new and complex radiation protection issues concerning the radiation burden and attendant risks accrued by patients undergoing such multi-modality procedures (especially in those instances in which higher-dose, diagnostic-quality CT studies are done as part of the PET-CT or SPECT-CT exam). In addition, because PET is dependent on the availability of short-lived 18F (Tp = 110 min) primarily in the form of FDG, and other short-lived positron emitters such as 11C (20 min), 13N (10 min), and 15O (2 min

  1. Identification of scanner models by comparison of scanned hologram images.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Shigeru

    2014-08-01

    A method to identify scanner models that had been used to forge low-level counterfeit currencies was proposed in this study. The method identified a scanner model by characterizing differences between hologram images that exist in low-level counterfeit currencies. Twenty scanners of 18 different models were used to make samples of hologram images used in this study. The method was divided into two steps: identification of capturing conditions and identification of the scanner model. The first proposed protocol used correlations of spatial distribution of brightness to identify capturing conditions. A second proposed protocol used correlations of color distributions to identify a scanner model. The effectiveness of the protocols was demonstrated with numerical methods and sample images. The preliminary study revealed that it is necessary to consider the orientation of the holograms when the scanner models were identified, but 180° rotations can be ignored. Moreover, it is necessary to consider position in the main scanning direction of the bed for charged-coupled-device scanners. The demonstration showed that the first protocol could correctly identify the capturing conditions of almost all hologram images. However, one image could not be identified correctly; the protocol could distinguish images captured by charged-coupled-device scanners and those captured by contact image sensor scanners if the hologram was placed on the right or left edge of the scanner bed, but could not distinguish them if the hologram was placed on the inside. The demonstration also showed that the second protocol could correctly identify scanner models of all hologram images.

  2. Transient foam flow in porous media with CAT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dianbin; Brigham, W.E.

    1992-03-01

    Transient behavior is likely to dominate over most of the duration of a foam injection field project. Due to the lack of date, little is presently known about transient foam flow behavior. Foam flow does not follow established models such as the Buckley-Leverett theory, and no general predictive model has been derived. Therefore, both experimental data and a foam flow theory are needed. In this work, foam was injected at a constant mass rate into one-dimensional sandpacks of 1-in diameter and 24-in or 48-in length that had initially been saturate with distilled water. The system was placed in a cat Scanner. Data, obtained at room temperature and low pressure at various times, include both the pressure and saturation distributions. Pressure profiles showed that the pressure gradient is much greater behind the foam front than ahead of it. Moreover, the pressure gradients keep changing as the foam advances in the sandpack. This behavior differs from Buckley-Leverett theory. The CT scan results demonstrated gas channeling near the front, but eventually the foam block all these channels and sweeps the entire cross section after many pore volumes of injection. Three series of experiments were run: (1) surfactant adsorption measurements; (2) gas displacements of surfactant-laden solutions and (3) foam displacements. The first two series of experiments were made to provide the necessary parameters required to match the foam displacements. To this end, it was necessary to smooth the saturation history data, using a Langmuir-type formula. A theory was proposed based on the principles of the fractional flow curve construction method. This foam theory treats the foam as composed of infinitesimal slugs of gas of varying viscosities. The foam front has the lowest viscosity and foam at the injection end has the highest.

  3. SU-E-I-25: Determining Tube Current, Tube Voltage and Pitch Suitable for Low- Dose Lung Screening CT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K; Matthews, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quality of a computed tomography (CT) image and the dose delivered during its acquisition depend upon the acquisition parameters used. Tube current, tube voltage, and pitch are acquisition parameters that potentially affect image quality and dose. This study investigated physicians' abilities to characterize small, solid nodules in low-dose CT images for combinations of current, voltage and pitch, for three CT scanner models. Methods: Lung CT images was acquired of a Data Spectrum anthropomorphic torso phantom with various combinations of pitch, tube current, and tube voltage; this phantom was used because acrylic beads of various sizes could be placed within the lung compartments to simulate nodules. The phantom was imaged on two 16-slice scanners and a 64-slice scanner. The acquisition parameters spanned a range of estimated CTDI levels; the CTDI estimates from the acquisition software were verified by measurement. Several experienced radiologists viewed the phantom lung CT images and noted nodule location, size and shape, as well as the acceptability of overall image quality. Results: Image quality for assessment of nodules was deemed unsatisfactory for all scanners at 80 kV (any tube current) and at 35 mA (any tube voltage). Tube current of 50 mA or more at 120 kV resulted in similar assessments from all three scanners. Physician-measured sphere diameters were closer to actual diameters for larger spheres, higher tube current, and higher kV. Pitch influenced size measurements less for larger spheres than for smaller spheres. CTDI was typically overestimated by the scanner software compared to measurement. Conclusion: Based on this survey of acquisition parameters, a low-dose CT protocol of 120 kV, 50 mA, and pitch of 1.4 is recommended to balance patient dose and acceptable image quality. For three models of scanners, this protocol resulted in estimated CTDIs from 2.9–3.6 mGy.

  4. Dual-source multi-energy CT with triple or quadruple x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lifeng; Li, Zhoubo; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-03-01

    Energy-resolved photon-counting CT (PCCT) is promising for material decomposition with multi-contrast agents. However, corrections for non-idealities of PCCT detectors are required, which are still active research areas. In addition, PCCT is associated with very high cost due to lack of mass production. In this work, we proposed an alternative approach to performing multi-energy CT, which was achieved by acquiring triple or quadruple x-ray beam measurements on a dual-source CT scanner. This strategy was based on a "Twin Beam" design on a single-source scanner for dual-energy CT. Examples of beam filters and spectra for triple and quadruple x-ray beam were provided. Computer simulation studies were performed to evaluate the accuracy of material decomposition for multi-contrast mixtures using both tri-beam and quadruple-beam configurations. The proposed strategy can be readily implemented on a dual-source scanner, which may allow material decomposition of multi-contrast agents to be performed on clinical CT scanners with energy-integrating detector.

  5. SU-D-BRA-05: Toward Understanding the Robustness of Radiomics Features in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, D; Zhang, L; Yang, J; Jones, A; Court, L; Fave, X; Fried, D; Taylor, B; Rodriguez-Rivera, E; Dodge, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To gauge the impact of inter-scanner variability on radiomics features in computed tomography (CT). Methods: We compared the radiomics features calculated for 17 scans of the specially designed Credence Cartridge Radiomics (CCR) phantom with those calculated for 20 scans of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. The scans were acquired at four medical centers using General Electric, Philips, Siemens, and Toshiba CT scanners. Each center used its own routine thoracic imaging protocol. To produce a large dynamic range of radiomics feature values, the CCR phantom has 10 cartridges comprising different materials. The features studied were derived from the neighborhood gray-tone difference matrix or image intensity histogram. To quantify the significance of the inter-scanner variability, we introduced the metric “feature noise”, which compares the ratio of inter-scanner variability and inter-patient variability in decibels, positive values indicating substantial noise. We performed hierarchical clustering based to look for dependence of the features on the scan acquisition parameters. Results: For 5 of the 10 features studied, the inter-scanner variability was larger than the inter-patient variability. Of the 10 materials in the phantom, shredded rubber seemed to produce feature values most similar to those of the NSCLC tumors. The feature busyness had the greatest feature noise (14.3 dB), whereas texture strength had the least (−14.6 dB). Hierarchical clustering indicated that the features depended in part on the scanner manufacturer, image slice thickness, and pixel size. Conclusion: The variability in the values of radiomics features calculated for CT images of a radiomics phantom can be substantial relative to the variability in the values of these features calculated for CT images of NSCLC tumors. These inter-scanner differences and their effects should be carefully considered in future radiomics studies.

  6. Quadrupole resonance scanner for narcotics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Julian D.; Moeller, C. R.; Magnuson, Erik E.; Sheldon, Alan G.

    1994-10-01

    Interest in non-invasive, non-hazardous, bulk detection technologies for narcotics interdiction has risen over the last few years. As part of our continuing research and development programs in detection of narcotics and explosives using sensitive magnetic measuring devices, we present the first commercially available prototype Quadrupole Resonance (QR) scanner for narcotics detection. The portable narcotics detection system was designed in modular form such that a single QR base system could be easily used with a variety of custom detection heads. The QR system presented in this paper is suitable for scanning items up to 61 X 35 X 13 cm in size, and was designed to scan mail packages and briefcase-sized items for the presence of narcotics. System tests have shown that detection sensitivity is comparable that obtained in laboratory systems.

  7. Echelle crossed grating millimeter wave beam scanner.

    PubMed

    Furxhi, Orges; Marks, Daniel L; Brady, David J

    2014-06-30

    We present a two-dimensional, active, millimeter-wave, electronic beam scanner, with Doppler capabilities for stand-off imaging. The two-dimensional scan is achieved by mapping the millimeter wave spectrum to space using a pair of crossed gratings. The active transceiver and heterodyne quadrature detection allow the measurement of the relative phase between two consecutive measurements and the synthesis of the scene's Doppler signature. The frame rate of the imager is currently limited by the sweep rate of the vector network analyzer which is used to drive the millimeter wave extenders. All of the beam steering components are passive and can be designed to operate at any wavelength. The system design, characterization and measurements are presented and further uses and improvements are suggested.

  8. Advanced clinical KCD scanner for digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBianca, Frank A.; Davis, Keana M.; Jordan, Lawrence M.; Laughter, Joseph S.; Krishnamurthy, Anand; Hu, Bo

    1998-07-01

    One of the goals of medical imaging scientists and bioengineers remains the development of digital electronic technologies that can replace film-based methods of acquiring x-ray images. With the achievement of this goal, all diagnostic imaging technologies would be based on digital techniques with all the attending benefits. Based on the performance of numerous research prototype small-field and one large-field Kinestatic Charge Detector (KCD) system for digital radiography, a large-field clinical KCD scanner is currently being designed and built for technical evaluation and for clinical evaluation of 200 volunteer patients (including clinical comparisons with film, storage phosphor, and other available clinical systems). The state of development of this clinical KCD system, including detector, data-acquisition system and scanning gantry design, is reviewed in this paper.

  9. Temporal analysis of multispectral scanner data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Torline, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Multispectral scanner reflectance data were sampled for bare soil, cotton, sorghum, corn, and citrus at four dates during a growing season (April, May, June, and July 1969) to develop a time-dependent signature for crop and soil discrimination. Discrimination tests were conducted for single-date and multidate formats using training and test data sets. For classifications containing several crops, the multidate or temporal approach improved discrimination compared with the single-date approach. The multidate approach also preserved recognition accuracy better in going from training fields to test fields than the single-date analysis. The spectral distinctiveness of bare soil versus vegetation resulted in essentially equal discrimination using single-date versus multidate data for those two categories.

  10. Wetlands mapping with spot multispectral scanner data

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr. ); Jensen, J.R. . Dept. of Geography)

    1989-01-01

    Government facilities such as the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina, often use remote sensing data to assist in environmental management. Airborne multispectral scanner (MSS) data have been acquired at SRP since 1981. Various types of remote sensing data have been used to map and characterize wetlands. Regional Landsat MSS and TM satellite data have been used for wetlands mapping by various government agencies and private organizations. Furthermore, SPOT MSS data are becoming available and provide opportunities for increased spacial resolution and temporal coverage for wetlands mapping. This paper summarizes the initial results from using five dates of SPOT MSS data from April through October, 1987, as a means to monitor seasonal wetland changes in freshwater wetlands of the SRP. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Chest pain: coronary CT in the ER.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Erica; Seitun, Sara; Guaricci, Andrea I; Cademartiri, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac CT has developed into a robust clinical tool during the past 15 years. Of the fields in which the potential of cardiac CT has raised more interest is chest pain in acute settings. In fact, the possibility to exclude with high reliability obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients at low-to-intermediate risk is of great interest both from the clinical standpoint and from the management standpoint. Several other modalities, with or without imaging, have been used during the past decades in the settings of new onset chest pain or in acute chest pain for both diagnostic and prognostic assessment of CAD. Each one has advantages and disadvantages. Most imaging modalities also focus on inducible ischaemia to guide referral to invasive coronary angiography. The advent of cardiac CT has introduced a new practice diagnostic paradigm, being the most accurate non-invasive method for identification and exclusion of CAD. Furthermore, the detection of subclinical CAD and plaque imaging offer the opportunity to improve risk stratification. Moreover, recent advances of the latest generation CT scanners allow combining both anatomical and functional imaging by stress myocardial perfusion. The role of cardiac CT in acute settings is already important and will become progressively more important in the coming years. PMID:26866681

  12. 34. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING ROOM 105 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - ROOM 105 - CHILLER ROOM, SHOWING SINGLE COMPRESSOR, LIQUID CHILLERS AND "CHILLED WATER RETURN", COOLING TOWER 'TOWER WATER RETURN" AND 'TOWER WATER SUPPLY" LINES. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  13. 19. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING AIR POLICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - AIR POLICE SITE SECURITY OFFICE WITH "SITE PERIMETER STATUS PANEL" AND REAL TIME VIDEO DISPLAY OUTPUT FROM VIDEO CAMERA SYSTEM AT SECURITY FENCE LOCATIONS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  14. 25. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC IN OPERATION AT 1930 ZULU TIME, 26 OCTOBER, 1999. MWOC SCREEN ALSO SHOWS RADAR "FACE A" AND "FACE B" ACTIVE STATUS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  15. 26. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC IN OPERATION AT 1945 ZULU TIME, 26 OCTOBER, 1999. "SPACE TRACK BOARD" DATA SHOWING ITEMS #16609 MIR (RUSSIA) AND #25544 ISS (INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION) BEING TRACKED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  16. 29. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING FLOOR 3A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - FLOOR 3A ("A" FACE) AT SYSTEM LAYOUT GRID 17. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF "A" FACE INTERIOR SHOWING RADAR EMITTER/ANTENNA INTERFACE ELECTRONICS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  17. 20. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING IN COMPUTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - IN COMPUTER ROOM LOOKING AT "CONSOLIDATED MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS CENTER" JOB AREA AND OPERATION WORK CENTER. TASKS INCLUDE RADAR MAINTENANCE, COMPUTER MAINTENANCE, CYBER COMPUTER MAINTENANCE AND RELATED ACTIVITIES. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  18. 21. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - LOOKING AT DISC STORAGE SYSTEMS A AND B (A OR B ARE REDUNDANT SYSTEMS), ONE MAINFRAME COMPUTER ON LINE, ONE ON STANDBY WITH STORAGE TAPE, ONE ON STANDBY WITHOUT TAPE INSTALLED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  19. Quantitative Assay for Starch by Colorimetry Using a Desktop Scanner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Kurt R.; Landmark, James D.; Stickle, Douglas F.

    2004-01-01

    The procedure to produce standard curve for starch concentration measurement by image analysis using a color scanner and computer for data acquisition and color analysis is described. Color analysis is performed by a Visual Basic program that measures red, green, and blue (RGB) color intensities for pixels within the scanner image.

  20. 27. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING OPERATIONS CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - OPERATIONS CENTER - MWOC MONITOR NO. 4 IN OPERATION AT 2002 ZULU, OCTOBER 26, 1999 CAPE COD, AS PAVE PAWS. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  1. Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, R.A.; Peck, K.

    1992-02-25

    A fluorescent scanner is designed for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier. The scanner includes a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from the volume to provide a display of the separated sample. 8 figs.

  2. 10. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - LOOKING AT SOUTHWEST CORNER "B" FACE AND "C" FACE ON WEST AND EVAPORATIVE COOLING TOWER AT NORTH. VIEW IS LOOKING NORTH 45° EAST. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  3. On the spectral quality of scanner illumination with LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chengwu

    2013-01-01

    Document scanner illumination has evolved along with general illumination technologies. LEDs have become more and more popular as the illumination sources for document scanning. LED technologies provide a wide range of choices both in terms of structural design and spectral compositions. In this report, we examine some popular LED technologies used for document scanner. We evaluate the color rendering performance of scanner models with different illumination technologies by examining their rendering of the Macbeth ColorChecker™ in sRGB. We found that more phosphors in phosphor conversion types of white LEDs may not be necessarily advantageous in terms of scanner color rendering performance. Also CIS type of scanner may be sensitive to the peak wavelength shift and can be particularly problematic when the peaks are out of certain range.

  4. Ultra-Miniature Lidar Scanner for Launch Range Data Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The most critical component in lidar is its laser scanner, which delivers pulsed or CW laser to target with desirable field of view (FOV). Most existing lidars use a rotating or oscillating mirror for scanning, resulting in several drawbacks. A lidar scanning technology was developed that could achieve very high scanning speed, with an ultra-miniature size and much lighter weight. This technology promises at least a 10x performance improvement in these areas over existing lidar scanners. Features of the proposed ultra-miniature lidar scanner include the ability to make the entire scanner <2 mm in diameter; very high scanning speed (e.g. 5 - 20 kHz, in contrast to several hundred Hz in existing scanners); structure design to meet stringent requirements on size, weight, power, and compactness for various applications; and the scanning speed and FOV can be altered for obtaining high image resolutions of targeted areas and for diversified uses.

  5. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Yang, Jie

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT.

  6. Empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Meyer, Esther; Prell, Daniel; Kachelriess, Marc

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Due to x-ray beam polychromaticity and scattered radiation, attenuation measurements tend to be underestimated. Cupping and beam hardening artifacts become apparent in the reconstructed CT images. If only one material such as water, for example, is present, these artifacts can be reduced by precorrecting the rawdata. Higher order beam hardening artifacts, as they result when a mixture of materials such as water and bone, or water and bone and iodine is present, require an iterative beam hardening correction where the image is segmented into different materials and those are forward projected to obtain new rawdata. Typically, the forward projection must correctly model the beam polychromaticity and account for all physical effects, including the energy dependence of the assumed materials in the patient, the detector response, and others. We propose a new algorithm that does not require any knowledge about spectra or attenuation coefficients and that does not need to be calibrated. The proposed method corrects beam hardening in single energy CT data. Methods: The only a priori knowledge entering EBHC is the segmentation of the object into different materials. Materials other than water are segmented from the original image, e.g., by using simple thresholding. Then, a (monochromatic) forward projection of these other materials is performed. The measured rawdata and the forward projected material-specific rawdata are monomially combined (e.g., multiplied or squared) and reconstructed to yield a set of correction volumes. These are then linearly combined and added to the original volume. The combination weights are determined to maximize the flatness of the new and corrected volume. EBHC is evaluated using data acquired with a modern cone-beam dual-source spiral CT scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), with a modern dual-source micro-CT scanner (TomoScope Synergy Twin, CT Imaging GmbH, Erlangen, Germany), and with a modern

  7. Energy Dependence of Measured CT Numbers on Substituted Materials Used for CT Number Calibration of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Reza; Jabbari, Nasrollah; aghdasi, Mehdi; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For accurate dose calculations, it is necessary to provide a correct relationship between the CT numbers and electron density in radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy dependence of measured CT numbers on substituted materials used for CT number calibration of radiotherapy TPSs and the resulting errors in the treatment planning calculation doses. Materials and Methods In this study, we designed a cylindrical water phantom with different materials used as tissue equivalent materials for the simulation of tissues and obtaining the related CT numbers. For evaluating the effect of CT number variations of substituted materials due to energy changing of scanner (kVp) on the dose calculation of TPS, the slices of the scanned phantom at three kVp's were imported into the desired TPSs (MIRS and CorePLAN). Dose calculations were performed on two TPSs. Results The mean absolute percentage differences between the CT numbers of CT scanner and two treatment planning systems for all the samples were 3.22%±2.57% for CorePLAN and 2.88%±2.11% for MIRS. It was also found that the maximum absolute percentage difference between all of the calculated doses from each photon beam of linac (6 and 15 MV) at three kVp's was less than 1.2%. Discussion The present study revealed that, for the materials with effective low atomic number, the mean CT number increased with increasing energy, which was opposite for the materials with an effective high atomic number. We concluded that the tissue substitute materials had a different behavior in the energy ranges from 80 to 130 kVp. So, it is necessary to consider the energy dependence of the substitute materials used for the measurement or calibration of CT number for radiotherapy treatment planning systems. PMID:27391672

  8. A PC-based multispectral scanner data evaluation workstation: Application to Daedalus scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; James, Mark W.; Smith, Matthew R.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    In late 1989, a personal computer (PC)-based data evaluation workstation was developed to support post flight processing of Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) data. The MAMS Quick View System (QVS) is an image analysis and display system designed to provide the capability to evaluate Daedalus scanner data immediately after an aircraft flight. Even in its original form, the QVS offered the portability of a personal computer with the advanced analysis and display features of a mainframe image analysis system. It was recognized, however, that the original QVS had its limitations, both in speed and processing of MAMS data. Recent efforts are presented that focus on overcoming earlier limitations and adapting the system to a new data tape structure. In doing so, the enhanced Quick View System (QVS2) will accommodate data from any of the four spectrometers used with the Daedalus scanner on the NASA ER2 platform. The QVS2 is designed around the AST 486/33 MHz CPU personal computer and comes with 10 EISA expansion slots, keyboard, and 4.0 mbytes of memory. Specialized PC-McIDAS software provides the main image analysis and display capability for the system. Image analysis and display of the digital scanner data is accomplished with PC-McIDAS software.

  9. Laser CT evaluation on normoxic PAGAT gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. S.; Samuel, E. J. J.; Watanabe, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Optical computed tomography has been shown to be a potentially useful imaging tool for the radiation therapy physicists. In radiation therapy, researchers have used optical CT for the readout of 3D dosimeters. The purpose of this paper is to describe the initial evaluation of a newly fabricated laser CT scanner for 3D gel dosimetry which works using the first generation principle. A normoxic PAGAT (Polyacrylamide Gelatin and Tetrakis) gel is used as a dosimeter for this analysis. When a laser passes through the gel phantom, absorption and scattering of photon take place. The optical attenuation coefficient of the laser can be obtained by measuring its intensity after passing through the gel by a sensor. The scanner motion is controlled by a computer program written in Microsoft Visual C++. Reconstruction and data analysis on the irradiated gel phantom is performed by suitable algorithm using Matlab software.

  10. {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT Simulation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Effect in Patients Already Staged by PET-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Gerard G.; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J.; Stewart, David P.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H.; Young, V.A. Linda D.C.R.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV{sub CT} to GTV{sub FUSED} was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). Conclusion: PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  11. Color accuracy and reproducibility in whole slide imaging scanners

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Prarthana; Hulsken, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We propose a workflow for color reproduction in whole slide imaging (WSI) scanners, such that the colors in the scanned images match to the actual slide color and the inter-scanner variation is minimum. We describe a new method of preparation and verification of the color phantom slide, consisting of a standard IT8-target transmissive film, which is used in color calibrating and profiling the WSI scanner. We explore several International Color Consortium (ICC) compliant techniques in color calibration/profiling and rendering intents for translating the scanner specific colors to the standard display (sRGB) color space. Based on the quality of the color reproduction in histopathology slides, we propose the matrix-based calibration/profiling and absolute colorimetric rendering approach. The main advantage of the proposed workflow is that it is compliant to the ICC standard, applicable to color management systems in different platforms, and involves no external color measurement devices. We quantify color difference using the CIE-DeltaE2000 metric, where DeltaE values below 1 are considered imperceptible. Our evaluation on 14 phantom slides, manufactured according to the proposed method, shows an average inter-slide color difference below 1 DeltaE. The proposed workflow is implemented and evaluated in 35 WSI scanners developed at Philips, called the Ultra Fast Scanners (UFS). The color accuracy, measured as DeltaE between the scanner reproduced colors and the reference colorimetric values of the phantom patches, is improved on average to 3.5 DeltaE in calibrated scanners from 10 DeltaE in uncalibrated scanners. The average inter-scanner color difference is found to be 1.2 DeltaE. The improvement in color performance upon using the proposed method is apparent with the visual color quality of the tissue scans. PMID:26158041

  12. Design Optimization of a TOF, Breast PET Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsin; Werner, Matthew E.; Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated breast positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with limited angle geometry can provide flexibility in detector placement around the patient as well as the ability to combine it with other imaging modalities. A primary challenge of a stationary limited angle scanner is the reduced image quality due to artifacts present in the reconstructed image leading to a loss in quantitative information. Previously it has been shown that using time-of-flight (TOF) information in image reconstruction can help reduce these image artifacts arising due to missing angular projections. Our goal in this work is to optimize the TOF, breast scanner design by performing studies for estimating image uniformity and lesion activity uptake as a function of system timing resolution, scanner angular coverage and shape. Our results show that (i) 1.5 × 1.5 × 15 mm3 lutetium oxy-orthosilicate (LSO) crystals provide a high spatial resolution and system sensitivity relative to clinical scanners, (ii) 2/3 angular coverage scanner design with TOF timing resolution less than 600 ps is appropriate for providing a tomographic image with fewer artifacts and good lesion uptake estimation relative to other partial ring designs studied in this work, (iii) a flat scanner design with 2/3 angular coverage is affected more by larger parallax error than a curved scanner geometry with the same angular coverage, but provides more uniform lesion contrast estimate over the imaging field-of-view (FOV), (iv) 2/3 angular coverage, flat, 300 ps TOF scanner design (for short, practical scan times of ≤ 5 mins per breast) provides similar precision of contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) values to a full curved, non-TOF scanner, and (v) employing depth-of-interaction (DOI) measuring detector and/or implementing resolution modeling (RM) in image reconstruction lead to improved and more uniform spatial resolution and lesion contrast over the whole FOV. PMID:24078744

  13. Evolution of spatial resolution in breast CT at UC Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Anthony Seibert, J.; Boone, John M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) technology for the purpose of breast cancer screening has been a focus of research at UC Davis since the late 1990s. Previous studies have shown that improvement in spatial resolution characteristics of this modality correlates with greater microcalcification detection, a factor considered a potential limitation of bCT. The aim of this study is to improve spatial resolution as characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) via changes in the scanner hardware components and operational schema. Methods: Four prototypes of pendant-geometry, cone-beam breast CT scanners were designed and developed spanning three generations of design evolution. To improve the system MTF in each bCT generation, modifications were made to the imaging components (x-ray tube and flat-panel detector), system geometry (source-to-isocenter and detector distance), and image acquisition parameters (technique factors, number of projections, system synchronization scheme, and gantry rotational speed). Results: Characterization of different generations of bCT systems shows these modifications resulted in a 188% improvement of the limiting MTF properties from the first to second generation and an additional 110% from the second to third. The intrinsic resolution degradation in the azimuthal direction observed in the first generation was corrected by changing the acquisition from continuous to pulsed x-ray acquisition. Utilizing a high resolution detector in the third generation, along with modifications made in system geometry and scan protocol, resulted in a 125% improvement in limiting resolution. An additional 39% improvement was obtained by changing the detector binning mode from 2 × 2 to 1 × 1. Conclusions: These results underscore the advancement in spatial resolution characteristics of breast CT technology. The combined use of a pulsed x-ray system, higher resolution flat-panel detector and changing the scanner geometry and image

  14. Evolution of spatial resolution in breast CT at UC Davis

    PubMed Central

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Anthony Seibert, J.; Boone, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) technology for the purpose of breast cancer screening has been a focus of research at UC Davis since the late 1990s. Previous studies have shown that improvement in spatial resolution characteristics of this modality correlates with greater microcalcification detection, a factor considered a potential limitation of bCT. The aim of this study is to improve spatial resolution as characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) via changes in the scanner hardware components and operational schema. Methods: Four prototypes of pendant-geometry, cone-beam breast CT scanners were designed and developed spanning three generations of design evolution. To improve the system MTF in each bCT generation, modifications were made to the imaging components (x-ray tube and flat-panel detector), system geometry (source-to-isocenter and detector distance), and image acquisition parameters (technique factors, number of projections, system synchronization scheme, and gantry rotational speed). Results: Characterization of different generations of bCT systems shows these modifications resulted in a 188% improvement of the limiting MTF properties from the first to second generation and an additional 110% from the second to third. The intrinsic resolution degradation in the azimuthal direction observed in the first generation was corrected by changing the acquisition from continuous to pulsed x-ray acquisition. Utilizing a high resolution detector in the third generation, along with modifications made in system geometry and scan protocol, resulted in a 125% improvement in limiting resolution. An additional 39% improvement was obtained by changing the detector binning mode from 2 × 2 to 1 × 1. Conclusions: These results underscore the advancement in spatial resolution characteristics of breast CT technology. The combined use of a pulsed x-ray system, higher resolution flat-panel detector and changing the scanner geometry and image

  15. Estimation of skull table thickness with clinical CT and validation with microCT.

    PubMed

    Lillie, Elizabeth M; Urban, Jillian E; Weaver, Ashley A; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Brain injuries resulting from motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are extremely common yet the details of the mechanism of injury remain to be well characterized. Skull deformation is believed to be a contributing factor to some types of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Understanding biomechanical contributors to skull deformation would provide further insight into the mechanism of head injury resulting from blunt trauma. In particular, skull thickness is thought be a very important factor governing deformation of the skull and its propensity for fracture. Current computed tomography (CT) technology is limited in its ability to accurately measure cortical thickness using standard techniques. A method to evaluate cortical thickness using cortical density measured from CT data has been developed previously. This effort validates this technique for measurement of skull table thickness in clinical head CT scans using two postmortem human specimens. Bone samples were harvested from the skulls of two cadavers and scanned with microCT to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated cortical thickness measured from clinical CT. Clinical scans were collected at 0.488 and 0.625 mm in plane resolution with 0.625 mm thickness. The overall cortical thickness error was determined to be 0.078 ± 0.58 mm for cortical samples thinner than 4 mm. It was determined that 91.3% of these differences fell within the scanner resolution. Color maps of clinical CT thickness estimations are comparable to color maps of microCT thickness measurements, indicating good quantitative agreement. These data confirm that the cortical density algorithm successfully estimates skull table thickness from clinical CT scans. The application of this technique to clinical CT scans enables evaluation of cortical thickness in population-based studies.

  16. Hybrid registration of PET/CT in thoracic region with pre-filtering PET sinogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokri, S. S.; Saripan, M. I.; Marhaban, M. H.; Nordin, A. J.; Hashim, S.

    2015-11-01

    The integration of physiological (PET) and anatomical (CT) images in cancer delineation requires an accurate spatial registration technique. Although hybrid PET/CT scanner is used to co-register these images, significant misregistrations exist due to patient and respiratory/cardiac motions. This paper proposes a hybrid feature-intensity based registration technique for hybrid PET/CT scanner. First, simulated PET sinogram was filtered with a 3D hybrid mean-median before reconstructing the image. The features were then derived from the segmented structures (lung, heart and tumor) from both images. The registration was performed based on modified multi-modality demon registration with multiresolution scheme. Apart from visual observations improvements, the proposed registration technique increased the normalized mutual information index (NMI) between the PET/CT images after registration. All nine tested datasets show marked improvements in mutual information (MI) index than free form deformation (FFD) registration technique with the highest MI increase is 25%.

  17. [The use of 3-dimensional CT reconstruction in childhood. Technics and dosimetry].

    PubMed

    Taccone, A; Ciccone, M A; Galano, N; Fondelli, M P; Ghiorzi, M; Cama, A; Roberti, M; Klamert, V; Pelizza, A

    1989-03-01

    A new computer method has been developed that allows the reprocessing of standard CT scans to produce 3D surface images. We employed the 3D reconstruction program developed by Hitachi Medical System using an Ansaldo A-TOM XR 1200 scanner. The process requires only standard CT scanner hardware, and reconstruction time is comparable to that of sagittal and coronal reconstructions. The applications of this technique and methodology to pediatric patients are discussed. In order to assess the relationship between image quality and radiation dose, we performed many CT scans with different protocols. A skull was employed for phantom, and plunged into a physiological solution, which helped us to determine the radiation exposure dose from every single CT scan. The measurements were taken with film and thermoluminescent crystal dosimeters (TLD). The results confirm that low-dose techniques allow a significant reduction in the total exposure. The authors discuss the clinical indications and the eventual applications of these techniques.

  18. Incorporating multislice imaging into x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H.; Hilts, M.; Jirasek, A.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) and to establish a baseline assessment of image noise and uniformity in an unirradiated gel dosimeter. Methods: A 16-slice CT scanner was used to acquire images through a 1 L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine. The variability in CT number (N{sub CT}) associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background subtraction artifact removal technique for CT PGD. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by evaluating image noise and uniformity. The agreement in N{sub CT} for slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also examined. Further study was performed to assess the effects of increasing x-ray tube load on the constancy of measured N{sub CT} and overall scan time. In all cases, results were compared to the single slice machine. Finally, images were collected throughout the volume of an unirradiated gel dosimeter to quantify image noise and uniformity before radiation is delivered. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in N{sub CT} observed across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image noise was higher for the multislice system compared to the single slice scanner, but overall image quality was comparable between the two systems. Further study showed N{sub CT} was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thicknesses examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in N{sub CT} due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen ... and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  20. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  1. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darne, Chinmay D.; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I.-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Smith, Anne M.; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-12-01

    The work presented herein describes the system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens micro positron emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be ±0.7% and ±0.3°, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 µM IRDye800CW and 68Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. Three-dimensional mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP3) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate the FDPM approach. Finally, the PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The obtained results validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging.

  2. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Darne, Chinmay D; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C; Smith, Anne M; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2012-12-21

    The work presented herein describes the system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens micro positron emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be ±0.7% and ±0.3°, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 µM IRDye800CW and ⁶⁸Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. Three-dimensional mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP₃) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate the FDPM approach. Finally, the PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The obtained results validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging.

  3. Mutual-information-based registration for ultrasound and CT datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firle, Evelyn A.; Wesarg, Stefan; Dold, Christian

    2004-05-01

    In many applications for minimal invasive surgery the acquisition of intra-operative medical images is helpful if not absolutely necessary. Especially for Brachytherapy imaging is critically important to the safe delivery of the therapy. Modern computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) scanners allow minimal invasive procedures to be performed under direct imaging guidance. However, conventional scanners do not have real-time imaging capability and are expensive technologies requiring a special facility. Ultrasound (U/S) is a much cheaper and one of the most flexible imaging modalities. It can be moved to the application room as required and the physician sees what is happening as it occurs. Nevertheless it may be easier to interpret these 3D intra-operative U/S images if they are used in combination with less noisier preoperative data such as CT. The purpose of our current investigation is to develop a registration tool for automatically combining pre-operative CT volumes with intra-operatively acquired 3D U/S datasets. The applied alignment procedure is based on the information theoretic approach of maximizing the mutual information of two arbitrary datasets from different modalities. Since the CT datasets include a much bigger field of view we introduced a bounding box to narrow down the region of interest within the CT dataset. We conducted a phantom experiment using a CIRS Model 53 U/S Prostate Training Phantom to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method.

  4. SU-E-I-33: Establishment of CT Diagnostic Reference Levels in Province Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkopi, E; Abdolell, M; Duffy, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate patient radiation dose from the most frequently performed CT examinations and to establish provincial diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) as a tool for protocol optimization. Methods: The study investigated the following CT examinations: head, chest, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis (CAP). Dose data, volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose-length product (DLP), were collected from 15 CT scanners installed during 2004–2014 in 11 hospital sites of Nova Scotia. All scanners had dose modulation options and multislice capability (16–128 detector rows). The sample for each protocol included 15 average size patients (70±20 kg). Provincial DRLs were calculated as the 75th percentile of patient dose distributions. The differences in dose between hospitals were evaluated with a single factor ANOVA statistical test. Generalized linear modeling was used to determine the factors associated with higher radiation dose. A sample of 36 abdominal studies performed on three different scanners was blinded and randomized for an assessment by an experienced radiologist who graded the imaging quality of anatomic structures. Results: Data for 900 patients were collected. The DRLs were proposed using CTDIvol (mGy) and DLP (mGy*cm) values for CT head (67 and 1049, respectively), chest (12 and 393), abdomen/pelvis (16 and 717), and CAP (14 and 1034). These DRLs were lower than the published national data except for the head CTDIvol. The differences between the means of the dose distributions from each scanner were statistically significant (p<0.05) for all examinations. A very weak correlation was found between the dose and the scanner age or the number of slices with Pearson’s correlation coefficients of 0.011–0.315. The blinded analysis of image quality demonstrated no clinically significant difference except for the noise category. Conclusion: Provincial DRLs were established for typical CT examinations. The variations in dose between the hospitals

  5. SU-E-T-541: Measurement of CT Density Model Variations and the Impact On the Accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) Dose Calculation in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H; Li, B; Behrman, R; Russo, G; Kachnic, L; Lu, H; Fernando, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the CT density model variations between different CT scanners used for treatment planning and impact on the accuracy of MC dose calculation in lung SBRT. Methods: A Gammex electron density phantom (RMI 465) was scanned on two 64-slice CT scanners (GE LightSpeed VCT64) and a 16-slice CT (Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT). All three scanners had been used to acquire CT for CyberKnife lung SBRT treatment planning. To minimize the influences of beam hardening and scatter for improving reproducibility, three scans were acquired with the phantom rotated 120° between scans. The mean CT HU of each density insert, averaged over the three scans, was used to build the CT density models. For 14 patient plans, repeat MC dose calculations were performed by using the scanner-specific CT density models and compared to a baseline CT density model in the base plans. All dose re-calculations were done using the same plan beam configurations and MUs. Comparisons of dosimetric parameters included PTV volume covered by prescription dose, mean PTV dose, V5 and V20 for lungs, and the maximum dose to the closest critical organ. Results: Up to 50.7 HU variations in CT density models were observed over the baseline CT density model. For 14 patient plans examined, maximum differences in MC dose re-calculations were less than 2% in 71.4% of the cases, less than 5% in 85.7% of the cases, and 5–10% for 14.3% of the cases. As all the base plans well exceeded the clinical objectives of target coverage and OAR sparing, none of the observed differences led to clinically significant concerns. Conclusion: Marked variations of CT density models were observed for three different CT scanners. Though the differences can cause up to 5–10% differences in MC dose calculations, it was found that they caused no clinically significant concerns.

  6. Radiation Doses of Various CT Protocols: a Multicenter Longitudinal Observation Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Emerging concerns regarding the hazard from medical radiation including CT examinations has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to observe the longitudinal changes of CT radiation doses of various CT protocols and to estimate the long-term efforts of supervising radiologists to reduce medical radiation. Radiation dose data from 11 representative CT protocols were collected from 12 hospitals. Attending radiologists had collected CT radiation dose data in two time points, 2007 and 2010. They collected the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) of each phase, number of phases, dose length product (DLP) of each phase, and types of scanned CT machines. From the collected data, total DLP and effective dose (ED) were calculated. CTDIvol, total DLP, and ED of 2007 and 2010 were compared according to CT protocols, CT machine type, and hospital. During the three years, CTDIvol had significantly decreased, except for dynamic CT of the liver. Total DLP and ED were significantly decreased in all 11 protocols. The decrement was more evident in newer CT scanners. However, there was substantial variability of changes of ED during the three years according to hospitals. Although there was variability according to protocols, machines, and hospital, CT radiation doses were decreased during the 3 years. This study showed the effects of decreased CT radiation dose by efforts of radiologists and medical society. PMID:26908984

  7. Dynamic computed tomography of the pituitary gland using a single slice scanner in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Del Magno, Sara; Grinwis, Guy C M; Voorhout, George; Meij, Björn P

    2016-08-01

    Selective removal of the pituitary adenoma has not been advocated in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism because the pituitary adenoma is usually not visualized on routine computed tomography (CT). Dynamic pituitary CT scanning is aimed at the detection of the pituitary flush and, indirectly, at the presence and position of the adenoma. The first aim of this retrospective study was to compare findings of a multiple slice dynamic scanning protocol with those of a single slice dynamic protocol using a single slice CT scanner. The second aim was to compare the CT findings with surgical findings, and surgical findings with histopathological findings. Computed tomography with single and multiple slice dynamic scanning protocols was performed in 86 dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism. Thirty dogs underwent transsphenoidal hypophysectomy and pituitary specimens were collected as tumor, normal, mixed and neurohypophyseal samples and processed for histology. The pituitary flush was not detected more frequent in multiple slice dynamic scanning series than in single slice dynamic scanning series. However, in non-enlarged pituitaries, the flush was seen significantly more frequently than in enlarged pituitaries. Prediction of the nature of the tissue during hypophysectomy by the surgeon was inconclusive. In conclusion, when using a single slice CT scanner, both single or multiple slice dynamic scanning protocols can be used for localization of the neurohypophyseal flush, and, indirectly, the adenoma. However, based on this study, the aim of surgery in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism remains total adenohypophysectomy, and when the neurophypophysis is recognized, it may be left in situ. PMID:27473973

  8. Handheld laser scanner automatic registration based on random coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Yu, Chun-ping; Wang, Li

    2011-06-01

    Current research on Laser Scanner often focuses mainly on the static measurement. Little use has been made of dynamic measurement, that are appropriate for more problems and situations. In particular, traditional Laser Scanner must Keep stable to scan and measure coordinate transformation parameters between different station. In order to make the scanning measurement intelligently and rapidly, in this paper ,we developed a new registration algorithm for handleheld laser scanner based on the positon of target, which realize the dynamic measurement of handheld laser scanner without any more complex work. the double camera on laser scanner can take photograph of the artificial target points to get the three-dimensional coordinates, this points is designed by random coding. And then, a set of matched points is found from control points to realize the orientation of scanner by the least-square common points transformation. After that the double camera can directly measure the laser point cloud in the surface of object and get the point cloud data in an unified coordinate system. There are three major contributions in the paper. Firstly, a laser scanner based on binocular vision is designed with double camera and one laser head. By those, the real-time orientation of laser scanner is realized and the efficiency is improved. Secondly, the coding marker is introduced to solve the data matching, a random coding method is proposed. Compared with other coding methods,the marker with this method is simple to match and can avoid the shading for the object. Finally, a recognition method of coding maker is proposed, with the use of the distance recognition, it is more efficient. The method present here can be used widely in any measurement from small to huge obiect, such as vehicle, airplane which strengthen its intelligence and efficiency. The results of experiments and theory analzing demonstrate that proposed method could realize the dynamic measurement of handheld laser

  9. FDG-PET/CT in pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Franzius, C

    2010-08-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become an important imaging modality in the non-invasive evaluation and monitoring of children with known or suspected malignant diseases. In sarcoma patients, [18F]FDG (FDG) PET and FDG PET/CT is useful in staging, therapy monitoring, and detection of relapse. However, FDG PET has been proven to be less sensitive than chest CT in the detection of pulmonary metastases derived from sarcoma. This disadvantage has been overcome using a PET/CT scanner. In neuroblastoma patients, PET using FDG is indicated in MIBG-negative cases. Furthermore, there are specific PET tracers for tumors of the sympathetic nervous system, such as [11C]Hydroxyephedrine (HED) and [18F]-labeled dihydrophenylalanine (F-DOPA), which can be used for PET/CT imaging for detection of disease, staging and monitoring therapy. However, there are only few studies using specific PET tracers in neuroblastoma patients. In other pediatric malignancies including germ cell tumors and hepatoblastoma PET and PET/CT may be helpful in individual cases, but the literature in these entities is limited so far. Although publications on the additional value of the combined PET/CT compared to both stand-alone modalities are still limited in pediatrics, it can already be anticipated that the combination of morphological and functional information obtained by integrated PET/CT will improve the accuracy of staging and will change patient management in a significant number of pediatric patients.

  10. Quantification of the accuracy of MRI generated 3D models of long bones compared to CT generated 3D models.

    PubMed

    Rathnayaka, Kanchana; Momot, Konstantin I; Noser, Hansrudi; Volp, Andrew; Schuetz, Michael A; Sahama, Tony; Schmutz, Beat

    2012-04-01

    Orthopaedic fracture fixation implants are increasingly being designed using accurate 3D models of long bones based on computer tomography (CT). Unlike CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) does not involve ionising radiation and is therefore a desirable alternative to CT. This study aims to quantify the accuracy of MRI-based 3D models compared to CT-based 3D models of long bones. The femora of five intact cadaver ovine limbs were scanned using a 1.5 T MRI and a CT scanner. Image segmentation of CT and MRI data was performed using a multi-threshold segmentation method. Reference models were generated by digitising the bone surfaces free of soft tissue with a mechanical contact scanner. The MRI- and CT-derived models were validated against the reference models. The results demonstrated that the CT-based models contained an average error of 0.15 mm while the MRI-based models contained an average error of 0.23 mm. Statistical validation shows that there are no significant differences between 3D models based on CT and MRI data. These results indicate that the geometric accuracy of MRI based 3D models was comparable to that of CT-based models and therefore MRI is a potential alternative to CT for generation of 3D models with high geometric accuracy.

  11. Design study for Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanich, C. G.; Osterwisch, F. G.; Szeles, D. M.; Houtman, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of dividing the 8-12 micrometer thermal infrared wavelength region into six spectral bands by an airborne line scanner system was investigated. By combining an existing scanner design with a 6 band spectrometer, a system for the remote sensing of Earth resources was developed. The elements in the spectrometer include an off axis reflective collimator, a reflective diffraction grating, a triplet germanium imaging lens, a photoconductive mercury cadmium telluride sensor array, and the mechanical assembly to hold these parts and maintain their optical alignment across a broad temperature range. The existing scanner design was modified to accept the new spectrometer and two field filling thermal reference sources.

  12. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  13. LANDSAT-4 horizon scanner performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, S.; Chen, L. C.; Davis, W. M.; Stanley, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Representative data spans covering a little more than a year since the LANDSAT-4 launch were analyzed to evaluate the flight performance of the satellite's horizon scanner. High frequency noise was filtered out by 128-point averaging. The effects of Earth oblateness and spacecraft altitude variations are modeled, and residual systematic errors are analyzed. A model for the predicted radiance effects is compared with the flight data and deficiencies in the radiance effects modeling are noted. Correction coefficients are provided for a finite Fourier series representation of the systematic errors in the data. Analysis of the seasonal dependence of the coefficients indicates the effects of some early mission problems with the reference attitudes which were computed by the onboard computer using star trackers and gyro data. The effects of sun and moon interference, unexplained anomalies in the data, and sensor noise characteristics and their power spectrum are described. The variability of full orbit data averages is shown. Plots of the sensor data for all the available data spans are included.

  14. [Innovation and Future Technologies for PET Scanners].

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays important roles in cancer diagnosis, neuroimaging and molecular imaging research; but potential points remain for which big improvements could be made, including spatial resolution, sensitivity and manufacturing costs. Higher spatial resolution is essential to enable earlier diagnosis, and improved sensitivity results in reduced radiation exposure and shortened measurement time. Therefore, research on next generation PET technologies remains a hot topic worldwide. In this paper, innovation and future technologies for the next generation PET scanners, such as time-of-flight measurement and simultaneous PET/MRI measurement, are described. Among them, depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement in the radiation sensor will be a key technology to get any significant improvement in sensitivity while maintaining high spatial resolution. DOI measurement also has a potential to expand PET application fields because it allows for more flexible detector arrangement. As an example, the world's first, open-type PET geometry "OpenPET", which is expected to lead to PET imaging during treatment, is under development. The DOI detector itself continues to evolve with the help of recently developed semiconductor photodetectors, often referred to as silicon photomultipliers. PMID:26753392

  15. Meteorological waves (by Ocean Color Scanner Data)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evdoshenko, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Data of normalized water leaving radiance at a wavelength 859 nm Lwn(859) of 250-m spatial resolution obtained from Moderate Ocean Color Scanners (MODIS) installed on Aqua and Terra satellites were used to study meteorological waves. These waves are caused by atmospheric internal gravity waves at the expense of a change of atmospheric pressure impacting the sea surface and bringing a change in its level; they are observable everywhere in the ocean. Examples of meteorological waves were considered for the eastern part of the Black Sea, where they appeared as stripes of alternate brightness on Lwn(859) images. It is shown that meteorological waves at one and the same place can be totally generated by atmospheric waves spreading at different heights of the lower troposphere. The 3D characteristics of meteorological waves were evaluated including the direction of wave propagation, crest length reaching more than one hundred kilometers, wavelength of several tens centimeters, and wave amplitude of several tens of centimeters. For conditions of intermittent cloudiness, imposition in a difference mode of the level L1b radiance image with the signature of atmospheric waves in a cloud and of the level L2 water leaving the radiance image with the signature of meteorological waves enabled us to examine the phase structure of waves and to reveal the existence of resonance.

  16. Scatter corrections for cone beam optical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver; Schreiner, L. John

    2009-05-01

    Cone beam optical computed tomography (OptCT) employing the VISTA scanner (Modus Medical, London, ON) has been shown to have significant promise for fast, three dimensional imaging of polymer gel dosimeters. One distinct challenge with this approach arises from the combination of the cone beam geometry, a diffuse light source, and the scattering polymer gel media, which all contribute scatter signal that perturbs the accuracy of the scanner. Beam stop array (BSA), beam pass array (BPA) and anti-scatter polarizer correction methodologies have been employed to remove scatter signal from OptCT data. These approaches are investigated through the use of well-characterized phantom scattering solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters. BSA corrected scatter solutions show good agreement in attenuation coefficient with the optically absorbing dye solutions, with considerable reduction of scatter-induced cupping artifact at high scattering concentrations. The application of BSA scatter corrections to a polymer gel dosimeter lead to an overall improvement in the number of pixel satisfying the (3%, 3mm) gamma value criteria from 7.8% to 0.15%.

  17. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose.

  18. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  19. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  20. Determination of noise equivalent reflectance for a multispectral scanner: A scanner sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, D. E.; Richard, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    The methods used to calculate the sensitivity parameter noise equivalent reflectance of a remote-sensing scanner are explored, and the results are compared with values measured over calibrated test sites. Data were acquired on four occasions covering a span of 4 years and providing various atmospheric conditions. One of the calculated values was based on assumed atmospheric conditions, whereas two others were based on atmospheric models. Results indicate that the assumed atmospheric conditions provide useful answers adequate for many purposes. A nomograph was developed to indicate sensitivity variations due to geographic location, time of day, and season.

  1. Estimating Radiation Dose Metrics for Patients Undergoing Tube Current Modulation CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kyle Lorin

    Computed tomography (CT) has long been a powerful tool in the diagnosis of disease, identification of tumors and guidance of interventional procedures. With CT examinations comes the concern of radiation exposure and the associated risks. In order to properly understand those risks on a patient-specific level, organ dose must be quantified for each CT scan. Some of the most widely used organ dose estimates are derived from fixed tube current (FTC) scans of a standard sized idealized patient model. However, in current clinical practice, patient size varies from neonates weighing just a few kg to morbidly obese patients weighing over 200 kg, and nearly all CT exams are performed with tube current modulation (TCM), a scanning technique that adjusts scanner output according to changes in patient attenuation. Methods to account for TCM in CT organ dose estimates have been previously demonstrated, but these methods are limited in scope and/or restricted to idealized TCM profiles that are not based on physical observations and not scanner specific (e.g. don't account for tube limits, scanner-specific effects, etc.). The goal of this work was to develop methods to estimate organ doses to patients undergoing CT scans that take into account both the patient size as well as the effects of TCM. This work started with the development and validation of methods to estimate scanner-specific TCM schemes for any voxelized patient model. An approach was developed to generate estimated TCM schemes that match actual TCM schemes that would have been acquired on the scanner for any patient model. Using this approach, TCM schemes were then generated for a variety of body CT protocols for a set of reference voxelized phantoms for which TCM information does not currently exist. These are whole body patient models representing a variety of sizes, ages and genders that have all radiosensitive organs identified. TCM schemes for these models facilitated Monte Carlo-based estimates of fully

  2. CT perfusion: principles, applications, and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Yim

    2004-10-01

    The fast scanning speed of current slip-ring CT scanners has enabled the development of perfusion imaging techniques with intravenous injection of contrast medium. In a typical CT perfusion study, contrast medium is injected and rapid scanning at a frequency of 1-2 Hz is used to monitor the first circulation of the injected contrast medium through a 1-2 cm thick slab of tissue. From the acquired time-series of CT images, arteries can be identified within the tissue slab to derive the arterial contrast concentration curve, Ca(t) while each individual voxel produces a tissue residue curve, Q(t) for the corresponding tissue region. Deconvolution between the measured Ca(t) and Q(t) leads to the determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in brain studies. In this presentation, an important application of CT perfusion in acute stroke studies - the identification of the ischemic penumbra via the CBF/CBV mismatch and factors affecting the quantitative accuracy of deconvolution, including partial volume averaging, arterial delay and dispersion are discussed.

  3. A variable-resolution rotate-only computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Hangartner, T N

    1994-10-01

    The Rotoscan is a computed tomography scanner that combines the advantages of variable geometric resolution and adjustable size of measurement diameter of translate-rotate scanners with the improved speed of rotate-only scanners. Because of the small number of only 26 detectors used for this scanner, a special data collection scheme of multiple rotations with interleaved detector positions was employed. In order to avoid angular data interpolation after reordering of the projections from the fan- to a parallel-beam geometry, the detectors were incrementally moved at a right angle to the centerline of the fan rather than rotated about the source. The measurement time of 40 s for one cross-section is comparable to that of second-generation systems. However, for longer measurement diameters, the measurement time for second-generation systems increases, whereas that of the Rotoscan remains constant.

  4. Scanning properties of a resonant fiber-optic piezoelectric scanner.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Yang, Zhe; Fu, Ling

    2011-12-01

    We develop a resonant fiber-optic scanner using four piezoelectric elements arranged as a square tube, which is efficient to manufacture and drive. Using coupled-field model based on finite element method, scanning properties of the scanner, including vibration mode, resonant frequency, and scanning range, are numerically studied. We also physically measure the effects of geometry sizes and drive signals on the scanning properties, thus providing a foundation for general purpose designs. A scanner adopted in a prototype of imaging system, with a diameter of ~2 mm and driven by a voltage of 10 V (peak to peak), demonstrates the scanning performance by obtaining an image of resolution target bars. The proposed fiber-optic scanner can be applied to micro-endoscopy that requires two-dimensional scanning of fibers. PMID:22225224

  5. Agricultural Applications and Requirements for Thermal Infrared Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Some of the applications of thermal scanner data in agriculture are presented along with illustrations of some of the factors affecting the temperature of plants, soil, and water. Examples of thermal imagery are included.

  6. 21 CFR 892.1300 - Nuclear rectilinear scanner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A nuclear rectilinear scanner is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in the body by means of a detector (or detectors) whose position moves in two directions with respect...

  7. Superwide-angle coverage code-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Arain, Muzammil A

    2004-05-01

    A superwide-angle coverage code-multiplexed optical scanner is presented that has the potential to provide 4 pi-sr coverage. As a proof-of-concept experiment, an angular scan range of 288 degrees for six randomly distributed beams is demonstrated. The proposed scanner achieves its superwide coverage by exploiting a combination of phase-encoded transmission and reflection holography within an in-line hologram recording-retrieval geometry. The basic scanner unit consists of one phase-only digital mode spatial light modulator for code entry (i.e., beam scan control) and a holographic material from which we obtained what we believe is the first-of-a-kind extremely wide coverage, low component count, high speed (e.g., microsecond domain), and large aperture (e.g., > 1-cm diameter) scanner.

  8. Geometric theory of horizon scanners. [onboard spacecraft for attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    The note presents a general geometrical theory of spacecraft horizon scanners for the purpose of actual attitude determination, as opposed to just attitude stabilization. Analysis is carried out in terms of the scanning angles and three sets of auxiliary axes: the scanner axes, the nonscanning axes, and the orbital axes. Euler angles (yaw, pitch, and roll) transform the orbital axes to the nonscanning axes, and spacecraft attitude is determined directly from the attitude of the nonscanning axes relative to the orbital axes. In most applications the scanning speed is fast, so that it can be assumed that the attitude of the spacecraft does not change during a scan; however, a perturbation analysis is provided for errors committed by neglecting attitude changes. The analysis is valid for all types of scanners; in addition, the case where two scanners with different half-cone angles are used is considered.

  9. Superwide-angle coverage code-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Arain, Muzammil A

    2004-05-01

    A superwide-angle coverage code-multiplexed optical scanner is presented that has the potential to provide 4 pi-sr coverage. As a proof-of-concept experiment, an angular scan range of 288 degrees for six randomly distributed beams is demonstrated. The proposed scanner achieves its superwide coverage by exploiting a combination of phase-encoded transmission and reflection holography within an in-line hologram recording-retrieval geometry. The basic scanner unit consists of one phase-only digital mode spatial light modulator for code entry (i.e., beam scan control) and a holographic material from which we obtained what we believe is the first-of-a-kind extremely wide coverage, low component count, high speed (e.g., microsecond domain), and large aperture (e.g., > 1-cm diameter) scanner. PMID:15143655

  10. High-performance horizontal side scanner using holographic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Charles C. K.

    1998-06-01

    A new holographic technique has been used to make a compact, accurate and reliable POS scanner. The holo-window technology permits compact POS scanner optical scanning in horizontal plan while maintaining excellent performance in changing the scan direction, equalizing the scan velocity and collecting the signal light. The holo-window design and fabrication in the holographic optical element (HOE) for such a compact POS scanner are described in this paper. Additionally this new horizontal side scanning possesses large depth of field (greater than 10 inches), allows the grocery items to be scanned horizontally thus eliminating the commonly experienced carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) hand injuries of the checkers. This newly designed POS scanner has been recognized by industry as the standard for the future POS scanning configuration.

  11. Whole-body 3D scanner and scan data report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addleman, Stephen R.

    1997-03-01

    With the first whole-body 3D scanner now available the next adventure confronting the user is what to do with all of the data. While the system was built for anthropologists, it has created interest among users from a wide variety of fields. Users with applications in the fields of anthropology, costume design, garment design, entertainment, VR and gaming have a need for the data in formats unique to their fields. Data from the scanner is being converted to solid models for art and design and NURBS for computer graphics applications. Motion capture has made scan data move and dance. The scanner has created a need for advanced application software just as other scanners have in the past.

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  13. LANDSAT-4 multispectral scanner (MSS) subsystem radiometric characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, W. (Editor); Barker, J. (Editor); Clark, B. P.; Dasgupta, R.

    1983-01-01

    The multispectral band scanner (mass) and its spectral characteristics are described and methods are given for relating video digital levels on computer compatible tapes to radiance into the sensor. Topics covered include prelaunch calibration procedures and postlaunch radiometric processng. Examples of current data resident on the MSS image processing system are included. The MSS on LANDSAT 4 is compared with the scanners on earlier LANDSAT satellites.

  14. 47. View of "dry air inlets" to waveguides entering scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. View of "dry air inlets" to waveguides entering scanner building 105. Dried air is generated under pressure by Ingersoll-Rand dehumidified/dessicator and compressor system. View is at entrance from passageway that links into corner of scanner building. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. Calibration free beam hardening correction for cardiac CT perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Jacob; Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) and coronary CTA have the potential to make CT an ideal noninvasive gate-keeper for invasive coronary angiography. However, beam hardening artifacts (BHA) prevent accurate blood flow calculation in MPI-CT. BH Correction (BHC) methods require either energy-sensitive CT, not widely available, or typically a calibration-based method. We developed a calibration-free, automatic BHC (ABHC) method suitable for MPI-CT. The algorithm works with any BHC method and iteratively determines model parameters using proposed BHA-specific cost function. In this work, we use the polynomial BHC extended to three materials. The image is segmented into soft tissue, bone, and iodine images, based on mean HU and temporal enhancement. Forward projections of bone and iodine images are obtained, and in each iteration polynomial correction is applied. Corrections are then back projected and combined to obtain the current iteration's BHC image. This process is iterated until cost is minimized. We evaluate the algorithm on simulated and physical phantom images and on preclinical MPI-CT data. The scans were obtained on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare). Mono-energetic reconstructed images were used as the reference. In the simulated phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 12+/-2HU to 1+/-1HU and cupping was reduced by 81%. Similarly, in physical phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 48+/-6HU to 1+/-5HU and cupping was reduced by 86%. In preclinical MPI-CT images, BHA was reduced from 28+/-6 HU to less than 4+/-4HU at peak enhancement. Results suggest that the algorithm can be used to reduce BHA in conventional CT and improve MPI-CT accuracy.

  16. MFP scanner motion characterization using self-printed target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwoong; Bauer, Peter; Wagner, Jerry K.; Allebach, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional printers (MFP) are products that combine the functions of a printer, scanner, and copier. Our goal is to help customers to be able to easily diagnose scanner or print quality issues with their products by developing an automated diagnostic system embedded in the product. We specifically focus on the characterization of scanner motions, which may be defective due to irregular movements of the scan-head. The novel design of our test page and two-stage diagnostic algorithm are described in this paper. The most challenging issue is to evaluate the scanner performance properly when both printer and scanner units contribute to the motion errors. In the first stage called the uncorrected-print-error-stage, aperiodic and periodic motion behaviors are characterized in both the spatial and frequency domains. Since it is not clear how much of the error is contributed by each unit, the scanned input is statistically analyzed in the second stage called the corrected-print-error-stage. Finally, the described diagnostic algorithms output the estimated scan error and print error separately as RMS values of the displacement of the scan and print lines, respectively, from their nominal positions in the scanner or printer motion direction. We validate our test page design and approaches by ground truth obtained from a high-precision, chrome-on-glass reticle manufactured using semiconductor chip fabrication technologies.

  17. Laboratory and field portable system for calibrating airborne multispectral scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlow, W.W.

    1981-01-01

    Manufacturers of airborne multispectral scanners suggest procedures for calibration and alignment that are usually awkward and even questionable. For example, the procedures may require: separating the scanner from calibration and alignment sources by 100 feet or more, employing folding mirrors, tampering with the detectors after the procedures are finished, etc. Under the best of conditions such procedures require about three hours yielding questionable confidence in the results; under many conditions, however, procedures commonly take six to eight hours, yielding no satisfactory results. EG and G, Inc. has designed and built a calibration and alignment system for airborne scanners which solves those problems, permitting the procedures to be carried out in about two to three hours. This equipment can be quickly disassembled, transported with the scanner in all but the smallest single engine aircraft, and reassembled in a few hours. The subsystems of this equipment are commonly available from manufacturers of optical and electronic equipment. The other components are easily purchased, or fabricated. The scanner discussed is the Model DS-1260 digital line scanner manufactured by Daedalus Enterprises, Inc. It is a dual-sensor system which is operated in one of two combination of sensors: one spectrometer head (which provides simultaneous coverage in ten visible channels) and one thermal infrared detector, or simply two thermal infrared detectors.

  18. CT angiography - arms and legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. Modern "spiral" scanners can perform ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging. 6th ed. ...

  19. A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Miller, DeWitt F.; Boone, John M.

    2006-06-15

    Cone beam CT systems are being deployed in large numbers for small animal imaging, dental imaging, and other specialty applications. A new high-precision method for cone beam CT system calibration is presented in this paper. It uses multiple projection images acquired from rotating point-like objects (metal ball bearings) and the angle information generated from the rotating gantry system is also used. It is assumed that the whole system has a mechanically stable rotation center and that the detector does not have severe out-of-plane rotation (<2 deg.). Simple geometrical relationships between the orbital paths of individual BBs and five system parameters were derived. Computer simulations were employed to validate the accuracy of this method in the presence of noise. Equal or higher accuracy was achieved compared with previous methods. This method was implemented for the geometrical calibration of both a micro CT scanner and a breast CT scanner. The reconstructed tomographic images demonstrated that the proposed method is robust and easy to implement with high precision.

  20. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  1. TU-F-18A-01: Preliminary Results of a Prototype Quality Control Process for Spectral CT

    SciTech Connect

    Nute, J; Jacobsen, M; Pennington, J; Cody, D; Chandler, A; Imai, Y; Baiu, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A prototype quality control (QC) phantom and analysis process has been designed specifically to monitor dual-energy CT and address the current lack of quantitative oversight of the spectral capabilities of these scanners. Methods: A prototype solid water phantom was designed with multiple material inserts, and to support both head and body protocols. Inserts included tissue equivalent and material rods (iodine, iron, calcium) at various concentrations. The oval body phantom, measuring 30cm×40cm×15cm, was scanned using four dual-energy protocols with CTDIvol ranges of 19.6–62mGy (0.516 pitch) and 10.3–32.5mGy (0.984 pitch), and rotation times ranging from 0.5-1sec. The circular head phantom, measuring 22cm in diameter by 15cm, was scanned using three dual-energy protocols with CTDIvol ranges of 67–132.6mGy (0.531 pitch) and 36.7–72.7mGy (0.969 pitch), and rotation times ranging from 0.5–0.9sec. All images were reconstructed at 50, 70, 110 and 140 keV, and using a water-iodine material basis pair. The images were evaluated for iodine quantification accuracy and stability of monoenergetic reconstructions. The phantom was scanned twice on ten GE 750HD CT scanners to evaluate inter-scanner agreement, as well as ten times on a single scanner over a oneweek period to evaluate intra-scanner repeatability. Results: Preliminary analysis revealed consistent (inter- and intra-scanner) iodine quantification accuracy within 10% was only achieved for protocols in the upper half of dose levels assessed when grouped by pitch. Although all scanners undergo rigorous daily single-energy QC, iodine quantification accuracy from one scanner unexpectedly deviated from the other nine substantially. In general, inter-scanner agreement and intra-scanner repeatability varied with dose, rotation time and reconstructed keV. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate the need for a dual-energy QC process to ensure inter-scanner agreement and intra-scanner repeatability. In

  2. Intramyocardial capillary blood volume estimated by whole-body CT: validation by micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yue; Beighley, Patricia E.; Eaker, Diane R.; Zamir, Mair; Ritman, Erik L.

    2008-03-01

    Fast CT has shown that myocardial perfusion (F) is related to myocardial intramuscular blood volume (Bv) as Bv=A*F+B*F 1/2 where A,B are constant coefficients. The goal of this study was to estimate the range of diameters of the vessels that are represented by the A*F term. Pigs were placed in an Electron Beam CT (EBCT) scanner for a perfusion CT scan sequence over 40 seconds after an IV contrast agent injection. Intramyocardial blood volume (Bv) and flow (F) were calculated in a region of the myocardium perfused by the LAD. Coefficients A and B were estimated over the range of F=1-5ml/g/min. After the CT scan, the LAD was injected with Microfil (R) contrast agent following which the myocardium was scanned by micro-CT at 20μm, 4μm and 2.5 μm cubic voxel resolutions. The Bv of the intramyocardial vessels was calculated for diameter ranges d=0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20μm, etc. EBCT-derived data were presented so that it could be directly compared the micro-CT data. The results indicated that the blood in vessels less than 10μm in lumen diameter occupied 0.27-0.42 of total intravascular blood volume, which is in good agreement with EBCT-based values 0.28-0.48 (R2 =0.96). We conclude that whole-body CT image data obtained during the passage of a bolus of IV contrast agent can provide a measure of the intramyocardial intracapillary blood volume.

  3. XPAD3: A new photon counting chip for X-ray CT-scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangaud, Patrick; Basolo, Stephanie; Boudet, Nathalie; Berar, Jean-François; Chantepie, Benoît; Delpierre, Pierre; Dinkespiler, Bernard; Hustache, Stephanie; Menouni, Mohsine; Morel, Christian

    2007-02-01

    The X-ray pixel chip with adaptable dynamics (XPAD3) circuit is the next generation of 2D X-ray photon counting imaging chip to be connected to a pixel sensor using the bump and flip-chip technologies. This circuit, designed in IBM 0.25 μm technology, contains 9600 pixels (130 μm×130 μm) distributed into 80 columns of 120 elements each. Its features have been improved to provide high-counting rate over 10 9 ph/pixel/mm 2, high-dynamic range over 60 keV, very low-noise detection level of 100e - rms, energy window selection and fast image readout less than 2 ms/frame. An innovative architecture has been designed in order to prevent the digital circuits from bothering the very sensitive analogue parts placed in their neighbourhood. This allows to read the chip during acquisition while conserving the precise setting of the thresholds over the pixel array. Finally, the aim of this development is to combine several XPAD3 to form the PIXSCAN detector.

  4. An evaluation of organ dose modulation on a GE optima CT660-computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Matthew T; Loader, Robert J; Stevens, Gregory C; Rowles, Nick P

    2016-01-01

    Organ Dose Modulation or ODM (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) was evaluated to characterize changes in CTDIvol, image noise, effective dose, and organ dose saving to patients. Three separate investigations were completed: a tube current modulation phantom was scanned with and without ODM, a CTDIvol phantom was scanned with ODM, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed. ODM was found to reduce the CTDIvol by approximately 20% whilst increasing the noise by approximately 14%. This was reflected in the dose distribution, where the anterior peripheral dose was reduced by approximately 40% whilst the identical poste-rior dose remained largely unaffected. Enabling ODM for the entire scan would reduce the effective dose by approximately 24%; however, this saving reduces to 5% if the images are matched for CTDIvol. These savings mostly originated from reductions in dose to the stomach, breasts, colon, bladder, and liver. ODM has the effect of a global reduction in CTDIvol with an associated increase in image noise. The benefit of ODM was found to be reduced when the dose-saving contribution from the reduced CTDIvol was removed. Given that there is a higher contribution to effective dose throughout the body from the anterior projections, consideration should be given to applying ODM throughout. PMID:27167255

  5. Performance evaluation of the CT component of the IRIS PET/CT preclinical tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Daniele; Belcari, Nicola; Tripodi, Maria; Burchielli, Silvia; Salvadori, Piero A.; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the physical performance of the CT component of the IRIS scanner, a novel combined PET/CT scanner for preclinical imaging. The performance assessment is based on phantom measurement for the determination of image quality parameters (spatial resolution, linearity, geometric accuracy, contrast to noise ratio) and reproducibility in dynamic (4D) imaging. The CTDI100 has been measured free in air with a pencil ionization chamber, and the animal dose was calculated using Monte Carlo derived conversion factors taken from the literature. The spatial resolution at the highest quality protocol was 6.9 lp/mm at 10% of the MTF, using the smallest reconstruction voxel size of 58.8 μm. The accuracy of the reconstruction voxel size was within 0.1%. The linearity of the CT numbers as a function of the concentration of iodine was very good, with R2>0.996 for all the tube voltages. The animal dose depended strongly on the scanning protocol, ranging from 158 mGy for the highest quality protocol (2 min, 80 kV) to about 12 mGy for the fastest protocol (7.3 s, 80 kV). In 4D dynamic modality, the maximum scanning rate reached was 3.1 frames per minute, using a short-scan protocol with 7.3 s of scan time per frame at the isotropic voxel size of 235 μm. The reproducibility of the system was high throughout the 10 frames acquired in dynamic modality, with a standard deviation of the CT values of all frames <8 HU and an average spatial reproducibility within 30% of the voxel size across all the field of view. Example images obtained during animal experiments are also shown.

  6. Color accuracy and reproducibility in whole slide imaging scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Prarthana; Hulsken, Bas

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a work-flow for color reproduction in whole slide imaging (WSI) scanners such that the colors in the scanned images match to the actual slide color and the inter scanner variation is minimum. We describe a novel method of preparation and verification of the color phantom slide, consisting of a standard IT8- target transmissive film, which is used in color calibrating and profiling the WSI scanner. We explore several ICC compliant techniques in color calibration/profiling and rendering intents for translating the scanner specific colors to the standard display (sRGB) color-space. Based on the quality of color reproduction in histopathology tissue slides, we propose the matrix-based calibration/profiling and absolute colorimetric rendering approach. The main advantage of the proposed work-ow is that it is compliant to the ICC standard, applicable to color management systems in different platforms, and involves no external color measurement devices. We measure objective color performance using CIE-DeltaE2000 metric, where DeltaE values below 1 is considered imperceptible. Our evaluation 14 phantom slides, manufactured according to the proposed method, show an average inter-slide color difference below 1 DeltaE. The proposed work-flow is implemented and evaluated in 35 Philips Ultra Fast Scanners (UFS). The results show that the average color difference between a scanner and the reference is 3.5 DeltaE, and among the scanners is 3.1 DeltaE. The improvement on color performance upon using the proposed method is apparent on the visual color quality of the tissues scans.

  7. Feasibility of C-Arm-Supported CT Fluoroscopy in Percutaneous Abscess Drainage Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, Jens J.; El-Sheik, Michael; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Achenbach, Steffen; Scherf, Claudia; Klose, Klaus J.

    2000-11-15

    Purpose: Evaluation of C-arm-supported CT fluoroscopy to facilitate percutaneous abscess drainage procedures.Methods: Prospectively, 40 percutaneous drainage procedures were performed either with C-arm-supported CT fluoroscopy or with CT fluoroscopy alone. Hybrid imaging was performed on the CT couch after complementing a CT fluoroscopy scanner with a C-arm fluoroscopy unit. Procedure times, drainage revisions during follow-up, and post interventional drainage periods were analyzed.Results: When compared with exclusive CT fluoroscopic guidance, a median procedure time of 9 {+-} 3.7 min versus 14.8 {+-} 7.3 min was required for C-arm-supported CT fluoroscopy (p < 0.005, t-test). During follow-up, eight drainage catheters had to be revised within the exclusive CT fluoroscopy group, while only two revisions were necessary within the C-arm-supported CT fluoroscopy group. With C-arm-supported CT fluoroscopy, post interventional drainage periods were reduced (median 13 vs 19 days; p < 0.001, t-test).Conclusion: Compared with exclusive cross-sectional image guidance, C-arm-supported CT fluoroscopy seems to improve placement of abscess drainage catheters to possibly reduce procedure times, drainage catheter revisions, and post interventional drainage periods.

  8. A CT scan protocol for the detection of radiographic loosening of the glenoid component after total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose It is difficult to evaluate glenoid component periprosthetic radiolucencies in total shoulder arthroplasties (TSAs) using plain radiographs. This study was performed to evaluate whether computed tomography (CT) using a specific patient position in the CT scanner provides a better method for assessing radiolucencies in TSA. Methods Following TSA, 11 patients were CT scanned in a lateral decubitus position with maximum forward flexion, which aligns the glenoid orientation with the axis of the CT scanner. Follow-up CT scanning is part of our routine patient care. Glenoid component periprosthetic lucency was assessed according to the Molé score and it was compared to routine plain radiographs by 5 observers. Results The protocol almost completely eliminated metal artifacts in the CT images and allowed accurate assessment of periprosthetic lucency of the glenoid fixation. Positioning of the patient within the CT scanner as described was possible for all 11 patients. A radiolucent line was identified in 54 of the 55 observed CT scans and osteolysis was identified in 25 observations. The average radiolucent line Molé score was 3.4 (SD 2.7) points with plain radiographs and 9.5 (SD 0.8) points with CT scans (p = 0.001). The mean intra-observer variance was lower in the CT scan group than in the plain radiograph group (p = 0.001). Interpretation The CT scan protocol we used is of clinical value in routine assessment of glenoid periprosthetic lucency after TSA. The technique improves the ability to detect and monitor radiolucent lines and, therefore, possibly implant loosening also. PMID:24286563

  9. Artifacts and pitfalls of high-resolution CT scans.

    PubMed

    Hahn, F J; Chu, W K; Anderson, J C; Dobry, C A

    1985-01-01

    Artifacts on CT images have been observed since the introduction of CT scanners. Some artifacts have been corrected with the improvement of technology and better understanding of the image formation and reconstruction algorithms. Some artifacts, however, are still observable in state-of-the-art high-resolution scans. Many investigations on CT artifacts have been reported. Some artifacts are obvious and some are similar to patterns commonly associated with pathological conditions. The present report summarizes some of the causes of artifacts and presents some artifacts that mimic pathology on clinical scans of the head and spine. It is the intention of this report to bring these artifacts and potential pitfalls to the attention of the radiologists so that misinterpretation can be avoided.

  10. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on

  11. Polymer gel dosimetry on a multislice computed tomography scanner: effect of changing parameters on CTDI.

    PubMed

    Hill, B; Venning, A J; Baldock, C

    2008-09-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry undertaken on a multislice CT scanner provides an alternative method to conventional dosimetry measurements. Polymer gel dosimeters were used to measure CT radiation doses and compared to TLD and ionization chamber measurements in different diameter phantoms. CTDI was investigated for each of these phantoms for a range of mAs (100-400 mAs), tube voltage (100-135 kV) and nominal slice width (2-32 mm). Linear fits of the CTDI values for mAs show for the smallest phantom diameter an increase in CTDI of 60% for both TLD and polymer gel dosimeters. A similar increase in CTDI of 50% at 100 kVp and 100% for 135 kVp was also noted. It was also shown that slice width variation measured with either polymer gel or TLD was greatest with the smallest slice widths. In summary, it was found that polymer gels can be used as an alternative dosimeter to TLD for the determination of SWDP and subsequent CTDI calculations.

  12. Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Stephen L

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale. PMID:26467835

  13. Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale. PMID:26467835

  14. Aviation focused eddy current and ultrasonic scanner assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gieske, J.H.

    1995-07-01

    Ultrasonic and eddy current C-scan images have been produced for non-destructive inspection (NDI) with laboratory scanners for over 25 years. In the last five years, portable mechanical scanner designs have been improved and modified so that they are suitable for application on aircraft structures. Eddy current and ultrasonic C-scan inspections are significant because they can be used for early detection of hidden damage. As an aid to the airline inspection industry, an evaluation of commercially available portable scanner systems and methodologies used for C-scan imaging of eddy current and ultrasonic inspection data was performed. Eight basic scanner designs were identified and scanner systems from eleven different companies were evaluated. Vendors of the equipment provided hands-on demonstrations on actual aircraft samples in the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) Aging Aircraft Nondestructive Inspection Validation Center (AANC). From observations and information recorded during the demonstrations, capabilities and limitations of the design, portability, articulation, performance, usability, and computer hardware/software were tabulated.

  15. Improving low-dose cardiac CT images using 3D sparse representation based processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Luyao; Chen, Yang; Luo, Limin

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has been widely used in diagnoses of coronary artery diseases due to the continuously improving temporal and spatial resolution. When helical CT with a lower pitch scanning mode is used, the effective radiation dose can be significant when compared to other radiological exams. Many methods have been developed to reduce radiation dose in coronary CT exams including high pitch scans using dual source CT scanners and step-and-shot scanning mode for both single source and dual source CT scanners. Additionally, software methods have also been proposed to reduce noise in the reconstructed CT images and thus offering the opportunity to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the desired diagnostic performance of a certain imaging task. In this paper, we propose that low-dose scans should be considered in order to avoid the harm from accumulating unnecessary X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. Accordingly, in this paper, a 3D dictionary representation based image processing method is proposed to reduce CT image noise. Information on both spatial and temporal structure continuity is utilized in sparse representation to improve the performance of the image processing method. Clinical cases were used to validate the proposed method.

  16. CT radiation profile width measurement using CR imaging plate raw data.

    PubMed

    Bjarnason, Thorarin Albert; Yang, Chang-Ying Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This technical note demonstrates computed tomography (CT) radiation profile measurement using computed radiography (CR) imaging plate raw data showing it is possible to perform the CT collimation width measurement using a single scan without saturating the imaging plate. Previously described methods require careful adjustments to the CR reader settings in order to avoid signal clipping in the CR processed image. CT radiation profile measurements were taken as part of routine quality control on 14 CT scanners from four vendors. CR cassettes were placed on the CT scanner bed, raised to isocenter, and leveled. Axial scans were taken at all available collimations, advancing the cassette for each scan. The CR plates were processed and raw CR data were analyzed using MATLAB scripts to measure collimation widths. The raw data approach was compared with previously established methodology. The quality control analysis scripts are released as open source using creative commons licensing. A log-linear relationship was found between raw pixel value and air kerma, and raw data collimation width measurements were in agreement with CR-processed, bit-reduced data, using previously described methodology. The raw data approach, with intrinsically wider dynamic range, allows improved measurement flexibility and precision. As a result, we demonstrate a methodology for CT collimation width measurements using a single CT scan and without the need for CR scanning parameter adjustments which is more convenient for routine quality control work. PMID:26699559

  17. A microPET/CT system for invivo small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, K.; Wu, Y.; Boone, J. M.; Cherry, S. R.

    2007-07-01

    A microCT scanner was designed, fabricated and integrated with a previously reported microPET II scanner (Tai et al 2003 Phys. Med. Biol. 48 1519, Yang et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 2527), forming a dual modality system for in vivo anatomic and molecular imaging of the mouse. The system was designed to achieve high-spatial-resolution and high-sensitivity PET images with adequate CT image quality for anatomic localization and attenuation correction with low x-ray dose. The system also has relatively high throughput for screening, and a flexible gantry and user interface. X-rays were produced by a 50 kVp, 1.5 mA fixed tungsten anode tube, with a focal spot size of 70 µm. The detector was a 5 × 5 cm2 photodiode detector incorporating 48 µm pixels on a CMOS array and a fast gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS) intensifying screen. The microCT system has a flexible C-arm gantry design with adjustable detector positioning, which acquires CT projection images around the common microPET/CT bed. The design and the initial characterization of the microCT system is described, and images of the first mouse scans with microPET/CT scanning protocols are shown.

  18. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhalisa, H.; Mohamad, A. S.; Rafidah, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  19. Improved Scanners for Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye

    2009-01-01

    Improved scanners to be incorporated into hyperspectral microscope-based imaging systems have been invented. Heretofore, in microscopic imaging, including spectral imaging, it has been customary to either move the specimen relative to the optical assembly that includes the microscope or else move the entire assembly relative to the specimen. It becomes extremely difficult to control such scanning when submicron translation increments are required, because the high magnification of the microscope enlarges all movements in the specimen image on the focal plane. To overcome this difficulty, in a system based on this invention, no attempt would be made to move either the specimen or the optical assembly. Instead, an objective lens would be moved within the assembly so as to cause translation of the image at the focal plane: the effect would be equivalent to scanning in the focal plane. The upper part of the figure depicts a generic proposed microscope-based hyperspectral imaging system incorporating the invention. The optical assembly of this system would include an objective lens (normally, a microscope objective lens) and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera. The objective lens would be mounted on a servomotor-driven translation stage, which would be capable of moving the lens in precisely controlled increments, relative to the camera, parallel to the focal-plane scan axis. The output of the CCD camera would be digitized and fed to a frame grabber in a computer. The computer would store the frame-grabber output for subsequent viewing and/or processing of images. The computer would contain a position-control interface board, through which it would control the servomotor. There are several versions of the invention. An essential feature common to all versions is that the stationary optical subassembly containing the camera would also contain a spatial window, at the focal plane of the objective lens, that would pass only a selected portion of the image. In one version

  20. Astrometric properties of the Tautenburg Plate Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunzendorf, Jens; Meusinger, Helmut

    The Tautenburg Plate Scanner (TPS) is an advanced plate-measuring machine run by the Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg (Karl Schwarzschild Observatory), where the machine is housed. It is capable of digitising photographic plates up to 30 cm × 30 cm in size. In our poster, we reported on tests and preliminary results of its astrometric properties. The essential components of the TPS consist of an x-y table movable between an illumination system and a direct imaging system. A telecentric lens images the light transmitted through the photographic emulsion onto a CCD line of 6000 pixels of 10 µm square size each. All components are mounted on a massive air-bearing table. Scanning is performed in lanes of up to 55 mm width by moving the x-y table in a continuous drift-scan mode perpendicular to the CCD line. The analogue output from the CCD is digitised to 12 bit with a total signal/noise ratio of 1000 : 1, corresponding to a photographic density range of three. The pixel map is produced as a series of optionally overlapping lane scans. The pixel data are stored onto CD-ROM or DAT. A Tautenburg Schmidt plate 24 cm × 24 cm in size is digitised within 2.5 hours resulting in 1.3 GB of data. Subsequent high-level data processing is performed off-line on other computers. During the scanning process, the geometry of the optical components is kept fixed. The optimal focussing of the optics is performed prior to the scan. Due to the telecentric lens refocussing is not required. Therefore, the main source of astrometric errors (beside the emulsion itself) are mechanical imperfections in the drive system, which have to be divided into random and systematic ones. The r.m.s. repeatability over the whole plate as measured by repeated scans of the same plate is about 0.5 µm for each axis. The mean plate-to-plate accuracy of the object positions on two plates with the same epoch and the same plate centre has been determined to be about 1 µm. This accuracy is comparable to

  1. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy.

  2. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy. PMID:27243822

  3. Brain Imaging Using Mobile CT: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    John, Seby; Stock, Sarah; Cerejo, Russell; Uchino, Ken; Winners, Stacey; Russman, Andrew; Masaryk, Thomas; Rasmussen, Peter; Hussain, Muhammad S

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an invaluable tool in the diagnosis of many clinical conditions. Several advancements in biomedical engineering have achieved increase in speed, improvements in low-contrast detectability and image quality, and lower radiation. Portable or mobile CT constituted one such important advancement. It is especially useful in evaluating critically ill, intensive care unit patients by scanning them at bedside. A paradigm shift in utilization of mobile CT was its installation in ambulances for the management of acute stroke. Given the time sensitive nature of acute ischemic stroke, Mobile stroke units (MSU) were developed in Germany consisting of an ambulance equipped with a CT scanner, point of care laboratory system, along with teleradiological support. In a radical reconfiguration of stroke care, the MSU would bring the CT scanner to the stroke patient, without waiting for the patient at the emergency room. Two separate MSU projects in Saarland and Berlin demonstrated the safety and feasibility of this concept for prehospital stroke care, showing increased rate of intravenous thrombolysis and significant reduction in time to treatment compared to conventional care. MSU also improved the triage of patients to appropriate and specialized hospitals. Although multiple issues remain yet unanswered with the MSU concept including clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness, the MSU venture is visionary and enables delivery of life-saving and enhancing treatment for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In this review, we discuss the development of mobile CT and its applications, with specific focus on its use in MSUs along with our institution's MSU experience. PMID:26593629

  4. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Munley, Michael T.; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-15

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed 'CTDI-aperture' is introduced.

  5. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Robert L; Munley, Michael T; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-01

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed "CTDI-aperture" is introduced.

  6. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  7. Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera and diagnostic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solný, Pavel; Zimák, Jaroslav

    2014-11-01

    Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera in seven different Departments of Nuclear Medicine (DNM) was conducted. Processed data and effective dose (E) estimations led to the idea of phantom verification and comparison of absorbed doses and software estimation. Anonymous data from about 100 examinations from each DNM was gathered. Acquired data was processed and utilized by dose estimation programs (ExPACT, ImPACT, ImpactDose) with respect to the type of examination and examination procedures. Individual effective doses were calculated using enlisted programs. Preserving the same procedure in dose estimation process allows us to compare the resulting E. Some differences and disproportions during dose estimation led to the idea of estimated E verification. Consequently, two different sets of about 100 of TLD 100H detectors were calibrated for measurement inside the Aldersnon RANDO Anthropomorphic Phantom. Standard examination protocols were examined using a 2 Slice CT- part of hybrid SPECT/CT. Moreover, phantom exposure from body examining protocol for 32 Slice and 64 Slice diagnostic CT scanner was also verified. Absorbed dose (DT,R) measured using TLD detectors was compared with software estimation of equivalent dose HT values, computed by E estimation software. Though, only limited number of cavities for detectors enabled measurement within the regions of lung, liver, thyroid and spleen-pancreas region, some basic comparison is possible.

  8. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same

  9. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same

  10. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-04-15

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhancement in the CTP series, where the use of plain averaging

  11. High Bandwidth Electro-optic Scanner for Optical Data Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Jinhui; Huang, Yuhong; Schroeck, Steve; Messner, W.; Stancil, Daniel D.; Schlesinger, T. E.

    2000-02-01

    Beam deflectors can be used as fine tracking actuators to improve track access time and data rate in future high performance optical disk drives. In this paper we report on the use of an electro-optic (EO) scanner for optical data storage. Track following has been accomplished using this EO actuator with a servo bandwidth of 200 kHz, and single-stage high-speed track switching/following has been demonstrated in a new optical head tracking system with reduced offset. A fine tracking experiment has also been demonstrated using an EO actuator with a voice coil motor (VCM) actuator to extend the fine tracking range. A new compensator design method, the PQ method, has been used for this scanner/VCM compound actuator system. Significant improvements in track switching/following speed are demonstrated with the scanner/VCM compound actuator as compared to tracking with the VCM actuator alone.

  12. Calibration procedure for a laser triangulation scanner with uncertainty evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genta, Gianfranco; Minetola, Paolo; Barbato, Giulio

    2016-11-01

    Most of low cost 3D scanning devices that are nowadays available on the market are sold without a user calibration procedure to correct measurement errors related to changes in environmental conditions. In addition, there is no specific international standard defining a procedure to check the performance of a 3D scanner along time. This paper aims at detailing a thorough methodology to calibrate a 3D scanner and assess its measurement uncertainty. The proposed procedure is based on the use of a reference ball plate and applied to a triangulation laser scanner. Experimental results show that the metrological performance of the instrument can be greatly improved by the application of the calibration procedure that corrects systematic errors and reduces the device's measurement uncertainty.

  13. Determining density of maize canopy. 2: Airborne multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Cipra, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Multispectral scanner data were collected in two flights over a light colored soil background cover plot at an altitude of 305 m. Energy in eleven reflective wavelength band from 0.45 to 2.6 microns was recorded. Four growth stages of maize (Zea mays L.) gave a wide range of canopy densities for each flight date. Leaf area index measurements were taken from the twelve subplots and were used as a measure of canopy density. Ratio techniques were used to relate uncalibrated scanner response to leaf area index. The ratios of scanner data values for the 0.72 to 0.92 micron wavelength band over the 0.61 to 0.70 micron wavelength band were calculated for each plot. The ratios related very well to leaf area index for a given flight date. The results indicated that spectral data from maize canopies could be of value in determining canopy density.

  14. Spectral reflectance estimation using a six-color scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kohno, Satoshi; Kakinuma, Hirokazu; Nohara, Fuminori; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2009-01-01

    A method is proposed for estimating the spectral reflectance function of an object surface by using a six-color scanner. The scanner is regarded as a six-band spectral imaging system, since it captures six color channels in total from two separate scans using two difference lamps. First, we describe the basic characteristics of the imaging systems for a HP color scanner and a multiband camera used for comparison. Second, we describe a computational method for recovering surface-spectral reflectances from the noisy sensor outputs. A LMMSE estimator is presented as an optimal estimator. We discuss the reflectance estimation for non-flat surfaces with shading effect. A solution method is presented for the reliable reflectance estimation. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is examined in detail on experiments using the Macbeth Color Checker and non-flat objects.

  15. Design and performance of HEAD PENN-PET scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Freifelder, R.; Karp, J.S. . Dept. of Radiology); Geagan, M.; Muehllehner, G. )

    1994-08-01

    A new PET scanner for brain imaging (and animals) has been designed with very high sensitivity and spatial resolution. The design is an evolution of the PENN-PET scanner, which uses large position-sensitive NaI(Tl) detectors, with Anger-type positioning logic, and which allows 3-D volume imaging, without septa. The new design is built with a single annular crystal coupled to 180 photomultiplier tubes, and uses local triggering electronics to subdivide the detector into small zones and to determine coincident events within the detector. The axial acceptance angle of [+-] 27 deg, with a field-of-view of 25.6 cm, is larger than any currently operating PET scanner. Performance measurements are presented.

  16. Fast resonant target vibrating wire scanner for photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutunian, S. G.; Chung, M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.; Margaryan, A. V.; Lazareva, E. G.; Lazarev, L. M.; Shahinyan, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new type of wire scanner for beam profile measurements, based on the use of a vibrating wire as a scattering target. Synchronous measurements with the wire oscillation allow to detect only the signal coming from the scattering of the beam on the wire. This resonant method enables fast beam profiling in the presence of a high level of background. The developed wire scanner, called resonant target vibrating wire scanner, is applied to photon beam profiling, in which the photons reflected on the wire are measured by a fast photodiode. In addition, the proposed measurement principle is expected to monitor other types of beams as well, such as neutrons, protons, electrons, and ions.

  17. Fast resonant target vibrating wire scanner for photon beam.

    PubMed

    Arutunian, S G; Chung, M; Harutyunyan, G S; Margaryan, A V; Lazareva, E G; Lazarev, L M; Shahinyan, L A

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new type of wire scanner for beam profile measurements, based on the use of a vibrating wire as a scattering target. Synchronous measurements with the wire oscillation allow to detect only the signal coming from the scattering of the beam on the wire. This resonant method enables fast beam profiling in the presence of a high level of background. The developed wire scanner, called resonant target vibrating wire scanner, is applied to photon beam profiling, in which the photons reflected on the wire are measured by a fast photodiode. In addition, the proposed measurement principle is expected to monitor other types of beams as well, such as neutrons, protons, electrons, and ions. PMID:26931835

  18. Incorporation of a two metre long PET scanner in STIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumpas, C.; Brain, C.; Dyke, T.; Gold, D.

    2015-09-01

    The Explorer project aims to investigate the potential benefits of a total-body 2 metre long PET scanner. The following investigation incorporates this scanner in STIR library and demonstrates the capabilities and weaknesses of existing reconstruction (FBP and OSEM) and single scatter simulation algorithms. It was found that sensible images are reconstructed but at the expense of high memory and processing time demands. FBP requires 4 hours on a core; OSEM: 2 hours per iteration if ran in parallel on 15-cores of a high performance computer. The single scatter simulation algorithm shows that on a short scale, up to a fifth of the scanner length, the assumption that the scatter between direct rings is similar to the scatter between the oblique rings is approximately valid. However, for more extreme cases this assumption is not longer valid, which illustrates that consideration of the oblique rings within the single scatter simulation will be necessary, if this scatter correction is the method of choice.

  19. Dental impressions using 3D digital scanners: virtual becomes reality.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Nathan S; Aaronson, Heidi B

    2008-10-01

    The technologies that have made the use of three-dimensional (3D) digital scanners an integral part of many industries for decades have been improved and refined for application to dentistry. Since the introduction of the first dental impressioning digital scanner in the 1980s, development engineers at a number of companies have enhanced the technologies and created in-office scanners that are increasingly user-friendly and able to produce precisely fitting dental restorations. These systems are capable of capturing 3D virtual images of tooth preparations, from which restorations may be fabricated directly (ie, CAD/CAM systems) or fabricated indirectly (ie, dedicated impression scanning systems for the creation of accurate master models). The use of these products is increasing rapidly around the world and presents a paradigm shift in the way in which dental impressions are made. Several of the leading 3D dental digital scanning systems are presented and discussed in this article.

  20. An investigation into factors affecting the precision of CT radiation dose profile width measurements using radiochromic films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Baojun Behrman, Richard H.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of x-ray beam energy, exposure intensity, and flat-bed scanner uniformity and spatial resolution on the precision of computed tomography (CT) beam width measurements using Gafchromic XR-QA2 film and an off-the-shelf document scanner. Methods: Small strips of Gafchromic film were placed at isocenter in a CT scanner and exposed at various x-ray beam energies (80–140 kVp), exposure levels (50–400 mA s), and nominal beam widths (1.25, 5, and 10 mm). The films were scanned in reflection mode on a Ricoh MP3501 flat-bed document scanner using several spatial resolution settings (100 to 400 dpi) and at different locations on the scanner bed. Reflection measurements were captured in digital image files and radiation dose profiles generated by converting the image pixel values to air kerma through film calibration. Beam widths were characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM) and full width at tenth maximum (FWTM) of dose profiles. Dependences of these parameters on the above factors were quantified in percentage change from the baselines. Results: The uncertainties in both FWHM and FWTM caused by varying beam energy, exposure level, and scanner uniformity were all within 4.5% and 7.6%, respectively. Increasing scanner spatial resolution significantly increased the uncertainty in both FWHM and FWTM, with FWTM affected by almost 8 times more than FWHM (48.7% vs 6.5%). When uncalibrated dose profiles were used, FWHM and FWTM were over-estimated by 11.6% and 7.6%, respectively. Narrower beam width appeared more sensitive to the film calibration than the wider ones (R{sup 2} = 0.68 and 0.85 for FWHM and FWTM, respectively). The global and maximum local background variations of the document scanner were 1.2%. The intrinsic film nonuniformity for an unexposed film was 0.3%. Conclusions: Measurement of CT beam widths using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films is robust against x-ray energy, exposure level, and scanner uniformity. With proper film

  1. Prefecture-wide multi-centre radiation dose survey as a useful tool for CT dose optimisation: report of Gunma radiation dose study.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Nakajima, Takahito; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the usefulness for the dose optimisation of setting a diagnostic reference level (DRL) based on the results of a prefecture-wide multi-centre radiation dose survey and providing data feedback. All hospitals/clinics in the authors' prefecture with computed tomography (CT) scanners were requested to report data. The first survey was done in July 2011, and the results of dose-length products (DLPs) for each CT scanner were fed back to all hospitals/clinics, with DRL set from all the data. One year later, a second survey was done in the same manner. The medians of DLP in the upper abdomen, whole body and coronary CT in 2012 were significantly smaller than those of the 2011 survey. The interquartile ranges of DLP in the head, chest, pelvis and coronary CT were also smaller in 2012. Radiation dose survey with data feedback may be helpful for CT dose optimisation.

  2. Performance characterization of a MVCT scanner using multislice thick, segmented cadmium tungstate-photodiode detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kirvan, P. F.; Monajemi, T. T.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) and megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) can be used for visualizing anatomical structures prior to radiation therapy treatments to assist in patient setup and target localization. These systems are less susceptible to metal artifacts and provide better CT number linearity than conventional CT scanners. However, their contrast is limited by the properties of the megavoltage photons and the low detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of flat panel detector systems currently available. By using higher DQE, thick, segmented cadmium tungstate detectors, the authors can improve the low contrast detectability of a MVCT system. This in turn would permit greater soft tissue visualization for a given radiation dose, allowing MVCT to be used in more clinical situations. Methods: This article describes the evaluation of our prototype system that uses thick, segmented detectors. In order to create images using a dose that would be acceptable for day to day patient imaging, the authors evaluated their system using the low intensity bremsstrahlung component of a 6 MeV electron beam. The system was evaluated for its uniformity, high contrast resolution, low contrast detectability, signal to noise ratio, contrast to noise ratio, and CT number linearity. Results: The prototype system was found to have a high contrast spatial resolution of about 5 line pairs per cm, and to be able to visualize a 15 mm 1.5% contrast target with 2 cGy of radiation dose delivered. SNR{sup 2} vs radiation dose and mean pixel value vs electron density curves were linear. Conclusions: This prototype system shows a large improvement in low contrast detectability over current MVCBCT systems.

  3. D Super-Resolution Approach for Sparse Laser Scanner Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinyalamdary, S.; Yilmaz, A.

    2015-08-01

    Laser scanner point cloud has been emerging in Photogrammetry and computer vision to achieve high level tasks such as object tracking, object recognition and scene understanding. However, low cost laser scanners are noisy, sparse and prone to systematic errors. This paper proposes a novel 3D super resolution approach to reconstruct surface of the objects in the scene. This method works on sparse, unorganized point clouds and has superior performance over other surface recovery approaches. Since the proposed approach uses anisotropic diffusion equation, it does not deteriorate the object boundaries and it preserves topology of the object.

  4. 30. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING FLOOR 3A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - FLOOR 3A ("A" FACE) INTERIOR BETWEEN GRIDS 17-A1 AND 18-A1, SHOWING REAR OF RADAR EMITTER ELECTRONIC INTERFACE TERMINAL NO. 3147-20, "RECEIVER TRANSMITTER RADAR" MODULE. VIEW IS ALSO SHOWING BUILDING FIRE STOP MATERIAL AT BOTTOM OF FLOOR. NOTE: WALL SLOPES BOTTOM TO TOP INWARD; STRUCTURAL ELEMENT IN FOREGROUND. VIEW ALSO SHOWS PIPING GRID OF CHILLED WATER LINES FOR ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS COOLING. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  5. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Z; Rizvi, A A; Riza, N A

    2001-12-10

    A wavelength-multiplexed optical scanning scheme is proposed for deflecting a free-space optical beam by selection of the wavelength of the light incident on a wavelength-dispersive optical element. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters, this scanner features microsecond domain scan setting speeds and large- diameter apertures of several centimeters or more for subdegree angular scans. Analysis performed indicates an optimum scan range for a given diffraction order and grating period. Limitations include beam-spreading effects based on the varying scanner aperture sizes and the instantaneous information bandwidth of the data-carrying laser beam.

  6. Impact of lighting and attire on 3D scanner performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajjimaporn, Pann; Feist, Dakota; Straub, Jeremy; Kerlin, Scott

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers the impact of lighting and attire on the performance of a previously created low-cost 3D scanning system. It considers the effect of adjusting the lighting configuration and of the subject's clothing on the quality of the scans and the number and types of objects that can be scanned. The experimentation performed tested different types (colors and textures) of clothing to assess which produced the best scans and multiple lighting configurations. This paper presents the results from this experimentation and, from this, make generalizations about optimizing visible light scanner performance before concluding with a discussion of scanner efficacy.

  7. Scanner baseliner monitoring and control in high volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Pavan; Chung, Woong Jae; Aung, Nyan; Subramany, Lokesh; Gao, Haiyong; Gomez, Juan-Manuel

    2016-03-01

    We analyze performance of different customized models on baseliner overlay data and demonstrate the reduction in overlay residuals by ~10%. Smart Sampling sets were assessed and compared with the full wafer measurements. We found that performance of the grid can still be maintained by going to one-third of total sampling points, while reducing metrology time by 60%. We also demonstrate the feasibility of achieving time to time matching using scanner fleet manager and thus identify the tool drifts even when the tool monitoring controls are within spec limits. We also explore the scanner feedback constant variation with illumination sources.

  8. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Z; Rizvi, A A; Riza, N A

    2001-12-10

    A wavelength-multiplexed optical scanning scheme is proposed for deflecting a free-space optical beam by selection of the wavelength of the light incident on a wavelength-dispersive optical element. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters, this scanner features microsecond domain scan setting speeds and large- diameter apertures of several centimeters or more for subdegree angular scans. Analysis performed indicates an optimum scan range for a given diffraction order and grating period. Limitations include beam-spreading effects based on the varying scanner aperture sizes and the instantaneous information bandwidth of the data-carrying laser beam. PMID:18364951

  9. CCD-based optical CT scanning of highly attenuating phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Nowais, Shamsa; Doran, Simon J.

    2009-05-01

    The introduction of optical computed tomography (optical-CT) offers economic and easy to use 3-D optical readout for gel dosimeters. However, previous authors have noted some challenges regarding the accuracy of such imaging techniques at high values of optical density. In this paper, we take a closer look at the 'cupping' artefact evident in both light-scattering polymer systems and highly light absorbing phantoms using our CCD-based optical scanner. In addition, a technique is implemented whereby the maximum measurable optical absorbance is extended to correct for any errors that may have occurred in the estimated value of the dark current or ambient light reaching the detector. The results indicate that for absorbance values up to 2.0, the optical scanner results have good accuracy, whereas this is not the case at high absorbance values for reasons yet to be explained.

  10. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    Significance. Respiratory motion has been shown to cause artifacts in PET/CT imaging. This breathing artifact can have a significant impact on PET quantification and it can lead to large uncertainties when using PET for radiation therapy planning. We have demonstrated a promising solution to resolve the breathing artifact by acquiring respiration-averaged CT (ACT) for PET/CT. The purpose of this work was to optimize the ACT acquisition for clinical implementation and to evaluate the impact of ACT on PET/CT quantification. The hypothesis was that ACT is an effective method in removing the breathing artifact when compared to our current clinical protocol. Methods. Phase and cine approaches for acquiring ACT were investigated and the results of these two approaches were compared to the ACT generated from clinical 4DCT data sets (abbreviated as ACT10phs ). In the phase approach, ACT was generated based on combinations of selected respiratory phases; in the cine approach, ACT was generated based on cine images acquired over a fixed cine duration. The phase combination and cine duration that best approximated the ACT10phs were determined to be the optimized scanning parameters. 216 thoracic PET/CT patients were scanned with both current clinical and the ACT protocols. The effects of ACT on PET/CT quantification were assessed by comparing clinical PET/CT and ACT PET/CT using 3 metrics: PET/CT image alignment, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and threshold segmented gross tumor volume (GTV). Results. ACT10phs can be best approximated to within 2% of SUV variation by phase averaging based on 4 representative phases, and to within 3% by cine image averaging based on >3s of cine duration. We implemented the cine approach on the PET/CT scanners and acquired 216 patient data sets. 68% of patients had breathing artifacts in their clinical PET/CT and the artifacts were removed/reduced in all corresponding ACT PET/CT. PET/CT quantification for lesions <50 cm3 and

  11. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  12. Patient- and cohort-specific dose and risk estimation for abdominopelvic CT: a study based on 100 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this work was twofold: (a) to estimate patient- and cohort-specific radiation dose and cancer risk index for abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) scans; (b) to evaluate the effects of patient anatomical characteristics (size, age, and gender) and CT scanner model on dose and risk conversion coefficients. The study included 100 patient models (42 pediatric models, 58 adult models) and multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which DLP-normalized-effective dose (k factor) and DLP-normalized-risk index values (q factor) were derived. The k factor showed exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For a given gender, q factor showed exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The discrepancies in k and q factors across scanners were on average 8% and 15%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of estimating patient-specific organ dose and cohort-specific effective dose and risk index in abdominopelvic CT requiring only the knowledge of patient size, gender, and age.

  13. SU-E-I-17: Evaluation of Commercially Available Extension Plates for the ACR CT Accreditation Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Greene-Donnelly, K; Ogden, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of commercially available extension plates on Hounsfield Unit (HU) values in the ACR CT accreditation phantom (Model 464, Gammex Inc., Middleton, Wi). The extension plates are intended to improve water HU values in scanners where the traditional solution involves scanning the phantom with an adjacent water or CTDI phantom. Methods: The Model 464 phantom was scanned on 9 different CT scanners at 8 separate sites representing 16 and 64 slice MDCT technology from four CT manufacturers. The phantom was scanned with and without the extension plates (Gammex 464 EXTPLT-KIT) in helical and axial modes. A water phantom was also scanned to verify water HU calibration. Technique was 120 kV tube potential, 350 mAs, and 210 mm display field of view. Slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm were based on site clinical protocols. The widest available beam collimation was used. Regions of interest were drawn on the HU test objects in Module 1 of the phantom and mean values recorded. Results: For all axial mode scans, water HU values were within limits with or without the extension plates. For two scanners (both Lightspeed VCT, GE Medical Systems, Waukesha WI), axial mode bone HU values were above the specified range both with and without the extension plates though they were closer to the specified range with the plates installed. In helical scan mode, two scanners (both GE Lightspeed VCT) had water HU values above the specified range without the plates installed. With the plates installed, the water HU values were within range for all scanners in all scan modes. Conclusion: Using the plates, the Lightspeed VCT scanners passed the water HU test when scanning in helical mode. The benefit of the extension plates was evident in helical mode scanning with GE scanners using a nominal 4 cm beam. Disclosure: The extension plates evaluated in this work were provided free of charge to the authors. The authors have no other financial interest in Gammex

  14. Using compressive sensing to recover images from PET scanners with partial detector rings

    SciTech Connect

    Valiollahzadeh, SeyyedMajid; Clark, John W.; Mawlawi, Osama

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Most positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners consist of tightly packed discrete detector rings to improve scanner efficiency. The authors’ aim was to use compressive sensing (CS) techniques in PET imaging to investigate the possibility of decreasing the number of detector elements per ring (introducing gaps) while maintaining image quality. Methods: A CS model based on a combination of gradient magnitude and wavelet domains (wavelet-TV) was developed to recover missing observations in PET data acquisition. The model was designed to minimize the total variation (TV) and L1-norm of wavelet coefficients while constrained by the partially observed data. The CS model also incorporated a Poisson noise term that modeled the observed noise while suppressing its contribution by penalizing the Poisson log likelihood function. Three experiments were performed to evaluate the proposed CS recovery algorithm: a simulation study, a phantom study, and six patient studies. The simulation dataset comprised six disks of various sizes in a uniform background with an activity concentration of 5:1. The simulated image was multiplied by the system matrix to obtain the corresponding sinogram and then Poisson noise was added. The resultant sinogram was masked to create the effect of partial detector removal and then the proposed CS algorithm was applied to recover the missing PET data. In addition, different levels of noise were simulated to assess the performance of the proposed algorithm. For the phantom study, an IEC phantom with six internal spheres each filled with F-18 at an activity-to-background ratio of 10:1 was used. The phantom was imaged twice on a RX PET/CT scanner: once with all detectors operational (baseline) and once with four detector blocks (11%) turned off at each of 0 °, 90 °, 180 °, and 270° (partially sampled). The partially acquired sinograms were then recovered using the proposed algorithm. For the third test, PET images

  15. Poster — Thur Eve — 06: Dose assessment of cone beam CT imaging protocols as part of SPECT/CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkopi, E; Ross, AA

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To assess radiation dose from the cone beam CT (CBCT) component of SPECT/CT studies and to compare with other CT examinations performed in our institution. Methods: We used an anthropomorphic chest phantom and the 6 cc ion chamber to measure entrance breast dose for several CBCT and diagnostic CT acquisition protocols. The CBCT effective dose was calculated with ImPACT software; the CT effective dose was evaluated from the DLP value and conversion factor, dependent on the anatomic region. The RADAR medical procedure radiation dose calculator was used to assess the nuclear medicine component of exam dose. Results: The entrance dose to the breast measured with the anthropomorphic phantom was 0.48 mGy and 9.41 mGy for cardiac and chest CBCT scans; and 4.59 mGy for diagnostic thoracic CT. The effective doses were 0.2 mSv, 3.2 mSv and 2.8 mSv respectively. For a small patient represented by the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose from the diagnostic CT was lower than from the CBCT scan, as a result of the exposure reduction options available on modern CT scanners. The CBCT protocols used the same fixed scanning techniques. The diagnostic CT dose based on the patient data was 35% higher than the phantom dose. For most SPECT/CT studies the dose from the CBCT component was comparable with the dose from the radiopharmaceutical. Conclusions: The patient radiation dose from the cone beam CT scan can be higher than that from a diagnostic CT and should be taken into consideration in evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.

  16. Light scattering in optical CT scanning of Presage dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Adamovics, J.; Cheeseborough, J. C.; Chao, K. S.; Wuu, C. S.

    2010-11-01

    The intensity of the scattered light from the Presage dosimeters was measured using a Thorlabs PM100D optical power meter (Thorlabs Inc, Newton, NJ) with an optical sensor of 1 mm diameter sensitive area. Five Presage dosimeters were made as cylinders of 15.2 cm, 10 cm, 4 cm diameters and irradiated with 6 MV photons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Each dosimeter was put into the scanning tank of an OCTOPUS" optical CT scanner (MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) filled with a refractive index matching liquid. A laser diode was positioned at one side of the water tank to generate a stationary laser beam of 0.8 mm width. On the other side of the tank, an in-house manufactured positioning system was used to move the optical sensor in the direction perpendicular to the outgoing laser beam from the dosimeters at an increment of 1 mm. The amount of scattered photons was found to be more than 1% of the primary light signal within 2 mm from the laser beam but decreases sharply with increasing off-axis distance. The intensity of the scattered light increases with increasing light attenuations and/or absorptions in the dosimeters. The scattered light at the same off-axis distance was weaker for dosimeters of larger diameters and for larger detector-to-dosimeter distances. Methods for minimizing the effect of the light scattering in different types of optical CT scanners are discussed.

  17. Ex vivo hemoglobin status study using photoacoustic computed tomography small animal scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to calibrate the PCT scanner to quantify the hemoglobin status utilizing a blood flow phantom. Materials and Methods: A blood circulation system was designed and constructed to control the oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration of blood. As a part of the circulation system, a 1.1mm FEP tube was placed in the center of imaging tank of PCT scanner as the imaging object. Photoacoustic spectra (690-950 nm) was acquired for different hemoglobin concentrations (CtHb) and oxygen saturation levels (SaO2), where the formers was formed by diluting blood samples with PBS and the latter by mixing blood with gases at different oxygen content. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to calculate the photon energy depositions in the phantom tube, which took into account photon losses in water and blood. A Kappa value which represents the energy transfer efficiency of hemoglobin molecule was calculated based on the PCT measurement and simulation result. The final SaO2 value of each blood sample was calculated based on the PCT spectrum and Kappa value. These oxygen saturation results were compared with co-oximeter measurements to obtain systematic errors. Results and Conclusion: The statistic error of calculating Kappa value from hemoglobin concentration experiment was less than 5%. The systematic error between PCT spectra analysis and co-oximeter analysis for hemoglobin oxygen saturation was -4.5%. These calibration techniques used to calculate Kappa and hemoglobin absorption spectra would be used in hypoxia measurements in tumors as well as for endogenous biomarkers studies.

  18. Cone beam optical computed tomography for gel dosimetry I: scanner characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver; Schreiner, L. John

    2010-05-01

    The ongoing development of easily accessible, fast optical readout tools promises to remove one of the barriers to acceptance of gel dosimetry as a viable tool in cancer clinics. This paper describes the characterization of a number of basic properties of the Vista™ cone beam CCD-based optical scanner, which can obtain high resolution reconstructed data in less than 20 min total imaging and reconstruction time. The suitability of a filtered back projection cone beam reconstruction algorithm is established for optically absorbing dosimeters using this scanner configuration. The system was then shown to be capable of imaging an optically absorbing media-filled 1 L polyethylene terephthalate (PETE) jar dosimeter to a reconstructed voxel resolution of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3. At this resolution, more than 60% of the imaged volume in the dosimeter exhibits minimal spatial distortion, a measurement accuracy of 3-4% and the mean to standard deviation signal-to-noise ratio greater than 100 over an optical absorption range of 0.06-0.18 cm-1. An inter-day scan precision of 1% was demonstrated near the upper end of this range. Absorption measurements show evidence of stray light perturbation causing artifacts in the data, which if better managed would improve the accuracy of optical readout. Cone beam optical attenuation measurements of scattering dosimeters, on the other hand, are nonlinearly affected by angled scatter stray light. Scatter perturbation leads to significant cupping artifacts and other inaccuracies that greatly limit the readout of scattering polymer gel dosimeters with cone beam optical CT.

  19. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  20. Enlarged longitudinal dose profiles in cone-beam CT and the need for modified dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Tsunoo, Takanori; Aoyama, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya

    2005-04-01

    In order to examine phantom length necessary to assess radiation dose delivered to patients in cone-beam CT with an enlarged beamwidth, we measured dose profiles in cylindrical phantoms of sufficient length using a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner developed at our institute. Dose profiles parallel to the rotation axis were measured at the central and peripheral positions in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantoms of 160 or 320 mm diameter and 900 mm length. For practical application, we joined unit cylinders (150 mm long) together to provide phantoms of 900 mm length. Dose profiles were measured with a pin photodiode sensor having a sensitive region of approximately 2.8x2.8 mm{sup 2} and 2.7 mm thickness. Beamwidths of the scanner were varied from 20 to 138 mm. Dose profile integrals (DPI) were calculated using the measured dose profiles for various beamwidths and integration ranges. For the body phantom (320-mm-diam phantom), 76% of the DPI was represented for a 20 mm beamwidth and 60% was represented for a 138 mm beamwidth if dose profiles were integrated over a 100 mm range, while more than 90% of the DPI was represented for beamwidths between 20 and 138 mm if integration was carried out over a 300 mm range. The phantom length and integration range for dosimetry of cone-beam CT needed to be more than 300 mm to represent more than 90% of the DPI for the body phantom with the beamwidth of more than 20 mm. Although we reached this conclusion using the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner, it may be applied to other multislice CT-scanners as well.

  1. Liquid-explosives scanners stand trial in airports

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Jermey N. A.

    2010-07-15

    Air passengers may once more be allowed to pack beverages, lotions, and hair spray in their carry-on luggage, if imaging technologies to detect liquid explosives can prove their worth. Several competing systems, including multi-energy x-ray systems and a low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, are undergoing field tests at some airports worldwide.

  2. Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Peck, Konan

    1992-01-01

    A fluorescent scanner for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier including a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from said volume to provide a display of the separated sample.

  3. Advanced scanners and imaging systems for earth observations. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Assessments of present and future sensors and sensor related technology are reported along with a description of user needs and applications. Five areas are outlined: (1) electromechanical scanners, (2) self-scanned solid state sensors, (3) electron beam imagers, (4) sensor related technology, and (5) user applications. Recommendations, charts, system designs, technical approaches, and bibliographies are included for each area.

  4. Teach Your Computer to Read: Scanners and Optical Character Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Desktop scanners can be used with a software technology called optical character recognition (OCR) to convert the text on virtually any paper document into an electronic form. OCR offers educators new flexibility in incorporating text into tests, lesson plans, and other materials. (MLF)

  5. OCR Scanners Facilitate WP Training in Business Schools and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Optical Character Recognition Scanners (OCR) scan typed text and feed it directly into word processing systems, saving input time. OCRs are valuable in word processing training programs because they allow more students access to classes and more time for skill training. (MD)

  6. Prototype active scanner for nighttime oil spill mapping and classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandness, G. A.; Ailes, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    A prototype, active, aerial scanner system was constructed for nighttime water pollution detection and nighttime multispectral imaging of the ground. An arc lamp was used to produce the transmitted light and four detector channels provided a multispectral measurement capability. The feasibility of the design concept was demonstrated by laboratory and flight tests of the prototype system.

  7. 9. View of back side of radar scanner building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View of back side of radar scanner building no. 106 showing passageway links to other buildings east and west, and DR 3 antenna in background. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  8. 10. View of back side of radar scanner building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of back side of radar scanner building no. 104 showing passageway links to other building to east and DR 1 antenna in background. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  9. Speech Perception in MRI Scanner Noise by Persons with Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eric W.; Moser, Dana C.; Morrow-Odom, K. Leigh; Hall, Deborah A.; Fridriksson, Julius

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine reductions in performance on auditory tasks by aphasic and neurologically intact individuals as a result of concomitant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner noise. Method: Four tasks together forming a continuum of linguistic complexity were developed. They included complex-tone pitch discrimination, same-different…

  10. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  11. Engineering evaluation of 24 channel multispectral scanner. [from flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambeck, P. F.

    1973-01-01

    The results of flight tests to evaluate the performance of the 24 channel multispectral scanner are reported. The flight plan and test site are described along with the time response and channel registration. The gain and offset drift, and moire patterns are discussed. Aerial photographs of the test site are included.

  12. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner demonstration.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Riza, Nabeel A

    2002-09-10

    Experimental demonstration of a no-moving-parts free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner (W-MOS) is presented. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters and planar wavelength dispersive elements such as diffraction gratings, this microsecond-speed scanner enables large several-centimeter apertures for subdegree angular scans. The proposed W-MOS design incorporates a unique optical amplifier and variable optical attenuator combination that enables the calibration and modulation of the scanner response, leading to any desired scanned laser beam power shaping. The experimental setup uses a tunable laser centered at 1560 nm and a 600-grooves/mm blazed reflection grating to accomplish an angular scan of 12.92 degrees as the source is tuned over an 80-nm bandwidth. The values for calculated maximum optical beam divergance, required wavelength resolution, beam-pointing accuracy, and measured scanner insertion loss are 1.076 mrad, 0.172 nm, 0.06 mrad, and 4.88 dB, respectively.

  13. LANSCE wire scanner AFE: analysis, design, and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Gruchalla, Mike; Chacon, Phillip; Gilpatrick, John D; Martinez, Derwin; Power, John F; Smith, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the design LANSCE-R Wire-Scanner Analog Front-end Electronics is to develop a high-performance, dual-axis wire-scanner analog front-end system implemented in a single cRIO module. This new design accommodates macropulse widths as wide as 700 {mu}s at a maximum pulse rate of 120Hz. A lossey integrator is utilized as the integration element to eliminate the requirement for providing gating signals to each wire scanner. The long macropulse and the high repetition rate present conflicting requirements for the design of the integrator. The long macropulse requires a long integration time constant to assure minimum integrator droop for accurate charge integration, and the high repetition rate requires a short time constant to assure adequate integrator reset between macropulses. Also, grounding is a serious concern due to the small signal levels. This paper reviews the basic Wire Scanner AFE system design implemented in the cRIO-module form factor to capture the charge information from the wire sensors and the grounding topology to assure minimum noise contamination of the wire signals.

  14. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner demonstration.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Riza, Nabeel A

    2002-09-10

    Experimental demonstration of a no-moving-parts free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner (W-MOS) is presented. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters and planar wavelength dispersive elements such as diffraction gratings, this microsecond-speed scanner enables large several-centimeter apertures for subdegree angular scans. The proposed W-MOS design incorporates a unique optical amplifier and variable optical attenuator combination that enables the calibration and modulation of the scanner response, leading to any desired scanned laser beam power shaping. The experimental setup uses a tunable laser centered at 1560 nm and a 600-grooves/mm blazed reflection grating to accomplish an angular scan of 12.92 degrees as the source is tuned over an 80-nm bandwidth. The values for calculated maximum optical beam divergance, required wavelength resolution, beam-pointing accuracy, and measured scanner insertion loss are 1.076 mrad, 0.172 nm, 0.06 mrad, and 4.88 dB, respectively. PMID:12224780

  15. Testing PEPT Algorithm on a Medical PET Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrmomtaz, Alireza

    The basis of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is the detection of the photons produced, when a positron annihilates with an electron. Conservation of energy and momentum then require that two 511 keV gamma rays are emitted almost back to back (180° apart). This method is used to determine the spatial distribution of a positron emitting fluid. Verifying the position of a single emitting particle in an object instead of determining the distribution of a positron emitting fluid is the basis of another technique, which has been named positron emitting particle tracking PEPT and has been developed in Birmingham University. Birmingham University has recently obtained the PET scanner from Hammersmith Hospital which was installed there in 1987. This scanner consists of 32 detector buckets, each includes 128 bismuth germanate detection elements, which are configured in 8 rings. This scanner has been rebuilt in a flexible geometry and will be used for PEPT studies. Testing the PEPT algorithm on ECAT scanner gives a high data rate, can track approximately accurate at high speed and also has the possibility of making measurements on large vessels.

  16. Scanners, optical character readers, Cyrillic alphabet and Russian translations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Gordon G.

    1995-01-01

    The writing of code for capture, in a uniform format, of bit maps of words and characters from scanner PICT files is presented. The coding of Dynamic Pattern Matched for the identification of the characters, words and sentences in preparation for translation is discussed.

  17. Inguinal Hernia and Airport Scanners: An Emerging Indication for Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O.; Maharaj, Ravi; Dan, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The use of advanced imaging technology at international airports is increasing in popularity as a corollary to heightened security concerns across the globe. Operators of airport scanners should be educated about common medical disorders such as inguinal herniae in order to avoid unnecessary harassment of travelers since they will encounter these with increasing frequency. PMID:24368923

  18. 20. View from northeast to southwest side of scanner building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View from northeast to southwest side of scanner building 104 showing two waveguide termination faces (fiberglass light bands on left of photograph). - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. 21. View from south to southerly face of scanner building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. View from south to southerly face of scanner building 104 showing building radius. Radius of building face matches radius of DR antenna systems. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. Measurement of time delay for a prospectively gated CT simulator.

    PubMed

    Goharian, M; Khan, R F H

    2010-04-01

    For the management of mobile tumors, respiratory gating is the ideal option, both during imaging and during therapy. The major advantage of respiratory gating during imaging is that it is possible to create a single artifact-free CT data-set during a selected phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The purpose of the present work is to present a simple technique to measure the time delay during acquisition of a prospectively gated CT. The time delay of a Philips Brilliance BigBore (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) scanner attached to a Varian Real-Time Position Management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was measured. Two methods were used to measure the CT time delay: using a motion phantom and using a recorded data file from the RPM system. In the first technique, a rotating wheel phantom was altered by placing two plastic balls on its axis and rim, respectively. For a desired gate, the relative positions of the balls were measured from the acquired CT data and converted into corresponding phases. Phase difference was calculated between the measured phases and the desired phases. Using period of motion, the phase difference was converted into time delay. The Varian RPM system provides an external breathing signal; it also records transistor-transistor logic (TTL) 'X-Ray ON' status signal from the CT scanner in a text file. The TTL 'X-Ray ON' indicates the start of CT image acquisition. Thus, knowledge of the start time of CT acquisition, combined with the real-time phase and amplitude data from the external respiratory signal, provides time-stamping of all images in an axial CT scan. The TTL signal with time-stamp was used to calculate when (during the breathing cycle) a slice was recorded. Using the two approaches, the time delay between the prospective gating signal and CT simulator has been determined to be 367 +/- 40 ms. The delay requires corrections both at image acquisition and while setting gates for the treatment delivery

  1. Impact of topographic mask models on scanner matching solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminski, Jacek K.; Pomplun, Jan; Renwick, Stephen P.

    2014-03-01

    Of keen interest to the IC industry are advanced computational lithography applications such as Optical Proximity Correction of IC layouts (OPC), scanner matching by optical proximity effect matching (OPEM), and Source Optimization (SO) and Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) used as advanced reticle enhancement techniques. The success of these tasks is strongly dependent on the integrity of the lithographic simulators used in computational lithography (CL) optimizers. Lithographic mask models used by these simulators are key drivers impacting the accuracy of the image predications, and as a consequence, determine the validity of these CL solutions. Much of the CL work involves Kirchhoff mask models, a.k.a. thin masks approximation, simplifying the treatment of the mask near-field images. On the other hand, imaging models for hyper-NA scanner require that the interactions of the illumination fields with the mask topography be rigorously accounted for, by numerically solving Maxwell's Equations. The simulators used to predict the image formation in the hyper-NA scanners must rigorously treat the masks topography and its interaction with the scanner illuminators. Such imaging models come at a high computational cost and pose challenging accuracy vs. compute time tradeoffs. Additional complication comes from the fact that the performance metrics used in computational lithography tasks show highly non-linear response to the optimization parameters. Finally, the number of patterns used for tasks such as OPC, OPEM, SO, or SMO range from tens to hundreds. These requirements determine the complexity and the workload of the lithography optimization tasks. The tools to build rigorous imaging optimizers based on first-principles governing imaging in scanners are available, but the quantifiable benefits they might provide are not very well understood. To quantify the performance of OPE matching solutions, we have compared the results of various imaging optimization trials obtained

  2. Pilot Study to Confirm that Fat and Liver can be Distinguished by Spectroscopic Tissue Response on a Medipix-All-Resolution System-CT (MARS-CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Kyra B.; Anderson, Nigel G.; Butler, Alexandra P.; Carr, James M.; Clark, Michael J.; Cook, Nick J.; Scott, Nicola J.; Butler, Philip H.; Butler, Anthony P.

    2009-07-23

    NAFLD, liver component of the 'metabolic' syndrome, has become the most common liver disease in western nations. Non-invasive imaging techniques exist, but have limitations, especially in detection and quantification of mild to moderate fatty liver. In this pilot study, we produced attenuation curves from biomedical-quality projection images of liver and fat using the MARS spectroscopic-CT scanner. Difficulties obtaining attenuation spectra after reconstruction demonstrated that standard reconstruction programs do not preserve spectral information.

  3. Pilot Study to Confirm that Fat and Liver can be Distinguished by Spectroscopic Tissue Response on a Medipix-All-Resolution System-CT (MARS-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Kyra B.; Carr, James M.; Clark, Michael J.; Cook, Nick J.; Anderson, Nigel G.; Scott, Nicola J.; Butler, Alexandra P.; Butler, Philip H.; Butler, Anthony P.

    2009-07-01

    NAFLD, liver component of the "metabolic" syndrome, has become the most common liver disease in western nations. Non-invasive imaging techniques exist, but have limitations, especially in detection and quantification of mild to moderate fatty liver. In this pilot study, we produced attenuation curves from biomedical-quality projection images of liver and fat using the MARS spectroscopic-CT scanner. Difficulties obtaining attenuation spectra after reconstruction demonstrated that standard reconstruction programs do not preserve spectral information.

  4. Coronary CT angiography: how should physicians use it wisely and when do physicians request it appropriately?

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua; Aziz, Yang Faridah Abdul; Ng, Kwan-Hoong

    2012-04-01

    Coronary CT angiography has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease due to rapid technological developments, which are reflected in the improved spatial and temporal resolution of the images. High diagnostic accuracy has been achieved with 64- and more slice CT scanners and in selected patients, coronary CT angiography is regarded as a reliable alternative to invasive coronary angiography. Although the tremendous contributions of coronary CT angiography to cardiac imaging are acknowledged, appropriate use of cardiac CT as the first line technique by physicians has not been well established. Optimal selection of cardiac CT is essential to ensure acquisition of valuable diagnostic information and avoid unnecessary invasive procedures. This is of paramount importance since cardiac CT not only involves patient risk assessment, prediction of major cardiac events, but also impacts physician decision-making on patient management. Applications of CT in cardiac imaging include coronary artery calcium scoring for predicting the patient risk of developing major cardiac events, followed by coronary CT angiography which is commonly used to determine the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy in the coronary artery disease. This review presents an overview of the applications of CT in cardiac imaging in terms of coronary calcium scoring and coronary CT angiography. Judicious use of both cardiac CT tools will be discussed with regard to their value in different patient risk groups with the aim of identifying the appropriate criteria for choosing a cardiac CT modality. An effective diagnostic pathway is finally recommended to physicians for appropriate selection of cardiac CT in clinical practice.

  5. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Yanof, J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kruecker, J.; Bauer, C.; Seip, R.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.

    2006-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  6. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Bradford J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.; Yanof, J.; Bauer, C.; Kruecker, J.; Seip, R.

    2006-05-08

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  7. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, R. A.; Dugad, S. R. Gopal, A. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Prabhu, S. S.; Garde, C. S.

    2014-02-15

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 − σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper.

  8. Resolution-enhancing hybrid, spectral CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2016-04-01

    Spectral x-ray imaging based on photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXD) is an area of growing interest. By measuring the energy of x-ray photons, a spectral CT system can better differentiate elements using a single scan. However, the spatial resolution achievable with most PCXDs limits their application, particularly in preclinical CT imaging. Consequently, our group is developing a hybrid micro-CT scanner based on a high-resolution, energy-integrating (EID) detector and a lower-resolution, PCXD. To complement this system, we propose and demonstrate a hybrid, spectral CT reconstruction algorithm which robustly combines the spectral contrast of the PCXD with the spatial resolution of the EID. Specifically, the high-resolution, spectrally resolved data (X) is recovered as the sum of two matrices: one with low column rank (XL) determined from the EID data and one with intensity gradient sparse columns (XS) corresponding to the upsampled spectral contrast obtained from the PCXD data. We test the proposed algorithm in a feasibility study focused on molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaque using activatable iodine and gold nanoparticles. The results show accurate estimation of material concentrations at increased spatial resolution for a voxel size ratio between the PCXD and the EID of 500 μm3:100 μm3. Specifically, regularized, iterative reconstruction of the MOBY mouse phantom around the K-edges of iodine (33.2 keV) and gold (80.7 keV) reduces the reconstruction error by more than a factor of three relative to least-squares, algebraic reconstruction. Likewise, the material decomposition accuracy into iodine, gold, calcium, and water improves by more than a factor of two.

  9. A COST EFFECTIVE MULTI-SPECTRAL SCANNER FOR NATURAL GAS DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Yudaya Sivathanu; Jongmook Lim; Vinoo Narayanan

    2004-10-25

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and field demonstrate a cost effective, multi-spectral scanner for natural gas leak detection in transmission and distribution pipelines. During the first year of the project, a laboratory version of the multi-spectral scanner was designed, fabricated, and tested at En'Urga Inc. The multi-spectral scanner was also evaluated using a blind DoE study at RMOTC. The performance of the scanner was inconsistent during the blind DoE study. However, most of the leaks were outside the view of the multi-spectral scanner. Therefore, a definite evaluation of the capability of the scanner was not obtained. Despite the results, sufficient number of plumes was detected fully confirming the feasibility of the multi-spectral scanner. During the second year, a rugged prototype scanner will be developed and evaluated, both at En'Urga Inc. and any potential field sites.

  10. Performance comparison of a state-of-the-art neuro-SPET scanner and a dedicated neuro-PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Bailey, D L; Zito, F; Gilardi, M C; Savi, A R; Fazio, F; Jones, T

    1994-05-01

    The physical performances of two current state-of-the-art scanners dedicated to functional imaging of the brain, one a single-photon emission tomography (SPET) scanner and the other a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, have been compared under identical conditions. The aim of the study was to compare the capabilities of the devices under conditions resembling the routine clinical environment, as well as to consider other issues such as radiation burden for some common investigations. Both systems have slightly less than 11-cm axial fields of view. The PET system can be operated in a septa-less (3D) mode as well as conventionally with septa (2D). The spatial resolution of both devices was less than 8 mm in all dimensions in scattering media. On average, the PET scanner's resolution was approximately 10%-15% better than the SPET system. Energy resolution on the SPET system was superior due the scintillator used [NaI(Tl)]. Sensitivity in air with a line source on the PET system was found to be approximately 150 times greater in 3D and approximately 25 times greater in 2D than with the SPET system. A normal subject was studied on each system in an attempt to obtain the highest quality data possible for a subjective comparison. It is clear that, while PET retains the advantages of more desirable radiopharmaceuticals and higher sensitivity, the quality obtainable from SPET devices has improved markedly. SPET may prove as useful for many clinical investigations. PMID:8062841

  11. Assessing Organ Doses from Paediatric CT Scans—A Novel Approach for an Epidemiology Study (the EPI-CT Study) †

    PubMed Central

    Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Dabin, Jérémie; Friberg, Eva G.; Hermen, Johannes; Istad, Tore S.; Jahnen, Andreas; Krille, Lucian; Lee, Choonsik; Maccia, Carlo; Nordenskjöld, Arvid; Olerud, Hilde M.; Rani, Kaddour; Rehel, Jean-Luc; Simon, Steven L.; Struelens, Lara; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2013-01-01

    The increasing worldwide use of paediatric computed tomography (CT) has led to increasing concerns regarding the subsequent effects of exposure to radiation. In response to this concern, the international EPI-CT project was developed to study the risk of cancer in a large multi-country cohort. In radiation epidemiology, accurate estimates of organ-specific doses are essential. In EPI-CT, data collection is split into two time periods—before and after introduction of the Picture Archiving Communication System (PACS) introduced in the 1990s. Prior to PACS, only sparse information about scanner settings is available from radiology departments. Hence, a multi-level approach was developed to retrieve information from a questionnaire, surveys, scientific publications, and expert interviews. For the years after PACS was introduced, scanner settings will be extracted from Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) headers, a protocol for storing medical imaging data. Radiation fields and X-ray interactions within the body will be simulated using phantoms of various ages and Monte-Carlo-based radiation transport calculations. Individual organ doses will be estimated for each child using an accepted calculation strategy, scanner settings, and the radiation transport calculations. Comprehensive analyses of missing and uncertain dosimetry data will be conducted to provide uncertainty distributions of doses. PMID:23429160

  12. A rigid motion correction method for helical computed tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nuyts, J.; Kyme, A.; Kuncic, Z.; Fulton, R.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a method to compensate for six degree-of-freedom rigid motion in helical CT of the head. The method is demonstrated in simulations and in helical scans performed on a 16-slice CT scanner. Scans of a Hoffman brain phantom were acquired while an optical motion tracking system recorded the motion of the bed and the phantom. Motion correction was performed by restoring projection consistency using data from the motion tracking system, and reconstructing with an iterative fully 3D algorithm. Motion correction accuracy was evaluated by comparing reconstructed images with a stationary reference scan. We also investigated the effects on accuracy of tracker sampling rate, measurement jitter, interpolation of tracker measurements, and the synchronization of motion data and CT projections. After optimization of these aspects, motion corrected images corresponded remarkably closely to images of the stationary phantom with correlation and similarity coefficients both above 0.9. We performed a simulation study using volunteer head motion and found similarly that our method is capable of compensating effectively for realistic human head movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first practical demonstration of generalized rigid motion correction in helical CT. Its clinical value, which we have yet to explore, may be significant. For example it could reduce the necessity for repeat scans and resource-intensive anesthetic and sedation procedures in patient groups prone to motion, such as young children. It is not only applicable to dedicated CT imaging, but also to hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT, where it could also ensure an accurate CT image for lesion localization and attenuation correction of the functional image data.

  13. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    2015-03-11

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  14. CT imaging of two phase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard G.; Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis M.

    1996-01-24

    This paper describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Three core configurations were constructed. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. Preliminary results are presented from a water/air experiment. These results suggest that it is incorrect to assume negligible capillary continuity between matrix blocks as is often done.

  15. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  16. Future generation CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Deborah; De Man, Bruno; Iatrou, Maria; Edic, Peter M

    2004-02-01

    X-ray CT technology has been available for more than 30 years, yet continued technological advances have kept CT imaging at the forefront of medical imaging innovation. Consequently, the number of clinical CT applications has increased steadily. Other imaging modalities might be superior to CT imaging for some specific applications, but no other single modality is more often used in chest imaging today. Future technological developments in the area of high-resolution detectors, high-capacity x-ray tubes, advanced reconstruction algorithms, and improved visualization techniques will continue to expand the imaging capability. Future CT imaging technology will combine improved imaging capability with advanced and specific computer-assisted tools, which will expand the usefulness of CT imaging in many areas.

  17. Automatic tube current modulation technique for multidetector CT: is it effective with a 64-detector CT?

    PubMed

    Funama, Yoshinori; Awai, Kazuo; Hatemura, Masahiro; Shimamura, Masamitchi; Yanaga, Yumi; Oda, Seitaro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2008-01-01

    To investigate whether it is possible to obtain adequate images at uniform image noise levels and reduced radiation exposure with our automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) technique for 64-detector CT. The study population consisted of 64 patients with known or suspected lung or abdominal disease. We used a 64-detector CT scanner (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI, USA) and a combined angular and longitudinal tube current modulation technique (Smart mA, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI, USA) to examine 34 patients. The scanning parameters were identical; the minimum and maximum tube current thresholds were 50 and 800 mA, respectively. For study of the constant tube current technique, 30 additional patients were examined at 350 mA. The CT number and image noise (SD of the CT number) were measured in the 64 patients at six levels, i.e., the center of the left ventricle, the liver dome, the porta hepatis, the center of the spleen and the right and left renal pelvis. When we used the ATCM technique, the mean image noise ranged from 8.40 at the center of the left ventricle to 11.31 at the porta hepatis; the mean tube current ranged from 105.9 mAs at the center of the left ventricle to 169.6 mAs at the center of the spleen. The mean dose reduction rate per constant tube current at 175 mAs ranged from 3.1 to 39.5%. By use of the ATCM technique, it is possible to maintain a constant image noise level with a 64-detector CT.

  18. SU-E-I-48: The Behavior of AEC in Scan Regions Outside the Localizer Radiograph FOV: An In Phantom Study of CT Systems From Four Vendors

    SciTech Connect

    Supanich, M; Bevins, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This review of scanners from 4 major manufacturers examines the clinical impact of performing CT scans that extend into areas of the body that were not acquired in the CT localizer radiograph. Methods: Anthropomorphic chest and abdomen phantoms were positioned together on the tables of CT scanners from 4 different vendors. All of the scanners offered an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) option with both lateral and axial tube current modulation. A localizer radiograph was taken covering the entire extent of both phantoms and then the scanner's Chest-Abdomen-Pelvis (CAP) study was performed with the clinical AEC settings employed and the scan and reconstruction range extending from the superior portion of the chest phantom through the inferior portion of the abdomen phantom. A new study was then initiated with a localizer radiograph extending the length of the chest phantom (not covering the abdomen phantom). The same CAP protocol and AEC settings were then used to scan and reconstruct the entire length of both phantoms. Scan parameters at specific locations in the abdomen phantom from both studies were investigated using the information contained in the DICOM metadata of the reconstructed images. Results: The AEC systems on all scanners utilized different tube current settings in the abdomen phantom for the scan completed without the full localizer radiograph. The AEC system behavior was also scanner dependent with the default manual tube current, the maximum tube current and the tube current at the last known position observed as outcomes. Conclusion: The behavior of the AEC systems of CT scanners in regions not covered by the localizer radiograph is vendor dependent. To ensure optimal image quality and radiation exposure it is important to include the entire planned scan region in the localizer radiograph.

  19. A Cost Effective Multi-Spectral Scanner for Natural Gas Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yudaya Sivathanu; Jongmook Lim; Vinoo Narayanan; Seonghyeon Park

    2005-12-07

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and demonstrate a cost effective, multi-spectral scanner for natural gas leak detection in transmission and distribution pipelines. During the first year of the project, a laboratory version of the multi-spectral scanner was designed, fabricated, and tested at EnUrga Inc. The multi-spectral scanner was also evaluated using a blind Department of Energy study at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The performance of the scanner was inconsistent during the blind study. However, most of the leaks were outside the view of the multi-spectral scanner that was developed during the first year of the project. Therefore, a definite evaluation of the capability of the scanner was not obtained. Despite the results, sufficient number of plumes was detected fully confirming the feasibility of the multi-spectral scanner. During the second year, the optical design of the scanner was changed to improve the sensitivity of the system. Laboratory tests show that the system can reliably detect small leaks (20 SCFH) at 30 to 50 feet. A prototype scanner was built and evaluated during the second year of the project. Only laboratory evaluations were completed during the second year. The laboratory evaluations show the feasibility of using the scanner to determine natural gas pipeline leaks. Further field evaluations and optimization of the scanner are required before commercialization of the scanner can be initiated.

  20. PET/CT artifacts.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Todd M; Mehta, Ajeet S; Mehta, Amar S; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in positron emission tomography/computed tomographic (PET/CT) imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for AC. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.