Science.gov

Sample records for 16-slice mdct arthrography

  1. [Evaluation of left ventricular function with a 16-slice multidetector tomograph (MDCT-16): correlation with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    de la Peña-Almaguer, Erasmo; Azpiri López, José Ramón; González-Camid, Felipe de Jesús; Ponce de León, Enrique; Flores-Ramírez, Ramiro; Zamarripa, Rafael; Loera, Javier; Rodríguez, Daniel; González Quijano, Rafael; Azpiri-Magallanes, Marcela; Jaramillo Estrada, Samuel; Assad Morell, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of Left ventricular function has both prognostic as well as therapeutic implications in patients with heart disease. Non-invasive coronary angiography with computed tomography using 16 slices (MDCT-16) allows to obtain images of the coronary anatomy due to its high spatial and temporal resolution, and also, to obtain data regarding Left ventricular function. The objective of this study was to correlate the use of MDCT-16 for the evaluation of the Left ventricular parameters using MRI as the Standard of reference. MRI: Se A 1.5 Tesla GE CvI Scanner optimized for cardiovascular applications was used. Using an ECG gated steady state fast precession sequence (SSFP, Thickness 10 mm, Flip Angle 45, FOV 36 cm. NEX 1, Frequency 256, Phase 128, Partial FOV 0.75, 16VPS), 6 to 8 short axis images of from base to apex of the left ventricle were obtained. Tomography: Using a 16 slice Multidetector tomograph (GE Lightspeed) and using ECG synchronization, images of the heart were obtained after the administration of 80 mls. of no-ionic contrast. The images were reconstructed off-line to obtain from 6 to 8 slices in a similar fashion to that of MR. Both studies were independently analyzed by 2 operators who obtained the ventricular function data. Linear correlation and a Paired T Student test was used to analyze the data and was considered significant when p < 0.05. 20 consecutive patients were evaluated with MDCT-16 and MRI, 18 males, mean age 52 +/- 15 years. There was no significant difference among the measurements for cardiac CT and MRI of the end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-sistolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), LV Mass or LV ejection fraction (LVEF). This results show a high correlation among the clinically relevant ventricular function parameters evaluated by cardiovascular CT and MRI. This findings suggest that ventricular function can be successfully evaluated along with the coronary anatomy using MDCT-16.

  2. MDCT arthrography of the hip: value of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique and potential for radiation dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Tobalem, Frank; Dugert, Eric; Verdun, Francis R; Dunet, Vincent; Ott, Julien G; Rudiger, Hannes A; Cherix, Stephane; Meuli, Reto; Becce, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to assess the effect of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique on image quality in hip MDCT arthrography and to evaluate its potential for reducing radiation dose. Thirty-seven patients examined with hip MDCT arthrography were prospectively randomized into three different protocols: one with a regular dose (volume CT dose index [CTDIvol], 38.4 mGy) and two with a reduced dose (CTDIvol, 24.6 or 15.4 mGy). Images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and four increasing percentages of ASIR (30%, 50%, 70%, and 90%). Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently evaluated several anatomic structures and image quality parameters using a 4-point scale. They also jointly assessed acetabular labrum tears and articular cartilage lesions. With decreasing radiation dose level, image noise statistically significantly increased (p=0.0009) and CNR statistically significantly decreased (p=0.001). We also found a statistically significant reduction in noise (p=0.0001) and increase in CNR (p≤0.003) with increasing percentage of ASIR; in addition, we noted statistically significant increases in image quality scores for the labrum and cartilage, subchondral bone, overall diagnostic quality (up to 50% ASIR), and subjective noise (p≤0.04), and statistically significant reductions for the trabecular bone and muscles (p≤0.03). Regardless of the radiation dose level, there were no statistically significant differences in the detection and characterization of labral tears (n=24; p=1) and cartilage lesions (n=40; p≥0.89) depending on the ASIR percentage. The use of up to 50% ASIR in hip MDCT arthrography helps to reduce radiation dose by approximately 35-60%, while maintaining diagnostic image quality comparable to that of a regular-dose protocol using FBP.

  3. Clinical arthrography

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, R.; Horns, J.W.; Gold, R.H.; Blaschke, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with the method and interpretation of arthrography of the shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, wrist, and metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, and temporomandibular joints. The emphasis is on orthopaedic disorders, usually of traumatic origin, which is in keeping with the application of arthrography in clinical practice. Other conditions, such as inflammatory and degenerative diseases, congenital disorders and, in the case of the hip, arthrography of reconstructive joint surgery, are included. Each chapter is devoted to one joint and provides a comprehensive discussion on the method of arthrography, including single and double contrast techniques where applicable, normal radiographic anatomy, and finally, the interpretation of the normal and the abnormal arthrogram.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row CT for detection of in-stent restenosis vs detection of stenosis in nonstented coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Kefer, Joelle M; Coche, Emmanuel; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for detecting in-stent restenosis. Fifty patients with 69 previously implanted coronary stents underwent 16-slice MDCT before quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Diagnostic accuracy of MDCT for detection of in-stent restenosis defined as >50% lumen diameter stenosis (DS) in stented and nonstented coronary segments >1.5-mm diameter was computed using QCA as reference. According to QCA, 18/69 (25%) stented segments had restenosis. In addition, 33/518 (6.4%) nonstented segments had >50% DS. In-stent restenosis was correctly identified on MDCT images in 12/18 stents, and absence of restenosis was correctly identified in 50/51 stents. Stenosis in native coronary arteries was correctly identified in 22/33 segments and correctly excluded in 482/485 segments. Thus, sensitivity (67% vs 67% p=1.0), specificity (98% vs 99%, p=0.96) and overall diagnostic accuracy (90% vs 97%, p=0.68) was similarly high for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting stenosis in nonstented coronary segments. MDCT has similarly high diagnostic accuracy for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting coronary artery disease in nonstented segments. This suggests that MDCT could be clinically useful for identification of restenosis in patients after coronary stenting.

  5. C-arm flat-panel CT arthrography of the shoulder: Radiation dose considerations and preliminary data on diagnostic performance.

    PubMed

    Guggenberger, Roman; Ulbrich, Erika J; Dietrich, Tobias J; Scholz, Rosemarie; Kaelin, Pascal; Köhler, Christoph; Elsässer, Thilo; Le Corroller, Thomas; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Andreisek, Gustav

    2017-02-01

    To investigate radiation dose and diagnostic performance of C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) versus standard multi-detector CT (MDCT) shoulder arthrography using MRI-arthrography as reference standard. Radiation dose of two different FPCT acquisitions (5 and 20 s) and standard MDCT of the shoulder were assessed using phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. FPCT arthrographies were performed in 34 patients (mean age 44 ± 15 years). Different joint structures were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed by two independent radiologists. Inter-reader agreement and diagnostic performance were calculated. Effective radiation dose was markedly lower in FPCT 5 s (0.6 mSv) compared to MDCT (1.7 mSv) and FPCT 20 s (3.4 mSv). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in FPCT 20-s versus 5-s protocols. Inter-reader agreements of qualitative ratings ranged between к = 0.47-1.0. Sensitivities for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies were low for FPCT 5-s (40 % and 20 %) and moderate for FPCT 20-s protocols (75 % and 73 %). FPCT showed high sensitivity (81-86 % and 89-99 %) for bone and acromioclavicular-joint pathologies. Using a 5-s protocol FPCT shoulder arthrography provides lower radiation dose compared to MDCT but poor sensitivity for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies. FPCT 20-s protocol is moderately sensitive for cartilage and rotator cuff tendon pathology with markedly higher radiation dose compared to MDCT. • FPCT shoulder arthrography is feasible with fluoroscopy and CT in one workflow. • A 5-s FPCT protocol applies a lower radiation dose than MDCT. • A 20-s FPCT protocol is moderately sensitive for cartilage and tendon pathology.

  6. [What remains of arthrography?].

    PubMed

    Morvan, G

    1994-06-15

    At the time of RMI, arthrography appears sometimes old-fashioned. However this exam, which knows a second youth in relation with the supply of CT-scan (arthro-CT) remains the gold-standard in the exploration of many pathologic situations: intra-articular foreign bodies, tears of glenoid or acetabular labrum, precise assessment of chondral or ligamentous lesions (especially of the ankle), sub-scapularis tendon tears, adhesive capsulitis, complications of prosthesis, appreciation of intra-articular position of the needle's tip before injection of a therapeutic drug. Arthrography, completed or not by CT-slices gives, in this indications, excellent spatial resolution images, easy to perform, to read, to understand and to transmit at the clinicians, with a reasonable cost and a minor risk. RMI is a more and more used alternative, especially for the study of meniscus and ligaments of the knee, and rotator's cuff of the shoulder. It's sure that, with the increase of the RMI image's quality, other common indications will slip towards this technique, but nevertheless at this time (and it seams to me, for a long time) arthrography and arthro-CT will remain an excellent diagnostic tool with a very competitive advantages/inconvenience ratio.

  7. [Detection of intraorbital foreign material using MDCT].

    PubMed

    Hoffstetter, P; Friedrich, C; Framme, C; Hoffstetter, M; Zorger, N; Stierstorfer, K; Ross, C; Uller, W; Müller-Wille, R; Rennert, J; Jung, E M; Schreyer, A G

    2011-06-01

    To judge the possibilities of detection of orbital foreign bodies in multidetector CT (MDCT) with a focus on glass slivers. Experimental systematic measuring of Hounsfield Units (HU) of 20 different materials, containing 16 different types of glass with 4 different types of ophthalmic lenses among them. The measurements were performed using a standardized protocol with an orbita phantom being scanned with 16-slice MDCT. Using the resulting density values, the smallest detectable volume was calculated. Using this data we produced slivers of 5 different glass types in the sub-millimeter range and calculated their volume. Those micro-slivers underwent another CT scan using the same protocol as mentioned above to experimentally discern and confirm the detection limit for micro-slivers made of different materials. Glass has comparatively high density values of at least 2000 HU. The density of glasses with strong refraction is significantly higher and reaches up to 12 400 HU. We calculated a minimum detectable volume of 0.07 mm (3) for glass with a density of 2000 HU. Only glass slivers with a density higher than 8300 HU were experimentally detectable in the sub-millimeter range up to a volume as small as 0.01 mm (3). Less dense glass slivers could not be seen, even though their volume was above the theoretically calculated threshold for detection. Due to its high density of at least 2000 HU, glass is usually easily recognizable as an orbital foreign body. The detection threshold depends on the object's density and size and can be as low as 0.01 mm (3) in the case of glass with strong refraction and thus high density. The detection of glass as an orbital foreign body seems to be secure for slivers with a volume of at least 0.2 mm (3) for all types of glass. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. [Arthrography in congenital hip dislocation].

    PubMed

    Sipukhin, Ia M; Bazlova, E S; Cheberiak, N V

    1992-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the results of contrast arthrography in 73 children with hip joint dysplasia, among which true dislocations prevailed (70 patients). In addition to bone alterations, arthrography revealed various soft tissue changes like hypertrophy and deformity of limbus, soft tissue interposition, separation of the articular sac with the presence of an isthmus, disintegration of articular cartilages. These findings are used to define indications for surgical intervention as well as for planning the area of operation.

  9. Prevalence and Characteristics of Cavum Septum Pellucidum in Schizophrenia: A 16 Slice Computed Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Khanra, Sourav; Srivastava, Naveen Kumar; Chail, Vivek; Khess, Christoday Raja Jayant

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Several significant midline abnormalities including cavum septum pellucidum (CSP) have been reported in schizophrenia. However, not all studies were able to replicate similar findings. Furthermore, very few of them were conducted with large samples. Methods: CSP was identified and graded with 16 slice computed tomography (CT) machine in 138 patients of schizophrenia and 64 controls. Results: We found 21.0% of patients in schizophrenia group had abnormal CSP compared to only 9.4% in control group (P = 0.047). Grade III was most frequent type (19.6%) in schizophrenia group. Conclusions: Our study adds to the existing literature suggesting abnormal CSP may reflect neurodevelopmental process in schizophrenia. The strength of our study was larger sample size. Limitations were use of CT, male predominance in schizophrenia group, the inclusion of nonpsychiatric patients in control group. PMID:27833230

  10. Image reconstruction and image quality evaluation for a 16-slice CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Flohr, Th; Stierstorfer, K; Bruder, H; Simon, J; Polacin, A; Schaller, S

    2003-05-01

    We present a theoretical overview and a performance evaluation of a novel approximate reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam spiral CT, the adaptive multiple plane reconstruction (AMPR), which has been introduced by Schaller, Flohr et al. [Proc. SPIE Int. Symp. Med. Imag. 4322, 113-127 (2001)] AMPR has been implemented in a recently introduced 16-slice CT scanner. We present a detailed algorithmic description of AMPR which allows for a free selection of the spiral pitch. We show that dose utilization is better than 90% independent of the pitch. We give an overview on the z-reformation functions chosen to allow for a variable selection of the spiral slice width at arbitrary pitch values. To investigate AMPR image quality we present images of anthropomorphic phantoms and initial patient results. We present measurements of spiral slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) and measurements of the maximum achievable transverse resolution, both in the isocenter and off-center. We discuss the pitch dependence of image noise measured in a centered 20 cm water phantom. Using the AMPR approach, cone-beam artifacts are considerably reduced for the 16-slice scanner investigated. Image quality in MPRs is independent of the pitch and equivalent to a single-slice CT system at pitch p approximately 1.5. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the spiral SSPs shows only minor variations as a function of the pitch, nominal, and measured values differ by less than 0.2 mm. With 16 x 0.75 mm collimation, the measured FWHM of the smallest reconstructed slice is about 0.9 mm. Using this slice width and overlapping image reconstruction, cylindrical holes with 0.6 mm diameter can be resolved in a z-resolution phantom. Image noise for constant effective mAs is nearly independent of the pitch. Measured and theoretically expected dose utilization are in good agreement. Meanwhile, clinical practice has demonstrated the excellent image quality and the increased diagnostic capability that is obtained

  11. Radiation Dose and Cancer Risk Estimates in 16-Slice Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Sanz, Javier; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Milite, Margherita; Sirol, Marc; Henzlova, Milena; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent advances have led to a rapid increase in the number of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) studies performed. While several studies have reported effective dose (E), there is no data available on cancer risk for current CTCA protocols. Methods and Results E and organ doses were estimated, using scanner-derived parameters and Monte Carlo methods, for 50 patients having 16-slice CTCA performed for clinical indications. Lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were estimated with models developed in the National Academies’ Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII report. E of a complete CTCA averaged 9.5 mSv, while that of a complete study, including calcium scoring when indicated, averaged 11.7 mSv. Calcium scoring increased E by 25%, while tube current modulation reduced it by 34% and was more effective at lower heart rates. Organ doses were highest to the lungs and female breast. LAR of cancer incidence from CTCA averaged approximately 1 in 1600, but varied widely between patients, being highest in younger women. For all patients, the greatest risk was from lung cancer. Conclusions CTCA is associated with non-negligible risk of malignancy. Doses can be reduced by careful attention to scanning protocol. PMID:18371595

  12. [MR-arthrography: general principles and applications].

    PubMed

    Blum, A; Loeuille, D; Iochum, S; Kohlmann, R; Grignon, B; Coudane, H

    2003-06-01

    The recent approval by the French Ministry of Health of the use of intra-articular Gadolinium could promote the increasing use of MR-arthrography in France. Although useful in specific pathologies, it should not be overly prescribed and should be considered only if it provides a more accurate diagnosis than other less invasive techniques. The technical aspects and medico-legal implications of MR-arthrography as well as its various indications are reviewed in this article. There are three possible techniques: indirect MR-arthrography with IV Gadolinium injection, direct MR-arthrography with intra-articular Gadolinium injection and lastly, direct MR-arthrography with intra-articular injection of iodinated contrast media (or saline solution). Indirect MR-arthrography cannot be recommended because of insufficient contrast enhancement and the absence of joint filling. Conversely, direct MR-arthrography allows joint expansion which smooths out capsule and ligaments, better delineates articular surfaces and yields a homogeneous high intensity signal of the entire joint. Direct MR-arthrography with iodinated contrast media combines standard arthrography with conventional MRI. Direct MR-arthrography with intra-articular injection of dilute Gadolinium is associated with T1WI, usually of higher quality than T2WI, even though the latter remains part of the protocol. Although, the last two techniques yield higher image quality and are often performed for various articular pathologies, they should not be randomly carried out in the evaluation of joint pathology. However, they should be recommended as the first step in the diagnosis of painful shoulders or hips in young adults and athletes.

  13. MDCT of abdominopelvic oncologic emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Gunabushanam, Gowthaman; Chintapalli, Kedar N; Ryan, John G; Reinhold, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Acute complications arising in abdominopelvic malignancies represent a unique subset of patients presenting to the emergency room. The acute presentation can be due to complications occurring in the tumor itself or visceral or vascular structures harboring the tumor. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is the investigation of choice in the workup of these patients and enables appropriate and timely management. Management of the complication depends primarily on the extent of the underlying malignancy and the involvement of other viscera. The purpose of this article is to depict the imaging features of these complications on MDCT. PMID:23876309

  14. Technical errors in MR arthrography.

    PubMed

    Hodler, Juerg

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses potential technical problems of MR arthrography. It starts with contraindications, followed by problems relating to injection technique, contrast material and MR imaging technique. For some of the aspects discussed, there is only little published evidence. Therefore, the article is based on the personal experience of the author and on local standards of procedures. Such standards, as well as medico-legal considerations, may vary from country to country. Contraindications for MR arthrography include pre-existing infection, reflex sympathetic dystrophy and possibly bleeding disorders, avascular necrosis and known allergy to contrast media. Errors in injection technique may lead to extra-articular collection of contrast agent or to contrast agent leaking from the joint space, which may cause diagnostic difficulties. Incorrect concentrations of contrast material influence image quality and may also lead to non-diagnostic examinations. Errors relating to MR imaging include delays between injection and imaging and inadequate choice of sequences. Potential solutions to the various possible errors are presented.

  15. Cardiac image reconstruction on a 16-slice CT scanner using a retrospectively ECG-gated multicycle 3D back-projection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechter, Gilad; Naveh, Galit; Altman, Ami; Proksa, Roland M.; Grass, Michael

    2003-05-01

    Fast 16-slice spiral CT delivers superior cardiac visualization in comparison to older generation 2- to 8-slice scanners due to the combination of high temporal resolution along with isotropic spatial resolution and large coverage. The large beam opening of such scanners necessitates the use of adequate algorithms to avoid cone beam artifacts. We have developed a multi-cycle phase selective 3D back projection reconstruction algorithm that provides excellent temporal and spatial resolution for 16-slice CT cardiac images free of cone beam artifacts.

  16. Arthrography

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit energy that varies according to the type of body ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned ...

  17. Arthrography

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluoroscopy to guide and evaluate the injection of iodine contrast material directly into the joint. In some ... bones, joints and internal organs in motion. When iodine contrast is injected into the joint, it fills ...

  18. Multidetector CT (MD-CT) in the diagnosis of uncertain open globe injuries.

    PubMed

    Hoffstetter, P; Schreyer, A G; Schreyer, C I; Jung, E M; Heiss, P; Zorger, N; Framme, C

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the significance of multislice CT for the diagnosis of uncertain penetrating globe injuries. Based on a retrospective chart review between 2002 and 2007, we identified 59 patients presenting with severe ocular trauma with uncertain rupture of the globe due to massive subconjunctival and/or anterior chamber hemorrhage. The IOP (intraocular pressure) was within normal range in all patients. High resolution multidetector CT (MD-CT) scans (16 slice scans) with axial and coronar reconstructions were performed in all patients. The affected eye was examined for signs of penetrating injury such as abnormal eye shape, scleral irregularities, lens dislocation or intravitreal hemorrhages. Four experienced radiologists read the CT scans independently. Beside the diagnosis, the relevant morphological criteria and the optimal plane orientation (axial or coronar) were specified. The sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive value were calculated. Additionally the interobserver variability was determined by applying the Cohen's kappa test. Surgical sclera inspections were performed in all cases as a standard of reference. The evaluations of the CT examination were compared with the surgery reports. 59 patients were evaluated (42 men, 17 women). The mean age was 29 years (range 7 - 91). In 17 patients a rupture of the globe was diagnosed during surgery. 12 of these 17 penetrating injuries (70.6 %) were classified correctly by MDCT, 5 of the 17 (29.4 %) were not detectable. 42 patients did not have an open globe injury. 41 of these patients were diagnosed correctly negative by MDCT, and one patient was classified false positive. This results in a sensitivity of 70 % with a specificity of 98 %. There was high inter-rater agreement with kappa values between 0.89 - 0.96. Most discrepancies were caused by wrong negative findings. The most frequent morphologic criteria for open globe injury were the deformation (n = 10) and the volume reduction (n = 7) of

  19. Scatter radiation exposure during knee arthrography

    SciTech Connect

    Light, M.C.; Molloi, S.Y.; Yandow, D.R.; Ranallo, F.N.

    1987-09-01

    Knee arthrography, as performed at the authors' institution, was simulated and scattered radiation exposure to a radiologist's gonads, thyroid, and eye lens was measured with a sensitive ionization chamber. Results show that radiologists who regularly conduct knee arthrography examinations can incur doses to the gonads that are less than 6% of the U.S. limits, and to the thyroid and eye that are approximately 10% of the U.S. limits. Since the scatter radiation from overhead imaging of stress views constituted most (greater than or equal to 60%) of the dose to the lens of the eye and the thyroid, spot imaging was evaluated as a substitute for overhead imaging in the assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament. This substitution resulted in no loss of clinical information and has now completely replaced overhead imaging of stress views at this institution.

  20. Arthrography and arthrotomy of the knee in sports injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, T; Noiklang, P

    1993-01-01

    A total of 266 patients with injuries to the knee sustained during sports activities were managed by arthroscopy and/or arthrotomy. All of them received systemic examination and a standard battery of knee stability tests. Fifty-three were examined by arthrography and all underwent arthrotomy for surgical correction of the lesion diagnosed by both clinical examination and arthrography. Our study showed that clinical examination could give an accurate clinical diagnosis in 88.35% of cases and arthrography in 76.89%. No complication from arthrography was found. Injury occurred most commonly between 21 and 30 years of age and was more common to the right knee than the left. The sport in which most injuries occurred was football. PMID:8358590

  1. Delayed Computed Tomography Arthrography of Human Knee Cartilage In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Aula, Antti S.; Kröger, Heikki; Suomalainen, Juha-Sampo; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Mervaala, Esa; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the feasibility of delayed computed tomography (CT) arthrography for evaluation of human knee cartilage in vivo. Especially, the diffusion of contrast agent out of the joint space and the optimal time points for imaging were determined. Design: Two patients were imaged using delayed CT arthrography and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) techniques. Results: Two hours after injection, the concentration of contrast agent in the joint space was still high enough (20% to 24.5% of the initial concentration at 0 minutes) to allow delayed CT arthrography. The half-life of the contrast agent in the joint space varied from 30 to 60 minutes. The contrast agent concentration in patellar and femoral cartilage reached the maximum after 30 and 60 minutes, respectively. According to dGEMRIC, there were no differences between patients. However, in delayed CT arthrography, the penetration of the contrast agent was higher in the osteoarthritic knee cartilage. Conclusions: Contrast agent remained in the joint space long enough to enable delayed CT arthrography of cartilage. After 30 minutes, the normalized contrast agent concentration was higher in the cartilage of the osteoarthritic knee in comparison with the healthy knee. To conclude, delayed CT arthrography exhibited potential for use in the clinical evaluation of cartilage integrity. PMID:26069643

  2. Cardiac MDCT in children: CT technology overview and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for congenital heart disease is a useful, rapid, and noninvasive imaging technique bridging the gaps between echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and cardiac MRI. Fast scan speed and greater anatomic coverage, combined with flexible ECG-synchronized scans and a low radiation dose, are critical for improving the image quality of cardiac MDCT and minimizing patient risk. Current MDCT techniques can accurately evaluate extracardiac great vessels, lungs, and airways, as well as coronary arteries and intracardiac structures. Radiologists who perform cardiac MDCT in children should be familiarized with optimal cardiac computed tomography (CT) scan techniques and characteristic cardiac CT scan imaging findings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Postmortem imaging: MDCT features of postmortem change and decomposition.

    PubMed

    Levy, Angela D; Harcke, Howard Theodore; Mallak, Craig T

    2010-03-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has emerged as an effective imaging technique to augment forensic autopsy. Postmortem change and decomposition are always present at autopsy and on postmortem MDCT because they begin to occur immediately upon death. Consequently, postmortem change and decomposition on postmortem MDCT should be recognized and not mistaken for a pathologic process or injury. Livor mortis increases the attenuation of vasculature and dependent tissues on MDCT. It may also produce a hematocrit effect with fluid levels in the large caliber blood vessels and cardiac chambers from dependent layering erythrocytes. Rigor mortis and algor mortis have no specific MDCT features. In contrast, decomposition through autolysis, putrefaction, and insect and animal predation produce dramatic alterations in the appearance of the body on MDCT. Autolysis alters the attenuation of organs. The most dramatic autolytic changes on MDCT are seen in the brain where cerebral sulci and ventricles are effaced and gray-white matter differentiation is lost almost immediately after death. Putrefaction produces a pattern of gas that begins with intravascular gas and proceeds to gaseous distension of all anatomic spaces, organs, and soft tissues. Knowledge of the spectrum of postmortem change and decomposition is an important component of postmortem MDCT interpretation.

  4. MR arthrography evaluation in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Saba, Luca; De Filippo, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the diagnostic accuracy of MR arthrography, compared with arthroscopy, in research of the glenoid labrum tear in patients with a first episode of traumatic anterior shoulder instability (TUBS). We retrospectively reviewed the MR arthrography shoulder images of 118 patients with a first episode of TUBS, between June 2014 and May 2016. The overall accuracy of MR arthrography compared with arthroscopy of the glenoid labrum lesions was 94%, sensitivity 93%, and specificity 96%. The sensitivity of MR arthrography for Perthes lesion was 71.4%, and for ALPSA lesion, it was 91%. Slap lesion occurred in 11 out of 77 cases (9.3% of 118 cases). The Hill-Sachs lesion occurred in 48 out of 118 cases (40.7%), while the Hill-Sachs reverse lesion in 4 cases (3.4%). The MR arthrography is accurate in detecting labral injuries. However, other studies are needed to assess the less frequent tear, as Perthes lesion. The presence of the Hill-Sachs lesion could provide useful information about the level of the shoulder instability.

  5. The use of arthrography in pediatric orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Philip D; Duhn, Ryan

    2014-08-01

    Surgery near pediatric joints can be challenging because it is difficult to visualize vital articular structures. Assessment of underlying pathology is also challenging because the joint structures have not yet ossified. Arthrography is a useful tool that is quick and minimally invasive and allows adequate visualization of joint anatomy during surgery, which aids intraoperative decision making. In pediatric patients, arthrography is most useful for visualization of the elbow, knee, and hip joints. This tool can help the surgeon to refine the diagnosis and management of pediatric fractures and aids in surgical assessment during joint and limb reconstruction. Arthrography adds minimal time to surgery and carries a low risk of complications; it should be part of the armamentarium of any surgeon who treats pediatric orthopaedic patients. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  6. Panoramic radiography for temporomandibular joint arthrography: a description of arthropanoramograms.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, K; Langlais, R P; Dolwick, M F

    1989-06-01

    TMJ arthrograms done with panoramic radiography, i.e., arthropanoramography, can demonstrate intracapsular disk displacement and perforation pathoses. These views are very practical for inferior synovial cavity arthrograms performed in the dental operatory since panoramic radiographic machines have become common in modern dental practices. Specific advantages of arthropanoramography include the decreased financial cost and decreased radiation exposure to the patient. Arthropanoramography does not replace tomography or videofluoroscopy in TMJ arthrography. It is, however, described as a simple alternative to the more conventional forms of arthrography.

  7. Variability of repeated coronary artery calcium scoring and radiation Dose on 64- and 16-slice computed tomography by prospective electrocardiographically-triggered axial and retrospective electrocardiographically-gated spiral computed tomography: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Jun; Kiguchi, Masao; Fujioka, Chikako; Arie, Ryuichi; Shen, Yun; Sunasaka, Kenichi; Kitagawa, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Hideya; Ito, Katsuhide

    2008-08-01

    We sought to compare coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores, the variability and radiation doses on 64- and 16-slice computed tomography (CT) scanners by both prospective electrocardiographically (ECG)-triggered and retrospective ECG-gated scans. Coronary artery models (n = 3) with different plaque CT densities (approximately 240 Hounsfield units [HU], approximately 600 HU, and approximately 1000 HU) of four sizes (1, 3, 5, and 10 mm in length) on a cardiac phantom were scanned three times in five heart rate sequences. The tube current-time products were set to almost the same on all four protocols (32.7 mAs for 64-slice prospective and retrospective scans, 33.3 mAs for 16-slice prospective and retrospective scans). Slice thickness was set to 2.5 mm to keep the radiation dose low. Overlapping reconstruction with a 1.25-mm increment was applied on the retrospective ECG-gated scan. The CAC scores were not different between the four protocols (one-factor analysis of variance: Agatston, P = .32; volume, P = .19; and mass, P = .09). Two-factor factorial analysis of variance test revealed that the interscan variability was different between protocols (P < .01) and scoring algorithms (P < .01). The average variability of Agatston/volume/mass scoring and effective doses were as follows: 64-slice prospective scan: 16%/15%/11% and 0.5 mSv; 64-slice retrospective scan: 11%/11%/8% and 3.7 mSv; 16-slice prospective scan: 20%/18%/13% and 0.6 mSv; and 16-slice retrospective scan: 16%/15%/11% and 2.9 to 3.5 mSv (depending on the pitch). Retrospective ECG-gated 64-slice CT showed the lowest variability. Prospective ECG-triggered 64-slice CT, with low radiation dose, shows low variability on CAC scoring comparable to retrospective ECG-gated 16-slice CT.

  8. Comparison of conventional radiography and MDCT in suspected scaphoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Karul, Murat; Henes, Frank Oliver; Laqmani, Azien; Catala-Lehnen, Philipp; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Nagel, Hans-Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose of conventional radiography and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in suspected scaphoid fractures. METHODS: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients were enrolled in our study who had suffered from a wrist trauma and showed typical clinical symptoms suspicious of an acute scaphoid fracture. All patients had initially undergone conventional radiography. Subsequent MDCT was performed within 10 d because of persisting clinical symptoms. Using the MDCT data as the reference standard, a fourfold table was used to classify the test results. The effective dose and impaired energy were assessed in order to compare the radiation burden of the two techniques. The Wilcoxon test was performed to compare the two diagnostic modalities. RESULTS: Conventional radiography showed 34 acute fractures of the scaphoid in 124 patients (42.2%). Subsequent MDCT revealed a total of 42 scaphoid fractures. The sensitivity of conventional radiography for scaphoid fracture detection was 42.8% and its specificity was 80% resulting in an overall accuracy of 59.6%. Conventional radiography was significantly inferior to MDCT (P < 0.01) concerning scaphoid fracture detection. The mean effective dose of MDCT was 0.1 mSv compared to 0.002 mSv of conventional radiography. CONCLUSION: Conventional radiography is insufficient for accurate scaphoid fracture detection. Regarding the almost negligible effective dose, MDCT should serve as the first imaging modality in wrist trauma. PMID:25628802

  9. Dose reduction in paediatric MDCT: general principles.

    PubMed

    Paterson, A; Frush, D P

    2007-06-01

    The number of multi-detector array computed tomography (MDCT) examinations performed per annum continues to increase in both the adult and paediatric populations. Estimates from 2003 suggested that CT contributed 17% of a radiology department's workload, yet was responsible for up to 75% of the collective population dose from medical radiation. The effective doses for some CT examinations today overlap with those argued to have an increased risk of cancer. This is especially pertinent for paediatric CT, as children are more radiosensitive than adults (and girls more radiosensitive than boys). In addition, children have a longer life ahead of them, in which radiation induced cancers may become manifest. Radiologists must be aware of these facts and practise the ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principle, when it comes to deciding CT protocols and parameters.

  10. MDCT of acute thrombotic and nonthrombotic pulmonary emboli.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Sanjeev; Lopez-Costa, Ignacio

    2007-10-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) remains a common clinical challenge. MDCT pulmonary angiography has become the first line imaging study in the diagnosis of PE because of its speed, accuracy, low-interobserver variability, and ability to provide alternative diagnoses. This review article highlights the role of MDCT in the evaluation of acute thrombotic PE in the era of PIOPED 2. MDCT findings of acute PE and some potential pitfalls are covered as well as some of the controversies in imaging young and pregnant patients. MDCT findings of acute non-thrombotic PE are also covered. This latter group may be occult on the angiographic portion of the study but may declare themselves through secondary findings. Their findings and potential mimics are included so that the interpreting radiologist can make the most of a CT to rule out PE.

  11. Temporal resolution improvement using PICCS in MDCT cardiac imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Tang, Jie; Hsieh, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    The current paradigm for temporal resolution improvement is to add more source-detector units and∕or increase the gantry rotation speed. The purpose of this article is to present an innovative alternative method to potentially improve temporal resolution by approximately a factor of 2 for all MDCT scanners without requiring hardware modification. The central enabling technology is a most recently developed image reconstruction method: Prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS). Using the method, cardiac CT images can be accurately reconstructed using the projection data acquired in an angular range of about 120°, which is roughly 50% of the standard short-scan angular range (∼240° for an MDCT scanner). As a result, the temporal resolution of MDCT cardiac imaging can be universally improved by approximately a factor of 2. In order to validate the proposed method, two in vivo animal experiments were conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice CT scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at different gantry rotation times and different heart rates. One animal was scanned at heart rate of 83 beats per minute (bpm) using 400 ms gantry rotation time and the second animal was scanned at 94 bpm using 350 ms gantry rotation time, respectively. Cardiac coronary CT imaging can be successfully performed at high heart rates using a single-source MDCT scanner and projection data from a single heart beat with gantry rotation times of 400 and 350 ms. Using the proposed PICCS method, the temporal resolution of cardiac CT imaging can be effectively improved by approximately a factor of 2 without modifying any scanner hardware. This potentially provides a new method for single-source MDCT scanners to achieve reliable coronary CT imaging for patients at higher heart rates than the current heart rate limit of 70 bpm without using the well-known multisegment FBP reconstruction algorithm. This method also enables dual-source MDCT scanner to achieve higher temporal resolution

  12. Comparison of MR-arthrography and CT-arthrography in hyaline cartilage-thickness measurement in radiographically normal cadaver hips with anatomy as gold standard.

    PubMed

    Wyler, A; Bousson, V; Bergot, C; Polivka, M; Leveque, E; Vicaut, E; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2009-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance (MR)-arthrography and multidetector-spiral-computed-tomography (MDSCT)-arthrography in cartilage-thickness measurement, in hips without cartilage loss, with coronal anatomic slices as gold standard. Institutional review board permission to study cadavers of individuals who willed their bodies to science was obtained. Two independent observers measured femoral and acetabular cartilage thicknesses of 12 radiographically normal hips (six women, five men; age range, 52-98 years; mean age, 76.5 years), on MDSCT-arthrographic and MR-arthrographic reformations, and on coronal anatomic slices, excluding regions of cartilage loss. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibilities were determined. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test differences between MR-arthrographic and MDSCT-arthrographic measurement errors compared to anatomy. By MR-arthrography, cartilage was not measurable at approximately 50% of points on sagittal and transverse sections, compared to 0-6% of the points by MDSCT-arthrography. In the coronal plane, the difference between MDSCT-arthrographic and MR-arthrographic measurement errors was not significant (P=0.93). In the coronal plane, MR-arthrography and MDSCT-arthrography were similarly accurate for measuring hip cartilage thickness.

  13. Comparison of conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the evaluation wrist ligament tears: A preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Shivani; Srivastava, Deep N; Sharma, Raju; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Kotwal, Prakash P; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-07-01

    To compare conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and intrinsic wrist ligament tears. T1-weighted, fat suppressed (FS) proton density plus T2-weighted (FS PD/T2), 3D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) sequences and direct MR arthrography were performed in 53 patients with wrist pain. Images were evaluated for the presence and location of TFCC, scapholunate ligament (SLL) and lunatotriquetral ligament (LTL) tears, and imaging findings were compared with operative findings in 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery (gold standard). SIXTEEN PATIENTS UNDERWENT ARTHROSCOPY/OPEN SURGERY: 12 TFCC tears were detected arthroscopically out of which 9 were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, 10 on MEDIC sequence, and all 12 were detected on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in the detection of TFCC tears were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. Out of the eight arthroscopically confirmed SLL tears, three tears were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, five on MEDIC sequence, and all eight were visualized on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting SLL tears were 37.5%, 62.5%, and 100%, respectively. One arthroscopically confirmed LTL tear was diagnosed on FS PD/T2 sequence, three on MEDIC sequence, and all five arthroscopically confirmed LTL tears were detected with MR arthrography. The sensitivities of PD, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting LTL tears were 20%, 40%, and 100%, respectively. MR arthrography is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament tears.

  14. Ultrasound-guided joint injections for MR arthrography in pediatric patients: how we do it.

    PubMed

    Otjen, Jeffrey; Parnell, Shawn E; Menashe, Sarah; Thapa, Mahesh M

    2015-03-01

    In children, MR arthrography is typically performed using fluoroscopic guidance. This article explores the role of US-guided joint injections as an alternative for MR arthrography in children, discussing its advantages and disadvantages compared to standard methods. We describe techniques for performing US-guided injection of the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, ankle and posterior subtalar joints, highlighting pertinent anatomy, routes of access and unique considerations for this modality in children. Written descriptions, images and links to video clips are used to illustrate proper arthrographic technique. We conclude that US provides effective guidance for intra-articular injection prior to MR arthrography, with the advantages of improved visualization of internal structures, reduced radiation exposure, convenience of performing the procedure portably and ease of performance. Although this paper does not address therapeutic steroid injections, these techniques could easily be translated for such purposes. We propose US guidance as a viable alternative to fluoroscopic technique for arthrography in children.

  15. Silicosis due to Denim Sandblasting in Young People: MDCT Findings.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Selim; Gocmen, Hayrettin; Yikilmaz, Ali; Coskun, Abdulhakim

    2010-04-01

    Occupational lung disease due to silica dust is one of the most common work-related injuries. In denim sandblasting, workers are exposed to silica that may cause immediate mortality, especially in young people. The aim of this study was to assess the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of silicosis in denim sandblasters and to better define the role of MDCT in the early detection of silicosis. The study included 12 consecutive male patients who were admitted to a pulmonary outpatient clinic between April 2009 and December 2009. All patients had been working as sandblasters for at least one year. All patients underwent chest CT examinations for suspected silicosis. Two radiologists independently assessed the images for the presence and distribution of airspace consolidation, ground-glass opacity, nodules, interlobular septal thickening, parenchymal bands, fibrosis, masses, traction bronchiectasis, honeycombing, lobular low-attenuation areas, emphysema, pleural effusion or thickening, and mediastinal or hilar adenopathy. MDCT detected parenchymal abnormalities in the lungs in eight (67%) of the twelve patients. The most common MDCT finding was ground glass opacity (58%). Other common findings were parencyhmal nodules and interlobular septal thickening, predominantly in the upper zones. Nodules were detected in six (50%) of the twelve patients. In four cases (67%), the nodules were numerous (>10), were predominantly smaller than 10 mm, and were centrilobular in distribution. In five (42%) of the 12 patients, interlobular septal thickening was detected. Only one (8%) patient presented with airspace consolidation; this was bilateral in the upper zones and associated with air bronchograms. In one (8%) patient there were several traction bronchiectases in the upper zones. None of the patients presented with pleural effusion, thickening, or honeycombing. Enlarged mediastinal nodes were identified in half of the patients, predominantly in the precarinal

  16. Silicosis due to Denim Sandblasting in Young People: MDCT Findings

    PubMed Central

    Doganay, Selim; Gocmen, Hayrettin; Yikilmaz, Ali; Coskun, Abdulhakim

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Occupational lung disease due to silica dust is one of the most common work-related injuries. In denim sandblasting, workers are exposed to silica that may cause immediate mortality, especially in young people. The aim of this study was to assess the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of silicosis in denim sandblasters and to better define the role of MDCT in the early detection of silicosis. Materials and Methods: The study included 12 consecutive male patients who were admitted to a pulmonary outpatient clinic between April 2009 and December 2009. All patients had been working as sandblasters for at least one year. All patients underwent chest CT examinations for suspected silicosis. Two radiologists independently assessed the images for the presence and distribution of airspace consolidation, ground-glass opacity, nodules, interlobular septal thickening, parenchymal bands, fibrosis, masses, traction bronchiectasis, honeycombing, lobular low-attenuation areas, emphysema, pleural effusion or thickening, and mediastinal or hilar adenopathy. Results: MDCT detected parenchymal abnormalities in the lungs in eight (67%) of the twelve patients. The most common MDCT finding was ground glass opacity (58%). Other common findings were parencyhmal nodules and interlobular septal thickening, predominantly in the upper zones. Nodules were detected in six (50%) of the twelve patients. In four cases (67%), the nodules were numerous (>10), were predominantly smaller than 10 mm, and were centrilobular in distribution. In five (42%) of the 12 patients, interlobular septal thickening was detected. Only one (8%) patient presented with airspace consolidation; this was bilateral in the upper zones and associated with air bronchograms. In one (8%) patient there were several traction bronchiectases in the upper zones. None of the patients presented with pleural effusion, thickening, or honeycombing. Enlarged mediastinal nodes were identified in half of the

  17. Perfusion measurement in acute pancreatitis using dynamic perfusion MDCT.

    PubMed

    Bize, Pierre E; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis in the initial phase of the disease. One hundred six patients with abdominal pain were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were separated into two groups: P1 (severe) and P2 (mild) acute pancreatitis. Mean perfusion value was 24.8 mL/100 mL/min in the P1 group and 50.5 mL/100 mL/min in the P2 group (p = 0.0016, significant). Our preliminary data suggest that pancreatic perfusion measurement using MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  18. 3-D segmentation of human sternum in lung MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Pazokifard, Banafsheh; Sowmya, Arcot

    2013-01-01

    A fully automatic novel algorithm is presented for accurate 3-D segmentation of the human sternum in lung multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) images. The segmentation result is refined by employing active contours to remove calcified costal cartilage that is attached to the sternum. For each dataset, costal notches (sternocostal joints) are localized in 3-D by using a sternum mask and positions of the costal notches on it as reference. The proposed algorithm for sternum segmentation was tested on 16 complete lung MDCT datasets and comparison of the segmentation results to the reference delineation provided by a radiologist, shows high sensitivity (92.49%) and specificity (99.51%) and small mean distance (dmean=1.07 mm). Total average of the Euclidean distance error for costal notches positioning in 3-D is 4.2 mm.

  19. Vascular involvement in periampullary tumors: MDCT, EUS, and CDU.

    PubMed

    Gusmini, S; Nicoletti, R; Martinenghi, C; Del Maschio, A

    2009-07-01

    In patients affected by periampullary tumors, surgical resection represents the only treatment with curative intent. Preoperative evaluation of vascular involvement is necessary to avoid surgical treatments unable of curative intent resection. The aim of our update article is to assess the performance of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) in the evaluation of vascular involvement of major peripancreatic vessels, in periampullary tumors, analyzing the current and past literature.

  20. Radiation dose measurement for various parameters in MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Hee-Joung; Jeon, Seong Su; Cho, Hyo-Min; Nam, So Ra; Jung, Ji-Young

    2008-03-01

    The MDCT parameters affecting radiation dose include tube voltage, tube current, change of beam collimation, and size of the human body. The purpose of this study was to measure and evaluate radiation dose for MDCT parameters. A comparative analysis of the radiation dose according to before and after the calibration of the ionization chamber was performed. The ionization chamber was used for measuring radiation dose in the MDCT, as well as of CTDI W according to temperature and pressure correction factors in the CT room. As a result, the patient dose of CTDI W values linearly increased as tube voltage and current were increased, and nonlinearly decreased as beam collimation was increased. And the CTDI W value which was reflected calibration factors, as well as correction factors of temperature and pressure, was found to be greater by the range of 0.479 ~ 3.162 mGy in effective radiation dose than the uncorrected value. Also, Under the abdomen routine CT conditions used in hospitals, patient exposure dose showed a difference of a maximum of 0.7 mSv between before and after the application of such factors. These results imply that the calibration of the ion chamber, and the application of temperature and pressure of the CT room are crucial in measuring and calculating patient exposure dose.

  1. Estimation and comparison of the radiation effective dose during coronary computed tomography angiography examinations on single-source 64-MDCT and dual-source 128-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Khoramian, Daryoush; Sistani, Soroush

    2017-09-14

    To estimate and compare the radiation dose associated with coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) examinations on two multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT), 64-MDCT and 128-MDCT, in daily practice. Scan parameters of 90 patients undergoing retrospective electrocardiographic gating spiral CCTA exam were recorded during a period on a single-source 64-MDCT and a dual-source 128-MDCT, and average scan parameters were derived that were used for dosimetry. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) with a pencil ionisation chamber and polymethyl methacrylate body phantom with diameter of 32 cm was measured on both scanners. The dose-length product (DLP) was calculated and the DLP to effective dose conversion factor (for chest scan at 120 kV of 0.014 mSv mGy(-1) cm(-1)) was used to estimate effective dose (ED). Patients' heart rate, scan length, pitch factor, CTDIv, DLP and ED for 128-MDCT were 64 (5) (beats min(-1)), 161 (10) (mm), 0.26, 47 (12) (mGy), 769 (212) (mGy cm) and 10.3 (3.1) (mSv), respectively [mean (one standard deviation)]. Patients' heart rate, scan length, pitch factor, CTDIv, DLP and ED for 64-MDCT were 60 (7) (beats min(-1)), 172 (14) (mm), 0.2, 60 (6) (mGy), 1068 (98) (mGy cm) and 14.9 (1.4) (mSv), respectively. Our results indicated that the CTDIv, DLP and the effective dose with 128-MDCT is significantly lower than with 64-MDCT (p < 0.05). As differences between the exposure parameter mAs on two CT scanners was not significant (p > 0.05) and the kV was constant for both scanners (120 kV), the differences resulted from a shorter scan length on the 128-MDCT and use of a higher pitch factor (0.26 and 0.2 in the 128-MDCT and 64-MDCT, respectively). Comparison with other published studies confirms the findings and indicates methods for reducing patient dose.

  2. Assessment of painful total shoulder arthroplasty using computed tomography arthrography.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Gregory C; Burton, Lauren; Coats-Thomas, Margaret; Daniels, S David; Sinz, Nathan J; Warner, Jon J P

    2015-10-01

    This study assessed the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) arthrography when evaluating glenoid component stability in the setting of postarthroplasty shoulder pain. We retrospectively reviewed all patients presenting to the clinic during a 5.5-year period to identify those with a painful shoulder arthroplasty more than 1 year after the index procedure. We excluded reverse and hemiarthroplasty procedures, patients with a clearly identifiable cause for pain, such as rotator cuff insufficiency or gross component loosening as seen on plain radiographs, and those with culture-positive aspiration. There were 14 patients with suspected glenoid component loosening but inconclusive plain radiographs. Each of the 14 patients underwent a CT arthrogram that was evaluated by the senior author (J.J.P.W.) for the presence or absence of contrast material underneath the polyethylene component. Operative reports and surgical videos from subsequent arthroscopy were reviewed to assess glenoid component stability as determined by direct arthroscopic visualization. CT arthrography suggested glenoid component loosening in 8 of 14 patients (57.1%), and arthroscopic inspection identified loosening in 10 of 14 patients (71.4%). In 3 of 10 patients (30%), CTA suggested a well-fixed glenoid component, but gross loosening was identified during arthroscopy. In this study, CTA yielded a sensitivity of 70%, a specificity of 75%, a positive predictive value of 87.5%, and a negative predictive value of 50.0%. CTA had a low negative predictive value (50%), and therefore, the prediction of component stability based on the absence of contrast between the glenoid component and the bone-cement interface does not always reflect true stability. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. External rotation and active supination CT arthrography for the postoperative evaluation of type II superior labral anterior to posterior lesions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae Hoon; Choi, Ja-Young; Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of external rotation and active supination CT arthrography in postoperative evaluation by comparing it with neutral CT arthrography and analyzing its agreement with postoperative clinical results after the repair of type II superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions. A total of 25 patients who had undergone CT arthrography in neutral, external rotation and active supination position at least 1 year after the arthroscopic repair of SLAP lesions were enrolled. Two radiologists independently evaluated the status of the repaired SLAP lesions with neutral CT arthrography and then with external rotation and active supination CT arthrography. Five patients had residual symptoms and positive findings upon SLAP-specific examinations. Agreements between the presence of symptoms and radiologic diagnoses based on neutral CT arthrography were insignificant for reader 1 (κ = 0.138, p = n.s.) and significant for reader 2 (κ = 0.328, p = 0.027). However, agreements were highly significant in the analysis following the evaluation of external rotation and active supination CT arthrography for both readers (κ = 0.694, p < 0.001 in reader 1; κ = 0.783, p < 0.001 in reader 2). The presence of contrast-filled gaps between the labrum and glenoid on neutral CT arthrography after SLAP repair is frequent with satisfactory clinical outcomes. Gaps without additional widening upon external rotation and active supination CT arthrography may suggest postoperatively stable biceps anchors, so this new method could minimize the overdiagnosis of recurrent SLAP lesions. Additional gap widening on external rotation and active supination CT arthrography could be related to a true recurrent SLAP lesion and the symptoms of the patients. Case series, Level IV.

  4. FIESTA: an MR arthrography celebration of shoulder joint anatomy, variants, and their mimics.

    PubMed

    Yu, D; Turmezei, T D; Kerslake, R W

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is currently the gold standard radiological investigation for shoulder joint instability. Not only does this investigation allow for identification of important disease processes, but the reduced slice thickness and increased in-plane resolution allowed by the latest imaging sequences also gives excellent demonstration of shoulder joint internal anatomy. This article describes the technique of MR arthrography of the shoulder practiced at our institution, briefly outlining features of the FIESTA (fast imaging employing steady state acquisition) MR sequence employed, including its advantages and limitations. A pictorial review of shoulder MR arthrography performed with this technique is presented, concentrating on normal shoulder joint internal anatomy and anatomical variants that may mimic pathology.

  5. MR evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage complex tears in the wrist: comparison with arthrography and arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cerofolini, E; Luchetti, R; Pederzini, L; Soragni, O; Colombini, R; D'Alimonte, P; Romagnoli, R

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) in the detection of tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), 10 consecutive patients with posttraumatic chronic wrist pain were examined with MR, arthrography, and arthroscopy and the results were compared. The MR images of 16 control subjects were also examined to define the MR appearance of the normal TFCC. When compared with arthroscopic findings, both MR and arthrography had two false-negative results (sensitivity, 80%) and no false-positive results. Regarding the sites of the TFCC tears, the findings on MR did not always correlate with the findings on arthrography. In no case was MR able to visualize the cartilaginous lesions visible by arthroscopy. These preliminary results illustrate the ability of MR to assess the integrity of the TFCC and suggest its use as the first imaging technique following plain radiography in the evaluation of patients with chronic posttraumatic pain on the ulnar side of the wrist.

  6. MDCT of hand and wrist infections: emphasis on compartmental anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S; Corl, F M; LaPorte, D M; Fishman, E K; Fayad, L M

    2017-04-01

    Hand and wrist infections can present with a spectrum of manifestations ranging from cellulitis to deep-space collections. The various infectious processes can be categorised as superficial or deep infections based on their respective locations relative to the tendons. Superficial hand infections are located superficial to the tendons and are comprised of cellulitis, lymphangitis, paronychia, pulp-space infections, herpetic whitlow, and include volar as well as dorsal subcutaneous abscesses. Deep hand infections are located deep to the tendon sheaths and include synovial space infections, such as infectious tenosynovitis, deep fascial space infections, septic arthritis, necrotising fasciitis, and osteomyelitis. Knowledge of hand and wrist compartmental anatomy is essential for the accurate diagnosis and management of hand infections. Although early and superficial infections of the hand may respond to non-surgical management, most hand infections are surgical emergencies. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), with its muliplanar reformation (MPR) and three-dimensional (3D) capabilities, is a powerful tool in the emergency setting for the evaluation of acute hand and wrist pathology. The clinical and imaging features of hand and wrist infections as evident on MDCT will be reviewed with emphasis on contiguous and closed synovial and deep fascial spaces. Knowledge of hand compartmental anatomy enables accurate characterisation of the infectious process and localise the extent of disease in the acute setting. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MDCT imaging of the stomach: advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Prashant; Prakash, Anjali; Pradhan, Gaurav; Vidholia, Aditi; Nagpal, Nishant; Saboo, Sachin S; Kuehn, David M; Khandelwal, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    The stomach may be involved by a myriad of pathologies ranging from benign aetiologies like inflammation to malignant aetiologies like carcinoma or lymphoma. Multidetector CT (MDCT) of the stomach is the first-line imaging for patients with suspected gastric pathologies. Conventionally, CT imaging had the advantage of simultaneous detection of the mural and extramural disease extent, but advances in MDCT have allowed mucosal assessment by virtual endoscopy (VE). Also, better three-dimensional (3D) post-processing techniques have enabled more robust and accurate pre-operative planning in patients undergoing gastrectomy and even predict the response to surgery for patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for weight loss. The ability of CT to obtain stomach volume (for bariatric surgery patients) and 3D VE images depends on various patient and protocol factors that are important for a radiologist to understand. We review the appropriate CT imaging protocol in the patients with suspected gastric pathologies and highlight the imaging pearls of various gastric pathologies on CT and VE.

  8. The diagnostic accuracy of X-ray arthrography for triangular fibrocartilaginous complex injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, T O; Drew, B T; Toms, A P; Chojnowski, A J

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic test accuracy of X-ray arthrography in the detection of TFCC tear. Both published and unpublished databases were searched from their inception to August 2010. All studies comparing the diagnostic accuracy of X-ray arthrography (index test) to arthroscopy (reference standard) for patients with suspected TFCC tears were included in this review. Twelve studies assessing 430 patients (430 wrists) satisfied the eligibility criteria and were included. X-ray arthrography presented with a pooled sensitivity of 76.2% and specificity of 92.5% for the detection of complete TFCC tear. The triple-compartment injection X-ray arthrography was superior to the single-compartment injection technique. To conclude, the diagnostic test accuracy of X-ray arthrography is limited. Neither the single- nor the triple-compartment injection arthrography method is acceptable, given their reported low sensitivities. Further evaluation of the diagnostic test accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Arthrography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging is therefore warranted.

  9. Bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip: diagnosis using arthrography and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, L.S.; Schneider, R.; Goldman, A.B.; Kazam, E.; Ranawat, C.S.; Ghelman, B.

    1985-08-01

    Bursae or abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint were demonstrated by hip arthrography or by computed tomography (CT) in 40 cases. The bursae or abscess cavities were associated with underlying abnormalities in the hip, including painful hip prostheses, infection, and inflammatory or degenerative arthritis. Symptoms may be produced directly as a result of infection or indirectly as a result of inflammation or pressure on adjacent structures. Hip arthrography can confirm a diagnosis of bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint in patients with hip pain or soft-tissue masses around the groin. Differentiation of enlarged bursae from other abnormalities is important to avoid unnecessary or incorrect surgery.

  10. Mixed-radix Algorithm for the Computation of Forward and Inverse MDCT

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiasong; Shu, Huazhong; Senhadji, Lotfi; Luo, Limin

    2008-01-01

    The modified discrete cosine transform (MDCT) and inverse MDCT (IMDCT) are two of the most computational intensive operations in MPEG audio coding standards. A new mixed-radix algorithm for efficient computing the MDCT/IMDCT is presented. The proposed mixed-radix MDCT algorithm is composed of two recursive algorithms. The first algorithm, called the radix-2 decimation in frequency (DIF) algorithm, is obtained by decomposing an N-point MDCT into two MDCTs with the length N/2. The second algorithm, called the radix-3 decimation in time (DIT) algorithm, is obtained by decomposing an N-point MDCT into three MDCTs with the length N/3. Since the proposed MDCT algorithm is also expressed in the form of a simple sparse matrix factorization, the corresponding IMDCT algorithm can be easily derived by simply transposing the matrix factorization. Comparison of the proposed algorithm with some existing ones shows that our proposed algorithm is more suitable for parallel implementation and especially suitable for the layer III of MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 audio encoding and decoding. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can be easily extended to the multidimensional case by using the vector-radix method. PMID:21258639

  11. Comparison of conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the evaluation of wrist ligament tears: A preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Shivani; Srivastava, Deep N; Sharma, Raju; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Kotwal, Prakash P; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To compare conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and intrinsic wrist ligament tears. Materials and Methods: T1-weighted, fat suppressed (FS) proton density plus T2-weighted (FS PD/T2), 3D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) sequences and direct MR arthrography were performed in 53 patients with wrist pain. Images were evaluated for the presence and location of TFCC, scapholunate ligament (SLL) and lunatotriquetral ligament (LTL) tears, and imaging findings were compared with operative findings in 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery (gold standard). Results: Sixteen patients underwent arthroscopy/open surgery: 12 TFCC tears were detected arthroscopically out of which 9 were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, 10 on MEDIC sequence, and all 12 were detected on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in the detection of TFCC tears were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. Out of the eight arthroscopically confirmed SLL tears, three tears were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, five on MEDIC sequence, and all eight were visualized on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting SLL tears were 37.5%, 62.5%, and 100%, respectively. One arthroscopically confirmed LTL tear was diagnosed on FS PD/T2 sequence, three on MEDIC sequence, and all five arthroscopically confirmed LTL tears were detected with MR arthrography. The sensitivities of PD, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting LTL tears were 20%, 40%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: MR arthrography is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament tears. PMID:25114389

  12. Underestimation of left atrial size measured with transthoracic echocardiography compared with 3D MDCT.

    PubMed

    Koka, Anish R; Yau, James; Van Why, Carolyn; Cohen, Ira S; Halpern, Ethan J

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution 64-MDCT images of the beating heart can be used for measurement of left atrial volume with 3D chamber reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to correlate measurements of left atrial volume obtained with clinical transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and measurements obtained with 64-MDCT 3D reconstructions of the left atrium. Patients who underwent TTE and MDCT within 3 days were identified. TTE images were graded as excellent, good, or suboptimal. Two independent observers calculated estimates of left atrial volume from TTE and 64-MDCT images using 3D chamber reconstructions and conventional geometric assumptions on MDCT echocardiographic views. MDCT estimates of phantom volume on 3D chamber reconstructions agreed with actual volumes within 1.5%. The TTE images of 37 of the 52 patients were judged to be of good or excellent quality and were included in the analysis. Mean left atrial volume measured on 3D chamber reconstructions was 61 +/- 14 mL/m(2). Estimates of left atrial volume obtained with TTE were significantly lower (28 +/- 12 mL/m(2)) than similar estimates obtained with MDCT echocardiographic views (53 +/- 15 mL/m(2)) (p < 0.001). TTE left atrial volume and 3D chamber reconstruction left atrial volume exhibited moderate correlation (r = 0.60-0.70), but the correlation improved when analysis was limited to the 26 studies with excellent-quality TTE images (r = 0.71). MDCT echocardiographic estimates of left atrial volume with the area-length method had excellent correlation (r = 0.89) with and were closest to estimates made on 3D chamber reconstructions. Left atrial volume is significantly underestimated on TTE images, and TTE estimates have moderate correlation with left atrial volume measured with MDCT. Measured and estimated left atrial volumes at MDCT can provide important additive prognostic information in the care of patients undergoing MDCT for other reasons. Future studies are needed to obtain normative MDCT measurements of

  13. Hepatosplenic volumetric assessment at MDCT for staging liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, Perry J; Malecki, Kyle; Hunt, Oliver F; Beaumont, Claire; Kloke, John; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Lubner, Meghan G

    2017-07-01

    To investigate hepatosplenic volumetry at MDCT for non-invasive prediction of hepatic fibrosis. Hepatosplenic volume analysis in 624 patients (mean age, 48.8 years; 311 M/313 F) at MDCT was performed using dedicated software and compared against pathological fibrosis stage (F0 = 374; F1 = 48; F2 = 40; F3 = 65; F4 = 97). The liver segmental volume ratio (LSVR) was defined by Couinaud segments I-III over segments IV-VIII. All pre-cirrhotic fibrosis stages (METAVIR F1-F3) were based on liver biopsy within 1 year of MDCT. LSVR and total splenic volumes increased with stage of fibrosis, with mean(±SD) values of: F0: 0.26 ± 0.06 and 215.1 ± 88.5 mm(3); F1: 0.25 ± 0.08 and 294.8 ± 153.4 mm(3); F2: 0.331 ± 0.12 and 291.6 ± 197.1 mm(3); F3: 0.39 ± 0.15 and 509.6 ± 402.6 mm(3); F4: 0.56 ± 0.30 and 790.7 ± 450.3 mm(3), respectively. Total hepatic volumes showed poor discrimination (F0: 1674 ± 320 mm(3); F4: 1631 ± 691 mm(3)). For discriminating advanced fibrosis (≥F3), the ROC AUC values for LSVR, total liver volume, splenic volume and LSVR/spleen combined were 0.863, 0.506, 0.890 and 0.947, respectively. Relative changes in segmental liver volumes and total splenic volume allow for non-invasive staging of hepatic fibrosis, whereas total liver volume is a poor predictor. Unlike liver biopsy or elastography, these CT volumetric biomarkers can be obtained retrospectively on routine scans obtained for other indications. • Regional changes in hepatic volume (LSVR) correlate well with degree of fibrosis. • Total liver volume is a very poor predictor of underlying fibrosis. • Total splenic volume is associated with the degree of hepatic fibrosis. • Hepatosplenic volume assessment is comparable to elastography for staging fibrosis. • Unlike elastography, volumetric analysis can be performed retrospectively.

  14. Computed tomographic arthrography of the normal dromedary camel carpus.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Adel M; Marzok, Mohamed A; Eshra, Eman A

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this prospective cadaveric study was to provide a detailed computed tomographic (CT) reference of the carpal joint in healthy dromedary camels. Twelve forelimbs of six apparently healthy camels were used. Computed tomographic imaging of 12 normal cadaveric camel carpal joints was performed before and after intra-articular administration of iodinated contrast medium. Transverse CT images were reconstructed in dorsal and parasagittal planes. The six carpal bones, the radial trochlea, and the proximal articular surface of the metacarpal bones were clearly visible on CT images with the bone setting window. Radiocarpal, carpometacarpal, transverse intercarpal, medial and lateral palmer intercarpal, middle intercarpal, accessory carpoulnar and medial and lateral collateral ligaments, carpal canal, joint capsule, and the extensor and flexor tendons were identified on CT images with the soft-tissue setting window. Postcontrast CT images provided better delineation of intercarpal ligaments, the capsular compartments and recesses. Results indicated that the osseous and the clinically important soft tissue structures of the dromedary camel carpal joint could be identified using CT and CT arthrography. The CT data of this study will serve as a basis for diagnosis of carpal problems in camels.

  15. Pain & resistance in patients with adhesive capsulitis during contrast material injection phase of MR arthrography.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mehmet Halit; Kantarci, Fatih; Adaletli, Ibrahim; Ulus, Sila; Gulsen, Fatih; Ozer, Harun; Aktas, Ilknur; Akgun, Kenan; Kanberoglu, Kaya

    2007-04-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of unknown aetiology that results in the development of restricted active and passive glenohumeral motion. It has been reported that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is useful in diagnosing adhesive capsulitis. We carried out this study to assess how pain and/or resistance during contrast material injection affects the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis on magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography. The study included MR arthrography examinations of 21 patients with a diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis. The control group consisted of 20 patients who presented clinically with rotator cuff tear. The pain (visual analog scale, VAS), resistance to injection and the amount of contrast material that could be injected during injection phase of MR arthrography was assessed and compared between groups. The patients in adhesive capsulitis group (mean VAS score 66.5+/-25.5) experienced more pain when compared with the control group (mean VAS score 34.9+/-27.7, P<0.001). A statistically significant difference (P<0.001) in terms of the amount of the injected fluid (4.3+/-2.6 ml for adhesive capsulitis group, and 10.9+/-4.1 ml for control group) was seen into the joint cavity. Resistance to injection was significantly more (P<0.001) in patients with adhesive capsulitis when compared to control group. Experience of pain during injection, a decreased amount of contrast material injected and resistance to injection in patients during injection phase of MR arthrography may suggest adhesive capsulitis.

  16. MDCT of extranodal mantle cell lymphoma: a single institute experience.

    PubMed

    Baheti, Akshay D; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Sewatkar, Rani; Sachin, Saboo S; Shinagare, Atul B; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2015-08-01

    To study the pattern of extranodal and particularly gastrointestinal (GI) involvement of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) on MDCT MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this IRB-approved, HIPAA compliant retrospective study, MDCT features of 78 patients (62 males and 16 females, mean age 57 years) with MCL including 28 patients at presentation were reviewed. Clinical and histopathological (blastoid vs. non-blastoid) data were noted from medical records. Extranodal involvement was present in overall 51/78 patients on CT (65%), 18/28 (64%) patients at presentation. Spleen (21/78-27%) and bowel (19/78-24%) were the most common sites of extranodal involvement by MCL on imaging, followed by lungs (10/78-13%) and skin/subcutaneous tissue (9/78-12%). Bowel involvement was either in the form of endophytic polypoidal lesions (n = 11, mean size 3.1 cm), as focal mild bowel wall thickening (n = 5, mean thickness 1.4 cm), or as combination of the two (n = 3). Blastoid histology was present in 14/78 (24%) patients and was statistically associated with skin/subcutaneous involvement (p < 0.05; Fisher's exact t test). Median follow-up was 72 months during which 21 patients died with median survival of 48 months (26 months for blastoid histology vs. 47 months for non-blastoid histology). There was no statistical correlation between sites of involvement and survival. MCL has a predilection for extranodal disease, predominantly involving the spleen, bowel, lungs, and subcutaneous tissue. GI involvement on CT is in the form of endoluminal polypoidal lesions and mild bowel wall thickening. Skin/subcutaneous involvement was statistically more common with blastoid histology in our study.

  17. Polyarteritis nodosa: MDCT as a 'One-Stop Shop' Modality for Whole-Body Arterial Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, W.-L.; Tsai, I-C.; Lee Tain; Hsieh, C.-W.

    2008-07-15

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare disease, which is characterized by aneurysm formation and occlusion in the arteries of multiple systems. Due to its extensive involvement, whole-body evaluation is necessary for diagnosis and treatment monitoring. We report a case of polyarteritis nodosa using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as a 'one-stop shop' modality for whole-body arterial evaluation. With precise protocol design, MDCT can be used as a reliable noninvasive modality providing comprehensive whole-body arterial evaluation.

  18. Quantitative magnetic resonance arthrography in patients with femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Samaan, Michael A; Zhang, Alan L; Gallo, Matthew C; Schwaiger, Benedikt J; Link, Thomas M; Souza, Richard B; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative MRI (QMRI) of the hip with sequences such as T1ρ and T2 mapping has been utilized to detect early changes in cartilage matrix composition. However, QMRI has not been performed in the presence of intra-articular contrast. Thus the purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and use of QMRI during MR-arthrography (MRA) in femoracetabular impingement (FAI) patients. Using a 3 Tesla MR-scanner, 10 FAI patients underwent a unilateral MRA and standard MRI of the hip joint. Global and sub-regional T1ρ and T2 relaxation times of the acetabular and femoral articular cartilage were computed in the MRA and MRI assessments and agreement of these values were assessed using the Krippendorff's alpha (α) coefficient and linear regression (μ). T1ρ and T2 relaxation times between the MRA and MRI were compared using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Both global and sub-regional T1ρ and T2 relaxation times demonstrated strong agreement (α > 0.83; μ > 0.85) independent of intra-articular contrast. Also, global and sub-regional acetabular T1ρ (P = 0.72) and T2 (P = 0.94), as well as femoral T1ρ , relaxation times were similar between MRA and MRI (P = 0.73) yet femoral T2 relaxation times decreased when using intra-articular contrast (P = 0.04). This study demonstrated the feasibility of T1ρ and T2 mapping for use in hip MRA with FAI patients. The inclusion of QMRI in MRA provides a quantitative assessment of the effects of FAI on hip joint articular cartilage while allowing for detailed assessment of labral pathology with the use of intra-articular contrast. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1539-1545. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. MDCT of the S-shaped sinoatrial node artery.

    PubMed

    Saremi, Farhood; Channual, Stephanie; Abolhoda, Amir; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Narula, Jagat; Milliken, Jeffrey C

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to use 64-MDCT to investigate the anatomic characteristics of the S-shaped variant of the sinoatrial node (SAN) artery and to describe the clinical implications of the findings in ablative procedures involving the left atrium. Coronary CT angiograms of 250 patients (152 men, 98 women; mean age, 60 +/- 12 [SD] years) were retrospectively analyzed for identification of the origin, number, anatomic course, mode of termination, and S-shaped variant of the SAN artery. At least one SAN artery was detected in 244 patients. The S-shaped variant was seen in 35 (14.3%) of these patients. Thirty-four of the variants (30.6% of all left SAN arteries) arose from the proximal to middle portion of the left circumflex artery (mean distance between the ostium of the left circumflex artery and the origin of S-shaped variant, 28.7 +/- 13.1 mm). The other variant (0.7% of all right SAN arteries) originated from the distal right coronary artery. The S-shaped variant was the only artery supplying the SAN in 28 (11.4%) of the patients. In patients with two arteries supplying the SAN, the right SAN artery and the S-shaped variant of the left SAN artery were seen together in seven patients. The S-shaped SAN artery (mean distance from atrial wall, 2.43 +/- 0.992 mm) had a predictable proximal course, lying in the posterior aspect in a groove between the orifices of the left superior pulmonary vein and the left atrial appendage close to the left atrial wall. The terminal segment of the artery approached the nodal tissue posterior to the superior vena cava in 22 patients, anterior to the vena cava in 10 patients, and through branches surrounding the vena cava in two patients. The S-shaped variation of the SAN artery is common and has a characteristic anatomic course. MDCT can be used to plan surgical and catheter-based left atrial interventions in which this artery is at risk of injury.

  20. Quantification of arterial plaque and lumen density with MDCT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Narinder S.; Blobel, Joerg; Kashani, Hany; Rice, Murray; Ursani, Ali

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to derive a mathematical correction function in order to normalize the CT number measurements for small volume arterial plaque and small vessel mimicking objects, imaged with multidetector CT (MDCT). Methods: A commercially available calcium plaque phantom (QRM GmbH, Moehrendorf, Germany) and a custom built cardiovascular phantom were scanned with 320 and 64 MDCT scanners. The calcium hydroxyapatite plaque phantom contained objects 0.5-5.0 mm in diameter with known CT attenuation nominal values ranging 50-800 HU. The cardiovascular phantom contained vessel mimicking objects 1.0-5.0 mm in diameter with different contrast media. Both phantoms were scanned using clinical protocols for CT angiography and images were reconstructed with different filter kernels. The measured CT number (HU) and diameter of each object were analyzed on three clinical postprocessing workstations. From the resultant data, a mathematical formula was derived based on absorption function exp(-{mu}{sup *}d) to demonstrate the relation between measured CT numbers and object diameters. Results: The percentage reduction in measured CT number (HU) for the group of selected filter kernels, apparent during CT angiography, is dependent only on the object size (plaque or vessel diameter). The derived formula of the form 1-c{sup *}exp(-a{sup *}d{sup b}) showed reduction in CT number for objects between 0.5 and 5 mm in diameter, with asymptote reaching background noise for small objects with diameters nearing the CT in-plane resolution (0.35 mm). No reduction was observed for the objects with diameters equal or larger than 5 mm. Conclusions: A clear mathematical relationship exists between object diameter and reduction in measured CT number in HU. This function is independent of exposure parameters and inherent attenuation properties of the objects studied. Future developments include the incorporation of this mathematical model function into quantification software in order to

  1. Magnetic resonance knee arthrography. Enhanced contrast by gadolinium complex in the rabbit and in humans.

    PubMed

    Engel, A

    1990-01-01

    This study contains the fundamentals and the technique of the intraarticular application of an MRI contrast agent in connection with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI arthrography). It also presents the resulting clinical relevance for knee joint diagnostics. The significance of MRI arthrography is linked above all to the central question of whether or not it is possible to depict the hyaline cartilage, its surface and its thickness with the help of MRI arthrography. MRI arthrography was used for in vitro examinations of rabbit knee joint cartilage and human joint cartilage. The in vivo application was carried out in 73 patients. Apart from the metric evaluation and the assessment of the information content of the MRI image, the corresponding histologic sections were made in 20 knee joints in order to compare the cartilage surface and the thickness of the cartilage with the results in the MRI image. The optimum amount of contrast agent for visualization was determined, the uptake and clearance of the contrast agent from the cartilage were assessed, and trace elements from the cartilage were also analyzed. The examination showed that the molecular structure of the contrast agent (gadolinium-DTPA) does not prevent the uptake of the contrast agent into the matrix of the hyaline cartilage. But this process is reversible. Thus, 14 hours after the intraarticular application of the contrast agent no measurable traces of gadolinium-DTPA could be established. The intraarticular application of the contrast agent also made it possible to achieve a constant and reproducible visualization of all joint structures. This affected mainly the surface of the hyaline cartilage. The best imaging quality was achieved with intraarticular application of 30 to 40 mL of a 2 mmolar solution of gadolinium-DTPA. The technique used for the intraarticular application is the same as for the common procedures of knee joint aspiration. The clinical importance of MRI arthrography lies in the fact that

  2. Three-dimensional reconstruction of upper airways from MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchet, Diane; Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-03-01

    Under the framework of clinical respiratory investigation, providing accurate modalities for morpho-functional analysis is essential for diagnosis improvement, surgical planning and follow-up. This paper focuses on the upper airways investigation and develops an automated approach for 3D mesh reconstruction from MDCT acquisitions. In order to overcome the difficulties related to the complex morphology of the upper airways and to the image gray level heterogeneity of the airway lumens and thin bony septa, the proposed 3D reconstruction methodology combines 2D segmentation and 3D surface regularization approaches. The segmentation algorithm relies on mathematical morphology theory and provides airway lumen robust discrimination from the surrounding tissues, while preserving the connectivity relationship between the different anatomical structures. The 3D regularization step uses an energy-based modeling in order to achieve a smooth and well-fitted 3D surface of the upper airways. An accurate 3D mesh representation of the reconstructed airways makes it possible to develop specific clinical applications such as virtual endoscopy, surgical planning and computer assisted intervention. In addition, building up patient-specific 3D models of upper airways is highly valuable for the study and design of inhaled medication delivery via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

  3. Accurate 3D quantification of the bronchial parameters in MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saragaglia, A.; Fetita, C.; Preteux, F.; Brillet, P. Y.; Grenier, P. A.

    2005-08-01

    The assessment of bronchial reactivity and wall remodeling in asthma plays a crucial role in better understanding such a disease and evaluating therapeutic responses. Today, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) makes it possible to perform an accurate estimation of bronchial parameters (lumen and wall areas) by allowing a quantitative analysis in a cross-section plane orthogonal to the bronchus axis. This paper provides the tools for such an analysis by developing a 3D investigation method which relies on 3D reconstruction of bronchial lumen and central axis computation. Cross-section images at bronchial locations interactively selected along the central axis are generated at appropriate spatial resolution. An automated approach is then developed for accurately segmenting the inner and outer bronchi contours on the cross-section images. It combines mathematical morphology operators, such as "connection cost", and energy-controlled propagation in order to overcome the difficulties raised by vessel adjacencies and wall irregularities. The segmentation accuracy was validated with respect to a 3D mathematically-modeled phantom of a pair bronchus-vessel which mimics the characteristics of real data in terms of gray-level distribution, caliber and orientation. When applying the developed quantification approach to such a model with calibers ranging from 3 to 10 mm diameter, the lumen area relative errors varied from 3.7% to 0.15%, while the bronchus area was estimated with a relative error less than 5.1%.

  4. Quantitative analysis of the central-chest lymph nodes based on 3D MDCT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Bascom, Rebecca; Mahraj, Rickhesvar P. M.; Higgins, William E.

    2009-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In lung-cancer staging, central-chest lymph nodes and associated nodal stations, as observed in three-dimensional (3D) multidetector CT (MDCT) scans, play a vital role. However, little work has been done in relation to lymph nodes, based on MDCT data, due to the complicated phenomena that give rise to them. Using our custom computer-based system for 3D MDCT-based pulmonary lymph-node analysis, we conduct a detailed study of lymph nodes as depicted in 3D MDCT scans. In this work, the Mountain lymph-node stations are automatically defined by the system. These defined stations, in conjunction with our system's image processing and visualization tools, facilitate lymph-node detection, classification, and segmentation. An expert pulmonologist, chest radiologist, and trained technician verified the accuracy of the automatically defined stations and indicated observable lymph nodes. Next, using semi-automatic tools in our system, we defined all indicated nodes. Finally, we performed a global quantitative analysis of the characteristics of the observed nodes and stations. This study drew upon a database of 32 human MDCT chest scans. 320 Mountain-based stations (10 per scan) and 852 pulmonary lymph nodes were defined overall from this database. Based on the numerical results, over 90% of the automatically defined stations were deemed accurate. This paper also presents a detailed summary of central-chest lymph-node characteristics for the first time.

  5. Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint meniscus: contrast arthrography vs. computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Sauser, D.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study to determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) meniscus was made by performing both CT and contrast arthrography on 18 joints suspected of meniscus dislocation. Arthography rather than surgery was chosen as the quality standard for comparing CT findings, as not all patients undergoing the studies underwent surgery. The results of each test were reported independently by the radiologist who obtained either all of the arthograms or all of the CT scans. For dislocation of the meniscus, there were excellent agreement between the two methods. CT seems to be nearly as accurate as arthrography for showing meniscus dislocation, is performed with lower x-ray exposure, and is noninvasive. Arthrograpy discloses more detailed information about the joint meniscus, such as perforation and maceration, and should continue to be used when this kind of information is clinically important.

  6. Shoulder arthrography: comparison of morbidity after use of various contrast media

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.M.; Goldberg, R.P.; Wyshak, G.; Kilcoyne, R.F.

    1985-02-01

    This prospective study compares immediate and delayed patient discomfort in 177 patients following shoulder arthrography using intraarticular combinations of metrizamide, meglumine/sodium diatrizoate, meglumine diatrizoate, lidocaine, epinephrine, and air. Patients receiving conventional ionic monomeric positive contrast media had a 60% (90/150) incidence of moderate or severe delayed exacerbation of their baseline symptoms; only 14% (3/21) of patients receiving metrizamide, a nonionic contrast medium had similar levels of postprocedural discomfort. Morbidity was somewhat diminished with the use of double-contrast (45%, 34/75) rather than single-contrast (75%, 56/75) examinations, and with avoidance of sodium-containing contrast agents or epinephrine. Nonionic or monovalent polymeric contrast media, despite their present high cost, may be the agents of choice if single-contrast arthrography is performed in joints associated with a high incidence of postprocedural pain.

  7. A Prototype Body-Mounted MRI-Compatible Robot for Needle Guidance in Shoulder Arthrography

    PubMed Central

    Monfaredi, R.; Seifabadi, R.; Iordachita, I.; Sze, R.; Safdar, N. M.; Sharma, K.; Fricke, S.; Krieger, A.; Cleary, K.

    2014-01-01

    A novel compact and lightweight patient-mounted MRI-compatible robot has been designed for MRI image-guided interventions. This robot is intended to enable MRI-guided needle placement as done in shoulder arthrography. The robot could make needle placement more accurate and simplify the current workflow by converting the traditional two-stage arthrography procedure (fluoroscopy-guided needle insertion followed by a diagnostic MRI scan) to a one-stage procedure (streamlined workflow all in MRI suite). The robot has 4 degrees of freedom (DOF), two for orientation of the needle and two for needle positioning. The mechanical design was based on several criteria including rigidity, MRI compatibility, compact design, sterilizability, and adjustability. The proposed workflow is discussed and initial MRI compatibility experiments are presented. The results show that artifacts in the region of interest are minimal and that MRI images of the shoulder were not adversely affected by placing the robot on a human volunteer. PMID:25473653

  8. Validity of magnetic resonance arthrography as a diagnostic tool in femoroacetabular impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    González Gil, A B; Llombart Blanco, R; Díaz de Rada, P

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is one of the main causes of hip pain in young adult and a contributory factor for development of early primary osteoarthritis. An accurate clinical diagnosis, supported by imaging studies, is important to determine the best treatment for the patient. The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic correlation between direct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) arthrography and the arthroscopic findings. A review was performed on a series of 36 patients diagnosed with FAI, and who underwent hip arthroscopy surgery between 2009 and 2012. All of them had a direct MRI arthrography performed in our hospital. The presence of labral lesions, CAM deformity, and acetabular and femoral cartilage damage, were evaluated in both imaging techniques. After analysing the results and taking the hip arthroscopy as 'gold standard', a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 77% were obtained, with a PPV of 87% for the diagnosis of labral lesions by direct MR arthrography. The specificity for CAM deformity was 100%, with a sensitivity of 79% and PPV of 100%. For chondral disorders lower values were found for both acetabulum and femoral head. For acetabular lesions the sensitivity was 78.5%, and specificity was 82% with a PPV of 73% and NPV of 80%. For femoral lesions, there was a sensitivity of 71.5%, a specificity of 73%, with a PPV of 62.5% and NPV of 80%. Due to the high sensitivity for the detection of labral lesions and the high specificity to detect CAM deformity, hip MR arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool for femoroacetabular impingement. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Fast MR arthrography using VIBE sequences to evaluate the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Vandevenne, Jan E; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Mahachie John, Jestinah M; Gelin, Geert; Parizel, Paul M

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if short volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences can be used as a substitute for T1-weighted with fat saturation (T1-FS) sequences when performing magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography to diagnose rotator cuff tears. Eighty-two patients underwent direct MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE (acquisition time of 13 s) and T1-FS (acquisition time of 5 min) sequences in the axial and paracoronal plane on a 1.0-T MR unit. Two radiologists scored rotator cuff tendons on VIBE and T1-FS images separately as normal, small/large partial thickness and full thickness tears with or without geyser sign. T1-FS sequences were considered the gold standard. Surgical correlation was available in a small sample. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of VIBE were greater than 92% for large articular-sided partial thickness and full thickness tears. For detecting fraying and articular-sided small partial thickness tears, these parameters were 55%, 94%, 94%, and 57%, respectively. The simple kappa value was 0.76, and the weighted kappa value was 0.86 for agreement between T1-FS and VIBE scores. All large partial and full thickness tears at surgery were correctly diagnosed using VIBE or T1-FS MR images. Fast MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE sequences showed good concordance with the classically used T1-FS sequences for the appearance of the rotator cuff, in particular for large articular-sided partial thickness tears and for full thickness tears. Due to its very short acquisition time, VIBE may be especially useful when performing MR arthrography in claustrophobic patients or patients with a painful shoulder.

  10. Reproducibility of X-rays and CT arthrography in SLAC, SNAC, SCAC wrists.

    PubMed

    Belhaouane, R; Lebeau, N; Maes-Clavier, C; Hustin, C; Krief, E; Bonnaire, B; Warin, M; Rotari, V; David, E

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility of the interpretation of CT arthrography and plain X-rays for scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC), scaphoid non-union advanced collapse (SNAC) and scaphoid chondrocalcinosis advanced collapse (SCAC) wrist conditions, as well as the clinical relevance of these imaging modalities. The CT and X-rays images were reviewed twice in a blinded and randomized manner by two experienced orthopedic surgeons specialized in hand surgery, two orthopedic surgery residents and two experienced radiologists specialized in bone and joint imaging. Cohen's kappa and Fleiss' kappa coefficients were used to analyze the reproducibility of interpretation of the radiological examinations. With CT arthrography, the overall diagnosis was often a problem, in terms of both inter- or intra-observer reproducibility. The assessment of the joint line appeared to be fairly reproducible for each observer but was poorly reproducible between different observers. Plain X-rays are not sufficient to assess cartilage quality in degenerative wrist disease. CT arthrography is a reliable examination, but its interpretation is not always standardized. Diagnostic arthroscopy may be justified in doubtful cases.

  11. Lesions of the rotator cuff footprint: diagnostic performance of MR arthrography compared with arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stoppino, L P; Ciuffreda, P; Rossi, M; Lelario, M; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Genovese, E A; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance arthrography (MR-A) of the shoulder in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears involving the humeral insertion of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon (footprint), using arthroscopy as the reference standard. The study population included 90 consecutive patients with history and clinical diagnosis of instability of the shoulder, rotator cuff tear or posterosuperior glenoid impingement. A total of 108 MR arthrograms were performed, since 18 patients had undergone a bilateral procedure. Arthroscopy, which was performed within 45 days after MR-A, was used as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values were then calculated. Magnetic resonance arthrography showed a sensitivity of 92 % and a specificity of 78 % for the overall detection of tears involving the rotator cuff footprint. The diagnostic accuracy was 90 %, and the positive and negative predictive values were 95 and 64 %, respectively. Ten lesions were non-classifiable on surgery, of which eight were non-classifiable on MR-A also. Magnetic resonance arthrography is extremely accurate for the detection and classification of rotator cuff footprint tears. Most of these lesions are articular-sided (partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsion lesions) with predominance in younger patients and concealed type of tear (concealed interstitial delamination lesions).

  12. Robust extraction of the aorta and pulmonary artery from 3D MDCT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeprasartsit, Pinyo; Higgins, William E.

    2010-03-01

    Accurate definition of the aorta and pulmonary artery from three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector CT (MDCT) images is important for pulmonary applications. This work presents robust methods for defining the aorta and pulmonary artery in the central chest. The methods work on both contrast enhanced and no-contrast 3D MDCT image data. The automatic methods use a common approach employing model fitting and selection and adaptive refinement. During the occasional event that more precise vascular extraction is desired or the method fails, we also have an alternate semi-automatic fail-safe method. The semi-automatic method extracts the vasculature by extending the medial axes into a user-guided direction. A ground-truth study over a series of 40 human 3D MDCT images demonstrates the efficacy, accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the methods.

  13. Tools of the trade for CTA: MDCT scanners and contrast medium injection protocols.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Richard L; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2006-12-01

    The introduction of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners in 1998 ushered in new advances in CT angiography (CTA). The subsequent expansion of MDCT scanner capabilities, coupled with advances in understanding of contrast medium (CM) dynamics, has further improved the clinical availability and consistency of CTA. We will review recent advances in CT scanner technology and discuss early CM dynamics. Specifically, we describe an approach tailored to the available scanner technology and to patient size aimed at providing consistently robust CTA studies across all vascular territories. A rational method to design combined CTA scan/injection protocols to facilitate this goal will be described. Our current experience with a simplified protocol for CTA with 64-MDCT will also be explained.

  14. Radiation dose reduction to the male gonads during MDCT: the effectiveness of a lead shield.

    PubMed

    Hohl, Christian; Mahnken, Andreas H; Klotz, Ernst; Das, Marco; Stargardt, Achim; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Schmidt, Thorsten; Günther, Rolf W; Wildberger, Joachim E

    2005-01-01

    Our study was designed to quantify the effect of a standard gonad shield on the testicular radiation exposure due to scatter during routine abdominopelvic MDCT. Routine abdominopelvic MDCT was performed in 34 patients with gonadal lead shielding and 32 patients without this shielding; the testes were not exposed to the direct beam during the examination. We estimated the testicular dose administered with thermoluminescent dosimetry, taking into account each patient's body weight and body mass index (BMI). With a 1-mm lead shield, the mean testicular dose was reduced from 2.40 to 0.32 mSv, a reduction of 87%. The difference was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.0001). No correlation between testicular dose and body weight or BMI was found. Shielding the male gonads reduces the testicular radiation dose during abdominopelvic MDCT significantly and can be recommended for routine use.

  15. Segmentation of the central-chest lymph nodes in 3D MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kongkuo; Higgins, William E

    2011-09-01

    Central-chest lymph nodes play a vital role in lung-cancer staging. The definition of lymph nodes from three-dimensional (3D) multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) images, however, remains an open problem. We propose two methods for computer-based segmentation of the central-chest lymph nodes from a 3D MDCT scan: the single-section live wire and the single-click live wire. For the single-section live wire, the user first applies the standard live wire to a single two-dimensional (2D) section after which automated analysis completes the segmentation process. The single-click live wire is similar but is almost completely automatic. Ground-truth studies involving human 3D MDCT scans demonstrate the robustness, efficiency, and intra-observer and inter-observer reproducibility of the methods.

  16. Feasibility of Free-breathing CCTA using 256-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Sun, Ye; Zhang, Zhuolu; Chen, Lei; Hong, Nan

    2016-07-01

    Usually, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is performed during breath-holding to reduce artifact caused by respiration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of free-breathing CCTA compared to breath-holding using CT scanner with wide detector. To evaluate the feasibility of CCTA during free-breathing using a 256-MDCT. In 80 patients who underwent CCTA, 40 were performed during breath-holding (group A), and the remaining 40 during free-breathing (group B). The quality scores for coronary arteries were analyzed and defined as: 3 (excellent), 2 (good), and 1 (poor). The image noise, signal-to-noise ratio and effective radiation dose as well as the heart rate variation were compared. The noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and effective radiation dose were not significantly different between the 2 groups. The mean heart rate variation between planning and scanning for group A was 7 ± 7.6 bpm, and larger than 3 ± 2.6 bpm for group B (P = 0.012). Quality scores of the free-breathing group were better than those of the breath-holding group (group A: 2.55 ± 0.64, group B: 2.85 ± 0.36, P = 0.018). Free-breathing CCTA is feasible on wide detector CT scanner to provide acceptable image quality with reduced heart rate variation and better images for certain patients.

  17. In the workup of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleed, does 64-slice MDCT have a role?

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Chinmay; Moorthy, Srikanth; Sreekumar, Kp; Rajeshkannan, R; Nazar, Pk; Sandya, Cj; Sivasubramanian, S; Ramchandran, Pv

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to prospectively determine the sensitivity of 64-slice MDCT in detecting and diagnosing the cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleed (OGIB). Our study included 50 patients (male 30, female 20) in the age range of 3-82 years (average age: 58.52 years) who were referred to our radiology department as part of their workup for clinically evident gastrointestinal (GI) bleed or as part of workup for anemia (with and without positive fecal occult blood test). All patients underwent conventional upper endoscopy and colonoscopy before undergoing CT scan. Following a noncontrast scan, all patients underwent triple-phase contrast CT scan using a 64-slice CT scan system. The diagnostic performance of 64-slice MDCT was compared to the results of capsule endoscopy, 99m-technetium-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy (99mTc-RBC scintigraphy), digital subtraction angiography, and surgery whenever available. CT scan showed positive findings in 32 of 50 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of MDCT for detection of bleed were 72.2%, 42.8%, 81.2%, and 44.4%, respectively. Capsule endoscopy was done in 15 patients and was positive in 10 patients; it had a sensitivity of 71.4%. Eleven patients had undergone 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy prior to CT scan, and the result was positive in seven patients (sensitivity 70%). Digital subtraction angiography was performed in only eight patients and among them all except one patient showed findings consistent with the lesions detected on MDCT. MDCT is a sensitive and noninvasive tool that allows rapid detection and localization of OGIB. It can be used as the first-line investigation in patients with negative endoscopy and colonoscopy studies. MDCT and capsule endoscopy have complementary roles in the evaluation of OGIB.

  18. Arteriovenous fistula and graft evaluation in hemodialysis patients using MDCT: a primer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Chi; Tsai, Wei-Lin; Tsai, I-Chen; Chan, Si-Wa; Liao, Wan-Chun; Lin, Pao-Chun; Yang, Su Jing

    2010-03-01

    Patent arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is related to better prognosis and quality of life for patients on long-term dialysis. When AVF dysfunction is suspected, MDCT is a good noninvasive tool for evaluating the entire AVF structure and determining reversible conditions for treatment. The aim of this article is to introduce the scanning and interpretation techniques and to illustrate the conditions related to early and late fistula failures. MDCT is a fast, noninvasive, and accurate technique for diagnosing AVF complications. Radiologists familiar with these techniques can help to improve the prognosis and quality of life for hemodialysis patients.

  19. [Direct MR arthrography of the wrist in comparison with arthroscopy: a prospective study on 125 patients].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, R; Christopoulos, G; Meier, R; Coblenz, G; Fröhner, S; Lanz, U; Krimmer, H

    2003-07-01

    In literature the diagnostic value of MRI for detecting lesions of the carpal ligaments and the TFCC is judged controversially. The aim of the following study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of direct MR arthrography for depicting and staging of intraarticular lesions of the wrist. One day before undergoing arthroscopy, 125 patients suffering from wrist pain were examined with direct MR arthrography in a prospective and blinded study. A mixture of contrast medium (iodine-containing contrast medium and gadopentetate in relation 200 : 1) was injected into both radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5T scanner: coronal T1-weighted SE, coronal fat-saturated T1-weighted SE, coronal T1-/T2*-DESS-3D, and sagittal T2*-weighted MEDIC. MRI results were compared with arthroscopic findings using statistical analysis (SEN = sensitivity, SPE = specificity, PPV = positive predictive value, NPV = negative predictive value, ACC = accuracy). In comparison to arthroscopy as the accepted diagnostic gold standard, the following results were found for MR arthrography. Detection of TFCC lesions: SEN 97.1 %, SPE 96.4 %, PPV 97.1 %, NPV 96.4 %, ACC 96.8 %. Detection of complete tears of the scapholunate ligament: SEN 91.7 %, SPE 100 %, PPV 100 %, NPV 99.1%, ACC 99.2%. Detection of partial tears: SEN 62.5 %, SPE 100 %, PPV 100 %, NPV 94.8 %, ACC 95.2 %. Detection of cartilage defects: SEN 84.2 %, SPE 96.2 %, PPV 80 %, NPV 97.1 %, ACC 94.4 %. In total, only three lesions of the lunotriquetral ligament were present. Direct MR arthrographic imaging is well suited for detecting intraarticular lesions of the wrist. The presented diagnostic results of MR arthrography are superior to the results of unenhanced MRI reported in the literature. Direct MR arthrography as a reliable diagnostic tool is strongly recommended if lesions of the scapholunate ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage complex are suspected. In contrast, an attitude of caution

  20. The role of arthrography in selecting an osteotomy for the correction of genu varum in pediatric patients with achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Shannon C; Neubauer, Philip R; Ain, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    Genu varum is a common manifestation of achondroplasia. In the pediatric population, determination of the appropriate corrective osteotomy can be challenging because of a large cartilage envelope. To determine whether osteotomy based on radiographs alone corresponded to osteotomy based on arthrography and radiography, we retrospectively studied 41 patients (75 limbs) and identified the appropriate osteotomy based on (i) radiographs alone and (ii) radiographs and arthrography. We found that the osteotomy choice changed in 45 limbs (60.8%) overall and in 34 limbs (94.44%) of patients aged below 8 years.

  1. US and MDCT diagnosis of a rare cause of haematuria in children: Posterior nutcracker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozel, A; Tufaner, O; Kaya, E; Maldur, V

    2011-06-01

    Posterior nutcracker syndrome is caused by compression of the left renal vein between the abdominal aorta and the vertebral column. We present the case of a 14-year-old girl with vague left loin pain, mild haematuria and proteinuria. Diagnosis of this rare syndrome was achieved using color Doppler US and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography.

  2. Three-dimensional MDCT angiography of splanchnic arteries: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Dohan, A; Dautry, R; Guerrache, Y; Fargeaudou, Y; Boudiaf, M; Le Dref, O; Sirol, M; Soyer, P

    2015-02-01

    Fast scanning along with high resolution of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) have expanded the role of non-invasive imaging of splanchnic arteries. Advancements in both MDCT scanner technology and three-dimensional (3D) imaging software provide a unique opportunity for non-invasive investigation of splanchnic arteries. Although standard axial computed tomography (CT) images allow identification of splanchnic arteries, visualization of small or distal branches is often limited. Similarly, a comprehensive assessment of the complex anatomy of splanchnic arteries is often beyond the reach of axial images. However, the submillimeter collimation that can be achieved with MDCT scanners now allows the acquisition of true isotropic data so that a high spatial resolution is now maintained in any imaging plane and in 3D mode. This ability to visualize the complex network of splanchnic arteries using 3D rendering and multiplanar reconstruction is of major importance for an optimal analysis in many situations. The purpose of this review is to discuss and illustrate the role of 3D MDCT angiography in the detection and assessment of abnormalities of splanchnic arteries as well as the limitations of the different reconstruction techniques.

  3. Spectrum of Abdominal Aortic Disease in a Tertiary Health Care Setup: MDCT Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, DG Santosh; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Kalyanpur, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Abdominal aortic disease is an important cause of clinical disability that requires early detection by imaging methods for prompt and effective management. Understanding regional disease pattern and prevalence has a bearing on healthcare management and resource planning. Non-invasive, conclusive imaging strategy plays an important role in the detection of disease. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) with its technological developments provides affordable, accurate and comprehensive imaging solution. Aim To evaluate regional demography of abdominal aortic disease spectrum detected using MDCT imaging data in a tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods A descriptive study was conducted based on MDCT imaging data of patients who were investigated with clinical diagnosis of abdominal aortic disease, from March 2008-2010, over a period of 24 months. Patients were examined with the contrast-enhanced MDCT examination. Morphological diagnosis of the aortic disease was based on changes in relative aortic caliber, luminal irregularity, presence of wall calcification, dissection or thrombus and evidence of major branch occlusion. Patients were categorized into four groups based on imaging findings. MDCT information and associated clinical parameters were examined and correlated to management of patient. Descriptive statistical data, namely mean, standard deviation and frequency of disease were evaluated. Results A total of 90 out of 210 patients (43%) were detected with the abdominal aortic abnormality defined by imaging criteria. Group I, comprising of patients with atherosclerosis –including those with complications, constituted 65.5% of the patients. Group II represented patients with aneurysms (45.5%). Group III, consisting of 32.2% of the patients, contained those with dissections. The rest of the patients, including patients with aorto-arteritis, were classified as group IV. Eight patients with aneurysm and one patient with aorto-arteritis were

  4. Fish bone foreign bodies in the pharynx and upper esophagus: evaluation with 64-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeon; Choi, Dae Seob; Shin, Hwa Seon; Cho, Jae Min; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Bae, Kyung-Soo; Koh, Eun Ha; Park, Jung Je

    2014-02-01

    Fish bone (FB) is one of the common causes of foreign body impaction in the pharynx and esophagus. To investigate the efficacy of 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for the evaluation of pharynx and upper esophageal FB foreign bodies. Sixty-six patients with suspected FB foreign body ingestion were examined by plain radiography (n = 40) and unenhanced MDCT (n = 66). We analyzed the presence, location, size, shape, and lying position of the foreign bodies. On MDCT, 46 foreign bodies were detected. Among them, 45 were confirmed by endoscopy. The sensitivity of MDCT for the detection of foreign bodies was 100%, which was superior to that of the plain radiography (51.7%). The location of the foreign bodies was most common in the upper esophagus (n = 22, 47.8%), followed by pharyngoesophageal junction (n = 10, 21.7%), transjunctional (n = 7, 15.2%), hypopharynx (n = 5, 10.9%), and oropharynx (n = 2, 4.3%). Their longest length was 5.3-40.1 mm (mean, 21.3 mm). Thirty-three FBs (71.7%) were linear and 13 (28.3%) were flat in shape. They showed transverse (n = 23, 50.0%), parallel (n = 13, 28.3%), and oblique positions (n = 10, 21.7%) to the long axis of the pharynx and esophagus, respectively. MDCT is useful for the evaluation of the pharynx and upper esophageal FB foreign bodies.

  5. Semi-automatic central-chest lymph-node definition from 3D MDCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Higgins, William E.

    2010-03-01

    Central-chest lymph nodes play a vital role in lung-cancer staging. The three-dimensional (3D) definition of lymph nodes from multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) images, however, remains an open problem. This is because of the limitations in the MDCT imaging of soft-tissue structures and the complicated phenomena that influence the appearance of a lymph node in an MDCT image. In the past, we have made significant efforts toward developing (1) live-wire-based segmentation methods for defining 2D and 3D chest structures and (2) a computer-based system for automatic definition and interactive visualization of the Mountain central-chest lymph-node stations. Based on these works, we propose new single-click and single-section live-wire methods for segmenting central-chest lymph nodes. The single-click live wire only requires the user to select an object pixel on one 2D MDCT section and is designed for typical lymph nodes. The single-section live wire requires the user to process one selected 2D section using standard 2D live wire, but it is more robust. We applied these methods to the segmentation of 20 lymph nodes from two human MDCT chest scans (10 per scan) drawn from our ground-truth database. The single-click live wire segmented 75% of the selected nodes successfully and reproducibly, while the success rate for the single-section live wire was 85%. We are able to segment the remaining nodes, using our previously derived (but more interaction intense) 2D live-wire method incorporated in our lymph-node analysis system. Both proposed methods are reliable and applicable to a wide range of pulmonary lymph nodes.

  6. Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder Joint: Value of Glenohumeral Distance on Magnetic Resonance Arthrography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Youn, In Young; Kim, Eugene; Park, Jai Hyung; Park, Se Jin

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of glenohumeral distance (GHD) on axial images of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography for diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis and to compare this finding with previously reported classic MR arthrographic findings of adhesive capsulitis. Our study was approved by the institutional ethical review board of our institute. We evaluated 41 patients (M-F, 35:6; mean age, 46 years; adhesive capsulitis, 21; no adhesive capsulitis, 20) who underwent MR arthrography. Two radiologists measured GHD, width of the axillary recess, and capsular thickness in consensus. The GHD was measured from the subchondral bone of the glenoid fossa to the subchondral bone of the humeral head at the level of the midline of the humeral head. Glenohumeral distance (anterior, middle, posterior, and mean), width of the axillary recess, and capsular thickness (anterior, posterior, and mean) were compared in the adhesive capsulitis and no adhesive capsulitis groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. The mean GHD of the no adhesive capsulitis group was longer than that of the adhesive capsulitis group. The length differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The mean width of the axillary recess of the no adhesive capsulitis group was significantly wider than that of the adhesive capsulitis group (P < 0.001). The mean capsular thickness of the no adhesive capsulitis group was significantly thinner than that in the adhesive capsulitis group (P = 0.001). A decreased GHD on MR arthrography can be another useful feature to diagnose adhesive capsulitis in addition to previously presented radiologic features such as capsular thickening and reduced axillary recess capacity.

  7. Assessment of the rotator cable in various rotator cuff conditions using indirect MR arthrography.

    PubMed

    Choo, Hye Jung; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Young-Mi; Kim, Jung-Han

    2014-11-01

    The rotator cable is an important structure providing stress shield to the rotator cuff, similar to the mechanism of suspension bridge. To evaluate the visibility and appearance of the rotator cable in various conditions of the rotator cuff, using indirect magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography. Indirect MR arthrography images from 27 patients (age range, 20-63 years) with normal rotator cuffs, and 47 (age range, 20-73 years) with tendinosis, 32 (age range, 49-71 years) with partial-thickness tears, and 55 (age range, 44-75 years) with full-thickness tears in the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons (SST-ISTs) were included in this study. In these various rotator cuff conditions, the visibility and appearance (thickness and width) of the rotator cable and the relationships between the rotator cable appearance, rotator cuff tear size, rotator cuff thickness, and patient's age were assessed. On the sagittal MR images, all rotator cables were visible in the normal rotator cuffs and tendinosis/partial-thickness tears of SST-ISTs. In the order of normal cuff, tendinosis, partial-thickness tear, and full-thickness tear of SST-ISTs, the rotator cable tended to become thicker (1.07, 1.27, 1.32, and 1.59 mm, respectively) and narrower (12.1, 10.68, 10.90, and 8.55 mm, respectively). The thickness of the rotator cable was significantly positively correlated with the rotator cuff thickness in the normal rotator cuffs (coefficient, 0.49; P = 0.010) and tendinosis of SST-ISTs (coefficient, 0.53; P < 0.001), but was not correlated with patients' age. On sagittal plane of indirect MR arthrography, most rotator cables were visible. The appearance of the rotator cable changed according to the rotator cuff condition. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. The medial dye pool revisited: correlation between arthrography and MRI In closed reductions for DDH.

    PubMed

    Gans, Itai; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2014-12-01

    Closed reduction (CR) and spica casting is performed using arthrography to assess the adequacy of reduction based in part on the width of medial dye pool (MDP); however, the amount of MDP that is acceptable and its correlation to the actual anatomic position of the femoral head within the acetabulum has been poorly delineated. The purpose of this study was to determine this correlation and to explore the potential limits of acceptable MDP measurements. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of patients with DDH treated at our institution by CR and immediate postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and found 20 patients (23 hips) meeting inclusion criteria. We measured the MDP and femoral head area on the best reduced arthrographic image, the immediate postoperative mid-coronal MRI, and on 3 planes (neutral, 30-degree anterior, and 30-degree posterior) of the mid-axial MRI and compared MDP values from both imaging modalities using the Pearson correlation coefficient (R). To provide useful data for establishing intraoperative thresholds, MDP was also expressed as a percentage of femoral head width to control for fluoroscopic magnification. Twenty-two of the 23 hips were reduced on postoperative MRI; the one persistently dislocated hip was excluded from our analysis. The Pearson correlation coefficient was R = 0.73 comparing arthrography and coronal MRI, indicating excellent correlation. Correlation was even stronger between arthrography and axial MRI (neutral R = 0.73; 30-degree anterior, R = 0.81; 30-degree posterior, R = 0.81). The mean fluoroscopic MDP in the successful, fully concentric, CRs was 4.2% of the femoral head width (range, 0.6% to 15.8%). There is very strong correlation between MDP measurements on arthrography and immediate postoperative MRI in both the axial and coronal planes. On the basis of our data, an arthrographic MDP between 0.6% and 15.8% of the femoral head width always resulted in an excellent reduction, suggesting that an

  9. Arthrography of the traumatized wrist: correlation with radiography and the carpal instability series

    SciTech Connect

    Levinsohn, E.M.; Palmer, A.K.

    1983-03-01

    Arthrography with fluoroscopic monitoring was used to assess the soft tissues of the wrist in 100 patients who had chronic traumatic pain but did not have rheumatoid arthritis. Findings were correlated with plain radiographs and the carpal instability series. Arthrograms were normal in 26% of cases and demonstrated perforation of the triangular fibrocartilage in 26%, radiocarpal-midcarpal communication in 30%, capsular lesions in 31%, lymphatic opacification in 12%, and tendon sheath filling in 10%. Communication between the radiocarpal and pisiform-troiquetral compartments, a normal finding, was seen in 69%. There was a significant association between perforation of the triangular fibrocartilage and both ulna-plus variance and carpal instability.

  10. Computed tomography arthrography in traumatic hip dislocation. Intra-articular and capsular findings.

    PubMed

    Glynn, T P; Kreipke, D L; DeRosa, G P

    1989-01-01

    The newer diagnostic modalities such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are becoming increasingly used in the evaluation of joint trauma. The combination of computed tomography and arthrography can also be of significant diagnostic value in certain specific situations. In our case report, we describe its use in post-traumatic recurrent hip dislocation and its value, not only in depicting a posterior capsular tear, but also in the diagnosis of an internal joint derangement which may contribute to incongruous reduction of the hip joint.

  11. Intussusception in Adults: The Role of MDCT in the Identification of the Site and Cause of Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Viola; Buquicchio, Grazia Loretta; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Di Grezia, Graziella; Ambrosio, Rosa; Trinci, Margherita; Miele, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Unlike pediatric intussusception, intestinal intussusception is infrequent in adults and it is often secondary to a pathological condition. The growing use of Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) in abdominal imaging has increased the number of radiological diagnoses of intussusception, even in transient and nonobstructing cases. MDCT is well suited to delineate the presence of the disease and provides valuable information about several features, such as the site of intussusception, the intestinal segments involved, and the extent of the intussuscepted bowel. Moreover, MDCT can demonstrate the complications of intussusceptions, represented by bowel wall ischemia and perforation, which are mandatory to promptly refer for surgery. However, not all intussusceptions need an operative treatment. In this paper, we review the current role of MDCT in the diagnosis and management of intussusception in adults, focusing on features, as the presence of a leading point, that may guide an accurate selection of patients for surgery. PMID:26819606

  12. MDCT Versus MRI Assessment of Tumor Response After Transarterial Chemoembolization for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kloeckner, Roman; Otto, Gerd; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Oberholzer, Katja; Dueber, Christoph; Pitton, Michael B.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate treatment results after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), with a special focus on the influence of Lipiodol on calculation of tumor necrosis according to EASL criteria. A total of 115 nodules in 20 patients (17 males, 3 females; 69.5 {+-} 9.35 years) with biopsy-proven hepatocellular carcinoma were treated with TACE. Embolization was performed using a doxorubicin-Lipiodol emulsion (group I) or DC Beads loaded with doxorubicin (group II). Follow-up included triphasic contrast-enhanced 64-row MDCT (collimation, 0.625 mm; slice, 3 mm; contrast bolus, 120 ml iomeprol; delay by bolus trigger) and contrast-enhanced MRI (T1 native, T2 native; five dynamic contrast-enhanced phases; 0.1 mmol/kg body weight gadolinium-DTPA; slice thickness, 4 mm). Residual tumor and the extent of tumor necrosis were evaluated according to EASL. Contrast enhancement within tumor lesions was suspected to represent vital tumor. In the Lipiodol-based TACE protocol, MDCT underestimated residual viable tumor compared to MRI, due to Lipiodol artifacts (23.2% vs 47.7% after first, 11.9% vs 31.2% after second, and 11.4% vs 23.7% after third TACE; p = 0.0014, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). In contrast to MDCT, MRI was completely free of any artifacts caused by Lipiodol. In the DC Bead-based Lipiodol-free TACE protocol, MRI and CT showed similar residual tumor and rating of treatment results (46.4% vs 41.2%, 31.9 vs 26.8%, and 26.0% vs 25.6%; n.s.). In conclusion, MRI is superior to MDCT for detection of viable tumor residuals after Lipiodol-based TACE. Since viable tumor tissue is superimposed by Lipiodol artifacts in MDCT, MRI is mandatory for reliable decision-making during follow-up after Lipiodol-based TACE protocols.

  13. Spectrum of MDCT Findings in Bowel Obstruction in a Tertiary Care Rural Hospital in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Amit; Gupta, Sharad; Mittal, Kapish; Taneja, Arpit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) provides clinically and surgically important information in bowel obstruction. It can depict the severity, level and cause of obstruction. Aim To depict the spectrum of MDCT findings in cases of small and large bowel obstruction. Materials and Methods Contrast enhanced MDCT examination of 50 patients were retrospectively included in the study who had evidence of clinical as well as MDCT evidence of bowel obstruction and in whom surgical/clinical follow-up for final diagnosis was available. CT scan was done in all the patients with Ingenuity CT (128 slice MDCT, Philips Medical Systems). The axial sections were reconstructed in coronal and sagital planes to determine site and cause of bowel obstruction. Results There were 34 males and 16 females patients in this study with mean age of 28.4 years. The level of obstruction was in small bowel in 39 patients (76.67%) and large bowel in 11 patients (23.33%). Adhesive bands were the cause of Small Bowel Obstruction (SBO) in 17 patients (43.5% of SBO patients). The most common CT signs in adhesive band SBO were beak sign (seen in 70.6% patients) and fat notch sign (52.9% patients). Five cases of SBO were secondary to benign stricture. Matted adhesions were the cause of obstruction in 3 patients. All these patients showed transition zone in pelvis with positive small bowel faeces sign. Two patients with SBO due to adhesive band had evidence of closed loop obstruction with evidence of gangrenous gut on surgery. Large Bowel Obstruction (LBO) was seen in 11 patients. Most common cause of LBO was primary colonic malignancy, accounting for 7 patients (63.6%). In one patient, the cause was direct invasion of hepatic flexure by carcinoma of gall bladder. Other causes of LBO were pelvic adhesions, faecal impaction and ischaemic stricture. Conclusion SBO is more common than LBO with adhesive bands being the most common cause of SBO. MDCT is very useful for depicting site and cause

  14. Ectopia cordis with tetralogy of Fallot in an infant with pentalogy of Cantrell: high-pitch MDCT exam.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Herrera, Rogerio; Ramirez-Carmona, Rocio; Criales-Vera, Sergio; Calderon-Colmenero, Juan; Kimura-Hayama, Eric

    2011-07-01

    We report the MDCT findings of a 17-month-old girl with Cantrell's pentalogy, a rare congenital disease characterized by several defects in the ventral thoracoabdominal wall including ectopia cordis, and, in this patient, associated with tetralogy of Fallot. This case provides an example of the utility of a wide volume in coverage and high-pitch MDCT scan in the evaluation of complex cardiovascular anatomy in infants with congenital heart disease without the need of an ECG-gating acquisition.

  15. Comparison between MDCT and Grayscale IVUS in a Quantitative Analysis of Coronary Lumen in Segments with or without Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Falcão, João L A A; Falcão, Breno A A; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Campos, Carlos M; Silva, Expedito R; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Rochitte, Carlos E; Shiozaki, Afonso A; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R; Lemos, Pedro A

    2015-01-27

    Background: The diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice MDCT in comparison with IVUS has been poorly described and is mainly restricted to reports analyzing segments with documented atherosclerotic plaques. Objectives: We compared 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with gray scale intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for the evaluation of coronary lumen dimensions in the context of a comprehensive analysis, including segments with absent or mild disease. Methods: The 64-slice MDCT was performed within 72 h before the IVUS imaging, which was obtained for at least one coronary, regardless of the presence of luminal stenosis at angiography. A total of 21 patients were included, with 70 imaged vessels (total length 114.6 ± 38.3 mm per patient). A coronary plaque was diagnosed in segments with plaque burden > 40%. Results: At patient, vessel, and segment levels, average lumen area, minimal lumen area, and minimal lumen diameter were highly correlated between IVUS and 64-slice MDCT (p < 0.01). However, 64-slice MDCT tended to underestimate the lumen size with a relatively wide dispersion of the differences. The comparison between 64-slice MDCT and IVUS lumen measurements was not substantially affected by the presence or absence of an underlying plaque. In addition, 64-slice MDCT showed good global accuracy for the detection of IVUS parameters associated with flow-limiting lesions. Conclusions: In a comprehensive, multi-territory, and whole-artery analysis, the assessment of coronary lumen by 64-slice MDCT compared with coronary IVUS showed a good overall diagnostic ability, regardless of the presence or absence of underlying atherosclerotic plaques.

  16. Comparison between MDCT and Grayscale IVUS in a Quantitative Analysis of Coronary Lumen in Segments with or without Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, João L. A. A.; Falcão, Breno A. A.; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V.; Campos, Carlos M.; Silva, Expedito R.; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Shiozaki, Afonso A.; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R.; Lemos, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice MDCT in comparison with IVUS has been poorly described and is mainly restricted to reports analyzing segments with documented atherosclerotic plaques. Objectives We compared 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with gray scale intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for the evaluation of coronary lumen dimensions in the context of a comprehensive analysis, including segments with absent or mild disease. Methods The 64-slice MDCT was performed within 72 h before the IVUS imaging, which was obtained for at least one coronary, regardless of the presence of luminal stenosis at angiography. A total of 21 patients were included, with 70 imaged vessels (total length 114.6 ± 38.3 mm per patient). A coronary plaque was diagnosed in segments with plaque burden > 40%. Results At patient, vessel, and segment levels, average lumen area, minimal lumen area, and minimal lumen diameter were highly correlated between IVUS and 64-slice MDCT (p < 0.01). However, 64-slice MDCT tended to underestimate the lumen size with a relatively wide dispersion of the differences. The comparison between 64-slice MDCT and IVUS lumen measurements was not substantially affected by the presence or absence of an underlying plaque. In addition, 64-slice MDCT showed good global accuracy for the detection of IVUS parameters associated with flow-limiting lesions. Conclusions In a comprehensive, multi-territory, and whole-artery analysis, the assessment of coronary lumen by 64-slice MDCT compared with coronary IVUS showed a good overall diagnostic ability, regardless of the presence or absence of underlying atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:25993595

  17. Comparison between MDCT and Grayscale IVUS in a Quantitative Analysis of Coronary Lumen in Segments with or without Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Falcão, João L A A; Falcão, Breno A A; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Campos, Carlos M; Silva, Expedito R; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Rochitte, Carlos E; Shiozaki, Afonso A; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R; Lemos, Pedro A

    2015-04-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice MDCT in comparison with IVUS has been poorly described and is mainly restricted to reports analyzing segments with documented atherosclerotic plaques. We compared 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with gray scale intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for the evaluation of coronary lumen dimensions in the context of a comprehensive analysis, including segments with absent or mild disease. The 64-slice MDCT was performed within 72 h before the IVUS imaging, which was obtained for at least one coronary, regardless of the presence of luminal stenosis at angiography. A total of 21 patients were included, with 70 imaged vessels (total length 114.6 ± 38.3 mm per patient). A coronary plaque was diagnosed in segments with plaque burden > 40%. At patient, vessel, and segment levels, average lumen area, minimal lumen area, and minimal lumen diameter were highly correlated between IVUS and 64-slice MDCT (p < 0.01). However, 64-slice MDCT tended to underestimate the lumen size with a relatively wide dispersion of the differences. The comparison between 64-slice MDCT and IVUS lumen measurements was not substantially affected by the presence or absence of an underlying plaque. In addition, 64-slice MDCT showed good global accuracy for the detection of IVUS parameters associated with flow-limiting lesions. In a comprehensive, multi-territory, and whole-artery analysis, the assessment of coronary lumen by 64-slice MDCT compared with coronary IVUS showed a good overall diagnostic ability, regardless of the presence or absence of underlying atherosclerotic plaques.

  18. MDCT assessment of CAD in type-2 diabetic subjects with diabetic neuropathy: the role of Charcot neuro-arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Marano, Riccardo; Pitocco, Dario; Di Stasio, Enrico; Savino, Giancarlo; Merlino, Biagio; Trani, Carlo; Pirro, Federica; Rutigliano, Claudia; Santangelo, Carolina; Minoiu, Aurelian Costin; Natale, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    To compare the CACS and CAD severity assessed by MDCT in neuropathic type-2 diabetic patients with and without Charcot-neuroarthropathy (CN). Thirty-four CN asymptomatic-patients and 36 asymptomatic-patients with diabetic-neuropathy (DN) without CN underwent MDCT to assess CACS and severity of CAD. Patients were classified as positive for significant CAD in presence of at least one stenosis >50 % on MDCT-coronary-angiography (MDCT-CA). Groups were matched for age, sex and traditional CAD risk-factors. The coronary-angiography (CA) was performed in all patients with at least a significant stenosis detected by MDCT-CA, both as reference and eventually as treatment. CN patients showed higher rates of significant CAD in comparison with DN subjects [p < 0.001], while non-significant differences were observed in CACS (p = 0.980). No significant differences were also observed in CACS distribution in all subjects for stenosis ≥/<50 % (p = 0.814), as well as in both groups (p = 0.661 and 0.559, respectively). The MDCT-CA showed an overall diagnostic-accuracy for significant CAD of 87%. These preliminary data suggest that CN-patients have a higher prevalence of severe CAD in comparison with DN-patients, while coronary plaques do not exhibit an increased amount of calcium. MDCT may be helpful to assess the CV risk in such asymptomatic type-2-diabetic patients with autonomic-neuropathy. Type 2-diabetic-patients with CN result having more severe coronary artery plaque-burden. MDCT-CA may stratify the CV risk in type 2-diabetic-patients with CN. Adequate diagnostic is mandatory for optimal management of type 2-diabetic-patients with CN.

  19. Placement of intra-articular injections verified by mini air-arthrography.

    PubMed

    Bliddal, H

    1999-10-01

    To develop and assess a simple, inexpensive method for ascertaining the placement of intra-articular injections for knee osteoarthritis During a one year period patients with "dry" osteoarthritis of the knee who received intra-articular therapy were tested by air-arthrography. Along with triamcinolone and lignocaine (lidocaine), 5 ml of air was injected into the joint. On subsequent lateral and anterior-posterior radiographs a correct placement was verified by a sharply defined shadow of air in the suprapatellar pouch, while extra-articular air was diffusely spread in the surrounding tissue. In 51 of 56 cases the injection was correctly placed. In the remaining five cases the injection was immediately repeated and positioned within the joint. No adverse events were seen that could be ascribed to the use of air during the study, although bleeding in the quadriceps was seen one week after an extra-articular injection. With mini-air arthrography, it is possible to test the placement of intra-articular injections in knee joints. The method is proposed as a learning tool as well as providing a means of quality assurance in studies involving intra-articular injections.

  20. Image quality improvement in MDCT cardiac imaging via SMART-RECON method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Cao, Ximiao; Xing, Zhanfeng; Sun, Xuguang; Hsieh, Jiang; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a challenging imaging task currently limited by the achievable temporal resolution of modern Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) scanners. In this paper, the recently proposed SMARTRECON method has been applied in MDCT-based CCTA imaging to improve the image quality without any prior knowledge of cardiac motion. After the prospective ECG-gated data acquisition from a short-scan angular span, the acquired data were sorted into several sub-sectors of view angles; each corresponds to a 1/4th of the short-scan angular range. Information of the cardiac motion was thus encoded into the data in each view angle sub-sector. The SMART-RECON algorithm was then applied to jointly reconstruct several image volumes, each of which is temporally consistent with the data acquired in the corresponding view angle sub-sector. Extensive numerical simulations were performed to validate the proposed technique and investigate the performance dependence.

  1. State-of-the-art preoperative staging of gastric cancer by MDCT and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Il; Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common and fatal cancers. The importance of accurate staging for gastric cancer has become more critical due to the recent introduction of less invasive treatment options, such as endoscopic mucosal resection or laparoscopic surgery. The tumor-node-metastasis staging system is the generally accepted staging system for predicting the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) is a widely accepted imaging modality for the preoperative staging of gastric cancer that can simultaneously assess locoregional staging, including the gastric mass, regional lymph nodes, and distant metastasis. The diagnostic performance of MDCT for T- and N-staging has been improved by the technical development of isotropic imaging and 3D reformation. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was not previously used to evaluate gastric cancer due to the modality’s limitations, the development of high-speed sequences has made MRI a feasible tool for the staging of gastric cancer. PMID:24782607

  2. MDCT Imaging Findings of Liver Cirrhosis: Spectrum of Hepatic and Extrahepatic Abdominal Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sangster, Guillermo P.; Previgliano, Carlos H.; Nader, Mathieu; Chwoschtschinsky, Elisa; Heldmann, Maureen G.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic cirrhosis is the clinical and pathologic result of a multifactorial chronic liver injury. It is well known that cirrhosis is the origin of multiple extrahepatic abdominal complications and a markedly increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This tumor is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide and the third most common cause of cancer related death. With the rising incidence of HCC worldwide, awareness of the evolution of cirrhotic nodules into malignancy is critical for an early detection and treatment. Adequate imaging protocol selection with dynamic multiphase Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) and reformatted images is crucial to differentiate and categorize the hepatic nodular dysplasia. Knowledge of the typical and less common extrahepatic abdominal manifestations is essential for accurately assessing patients with known or suspected hepatic disease. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the imaging spectrum of intra- and extrahepatic abdominal manifestations of hepatic cirrhosis seen on MDCT. PMID:23986608

  3. Congenital thoracic vascular anomalies: evaluation with state-of-the-art MR imaging and MDCT.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Daubert, Melissa; Lee, Edward Y; Epelman, Monica

    2011-09-01

    Congenital thoracic vascular anomalies include embryologic developmental disorders of the thoracic aorta, aortic arch branch arteries, pulmonary arteries, thoracic systemic veins, and pulmonary veins. Diagnostic evaluation of these anomalies in pediatric patients has evolved with innovations in diagnostic imaging technology. State-of-the-art magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR angiography multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography, and advanced postprocessing visualization techniques offer accurate and reliable high-resolution two-dimensional and three-dimensional noninvasive anatomic displays for interpretation and clinical management of congenital thoracic vascular anomalies. This article reviews vascular MR imaging, MR angiography, MDCT angiography, and advanced visualization techniques and applications for the assessment of congenital thoracic vascular anomalies, emphasizing clinical embryology and the characteristic imaging findings.

  4. Robust method for extracting the pulmonary vascular trees from 3D MDCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeprasartsit, Pinyo; Higgins, William E.

    2011-03-01

    Segmentation of pulmonary blood vessels from three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector CT (MDCT) images is important for pulmonary applications. This work presents a method for extracting the vascular trees of the pulmonary arteries and veins, applicable to both contrast-enhanced and unenhanced 3D MDCT image data. The method finds 2D elliptical cross-sections and evaluates agreement of these cross-sections in consecutive slices to find likely cross-sections. It next employs morphological multiscale analysis to separate vessels from adjoining airway walls. The method then tracks the center of the likely cross-sections to connect them to the pulmonary vessels in the mediastinum and forms connected vascular trees spanning both lungs. A ground-truth study indicates that the method was able to detect on the order of 98% of the vessel branches having diameter >= 3.0 mm. The extracted vascular trees can be utilized for the guidance of safe bronchoscopic biopsy.

  5. High-resolution bone imaging for osteoporosis diagnostics and therapy monitoring using clinical MDCT and MRI.

    PubMed

    Baum, T; Karampinos, D C; Liebl, H; Rummeny, E J; Waldt, S; Bauer, J S

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is classified as a public health problem due to its increased risk for fragility fractures. Osteoporotic fractures, in particular spine and hip fractures, are associated with a high morbidity and mortality, and generate immense financial cost. The World Health Organisation (WHO) based the diagnosis of osteoporosis on the measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). However, BMD values of subjects with versus without osteoporotic fractures overlap. Furthermore, it was reported that the anti-fracture effects of drugs could be only partially explained by their effects on BMD. Bone strength reflects the integration of BMD and bone quality. The later can be partly determined by measurements of bone microstructure. Therefore, substantial research efforts have been undertaken to assess bone microstructure by using high-resolution imaging techniques, including high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (hr-pQCT), high-resolution multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Clinical MDCT and MRI systems are broadly available and allow an adequate depiction of the bone microstructure at the clinically most important fracture sites, i.e. radius, spine and hip. Bone microstructure parameters and finite element models can be computed in high-resolution MDCT and MR images. These measurements improved the prediction of bone strength beyond the DXA-derived BMD and revealed pharmacotherapy effects, which are partly not captured by BMD. Therefore, high-resolution bone imaging using clinical MDCT and MRI may be beneficial for osteoporosis diagnostics and allow a highly sensitive monitoring of drug treatment, which plays an important role in the prevention of fragility fractures.

  6. Evaluating the effect of two different anesthetic protocols on 64-MDCT coronary angiography in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Pinkerton, Marie; Del Rio, Alejandro Munoz; Saunders, Jimmy H; François, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate is a major factor influencing diagnostic image quality in computed tomographic coronary artery angiography (MDCT-CA) with an ideal heart rate of 60–65 beats/minute in humans. Using standardized contrast bolus volume, two different clinically applicable anesthetic protocols were compared for effect on cardiovascular parameters and 64-MDCT-CA quality in ten healthy dogs. The protocol using midazolam/fentanyl (A) was hypothesized to result in adequate reduction of heart rate achieving adequate image quality for MDCT-CA studies and having low impact on blood pressure, where as the protocol utilizing dexmedetomidine (B) was expected to result in reduction of heart rate to the target heart range resulting in excellent image quality while possibly showing undesirable effect on the blood pressure values measured. Heart rate was 80.6 ± 7.5bpm with protocol A and 79.2 ± 14.2bpm with protocol B during image acquisition (P=1). R-R intervals allowing for the best depiction of the individual coronary artery segments were found in the end diastolic period and varied between the 70–95% interval. Diagnostic quality was rated excellent, good and moderate in the majority of the segments evaluated, with higher scores given for more proximal segments and lower for more distal segments respectively. Blur was the most commonly observed artifact and most affected the distal segments. There was no significant difference for the optimal reconstruction interval, diagnostic quality and measured length individual segments or proximal diameter of the coronary arteries between both protocols (P=1). Both anesthetic protocols and the standardized bolus volume allow for diagnostic quality coronary 64-MDCT-CA exams. PMID:25065815

  7. Spontaneous Renal Artery Dissection as a Cause of Acute Renal Infarction: Clinical and MDCT Findings.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kibo; Song, Soon Young; Lee, Chang Hwa; Ko, Byung Hee; Lee, Seunghun; Kang, Bo Kyeong; Kim, Mi Mi

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) as a cause of acute renal infarction, and to evaluate the clinical and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of SRAD. From November 2011 to January 2014, 35 patients who were diagnosed with acute renal infarction by MDCT were included. We analyzed the 35 MDCT data sets and medical records retrospectively, and compared clinical and imaging features of SRAD with an embolism, using Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. The most common cause of acute renal infarction was an embolism, and SRAD was the second most common cause. SRAD patients had new-onset hypertension more frequently than embolic patients. Embolic patients were found to have increased C-reactive protein (CRP) more often than SRAD patients. Laboratory results, including tests for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and the BUN/creatinine ratio (BCR) were significantly higher in embolic patients than SRAD patients. Bilateral renal involvement was detected in embolic patients more often than in SRAD patients. MDCT images of SRAD patients showed the stenosis of the true lumen, due to compression by a thrombosed false lumen. None of SRAD patients progressed to an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m² or to end-stage renal disease during the follow-up period. SRAD is not a rare cause of acute renal infarction, and it has a benign clinical course. It should be considered in a differential diagnosis of acute renal infarction, particularly in patients with new-onset hypertension, unilateral renal involvement, and normal ranges of CRP, LDH, BUN, and BCR.

  8. Spontaneous Renal Artery Dissection as a Cause of Acute Renal Infarction: Clinical and MDCT Findings

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) as a cause of acute renal infarction, and to evaluate the clinical and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of SRAD. From November 2011 to January 2014, 35 patients who were diagnosed with acute renal infarction by MDCT were included. We analyzed the 35 MDCT data sets and medical records retrospectively, and compared clinical and imaging features of SRAD with an embolism, using Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. The most common cause of acute renal infarction was an embolism, and SRAD was the second most common cause. SRAD patients had new-onset hypertension more frequently than embolic patients. Embolic patients were found to have increased C-reactive protein (CRP) more often than SRAD patients. Laboratory results, including tests for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and the BUN/creatinine ratio (BCR) were significantly higher in embolic patients than SRAD patients. Bilateral renal involvement was detected in embolic patients more often than in SRAD patients. MDCT images of SRAD patients showed the stenosis of the true lumen, due to compression by a thrombosed false lumen. None of SRAD patients progressed to an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or to end-stage renal disease during the follow-up period. SRAD is not a rare cause of acute renal infarction, and it has a benign clinical course. It should be considered in a differential diagnosis of acute renal infarction, particularly in patients with new-onset hypertension, unilateral renal involvement, and normal ranges of CRP, LDH, BUN, and BCR. PMID:28244286

  9. Managing patient dose in multi-detector computed tomography(MDCT). ICRP Publication 102.

    PubMed

    Valentin, J

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) technology has changed considerably in recent years with the introduction of increasing numbers of multiple detector arrays. There are several parameters specific to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners that increase or decrease patient dose systematically compared to older single detector computed tomography (SDCT) scanners. This document briefly reviews the MDCT technology, radiation dose in MDCT, including differences from SDCT and factors that affect dose, radiation risks, and the responsibilities for patient dose management. The document recommends that users need to understand the relationship between patient dose and image quality and be aware that image quality in CT is often higher than that necessary for diagnostic confidence. Automatic exposure control (AEC) does not totally free the operator from selection of scan parameters, and awareness of individual systems is important. Scanning protocols cannot simply be transferred between scanners from different manufacturers and should be determined for each MDCT. If the image quality is appropriately specified by the user, and suited to the clinical task, there will be a reduction in patient dose for most patients. Understanding of some parameters is not intuitive and the selection of image quality parameter values in AEC systems is not straightforward. Examples of some clinical situation shave been included to demonstrate dose management, e.g. CT examinations of the chest, the heart for coronary calcium quantification and non-invasive coronary angiography, colonography, the urinary tract, children, pregnant patients, trauma cases, and CT guided interventions. CT is increasingly being used to replace conventional x-ray studies and it is important that patient dose is given careful consideration, particularly with repeated or multiple examinations.

  10. Beak-Like Extension of the Pancreatic Uncinate Process on MDCT: Is It Hyperplasia or Movement?

    PubMed

    Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Matsumoto, Shunro; Kiyonaga, Maki; Takaji, Ryo; Yamada, Yasunari; Mori, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the pancreatic uncinate process with a beak-like extension (BLE) beyond the left border of the superior mesenteric artery, to define the cause of BLE, and to differentiate BLE from hyperplasia. We retrospectively reviewed 1042 triple-phase contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (3P-CE-MDCT) examinations of 500 patients. Finally, 38 patients (28 men, 10 women; mean age, 66 years) with 140 3P-CE-MDCT images showing BLE were studied regarding BLE size, contour, and cause. The superior mesenteric artery position was also evaluated. Beak-like extensions were found in 7.6% of patients. Most were caused by movement of the small bowel mesentery (n = 21, 55%), with deviation of mesenteric vessels or mass effect from expanded adjacent organs (n = 3, 8%). Seven patients (18.5%) had true hyperplasia. Beak-like extension is caused by movement of the small bowel mesentery with deviation of mesenteric vessels or by adjacent organ expansion. Beak-like extension closely mimics other pathology on nonenhanced MDCT.

  11. Conventional and reduced radiation dose of 16-MDCT for detection of nephrolithiasis and ureterolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Erik K; Weaver, Carolyn; Ho, Lisa M; Martin, Lucie; Li, Jianying; Darsie, James; Frush, Donald P

    2008-01-01

    Our purpose was to prospectively compare the reader compatibility and acceptability of a range of reduced-dose 16-MDCT images with standard-dose 16-MDCT images for the detection of nephroureterolithiasis using a dose reduction simulation technique. The study was HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved. Fifty consecutive patients with suspected nephrolithiasis were recruited to undergo conventional renal stone unenhanced 16-MDCT with at least 160 mA. Noise was then artificially introduced to simulate levels of 70, 100, and 130 mA. Three blinded independent readers interpreted the original and simulated-dose scans for the location and number of renal and ureteral calculi and secondary signs of obstruction using a 5-point confidence scale. Reader acceptability of scans was inversely related to noise. There was no significant reduction in readers' confidence in detection or exclusion of renal collecting system calculi with simulated reduction of mA of 70, 100, and 130 compared with the standard-dose study. However, for ureteral calcifications, there was a decrease in confidence for the detection or exclusion of ureterolithiasis at an mA of 70 (35 mAs). An mA as low as 70 (35 mAs) is acceptable for evaluation of nephrolithiasis. However, the evaluation of ureterolithiasis is compromised with an mA of 70.

  12. Spectrum of imaging findings on MDCT enterography in patients with small bowel tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kalra, N; Agrawal, P; Mittal, V; Kochhar, R; Gupta, V; Nada, R; Singh, R; Khandelwal, N

    2014-03-01

    Abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is the sixth most common extrapulmonary site of involvement. The sites of involvement in abdominal tuberculosis, in descending order of frequency, are lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity, and gastrointestinal tract. The radiological armamentarium for evaluating tuberculosis of the small bowel (SBTB) includes barium studies (small bowel follow-through, SBFT), CT (multidetector CT, CT enterography, and CT enteroclysis), ultrasound (sonoenteroclysis), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; enterography and enteroclysis). In this review, we illustrate the abnormalities at MDCT enterography in 20 consecutive patients with SB TB and also describe extraluminal findings in these patients. MDCT enterography allows non-invasive good-quality assessment of well-distended bowel loops and the adjacent soft tissues. It displays the thickness and enhancement of the entire bowel wall in all three planes and allows examination of all bowel loops, especially the ileal loops, which are mostly superimposed. The terminal ileum and ileocaecal junction are the most common sites of small bowel involvement in intestinal TB. The most common abnormality is short-segment strictures with symmetrical concentric mural thickening and homogeneous mural enhancement. Other findings include lymphadenopathy, ascites, enteroliths, peritoneal thickening, and enhancement. In conclusion, MDCT enterography is a comprehensive technique for the evaluation of SB TB.

  13. How reliable are 40 MHz IVUS and 64-slice MDCT in characterizing coronary plaque composition? An ex vivo study with histopathological comparison.

    PubMed

    Chopard, Romain; Boussel, Loic; Motreff, Pascal; Rioufol, Gilles; Tabib, Alain; Douek, Philippe; Meyronet, David; Revel, Didier; Finet, Gérard

    2010-04-01

    The present study investigated whether IVUS could serve as a reliable reference in validating MDCT characterization of coronary plaque against a histological gold standard. Twenty-one specimens were postmortem human coronary arteries. Coronary cross-sections were imaged by 40 MHz IVUS and by 64-slice MDCT and characterized histologically as presenting calcified, fibrous or lipid-rich plaques. Plaque composition was analyzed visually and intra-plaque MDCT attenuation was measured in Hounsfield Units (HU). 83 atherosclerotic plaques were identified. IVUS failed to characterize calcified plaque accurately, with a positive predictive value (ppv) of 75% versus 100% for MDCT. Lipid-rich plaque was even less accurately characterized, with ppv of 60 and 68% for IVUS and MDCT respectively. Mean MDCT attenuation was 966 +/- 473 HU for calcified plaque, 83 +/- 35 HU for fibrous plaque and 70.92 HU +/- 41 HU for lipid-rich plaque. No significant difference in mean MDCT attenuation was found between fibrous and lipid-rich plaques (P = 0.276). In vivo validation of MDCT against an IVUS reference thus appears to be an unsuitable and unreliable approach: 40 MHz IVUS suffers from acoustic ambiguities in plaque characterization, and 64-slice MDCT fails to analyze plaque morphology and components accurately.

  14. Assessment of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI for HCC and dysplastic nodules and comparison of detection sensitivity versus MDCT.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tatsuo; Kudo, Masatoshi; Komuta, Mina; Hayaishi, Sosuke; Ueda, Taisuke; Takita, Masahiro; Kitai, Satoshi; Hatanaka, Kinuyo; Yada, Norihisa; Hagiwara, Satoru; Chung, Hobyung; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Ueshima, Kazuomi; Sakamoto, Michiie; Maenishi, Osamu; Hyodo, Tomoko; Okada, Masahiro; Kumano, Seishi; Murakami, Takamichi

    2012-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and dysplastic nodules (DNs) compared with dynamic multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT), and to discriminate between HCCs and DNs. Eighty-six nodules diagnosed as HCC or DNs were retrospectively investigated. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and dynamic MDCT were compared with respect to their diagnostic ability for hypervascular HCCs and detection sensitivity for hypovascular tumors. The ability of hepatobiliary images of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI to discriminate between these nodules was assessed. We also calculated the EOB enhancement ratio of the tumors. For hypervascular HCCs, the diagnostic ability of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was significantly higher than that of MDCT for tumors less than 2 cm (p = 0.048). There was no difference in the detection of hypervascular HCCs between hepatobiliary phase images of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (43/45: 96%) and dynamic MDCT (40/45: 89%), whereas the detection sensitivity of hypovascular tumors by Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was significantly higher than that by dynamic MDCT (39/41: 95% vs. 25/41: 61%, p = 0.001). EOB enhancement ratios were decreased in parallel with the degree of differentiation in DNs and HCCs, although there was no difference between DNs and hypovascular well-differentiated HCCs. The diagnostic ability of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI for hypervascular HCCs less than 2 cm was significantly higher than that of MDCT. For hypovascular tumors, the detection sensitivity of hepatobiliary phase images of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was significantly higher than that of dynamic Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and dynamic MDCT. It was difficult to distinguish between DNs and hypovascular well-differentiated HCCs based on the EOB enhancement ratio.

  15. Potential Utility of a Combined Approach with US and MR Arthrography to Image Medial Elbow Pain in Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Roedl, Johannes B; Gonzalez, Felix M; Zoga, Adam C; Morrison, William B; Nevalainen, Mika T; Ciccotti, Michael G; Nazarian, Levon N

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To evaluate a combined imaging approach with both ultrasonography (US; conventional US and valgus stress US) and magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in baseball players with medial elbow pain. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained and the requirement for informed consent was waived. The study is compliant with HIPAA. Baseball players with medial elbow pain underwent US in addition to MR arthrography. Findings were assessed with each modality alone and both combined in this retrospective investigation. For the evaluation of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tears with stress US, the interval gapping of the medial elbow joint was measured between rest and valgus stress both at the injured and at the uninjured (contralateral) elbow. Surgical or arthroscopic correlation was available as the so-called gold standard. McNemar tests compared the accuracies of the imaging modalities. Results In this study, 144 baseball players had 191 findings of medial elbow pain, including 53 UCL tears. With stress US, joint gapping at the injured elbow greater than 1.0 mm compared with the contralateral elbow yielded a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 96%, 81%, and 87%, respectively, for diagnosing UCL tears. With MR arthrography, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for UCL tears were 81%, 91%, and 88%, respectively, and increased to 96% (P = .013, McNemar test), 99% (P = .023), and 98% (P < .001), respectively, when combined with US to a dual modality MR and US approach. For 31 patients with ulnar neuritis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy increased from 74%, 92%, and 88%, respectively, with MR arthrography alone to 90% (P = .07, McNemar test), 100% (P < .001), and 98% (P < .001) combined with US. For the 59 myotendinous and the 48 osteochondral diagnoses, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy with MR arthrography alone were 93%, 93%, and 93%, and 94%, 98%, and 97%, respectively, with no additional diagnostic value

  16. Diagnosis of lesions of the acetabular labrum, of the labral-chondral transition zone, and of the cartilage in femoroacetabular impingement: Correlation between direct magnetic resonance arthrography and hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Crespo Rodríguez, A M; de Lucas Villarrubia, J C; Pastrana Ledesma, M A; Millán Santos, I; Padrón, M

    2015-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and accuracy of direct MR arthrography in the diagnosis of intra-articular lesions associated with femoroacetabular impingement. We used direct MR arthrography to study 51 patients with femoroacetabular impingement who underwent arthroscopic hip surgery. Surgery demonstrated 37 labral tears, 44 lesions in the labral-chondral transitional zone, and 40 lesions of the articular cartilage. We correlated the findings at preoperative direct MR arthrography with those of hip arthroscopy and calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and validity index for direct MR arthrography. The sensitivity and specificity of MR arthrography were 94.5% and 100%, respectively, for diagnosing labral tears, 100% and 87.5%, respectively, for diagnosing lesions of the labral-chondral transition zone, and 92.5% and 54.5%, respectively, for diagnosing lesions of the articular cartilage. The negative predictive value of MR arthrography for lesions of the labral-chondral transitional zone was 100%. MR arthrography accurately defined extensive lesions of the cartilage and the secondary osseous changes (the main factor in poor prognosis), although its diagnostic performance was not so good in small chondral lesions. In patients with femoroacetabular impingement, direct MR arthrography can adequately detect and characterize lesions of the acetabular labrum and of the labral-chondral transitional zone as well as extensive lesions of the articular cartilage and secondary osseous changes. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. MR-Imaging of teeth and periodontal apparatus: an experimental study comparing high-resolution MRI with MDCT and CBCT.

    PubMed

    Gaudino, Chiara; Cosgarea, Raluca; Heiland, Sabine; Csernus, Réka; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Pham, Mirko; Kim, Ti-Sun; Bendszus, Martin; Rohde, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to assess the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize dental and periodontal structures and (2) to compare findings with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone beam CT (CBCT). Four porcine mandibles were examined with (1) 3T-MRI, (2) MDCT and (3) CBCT. Two observers independently reviewed MR, MDCT and CBCT images and assessed image quality of different dental and periodontal structures. To assess quantitatively the accuracy of the different imaging technique, both observers measured burr holes, previously drilled in the mandibles. Dental structures, e.g. teeth roots, pulpa chamber and dentin, were imaged accurately with all imaging sources. Periodontal space and cortical/trabecular bone were better visualized by MRI (p < 0.001). MRI could excellently display the lamina dura, not detectable with MDCT and only inconstant visible with CBCT (p < 0.001). Burr hole measurements were highly precise with all imaging techniques. This experimental study shows the diagnostic feasibility of MRI in visualization of teeth and periodontal anatomy. Detection of periodontal structures was significantly better with MRI than with MDCT or CBCT. Prospective trials have to evaluate further the potential benefit of MRI in a clinical setting.

  18. The value of magnetic resonance arthrography of the temporomandibular joint in imaging disc adhesions and perforations

    PubMed Central

    Venetis, G; Pilavaki, M; Triantafyllidou, K; Papachristodoulou, A; Lazaridis, N; Palladas, P

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study attempted to validate MR arthrography (MRAr) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in detecting the position, integrity and relations of the articular disc and retrodiscal tissue. Methods A total of 20 TMJs from 10 patients with severe TMJ dysfunction underwent MRI and MRAr. A paramagnetic contrast medium was injected into the upper joint compartment to observe possible adhesions and/or leakage into the lower compartment. 15 TMJs were surgically or arthroscopically explored and restored. Results MRAr was approximately in the same diagnostic value as MRI when locating position, but superior in detecting disc perforations (eight TMJs) and adhesions (seven TMJs) appearing together in four cases. Surgery confirmed radiological findings in all but one case, where arthroscopy and surgery failed to confirm a disc perforation indicated by MRAr. Conclusions TMJ MRAr may simultaneously reveal adhesions and perforations. Sensitivity and the probability of false-positive results require further study. PMID:21239570

  19. Use of intra-articular carbon dioxide and air for MR arthrography: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Maes, Robbert M; Morrison, William B; Lewin, Jonathan S; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Kiewiet, Cunera J M; Wacker, Frank K

    2006-01-01

    During animal experiments, carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and air were used as a novel contrast agent for direct magnetic resonance arthrography (MRAr). MRAr was performed after injection of CO(2) and air in the knee joints of two pigs. MR images of phantoms containing air, CO(2) and nitrogen were compared. After intra-articular injection, both present as a signal void on various sequences and permit sharp delineation of cartilage and other adjacent structures. Despite the potential for artefact generation, only a slight susceptibility artefact was seen after injection of CO(2) and air. In phantom experiments, air, CO(2) and nitrogen demonstrated identical slight regular susceptibility artefacts at the phantom margins. CO(2) MRAr can yield high contrast between cartilage, ligaments and synovium relative to the joint compartment. Therefore, this technique might be useful as an investigational method for the evaluation of cartilage surface lesions and possibly as an alternative contrast agent for clinical use.

  20. Gradient-recalled echo sequences in direct shoulder MR arthrography for evaluating the labrum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marc J; Motamedi, Kambiz; Chow, Kira; Seeger, Leanne L

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of fat-suppressed gradient-recalled echo (GRE) compared with conventional spin echo T1-weighted (T1W) sequences in direct shoulder MR arthrography for evaluating labral tears. Three musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed MR arthrograms performed over a 12-month period for which surgical correlation was available. Of 180 serial arthrograms, 31 patients had surgery with a mean of 48 days following imaging. Paired coronal oblique and axial T1W or GRE sequences were analyzed by consensus for labral tear (coronal oblique two-dimensional multi-echo data image combination, 2D MEDIC; and axial three-dimensional double-echo steady-state, 3D DESS; Siemens MAGNETOM Sonata 1.5-T MR system). Interpretations were correlated with operative reports. Of 31 shoulders, 25 had labral tears at surgery. The GRE sequences depicted labral tears in 22, while T1W images depicted tears in 16 (sensitivity 88% versus 64%; p<0.05). Subdividing the labrum, GRE was significantly more sensitive for the posterior labrum (75% versus 25%; p<0.05) with a trend toward greater sensitivity at the anterior labrum (78% versus 56%; p=0.157) but not significantly different for the superior labrum (50% versus 57%; p>0.7). Specificities were somewhat lower for GRE. Thin section GRE sequences are more sensitive than T1W for the detection of anterior and posterior labral tears. As the specificity of GRE was lower, it should be considered as an adjunctive imaging sequence that may improve depiction of labral tears, particularly smaller tears, in routine MR arthrography protocols.

  1. Accuracy of 3D Dual Echo Steady State (DESS) MR Arthrography to Quantify Acetabular Cartilage Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Christine L; Bangerter, Neal K; McGavin, Lance S; Peters, Christopher L; Drew, Alex J; Hanrahan, Christopher J; Anderson, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences used to image hip cartilage often have reduced out-of-plane resolution and may lack adequate signal to noise to image cartilage. We deployed and quantified the accuracy of 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) MR arthrography with hip traction to image acetabular cartilage. Methods Saline was injected into four cadaver hips placed under traction. 3D DESS MRI scans were obtained before and after cores of cartilage were harvested from the acetabulum; the two MRIs were spatially aligned to reference core positions. The thickness of cartilage cores was measured under microscopy to serve as the reference standard. 3D reconstructions of cartilage and subchondral bone were generated using automatic and semi-automatic image segmentation. Cartilage thickness estimated from the 3D reconstructions was compared to physical measurements using Bland-Altman plots. Results As revealed by the automatic segmentation mask, saline imbibed the joint space throughout the articulating surface, with the exception of the posteroinferior region in two hips. Locations where air bubbles were introduced and regions of suspected low density bone disrupted an otherwise smooth automatic segmentation mask. Automatic and semi-automatic segmentation yielded a bias ± repeatability coefficient (95% limits of agreement) of 0.10 ± 0.51 mm (−0.41 to 0.61 mm) and 0.06 ± 0.43 mm (−0.37 to 0.49 mm), respectively. Conclusions Cartilage thickness can be estimated to within ~0.5 mm of the physical value with 95% confidence using 3D reconstructions of 3D DESS MR arthrography images. Manual correction of the automatic segmentation mask may improve reconstruction accuracy. PMID:25851109

  2. Accuracy of 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) MR arthrography to quantify acetabular cartilage thickness.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Christine L; Bangerter, Neal K; McGavin, Lance S; Peters, Christopher L; Drew, Alex J; Hanrahan, Christopher J; Anderson, Andrew E

    2015-11-01

    To deploy and quantify the accuracy of 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) MR arthrography with hip traction to image acetabular cartilage. Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences used to image hip cartilage often have reduced out-of-plane resolution and may lack adequate signal-to-noise to image cartilage. Saline was injected into four cadaver hips placed under traction. 3D DESS MRI scans were obtained before and after cores of cartilage were harvested from the acetabulum; the two MRIs were spatially aligned to reference core positions. The thickness of cartilage cores was measured under microscopy to serve as the reference standard. 3D reconstructions of cartilage and subchondral bone were generated using automatic and semiautomatic image segmentation. Cartilage thickness estimated from the 3D reconstructions was compared to physical measurements using Bland-Altman plots. As revealed by the automatic segmentation mask, saline imbibed the joint space throughout the articulating surface, with the exception of the posteroinferior region in two hips. Locations where air bubbles were introduced and regions of suspected low density bone disrupted an otherwise smooth automatic segmentation mask. Automatic and semiautomatic segmentation yielded a bias ± repeatability coefficient (95% limits of agreement) of 0.10 ± 0.51 mm (-0.41 to 0.61 mm) and 0.06 ± 0.43 mm (-0.37 to 0.49 mm), respectively. Cartilage thickness can be estimated to within ∼0.5 mm of the physical value with 95% confidence using 3D reconstructions of 3D DESS MR arthrography images. Manual correction of the automatic segmentation mask may improve reconstruction accuracy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Role of preoperative arthrography in early Perthes disease as a decision-making tool. Is it really necessary?

    PubMed

    Devalia, Kailash L; Wright, David; Sathyamurthy, Paramasivam; Prasad, Pidikiti; Bruce, Colin

    2007-05-01

    Arthrograms are commonly done in conjunction with an examination under anaesthesia (EUA), before any surgical intervention in Perthes disease. This usually is done as an independent day case procedure in the radiology department. The aim of this study is to confirm that the affected hip meets the prerequisites of a containment procedure. This study was carried out to investigate whether arthrogram findings ever altered the preoperative clinical decision of proposed osteotomy. One hundred and seven cases were reviewed retrospectively. Forty patients were excluded. Decision was not changed in 62 out of 67 hips, after the procedure. Five patients required different management following arthrogram and this was based mainly on EUA findings. EUA under image intensification helps the surgeon to decide the angle of varus osteotomy, required to contain the femoral head in the acetabulum and confirms an adequate range of abduction to undertake the procedure. This quick assessment can be done at the time of surgery under the same anaesthesia without the need for arthrography. Our findings question the role of arthrography as a routine before surgical intervention in Perthes disease and suggest that it may represent an unnecessary cost. We now reserve arthrography for cases of late Perthes disease where valgus osteotomy may be appropriate or for those unusual or questionable cases where clinical findings are inconclusive and therefore the type or appropriateness of treatment is uncertain.

  4. Anatomy, Variants, and Pathologies of the Superior Glenohumeral Ligament: Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Three-Dimensional Volumetric Interpolated Breath-Hold Examination Sequence and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Arthrography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Karaca, Leyla; Can, Cahit Emre; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Topal, Murat; Okur, Aylin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to demonstrate magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography findings of anatomy, variants, and pathologic conditions of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL). This review also demonstrates the applicability of a new MR arthrography sequence in the anterosuperior portion of the glenohumeral joint. The SGHL is a very important anatomical structure in the rotator interval that is responsible for stabilizing the long head of the biceps tendon. Therefore, a torn SGHL can result in pain and instability. Observation of the SGHL is difficult when using conventional MR imaging, because the ligament may be poorly visualized. Shoulder MR arthrography is the most accurately established imaging technique for identifying pathologies of the SGHL and associated structures. The use of three dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences produces thinner image slices and enables a higher in-plane resolution than conventional MR arthrography sequences. Therefore, shoulder MR arthrography using 3D VIBE sequences may contribute to evaluating of the smaller intraarticular structures such as the SGHL. PMID:25053912

  5. Anatomy, variants, and pathologies of the superior glenohumeral ligament: magnetic resonance imaging with three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence and conventional magnetic resonance arthrography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Karaca, Leyla; Can, Cahit Emre; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Topal, Murat; Okur, Aylin; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to demonstrate magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography findings of anatomy, variants, and pathologic conditions of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL). This review also demonstrates the applicability of a new MR arthrography sequence in the anterosuperior portion of the glenohumeral joint. The SGHL is a very important anatomical structure in the rotator interval that is responsible for stabilizing the long head of the biceps tendon. Therefore, a torn SGHL can result in pain and instability. Observation of the SGHL is difficult when using conventional MR imaging, because the ligament may be poorly visualized. Shoulder MR arthrography is the most accurately established imaging technique for identifying pathologies of the SGHL and associated structures. The use of three dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences produces thinner image slices and enables a higher in-plane resolution than conventional MR arthrography sequences. Therefore, shoulder MR arthrography using 3D VIBE sequences may contribute to evaluating of the smaller intraarticular structures such as the SGHL.

  6. Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Identifying the Loss of the Y Chromosome on Multiphasic MDCT.

    PubMed

    Young, Jonathan R; Coy, Heidi; Douek, Michael; Lo, Pechin; Sayre, James; Pantuck, Allan J; Raman, Steven S

    2017-08-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate whether multiphasic MDCT enhancement can help identify clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) with the loss of the Y chromosome. We derived a cohort of 43 clear cell RCCs in men who underwent preoperative four-phase renal mass MDCT from October 2000 to August 2013. Each lesion was segmented in its entirety on axial images. A computer-assisted detection algorithm selected a 0.5-cm-diameter region of maximal attenuation within each lesion in each phase. A 0.5-cm-diameter ROI was manually placed on uninvolved renal cortex in each phase. The relative attenuation of each lesion was calculated as follows: [(maximal lesion attenuation - cortex attenuation) / cortex attenuation] × 100. Absolute attenuation and relative attenuation in each phase were compared using t tests. Both clear cell RCCs with the loss of the Y chromosome and clear cell RCCs without the loss of the Y chromosome exhibited peak enhancement in the corticomedullary phase. However, relative nephrographic attenuation of clear cell RCCs with the loss of Y was significantly less than that of clear cell RCCs without the loss of Y (mean, -8.9 vs 8.4 respectively; p = 0.013). A relative nephrographic attenuation threshold of -1.6 identified the loss of Y with an accuracy of 70% (30/43), sensitivity of 73% (16/22), and specificity of 67% (14/21). Multiphasic MDCT enhancement may assist in identifying the loss of the Y chromosome in clear cell RCCs; this result should be validated in a large prospective trial.

  7. MDCT of acute subaxial cervical spine trauma: a mechanism-based approach.

    PubMed

    Raniga, Sameer B; Menon, Venugopal; Al Muzahmi, Khamis S; Butt, Sajid

    2014-06-01

    Injuries to the spinal column are common and road traffic accidents are the commonest cause. Subaxial cervical spine (C3-C7) trauma encompasses a wide spectrum of osseous and ligamentous injuries, in addition to being frequently associated with neurological injury. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is routinely performed to evaluate acute cervical spine trauma, very often as first-line imaging. MDCT provides an insight into the injury morphology, which in turn reflects the mechanics of injury. This article will review the fundamental biomechanical forces underlying the common subaxial spine injuries and resultant injury patterns or "fingerprints" on MDCT. This systematic and focused analysis enables a more accurate and rapid interpretation of cervical spine CT examinations. Mechanical considerations are important in most clinical and surgical decisions to adequately realign the spine, to prevent neurological deterioration and to facilitate appropriate stabilisation. This review will emphasise the variables on CT that affect the surgical management, as well as imaging "pearls" in differentiating "look-alike" lesions with different surgical implications. It will also enable the radiologist in writing clinically relevant CT reports of cervical spine trauma. Teaching Points • Vertebral bodies and disc bear the axial compression forces, while the ligaments bear the distraction forces.• Compressive forces result in fracture and distractive forces result in ligamentous disruption.• Bilateral facet dislocation is the most severe injury of the flexion-distraction spectrum.• Biomechanics-based CT reading will help to rapidly and accurately identify the entire spectrum of injury.• This approach also helps to differentiate look-alike injuries with different clinical implications.

  8. Coronary fly-through or virtual angioscopy using dual-source MDCT data.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Peter M A; de Jonge, Gonda; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2007-11-01

    Coronary fly-through or virtual angioscopy (VA) has been studied ever since its invention in 2000. However, application was limited because it requires an optimal computed tomography (CT) scan and time-consuming post-processing. Recent advances in post-processing software facilitate easy construction of VA, but until now image quality was insufficient in most patients. The introduction of dual-source multidetector CT (MDCT) could enable VA in all patients. Twenty patients were scanned using a dual-source MDCT (Definition, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using a standard coronary artery protocol. Post-processing was performed on an Aquarius Workstation (TeraRecon, San Mateo, Calif.). Length travelled per major branch was recorded in millimetres, together with the time required in minutes. VA could be performed in every patient for each of the major coronary arteries. The mean (range) length of the automated fly-through was 80 (32-107) mm for the left anterior descending (LAD), 75 (21-116) mm for the left circumflex artery (LCx), and 109 (21-190) mm for the right coronary artery (RCA). Calcifications and stenoses were visualised, as well as most side branches. The mean time required was 3 min for LAD, 2.5 min for LCx, and 2 min for the RCA. Dual-source MDCT allows for high quality visualisation of the coronary arteries in every patient because scanning with this machine is independent of the heart rate. This is clearly shown by the successful VA in all patients. Potential clinical value of VA should be determined in the near future.

  9. Ileocaecal Intussusception with a Lead Point: Unusual MDCT Findings of Active Crohn's Disease Involving the Appendix

    PubMed Central

    Ozan, Ebru; Atac, Gokce Kaan; Akincioglu, Egemen; Keskin, Mete; Gulpinar, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Adult intussusception is a rare entity accounting for 1% of all bowel obstructions. Unlike intussusceptions in children, which are idiopathic in 90% of cases, adult intussusceptions have an identifiable cause (lead point) in the majority of cases. Crohn's disease (CD) may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, including the appendix. It was shown to be a predisposing factor for intussusception. Here, we report a rare case of adult intussusception with a lead point, emphasizing diagnostic input of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in a patient with active CD that involves the appendix. PMID:26558130

  10. Rare diagnosis of nodular lymphangitis caused by Mycobacterium marinum: MDCT imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Margarita; Soriano, Alex; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; Tudo, Griselda; Garcia, Sebastian; Pomes, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is an atypical mycobacterium that usually causes a solitary nodule on the hand (“fish tank granuloma”) or less commonly, secondary erythematous channels and nodules spread along lymphatic drainage of the extremity, mimicking sporothricoid skin lesions of nodular lymphangitis. This report presents a case of this rare entity, a nodular lymphangitis caused by Mycobacterium marinum. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) imaging was very useful in determining the morphology (cellulitis with a few small subcutaneous nodules and channels) and the extension of the lesion. PMID:24778804

  11. Diagnostic performance of 64-MDCT and 1.5-T MRI with high-resolution sequences in the T staging of gastric cancer: a comparative analysis with histopathology.

    PubMed

    Anzidei, M; Napoli, A; Zaccagna, F; Di Paolo, P; Zini, C; Cavallo Marincola, B; Geiger, D; Catalano, C; Passariello, R

    2009-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (64-MDCT) in the T staging of gastric carcinoma in comparison with histopathology. Forty patients with an endoscopic diagnosis of gastric carcinoma underwent preoperative MR imaging and 64-MDCT, both of which were performed after i.v. injection of scopolamine and water distension of the stomach. In the MR imaging protocol, we acquired T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences, true fast imaging steady-state free precession (true-FISP) and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) 3D sequences. Contrastenhanced CT scans were obtained in the arterial and venous phases. Two groups of radiologists independently reviewed the MR and 64-MDCT images. The results were compared with pathology findings. In the evaluation of T stage, 64-MDCT had 82.5% and MR imaging had 80% sensitivity. Accuracy of MR imaging was slightly higher than that of 64-MDCT in identifying T1 lesions (50% vs 37.5%), whereas the accuracy of 64-MDCT was higher in differentiating T2 lesions (81.2% vs 68.7%). The accuracy of MR imaging and 64-MDCT did not differ significantly in the evaluation of T3-T4 lesions (p>0.05). Understaging was observed in 20% of cases with MR imaging and in 17.5% with 64-MDCT. MR imaging and 64-MDCT accuracy levels did not differ in advanced stages of disease, whereas MR imaging was superior in identifying early stages of gastric cancer and can be considered a valid alternative to MDCT in clinical practice.

  12. Esophagobronchial fistulae: Diagnosis by MDCT with oral contrast swallow examination of a benign and a malignant cause

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Rahul G; Kalekar, Tushar M; Gajbhiye, Meenakshi I; Bandgar, Amol S; Pawar, Shephali S; Khadse, Gopal J

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of esophagobronchial fistulae diagnosed by Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) oral contrast swallow examination. It is helpful to supplement the CT study with an oral contrast swallow as it aids in confirmation of a suspected fistula and also demonstrates the fistula tract better. We present the clinical details and the imaging findings on MDCT of two cases of esophagobronchial fistulae – one secondary to chronic chest tuberculosis and the other secondary to a squamous cell carcinoma of the upper esophagus – followed by discussion of the etiology, pathogenesis, and imaging of these fistulae. PMID:24082484

  13. Leukemias involving abdominal and pelvic lymph nodes: evaluation with contrast-enhanced MDCT.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ge; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Bai, Jiao; Li, Yuan; Xu, Hua-Yan; Long, Qi-Hua

    2014-10-01

    To clarify features of lymph nodes associated with leukemia purposing to offer help for imaging diagnosis and differential diagnosis of leukemia. We retrospectively analyzed 47 patients with clinically proven leukemia involving the abdominal and pelvic lymph nodes. Of these 47 patients, 10 had acute myeloid leukemia, 9 had acute lymphocytic leukemia, and 28 had chronic lymphocytic leukemia. MDCT was used to determine lymph node features such as morphology, growth patterns, size, enhancement patterns, anatomical distribution, and manifestations in extramedullary organs. Incidence of leukemia was higher in men than in women. Enlarged lymph nodes were more frequently conglomerated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (96.4%) than in acute myeloid leukemia (50%) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (55.6%; P < 0.05 for both). Lymph nodes associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia were larger than those associated with acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias (P < 0.05 for both). The enlarged lymph nodes appeared homogeneous (80.9%) and homogeneous mixed with peripheral (19.1%). No statistically significant differences were observed between the three types of leukemias with respect to enhancement patterns (all P > 0.05). The lymph nodes commonly associated with these three leukemias were located in the lesser omentum, upper and lower para-aortic regions, and groin region. Our study showed that contrast-enhanced MDCT could accurately determine the enhancement patterns and anatomical distribution of lymph nodes associated with leukemia. Therefore, it is helpful for imaging diagnosis and differential diagnosis of leukemia.

  14. Effect of Low-Dose MDCT and Iterative Reconstruction on Trabecular Bone Microstructure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G.; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Kirschke, Jan S.; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low-dose multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) in combination with statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms on trabecular bone microstructure parameters. Twelve donated vertebrae were scanned with the routine radiation exposure used in our department (standard-dose) and a low-dose protocol. Reconstructions were performed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum-likelihood based statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR). Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed and statistically compared for each reconstruction. Moreover, fracture loads of the vertebrae were biomechanically determined and correlated to the assessed microstructure parameters. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters based on low-dose MDCT and SIR significantly correlated with vertebral bone strength. There was no significant difference between microstructure parameters calculated on low-dose SIR and standard-dose FBP images. However, the results revealed a strong dependency on the regularization strength applied during SIR. It was observed that stronger regularization might corrupt the microstructure analysis, because the trabecular structure is a very small detail that might get lost during the regularization process. As a consequence, the introduction of SIR for trabecular bone microstructure analysis requires a specific optimization of the regularization parameters. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods. PMID:27447827

  15. MDCT of the liver in obese patients: evaluation of a different method to optimize iodine dose.

    PubMed

    Rengo, Marco; Bellini, Davide; Businaro, Rita; Caruso, Damiano; Azzara, Gabriella; De Santis, Domenico; Picchia, Simona; Biondi, Tommaso; Eid, Marwen; Boschiero, Dario; Laghi, Andrea

    2017-04-27

    To prospectively compare two different approaches for estimating the amount of intravenous contrast media (CM) needed for multiphasic MDCT of the liver in obese patients. This single-center, HIPAA-compliant prospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. Ninety-six patients (55 men, 41 women), with a total of 42 hypovascular liver lesions, underwent MDCT of the liver. The amount of contrast medium injected was computed according to the patient's lean body weight which was estimated using either a bioimpedance device (Group A) or the James formula (Group B). The following variables were compared between the two groups: the amount of contrast medium injected (in grams of Iodine, gI), the contrast enhancement index (CEI) and the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio. Protocols A and B yielded significant differences in the amount of CM injected (mean values 41.9 ± 4.41 gI in Group A vs. 35.9 ± 5.75 gI in Group B; P = 0.021). The mean CEI value and lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio measured on the portal phase were significantly higher with protocol A than with protocol B (P < 0.05). Our study shows that the adoption of a bioimpedance device in obese patients improves liver parenchymal enhancement and lesion conspicuity.

  16. Accuracy of Monte Carlo simulations compared to in-vivo MDCT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bostani, Maryam McMillan, Kyle; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Mueller, Jonathon W.; Cody, Dianna D.; DeMarco, John J.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of a Monte Carlo simulation-based method for estimating radiation dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) by comparing simulated doses in ten patients to in-vivo dose measurements. Methods: MD Anderson Cancer Center Institutional Review Board approved the acquisition of in-vivo rectal dose measurements in a pilot study of ten patients undergoing virtual colonoscopy. The dose measurements were obtained by affixing TLD capsules to the inner lumen of rectal catheters. Voxelized patient models were generated from the MDCT images of the ten patients, and the dose to the TLD for all exposures was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations. The Monte Carlo simulation results were compared to the in-vivo dose measurements to determine accuracy. Results: The calculated mean percent difference between TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations was −4.9% with standard deviation of 8.7% and a range of −22.7% to 5.7%. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrate very good agreement between simulated and measured doses in-vivo. Taken together with previous validation efforts, this work demonstrates that the Monte Carlo simulation methods can provide accurate estimates of radiation dose in patients undergoing CT examinations.

  17. Assessment of patient and occupational dose in established and new applications of MDCT fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Joemai, Raoul M S; Zweers, Dirk; Obermann, Wim R; Geleijns, Jacob

    2009-04-01

    This study aimed to assess patient dose and occupational dose in established and new applications of MDCT fluoroscopy. Electronic personal dosimeters were used to measure occupational dose equivalent. Effective patient dose was derived from the recorded dose-length product. Acquisition parameters that were observed during CT fluoroscopy (CTF) provided the basis for the estimation of an entrance skin dose profile. Two hundred ten CT-guided interventional procedures were included in the study. The median effective patient dose was 10 mSv (range, 0.1-235 mSv; 107 procedures). The median peak entrance skin dose was 0.4 Sv (0.1-2.1 Sv; 27 procedures). From 547 measurements of occupational dose equivalent, a median occupational effective dose of 3 muSv per procedure was derived for the interventional radiologists and 0.4 muSv per procedure for the assisting radiologists and radiology technologists. The estimated maximum occupational effective dose reached 0.4 mSv. The study revealed high effective patient doses, up to 235 mSv, mainly for relatively new applications such as CTF-guided radiofrequency ablations using MDCT, vertebroplasty, and percutaneous ethanol injections of tumors. Entrance doses were occasionally in the range of the warning level for deterministic skin effects but were always below the threshold for serious deterministic effects. The complexity of the procedure, expected benefits of the treatment, and general health state of the patient contribute to the justification of observed high effective patient doses.

  18. MDCT Findings of Denim-Sandblasting-Induced Silicosis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Denim sandblasting is as a novel cause of silicosis in Turkey, with reports of a recent increase in cases and fatal outcomes. We aimed to describe the radiological features of patients exposed to silica during denim sandblasting and define factors related to the development of silicosis. Methods Sixty consecutive men with a history of exposure to silica during denim sandblasting were recruited. All CT examinations were performed using a 64-row multi-detector CT (MDCT). The nodules were qualitatively and semi-quantitatively analyzed by grading nodular profusion (NP) on CT images. Results Silicosis was diagnosed radiologically in 73.3% of patients (44 of 60). The latency period (the time between initial exposure and radiological imaging) and duration of silica exposure was longer in patients diagnosed with silicosis than in those without silicosis (p < 0.05). Nodules were present in all cases with centrilobular type as the commonest (63.6%). All cases of silicosis were clinically classified as accelerated and 11.4% had progressive massive fibrosis (PMF). Mild NP lesions were the most prevalent in all six zones of the lung. The NP score was significantly correlated with the duration of silica exposure, the latency period, presence of PMF, and pleural thickening. Enlarged lymphadenopathy was present in 45.5% of patients. Conclusions The duration of exposure and the latency period are important for development of silicosis in denim sandblasters. MDCT is a useful tool in detecting findings of silicosis in workers who has silica exposure. PMID:20398415

  19. MDCT findings of denim-sandblasting-induced silicosis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Cihan Akgul; Nazaroglu, Hasan; Yildiz, Tekin; Bayrak, Aylin Hasanefendioglu; Senturk, Senem; Ates, Gungor; Akyildiz, Levent

    2010-04-17

    Denim sandblasting is as a novel cause of silicosis in Turkey, with reports of a recent increase in cases and fatal outcomes. We aimed to describe the radiological features of patients exposed to silica during denim sandblasting and define factors related to the development of silicosis. Sixty consecutive men with a history of exposure to silica during denim sandblasting were recruited. All CT examinations were performed using a 64-row multi-detector CT (MDCT). The nodules were qualitatively and semi-quantitatively analyzed by grading nodular profusion (NP) on CT images. Silicosis was diagnosed radiologically in 73.3% of patients (44 of 60). The latency period (the time between initial exposure and radiological imaging) and duration of silica exposure was longer in patients diagnosed with silicosis than in those without silicosis (p < 0.05). Nodules were present in all cases with centrilobular type as the commonest (63.6%). All cases of silicosis were clinically classified as accelerated and 11.4% had progressive massive fibrosis (PMF). Mild NP lesions were the most prevalent in all six zones of the lung. The NP score was significantly correlated with the duration of silica exposure, the latency period, presence of PMF, and pleural thickening. Enlarged lymphadenopathy was present in 45.5% of patients. The duration of exposure and the latency period are important for development of silicosis in denim sandblasters. MDCT is a useful tool in detecting findings of silicosis in workers who has silica exposure.

  20. Comparison between a new reconstruction algorithm (OPED) and filtered backprojection (FBP) for MDCT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renger, Bernhard; No"l, Peter B.; Tischenko, Oleg; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    Previously the Orthogonal Polynomial Expansion on the Disk (OPED) algorithm was presented. Further, in prototype experiments in combination with the CT D`or geometry feasibility was demonstrated. In this study we implemented OPED with a clinical Scanner, and evaluated the potential using phantom studies. All studies were acquired on a Siemens Somatom 64 (Erlangen, Germany) scanner, where raw projection data were reconstructed with the conventional FBP reconstruction and the OPED algorithm. OPED allows one to use fan beam geometry directly without any additional procedures such as interpolation or rebinning if using the CT D`or geometry. In particular, OPED describes an approximation of the image function as a sum of polynomials using Chebychev polynomials. For performance evaluation, the Catphan phantom 600 was imaged. OPED Images where reconstructed using C++ and MATLAB® .We measured uniformity, MTF and CNR for different dose levels and compared these to standard FBP images reconstructions with different filter kernels. The integration and interpretation of the MDCT projection data for the OPED algorithm was accomplished. Reconstruction time is about 6 s on Quad-Core 3 GHz Intel Xeon processor. Typical artifacts are reduced when applying OPED. Using OPED the MTF maintains constant over the whole FOV. Uniformity and CNR are equal compared to FBP. Advantages of OPED were demonstrated by applying the algorithm to projections images from a clinical MDCT scanner. In the future, we see OPED applications for low-dose or limited angle geometries to reduce the radiation dose while improving diagnostic quality of the reconstructed slices.

  1. A comparative study of indium-111 DTPA radionuclide and iothalamate meglumine roentgenographic arthrography in the evaluation of painful total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.; Schneider, H.J.; Hopson, C.N.; Miller, E.H.; Von Stein, D.E.; Kereiakes, J.G.; Cummings, D.D.; McDevitt, R.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Fifteen patients with painful total hip prostheses were referred for nuclear medicine and roentgenographic arthrography studies to exclude loosening of the acetabular and/or the femoral component. A new radioisotopic technique suitable for the evaluation of both components was developed using dual-isotope single-photon tomography with {sup 99m}technetium methylene diphosphonate bone imaging and indium-111 diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid arthrography. Thirteen of the 15 subjects were subsequently treated with additional surgery. The surgical findings were compared with the nuclear medicine and roentgenographic results. The overall diagnostic accuracy of both arthrographic procedures was approximately 80%, but the roentgenographic arthrogram was more sensitive and the radionuclide arthrogram was more specific.

  2. MDCT evaluation of potential living renal donor, prior to laparoscopic donor nephrectomy: What the transplant surgeon wants to know?

    PubMed

    Ghonge, Nitin P; Gadanayak, Satyabrat; Rajakumari, Vijaya

    2014-10-01

    As Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy (LDN) offers several advantages for the donor such as lesser post-operative pain, fewer cosmetic concerns and faster recovery time, there is growing global trend towards LDN as compared to open nephrectomy. Comprehensive pre-LDN donor evaluation includes assessment of renal morphology including pelvi-calyceal and vascular system. Apart from donor selection, evaluation of the regional anatomy allows precise surgical planning. Due to limited visualization during laparoscopic renal harvesting, detailed pre-transplant evaluation of regional anatomy, including the renal venous anatomy is of utmost importance. MDCT is the modality of choice for pre-LDN evaluation of potential renal donors. Apart from appropriate scan protocol and post-processing methods, detailed understanding of surgical techniques is essential for the Radiologist for accurate image interpretation during pre-LDN MDCT evaluation of potential renal donors. This review article describes MDCT evaluation of potential living renal donor, prior to LDN with emphasis on scan protocol, post-processing methods and image interpretation. The article laid special emphasis on surgical perspectives of pre-LDN MDCT evaluation and addresses important points which transplant surgeons want to know.

  3. [MDCT features and anatomic-pathological basis of the diseases in central thoracic-abdominal junctional region].

    PubMed

    Ye, Yilan; Yang, Zhigang; Li, Hua; Deng, Wen; Li, Yuan; Guo, Yingkun

    2012-02-01

    This paper is to determine relationship between MDCT features and anatomic-pathology of the diseases in central thoracic-abdominal junctional region. 3 cadavers were cut transversely and another 3 vertically to observe the anatomy of thoracic-abdominal junctional zone. 93 patients with diseases in central thoracic-abdominal junctional zone were scanned with MDCT. The correlation between MDCT features of the diseases in central thoracic-abdominal junctional region and the anatomic-pathology of the diseases in this region was evaluated. On cadaver sections, central thoracic-abdominal junctional region was an area between anterior chest wall and dorsal spine in vertical direction. The region was separated into upper and lower sections by diaphragm. The upper section mainly contains heart and pericardium, while the lower contains broad ligament and left lobe of liver. The hiatus of diaphragm are vena caval foramen, esophageal foramen and aortic foramen in anterior-posterior turn. In the present study, 23 patients had portal hypertension, 18 had dissection of aorta, 8 got diseases in inferior vena cava, 9 had lymphoma, 12 got diseases in multiple vertebrae, 7 had lower thoracic esophageal carcinoma accompanied with metastasis in upper abdominal lymph nodes, 9 had carcinoma of abdominal esophagus and/or gastric cardia, 4 had esophageal hiatal hernia and 3 patients had neurogenic tumor in posterior mediastinum and/or superior spatium retroperitoneale. The MDCT features and distribution of the diseases in central thoracic-abdominal junctional region influence the anatomic-pathology characteristics in this region.

  4. [Current practice of pediatric MDCT in Japan: survey results of demographics and age-based dose reduction].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Osamu; Kitamura, Masayuki; Masaki, Hidekazu; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Miyasaka, Mikiko; Kashima, Kyoko; Okada, Yoshiyuki; Tsutsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2005-07-01

    To assess the current practice of pediatric MDCT in Japan, with particular reference to age-related dose adjustment. During the first three months of 2004, a questionnaire was mailed to 996 institutions, among which listed MDCT users ranged from private hospitals to large university-based hospitals. We received responses from 348 (34.9%) institutions. Fifty-three percent of the respondents had four-detector MDCT units. Approximately 70% of examinations were head and 22% were body. Scanning parameters were determined by full-time radiologists in 40%, and by CT technologists in 28% of respondents. Eighty-nine percent (head CT) and 85% (abdominal CT) of respondents indicated that they changed parameters for children. More than 90% changed tube current for optimization. Change was based on the technologist's experience (56%, head CT; 43%, abdominal CT), and automatic exposure control has been used as a basis of mAs control in 17% of respondents for head CT and in 34% for abdominal CT. Age-related mAs settings for abdominal CT were almost the same as those published in a United States survey. Although Japan has approximately 40% of the world's CT units, optimized pediatric MDCT settings might be moved away from a fixed mA protocol as recommended by the FDA and in conformity with the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept.

  5. CT arthrography of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: Are MR signs applicable?

    PubMed

    Cerny, Milena; Omoumi, Patrick; Larbi, Ahmed; Manicourt, Daniel; Perozziello, Anne; Lecouvet, Frederic E; Berg, Bruno Vande; Dallaudière, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    To determine if diagnostic signs of adhesive capsulitis (AC) of the shoulder at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and arthrography (MRA) are applicable to CT arthrography (CTA). 22 shoulder CTAs with AC were retrospectively reviewed for features described in MR literature. The control group was composed of 83 shoulder CTA divided into four subgroups 1) normal (N = 20), 2) omarthrosis (N = 19), 3) labral injury (N = 23), and 4) rotator cuff tear (N = 21). Two musculoskeletal radiologists assessed the rotator interval (RI) for obliteration, increased width and thickening of coracohumeral ligament (CHL). The width and capsule thickness of the axillary recess were measured. The width of the axillary recess was significantly decreased in the AC group (4.6 ± 2.6 mm versus 9.9 ± 4.6 mm, p ≤ 0.0001; sensitivity and specificity of 84% and 80%). Thickness of the medial and lateral walls of the axillary capsule was significantly increased in the AC group (5.9 ± 1.3 mm versus 3.7 ± 1.1 mm, p ≤ 0.0001 and 5.7 ± 1 mm versus 3.5 ± 1.3 mm, p ≤ 0.0001, respectively). CHL thickness was significantly increased in the AC group (4.1 ± 1 mm (p ≤ 0.001)) in comparison to others groups. Obliteration of the RI was statistically significantly more frequent in patients with AC (72.7% (16/22) vs. 12% (10/83), p < 0.0001). Width of the RI did not differ significantly between patients and controls (p ≥ 0.428). Decreased axillary width, and thickened axillary capsule are MR signs of AC applicable to CTA. Evaluation of rotator interval seems useful and reproducible only for obliteration.

  6. 3D Volumetric Evaluation of Lipiodol Retention in HCC after Chemoembolization: A Quantitative Comparison between CBCT and MDCT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijun; Lin, MingDe; Lesage, David; Chen, Rongxin; Chapiro, Julius; Gu, Tara; Tacher, Vania; Duran, Rafael; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To evaluate the capability of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired immediately after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in determining Lipiodol retention quantitatively and volumetrically when compared to 1-day post-procedure unenhanced MDCT. Materials and methods From June to December, 2012, fifteen patients met the inclusion criteria of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that was treated with conventional TACE (cTACE), and had intra-procedural CBCT and 1-day post-TACE MDCT. Four patients were excluded because the Lipiodol was diffuse throughout the entire liver or Lipiodol deposition was not clear on both CBCT and MDCT. Eleven patients with a total of 31 target lesions were included in the analysis. A quantitative and 3D software was used to assess complete, localized and diffuse lipiodol deposition. Tumor volume, Lipiodol volume in the tumor, % Lipiodol retention, and Lipiodol enhancement in Hounsfield Unit (HU) were calculated and compared between CBCT and MDCT using two-tailed student’s t-test and Bland-Altman plots. Results The mean value of tumor volume, Lipiodol deposited regions, calculated average % Lipiodol retention, and HU value of CBCT were not significantly different from those of MDCT (tumor volume: 9.37±11.35cm3 vs. 9.34±11.44cm3, P=0.991; Lipiodol volume: 7.84±9.34cm3 vs. 7.84±9.60 cm3, P=0.998; % Lipiodol retention: 89.3%±14.7% vs. 90.2% ± 14.9%, P=0.811; HU value: 307.7±160.1 HU vs. 257.2±120.0 HU, P=0.139). Bland-Altman plots showed only minimal difference and high agreement when comparing CBCT to MDCT. Conclusion CBCT has a similar capability, intraprocedurally, to assess Lipiodol deposition in 3D for patients with HCC treated with cTACE when compared to MDCT. PMID:24507426

  7. Comparison of hepatic MDCT, MRI, and DSA to explant pathology for the detection and treatment planning of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ladd, Lauren M.; Tirkes, Temel; Tann, Mark; Agarwal, David M.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Tahir, Bilal; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The diagnosis and treatment plan for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be made from radiologic imaging. However, lesion detection may vary depending on the imaging modality. This study aims to evaluate the sensitivities of hepatic multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in the detection of HCC and the consequent management impact on potential liver transplant patients. Methods One hundred and sixteen HCC lesions were analyzed in 41 patients who received an orthotopic liver transplant (OLT). All of the patients underwent pretransplantation hepatic DSA, MDCT, and/or MRI. The imaging results were independently reviewed retrospectively in a blinded fashion by two interventional and two abdominal radiologists. The liver explant pathology was used as the gold standard for assessing each imaging modality. Results The sensitivity for overall HCC detection was higher for cross-sectional imaging using MRI (51.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI]=36.2-58.4%) and MDCT (49.8%, 95% CI=43.7-55.9%) than for DSA (41.7%, 95% CI=36.2-47.3%) (P=0.05). The difference in false-positive rate was not statistically significant between MRI (22%), MDCT (29%), and DSA (29%) (P=0.67). The sensitivity was significantly higher for detecting right lobe lesions than left lobe lesions for all modalities (MRI: 56.1% vs. 43.1%, MDCT: 55.0% vs. 42.0%, and DSA: 46.9% vs. 33.9%; all P<0.01). The sensitivities of the three imaging modalities were also higher for lesions ≥2 cm vs. <2 cm (MRI: 73.4% vs. 32.7%, MDCT: 66.9% vs. 33.8%, and DSA: 62.2% vs. 24.1%; all P<0.01). The interobserver correlation was rated as very good to excellent. Conclusion The sensitivity for detecting HCC is higher for MRI and MDCT than for DSA, and so cross-sectional imaging modalities should be used to evaluate OLT candidacy. PMID:27987537

  8. Application of MPVR and TL-VR with 64-row MDCT in neonates with congenital EA and distal TEF.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yang; Peng, Yun; Zhai, Ren-You; Li, Ying-Zi

    2011-03-28

    To assess the application of multiple planar volume reconstruction (MPVR) and three-dimensional (3D) transparency lung volume rendering (TL-VR) with 64-row multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in neonates with congenital esophageal atresia (EA) and distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). Twenty neonates (17 boys, 3 girls) with EA and distal TEF at a mean age of 4.6 d (range 1-16 d) were enrolled in this study. A helical scan of 64-row MDCT was performed at the 64 mm × 0.625 mm collimation. EA and TEF were reconstructed with MPVR and TL-VR, respectively. Initial diagnosis of EA was made by chest radiography showing the inserted catheter in the proximal blind-ended esophageal pouch. Manifestations of MDCT images were compared with the findings at surgery. MDCT showed the proximal and distal esophageal pouches in 20 cases. No significant difference was observed in gaps between the proximal and distal esophageal pouches detected by MPVR and TL-VR. The lengths of gaps between the proximal and distal esophageal pouches detected by MPVR and TL-VR correlated well with the findings at surgery (R = 0.87, P < 0.001). The images of MPVR revealed the orifice of TEF in 13 cases, while TL-VR images showed the orifice of TEF in 4 cases. EA and distal TEF can be reconstructed using MPVR and TL-VR of 64-row MDCT, which is a noninvasive technique to demonstrate the distal esophageal pouches and inter-pouch distance in neonates with EA and distal TEF.

  9. Coronary image quality of 320-MDCT in patients with heart rates above 65 beats per minute: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Lee, Allan B; Nandurkar, Dee; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal E; Crossett, Marcus; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Cameron, James D; Troupis, John M

    2011-06-01

    High heart rate may negatively influence the image quality of cardiac CT. The technical advances of 320-MDCT may overcome issues with poor image quality associated with high heart rate. This study aimed to evaluate the coronary image quality of 320-MDCT in patients with heart rates above 65 beats/min. Patients who presented for cardiac CT were divided into two groups according to heart rate, either greater than 65 beats/min or less than or equal to 65 beats/min. Two radiologists were blinded to the patient groups and evaluated images of 15 coronary artery segments per patient using 320-MDCT with consensus agreement. The image quality was scored subjectively as 1 or 2 (diagnostic quality) or 3 (poor quality and nondiagnostic). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, sex, and body mass index (p > 0.05). The median heart rate was 70 beats/min (range, 67-110 beats/min) for the group with heart rate greater than 65 beats/min and 60 beats/min (range, 48-65 beats/min) for the group with heart rate less than or equal to 65 beats/min (p < 0.001). In patients with heart rates greater than 65 beats/min, diagnostic quality images (scores of 1 or 2) were obtained in 95.6% of the analyzed segments, compared with 96.9% in the group with heart rate less than or equal to 65 beats/min (p = 0.7). Our initial evaluation suggests that coronary artery images of diagnostic quality can be obtained using 320-MDCT in most patients with heart rates greater than 65 beats/min, in percentages similar to those for patients with heart rates less than or equal to 65 beats/min. This finding may be the result of the inherent image acquisition and reconstruction technique of 320-MDCT.

  10. Hi-Res scan mode in clinical MDCT systems: Experimental assessment of spatial resolution performance

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Bastida, Juan P.; Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Li, Ke; Sun, Heyi; Hsieh, Jiang; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The introduction of a High-Resolution (Hi-Res) scan mode and another associated option that combines Hi-Res mode with the so-called High Definition (HD) reconstruction kernels (referred to as a Hi-Res/HD mode in this paper) in some multi-detector CT (MDCT) systems offers new opportunities to increase spatial resolution for some clinical applications that demand high spatial resolution. The purpose of this work was to quantify the in-plane spatial resolution along both the radial direction and tangential direction for the Hi-Res and Hi-Res/HD scan modes at different off-center positions. Methods: A technique was introduced and validated to address the signal saturation problem encountered in the attempt to quantify spatial resolution for the Hi-Res and Hi-Res/HD scan modes. Using the proposed method, the modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a 64-slice MDCT system (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare) equipped with both Hi-Res and Hi-Res/HD modes were measured using a metal bead at nine different off-centered positions (0–16 cm with a step size of 2 cm); at each position, both conventional scans and Hi-Res scans were performed. For each type of scan and position, 80 repeated acquisitions were performed to reduce noise induced uncertainties in the MTF measurements. A total of 15 reconstruction kernels, including eight conventional kernels and seven HD kernels, were used to reconstruct CT images of the bead. An ex vivo animal study consisting of a bone fracture model was performed to corroborate the MTF results, as the detection of this high-contrast and high frequency task is predominantly determined by spatial resolution. Images of this animal model generated by different scan modes and reconstruction kernels were qualitatively compared with the MTF results. Results: At the centered position, the use of Hi-Res mode resulted in a slight improvement in the MTF; each HD kernel generated higher spatial resolution than its counterpart conventional kernel

  11. Impact of Aortic Valve Calcification, as Measured by MDCT, on Survival in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Capoulade, Romain; Malouf, Joseph; Aggarval, Shivani; Araoz, Phillip A.; Michelena, Hector I.; Cueff, Caroline; Larose, Eric; Miller, Jordan D.; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aortic valve calcification (AVC) load measures lesion severity in aortic stenosis (AS) and is useful for diagnostic purposes. Whether AVC predicts survival after diagnosis, independent of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic AS characteristics, has not been studied. OBJECTIVES This study evaluated the impact of AVC load, absolute and relative to aortic annulus size (AVCdensity), on overall mortality in patients with AS under conservative treatment and without regard to treatment. METHODS In 3 academic centers, we enrolled 794 patients (mean age, 73 ± 12 years; 274 women) diagnosed with AS by Doppler echocardiography who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) within the same episode of care. Absolute AVC load and AVCdensity (ratio of absolute AVC to cross-sectional area of aortic annulus) were measured, and severe AVC was separately defined in men and women. RESULTS During follow-up, there were 440 aortic valve implantations (AVIs) and 194 deaths (115 under medical treatment). Univariate analysis showed strong association of absolute AVC and AVCdensity with survival (both, p < 0.0001) with a spline curve analysis pattern of threshold and plateau of risk. After adjustment for age, sex, coronary artery disease, diabetes, symptoms, AS severity on hemodynamic assessment, and LV ejection fraction, severe absolute AVC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 2.92; p = 0.03) or severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.37 to 4.37; p = 0.002) independently predicted mortality under medical treatment, with additive model predictive value (all, p ≤ 0.04) and a net reclassification index of 12.5% (p = 0.04). Severe absolute AVC (adjusted HR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.62; p = 0.01) and severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.40 to 3.52; p = 0.001) also independently predicted overall mortality, even with adjustment for time-dependent AVI. CONCLUSIONS This large-scale, multicenter outcomes study of

  12. Hi-Res scan mode in clinical MDCT systems: Experimental assessment of spatial resolution performance.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bastida, Juan P; Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Li, Ke; Sun, Heyi; Hsieh, Jiang; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of a High-Resolution (Hi-Res) scan mode and another associated option that combines Hi-Res mode with the so-called High Definition (HD) reconstruction kernels (referred to as a Hi-Res/HD mode in this paper) in some multi-detector CT (MDCT) systems offers new opportunities to increase spatial resolution for some clinical applications that demand high spatial resolution. The purpose of this work was to quantify the in-plane spatial resolution along both the radial direction and tangential direction for the Hi-Res and Hi-Res/HD scan modes at different off-center positions. A technique was introduced and validated to address the signal saturation problem encountered in the attempt to quantify spatial resolution for the Hi-Res and Hi-Res/HD scan modes. Using the proposed method, the modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a 64-slice MDCT system (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare) equipped with both Hi-Res and Hi-Res/HD modes were measured using a metal bead at nine different off-centered positions (0-16 cm with a step size of 2 cm); at each position, both conventional scans and Hi-Res scans were performed. For each type of scan and position, 80 repeated acquisitions were performed to reduce noise induced uncertainties in the MTF measurements. A total of 15 reconstruction kernels, including eight conventional kernels and seven HD kernels, were used to reconstruct CT images of the bead. An ex vivo animal study consisting of a bone fracture model was performed to corroborate the MTF results, as the detection of this high-contrast and high frequency task is predominantly determined by spatial resolution. Images of this animal model generated by different scan modes and reconstruction kernels were qualitatively compared with the MTF results. At the centered position, the use of Hi-Res mode resulted in a slight improvement in the MTF; each HD kernel generated higher spatial resolution than its counterpart conventional kernel. However, the MTF along the

  13. Chest pain evaluation in the emergency department: can MDCT provide a comprehensive evaluation?

    PubMed

    White, Charles S; Kuo, Dick; Kelemen, Mark; Jain, Vineet; Musk, Amy; Zaidi, Eram; Read, Katrina; Sliker, Clint; Prasad, Rajnish

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine whether MDCT can provide a comprehensive assessment of cardiac and noncardiac causes of chest pain in stable emergency department patients. Patients with chest pain who presented to the emergency department without definitive findings of acute myocardial infarction based on history, physical examination, and ECG were recruited immediately after the initial clinical assessment. For each patient, the emergency department physician was asked whether a CT scan would normally have been ordered on clinical grounds (e.g., to exclude pulmonary embolism). Each consenting patient underwent enhanced ECG-gated 16-MDCT. Ten cardiac phases were reconstructed. The images were evaluated for cardiac (coronary calcium and stenosis, ejection fraction, and wall motion and perfusion) and significant noncardiac (pulmonary embolism, dissection, pneumonia, and so forth) causes of chest pain. Correlation was made between the presence of significant cardiac and noncardiac findings on CT and the final clinical diagnosis based on history, examination, and any subsequent cardiac workup at the 1-month follow-up by a consensus of three physicians. Sixty-nine patients met all criteria for enrollment in the study, of whom 45 (65%) would not otherwise have undergone CT. Fifty-two patients (75%) had no significant CT findings and a final diagnosis of clinically insignificant chest pain. Thirteen patients (19%) had significant CT findings (cardiac, 10; noncardiac, 3) concordant with the final diagnosis. CT failed to suggest a diagnosis in two patients (3%), both of whom proved to have clinically significant coronary artery stenoses. In two patients (3%), CT overdiagnosed a coronary stenosis. Sensitivity and specificity for the establishment of a cardiac cause of chest pain were 83% and 96%, respectively. Overall sensitivity and specificity for all other cardiac and noncardiac causes were 87% and 96%, respectively. ECG-gated MDCT appears to be logistically

  14. In vitro study of the antimicrobial effects of radiological contrast agents used in arthrography.

    PubMed

    Bruins, M J; Zwiers, J H; Verheyen, C C P M; Wolfhagen, M J H M

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration arthrography using an iodinated contrast medium is a useful tool for the investigation of septic or aseptic loosening of arthroplasties and of septic arthritis. Previously, the contrast media have been thought to cause false negative results in cultures when present in aspirated samples of synovial fluid, probably because free iodine is bactericidal, but reports have been inconclusive. We examined the influence of the older, high osmolar contrast agents and the low osmolar media used currently on the growth of ten different micro-organisms capable of causing deep infection around a prosthesis. Five media were tested, using a disc diffusion technique and a time-killing curve method in which high and low inocula of micro-organisms were incubated in undiluted media. The only bactericidal effects were found with low inocula of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in ioxithalamate, one of the older ionic media. The low and iso-osmolar iodinated contrast media used currently do not impede culture. Future study must assess other causes of false negative cultures of synovial fluid and new developments in enhancing microbial recovery from aspirated samples.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of the relaxivity effects of iodine on GD-DTPA enhanced MR arthrography.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Arundhuti; Gold, Garry E; Butts Pauly, Kim; Mayer, Dirk; Moseley, Michael M; Pelc, Norbert J; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2007-06-01

    To quantify the effect of iodine on the gadolinium (Gd) contrast-enhanced signal in MR arthrography. Saline solutions of Gd contrast agent (0-1 mmol/liter) were mixed with iodinated contrast agent (0-185 mmol/liter). The T1 and T2 relaxation constants of these solutions were measured at 1.5T. Different types of commonly used iodinated contrast agents as well as sodium iodide (NaI) solutions were also analyzed. Iodine caused significant T2 shortening and some T1 shortening in Gd contrast solutions. Both contrast agents independently obeyed the standard relaxation relation, and their mixture obeyed a modified version of this relation. The side chains in various iodine molecules and their viscosities affected the relaxation properties differently. For various spin-echo (SE) sequences, the signal from synovial fluid containing different concentrations of the two contrast agents was calculated. The T2-weighted signal appeared to be most affected by the increase in iodine concentrations. In the absence of Gd contrast, all SE sequences showed an initial increase in signal from iodine contrast. A generalized relation for the relaxivities of Gd contrast in the presence of iodine was established. The side chains of iodine contrast were found to alter the relaxivities of Gd contrast. Imaging with proton density (PD)-weighted SE with only iodine contrast agent was found to be feasible. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Diagnostic Value of CT Arthrography for Evaluation of Osteochondral Lesions at the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Kirschke, Jan S.; Braun, Sepp; Baum, Thomas; Holwein, Christian; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background. To retrospectively determine the diagnostic value of computed tomography arthrography (CTA) of the ankle in the evaluation of (osteo)chondral lesions in comparison to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings. Methods. A total of N = 79 patients had CTAs and MRI of the ankle; in 17/79 cases surgical reports with statements on cartilage integrity were available. Cartilage lesions and bony defects at talus and tibia were scored according to defect depth and size by two radiologists. Statistical analysis included sensitivity analyses and Cohen's kappa calculations. Results. On CTA, 41/79 and 31/79 patients had full thickness cartilage defects at the talus and at the tibia, respectively. MRI was able to detect 54% of these defects. For the detection of full thickness cartilage lesions, interobserver agreement was substantial (0.72 ± 0.05) for CTA and moderate (0.55 ± 0.07) for MRI. In surgical reports, 88–92% and 46–62% of full thickness defects detected by CTA and MRI were described. CTA findings changed the further clinical management in 15.4% of cases. Conclusions. As compared to conventional MRI, CTA improves detection and visualization of cartilage defects at the ankle and is a relevant tool for treatment decisions in unclear cases. PMID:27891511

  17. Heterogeneous MR arthrography findings in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome - Diagnostic subgroups?

    PubMed

    de Witte, Pieter Bas; Overbeek, Celeste L; Navas, Ana; Nagels, Jochem; Reijnierse, Monique; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-08-01

    Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is frequently diagnosed, but treatment results vary greatly. It is increasingly reported that SIS symptoms are caused by various underlying mechanisms that need distinctive treatment strategies. We evaluated a set of specific MRI Arthrography (MRA) characteristics that have been related with underlying mechanisms for SIS in the literature, in patients with SIS. In 47 patients diagnosed with SIS, MRA characteristics were evaluated and categorized into categories of potential underlying mechanisms: (1) extrinsic: e.g. acromion shape; (2) intrinsic: e.g. tendinosis; (3) dynamic: e.g. signs of glenohumeral (micro-)instability. Control values were obtained from the literature. With cluster analysis, potential patient subgroups were assessed. In 17 (36.2%) patients originally diagnosed with SIS, specific other conditions were found, including rotator cuff tears and labrum lesions. In the remaining 30, all had positive signs of at least one of the predefined underlying mechanisms. Patients could be categorized into 2 groups: predominantly findings corresponding with extrinsic/structural causes, or with dynamic/(micro)instability. MRA characteristics in patients with SIS symptoms are heterogeneous and many patients have specific other shoulder conditions causing symptoms. Patients without specific other conditions have MRA characteristics associated with either extrinsic (structural), or dynamic (e.g. micro-instability) underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diagnostic performance of direct traction MR arthrography of the hip: detection of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison.

    PubMed

    Schmaranzer, Florian; Klauser, Andrea; Kogler, Michael; Henninger, Benjamin; Forstner, Thomas; Reichkendler, Markus; Schmaranzer, Ehrenfried

    2015-06-01

    To assess diagnostic performance of traction MR arthrography of the hip in detection and grading of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison. Seventy-five MR arthrograms obtained ± traction of 73 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.5 years; range, 14-54 years) who underwent arthroscopy were included. Traction technique included weight-adapted traction (15-23 kg), a supporting plate for the contralateral leg, and intra-articular injection of 18-27 ml (local anaesthetic and contrast agent). Patients reported on neuropraxia and on pain. Two blinded readers independently assessed femoroacetabular cartilage and labrum lesions which were correlated with arthroscopy. Interobserver agreement was calculated using κ values. Joint distraction ± traction was evaluated in consensus. No procedure had to be stopped. There were no cases of neuropraxia. Accuracy for detection of labral lesions was 92 %/93 %, 91 %/83 % for acetabular lesions, and 92 %/88 % for femoral cartilage lesions for reader 1/reader 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.58) for grading of labrum lesions and substantial (κ = 0.7, κ = 0.68) for grading of acetabular and femoral cartilage lesions. Joint distraction was achieved in 72/75 and 14/75 hips with/without traction, respectively. Traction MR arthrography safely enabled accurate detection and grading of labral and chondral lesions. • The used traction technique was well tolerated by most patients. • The used traction technique almost consistently achieved separation of cartilage layers. • Traction MR arthrography enabled accurate detection of chondral and labral lesions.

  19. Data compression in wireless sensors network using MDCT and embedded harmonic coding.

    PubMed

    Alsalaet, Jaafar K; Ali, Abduladhem A

    2015-05-01

    One of the major applications of wireless sensors networks (WSNs) is vibration measurement for the purpose of structural health monitoring and machinery fault diagnosis. WSNs have many advantages over the wired networks such as low cost and reduced setup time. However, the useful bandwidth is limited, as compared to wired networks, resulting in relatively low sampling. One solution to this problem is data compression which, in addition to enhancing sampling rate, saves valuable power of the wireless nodes. In this work, a data compression scheme, based on Modified Discrete Cosine Transform (MDCT) followed by Embedded Harmonic Components Coding (EHCC) is proposed to compress vibration signals. The EHCC is applied to exploit harmonic redundancy present is most vibration signals resulting in improved compression ratio. This scheme is made suitable for the tiny hardware of wireless nodes and it is proved to be fast and effective. The efficiency of the proposed scheme is investigated by conducting several experimental tests.

  20. A Rare Presentation of an Entrapment in a Liver Transplant Candidate Depicted by MDCT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Kantarci, Mecit; Aydin, Unal; Doganay, Selim; Aydinli, Bulent; Yuce, Ihsan; Polat, Kamil Yalcin

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophic caudate lobe veins can mimic a normal venous configuration. In cases of multiple vascular collaterals, Doppler evaluations must be conducted, and the flow direction of these veins as well as the IVC should be evaluated. If the flow in the IVC is reversed, Budd-Chiari syndrome should be suspected; moreover, at the supra diaphragmatic level, which may be considered a blind spot, particularly for radiologists, a web should be searched for in the area where the IVC opens into the right atrium. In this study, we present the unique findings of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography for a liver transplant candidate with Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by a web in the proximal IVC. PMID:25610132

  1. Multiphase contrast-saline mixture injection with dual-flow in 64-row MDCT coronary CTA.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lizhen; Du, Xiangying; Li, Pengyu; Liu, Yaou; Li, Kuncheng

    2009-03-01

    To explore the feasibility of multiphase contrast-saline mixture with dual-flow injection technique for visualization of right ventricular (RV) cavity and interventricular septum (IVS) in 64-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography. Twenty-four patients underwent coronary CT angiography (CTA) imaging with 64-row MDCT. In twelve patients (group A), 60 ml contrast medium (CM) bolus was followed by 40 ml saline, and in the other twelve patients (group B), 50 ml CM bolus was followed by 50 ml contrast-saline mixture at 60:40 ratio. The CM, saline and contrast-saline mixture flow rate were all 5.0 ml/s. Two experienced radiologists measured the CT values of ascending aorta, descending aorta, pulmonary artery and RV, rated the uniformity of RV cavity, the visualization of coronary arteries and IVS independently. By Kappa test, agreement between the two radiologists was 0.93 and 0.86 concerning the CT value measurements and the grades of the three indexes, respectively. By t-test, the mean CT values of ascending aorta and descending aorta of the two groups had no statistical difference (t=1.459, P>0.05; t=1.619, P>0.05); while the mean CT values of pulmonary artery and RV cavity had statistical differences (t=8.316, P<0.05; t=10.372, P<0.05). By two-related rank sum test, according to the visualization of coronary arteries and the uniformity of RV cavity, there were no statistical differences (U=66.00, P>0.05; U=54.00, P>0.05); while according to the visualization of IVS, group B was better than group A (U=8.00, P<0.05). In coronary CTA, a contrast-saline mixture after CM bolus can provide clear visualization of RV and IVS and LV without impairing coronary CTA image.

  2. MDCT for automated detection and measurement of pneumothoraces in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenli; Tabbara, Malek; Takata, Noboru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Harris, Gordon J; Novelline, Robert A; de Moya, Marc

    2009-03-01

    The size of a pneumothorax is an important index to guide the emergency treatment of trauma patients--chest tube drainage. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an automated computer-aided volumetry scheme for detection and measurement of pneumothoraces for trauma patients imaged with MDCT. Three pigs and 68 trauma patients with at least one diagnosed occult pneumothorax (23 women and 45 men; age range, 14-89 years; mean age, 41 +/- 19 years) were selected for the development and validation of our computer-aided volumetry scheme for pneumothorax. Computer-aided volumetry of pneumothorax consisted of five automated steps: extraction of pleural region, detection of pneumothorax candidates, delineation of the detected pneumothorax candidates, reduction of false-positive findings, and report of the volumetric measurement of pneumothoraces. In the animal study, our computer-aided volumetry scheme yielded a mean value of 24.27 +/- 0.64 mL (SD) compared with 25 mL of air volume manually injected in each scan. The correlation coefficients were 0.999 and 0.997 for the in vivo and ex vivo comparison, respectively. In the patient study, the sensitivity of our computer-aided volumetry scheme was 100% with a false-positive rate of 0.15 per case for 32 occult pneumothoraces > or = 25 mL. The correlation coefficient was 0.999 for manual volumetry comparison. This automated computer-aided volumetry scheme took approximately 3 minutes to finish the detection and measurement per case. The results show that our computer-aided volumetry scheme provides an automated method for accurate and efficient detection and measurement of pneumothoraces in MDCT images of trauma patients.

  3. Diagnostic Value and Interreader Agreement of the Pancreaticolienal Gap in Pancreatic Cancer on MDCT

    PubMed Central

    Schawkat, Khoschy; Kühn, Wolfgang; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Gloor, Beat; Heverhagen, Johannes T.; Runge, Val Murray; Christe, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic value and measure interreader agreement of the pancreaticolienal gap (PLG) in the assessment of imaging features of pancreatic carcinoma (PC) on contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography (CE-MDCT). Materials and Methods CE-MDCT studies in the portal venous phase were retrospectively reviewed for 66 patients with PC. The age- and gender-matched control group comprised 103 healthy individuals. Three radiologists with different levels of experience independently measured the PLG (the minimum distance of the pancreatic tail to the nearest border of the spleen) in the axial plane. The interreader agreement of the PLG and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to calculate the accuracy of the technique. Results While the control group (n = 103) showed a median PLG of 3 mm (Range: 0 – 39mm) the PC patients had a significantly larger PLG of 15mm (Range: 0 – 53mm)(p < 0.0001). A ROC curve demonstrated a cutoff-value of >12 mm for PC, with a sensitivity of 58.2% (95% CI = 45.5–70.1), specificity of 84.0% (95% CI = 75.6–90.4) and an area under the ROC curve of 0.714 (95% CI = 0.641 to 0.780). The mean interreader agreement showed correlation coefficient r of 0.9159. The extent of the PLG did not correlate with tumor stage but did correlate with pancreatic density (fatty involution) and age, the density decreased by 4.1 HU and the PLG increased by 0.8 mm within every 10 y. Conclusion The significant interreader agreement supports the use of the PLG as a characterizing feature of pancreatic cancer independent of the tumor stage on an axial plane. The increase in the PLG with age may represent physiological atrophy of the pancreatic tail. PMID:27893776

  4. Comparison of three-dimensional isotropic and two-dimensional conventional indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jee, Sukkyung; Kwon, Jong Won; Cha, Jang Gyu; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2014-01-01

    To compare the accuracy between a three-dimensional (3D) indirect isotropic T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography and a conventional two-dimensional (2D) T1-weighted sequences of indirect MR arthrography for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. The study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. In total, 205 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery for 206 shoulders were included in this study. Both conventional 2D T1-weighted FSE sequences and 3D isotropic T1-weighted FSE sequence were performed in all patients. Two radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of full- or partial-thickness tears in the supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) tendons and tears in the subscapularis (SSC) tendons. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the diagnostic performances of both methods were analyzed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Arthroscopy confirmed 165 SSP-ISP tendon tears and 103 SSC tendon tears. For diagnosing SSP-ISP tendon tears, the AUC values were 0.964 and 0.989 for the 2D sequences and 3D T1-weighted FSE sequence, respectively, in reader I and 0.947 and 0.963, respectively, in reader II. The AUC values for diagnosing SSC tendon tears were 0.921 and 0.925, respectively, for reader I and 0.856 and 0.860, respectively, for reader II. There was no significant difference between the AUC values of the 2D and 3D sequences in either reader for either type of tear. 3D indirect isotropic MR arthrography with FSE sequence and the conventional 2D arthrography are not significantly different in terms of accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears.

  5. Comparison of Three-Dimensional Isotropic and Two-Dimensional Conventional Indirect MR Arthrography for the Diagnosis of Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Jee, Sukkyung; Kwon, Jong Won; Cha, Jang Gyu; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy between a three-dimensional (3D) indirect isotropic T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography and a conventional two-dimensional (2D) T1-weighted sequences of indirect MR arthrography for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods The study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. In total, 205 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery for 206 shoulders were included in this study. Both conventional 2D T1-weighted FSE sequences and 3D isotropic T1-weighted FSE sequence were performed in all patients. Two radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of full- or partial-thickness tears in the supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) tendons and tears in the subscapularis (SSC) tendons. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the diagnostic performances of both methods were analyzed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results Arthroscopy confirmed 165 SSP-ISP tendon tears and 103 SSC tendon tears. For diagnosing SSP-ISP tendon tears, the AUC values were 0.964 and 0.989 for the 2D sequences and 3D T1-weighted FSE sequence, respectively, in reader I and 0.947 and 0.963, respectively, in reader II. The AUC values for diagnosing SSC tendon tears were 0.921 and 0.925, respectively, for reader I and 0.856 and 0.860, respectively, for reader II. There was no significant difference between the AUC values of the 2D and 3D sequences in either reader for either type of tear. Conclusion 3D indirect isotropic MR arthrography with FSE sequence and the conventional 2D arthrography are not significantly different in terms of accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. PMID:25469089

  6. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Yvana Lopes Pinheiro; Costa, Rita Zanlorensi Visneck; Pinho, Kátia Elisa Prus; Ferreira, Ricardo Rabello; Schuindt, Sueliton Miyamoto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography. PMID:25987746

  7. The use of MR arthrography to document an occult joint communication in a recurrent peroneal intraneural ganglion.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Robert J; Amrami, Kimberly K; Rock, Michael G

    2006-03-01

    The pathogenesis of intraneural ganglia remains controversial. Only half of the reported cases of the most common type, the peroneal nerve at the fibular neck, have been found to have pedicles connecting the cysts to neighboring joints detected with preoperative imaging or intraoperatively. We believe that all intraneural ganglia arise from joints, and that radiologists and surgeons need to look closely preoperatively and intraoperatively for connections. Not identifying these connections with imaging and surgical exploration has led not only to skepticism about an articular origin of the cyst, but also to a high recurrence rate after surgery. We present a patient who had two recurrences of a peroneal intraneural ganglion in whom a joint connection was not detected on previous MRIs and operations. Reinterpretation of the original films and high-resolution MRI demonstrated an "occult" joint connection to the superior tibiofibular joint. MR arthrography performed after exercise and 1 h delay, however, clearly showed the connection and communication. The joint connection was then confirmed at surgery through an articular branch. Postoperatively the patient regained nearly normal neurologic function, and follow-up MRI showed no cyst recurrence. MR arthrography with delayed imaging should be considered in cases of intraneural ganglia when a joint connection is not obvious on MRI.

  8. Reporting rotator cuff tears on magnetic resonance arthrography using the Snyder’s arthroscopic classification

    PubMed Central

    Aliprandi, Alberto; Messina, Carmelo; Arrigoni, Paolo; Bandirali, Michele; Di Leo, Giovanni; Longo, Stefano; Magnani, Sandro; Mattiuz, Chiara; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) in evaluating rotator cuff tears (RCTs) using Snyder’s classification for reporting. METHODS One hundred and twenty-six patients (64 males, 62 females; median age 55 years) underwent shoulder MRA and arthroscopy, which represented our reference standard. Surgical arthroscopic reports were reviewed and the reported Snyder’s classification was recorded. MRA examinations were evaluated by two independent radiologists (14 and 5 years’ experience) using Snyder’s classification system, blinded to arthroscopy. Agreement between arthroscopy and MRA on partial- and full-thickness tears was calculated, first regardless of their extent. Then, analysis took into account also the extent of the tear. Interobserver agreement was also calculated the quadratically-weighted Cohen kappa statistics. RESULTS On arthroscopy, 71/126 patients (56%) had a full-thickness RCT. The remaining 55/126 patients (44%) had a partial-thickness RCT. Regardless of tear extent, out of 71 patients with arthroscopically-confirmed full-thickness RCTs, 66 (93%) were correctly scored by both readers. All 55 patients with arthroscopic diagnosis of partial-thickness RCT were correctly assigned as having a partial-thickness RCT at MRA by both readers. Interobserver reproducibility analysis showed total agreement between the two readers in distinguishing partial-thickness from full-thickness RCTs, regardless of tear extent (k = 1.000). With regard to tear extent, in patients in whom a complete tear was correctly diagnosed, correct tear extent was detected in 61/66 cases (92%); in the remaining 5/66 cases (8%), tear extent was underestimated. Agreement was k = 0.955. Interobserver agreement was total (k = 1.000). CONCLUSION MRA shows high diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility in evaluating RCTs using the Snyder’s classification for reporting. Snyder’s classification may be adopted for routine reporting of MRA. PMID

  9. Diagnostic shortcomings of magnetic resonance arthrography to evaluate partial rotator cuff tears in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Eric W; Eisner, Eric A; Kruk, Peter G; Roocroft, Joanna H; Dwek, Jerry D

    2015-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests an increase in the incidence of partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears in adolescent athletes, but the accuracy of diagnostic studies has not been previously assessed in this cohort. This study was performed to assess the ability of magnetic resonance imaging with arthrography (MRIa) to diagnose partial rotator cuff (PRC) pathology in the adolescent age group. All patients under the age of 19 years who underwent shoulder arthroscopy, between August 2008 and August 2010, were grouped based on the presence of a PRC tear diagnosed by either MRIa or arthroscopy. The control cohort included children without evidence of an intraoperative PRC. Surgical findings were then correlated with the preoperative MRIa findings and the accuracy of MRIa reading. Interclass coefficient was then determined for the MRIa reviewers. Thirty-one of 89 adolescents (mean age, 15.9 y; 36% girls and 64% boys) who underwent arthroscopic shoulder surgery were found to have radiographic or arthroscopic evidence of a PRC injury. There were 17 boys and 14 girls in the PRC group, with a mean age of 15.6 years. The PRC injuries involved either the supraspinatus tendon, infraspinatus tendon, or both. MRIa was 44% sensitive and 87% specific, with a positive predictive value of 64% and a negative predictive value of 74% with arthroscopic findings used as the gold standard. The ICC between reviewers was κ=0.57, with an absolute agreement of 84%. The overall diagnostic accuracy of the MRIa with regard to adolescent PRC injuries was 72%. MRIa was found to be specific, but not sensitive for the diagnosis of this pathology. The high false-negative rate seen in this adolescent cohort indicates that a PRC injury may be present even with a negative MRIa. Therefore, if clinical suspicion indicates a PRC injury, then the treating physician should consider management for rotator cuff pathology despite negative MRIa findings. Level III--retrospective cohort study.

  10. Use of Preprocedural MDCT for Cardiac Implantable Electric Device Lead Extraction: Frequency of Findings That Change Management.

    PubMed

    Ehieli, Wendy L; Boll, Daniel T; Marin, Daniele; Lewis, Robert; Piccini, Jonathan P; Hurwitz, Lynne M

    2017-04-01

    Five percent of cardiac implantable electric devices (CIEDs) are removed each year. Percutaneous extraction is preferred but can be complicated if the leads adhere to the vasculature or perforate. The goal of this study is to assess the frequency of findings on dedicated MDCT that alter preprocedural planning for percutaneous CIED extraction. One hundred patients with CIEDs who underwent MDCT before percutaneous lead extraction were analyzed. Major findings that could preclude percutaneous removal, including lead course and termination, were distinguished from moderately significant findings that could alter but not preclude percutaneous removal, including endofibrosis of leads to the vasculature, lead termination abnormalities, central vein stenosis, or thrombus. Incidental findings were characterized separately. Findings were correlated with preprocedural decisions, the extraction procedure performed, and procedural outcomes. Twenty-six women and 74 men with 125 right ventricular leads, 84 right atrial leads, and 26 coronary venous leads were evaluated. Major findings were present in 7% of patients, including six patients with lead perforation and one with a lead coursing outside a tricuspid annuloplasty ring. Moderately significant findings of endothelial fibrosis were found in 78% of patients. The central veins were narrowed or occluded in 42% of patients, and thrombus was present in 2% of patients. Thirty-six percent of patients had incidental findings, and 4% of patients had unexpected findings requiring immediate inpatient attention. MDCT performed before CIED lead extraction is able to identify major and moderately significant findings that can alter either percutaneous extraction or preprocedural planning. The use of dedicated preprocedural MDCT can help to stratify patient risk, guide decision making by the proceduralist, and identify non-catheter-related findings that affect patient management.

  11. Evaluation of a single-pass continuous whole-body 16-MDCT protocol for patients with polytrauma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy; Platon, Alexandra; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Mirvis, Stuart E; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a conventional multiregional MDCT protocol with two continuous single-pass whole-body MDCT protocols in imaging of patients with polytrauma. Ninety patients with polytrauma underwent whole-body 16-MDCT with a conventional (n=30) or one of two single-pass (n=60) protocols. The conventional protocol included unenhanced scans of the head and cervical spine and contrast-enhanced helical scans (140 mL, 4 mL/s, 300 mg I/mL) of the thorax and abdomen. The single-pass protocols consisted of unenhanced scans of the head followed by one-sweep acquisition from the circle of Willis through the pubic symphysis with a biphasic (150 mL, 6 and 4 mL/s, 300 mg I/mL) or monophasic (110 mL, 4 mL/s, 400 mg I/mL) injection. Acquisition times and interval delays between head, chest, and abdominal scans were recorded. Contrast enhancement was measured in the aortic arch, liver, spleen, and kidney. Diagnostic image quality in the same areas was assessed on a 4-point scale. Median acquisition times for the single-pass protocols were significantly shorter (-42.5%) than the acquisition time for the conventional protocol. No significant differences were found in mean enhancement values in the aorta, liver, spleen, and kidney for the three protocols. The image quality with both single-pass protocols was better than that with the conventional protocol in assessment of the mediastinum and cervical spine (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between the single-pass protocols. Use of single-pass continuous whole-body MDCT protocols can significantly decrease examination time for patients with polytrauma and improve image quality compared with a conventional serial scan protocol. Monophasic injection with highly concentrated contrast medium can reduce injection flow rate and should therefore be preferred to a biphasic injection technique.

  12. Accuracy of water-enema multidetector computed tomography (WE-MDCT) in colon cancer staging: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Sibileau, E; Ridereau-Zins, Catherine; Vanel, D; Pavageau, A H; Bertrais, S; Metivier-Cesbron, E; Venara, A; Aubé, C

    2014-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of water-enema multidetector computed tomography (WE-MDCT) in extra-rectal colon cancer staging. Fifty-three patients (mean age 70 years) with extra-rectal colon cancer proven by colonoscopy and biopsy were prospectively evaluated by preoperative WE-MDCT. CT scans were both intraluminal (water enema or WE) and intravenous (iodinated) contrast enhanced (CE). All patients underwent surgery. Tumors were classified with the TNM staging system. Noted CT features were: tumor size and location; tumor form and edges; spread to the pericolic fat or neighboring organs; thickening of retroperitoneal fascia; number, size, and enhancement of the peritumoral lymph nodes. Tumors were classified on CT into 3 T-stage groups: T1/T2, T3, and T4. Lymph nodes were classified by their density after injection [positive over 100 Hounsfield units (HU)]. Tumor localization to the specific colon segment was correct in all the cases. The agreement between WE-MDCT staging and histopathology staging was good (k = 0.64). An irregular and bowl-shaped aspect of the external edges of tumor provided excellent sensitivity for T3/T4 inclusion (Se 97.7%, NPV 85.7%). Thickening of a fascia or the abdominal wall provided good specificity for T4 stage (Sp 88.1%, NPV 94.9%). Enhancement over 100 HU of at least one peritumoral lymph node was the best criterion of N+ staging (Sp 67.7%, NPV 87.5%). WE-MDCT permits good staging of colon cancer based on objective features.

  13. Trauma whole-body MDCT: an assessment of image quality in conventional dual-phase and modified biphasic injection.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Wasim; Kamanahalli, Raghavendra; Dick, Elizabeth; Bharwani, Nishat; Fetherston, Shirley; Kashef, Elika

    2016-07-01

    To compare the image quality of conventional arterial and portal venous (PV) phase multidetector CT (MDCT) with two biphasic injection protocols in polytrauma patients. 60 consecutive patients with polytrauma underwent body 256-slice MDCT with a conventional protocol or 1 of 2 single-pass biphasic protocols: Group A, arterial (30 s) and PV (60 s) phase acquisitions; Group B, "biphasic" contrast injection with a single acquisition at 60 s; and Group C, "modified biphasic" injection with a single acquisition at a 70-s delay. Images were analyzed for arterial, venous and parenchymal attenuation profiles with regions of interest in the major arteries, veins and solid abdominal organs. A 5-point scoring system was used to assess the image quality, with 5 representing excellent arterial, venous and parenchymal opacification and <3 representing non-diagnostic opacification. In addition, the effective dose (millisieverts) was compared between the groups. In 93% of patients, image quality was scored as good or excellent (≥4). All studies were of satisfactory diagnostic quality. Overall, venous and arterial attenuation profiles were comparable. Attenuation profiles in the solid abdominal viscera were significantly higher (p < 0.01) using both biphasic protocols than with arterial or PV phase of conventional protocols. Effective doses were higher in Group A. Comparable image quality can be achieved using a biphasic i.v. contrast injection protocol with single MDCT acquisition with less radiation and reduction in acquisition time. For these particular biphasic injection protocols, we have shown that image quality is comparable with a conventional protocol. This has been achieved by comparing enhanced densities of specific structures, as well as gestalt scoring by assessors, on a 256-slice MDCT.

  14. [Dose reduction and image quality in MDCT of the upper abdomen: potential of an adaptive post-processing filter].

    PubMed

    Kröpil, P; Lanzman, R S; Walther, C; Röhlen, S; Godehardt, E; Mödder, U; Cohnen, M

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of a 2D non-linear adaptive post-processing filter (2D-NLAF) on image quality in dose-reduced multi-detector CT (MDCT) of the upper abdomen. MDCT of the upper abdomen was simulated on a 64-slice scanner using a multi-modal anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS, Norfolk, USA). While keeping the collimation (64 x 0.6 mm) and pitch (p = 1) unchanged, the tube current (100 - 500 mAs) and tube potential (80 - 140 kVp) were varied to perform MDCT as high dose (CTDI > 20), middle dose (CTDI 10 - 20) and low dose (CTDI < 10) level protocols. Four independent blinded radiologists evaluated axial images with a thickness of 7 and 3 mm with respect to the presentation of "mesenteric low contrast lesions", "liver veins", "liver cysts", "renal cysts" and "big vessels". The subjective image quality of original data and post-processed images using a 2D-NLAF (SharpViewCT, Linköping, Sweden) was graded on a 5-point scale (from "1" not visible to "5" excellent) and statistically analyzed. The effective dose (E) was estimated using commercial software (CT-EXPO). For all protocol groups, 2D-NLAF led to a significant improvement in subjective image quality for all examined lesions (p < 0.01), particularly at the protocols of middle dose (E: 5 - 8 mSv) and low dose level (E: 1 - 5 mSv). A maximum effect was seen in middle dose protocols for "low contrast lesions" (score "3.3" with filter versus "2.5" without) and "liver veins" ("4.5" versus "3.9"). The phantom study indicates a potential dose reduction of up to 50 % in MDCT of the upper abdomen by use of a 2D-NLAF, which should be further examined in clinical trails. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  15. Emergency radiology: straightening of the cervical spine in MDCT after trauma—a sign of injury or normal variant?

    PubMed Central

    Deak, Zsuszsanna; Krtakovska, Aina; Ruschi, Francesco; Kammer, Nora; Wirth, Stefan; Reiser, Maximilian; Geyer, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether straightening of the cervical spine (C-spine) alignment after trauma can be considered a significant multidetector CT (MDCT) finding. Methods: 160 consecutive patients after C-spine trauma admitted to a Level 1 trauma centre received MDCT according to Canadian Cervical Spine Rule and National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study indication rule; subgroups with and without cervical collar immobilization (CCI +/−) were compared with a control group (n = 20) of non-traumatized patients. Two independent readers evaluated retrospectively the alignment, determined the absolute rotational angle of the posterior surface of C2 and C7 (ARA C2–7) and grouped the results for lordosis (<−13°), straight (−13 to +6°) and kyphosis (>+6°). Results: In the two CCI−/CCI+ study groups, the straight or kyphotic alignment significantly (p = 0.001) predominated over lordosis. The number of patients with straight C-spine alignment was higher in the CCI+ group (CCI+ 69% vs CCI− 49%, p = 0.05). A comparison of the CCI+ group vs the CCI− group revealed a slightly smaller number of kyphotic (10% vs 18%, p = 0.34) and lordotic (21% vs 33%, p = 0.33) alignments. Statistically, however, the differences were of no significance. The control group revealed no significant differences. Conclusion: Straightening of the C-spine alone is not a definitive sign of injury but is a biomechanical variation due to CCI and neck positioning during MDCT or active patient control. Advances in knowledge: Straightening of the C-spine alignment in MDCT alone is not a definitive sign of injury. Straightening of the C-spine alignment is related to neck positioning and active patient control. CCI has a straightening effect on the cervical alignment. PMID:26764283

  16. Printed MDCT 3D models for prediction of Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) occluder device size - A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Goitein, Orly; Fink, Noam; Guetta, Victor; Beinart, Roy; Brodov, Yafim; Konen, Eli; Goitein, David; Di Segni, Elio; Grupper, Avishay; Glikson, Michael

    2017-05-16

    Trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE) and MDCT currently serve as imaging modalities for left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion pre-procedural planning. We assessed the feasibility of multi-detector CT (MDCT) based models to predict the correct size of device for LAA occlusion procedures. Patients planned for LAA occlusion underwent MDCT before implantation, which was used for creating and printing 3D LAA models. Three cardiologists evaluated the 3D models and predicted the correct size of the device by manual manipulation, these predictions were compared with the actual device implanted during the procedure. Twenty nine patients were included in this study. Amplatzer™ and Watchman™ devices were deployed in 12 and 17 patients, respectively. Two procedures were aborted due to failure of occlusion, all three physicians predicted it. There was good correlation between the 3D models and the inserted device for Amplatzer™ devices with concordance correlation coefficient 0.778 (P=0.001) and poor agreement for Watchman™ devices - concordance correlation coefficient of 0.315 (P=0.203). Agreement between the three physicians for Amplatzer ™ and Watchman™ devices were excellent with a calculated average intra-class correlation of 0.915 and 0.816 respectively. We found LAA printed 3D models to be accurate for prediction of LAA occluder device size for Amplatzer™ device but not for Watchman™ device.

  17. Extramural venous invasion detected by MDCT as an adverse imaging feature for predicting synchronous metastases in T4 gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Wu, Jing; Ye, Yingjiang; Zhang, Chunfang; Zhang, Yinli; Wang, Yi

    2017-04-01

    Background Extramural venous invasion (EMVI) is defined histologically as the active invasion of tumor cells to the lumens of mesenteric vessels beyond the muscularis propria in advanced gastrointestinal cancer, resulting in distant metastases. Purpose To determine the association between synchronous metastatic disease in patients with T4 gastric cancer and EMVI detected on contrast-enhanced multiple-row detector computed tomography (MDCT). Material and Methods A total of 152 patients with T4 gastric carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed and divided into EMVI-positive and EMVI-negative groups where EMVI, as detected on MDCT, was defined as a tubular or nodular soft tissue thickening extending from the tumor along the vessels of the mesentery. Synchronous metastases were detected by MDCT and/or confirmed by postoperative diagnosis. Logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze the predictive factors of synchronous metastases in gastric cancer. Results Synchronous metastases were found in 47 of 152 (30.9%) patients with T4 gastric cancer. Thirty-one of 77 (40.3%) patients in the EMVI-positive group had evidence of metastases compared to 16 (21.3%) of 75 patients in the EMVI-negative group ( P = 0.019). Synchronous metastases were significantly associated with EMVI with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.250 (95% CI, 1.072-4.724). Conclusion EMVI-positive tumors, as an adverse imaging feature, were significantly associated with synchronous metastases in patients with T4 gastric cancer.

  18. MDCT Linear and Volumetric Analysis of Adrenal Glands: Normative Data and Multiparametric Assessment.

    PubMed

    Carsin-Vu, Aline; Oubaya, Nadia; Mulé, Sébastien; Janvier, Annaëlle; Delemer, Brigitte; Soyer, Philippe; Hoeffel, Christine

    2016-08-01

    To study linear and volumetric adrenal measurements, their reproducibility, and correlations between total adrenal volume (TAV) and adrenal micronodularity, age, gender, body mass index (BMI), visceral (VAAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue volume (SAAT), presence of diabetes, chronic alcoholic abuse and chronic inflammatory disease (CID). We included 154 patients (M/F, 65/89; mean age, 57 years) undergoing abdominal multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT). Two radiologists prospectively independently performed adrenal linear and volumetric measurements with semi-automatic software. Inter-observer reliability was studied using inter-observer correlation coefficient (ICC). Relationships between TAV and associated factors were studied using bivariate and multivariable analysis. Mean TAV was 8.4 ± 2.7 cm(3) (3.3-18.7 cm(3)). ICC was excellent for TAV (0.97; 95 % CI: 0.96-0.98) and moderate to good for linear measurements. TAV was significantly greater in men (p < 0.0001), alcoholics (p = 0.04), diabetics (p = 0.0003) and those with micronodular glands (p = 0.001). TAV was lower in CID patients (p = 0.0001). TAV correlated positively with VAAT (r = 0.53, p < 0.0001), BMI (r = 0.42, p < 0.0001), SAAT (r = 0.29, p = 0.0003) and age (r = 0.23, p = 0.005). Multivariable analysis revealed gender, micronodularity, diabetes, age and BMI as independent factors influencing TAV. Adrenal gland MDCT-based volumetric measurements are more reproducible than linear measurements. Gender, micronodularity, age, BMI and diabetes independently influence TAV. • Volumetric measurements are more reproducible than linear measurements for adrenal glands. • Inter-observer reproducibility of adrenal gland volume is excellent using semiautomatic software. • Gender, age, BMI, and diabetes independently influence total adrenal gland volume. • Adrenal micronodularity is associated with increased total adrenal gland volume.

  19. STATIC VS PROSPECTIVE GATED, NON-BREATH HOLD VOLUMETRIC MDCT IMAGING OF THE LUNGS

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Osama I.; Chon, Deokiee; Beck, Kenneth; McLennan, Geoffrey; Sieren, Jered; Reinhardt, Joseph; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: We seek to establish lung imaging methods which provide for the ability to image the lung under dynamic, non-breath hold conditions while providing “virtual breath hold,” quantifiable volumetric image data sets. We use static, breath hold images as the gold standard for evaluating these virtual breath hold images in both a phantom and sheep. Materials and Methods: We have developed axial methods for gating image acquisition to multiple points in the respiratory cycle interleaved with incremental table stepping during multidetector-row CT (MDCT) scanning. Datasets are generated over multiple breaths, providing volume images representative of multiple points within a respiratory cycle. To determine the reproducibility and accuracy of the methods , 6 anesthetized sheep were studied by MDCT in non-gated and airway-pressure (Pawy)-gated modes where Pawy was 0, 7 and 15 cmH2O. Results: No significant differences were found between the coefficient of variation in air volume measured from repeated static scans (1.74±1.78%), gated scans: Inspiratory gated (1.2±0.44%) or expiratory-gated (1.39±0.98%), or between static (1.74±1.78%) and gated (1.39+/-0.98%) scanning at similar Pawy (p>0.1). Measured air volumes were larger from static vs. gated scans by 5.85±3.77% at 7cmH2O and 4.45±3.6% at 15cmHL2O Pawy (p<0.05) consistent with hysteresis. Differences between air volumes at 7 and 15 cmH2O measured from either static or gated scans or that delivered by a supersyringe were insignificant (p<0.05). Visual accuracy of 3D anatomic geometry was achieved, and landmark certainty was within 1mm across respiratory cycles. Conclusion: A method has been demonstrated which provides for accurate gating to respiratory signals during axial scanning. High resolution volumetric image datasets are achievable while the scanned subject is breathing.Images are quantitatively similar to breath hold images with differences likely explained by known P-V hysteresis

  20. Feasibility of using single-slice MDCT to evaluate visceral abdominal fat in an urban pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Blitman, Netta M; Baron, Lindsay Stanton; Berkenblit, Robert G; Schoenfeld, Alan H; Markowitz, Morri; Freeman, Katherine

    2011-08-01

    Obesity is a growing clinical problem, especially among children of low socioeconomic status. Increased visceral abdominal fat is implicated in the metabolic syndrome and its health consequences. The purpose of this study is to validate measurement of a single MDCT slice as a predictor of total visceral abdominal fat and to correlate over a wide range of body mass indexes (BMIs). A two-phase retrospective analysis was performed. For validation, MDCTs of 21 consecutive healthy children (8-14 years old) were reviewed. In these cases, visceral abdominal fat and subcutaneous abdominal fat area were calculated using a body fat analysis function from single 0.625-mm MDCT slices at the umbilicus and were compared with total visceral abdominal fat area as measured from T11 to the coccyx. Subsequently, visceral abdominal fat area was obtained from single slices at the umbilicus from abdominal MDCT scans of 146 consecutive healthy children (age range, 6-14 years; 80 boys and 66 girls; 77 Hispanic, 41 African American, 15 white, and 13 multiracial or other race) for whom BMI was available. Associations between visceral abdominal fat area and sex, race, and BMI were determined. Effective radiation dose for a 1.25-mm axial MDCT slice was calculated using a mathematic model that uses derived scaling factors for pediatric patients. Visceral abdominal fat area obtained from a 0.625-mm slice at the umbilicus was highly correlated with total visceral abdominal fat area (r = 0.96; p < 0.0001). Visceral abdominal fat area from single slices at the umbilicus was significantly correlated with BMI (r = 0.72; p < 0.0001). Umbilical visceral abdominal fat area was significantly lower in African American children compared with others (median, 14 vs 22 cm(2); p = 0.02) and was not associated with sex. In our population, the effective radiation dose from the smallest obtainable slice was 0.015-0.019 mSv/37-54 kg of patient weight. Visceral abdominal fat area calculated from a single abdominal

  1. Morphological and functional MDCT: problem-solving tool and surrogate biomarker for hepatic disease clinical care and drug discovery in the era of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang

    2010-08-17

    This article explains the significant role of morphological and functional multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) in combination with imaging postprocessing algorithms served as a problem-solving tool and noninvasive surrogate biomarker to effectively improve hepatic diseases characterization, detection, tumor staging and prognosis, therapy response assessment, and novel drug discovery programs, partial liver resection and transplantation, and MDCT-guided interventions in the era of personalized medicine. State-of-the-art MDCT depicts and quantifies hepatic disease over conventional CT for not only depicting lesion location, size, and extent but also detecting changes in tumor biologic behavior caused by therapy or tumor progression before morphologic changes. Color-encoded parameter display provides important functional information on blood flow, permeability, leakage space, and blood volume. Together with other relevant biomarkers and genomics, the imaging modality is being developed and validated as a biomarker to early response to novel, targeted anti-VEGF(R)/PDGFR or antivascular/angiogenesis agents as its parameters correlate with immunohistochemical surrogates of tumor angiogenesis and molecular features of malignancies. MDCT holds incremental value to World Health Organization response criteria and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors in liver disease management. MDCT volumetric measurement of future remnant liver is the most important factor influencing the outcome of patients who underwent partial liver resection and transplantation. MDCT-guided interventional methods deliver personalized therapies locally in the human body. MDCT will hold more scientific impact when it is fused with other imaging probes to yield comprehensive information regarding changes in liver disease at different levels (anatomic, metabolic, molecular, histologic, and other levels).

  2. Correlation between epicardial adipose tissue and severity of coronary artery stenosis evaluated by 64-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunying; Li, Liang; Zha, Yunfei; Peng, Zhoufeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the correlation between epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness, EAT volume, and severity of coronary artery stenosis. We retrospectively enrolled 188 patients that underwent coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography for clinically suspected coronary artery disease using 64-MDCT. Images were reconstructed using a retrospective electrocardiogram-gated algorithm with 0.625-mm-thick sections. EAT thickness and volume were calculated. The coronary CT angiography showed 106 patients who had coronary artery pathology (178 lesions), 21 patients with moderate stenosis (27 lesions), 12 patients with severe stenosis (18 lesions), and 6 patients with complete occlusion (8 lesions). EAT thickness, EAT volume, and Gensini score were statistically different among groups (FT=32.306, FV=27.743, F=110.483, P=.000). Pearson correlation analysis showed that Gensini score had significantly positive correlation with EAT thickness and volume, respectively. EAT thickness and volume demonstrated a positive correlation with severity of coronary artery stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Numerical Study of Water Loss Rate Distributions in MDCT-based Human Airway Models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-01-01

    Both three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are applied to study regional water loss in three multi-detector row computed-tomography (MDCT)-based human airway models at the minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. The overall water losses predicted by both 3D and 1D models in the entire respiratory tract agree with available experimental measurements. However, 3D and 1D models reveal different regional water loss rate distributions due to the 3D secondary flows formed at bifurcations. The secondary flows cause local skewed temperature and humidity distributions on inspiration acting to elevate the local water loss rate; and the secondary flow at the carina tends to distribute more cold air to the lower lobes. As a result, the 3D model predicts that the water loss rate first increases with increasing airway generation, and then decreases as the air approaches saturation, while the 1D model predicts a monotonic decrease of water loss rate with increasing airway generation. Moreover, the 3D (or 1D) model predicts relatively higher water loss rates in lower (or upper) lobes. The regional water loss rate can be related to the non-dimensional wall shear stress (τ*) by the non-dimensional mass transfer coefficient (h0*) as h0* = 1.15 τ*0.272, R = 0.842. PMID:25869455

  4. Accuracy of gantry rotation time of less than 300 ms for modern MDCT systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Matsubara, Kosuke; Miyati, Tosiaki

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of gantry rotation times of less than 300 ms has been assessed for two "state-of-the art" MDCT systems. The rotation time was measured at selected nominal rotation times (275 and 280 ms) with a solid-state detector; Unfors Xi probe. The detector was positioned on the inner bottom of the gantry bore. Because a pair of two successive radiation peaks is necessary for determination of the rotation time, the radiation detection was performed with the helical scan mode of operation. Upon completion of the data acquisition, we determined the peak times with the Unfors Xi View software program to obtain the rotation time. The means and standard deviations of the measured rotation times were 275.3 ± 0.5 and 285.1 ± 0.4 ms, respectively. The inaccuracy of the rotation time was approximately 5 ms at most, which was comparable to that previously reported for slower rotation times.

  5. Utility of Postmortem Autopsy via Whole-Body Imaging: Initial Observations Comparing MDCT and 3.0T MRI Findings with Autopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Dae Ho; Paik, Sang Hyun; Park, Jai Soung; Park, Seong Jin; Lee, Hae Kyung; Hong, Hyun Sook; Choi, Duek Lin; Chung, Nak Eun; Lee, Bong Woo; Seo, Joong Seok

    2010-01-01

    Objective We prospectively compared whole-body multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) images with autopsy findings. Materials and Methods Five cadavers were subjected to whole-body, 16-channel MDCT and 3.0T MR imaging within two hours before an autopsy. A radiologist classified the MDCT and 3.0T MRI findings into major and minor findings, which were compared with autopsy findings. Results Most of the imaging findings, pertaining to head and neck, heart and vascular, chest, abdomen, spine, and musculoskeletal lesions, corresponded to autopsy findings. The causes of death that were determined on the bases of MDCT and 3.0T MRI findings were consistent with the autopsy findings in four of five cases. CT was useful in diagnosing fatal hemorrhage and pneumothorax, as well as determining the shapes and characteristics of the fractures and the direction of external force. MRI was effective in evaluating and tracing the route of a metallic object, soft tissue lesions, chronicity of hemorrhage, and bone bruises. Conclusion A postmortem MDCT combined with MRI is a potentially powerful tool, providing noninvasive and objective measurements for forensic investigations. PMID:20592923

  6. [Arthro-scanner of the knee: current indication, examination of the femoro-tibial compartment. Comparative study with classical simple-contrast media arthrography].

    PubMed

    Pelousse, F; Olette, J

    1993-12-01

    The authors report on a series of 50 single contrast knee arthroscans and describe a method of examination in fine sections that allows for a detailed analysis of the femoro-tibial compartment. The authors compared the sensitivity of the single contrast arthrography with their arthroscanner technique. Thus they prove the major interest of the fine section arthroscanner in assessing chondropathies of all types, the frequency and stage of which are heavily underestimated in conventional arthrography, not only in respect of the patella but also where the other covering cartilages are concerned. They also demonstrate the additional interest of the arthroscanner for certain meniscus and ligament lesions as well as for detecting osteochondromatosis nodules.

  7. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance arthrography and computed tomography for the detection of chondral lesions of the knee.

    PubMed

    Smith, Toby O; Drew, Benjamin T; Toms, Andoni P; Donell, Simon T; Hing, Caroline B

    2012-12-01

    To assess the diagnostic test accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) for the detection of chondral lesions of the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joints. A review of published and unpublished literature sources was conducted on 22nd September 2011. All studies assessing the diagnostic test accuracy (sensitivity/specificity) of MRI or MRA or CTA for the assessment of adults with chondral (cartilage) lesions of the knee (tibiofemoral/patellofemoral joints) with surgical comparison (arthroscopic or open) as the reference test were included. Data were analysed through meta-analysis. Twenty-seven studies assessing 2,592 knees from 2,509 patients were included. The findings indicated that whilst presenting a high specificity (0.95-0.99), the sensitivity of MRA, MRI and CTA ranged from 0.70 to 0.80. MRA was superior to MRI and CTA for the detection of patellofemoral joint chondral lesions and that higher field-strength MRI scanner and grade four lesions were more accurately detected compared with lower field-strength and grade one lesions. There appeared no substantial difference in diagnostic accuracy between the interpretation from musculoskeletal and general radiologists when undertaking an MRI review of tibiofemoral and patellofemoral chondral lesions. Specialist radiological imaging is specific for cartilage disease in the knee but has poorer sensitivity to determine the therapeutic options in this population. Due to this limitation, there remains little indication to replace the 'gold-standard' arthroscopic investigation with MRI, MRA or CTA for the assessment of adults with chondral lesions of the knee. II.

  8. Femoro-acetabular impingement: can indirect MR arthrography be considered a valid method to detect endoarticular damage? A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Grazia; Stradiotti, Paola; Parra, Cleber Garcia; Zagra, Luigi; Sironi, Sandro; Zerbi, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of indirect Magnetic Resonance arthrography (i-MRa) in the detection of chondral and labral lesions related to femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) a series of 21 hip joints in 17 patients with a clinical diagnosis of FAI were examined either with standard MR imaging, i-MRa and direct-MR arthrography (d-MRa). Sensitivity and accuracy of i-MRa in detecting chondral, labral and tardive lesions were calculated and compared with standard MR. The agreement in detecting endoarticular damage between i-MRa and d-MRa and the interobserver agreement was assessed by K statistic (p<0.05). Finally the presence of trocanteric bursitis was evaluated. I-MRa showed higher values of both sensivity and accuracy than standard MR in detecting chondral damage, with an increase to 92% for the first item and 95% for the second. The same was noticed in labrum evaluation with an increase to 88% and 90% respectively. The level of agreement between i-MRa and d-MRa in detection of chondral lesions was excellent, substantial for the labral damage and absolute for early osteoarthritic changes. An excellent interobserver agreement resulted in detection of both chondral and labral damages with i-MRa. In 6 hips (28,5%) we also found the presence of peri-trochanteric soft tissue inflammation that indicated the possibility of extrarticular involvement in FAI. Indirect-MRa can be considered a valid method of assessing endoarticular damage related to FAI, in comparison to d-MRa. It should be performed instead of standard MR if d-MRa is not available.

  9. CT Hounsfield Numbers of Soft Tissues on Unenhanced Abdominal CT Scans: Variability Between Two Different Manufacturers’ MDCT Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P.; Corwin, Michael T.; Li, Chin-Shang; Tran, Tien; Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT of the same patient vary on repeat scans done on two different manufacturers’ MDCT scanners. MATERIALS AND METHODS A database search was performed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent unenhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed both on a Volume CT (GE Healthcare) and a Definition AS Plus (Siemens Healthcare) 64-MDCT scanner within 12 months of each other. After excluding those patients for whom Hounsfield unit measurements would be affected by mitigating factors, 48 patients (mean age, 58.8 years) were identified. Hounsfield unit measurements were obtained in nine different soft-tissue anatomic locations on each scan, and the location of these sites was kept identical on each scan pair. Data were analyzed to evaluate Hounsfield unit differences between these scanners. RESULTS In general, there was a low consistency in the Hounsfield unit measurements for each of these sites on scans obtained by the two scanners, with the subcutaneous fat in the left posterolateral flank showing the lowest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.198). There were differences in the Hounsfield unit measurements obtained in all anatomic sites on scans obtained by both scanners. Mean Hounsfield unit measurements obtained on the Definition AS Plus scanner were lower than those obtained on the Volume CT scanner, with the intriguing exception of the anterior midline subcutaneous fat Hounsfield unit measurements, which were higher on the Definition AS Plus scanner. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION Hounsfield unit measurements for unenhanced abdominal soft tissues of the same patient vary between scanners of two common MDCT manufacturers. PMID:25341139

  10. CT Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT scans: variability between two different manufacturers' MDCT scanners.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P; Corwin, Michael T; Li, Chin-Shang; Tran, Tien; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT of the same patient vary on repeat scans done on two different manufacturers' MDCT scanners. A database search was performed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent unenhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed both on a Volume CT (GE Healthcare) and a Definition AS Plus (Siemens Healthcare) 64-MDCT scanner within 12 months of each other. After excluding those patients for whom Hounsfield unit measurements would be affected by mitigating factors, 48 patients (mean age, 58.8 years) were identified. Hounsfield unit measurements were obtained in nine different soft-tissue anatomic locations on each scan, and the location of these sites was kept identical on each scan pair. Data were analyzed to evaluate Hounsfield unit differences between these scanners. In general, there was a low consistency in the Hounsfield unit measurements for each of these sites on scans obtained by the two scanners, with the subcutaneous fat in the left posterolateral flank showing the lowest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.198). There were differences in the Hounsfield unit measurements obtained in all anatomic sites on scans obtained by both scanners. Mean Hounsfield unit measurements obtained on the Definition AS Plus scanner were lower than those obtained on the Volume CT scanner, with the intriguing exception of the anterior midline subcutaneous fat Hounsfield unit measurements, which were higher on the Definition AS Plus scanner. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Hounsfield unit measurements for unenhanced abdominal soft tissues of the same patient vary between scanners of two common MDCT manufacturers.

  11. Vascular Injuries to the Neck After Penetrating Trauma: Diagnostic Performance of 40- and 64-MDCT Angiography.

    PubMed

    Bodanapally, Uttam K; Dreizin, David; Sliker, Clint W; Boscak, Alexis R; Reddy, Ramachandra P

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the diagnostic performance of 40- and 64-MDCT angiography with digital subtraction angiography as the reference standard in the detection of arterial injuries in patients at high risk after penetrating neck trauma and to perform a separate analysis of injuries to the external carotid artery. In a retrospective evaluation of 53 sets of angiograms from 51 patients with penetrating neck injury, three reviewers unaware of the digital subtraction angiographic findings reviewed the CT angiographic (CTA) images to discern the presence or absence of arterial injuries. Sensitivity and specificity of CTA were calculated per injury, and a separate analysis of external carotid artery injuries was performed. Sensitivity of CTA for detecting arterial injuries ranged from 75.7% (95% CI, 62.3-86.9%) to 82.2% (95% CI, 69.5-92.1%). Specificity ranged from 96.4% (95% CI, 94.0-98.4%) to 98.4% (95% CI, 96.0-100%). CTA was highly sensitive for detection of the subgroup of injuries involving the large-caliber vessels that contribute to cerebral circulation. These sensitivities ranged from 92.8% (95% CI, 66-98.8%) to 100% (95% CI, 76.6-100%) for internal carotid artery injuries and from 88.9% (95% CI, 65.2-98.3%) to 94.4% (95% CI, 72.6-99.0%) for vertebral artery injuries. In contrast, sensitivity of CTA was limited for external carotid artery injuries, ranging from 63.4% (95% CI, 45.5-79.5%) to 70.0% (95% CI, 52.0-85.0%). CTA can be used for initial evaluation and may help guide management decisions if an external carotid artery injury is detected. Negative findings should not preclude close clinical follow-up, repeat CTA evaluation, or, in the presence of high suspicion of arterial injury due to clinical findings or wound trajectory, evaluation with digital subtraction angiography.

  12. Noninvasive detection of cardiac amyloidosis using delayed enhanced MDCT: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Deux, Jean-François; Mihalache, Cristian-Ionut; Legou, François; Damy, Thibaud; Mayer, Julie; Rappeneau, Stéphane; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Luciani, Alain; Kobeiter, Hicham; Rahmouni, Alain

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate myocardial enhancement of patients with cardiac amyloidosis (CA) using computed tomography (CT). Thirteen patients with CA and 11 control patients were examined with first-pass and delayed CT acquisition. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of images was performed. Myocardial attenuation, myocardial signal-to-noise ratio (SNRmyoc), blood pool SNR (SNRblood), contrast-to-noise ratio between blood pool and myocardium (CNRblood-myoc) and relative attenuation index (RAI) defined as variation of myocardial attenuation between delayed and first-pass acquisitions were calculated. Two false negative cases (15 %) and three false positive cases (27 %) were detected on qualitative analysis. SNRmyoc of patients with CA was significantly (p < 0.05) lower on first-pass (4.08 ± 1.9) and higher on delayed acquisition (7.10 ± 2.7) than control patients (6.1 ± 2.2 and 5.03 ± 1.8, respectively). Myocardial attenuation was higher in CA (121 ± 39 HU) than control patients (81 ± 17 HU) on delayed acquisition. CNRblood-myoc was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in CA (1.51 ± 0.7) than control patients (2.85 ± 1.2) on delayed acquisition. The RAI was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in CA (0.12 ± 0.25) than in control patients (-0.56 ± 0.21). Dual phase MDCT can detect abnormal myocardial enhancement in patients with CA. • CT can detect abnormal first-pass and delayed enhancement in cardiac amyloidosis. • Measurement of relative myocardial enhancement between acquisitions helps to detect cardiac amyloidosis. • CT may provide useful data to diagnose cardiac amyloidosis.

  13. Automated diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases and emphysema in MDCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Chang Chien, Kuang-Che; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Prêteux, Françoise

    2007-09-01

    Diffuse lung diseases (DLD) include a heterogeneous group of non-neoplasic disease resulting from damage to the lung parenchyma by varying patterns of inflammation. Characterization and quantification of DLD severity using MDCT, mainly in interstitial lung diseases and emphysema, is an important issue in clinical research for the evaluation of new therapies. This paper develops a 3D automated approach for detection and diagnosis of diffuse lung diseases such as fibrosis/honeycombing, ground glass and emphysema. The proposed methodology combines multi-resolution 3D morphological filtering (exploiting the sup-constrained connection cost operator) and graph-based classification for a full characterization of the parenchymal tissue. The morphological filtering performs a multi-level segmentation of the low- and medium-attenuated lung regions as well as their classification with respect to a granularity criterion (multi-resolution analysis). The original intensity range of the CT data volume is thus reduced in the segmented data to a number of levels equal to the resolution depth used (generally ten levels). The specificity of such morphological filtering is to extract tissue patterns locally contrasting with their neighborhood and of size inferior to the resolution depth, while preserving their original shape. A multi-valued hierarchical graph describing the segmentation result is built-up according to the resolution level and the adjacency of the different segmented components. The graph nodes are then enriched with the textural information carried out by their associated components. A graph analysis-reorganization based on the nodes attributes delivers the final classification of the lung parenchyma in normal and ILD/emphysematous regions. It also makes possible to discriminate between different types, or development stages, among the same class of diseases.

  14. A Numerical Study of Heat and Water Vapor Transfer in MDCT-Based Human Airway Models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) thermo-fluid model is developed to study regional distributions of temperature and water vapor in three multi-detector row computed-tomography (MDCT)-basedhuman airwayswith minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. A one-dimensional (1D) model is also solved to provide necessary initial and boundary conditionsforthe 3D model. Both 3D and 1D predicted temperature distributions agree well with available in vivo measurement data. On inspiration, the 3D cold high-speed air stream is split at the bifurcation to form secondary flows, with its cold regions biased toward the inner wall. The cold air flowing along the wall is warmed up more rapidly than the air in the lumen center. The repeated splitting pattern of air streams caused by bifurcations acts as an effective mechanism for rapid heat and mass transfer in 3D. This provides a key difference from the 1D model, where heating relies largely on diffusion in the radial direction, thus significantly affecting gradient-dependent variables, such as energy flux and water loss rate. We then propose the correlations for respective heat and mass transfer in the airways of up to 6 generations: Nu=3.504(ReDaDt)0.277, R = 0.841 and Sh=3.652(ReDaDt)0.268, R = 0.825, where Nu is the Nusselt number, Sh is the Sherwood number, Re is the branch Reynolds number, Da is the airway equivalent diameter, and Dt is the tracheal equivalentdiameter. PMID:25081386

  15. MDCT in the assessment of laryngeal trauma: value of 2D multiplanar and 3D reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Becker, Minerva; Duboé, Pier-Olivier; Platon, Alexandra; Kohler, Romain; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze fracture patterns and related effects of laryngeal trauma and to assess the value of 2D multiplanar reformation (MPR) and 3D reconstruction. Among 4222 consecutively registered trauma patients who underwent emergency MDCT, 38 patients had presented with laryngeal trauma. Axial, 2D MPR, 3D volume-rendered, and virtual endoscopic images were analyzed retrospectively by two blinded observers according to predefined criteria. Laryngeal fractures, soft-tissue injuries, and airway compromise were evaluated and correlated with clinical, endoscopic, surgical, and follow-up findings. Fifty-nine fractures (37 thyroid, 13 cricoid, nine arytenoid) were present in 38 patients. They were isolated in 21 (55%) patients. The other 17 (45%) patients had additional injuries to the neck, face, brain, chest, or abdomen. Laryngeal fractures were bilateral in 31 (82%) patients and were associated with hyoid bone fractures in nine (24%) patients. Arytenoid luxation was present in eight cartilages. Axial imaging missed 7 of 59 (12%) laryngeal fractures, six of eight (75%) arytenoid luxations, and four of nine (44%) hyoid bone fractures. Additional 2D MPR imaging missed 5 of 59 (8%) laryngeal fractures, five of eight (62.5%) arytenoid luxations, and two of nine (22%) hyoid bone fractures, whereas 3D volume-rendered images depicted them all. Virtual endoscopy and 3D volume rendering added diagnostic accuracy with respect to the length, width, shape, and spatial orientation of fractures in 22 of 38 (58%) patients; arytenoid luxation in six of eight (75%) luxations; and the evaluation of airway narrowing in 19 of 38 (50%) patients. Three-dimensional volume rendering was not of additional value in evaluation of the cricoid cartilage. The use of 2D MPR and 3D volume rendering with or without virtual endoscopy improved assessment of thyroid and hyoid bone fractures, arytenoid luxations, and laryngotracheal narrowing, providing helpful data for optimal

  16. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C{sub 1} continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  17. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C1 continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  18. Synchronous infection of the aorta and the testis: emphysematous epididymo-orchitis, abdominal aortic mycotic aneurysm, and testicular artery pseudoaneurysm diagnosed by use of MDCT.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Rahul G; Balani, Ankit; Merchant, Suleman A; Joshi, Anagha R

    2014-07-01

    We report clinical details and imaging findings for a case of emphysematous epididymo-orchitis with co-existing mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm and a testicular artery pseudoaneurysm in a diabetic 65-year-old male. We report imaging findings from ultrasonography (USG) and contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Use of MDCT to identify, confirm, and define the extent of the disease, and its utility in understanding the pathogenesis of this rare condition are highlighted. For such lethal infections, early diagnosis and intervention can be lifesaving; imaging can be of crucial importance in this.

  19. The impacts of open-mouth breathing on upper airway space in obstructive sleep apnea: 3-D MDCT analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Joong; Choi, Ji Ho; Kim, Kang Woo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Hag; Lee, Heung Man; Shin, Chol; Lee, Ki Yeol; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2011-04-01

    Open-mouth breathing during sleep is a risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and is associated with increased disease severity and upper airway collapsibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of open-mouth breathing on the upper airway space in patients with OSA using three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3-D MDCT). The study design included a case-control study with planned data collection. The study was performed at a tertiary medical center. 3-D MDCT analysis was conducted on 52 patients with OSA under two experimental conditions: mouth closed and mouth open. Under these conditions, we measured the minimal cross-sectional area of the retropalatal and retroglossal regions (mXSA-RP, mXSA-RG), as well as the upper airway length (UAL), defined as the vertical dimension from hard palate to hyoid. We also computed the volume of the upper airway space by 3-D reconstruction of both conditions. When the mouth was open, mXSA-RP and mXSA-RG significantly decreased and the UAL significantly increased, irrespective of the severity of OSA. However, between the closed- and open-mouth states, there was no significant change in upper airway volume at any severity of OSA. Results suggest that the more elongated and narrow upper airway during open-mouth breathing may aggravate the collapsibility of the upper airway and, thus, negatively affect OSA severity.

  20. MDCT Anatomic Assessment of Right Inferior Phrenic Artery Origin Related to Potential Supply to Hepatocellular Carcinoma and its Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, Antonio Tsetis, Dimitrios; Montineri, Arturo; Puleo, Stefano; Massa Saluzzo, Cesare; Runza, Giuseppe; Coppolino, Francesco; Ettorre, Giovanni Carlo; Patti, Maria Teresa

    2008-03-15

    Purpose. To prospectively assess the anatomic variation of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) origin with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scans in relation to the technical and angiographic findings during transcatheter arterial embolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. Two hundred patients with hepatocellular carcinomas were examined with 16-section CT during the arterial phase. The anatomy of the inferior phrenic arteries was recorded, with particular reference to their origin. All patients with subcapsular HCC located at segments VII and VIII underwent arteriography of the RIPA with subsequent embolization if neoplastic supply was detected. Results. The RIPA origin was detected in all cases (sensitivity 100%), while the left inferior phrenic artery origin was detected in 187 cases (sensitivity 93.5%). RIPAs originated from the aorta (49%), celiac trunk (41%), right renal artery (5.5%), left gastric artery (4%), and proper hepatic artery (0.5%), with 13 types of combinations with the left IPA. Twenty-nine patients showed subcapsular HCCs in segments VII and VIII and all but one underwent RIPA selective angiography, followed by embolization in 7 cases. Conclusion. MDCT assesses well the anatomy of RIPAs, which is fundamental for planning subsequent cannulation and embolization of extrahepatic RIPA supply to HCC.

  1. Medial pathway patterns of the right retromesenteric plane: anatomical investigation using MDCT in patients with acute pancreatitis and pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Takaji, Ryo; Mori, Hiromu; Yamada, Yasunari; Kiyonaga, Maki; Matsumoto, Shunro

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the medial pathways of the right retromesenteric plane by reviewing multidetector CT (MDCT) findings in patients with acute pancreatitis and pyelonephritis. 112 patients with acute pancreatitis and 114 patients with pyelonephritis underwent MDCT scans. 64 of the 112 patients with acute pancreatitis and 34 of the 114 patients with pyelonephritis had right retromesenteric plane thickening because of inflammatory extensions. The medial pathways of the right retromesenteric plane were evaluated by two radiologists in consensus. In 18 (28%) of the 64 patients with acute pancreatitis and 10 (29%) of the 34 patients with pyelonephritis, the right retromesenteric plane continued to the central retroperitoneum behind the descending duodenum and pancreatic head (Type 1 pathway). The right retromesenteric plane extended to the right wall of the descending duodenum (Type 2 pathway) in 46 patients (72%) with acute pancreatitis and 24 patients (71%) with pyelonephritis. There was no significant difference in the pathway patterns of the right retromesenteric plane between the acute pancreatitis group and the pyelonephritis group (Type 1 pathway, p = 0.89; Type 2 pathway, p = 0.76). Two patterns were confirmed regarding the medial pathways of the right retromesenteric plane; this anatomical knowledge is important for evaluating the extension of retroperitoneal diseases. Medial aspect of the right retromesenteric plane is thought to have two pathways. The right retromesenteric plane continuing to the right duodenal wall is a common type. Knowledge of these variations is important when evaluating the retroperitoneal diseases.

  2. Medial pathway patterns of the right retromesenteric plane: anatomical investigation using MDCT in patients with acute pancreatitis and pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hiromu; Yamada, Yasunari; Kiyonaga, Maki; Matsumoto, Shunro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the medial pathways of the right retromesenteric plane by reviewing multidetector CT (MDCT) findings in patients with acute pancreatitis and pyelonephritis. Methods: 112 patients with acute pancreatitis and 114 patients with pyelonephritis underwent MDCT scans. 64 of the 112 patients with acute pancreatitis and 34 of the 114 patients with pyelonephritis had right retromesenteric plane thickening because of inflammatory extensions. The medial pathways of the right retromesenteric plane were evaluated by two radiologists in consensus. Results: In 18 (28%) of the 64 patients with acute pancreatitis and 10 (29%) of the 34 patients with pyelonephritis, the right retromesenteric plane continued to the central retroperitoneum behind the descending duodenum and pancreatic head (Type 1 pathway). The right retromesenteric plane extended to the right wall of the descending duodenum (Type 2 pathway) in 46 patients (72%) with acute pancreatitis and 24 patients (71%) with pyelonephritis. There was no significant difference in the pathway patterns of the right retromesenteric plane between the acute pancreatitis group and the pyelonephritis group (Type 1 pathway, p = 0.89; Type 2 pathway, p = 0.76). Conclusion: Two patterns were confirmed regarding the medial pathways of the right retromesenteric plane; this anatomical knowledge is important for evaluating the extension of retroperitoneal diseases. Advances in knowledge: Medial aspect of the right retromesenteric plane is thought to have two pathways. The right retromesenteric plane continuing to the right duodenal wall is a common type. Knowledge of these variations is important when evaluating the retroperitoneal diseases. PMID:26694254

  3. MDCT quantification is the dominant parameter in decision–making regarding chest tube drainage for stable patients with traumatic pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenli; Lee, June-Goo; Fikry, Karim; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Novelline, Robert; de Moya, Marc

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the size of a pneumothorax is an important determinant of treatment decision, in particular regarding whether chest tube drainage (CTD) is required. However, the volumetric quantification of pneumothoraces has not routinely been performed in clinics. In this paper, we introduced an automated computer-aided volumetry (CAV) scheme for quantification of volume of pneumothoraces in chest multi-detect CT (MDCT) images. Moreover, we investigated the impact of accurate volume of pneumothoraces in the improvement of the performance in decision-making regarding CTD in the management of traumatic pneumothoraces. For this purpose, an occurrence frequency map was calculated for quantitative analysis of the importance of each clinical parameter in the decision-making regarding CTD by a computer simulation of decision-making using a genetic algorithm (GA) and a support vector machine (SVM). A total of 14 clinical parameters, including volume of pneumothorax calculated by our CAV scheme, was collected as parameters available for decision-making. The results showed that volume was the dominant parameter in decision-making regarding CTD, with an occurrence frequency value of 1.00. The results also indicated that the inclusion of volume provided the best performance that was statistically significant compared to the other tests in which volume was excluded from the clinical parameters. This study provides the scientific evidence for the application of CAV scheme in MDCT volumetric quantification of pneumothoraces in the management of clinically stable chest trauma patients with traumatic pneumothorax. PMID:22560899

  4. Influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm in MDCT assessment of airway wall thickness: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Nagle, Scott K.; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong; Robinson, Terry E.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Wall thickness (WT) is an airway feature of great interest for the assessment of morphological changes in the lung parenchyma. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has recently been used to evaluate airway WT, but the potential risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis—particularly in younger patients—might limit a wider use of this imaging method in clinical practice. The recent commercial implementation of the statistical model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm, instead of the conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm, has enabled considerable radiation dose reduction in many other clinical applications of MDCT. The purpose of this work was to study the impact of radiation dose and MBIR in the MDCT assessment of airway WT. Methods: An airway phantom was scanned using a clinical MDCT system (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare) at 4 kV levels and 5 mAs levels. Both FBP and a commercial implementation of MBIR (Veo{sup TM}, GE Healthcare) were used to reconstruct CT images of the airways. For each kV–mAs combination and each reconstruction algorithm, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the airways was measured, and the WT of each airway was measured and compared with the nominal value; the relative bias and the angular standard deviation in the measured WT were calculated. For each airway and reconstruction algorithm, the overall performance of WT quantification across all of the 20 kV–mAs combinations was quantified by the sum of squares (SSQs) of the difference between the measured and nominal WT values. Finally, the particular kV–mAs combination and reconstruction algorithm that minimized radiation dose while still achieving a reference WT quantification accuracy level was chosen as the optimal acquisition and reconstruction settings. Results: The wall thicknesses of seven airways of different sizes were analyzed in the study. Compared with FBP, MBIR improved the CNR of the airways, particularly at low radiation dose

  5. Shading correction for on-board cone-beam CT in radiation therapy using planning MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianye; Sun, Mingshan; Star-Lack, Josh; Gao, Hewei; Fan, Qiyong; Zhu, Lei

    2010-10-01

    Applications of cone-beam CT (CBCT) to image-guided radiationtherapy (IGRT) are hampered by shading artifacts in the reconstructed images. These artifacts are mainly due to scatter contamination in the projections but also can result from uncorrected beam hardening effects as well as nonlinearities in responses of the amorphous silicon flat panel detectors. While currently, CBCT is mainly used to provide patient geometry information for treatment setup, more demanding applications requiring high-quality CBCT images are under investigation. To tackle these challenges, many CBCT correction algorithms have been proposed; yet, a standard approach still remains unclear. In this work, we propose a shading correction method for CBCT that addresses artifacts from low-frequency projection errors. The method is consistent with the current workflow of radiation therapy. With much smaller inherent scatter signals and more accurate detectors, diagnostic multidetector CT (MDCT) provides high quality CT images that are routinely used for radiation treatment planning. Using the MDCT image as "free" prior information, we first estimate the primary projections in the CBCT scan via forward projection of the spatially registered MDCT data. Since most of the CBCT shading artifacts stem from low-frequency errors in the projections such as scatter, these errors can be accurately estimated by low-pass filtering the difference between the estimated and raw CBCT projections. The error estimates are then subtracted from the raw CBCT projections. Our method is distinct from other published correction methods that use the MDCT image as a prior because it is projection-based and uses limited patient anatomical information from the MDCT image. The merit of CBCT-based treatment monitoring is therefore retained. The proposed method is evaluated using two phantom studies on tabletop systems. On the Catphan 600 phantom, our approach reduces the reconstruction error from 348 Hounsfield unit (HU

  6. Shading correction for on-board cone-beam CT in radiation therapy using planning MDCT images

    SciTech Connect

    Niu Tianye; Sun, Mingshan; Star-Lack, Josh; Gao Hewei; Fan Qiyong; Zhu Lei

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Applications of cone-beam CT (CBCT) to image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) are hampered by shading artifacts in the reconstructed images. These artifacts are mainly due to scatter contamination in the projections but also can result from uncorrected beam hardening effects as well as nonlinearities in responses of the amorphous silicon flat panel detectors. While currently, CBCT is mainly used to provide patient geometry information for treatment setup, more demanding applications requiring high-quality CBCT images are under investigation. To tackle these challenges, many CBCT correction algorithms have been proposed; yet, a standard approach still remains unclear. In this work, we propose a shading correction method for CBCT that addresses artifacts from low-frequency projection errors. The method is consistent with the current workflow of radiation therapy. Methods: With much smaller inherent scatter signals and more accurate detectors, diagnostic multidetector CT (MDCT) provides high quality CT images that are routinely used for radiation treatment planning. Using the MDCT image as ''free'' prior information, we first estimate the primary projections in the CBCT scan via forward projection of the spatially registered MDCT data. Since most of the CBCT shading artifacts stem from low-frequency errors in the projections such as scatter, these errors can be accurately estimated by low-pass filtering the difference between the estimated and raw CBCT projections. The error estimates are then subtracted from the raw CBCT projections. Our method is distinct from other published correction methods that use the MDCT image as a prior because it is projection-based and uses limited patient anatomical information from the MDCT image. The merit of CBCT-based treatment monitoring is therefore retained. Results: The proposed method is evaluated using two phantom studies on tabletop systems. On the Catphan(c)600 phantom, our approach reduces the reconstruction error

  7. Anomalous Origin of One Pulmonary Artery Branch From the Aorta: Role of MDCT Angiography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Jimei; Xie, Zhaofeng; Wang, Qiushi; Zhang, Xiaoshen; Liang, Changhong; Huang, Hongfei; Kwong, Raymond Y; Saboo, Sachin S

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, MDCT angiography (MDCTA) appearance, associated congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, and prognosis of anomalous origin of one pulmonary artery from the aorta (AOPA) on the basis of MDCTA. We conducted a retrospective search of patients with AOPA from our database in a single center, consisting of 5729 patients referred for MDCTA with known or suspected congenital heart diseases from transthoracic echocardiography. The clinical information, subtypes of AOPA, associated cardiovascular anomalies, and surgical and clinical outcomes were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The MDCTA images were retrospectively processed for analysis, and the MDCTA and echocardiography images were interpreted by radiologist and cardiologist without knowledge of the actual diagnosis or surgical outcome. AOPA was seen in 19 patients (14 males and five females; median age, 3 months; range, 4 days-21 years) showing a prevalence of 0.33%. Anomalous origin of the right pulmonary artery (AORPA, 89%), proximal origin subtype of the AOPA (89%), and ipsilateral aortic wall origin of AOPA (58%) were more commonly seen. In addition to the benefit of preoperative planning, MDCTA also supplemented echocardiography by providing accurate diagnosis of AOPA and other associated cardiovascular anomalies compared with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). We found a total of four patients (21%) with misdiagnosis by TTE, including three patients with underdiagnosis of AOPA and one patient with misdiagnosis as transposition of the great arteries. In addition, two other patients had AOPA diagnosed, but the associated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) was not detected. MDCTA revealed 95% association with other congenital cardiovascular anomalies, including PDA (71% of AORPA), and aortic arch anomalies (100% of anomalous origin of the left pulmonary artery, AOLPA). The types of surgery depended on the MDCTA findings, including the sub-type, origin

  8. Colorectal liver metastasis after 90Y radioembolization therapy: pilot study of change in MDCT attenuation as a surrogate marker for future FDG PET response.

    PubMed

    Tochetto, Sandra M; Töre, Hüseyin Gürkan; Chalian, Hamid; Yaghmai, Vahid

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether changes in attenuation and size of liver metastatic lesions of colorectal cancer at MDCT 1 month after (90)Y radioembolization treatment are predictive of response at FDG PET 3 months after treatment. Twenty patients with colorectal liver metastasis consecutively treated with (90)Y radioembolization underwent triphasic MDCT of the liver at baseline and 1 and 3 months after treatment and FDG PET at baseline and 3 months after treatment. Percentage change in tumor attenuation at MDCT (volumetric attenuation), tumor size at MDCT (according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST] and World health Organization [WHO] criteria), and volume-weighted maximum standardized uptake value at FDG PET were evaluated. The correlation between FDG PET response 3 months after treatment and response according to RECIST, WHO criteria, and attenuation 1 month after treatment was evaluated. Only 13.3% of patients with FDG PET findings of response 3 months after treatment were identified according to RECIST and WHO criteria 1 month after treatment. According to attenuation criteria at 1 month, however, 53.3% of patients with an FDG PET response at 3 months were identified. A strong association was found between FDG PET response at 3 months and response based on attenuation criteria (odds ratio, 12.4; 95% CI, 0.58-265.3; p = 0.05). Early changes in the attenuation of liver metastatic lesions of colon cancer after (90)Y radioembolization treatment may be predictive of future response at FDG PET.

  9. [Preoperative T stage of non-small cell lung cancer: comparison of the efficacy of 64-MDCT versus 3.0T MR imaging].

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Wu, Ning; Ouyang, Han; Huang, Yao; Liu, Li; Li, Meng; Zhou, Lina; Xu, Xiaojuan

    2015-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic efficacies of 64-MDCT and 3.0-T MRI in determining the T stage of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Approval from the institutional ethics committee and informed consent from patients were obtained before the study started. 40 patients with NSCLC proved by pathology were enrolled in the study. All the 40 patients underwent non-enhanced MRI, enhanced MRI, and enhanced MDCT. Their T stages were preliminarily evaluated according to these imaging manifestations by 3 groups of experienced chest radiologists respectively, and correlated with that of postoperative pathology using the Kappa test. The diagnostic efficacies of these three imaging modalities for determining the T stage of NSCLC were compared using the McNemar test. The preoperative diagnostic accuracy rate for the T stage of NSCLC was 85.0% (34 of 40) by non-enhanced MRI, 87.5% (35 of 40) by enhanced MRI, and 80.0% (32 of 40) by enhanced CT, showing no significant differences between the non-enhanced MRI and enhanced CT, enhanced MRI and enhanced CT, and non-enhanced MRI and enhanced MRI for determining the T stage of NSCLC (P>0.05). Compared with the enhanced MDCT, non-enhanced MRI and enhanced MRI provide slightly superior diagnostic efficacy for the preoperative T staging of NSCLC. For the patients with intolerance to contrast medium on MDCT scan, 3.0T MRI may be an alternative for determining the preoperative T stage of NSCLC.

  10. Abdominal rapid-kVp-switching dual-energy MDCT with reduced IV contrast compared to conventional MDCT with standard weight-based IV contrast: an intra-patient comparison.

    PubMed

    Clark, Zachary E; Bolus, David N; Little, Mark D; Morgan, Desiree E

    2015-04-01

    Perform intra-patient comparison of attenuation values on lower keV dual-energy abdominal CT images using reduced IV contrast dose compared to conventional single energy polychromatic beam abdominal MDCT images using standard IV contrast dose. IRB approved retrospective evaluation of consecutive adults who had both standard IV contrast dosage conventional multiphasic MDCT (SECT) and reduced IV contrast dosage rapid kV-switching dual-energy multiphasic MDCT (rsDECT) of the abdomen. Arterial phase dual-energy 52, 70 and 78 keV simulated monoenergetic HU were compared (t test) to arterial phase SECT HU for: aorta, liver, pancreas, psoas, and hepatic/pancreatic tumors. Contrast to noise ratios (CNR), IV contrast dose reduction and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded. Two blinded independent readers evaluated the CT datasets for subjective image quality based on a five point scale. Twenty-nine scan pairs in 24 subjects (13 M, mean age 64, weight 76.7 kg) were evaluated. Mean reduction in IV contrast dose was 37 %. Mean ± SD HU on 52 keV rsDECT vs. SECT were: aorta 534 ± 138 vs. 271 ± 69; liver 88 ± 24 vs. 67 ± 16; pancreas 140 ± 60 vs. 89 ± 40; psoas 63 ± 15 vs. 50 ± 12 (all p < 0.001). Noise was higher for 52 keV compared to SECT (p < 0.001); CNRs were not significantly different. Mean ± SD DLP for rsDECT was 1421 ± 563 and SECT 1335 ± 562 mGy·cm (p = 0.640). For tumor vs. nontumoral parenchyma, mean absolute contrast difference was 58.4 HU on 52 keV, and 29.0 HU on SECT. Nearly all images were rated as good or excellent and there were no statistically significant differences in image quality between the DECT and SECT images. Statistically significant gains in vascular and parenchymal enhancement without adverse effect on CNR or lesion contrast were observed in this intra-patient comparison using reduced IV contrast dose rsDECT compared to standard weight-based IV dose conventional SECT.

  11. High-pitch computed tomography of the lung in pediatric patients: an intraindividual comparison of image quality and radiation dose to conventional 64-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Tsiflikas, I; Thomas, C; Ketelsen, D; Seitz, G; Warmann, S; Claussen, C D; Schäfer, J F

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of typical artifacts in low-dose pediatric lung examinations using high-pitch computed tomography (HPCT) compared to MDCT, and to estimate the effective radiation dose (Eeff). Institutional review board approval for this retrospective study was obtained. 35 patients (17 boys, 18 girls; mean age 112 ± 69 months) were included and underwent MDCT and follow-up scan by HPCT or vice versa (mean follow-up time 87 days), using the same tube voltage and current. The total artifact score (0 - 8) was defined as the sum of artifacts arising from movement, breathing or pulsation of the heart or pulmonary vessels (0 - no; 1 - moderate; 2 - severe artifacts). Eeff was estimated according to the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Multislice Computed Tomography. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze differences between the patient groups. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used for correlation of ordinal variables. The scan time was significantly lower for HPCT compared to MDCT (0.72 ± 0.13 s vs. 3.65 ± 0.81s; p < 0.0001). In 28 of 35 (80 %) HPCT examinations no artifacts were visible, whereas in MDCT artifacts occurred in all examinations. The frequency of pulsation artifacts and breathing artifacts was higher in MDCT compared to HPCT (100 % vs. 17 % and 31 % vs. 6 %). The total artifact score significantly correlated with the patient's age in MDCT (r = - 0.42; p = 0.01), but not in HPCT (r = - 0.32; p = 0.07). The estimated Eeff was significantly lower in HPCT than in MDCT (1.29 ± 0.31 vs. 1.47 ± 0.37 mSv; p < 0.0001). Our study indicates that the use of HPCT has advantages for pediatric lung imaging with a reduction of breathing and pulsation artifacts. Moreover, the estimated Eeff was lower. In addition, examinations can be performed without sedation or breath-hold without losing image quality. • Fewer artifacts in pediatric

  12. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and chronic mass-forming pancreatitis: Differentiation with dual-energy MDCT in spectral imaging mode.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qihua; Zou, Xinnong; Zai, Xiaodong; Wu, Zhiyuan; Wu, Qingyang; Jiang, Xingyu; Chen, Hongwei; Miao, Fei

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the value of dual-energy MDCT in spectral imaging in the differential diagnosis of chronic mass-forming chronic pancreatitis (CMFP) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) during the arterial phase (AP) and the pancreatic parenchymal phase (PP). Thirty five consecutive patients with CMFP (n=15) or PDAC (n=20) underwent dual-energy MDCT in spectral imaging during AP and PP. Iodine concentrations were derived from iodine-based material-decomposition CT images and normalized to the iodine concentration in the aorta. The difference in iodine concentration between the AP and PP, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the slope K of the spectrum curve were calculated. Normalized iodine concentrations (NICs) in patients with CMFP differed significantly from those in patients with PDAC during two double phases (mean NIC, 0.26±0.04 mg/mL vs. 0.53±0.02 mg/mL, p=0.0001; 0.07±0.02 mg/mL vs. 0.28±0.04 mg/mL, p=0.0002, respectively). There were significant differences in the value of the slope K of the spectrum curve in two groups during AP and PP (K(CMFP)=3.27±0.70 vs. K(PDAC)=1.35±0.41, P=0.001, and K(CMFP)=3.70±0.17 vs. K(PDAC)=2.16±0.70, p=0.003, respectively). CNRs at low energy levels (40-70 keV) were higher than those at high energy levels (80-40 keV). Individual patient CNR-optimized energy level images and the NIC can be used to improve the sensitivity and the specificity for differentiating CMFP from PDAC by use of dual-energy MDCT in spectral imaging with fast tube voltage switching. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Pelvic ultrasound immediately following MDCT in female patients with abdominal/pelvic pain: is it always necessary?

    PubMed

    Yitta, Silaja; Mausner, Elizabeth V; Kim, Alice; Kim, Danny; Babb, James S; Hecht, Elizabeth M; Bennett, Genevieve L

    2011-10-01

    To determine the added value of reimaging the female pelvis with ultrasound (US) immediately following multidetector CT (MDCT) in the emergent setting. CT and US exams of 70 patients who underwent MDCT for evaluation of abdominal/pelvic pain followed by pelvic ultrasound within 48 h were retrospectively reviewed by three readers. Initially, only the CT images were reviewed followed by evaluation of CT images in conjunction with US images. Diagnostic confidence was recorded for each reading and an exact Wilcoxon signed rank test was performed to compare the two. Changes in diagnosis based on combined CT and US readings versus CT readings alone were identified. Confidence intervals (95%) were derived for the percentage of times US reimaging can be expected to lead to a change in diagnosis relative to the diagnosis based on CT interpretation alone. Ultrasound changed the diagnosis for the ovaries/adnexa 8.1% of the time (three reader average); the majority being cases of a suspected CT abnormality found to be normal on US. Ultrasound changed the diagnosis for the uterus 11.9% of the time (three reader average); the majority related to the endometrial canal. The 95% confidence intervals for the ovaries/adnexa and uterus were 5-12.5% and 8-17%, respectively. Ten cases of a normal CT were followed by a normal US with 100% agreement across all three readers. Experienced readers correctly diagnosed ruptured ovarian cysts and tubo-ovarian abscesses (TOA) based on CT alone with 100% agreement. US reimaging after MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis is not helpful: (1) following a normal CT of the pelvic organs or (2) when CT findings are diagnostic and/or characteristic of certain entities such as ruptured cysts and TOA. Reimaging with ultrasound is warranted for (1) less-experienced readers to improve diagnostic confidence or when CT findings are not definitive, (2) further evaluation of suspected endometrial abnormalities. A distinction should be made between the need for

  14. Aortic and hepatic contrast enhancement with abdominal 64-MDCT in pediatric patients: effect of body weight and iodine dose.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kyongtae T; Shah, Amisha J; Shang, Sherry S; Wang, Jin Hong; Chang, Samuel; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hildebolt, Charles F

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the effect of body weight and iodine dose on aortic and hepatic contrast enhancement in pediatric patients who underwent 64-MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis. Eighty-seven consecutive pediatric patients (50 boys and 37 girls; median age, 12.1 years; age range, 3.8-17.6 years) underwent standard abdominopelvic CT with a 64-MDCT scanner. Contrast medium (350 mg I/mL) was injected using a power injector at 2 mL/s followed by 15-20 mL of saline flush. According to our CT protocol, the volume of administered contrast medium was approximately 1.8 mL/kg of body weight, up to the maximum volume of 80 mL. CT scanning was initiated 60 seconds after the start of the contrast medium injection. CT attenuations of the aorta and liver were measured. For each patient, the injected contrast medium iodine mass per body weight index (g I/kg) (hereafter, iodine mass body index) was calculated. Linear regression analysis was performed between iodine mass body index and aortic and hepatic attenuations. A wide range of patient weights (19-82 kg; mean, 48.6 kg [95% CI, 45.3-51.9 kg]) and contrast volumes (30-80 mL; median, 80.0 mL) were observed. The median attenuations were 149.0 HU (141.0-160.0 HU) for the aorta and 113.5 HU (109.5-120.0 HU) for the liver. Moderately high correlations were observed between iodine mass body index and aortic (Spearman's rho [r(s)] = 0.60 [0.45-0.72]; p < 0.001) and hepatic (r(s) = 0.60 [0.42-0.70]; p < 0.001) attenuations. The regression formulae for aortic attenuation (58.4 + 176.3 x iodine mass body index [p < 0.001]) and hepatic attenuation (58.7 + 108.5 x iodine mass body index [p < 0.001]) indicate that 1.5 and 1.8 mL/kg (350 mg I/mL) of contrast media are required to achieve 116 and 127 HU, respectively, of contrast-enhanced attenuation in the liver. In our study, using abdominal 64-MDCT in pediatric patients, we found that approximately 1.5 mL/kg, or 0.525 g I/kg, yields 116 HU of hepatic

  15. 3-T direct MR arthrography of the wrist: value of finger trap distraction to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Milena; Marlois, Romain; Theumann, Nicolas; Bollmann, Christof; Wehrli, Laurent; Richarme, Delphine; Meuli, Reto; Becce, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    To determine the value of applying finger trap distraction during direct MR arthrography of the wrist to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears. Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively investigated by three-compartment wrist MR arthrography. Imaging was performed with 3-T scanners using a three-dimensional isotropic (0.4 mm) T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequence, with and without finger trap distraction (4 kg). In a blind and independent fashion, two musculoskeletal radiologists measured the width of the scapholunate (SL), lunotriquetral (LT) and ulna-TFC (UTFC) joint spaces. They evaluated the amount of contrast medium within these spaces using a four-point scale, and assessed SL, LT and TFCC tears, as well as the disruption of Gilula's carpal arcs. With finger trap distraction, both readers found a significant increase in width of the SL space (mean Δ = +0.1mm, p ≤ 0.040), and noticed more contrast medium therein (p ≤ 0.035). In contrast, the differences in width of the LT (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≥ 0.057) and UTFC (mean Δ = 0mm, p ≥ 0.728) spaces, as well as the amount of contrast material within these spaces were not statistically significant (p = 0.607 and ≥ 0.157, respectively). Both readers detected more SL (Δ = +1, p = 0.157) and LT (Δ = +2, p = 0.223) tears, although statistical significance was not reached, and Gilula's carpal arcs were more frequently disrupted during finger trap distraction (Δ = +5, p = 0.025). The application of finger trap distraction during direct wrist MR arthrography may enhance both detection and characterisation of SL and LT ligament tears by widening the SL space and increasing the amount of contrast within the SL and LT joint spaces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Lesions of the biceps pulley: diagnostic accuracy of MR arthrography of the shoulder and evaluation of previously described and new diagnostic signs.

    PubMed

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Waldt, Simone; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Jungmann, Pia M; Wolf, Petra; Stat, Dipl; Schröder, Michael; Rummeny, Ernst J; Imhoff, Andreas B; Woertler, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    To retrospectively determine the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the shoulder in the evaluation of lesions of the biceps pulley and to evaluate previously described and new diagnostic signs. Institutional review board approval was obtained; the requirement for informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 80 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.2 years; 53 male, 27 female) with arthroscopically proved intact or torn pulley systems were assessed for the presence of a pulley lesion by three radiologists who were blinded to arthroscopic results. Criteria evaluated were displacement of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) relative to the subscapularis tendon on oblique sagittal images (displacement sign), medial subluxation of the LHBT on transverse images, nonvisibility or discontinuity of the superior glenohumeral ligament (SGHL), presence of biceps tendinopathy, and rotator cuff tears adjacent to the rotator interval. There were 28 pulley lesions noted at arthroscopy. For observers 1, 2, and 3, respectively: MR arthrography showed a sensitivity of 89%, 86%, and 82% and a specificity of 96%, 98%, and 87% in the detection of pulley lesions. Nonvisibility or discontinuity of the SGHL was sensitive (79%, 89%, and 79%) and specific (83%, 79%, and 75%). With the displacement sign, sensitivity was 86%, 82%, and 75% and specificity was 96%, 98%, 90%. Tendinopathy of the LHBT on oblique sagittal images showed a sensitivity of 93%, 82%, 64%; specificity was 81%, 96%, and 85%. Subluxation of the LHBT was insensitive (36%, 50%, and 64%) but specific (100%, 98%, and 96%). MR arthrography is accurate in the detection of pulley lesions; the displacement sign, nonvisibility or discontinuity of the SGHL, and tendinopathy of the LHBT on oblique sagittal images are the most accurate criteria for the detection of pulley lesions.

  17. Correlating MDCT Liver Injury Grade and Clinical Outcome in Patients Without Significant Extra-hepatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravi; Kumar, Atin; Baliyan, Vinit; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Subodh; Misra, M C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to correlate multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) grading with clinical severity and outcome in liver trauma patients without significant extrahepatic injury. Over a period of 2 years (2011-2013), all patients showing evidence of liver injury on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) abdomen and without significant extrahepatic trauma were prospectively included in the study. Correlation between the CT injury grade and outcome in terms of mortality, duration of ICU/hospital stay, fluid and blood requirements, need for intervention and complications were assessed. The significance of the difference in mortality, duration of ICU/hospital stay, fluid requirement and blood requirements among the patients with various injury grades was assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test. The significance of the difference in need for intervention and complications among the patients with various injury grades was assessed by Fisher's exact test. A total of 198 patients were found to have evidence of hepatic injury on CECT. Out of 198 patients, 117 had insignificant extrahepatic trauma. The overall mean age for these 117 patients was 25.74 ± 15.53 (age range 2-84 years). Death rates according to AAST grades were 0 % in grades II and III, 6.89 % in grade IV and 9.09 % in grade V (p = 0.053). The mean ICU and total hospital stay for grade II was 1.32 and 5.91 days, for grade III was 1.76 and 8.48, for grade IV was 2.86 and 10.31 days and for grade V was 6.54 and 12 days, respectively (p = 0.0001 for ICU, p = 0.0003 for total stay). Mean input and fluid deficit according to various grades were 8634/2607 ml for grade II, 9535/2555 ml for grade III, 15,549/6242 ml for grade IV and 19,958/8280 ml for grade V (p value input-0.0016, output-input (fluid deficit)-0.0001). Average unit of RBC and sum of the blood products transfused were 1.73 and 2.26 for grade II, 2.18 and 2.72 for grade III, 3.03 and 6.27 for grade IV, 6.85 and 38.12 for grade V

  18. Impaired ossification coupled with accelerated cartilage degeneration in developmental dysplasia of the hip: evidences from μCT arthrography in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ming; Liu, Jin; Huang, Guangxin; Huang, Zhiyu; Zhang, Zhiqi; Wu, Peihui; Wang, Bingjun; Yang, Zibo; Liao, Weiming

    2014-10-08

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) always leads to cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis of the hip joint. However, the diagnosis of early cartilage degeneration in DDH is still a clinical challenge. This study aims to investigate the dynamic changes of bone and cartilage in the hip of a rat model of DDH and to explore the potential application of microcomputed tomography (μCT) arthrography to detect early cartilage degeneration in DDH. Newborn Wistar rats were used to induce DDH by hindlimb swaddling. The bone and cartilage of the hip in model and control group were analyzed by μCT arthrography and histology examination at postnatal day 10, week 4, 6 and 8. Hip dysplasia developed with age, became obvious at postnatal week 6 and further progressed at week 8. μCT analysis showed that bone mineral density (BMD) and bone volume density (bone volume over total volume, BV/TV) of the femoral head and neck region (FHNR) in model group were both significantly lower than those in control group, and they increased dramatically from postnatal week 4 to week 6 but maintained at a similar level at week 8. Contrast-enhanced μCT (CE-μCT) arthrography and histology data showed age-dependent increase in cartilage attenuation (CA) and decrease in safranin O staining intensity (SI) in model group, respectively. Moreover, the model group revealed remarkably higher CA and lower SI than control group, respectively. In addition, significant changes of CA and SI were both observed from postnatal week 6 to week 8 in model group. A strong linear correlation (r2=0.789, P <0.001) was found between CA and SI in model group. Furthermore, BMD was negatively correlated with SI (t=-2.683, P <0.05), whereas specific bone surface (bone surface over bone volume, BS/BV) was positively correlated with SI (t =4.501, P <0.01), in model group. Impaired ossification coupled with continuous loss of sGAG in cartilage matrix was found in the dysplasia hip during the disease progression of DDH

  19. 3-T contrast-enhanced MR angiography in evaluation of suspected intracranial aneurysm: comparison with MDCT angiography.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Villablanca, J Pablo; Mossaz, Léonard; Pope, Whitney; Juncosa, Alex; Laub, Gerhard; Finn, J Paul

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate a high-spatial-resolution contrast-enhanced 3-T MR angiography protocol for detection and characterization of intracranial aneurysms and to compare the results with those of MDCT angiography. Forty-one patients with suspected intracranial aneurysm underwent high-spatial-resolution 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography and CT angiography (CTA). With a generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition algorithm with an acceleration factor of 4 at 3 T, contrast-enhanced MR angiographic images were acquired over 20 seconds with a spatial-resolution of 0.7 x 0.7 x 0.8 mm. CTA images were acquired with a spatial resolution of 0.35 x 0.35 x 0.8 mm on a 16-MDCT scanner in 17 seconds. The images from the two studies were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists for image quality, presence of aneurysm, and characterization of aneurysm. The dimensions of the aneurysm were measured independently with both techniques. A total of 25 aneurysms were identified with both contrast-enhanced MR angiography and CTA. A comparative analysis of detection and depiction of aneurysms showed excellent interobserver agreement for both contrast-enhanced MR angiography (kappa = 0.81) and CTA (kappa = 0.91) images. There was significant correlation between the techniques for both qualitative assessment of aneurysm depiction (rho = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.88-0.95) and quantitative dimensional measurement of aneurysm size (r = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.97). Contrast-enhanced MR angiography at 3 T is reliable for evaluation and characterization of intracranial aneurysms. The results are comparable with those of MDCTA.

  20. Interobserver agreement for detection of malignant features of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas on MDCT.

    PubMed

    Do, Richard K G; Katz, Seth S; Gollub, Marc J; Li, Jian; LaFemina, Jennifer; Zabor, Emily C; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Klimstra, David S; Allen, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to measure interobserver agreement in the assessment of malignant imaging features of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) on MDCT. Pancreatic protocol CT studies were reviewed for 84 patients with resected IPMNs. Maximal diameter of the dominant cyst, presence of a mural nodule, presence of a solid component, and diameters of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) and common bile duct (CBD) were measured by four radiologists independently. In each patient, the IPMN was classified into one of three types: main duct, branch duct, or mixed IPMN. Interobserver agreement of lesion features was examined using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for continuous features and Fleiss kappa for categorical features. The final dataset included 55 branch duct IPMNs, nine main duct IPMNs, and 20 mixed IPMNs. Moderate agreement (ĸ = 0.458; 95% CI, 0.345-0.564) was observed in assigning branch duct, main duct, or mixed IPMN subtypes. Measurement agreement was substantial to excellent for dominant cyst (ICC = 0.852; 95% CI, 0.777-0.907), MPD (0.753, 0.655-0.837), and CBD (0.608, 0.463-0.724) but only fair to moderate for the detection of the presence of mural nodule (ĸ = 0.284, 0.125-0.432) or solid component (ĸ = 0.405, 0211-0.577). Substantial to excellent interobserver agreement in the measurement of cyst diameter, MPD, and CBD support their use for characterizing malignant features of IPMN on MDCT. However, the subjective interpretation of the presence of solid components and mural nodules by individual radiologists was more variable.

  1. MDCT quantification is the dominant parameter in decision-making regarding chest tube drainage for stable patients with traumatic pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenli; Lee, June-Goo; Fikry, Karim; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Novelline, Robert; de Moya, Marc

    2012-07-01

    It is commonly believed that the size of a pneumothorax is an important determinant of treatment decision, in particular regarding whether chest tube drainage (CTD) is required. However, the volumetric quantification of pneumothoraces has not routinely been performed in clinics. In this paper, we introduced an automated computer-aided volumetry (CAV) scheme for quantification of volume of pneumothoraces in chest multi-detect CT (MDCT) images. Moreover, we investigated the impact of accurate volume of pneumothoraces in the improvement of the performance in decision-making regarding CTD in the management of traumatic pneumothoraces. For this purpose, an occurrence frequency map was calculated for quantitative analysis of the importance of each clinical parameter in the decision-making regarding CTD by a computer simulation of decision-making using a genetic algorithm (GA) and a support vector machine (SVM). A total of 14 clinical parameters, including volume of pneumothorax calculated by our CAV scheme, was collected as parameters available for decision-making. The results showed that volume was the dominant parameter in decision-making regarding CTD, with an occurrence frequency value of 1.00. The results also indicated that the inclusion of volume provided the best performance that was statistically significant compared to the other tests in which volume was excluded from the clinical parameters. This study provides the scientific evidence for the application of CAV scheme in MDCT volumetric quantification of pneumothoraces in the management of clinically stable chest trauma patients with traumatic pneumothorax. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of computing parameters and measurement locations on the estimation of 3D NPS in non-stationary MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Miéville, Frédéric A; Bolard, Gregory; Bulling, Shelley; Gudinchet, François; Bochud, François O; Verdun, François R

    2013-11-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of computing parameters and the location of volumes of interest (VOI) on the calculation of 3D noise power spectrum (NPS) in order to determine an optimal set of computing parameters and propose a robust method for evaluating the noise properties of imaging systems. Noise stationarity in noise volumes acquired with a water phantom on a 128-MDCT and a 320-MDCT scanner were analyzed in the spatial domain in order to define locally stationary VOIs. The influence of the computing parameters in the 3D NPS measurement: the sampling distances bx,y,z and the VOI lengths Lx,y,z, the number of VOIs NVOI and the structured noise were investigated to minimize measurement errors. The effect of the VOI locations on the NPS was also investigated. Results showed that the noise (standard deviation) varies more in the r-direction (phantom radius) than z-direction plane. A 25 × 25 × 40 mm(3) VOI associated with DFOV = 200 mm (Lx,y,z = 64, bx,y = 0.391 mm with 512 × 512 matrix) and a first-order detrending method to reduce structured noise led to an accurate NPS estimation. NPS estimated from off centered small VOIs had a directional dependency contrary to NPS obtained from large VOIs located in the center of the volume or from small VOIs located on a concentric circle. This showed that the VOI size and location play a major role in the determination of NPS when images are not stationary. This study emphasizes the need for consistent measurement methods to assess and compare image quality in CT.

  3. Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Arthrography of the Shoulder Joint Using Virtual Monochromatic Spectral Imaging: Optimal Dose of Contrast Agent and Monochromatic Energy Level

    PubMed Central

    An, Chansik; Chun, Yong-Min; Kim, Sungjun; Lee, Young Han; Yun, Min Jeong; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-01-01

    Objective To optimize the dose of contrast agent and the level of energy for dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) arthrography of the shoulder joint and to evaluate the benefits of the optimized imaging protocol. Materials and Methods Dual-energy scans with monochromatic spectral imaging mode and conventional single energy scans were performed on a shoulder phantom with 10 concentrations from 0 to 210 mg/mL of iodinated contrast medium at intervals of 15 or 30 mg/mL. Image noise, tissue contrast, and beam hardening artifacts were assessed to determine the optimum dose of contrast agent and the level of monochromatic energy for DECT shoulder arthrography in terms of the lowest image noise and the least beam hardening artifacts while good tissue contrast was maintained. Material decomposition (MD) imaging for bone-iodine differentiation was qualitatively assessed. The optimized protocol was applied and evaluated in 23 patients. Results The optimal contrast dose and energy level were determined by the phantom study at 60 mg/mL and 72 keV, respectively. This optimized protocol for human study reduced the image noise and the beam-hardening artifacts by 35.9% and 44.5%, respectively. Bone-iodine differentiation by MD imaging was not affected by the iodine concentration or level of energy. Conclusion Dual-energy scan with monochromatic spectral imaging mode results in reduced image noise and beam hardening artifacts. PMID:25469086

  4. COMPARISON BETWEEN COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ARTHROGRAPHY, RADIOGRAPHY, ULTRASONOGRAPHY, AND ARTHROSCOPY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF FEMOROTIBIAL JOINT DISEASE IN WESTERN PERFORMANCE HORSES.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Brad B; Kawcak, Chris E; Goodrich, Laurie R; Werpy, Natasha M; Valdés-Martínez, Alejandro; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2016-07-01

    The femorotibial joints are a common source of lameness in Western performance horses. The objective of this prospective study was to compare the radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomographic arthrography (CTA), and arthroscopy findings in horses with lameness localized to the femorotibial joints. Twenty-five stifles in 24 horses were included and were evaluated with all four of these diagnostic methods. Defects detected in femorotibial joint structures were compared between diagnostic methods using a McNemar's test to evaluate for disagreement. Cranial medial meniscotibial desmopathy was most detected on arthroscopy (in 14/25 cases) and was only detected on ultrasonography in three out of 11 (27.3%) arthroscopically observed cases, but was detected on CTA in nine out of 12 (75%) arthroscopically observed cases. Medial meniscal injury located on the craniolateral border was most detected on arthroscopy (n = 9) and was detected on CTA in five cases, but on ultrasonography in 0 cases. Detection of articular cartilage defects on the medial femoral condyle was most detected with arthroscopy (24/25, 96% cases) and was also detected on CTA in 12/20 (60%) cases with a significant disagreement identified between modalities (P = 0.02). Cranial and caudal cruciate ligament defects were detected on CTA in 6/22 (27.3%) and 7/19 (36.8%) cases, respectively, and with arthroscopy in 3/25 (12%) and 2/25 (8%) cases, respectively. The use of CTA detected more defects in the cruciate ligaments, proximal tibia, and ligament entheses than the other diagnostic methods, but was not reliable for detection of articular cartilage damage on the medial femoral condyle. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  5. Incidence of greater trochanteric pain syndrome in patients suspected for femoroacetabular impingement evaluated using magnetic resonance arthrography of the hip.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Grazia; Lanza, Ezio; Parra, Cleber Garcia; Merli, Ilaria; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Zerbi, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the incidence of greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS) in patients who underwent magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the hip for a suspected femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome. Hip MRA performed at our institution (3/2012-1/2014) were reviewed. The absence/presence of FAI (cam, pincer, and mixed) was noted. GTPS diagnosis was based on gluteus medius/minimus tendinopathy/tears, trochanteric bursitis, fascia lata thickening, and trochanter bone oedema/erosion. Subgroup analysis for age (under/over 40 years) and FAI type (cam, pincer, and mixed) was also performed. N = 189 patients were included (n = 125 males; age 39 ± 12 years). FAI was diagnosed in n = 133 (70, 4%): cam type, n = 85 (63, 9%); pincer type, n = 22 (16, 6%); and mixed type, n = 26 (19, 5%). N = 72 patients (38.1%) had tendinopathy, n = 14 (7.4%) had trochanter erosion, n = 31 (16.4%) had bursitis, n = 4 had bone oedema (2.1%), and n = 3 (1.6%) had fascia lata thickening, resulting in GTPS diagnosis in n = 74 patients (39.2%). The association of normal hip morphology/GTPS was significantly higher (P = 0.023) than that of FAI/GTPS. Under 40 years, GTPS incidence was higher in patients with normal hip and pincer-type FAI (P = 0.028). Over 40 years, no difference between patients with/without FAI (P = 0.119) was seen. GTPS was more frequently observed in patients with normal hip morphology than in patients with FAI, particularly in patients under 40.

  6. Computed tomography arthrography with traction in the human hip for three-dimensional reconstruction of cartilage and the acetabular labrum

    PubMed Central

    Henak, C.R.; Abraham, C.L.; Peters, C.L.; Sanders, R.K.; Weiss, J.A.; Anderson, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    AIM To develop and demonstrate the efficacy of a computed tomography arthrography (CTA) protocol for the hip that enables accurate three-dimensional reconstructions of cartilage and excellent visualization of the acetabular labrum. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety-three subjects were imaged (104 scans); 68 subjects with abnormal anatomy, 11 patients after periacetabular osteotomy surgery, and 25 subjects with normal anatomy. Fifteen to 25 ml of contrast agent diluted with lidocaine was injected using a lateral oblique approach. A Hare traction splint applied traction during CT. The association between traction force and intra-articular joint space was assessed qualitatively under fluoroscopy. Cartilage geometry was reconstructed from the CTA images for 30 subjects; the maximum joint space under traction was measured. RESULTS Using the Hare traction splint, the intra-articular space and boundaries of cartilage could be clearly delineated throughout the joint; the acetabular labrum was also visible. Dysplastic hips required less traction (~5 kg) than normal and retroverted hips required (>10 kg) to separate the cartilage. An increase in traction force produced a corresponding widening of the intra-articular joint space. Under traction, the maximum width of the intra-articular joint space during CT ranged from 0.98–6.7 mm (2.46 ± 1.16 mm). CONCLUSIONS When applied to subjects with normal and abnormal hip anatomy, the CTA protocol presented yields clear delineation of the cartilage and the acetabular labrum. Use of a Hare traction splint provides a simple, cost-effective method to widen the intra-articular joint space during CT, and provides flexibility to vary the traction as required. PMID:25070373

  7. Radiological surveillance of formerly asbestos-exposed power industry workers: rates and risk factors of benign changes on chest X-ray and MDCT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of asbestos-related changes on chest X-ray (CXR) and low-dose multidetector-row CT (MDCT) of the thorax in a cohort of formerly asbestos-exposed power industry workers and to assess the importance of common risk factors associated with specific radiological changes. Methods To assess the influence of selected risk factors (age, time since first exposure, exposure duration, cumulative exposure and pack years) on typical asbestos-related radiographic changes, we employed multiple logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results On CXR, pleural changes and asbestosis were strongly associated with age, years since first exposure and exposure duration. The MDCT results showed an association between asbestosis and age and between plaques and exposure duration, years since first exposure and cumulative exposure. Parenchymal changes on CXR and MDCT, and diffuse pleural thickening on CXR were both associated with smoking. Using a cut-off of 55 years for age, 17 years for exposure duration and 28 years for latency, benign radiological changes in the cohort with CXR could be predicted with a sensitivity of 82.0% for all of the three variables and a specificity of 47.4%, 39.0% and 40.6%, respectively. Conclusions Participants aged 55 years and older and those with an asbestos exposure of at least 17 years or 28 years since first exposure should be seen as having an increased risk of abnormal radiological findings. For implementing a more focused approach the routine use of low-dose MDCT rather than CXR at least for initial examinations would be justified. PMID:24808921

  8. Characterization of atypical cystic renal masses with MDCT: comparison of 5-mm axial images and thin multiplanar reconstructed images.

    PubMed

    Bertolotto, Michele; Zappetti, Roberta; Cavallaro, Marco; Perrone, Rosaria; Perretti, Leonardo; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cystic renal masses are better characterized on thin axial and multiplanar reconstructed MDCT images than on 5-mm images. The records of 70 complex cystic renal masses in 59 patients (45 men, 14 women; mean age, 68 +/- 13 years) who underwent 64-MDCT at two medical centers were studied. Twenty-three of the masses were confirmed on the basis of the histologic findings and 47 in 2-4 years of follow-up. Images were reviewed in two sessions by two radiologists with 12 and 2 years of experience. In the first session, 5-mm axial images were analyzed, and in the second, thin axial images and multiplanar reconstructions. To assess intraobserver variability, analysis was repeated after 1 month. Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon's signed rank test, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and weighted kappa statistics. Radiologists 1 and 2 detected thicker cystic walls (p < 0.001, p < 0.005) and septa (p < 0.03, p < 0.05) and fewer septa (p < 0.005, p < 0.002) on 5-mm axial images and assigned significantly different Bosniak categories than they did in analysis of the volume data (p < 0.04, p < 0.05). Variability was reduced in thin axial and multiplanar views. No significant differences were found in characterization of lesions as benign or malignant in review of 5-mm axial images and volume data sets. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.89 for 5-mm images and 0.96 for volume data sets for radiologist 1 and 0.87 and 0.90 for radiologist 2. Analysis of volume data sets is associated with less intraobserver and interobserver variability than review of 5-mm axial images. Wall thickness and the number and thickness of septa may differ, resulting in assignment of different Bosniak categories. Diagnostic performance in characterizing lesions as benign or malignant, however, is not statistically different for the thick and thin images.

  9. Systems for Lung Volume Standardization during Static and Dynamic MDCT-based Quantitative Assessment of Pulmonary Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuld, Matthew K.; Grout, Randall; Guo, Junfeng; Morgan, John H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Multidetector-row Computed Tomography (MDCT) has emerged as a tool for quantitative assessment of parenchymal destruction, air trapping (density metrics) and airway remodeling (metrics relating airway wall and lumen geometry) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Critical to the accuracy and interpretability of these MDCT-derived metrics is the assurance that the lungs are scanned during a breath-hold at a standardized volume. Materials and Methods A computer monitored turbine-based flow meter system was developed to control patient breath-holds and facilitate static imaging at fixed percentages of the vital capacity. Due to calibration challenges with gas density changes during multi-breath xenon-CT an alternative system was required. The design incorporated dual rolling seal pistons. Both systems were tested in a laboratory environment and human subject trials. Results The turbine-based system successfully controlled lung volumes in 32/37 subjects, having a linear relationship for CT measured air volume between repeated scans: for all scans, the mean and confidence interval of the differences (scan1-scan2) was −9 ml (−169, 151); for TLC alone 6 ml (−164, 177); for FRC alone, −23 ml (−172, 126). The dual-piston system successfully controlled lung volume in 31/41 subjects. Study failures related largely to subject non-compliance with verbal instruction and gas leaks around the mouthpiece. Conclusion We demonstrate the successful use of a turbine-based system for static lung volume control and demonstrate its inadequacies for dynamic xenon-CT studies. Implementation of a dual-rolling seal spirometer has been shown to adequately control lung volume for multi-breath wash-in xenon-CT studies. These systems coupled with proper patient coaching provide the tools for the use of CT to quantitate regional lung structure and function. The wash-in xenon-CT method for assessing regional lung function, while not

  10. Value of computed tomography arthrography with delayed acquisitions in the work-up of ganglion cysts of the tarsal tunnel: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Omoumi, Patrick; de Gheldere, Antoine; Leemrijse, Thibaut; Galant, Christine; Van den Bergh, Peter; Malghem, Jacques; Simoni, Paolo; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Lecouvet, Frédéric E

    2010-04-01

    Ganglion cysts are a common cause of tarsal tunnel syndrome. As in other locations, these cysts are believed to communicate with neighboring joints. The positive diagnosis and preoperative work-up of these cysts require identification and location of the cyst pedicles so that they may be excised and the risk of recurrence decreased. This can be challenging with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We present three cases of symptomatic ganglion cysts of the tarsal tunnel, diagnosed by MR imaging, where computed tomography (CT) arthrography with delayed acquisitions helped to confirm the diagnosis and identify precisely the topography of the communication with the subtalar joint. These cases provide new evidence of the articular origin of ganglion cysts developing in the tarsal tunnel.

  11. Transverse thickening along the articular surface of the rotator cuff consistent with the rotator cable: identification with MR arthrography and relevance in rotator cuff evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sheah, Kenneth; Bredella, Miriam A; Warner, Jon J P; Halpern, Elkan F; Palmer, William E

    2009-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe the imaging appearance of transverse thickening along the articular surface of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons presumed to represent the rotator cable on MR arthrographic images obtained with the shoulder in abduction and external rotation (ABER) and in the non-ABER position and to assess the role of the rotator cable in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. The study group comprised 54 patients who underwent arthroscopy of the shoulder and preoperative MR arthrography in which ABER images were obtained. Two blinded reviewers independently examined the ABER and non-ABER images for the presence of the rotator cable and rotator cuff tears. In intact rotator cuffs, the presumed rotator cable was not well visualized on non-ABER images. In one case of prominent rotator cable, MR arthrography showed no tear on non-ABER images, but at arthroscopy, a partial-thickness undersurface tear was found. On non-ABER images, both readers readily visualized the rotator cable in eight and 10 of 18 cases (44% and 56%) of partial-thickness undersurface tear and four of five cases (80%) of full-thickness tear. On ABER images, both readers readily visualized the rotator cable in 15 and 17 of 31 cases (48% and 55%) of intact cuff, 14 and 15 of 18 cases (78% and 83%) of undersurface tear, and four and five cases (80% and 100%) of full-thickness tear. Interobserver agreement on cable visualization was almost perfect (kappa = 0.86). On non-ABER MR arthrographic images, thickening along the articular side of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons presumed to represent the rotator cable suggests the presence of a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear. On ABER images, the cable is well defined in intact and torn rotator cuffs.

  12. Contribution of MRI and CT arthrography to the diagnosis of intra-articular tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps.

    PubMed

    Nourissat, G; Tribot-Laspiere, Q; Aim, F; Radier, C

    2014-12-01

    Clinical diagnosis of biceps tendinopathy is difficult to make because of the poor sensitivity of existing clinical tests. The goal of this study was to determine whether MRI or CT arthrogram could contribute to the diagnosis of tendinopathy in the intra-articular portion of the long head of biceps (LHB), while using macroscopic findings during shoulder arthroscopy as a reference. A prospective, single-centre study was performed over a 4-month period. The radiology part of the study was carried out by a radiologist experienced in shoulder imaging. The arthroscopy part of the study was conducted while the biceps was being evaluated for treatment purposes. The study included 87 patients having an average age of 45.7 years (range 17-78). Fifty-eight patients underwent CT arthrography and 38 underwent an MRI. Seven patients underwent both imaging exams. One patient was removed from the study because of a spontaneous LHB rupture. The demographics of the two study populations were equivalent. For the diagnosis of tendinopathy of the intra-articular portion of the long head of biceps, the CT arthrogram had a sensitivity of 71.43%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% but a negative predictive value of 67.74%. For the diagnosis of tendinopathy of the intra-articular portion of the long head of biceps, the MRI had a sensitivity of 42.85%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 50% but a negative predictive value of 69.23%. This study showed that radiological diagnosis of tendinopathy of the long head of biceps remains challenging. Nevertheless, CT arthrography is more sensitive and specific than MRI in identifying this disorder. III (case-control study). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of Contrast Media on Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Measurements from Routine Contrast-Enhanced MDCT Datasets using a Phantom-less BMD Measurement Tool.

    PubMed

    Toelly, Andrea; Bardach, Constanze; Weber, Michael; Gong, Rui; Lai, Yanbo; Wang, Pei; Guo, Yulin; Kirschke, Jan; Baum, Thomas; Gruber, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Aim To evaluate the differences in phantom-less bone mineral density (BMD) measurements in contrast-enhanced routine MDCT scans at different contrast phases, and to develop an algorithm for calculating a reliable BMD value. Materials and Methods 112 postmenopausal women from the age of 40 to 77 years (mean age: 57.31 years; SD 9.61) who underwent a clinically indicated MDCT scan, consisting of an unenhanced, an arterial, and a venous phase, were included. A retrospective analysis of the BMD values of the Th12 to L4 vertebrae in each phase was performed using a commercially available phantom-less measurement tool. Results The mean BMD value in the unenhanced MDCT scans was 79.76 mg/cm³ (SD 31.20), in the arterial phase it was 85.09 mg/cm³ (SD 31.61), and in the venous phase it was 86.18 mg/cm³ (SD 31.30). A significant difference (p < 0.001) was found between BMD values on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MDCT scans. There was no significant difference between BMD values in the arterial and venous phases (p = 0.228). The following conversion formulas were calculated using linear regression: unenhanced BMD = -2.287 + 0.964 * [arterial BMD value] and -4.517 + 0.978 * [venous BMD value]. The intrarater agreement of BMD measurements was calculated with an intraclass correlation (ICC) of 0.984 and the interobserver reliability was calculated with an ICC of 0.991. Conclusion Phantom-less BMD measurements in contrast-enhanced MDCT scans result in increased mean BMD values, but, with the formulas applied in our study, a reliable BMD value can be calculated. However, the mean BMD values did not differ significantly between the arterial and venous phases. Key points  · BMD can be assessed on routine CT scans using a phantom-less tool.. · i. v. contrast agent significantly elevates BMD values measured on routine CT scans.. · BMD values measured in the arterial and venous phase did not differ significantly.. · Conversion formulas

  14. Impact of bowtie filter and object position on the two-dimensional noise power spectrum of a clinical MDCT system

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Cruz-Bastida, Juan Pablo; Li, Ke; Budde, Adam; Hsieh, Jiang; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Noise characteristics of clinical multidetector CT (MDCT) systems can be quantified by the noise power spectrum (NPS). Although the NPS of CT has been extensively studied in the past few decades, the joint impact of the bowtie filter and object position on the NPS has not been systematically investigated. This work studies the interplay of these two factors on the two dimensional (2D) local NPS of a clinical CT system that uses the filtered backprojection algorithm for image reconstruction. Methods: A generalized NPS model was developed to account for the impact of the bowtie filter and image object location in the scan field-of-view (SFOV). For a given bowtie filter, image object, and its location in the SFOV, the shape and rotational symmetries of the 2D local NPS were directly computed from the NPS model without going through the image reconstruction process. The obtained NPS was then compared with the measured NPSs from the reconstructed noise-only CT images in both numerical phantom simulation studies and experimental phantom studies using a clinical MDCT scanner. The shape and the associated symmetry of the 2D NPS were classified by borrowing the well-known atomic spectral symbols s, p, and d, which correspond to circular, dumbbell, and cloverleaf symmetries, respectively, of the wave function of electrons in an atom. Finally, simulated bar patterns were embedded into experimentally acquired noise backgrounds to demonstrate the impact of different NPS symmetries on the visual perception of the object. Results: (1) For a central region in a centered cylindrical object, an s-wave symmetry was always present in the NPS, no matter whether the bowtie filter was present or not. In contrast, for a peripheral region in a centered object, the symmetry of its NPS was highly dependent on the bowtie filter, and both p-wave symmetry and d-wave symmetry were observed in the NPS. (2) For a centered region-ofinterest (ROI) in an off-centered object, the symmetry of

  15. Development of a voxel-matching technique for substantial reduction of subtraction artifacts in temporal subtraction images obtained from thoracic MDCT.

    PubMed

    Itai, Yoshinori; Kim, Hyoungseop; Ishikawa, Seiji; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Doi, Kunio

    2010-02-01

    A temporal subtraction image, which is obtained by subtraction of a previous image from a current one, can be used for enhancing interval changes (such as formation of new lesions and changes in existing abnormalities) on medical images by removing most of the normal structures. However, subtraction artifacts are commonly included in temporal subtraction images obtained from thoracic computed tomography and thus tend to reduce its effectiveness in the detection of pulmonary nodules. In this study, we developed a new method for substantially removing the artifacts on temporal subtraction images of lungs obtained from multiple-detector computed tomography (MDCT) by using a voxel-matching technique. Our new method was examined on 20 clinical cases with MDCT images. With this technique, the voxel value in a warped (or nonwarped) previous image is replaced by a voxel value within a kernel, such as a small cube centered at a given location, which would be closest (identical or nearly equal) to the voxel value in the corresponding location in the current image. With the voxel-matching technique, the correspondence not only between the structures but also between the voxel values in the current and the previous images is determined. To evaluate the usefulness of the voxel-matching technique for removal of subtraction artifacts, the magnitude of artifacts remaining in the temporal subtraction images was examined by use of the full width at half maximum and the sum of a histogram of voxel values, which may indicate the average contrast and the total amount, respectively, of subtraction artifacts. With our new method, subtraction artifacts due to normal structures such as blood vessels were substantially removed on temporal subtraction images. This computerized method can enhance lung nodules on chest MDCT images without disturbing misregistration artifacts.

  16. Variability in brain treatment during mummification of royal Egyptians dated to the 18th-20th dynasties: MDCT findings correlated with the archaeologic literature.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Sahar N; Hawass, Zahi

    2013-04-01

    The objective of our study was to use MDCT to study brain treatment and removal (excerebration) as part of mummification of royal Egyptian mummies dated to the 18th to early 20th Dynasties and to correlate the imaging findings with the archaeologic literature. As part of an MDCT study of the Royal Ancient Egyptian Mummies Project, we analyzed CT images of the heads of 12 mummies dated to circa 1493-1156 BC (18th to early 20th Dynasties). We reconstructed and analyzed CT images for the presence of cranial defects, brain remnants, intracranial embalming materials, and nasal packs. We compared the CT findings of mummies dated to the 18th Dynasty with those dated to the 19th to early 20th Dynasties. The Akhenaten mummy was excluded because of extensive postmortem skull fractures. CT showed that no brain treatment was offered to three mummies (Thutmose I, II, and III) who dated to the early 18th Dynasty and was offered to the eight mummies who dated later. The route of excerebration was transnasal in eight mummies; an additional suspected route was via a parietal defect. CT showed variable appearances of the intracranial contents. There were larger volumes of cranial packs and more variability in the appearances of the cranial packs in the royal mummies dated to the 19th to 20th Dynasties than in those dated to the 18th Dynasty. MDCT shows variations in brain treatment during mummification of royal Egyptian mummies (18th-20th Dynasties). This study sets a template for future CT studies of the heads of ancient Egyptian mummies and focuses on the key elements of cranial mummification in this ancient era.

  17. Longitudinal changes in structural abnormalities using MDCT in COPD: do the CT measurements of airway wall thickness and small pulmonary vessels change in parallel with emphysematous progression?

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi, Shin; Kawata, Naoko; Tada, Yuji; Ikari, Jun; Matsuura, Yukiko; Matsuoka, Shin; Matsushita, Shoichiro; Yanagawa, Noriyuki; Kasahara, Yasunori; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) facilitate acquiring important clinical information for managing patients with COPD. MDCT can detect the loss of lung tissue associated with emphysema as a low-attenuation area (LAA) and the thickness of airways as the wall area percentage (WA%). The percentage of small pulmonary vessels <5 mm2 (% cross-sectional area [CSA] <5) has been recently recognized as a parameter for expressing pulmonary perfusion. We aimed to analyze the longitudinal changes in structural abnormalities using these CT parameters and analyze the effect of exacerbation and smoking cessation on structural changes in COPD patients. Methods We performed pulmonary function tests (PFTs), an MDCT, and a COPD assessment test (CAT) in 58 patients with COPD at the time of their enrollment at the hospital and 2 years later. We analyzed the change in clinical parameters including CT indices and examined the effect of exacerbations and smoking cessation on the structural changes. Results The CAT score and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) did not significantly change during the follow-up period. The parameters of emphysematous changes significantly increased. On the other hand, the WA% at the distal airways significantly decreased or tended to decrease, and the %CSA <5 slightly but significantly increased over the same period, especially in ex-smokers. The parameters of emphysematous change were greater in patients with exacerbations and continued to progress even after smoking cessation. In contrast, the WA% and %CSA <5 did not change in proportion to emphysema progression. Conclusion The WA% at the distal bronchi and the %CSA <5 did not change in parallel with parameters of LAA over the same period. We propose that airway disease and vascular remodeling may be reversible to some extent by smoking cessation and appropriate treatment. Optimal management may have a greater effect on pulmonary vascularity and airway disease

  18. Estimating Effective Dose of Radiation From Pediatric Cardiac CT Angiography Using a 64-MDCT Scanner: New Conversion Factors Relating Dose-Length Product to Effective Dose.

    PubMed

    Trattner, Sigal; Chelliah, Anjali; Prinsen, Peter; Ruzal-Shapiro, Carrie B; Xu, Yanping; Jambawalikar, Sachin; Amurao, Maxwell; Einstein, Andrew J

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the conversion factors that enable accurate estimation of the effective dose (ED) used for cardiac 64-MDCT angiography performed for children. Anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1- and 10-year-old children, with 50 metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimeters placed in organs, underwent scanning performed using a 64-MDCT scanner with different routine clinical cardiac scan modes and x-ray tube potentials. Organ doses were used to calculate the ED on the basis of weighting factors published in 1991 in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publication 60 and in 2007 in ICRP publication 103. The EDs and the scanner-reported dose-length products were used to determine conversion factors for each scan mode. The effect of infant heart rate on the ED and the conversion factors was also assessed. The mean conversion factors calculated using the current definition of ED that appeared in ICRP publication 103 were as follows: 0.099 mSv · mGy(-1) · cm(-1), for the 1-year-old phantom, and 0.049 mSv · mGy(-1) · cm(-1), for the 10-year-old phantom. These conversion factors were a mean of 37% higher than the corresponding conversion factors calculated using the older definition of ED that appeared in ICRP publication 60. Varying the heart rate did not influence the ED or the conversion factors. Conversion factors determined using the definition of ED in ICRP publication 103 and cardiac, rather than chest, scan coverage suggest that the radiation doses that children receive from cardiac CT performed using a contemporary 64-MDCT scanner are higher than the radiation doses previously reported when older chest conversion factors were used. Additional up-to-date pediatric cardiac CT conversion factors are required for use with other contemporary CT scanners and patients of different age ranges.

  19. Risk of contrast-medium-induced nephropathy in high-risk patients undergoing MDCT--a pooled analysis of two randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Morcos, Sameh K

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of contrast-medium-induced nephropathy (CIN) following intravenous (IV) CM administration of contrast media to renally impaired patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is not well characterized. Our objective was to investigate the incidence of CIN in patients with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 ml/min undergoing contrast-enhanced MDCT examinations and to compare the rates of CIN following the IV administration of low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM, iopamidol and iomeprol) and an iso-osmolar contrast medium (IOCM, iodixanol). A total of 301 adult patients with moderate-to-severe renal failure received a similar IV contrast dose (40 gI). Serum creatinine (SCr) was measured at screening, baseline and 48-72 +/- 6 h after the MDCT examination. Primary CIN outcome was an increase in SCr >or=0.5 mg/dl (>or=44.2 micromol/l) from baseline. The CIN rates were 2.3% in the total population, 0.6% when GFR >40 ml/min, 4.6% when GFR <40 ml/min and 7.8% in patients with GFR <30 ml/min. The incidence of CIN was significantly higher after iodixanol than after LOCM (seven patients, 4.7% following IOCM, no CIN cases following the LOCM; p = 0.007). Significant differences in favor of the LOCM were also observed in patients with GFR <40 ml/min and GFR <30 ml/min. Following the IV administration of nonionic contrast agents in patients with moderate-to-severe renal insufficiency, the risk of significant CIN seems to be low. The IOCM iodixanol caused a higher rate of CIN than the LOCM iopamidol and iomeprol, especially in high-risk patients. Differences in osmolality between these LOCM and iodixanol do not play a role in the genesis of CIN.

  20. Imaging assessment of desmoid tumours in familial adenomatous polyposis: is state-of-the-art 1.5 T MRI better than 64-MDCT?

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, A; Hansmann, A; Bhandari, S; Gupta, A; Burling, D; Rana, S; Phillips, R K; Clark, S K; Goh, V

    2012-01-01

    Objective Desmoid tumour is a common extraintestinal manifestation of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) who have undergone prophylactic colectomy. We aimed to determine whether MRI provides equivalent or better assessment of desmoid tumours than CT, the current first-line investigation. Methods Following ethics approval and informed consent, FAP patients with known desmoid tumour underwent contrast-enhanced 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT) and 1.5 T MRI (incorporating T1 weighted, T2 weighted, short tau inversion–recovery and T1 weighted with contrast, axial, sagittal and coronal sequences). The number, site, size, local extent, tumour signal intensity and desmoid-to-aorta enhancement ratio were analysed. Results MRI identified 23 desmoid tumours in 9 patients: 9 intra-abdominal desmoid (IAD) tumours, 10 abdominal wall desmoid (AWD) tumours and 4 extra-abdominal desmoid (EAD) tumours. CT identified only 21 desmoids; 1 EAD and 1 AWD were not identified. The two modalities were equivalent in terms of defining local extent of desmoid. Five IAD tumours involved the bowel, six caused ureteric compression and none compromised the proximal superior mesenteric artery. There was no difference in median desmoid size: 56.7 cm2 (range 2–215 cm2) on MDCT and 56.3 cm2 (3–215 cm2) on MRI (p=0.985). The mean MRI enhancement ratio, at 1.12 (standard deviation 0.43), was greater than the CT enhancement ratio, which was 0.48 (0.16) (p<0.0001). High signal intensity on T2 MRI was associated with increased MRI enhancement ratio (p=0.006). Conclusions MRI is at least equivalent (and may be superior) to MDCT for the detection of desmoid tumours in FAP. Coupled with the advantage of avoiding radiation, it should be considered as the primary imaging modality for young FAP patients. PMID:22215881

  1. Selection of peripheral intravenous catheters with 24-gauge side-holes versus those with 22-gauge end-hole for MDCT: A prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Akio; Kato, Kenichi; Kamata, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Michiko; Nakayama, Manabu; Tomabechi, Makiko; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    2017-02-01

    To compare the 24-gauge side-holes catheter and conventional 22-gauge end-hole catheter in terms of safety, injection pressure, and contrast enhancement on multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). In a randomized single-center study, 180 patients were randomized to either the 24-gauge side-holes catheter or the 22-gauge end-hole catheter groups. The primary endpoint was safety during intravenous administration of contrast material for MDCT, using a non-inferiority analysis (lower limit 95% CI greater than -10% non-inferiority margin for the group difference). The secondary endpoints were injection pressure and contrast enhancement. A total of 174 patients were analyzed for safety during intravenous contrast material administration for MDCT. The overall extravasation rate was 1.1% (2/174 patients); 1 (1.2%) minor episode occurred in the 24-gauge side-holes catheter group and 1 (1.1%) in the 22-gauge end-hole catheter group (difference: 0.1%, 95% CI: -3.17% to 3.28%, non-inferiority P=1). The mean maximum pressure was higher with the 24-gauge side-holes catheter than with the 22-gauge end-hole catheter (8.16±0.95kg/cm(2) vs. 4.79±0.63kg/cm(2), P<0.001). The mean contrast enhancement of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, superior mesenteric artery, and pancreatic parenchyma in the two groups were not significantly different. In conclusion, our study showed that the 24-gauge side-holes catheter is safe and suitable for delivering iodine with a concentration of 300mg/mL at a flow-rate of 3mL/s, and it may contribute to the care of some patients, such as patients who have fragile and small veins. (Trial registration: UMIN000023727). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Arterial double-contrast dual-energy MDCT: in-vivo rabbit atherosclerosis with iodinated nanoparticles and gadolinium agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Raz; Kafri, Galit; Altman, Ami; Goshen, Liran; Planer, David; Sosna, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    An in-vivo feasibility study of potentially improved atherosclerosis CT imaging is presented. By administration of two different contrast agents to rabbits with induced atherosclerotic plaques we aim at identifying both soft plaque and vessel lumen simultaneously. Initial injection of iodinated nanoparticle (INP) contrast agent (N1177 - Nanoscan Imaging), two to four hours before scan, leads to its later accumulation in macrophage-rich soft plaque, while a second gadolinium contrast agent (Magnevist) injected immediately prior to the scan blends with the aortic blood. The distinction between the two agents in a single scan is achieved with a double-layer dual-energy MDCT (Philips Healthcare) following material separation analysis using the reconstructed images of the different x-ray spectra. A single contrast agent injection scan, where only INP was injected two hours prior to the scan, was compared to a double-contrast scan taken four hours after INP injection and immediately after gadolinium injection. On the single contrast agent scan we observed along the aorta walls, localized iodine accumulation which can point on INP uptake by atherosclerotic plaque. In the double-contrast scan the gadolinium contributes a clearer depiction of the vessel lumen in addition to the lasting INP presence. The material separation shows a good correlation to the pathologies inferred from the conventional CT images of the two different scans while performing only a single scan prevents miss-registration problems and reduces radiation dose. These results suggest that a double-contrast dual-energy CT may be used for advanced clinical diagnostic applications.

  3. C-arm cone beam CT perfusion imaging in the angiographic suite: a comparison with MDCT perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Kai; Yang, Pengfei; Wu, Yijing; Struffert, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and background Perfusion imaging in the angiography suite may provide a way to reduce time from stroke onset to endovascular revascularization of patients with a large vessel occlusion. Our purpose was to compare CBCTP with MDCTP. Materials and Methods Data from seven subjects with both MDCTP and CBCTP were retrospectively processed and analyzed. Two algorithms were used to enhance temporal resolution, temporal sampling density and reduce noise of CBCT data before generating perfusion maps. Two readers performed qualitative image quality evaluation on maps using a 5-point scale. ROIs indicating CBF/CBV abnormalities were drawn. Quantitative analyses were performed using the Sørensen–Dice coefficients to quantify the similarity of abnormalities. A non-inferiority hypothesis was tested to compare CBCTP against CBCTP. Results Averaged image quality score for MDCTP and CBCTP images was 2.4 and 2.3 respectively. Averaged confidence scores in diagnosis were both 1.4 for MDCT and CBCT; averaged confidence scores on presence of a CBV/CBF mismatch was 1.7 (κ = 0.50) and 1.5 (κ = 0.64). For MDCTP and CBCTP maps the average score of confidence in making treatment decision was 1.4 (κ = 0.79) and 1.3 (κ = 0.90). Area under visual grading characteristic (AVGC) for the above four qualitative quality score showed an average AVGC of 0.50 with 95% confidence level cover centered at the mean for both readers. Sørensen–Dice coefficient for CBF maps is 0.81 and for CBV maps is 0.55. Conclusions After post-processing methods were applied to enhance image quality for CBCTP maps, the CBCTP maps were not inferior to those generated from MDCTP. PMID:26892987

  4. A novel scheme for detection of diffuse lung disease in MDCT by use of statistical texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Li, Feng; Doi, Kunio; Li, Qiang

    2009-02-01

    The successful development of high performance computer-aided-diagnostic systems has potential to assist radiologists in the detection and diagnosis of diffuse lung disease. We developed in this study an automated scheme for the detection of diffuse lung disease on multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). Our database consisted of 68 CT scans, which included 31 normal and 37 abnormal cases with three kinds of abnormal patterns, i.e., ground glass opacity, reticular, and honeycombing. Two radiologists first selected the CT scans with abnormal patterns based on clinical reports. The areas that included specific abnormal patterns in the selected CT images were then delineated as reference standards by an expert chest radiologist. To detect abnormal cases with diffuse lung disease, the lungs were first segmented from the background in each slice by use of a texture analysis technique, and then divided into contiguous volumes of interest (VOIs) with a 64×64×64 matrix size. For each VOI, we calculated many statistical texture features, including the mean and standard deviation of CT values, features determined from the run length matrix, and features from the co-occurrence matrix. A quadratic classifier was employed for distinguishing between normal and abnormal VOIs by use of a leave-one-case-out validation scheme. A rule-based criterion was employed to further determine whether a case was normal or abnormal. For the detection of abnormal VOIs, our CAD system achieved a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 90%. For the detection of abnormal cases, it achieved a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 90%. This preliminary study indicates that our CAD system would be useful for the detection of diffuse lung disease.

  5. Radiation dose from MDCT using Monte Carlo simulations: estimating fetal dose due to pulmonary embolism scans accounting for overscan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, E.; Wellnitz, C.; Goodsitt, M.; DeMarco, J.; Cagnon, C.; Ghatali, M.; Cody, D.; Stevens, D.; McCollough, C.; Primak, A.; McNitt-Gray, M.

    2007-03-01

    Pregnant women with shortness of breath are increasingly referred for CT Angiography to rule out Pulmonary Embolism (PE). While this exam is typically focused on the lungs, extending scan boundaries and overscan can add to the irradiated volume and have implications on fetal dose. The purpose of this work was to estimate radiation dose to the fetus when various levels of overscan were encountered. Two voxelized models of pregnant patients derived from actual patient anatomy were created based on image data. The models represent an early (< 7 weeks) and late term pregnancy (36 weeks). A previously validated Monte Carlo model of an MDCT scanner was used that takes into account physical details of the scanner. Simulated helical scans used 120 kVp, 4x5 mm beam collimation, pitch 1, and varying beam-off locations (edge of the irradiated volume) were used to represent different protocols plus overscan. Normalized dose (mGy/100mAs) was calculated for each fetus. For the early term and the late term pregnancy models, fetal dose estimates for a standard thoracic PE exam were estimated to be 0.05 and 0.3 mGy/100mAs, respectively, increasing to 9 mGy/100mAs when the beam-off location was extended to encompass the fetus. When performing PE exams to rule out PE in pregnant patients, the beam-off location may have a large effect on fetal dose, especially for late term pregnancies. Careful consideration of ending location of the x-ray beam - and not the end of image data - could result in significant reduction in radiation dose to the fetus.

  6. In-Vivo Assessment of Femoral Bone Strength Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) Based on Routine MDCT Imaging: A Preliminary Study on Patients with Vertebral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Hans; Garcia, Eduardo Grande; Holzner, Fabian; Noel, Peter B.; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Baum, Thomas; Bauer, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To experimentally validate a non-linear finite element analysis (FEA) modeling approach assessing in-vitro fracture risk at the proximal femur and to transfer the method to standard in-vivo multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) data of the hip aiming to predict additional hip fracture risk in subjects with and without osteoporosis associated vertebral fractures using bone mineral density (BMD) measurements as gold standard. Methods One fresh-frozen human femur specimen was mechanically tested and fractured simulating stance and clinically relevant fall loading configurations to the hip. After experimental in-vitro validation, the FEA simulation protocol was transferred to standard contrast-enhanced in-vivo MDCT images to calculate individual hip fracture risk each for 4 subjects with and without a history of osteoporotic vertebral fractures matched by age and gender. In addition, FEA based risk factor calculations were compared to manual femoral BMD measurements of all subjects. Results In-vitro simulations showed good correlation with the experimentally measured strains both in stance (R2 = 0.963) and fall configuration (R2 = 0.976). The simulated maximum stress overestimated the experimental failure load (4743 N) by 14.7% (5440 N) while the simulated maximum strain overestimated by 4.7% (4968 N). The simulated failed elements coincided precisely with the experimentally determined fracture locations. BMD measurements in subjects with a history of osteoporotic vertebral fractures did not differ significantly from subjects without fragility fractures (femoral head: p = 0.989; femoral neck: p = 0.366), but showed higher FEA based risk factors for additional incident hip fractures (p = 0.028). Conclusion FEA simulations were successfully validated by elastic and destructive in-vitro experiments. In the subsequent in-vivo analyses, MDCT based FEA based risk factor differences for additional hip fractures were not mirrored by according BMD measurements. Our

  7. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, W.; Santos, W. S.; Paschoal, C. M. M.; Souza, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current-time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  8. Celiac Axis, Common Hepatic and Hepatic Artery Variants as Evidenced on MDCT Angiography in South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the increase in the hepatobiliary, pancreatic surgeries and liver transplantation, being aware of the anatomic variations of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries is of paramount importance. Aim To illustrate the normal anatomy and variants of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries with multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography in South Indian population and determine the potential variations in the celiac axis anatomy and the hepatic arteries, thus assisting the hepatobiliary surgeon and the interventional radiologist in avoiding iatrogenic injury to the arteries. Materials and Methods Two hundred patients undergoing abdominal CT angiography from July 2014 till July 2015 were retrospectively studied for hepatic arterial and celiac axis anatomical variation. The anatomic variations in our study were correlated with other studies. Results The celiac axis (CA) and the hepatic artery (HA) variations were analysed as per criteria laid by Song et al., and Michel. Out of 15 possible CA variations, 5 types of celiac artery variations were seen in 14 patients. A normal CA was seen in 179(89.5%) patients of the 200 patients. In the remaining 7 patients, the CA anatomy was classified as ambiguous since there was separate origin of the right and left hepatic arteries from the CA with absent common hepatic artery (CHA). The CHA originated normally from the celiac axis in 94% of the cases. Variation of CHA origin was seen in 5 patients. Normal HA anatomy was seen in 114 (57%) patients. Variation in HA anatomy was seen in 86 (43%) patients. Origin of the right hepatic artery (RHA) from the hepatic artery proper was seen in 182 (91%) patients and replaced origin of RHA from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was seen in 18 (9%) of the cases. Accessory RHA was seen in 7(3.5%) patients. The left hepatic artery (LHA) originated from the hepatic artery proper in 186 (93%) patients and replaced origin of LHA from the left gastric artery (LGA) was

  9. The four different types of internal hernia occurring after laparascopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass performed for morbid obesity: are there any multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features permitting their distinction?

    PubMed

    Kawkabani Marchini, Aida; Denys, Alban; Paroz, Alexandre; Romy, Sébastien; Suter, Michel; Desmartines, Nicolas; Meuli, Reto; Schmidt, Sabine

    2011-04-01

    Four different types of internal hernias (IH) are known to occur after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP) performed for morbid obesity. We evaluate multidetector row helical computed tomography (MDCT) features for their differentiation. From a prospectively collected database including 349 patients with LRYGBP, 34 acutely symptomatic patients (28 women, mean age 32.6), operated on for IH immediately after undergoing MDCT, were selected. Surgery confirmed 4 (11.6%) patients with transmesocolic, 10 (29.4%) with Petersen's, 15 (44.2%) with mesojejunal, and 5 (14.8%) with jejunojejunal IH. In consensus, 2 radiologists analyzed 13 MDCT features to distinguish the four types of IH. Statistical significance was calculated (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test, chi-square test). MDCT features of small bowel obstruction (SBO) (n=25, 73.5%), volvulus (n=22, 64.7%), or a cluster of small bowel loops (SBL) (n=27, 79.4%) were inconsistently present and overlapped between the four IH. The following features allowed for IH differentiation: left upper quadrant clustered small bowel loops (p<0.0001) and a mesocolic hernial orifice (p=0.0003) suggested transmesocolic IH. SBL abutting onto the left abdominal wall (p=0.0021) and left abdominal shift of the superior mesenteric vessels (SMV) (p=0.0045) suggested Petersen's hernia. The SMV predominantly shifted towards the right anterior abdominal wall in mesojejunal hernia (p=0.0033). Location of the hernial orifice near the distal anastomosis (p=0.0431) and jejunojejunal suture widening (p=0.0005) indicated jejunojejunal hernia. None of the four IH seems associated with a higher risk of SBO. Certain MDCT features, such as the position of clustered SBL and hernial orifice, help distinguish between the four IH and may permit straightforward surgery.

  10. Impact of aortic valve calcification, as measured by MDCT, on survival in patients with aortic stenosis: results of an international registry study.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Capoulade, Romain; Malouf, Joseph; Aggarval, Shivani; Araoz, Phillip A; Michelena, Hector I; Cueff, Caroline; Larose, Eric; Miller, Jordan D; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2014-09-23

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) load measures lesion severity in aortic stenosis (AS) and is useful for diagnostic purposes. Whether AVC predicts survival after diagnosis, independent of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic AS characteristics, has not been studied. This study evaluated the impact of AVC load, absolute and relative to aortic annulus size (AVCdensity), on overall mortality in patients with AS under conservative treatment and without regard to treatment. In 3 academic centers, we enrolled 794 patients (mean age, 73 ± 12 years; 274 women) diagnosed with AS by Doppler echocardiography who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) within the same episode of care. Absolute AVC load and AVCdensity (ratio of absolute AVC to cross-sectional area of aortic annulus) were measured, and severe AVC was separately defined in men and women. During follow-up, there were 440 aortic valve implantations (AVIs) and 194 deaths (115 under medical treatment). Univariate analysis showed strong association of absolute AVC and AVCdensity with survival (both, p < 0.0001) with a spline curve analysis pattern of threshold and plateau of risk. After adjustment for age, sex, coronary artery disease, diabetes, symptoms, AS severity on hemodynamic assessment, and LV ejection fraction, severe absolute AVC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 2.92; p = 0.03) or severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.37 to 4.37; p = 0.002) independently predicted mortality under medical treatment, with additive model predictive value (all, p ≤ 0.04) and a net reclassification index of 12.5% (p = 0.04). Severe absolute AVC (adjusted HR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.62; p = 0.01) and severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.40 to 3.52; p = 0.001) also independently predicted overall mortality, even with adjustment for time-dependent AVI. This large-scale, multicenter outcomes study of quantitative Doppler echocardiographic and MDCT

  11. Patient Characteristics as Predictors of Image Quality and Diagnostic Accuracy of MDCT Compared With Conventional Coronary Angiography for Detecting Coronary Artery Stenoses: CORE-64 Multicenter International Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Marc; Vavere, Andrea L.; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Miller, Julie M.; Sara, Leonardo; Cox, Christopher; Gottlieb, Ilan; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; de Roos, Albert; Lardo, Albert C.; Lima, Joao A.; Clouse, Melvin E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of the study was to investigate patient characteristics associated with image quality and their impact on the diagnostic accuracy of MDCT for the detection of coronary artery stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two hundred ninety-one patients with a coronary artery calcification (CAC) score of ≤ 600 Agatston units (214 men and 77 women; mean age, 59.3 ± 10.0 years [SD]) were analyzed. An overall image quality score was derived using an ordinal scale. The accuracy of quantitative MDCT to detect significant (≥ 50%) stenoses was assessed using quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) per patient and per vessel using a modified 19-segment model. The effect of CAC, obesity, heart rate, and heart rate variability on image quality and accuracy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression. Image quality and accuracy were further analyzed in subgroups of significant predictor variables. Diagnostic analysis was determined for image quality strata using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. RESULTS Increasing body mass index (BMI) (odds ratio [OR] = 0.89, p < 0.001), increasing heart rate (OR = 0.90, p < 0.001), and the presence of breathing artifact (OR = 4.97, p ≤ 0.001) were associated with poorer image quality whereas sex, CAC score, and heart rate variability were not. Compared with examinations of white patients, studies of black patients had significantly poorer image quality (OR = 0.58, p = 0.04). At a vessel level, CAC score (10 Agatston units) (OR = 1.03, p = 0.012) and patient age (OR = 1.02, p = 0.04) were significantly associated with the diagnostic accuracy of quantitative MDCT compared with QCA. A trend was observed in differences in the areas under the ROC curves across image quality strata at the vessel level (p = 0.08). CONCLUSION Image quality is significantly associated with patient ethnicity, BMI, mean scan heart rate, and the presence of breathing artifact but not with CAC score at a patient level. At a vessel level

  12. Unusual vanishing interstitial lymphatic "pearls" in a patient presenting with extensive interstitial and mediastinal MDCT features of acute cardiogenic failure related to bradycardia and mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Coulier, Bruno; El Khoury, Elie; Deprez, Fabrice C; Ghaye, Benoît; Van den Broeck, Stephane; Tourmous, Hussein

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic multidetector computed tomography-MDCT-was simultaneously performed during emergency abdominal CT in a patient presenting with abdominal pain and acute cardiogenic edema related to sick sinus syndrome and mitral prolapse with regurgitation. A constellation of severe but completely reversible interstitial and mediastinal features was found comprising pleural effusions, diffuse alveolar ground glass, thickening of the bronchial walls and septal lines, hazy infiltration of the mediastinal fat, and enlarged lymphatic nodes. Multiple atypical hypodense nodular "pearls" were also found. These oval shape or fusiform pearls were distributed along the thickened septal lines and disappeared completely after treatment. The hypothesis of transient lymphatic ectasia or lakes is proposed for these never previously described abnormalities.

  13. Differentiation of fat-poor angiomyolipoma from clear cell renal cell carcinoma in contrast-enhanced MDCT images using quantitative feature classification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Sang; Hong, Helen; Jung, Dae Chul; Park, Seunghyun; Kim, Junmo

    2017-07-01

    To develop a computer-aided classification system to differentiate benign fat-poor angiomyolipoma (fp-AML) from malignant clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) using quantitative feature classification on histogram and texture patterns from contrast-enhanced multidetector computer tomography (CE MDCT) images. A dataset including 50 CE MDCT images of 25 fp-AML and 25 ccRCC patients was used. From these images, the tumors were manually segmented by an expert radiologist to define the regions of interest (ROI). A feature classification system was proposed for separating two types of renal masses, using histogram and texture features and machine learning classifiers. First, 64 quantitative image features, including histogram features based on basic histogram characteristics, percentages of pixels above the thresholds, percentile intensities, and texture features based on gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM), gray-level run-length matrices (GLRLM), and local binary patterns (LBP), were extracted from each ROI. A number of feature selection methods including stepwise feature selection (SFS), ReliefF selection, and principal component analysis (PCA) transformation, were applied to select the group of useful features. Finally, the feature classifiers including logistic regression, k nearest neighbors (kNN), support vector machine (SVM), and random forest (RF), were trained on the selected features to differentiate benign fp-AML from malignant ccRCC. Each combination of feature selection and classification methods was tested using a fivefold cross-validation method and evaluated using accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV), negative predictive values (NPV), and area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). In feature selection, the features commonly selected by different feature selection methods were assessed. From three selection methods, three histogram features including maximum intensity, percentages of pixels above the

  14. Whole-Chest 64-MDCT of Emergency Department Patients with Nonspecific Chest Pain: Radiation Dose and Coronary Artery Image Quality with Prospective ECG Triggering Versus Retrospective ECG Gating

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, William P.; Branch, Kelley R.; May, Janet M.; Mitsumori, Lee M.; Strote, Jared N.; Warren, Bill H.; Dubinsky, Theodore J.; Lockhart, David W.; Caldwell, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the patient radiation dose and coronary artery image quality of long-z-axis whole-chest 64-MDCT performed with retrospective ECG gating with those of CT performed with prospective ECG triggering in the evaluation of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain. Subjects and Methods Consecutively registered emergency department patients with nonspecific low-to-moderate-risk chest pain underwent whole-chest CT with retrospective gating (n = 41) or prospective triggering (n = 31). Effective patient radiation doses were estimated and compared by use of unpaired Student's t tests. Two reviewers independently scored the quality of images of the coronary arteries, and the scores were compared by use of ordinal logistic regression. Results Age, heart rate, body mass index, and z-axis coverage were not statistically different between the two groups. For retrospective gating, the mean effective radiation dose was 31.8 ± 5.1 mSv; for prospective triggering, the mean effective radiation dose was 9.2 ± 2.2 mSv (prospective triggering 71% lower, p < 0.001). Two of 512 segments imaged with retrospective gating were nonevaluable (0.4%), and two of 394 segments imaged with prospective triggering were nonevaluable (0.5%). Prospectively triggered images were 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1–4.5) times as likely as retrospectively gated images to receive a high image quality score for each segment after adjustment for segment differences (p < 0.05). Conclusion For long-z-axis whole-chest 64-MDCT of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain, use of prospective ECG triggering may result in substantially lower patient radiation doses and better coronary artery image quality than is achieved with retrospective ECG gating. PMID:19457832

  15. Hepatic Arterial Configuration in Relation to the Segmental Anatomy of the Liver; Observations on MDCT and DSA Relevant to Radioembolization Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hoven, Andor F. van den Leeuwen, Maarten S. van Lam, Marnix G. E. H. Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2015-02-15

    PurposeCurrent anatomical classifications do not include all variants relevant for radioembolization (RE). The purpose of this study was to assess the individual hepatic arterial configuration and segmental vascularization pattern and to develop an individualized RE treatment strategy based on an extended classification.MethodsThe hepatic vascular anatomy was assessed on MDCT and DSA in patients who received a workup for RE between February 2009 and November 2012. Reconstructed MDCT studies were assessed to determine the hepatic arterial configuration (origin of every hepatic arterial branch, branching pattern and anatomical course) and the hepatic segmental vascularization territory of all branches. Aberrant hepatic arteries were defined as hepatic arterial branches that did not originate from the celiac axis/CHA/PHA. Early branching patterns were defined as hepatic arterial branches originating from the celiac axis/CHA.ResultsThe hepatic arterial configuration and segmental vascularization pattern could be assessed in 110 of 133 patients. In 59 patients (54 %), no aberrant hepatic arteries or early branching was observed. Fourteen patients without aberrant hepatic arteries (13 %) had an early branching pattern. In the 37 patients (34 %) with aberrant hepatic arteries, five also had an early branching pattern. Sixteen different hepatic arterial segmental vascularization patterns were identified and described, differing by the presence of aberrant hepatic arteries, their respective vascular territory, and origin of the artery vascularizing segment four.ConclusionsThe hepatic arterial configuration and segmental vascularization pattern show marked individual variability beyond well-known classifications of anatomical variants. We developed an individualized RE treatment strategy based on an extended anatomical classification.

  16. Estimated Patient Dose Indexes in Adult and Pediatric MDCT: Comparison of Automatic Tube Voltage Selection With Fixed Tube Current, Fixed Tube Voltage, and Weight-Based Protocols.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark E; Karim, Wadih; Bullen, Jennifer A; Primak, Andrew N; Dong, Frank F; Herts, Brian R

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the differences in estimated volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol) obtained from the topogram before abdominal and pelvic MDCT in adult and pediatric patients using a scan type-based algorithm for selecting kilovoltage (CARE kV) and a fixed and a weight-based Quality Reference mAs for selecting tube (gmAs) current-exposure time product, in comparison with standard protocols, and to determine the bias and variability of estimated CTDIvol vis-à-vis actual CTDIvol using the standard protocols. During a 14-month period, 312 adult and pediatric patients referred for abdominal and pelvic MDCT were included in the study. For all patients, the estimated CTDIvol based on the topogram was recorded: protocol A, CARE kV on and 210 gmAs; protocol B, CARE kV on and 1 gmAs times patient weight (in pounds); and protocol C (standard protocol), CARE kV off, 120 kVp, and 1 gmAs times patient weight (in pounds). For the pediatric patients, estimated CTDIvol for the standard protocol D was calculated with 120 kVp and 150 gmAs. All patients were scanned with the standard protocols, and the actual CTDIvol was recorded. Linear regression models compared the CTDIvol of the three protocols in adults and the fourth for children. The estimated and actual CTDIvol were compared using a t test. Protocol B yielded the lowest estimated CTDIvol (mean, 13.2 mGy for adults and 3.5 mGy for pediatric patients). The estimated CTDIvol overestimated the actual CTDIvol by, on average, 1.07 mGy for adults and 0.3 mGy for children. CARE kV appears to reduce estimated CTDIvol vis-à-vis standard protocols only when a weight-based gmAs is used. Prescan estimated CTDIvol calculations appear to generally overestimate actual CTDIvol.

  17. Whole-chest 64-MDCT of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain: Radiation dose and coronary artery image quality with prospective ECG triggering versus retrospective ECG gating.

    PubMed

    Shuman, William P; Branch, Kelley R; May, Janet M; Mitsumori, Lee M; Strote, Jared N; Warren, Bill H; Dubinsky, Theodore J; Lockhart, David W; Caldwell, James H

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the patient radiation dose and coronary artery image quality of long-z-axis whole-chest 64-MDCT performed with retrospective ECG gating with those of CT performed with prospective ECG triggering in the evaluation of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain. Consecutively registered emergency department patients with nonspecific low-to-moderate-risk chest pain underwent whole-chest CT with retrospective gating (n = 41) or prospective triggering (n = 31). Effective patient radiation doses were estimated and compared by use of unpaired Student's t tests. Two reviewers independently scored the quality of images of the coronary arteries, and the scores were compared by use of ordinal logistic regression. Age, heart rate, body mass index, and z-axis coverage were not statistically different between the two groups. For retrospective gating, the mean effective radiation dose was 31.8 +/- 5.1 mSv; for prospective triggering, the mean effective radiation dose was 9.2 +/- 2.2 mSv (prospective triggering 71% lower, p < 0.001). Two of 512 segments imaged with retrospective gating were nonevaluable (0.4%), and two of 394 segments imaged with prospective triggering were nonevaluable (0.5%). Prospectively triggered images were 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1-4.5) times as likely as retrospectively gated images to receive a high image quality score for each segment after adjustment for segment differences (p < 0.05). For long-z-axis whole-chest 64-MDCT of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain, use of prospective ECG triggering may result in substantially lower patient radiation doses and better coronary artery image quality than is achieved with retrospective ECG gating.

  18. Optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography using a 320-row MDCT volume scanner.

    PubMed

    Shirasaka, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Yamashita, Koji; Kondo, Masatoshi; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Shimomiya, Yamato; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Funama, Yoshinori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    A 320-row multidetector CT (MDCT) is expected for a good artery-vein separation in terms of temporal resolution. However, a shortened scan duration may lead to insufficient vascular enhancement. We assessed the optimal scan timing for the artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography (CTA) when bolus tracking was used at 320-row MDCT. We analyzed 60 patients, who underwent whole-brain four-dimensional CTA. Difference in CT attenuation between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the superior sagittal sinus (Datt) was calculated in each phase. Using a visual evaluation score for the depiction of arteries and veins, we calculated the difference between the mean score for the intracranial arteries and the mean score for the veins (Dscore). We assessed the time at which the maximum Datt and Dscore were simultaneously observed. The maximum Datt was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s and 18.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the contrast media arrival time at the ICA (Taa). The maximum Dscore was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the Taa. There were no statistically significant differences in Datt (p = 0.375) or Dscore (p = 0.139) between these scan timings. The optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CTA was 6.0 s or 8.0 s for the arteries and 16.0 s for the veins after the Taa. Advances in knowledge: Optimal scan timing allowed us to visualize intracranial arteries or veins with minimal superimposition.

  19. Computer-aided liver volumetry: performance of a fully-automated, prototype post-processing solution for whole-organ and lobar segmentation based on MDCT imaging.

    PubMed

    Fananapazir, Ghaneh; Bashir, Mustafa R; Marin, Daniele; Boll, Daniel T

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the performance of a prototype, fully-automated post-processing solution for whole-liver and lobar segmentation based on MDCT datasets. A polymer liver phantom was used to assess accuracy of post-processing applications comparing phantom volumes determined via Archimedes' principle with MDCT segmented datasets. For the IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 25 patients were enrolled. Volumetry performance compared the manual approach with the automated prototype, assessing intraobserver variability, and interclass correlation for whole-organ and lobar segmentation using ANOVA comparison. Fidelity of segmentation was evaluated qualitatively. Phantom volume was 1581.0 ± 44.7 mL, manually segmented datasets estimated 1628.0 ± 47.8 mL, representing a mean overestimation of 3.0%, automatically segmented datasets estimated 1601.9 ± 0 mL, representing a mean overestimation of 1.3%. Whole-liver and segmental volumetry demonstrated no significant intraobserver variability for neither manual nor automated measurements. For whole-liver volumetry, automated measurement repetitions resulted in identical values; reproducible whole-organ volumetry was also achieved with manual segmentation, p(ANOVA) 0.98. For lobar volumetry, automated segmentation improved reproducibility over manual approach, without significant measurement differences for either methodology, p(ANOVA) 0.95-0.99. Whole-organ and lobar segmentation results from manual and automated segmentation showed no significant differences, p(ANOVA) 0.96-1.00. Assessment of segmentation fidelity found that segments I-IV/VI showed greater segmentation inaccuracies compared to the remaining right hepatic lobe segments. Automated whole-liver segmentation showed non-inferiority of fully-automated whole-liver segmentation compared to manual approaches with improved reproducibility and post-processing duration; automated dual-seed lobar segmentation showed slight tendencies for underestimating the right hepatic lobe

  20. Morphometric evaluation of subaxial cervical spine using multi-detector computerized tomography (MD-CT) scan: the consideration for cervical pedicle screws fixation.

    PubMed

    Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Kraiwattanapong, Chaiwat; Aroonjarattham, Kitti; Leelapattana, Pittavat; Keorochana, Gun; Jaovisidha, Suphaneewan; Wajanavisit, Wiwat

    2014-04-11

    Cervical pedicle screw (CPS) insertion is a technically demanding procedure. The quantitative understanding of cervical pedicle morphology, especially the narrowest part of cervical pedicle or isthmus, would minimize the risk of catastrophic damage to surrounding neurovascular structures and improve surgical outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate morphology and quantify cortical thickness of the cervical isthmus by using Multi-detector Computerized Tomography (MD-CT) scan. The cervical CT scans were performed in 74 patients (37 males and 37 females) with 1-mm slice thickness and then retro-reconstructed into sagittal and coronal planes to measure various cervical parameters as follows: outer pedicle width (OPW), inner pedicle width (IPW), outer pedicle height (OPH), inner pedicle height (IPH), pedicle cortical thickness, pedicle sagittal angle (PSA), and pedicle transverse angle (PTA). Total numbers of 740 pedicles were measured in this present study. The mean OPW and IPW significantly increased from C3 to C7 while the mean OPH and IPH of those showed non-significant difference between any measured levels. The medial-lateral cortical thickness was significantly smaller than the superior-inferior one. PTA in the upper cervical spine was significantly wider than the lower ones. The PSA changed from upward inclination at upper cervical spine to the downward inclination at lower cervical spine. This study has demonstrated that cervical vertebra has relatively small and narrow inner pedicle canal with thick outer pedicle cortex and also shows a variable in pedicle width and inconsistent transverse angle. To enhance the safety of CPS insertion, the entry point and trajectories should be determined individually by using preoperative MD-CT scan and the inner pedicle width should be a key parameter to determine the screw dimensions.

  1. [Variations of pulmonary venous drainage and venous ostium index detection in atrial fibrillation patients prior to radiofrequency catheter ablation by MDCT pulmonary venography].

    PubMed

    Shan, Fei; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Gang; Miao, Xi-Yin; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Li-Jun; Zeng, Liang-Bin

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate variations of pulmonary venous drainage and venous ostium index (VOI) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) prior to radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) by MDCT pulmonary venography. 16-detector row CT pulmonary venography was performed in 64 AF patients referred to RFCA from June, 2005 to May, 2006. Variations in pulmonary venous drainage were observed in volume render imagines. Anterior-posterior and superior-inferior diameters of pulmonary venous ostium were measured on maximum intensity projection images. VOI derived from left superior, left inferior, right superior, right inferior pulmonary veins and variations in pulmonary venous drainage were calculated. Classic pulmonary veins anatomy was found in 11 patients (17.18%), early branching veins in 45 patients (70.31%), left common ostium in 5 patients (7.81%), right common ostia in 1 patient, right accessory (middle) pulmonary vein in 5 patients (7.81%) and left accessory (middle) pulmonary vein in 1 patient (1.56%). VOI of homolateral pulmonary veins and bilateral superior pulmonary veins were similar (P > 0.05) while there was a significant difference on VOIs derived from left superior and right inferior; two inferior, left inferior versus right superior veins (P < 0.05). Right inferior pulmonary venous ostium was most rounded and had the highest index (0.88) and left inferior pulmonary venous ostium was most oval and had the lowest index (0.72). Multidetector row CT pulmonary venography (MDCT-PV) could provide valuable informations on pulmonary venous anatomy in AF patients referred to RFCA and should be used as a routine examination prior to the operation.

  2. Increasing bone sclerosis during bortezomib therapy in multiple myeloma patients: results of a reduced-dose whole-body MDCT study.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Maximilian; Weisel, Katja; Grandjean, Caroline; Oehrlein, Katharina; Zago, Manola; Spira, Daniel; Horger, Marius

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the frequency, location, extent, and patterns of bone sclerosis occurring in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) during bortezomib-based therapy. From June 2003 through December 2011, 593 whole-body reduced-dose MDCT studies were performed of 79 consecutive patients receiving bortezomib. The median surveillance time was 21 months (range, 3-67 months). Baseline studies were compared with follow-up studies during therapy (follow-up 1), at the end of therapy (follow-up 2), and 12 months after cessation of bortezomib therapy (follow-up 3). We recorded any sclerotic change occurring inside or along the margins of the osteolytic lesions, in the cancellous bone, or inside preexistent medullary or extramedullary lesions. The time point of occurrence of bone sclerosis was correlated with the best hematologic response category. Fourteen (17.7%) patients developed focal (n = 11) or diffuse (n = 3) bone sclerosis. The time window from bortezomib initiation to radiographic detection of bone sclerosis was 8 months (SD, 7 months). Sclerosis occurred at multiple sites (n = 7) or at an isolated site (n = 7). On subsequent whole-body reduced-dose MDCT studies, sclerosis further increased in seven (50%) patients. Hematologic best response during bortezomib treatment was complete response (n = 1), very good partial response (n = 2), partial response (n = 8), and stable disease (n = 3). Radiologic response at the time of sclerosis detection was partial response (n = 8), stable disease (n = 2), and progressive disease (n = 4). Bone remineralization may occur during bortezomib-based therapy for MM in a substantial proportion of patients. The extent, location, and patterns of sclerosis differ among patients and are unpredictable. Sclerosis was documented even in patients showing suboptimal hematologic response.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography, MRI and MR arthrography in the characterisation of rotator cuff disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Braën, Caroline; Leblond, Jean; Desmeules, François; Dionne, Clermont E; MacDermid, Joy C; Bureau, Nathalie J; Frémont, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Different diagnostic imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), MRI, MR arthrography (MRA) are commonly used for the characterisation of rotator cuff (RC) disorders. Since the most recent systematic reviews on medical imaging, multiple diagnostic studies have been published, most using more advanced technological characteristics. The first objective was to perform a meta-analysis on the diagnostic accuracy of medical imaging for characterisation of RC disorders. Since US is used at the point of care in environments such as sports medicine, a secondary analysis assessed accuracy by radiologists and non-radiologists. Methods A systematic search in three databases was conducted. Two raters performed data extraction and evaluation of risk of bias independently, and agreement was achieved by consensus. Hierarchical summary receiver-operating characteristic package was used to calculate pooled estimates of included diagnostic studies. Results Diagnostic accuracy of US, MRI and MRA in the characterisation of full-thickness RC tears was high with overall estimates of sensitivity and specificity over 0.90. As for partial RC tears and tendinopathy, overall estimates of specificity were also high (>0.90), while sensitivity was lower (0.67–0.83). Diagnostic accuracy of US was similar whether a trained radiologist, sonographer or orthopaedist performed it. Conclusions Our results show the diagnostic accuracy of US, MRI and MRA in the characterisation of full-thickness RC tears. Since full thickness tear constitutes a key consideration for surgical repair, this is an important characteristic when selecting an imaging modality for RC disorder. When considering accuracy, cost, and safety, US is the best option. PMID:25677796

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography, MRI and MR arthrography in the characterisation of rotator cuff disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Braën, Caroline; Leblond, Jean; Desmeules, François; Dionne, Clermont E; MacDermid, Joy C; Bureau, Nathalie J; Frémont, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Different diagnostic imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), MRI, MR arthrography (MRA) are commonly used for the characterisation of rotator cuff (RC) disorders. Since the most recent systematic reviews on medical imaging, multiple diagnostic studies have been published, most using more advanced technological characteristics. The first objective was to perform a meta-analysis on the diagnostic accuracy of medical imaging for characterisation of RC disorders. Since US is used at the point of care in environments such as sports medicine, a secondary analysis assessed accuracy by radiologists and non-radiologists. A systematic search in three databases was conducted. Two raters performed data extraction and evaluation of risk of bias independently, and agreement was achieved by consensus. Hierarchical summary receiver-operating characteristic package was used to calculate pooled estimates of included diagnostic studies. Diagnostic accuracy of US, MRI and MRA in the characterisation of full-thickness RC tears was high with overall estimates of sensitivity and specificity over 0.90. As for partial RC tears and tendinopathy, overall estimates of specificity were also high (>0.90), while sensitivity was lower (0.67-0.83). Diagnostic accuracy of US was similar whether a trained radiologist, sonographer or orthopaedist performed it. Our results show the diagnostic accuracy of US, MRI and MRA in the characterisation of full-thickness RC tears. Since full thickness tear constitutes a key consideration for surgical repair, this is an important characteristic when selecting an imaging modality for RC disorder. When considering accuracy, cost, and safety, US is the best option. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Accuracy of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in staging of renal cell carcinoma (RCC): analysis of risk factors for mis-staging and its impact on surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    El-Hefnawy, Ahmed S; Mosbah, Ahmed; El-Diasty, Tarek; Hassan, Mohammed; Shaaban, Atallah A

    2013-08-01

    To assess the accuracy of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in preoperative staging of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to detect the possible risk factors for mis-staging. In addition, the impact of radiological mis-staging on surgical decision and operative procedures was evaluated. Data files of 693 patients, who underwent either radical or partial nephrectomy after preoperative staging by MDCT between January 2003 and December 2010, were retrospectively reviewed. Radiological data were compared to surgical and histopathological findings. Patients were classified according to 2009 TNM staging classification. Diagnostic accuracy per stage and its impact on surgical intervention were evaluated. The overall accuracy was 64.5%, and over-stage was detected in 29.5% and under-stage in 6%. Sensitivity and specificity were highest in stage T3b (85 and 99.5%, respectively), while T4 showed the lowest sensitivity and PPV (57 and 45%). Degree of agreement with pathological staging was substantial in T1 (κ = 0.7), fair in T2 (κ = 0. 4), perfect in T3b (κ = 0.81), and slight for the other stages (κ = <0.1). On multivariate analysis, conventional RCC and tumor size > 7 cm represent the significant risk factors (RR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-2.3, P < 0.004 and RR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.7-3.5, P < 0.001, respectively). Mis-staging was seen to have no negative impact on surgical decision. MDCT is an accepted tool for renal tumor staging. Tumor mis-staging after MDCT is of little clinical importance. Large tumor size >7 cm and conventional RCC are risk factors for tumor mis-staging.

  6. Trabecular bone structure analysis in the osteoporotic spine using a clinical in vivo setup for 64-slice MDCT imaging: comparison to microCT imaging and microFE modeling.

    PubMed

    Issever, Ahi S; Link, Thomas M; Kentenich, Marie; Rogalla, Patrik; Schwieger, Karsten; Huber, Markus B; Burghardt, Andrew J; Majumdar, Sharmila; Diederichs, Gerd

    2009-09-01

    Assessment of trabecular microarchitecture may improve estimation of biomechanical strength, but visualization of trabecular bone structure in vivo is challenging. We tested the feasibility of assessing trabecular microarchitecture in the spine using multidetector CT (MDCT) on intact human cadavers in an experimental in vivo-like setup. BMD, bone structure (e.g., bone volume/total volume = BV/TV; trabecular thickness = Tb.Th; structure model index = SMI) and bone texture parameters were evaluated in 45 lumbar vertebral bodies using MDCT (mean in-plane pixel size, 274 microm(2); slice thickness, 500 microm). These measures were correlated with structure measures assessed with microCT at an isotropic spatial resolution of 16 microm and to microfinite element models (microFE) of apparent modulus and stiffness. MDCT-derived BMD and structure measures showed significant correlations to the density and structure obtained by microCT (BMD, R(2) = 0.86, p < 0.0001; BV/TV, R(2) = 0.64, p < 0.0001; Tb.Th, R(2) = 0.36, p < 0.01). When comparing microCT-derived measures with microFE models, the following correlations (p < 0.001) were found for apparent modulus and stiffness, respectively: BMD (R(2) = 0.58 and 0.66), BV/TV (R(2) = 0.44 and 0.58), and SMI (R(2) = 0.44 and 0.49). However, the overall highest correlation (p < 0.001) with microFE app. modulus (R(2) = 0.75) and stiffness (R(2) = 0.76) was achieved by the combination of QCT-derived BMD with the bone texture measure Minkowski Dimension. In summary, although still limited by its spatial resolution, trabecular bone structure assessment using MDCT is overall feasible. However, when comparing with microFE-derived bone properties, BMD is superior compared with single parameters for microarchitecture, and correlations further improve when combining with texture measures.

  7. Reducing radiation dose to selected organs by selecting the tube start angle in MDCT helical scans: A Monte Carlo based study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Di; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Angel, Erin; Turner, Adam C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Previous work has demonstrated that there are significant dose variations with a sinusoidal pattern on the peripheral of a CTDI 32 cm phantom or on the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom when helical CT scanning is performed, resulting in the creation of ''hot'' spots or ''cold'' spots. The purpose of this work was to perform preliminary investigations into the feasibility of exploiting these variations to reduce dose to selected radiosensitive organs solely by varying the tube start angle in CT scans. Methods: Radiation dose to several radiosensitive organs (including breasts, thyroid, uterus, gonads, and eye lenses) resulting from MDCT scans were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models, including GSF's Baby, Child, and Irene. Dose to fetus was also estimated using four pregnant female models based on CT images of the pregnant patients. Whole-body scans were simulated using 120 kVp, 300 mAs, both 28.8 and 40 mm nominal collimations, and pitch values of 1.5, 1.0, and 0.75 under a wide range of start angles (0 deg. - 340 deg. in 20 deg. increments). The relationship between tube start angle and organ dose was examined for each organ, and the potential dose reduction was calculated. Results: Some organs exhibit a strong dose variation, depending on the tube start angle. For small peripheral organs (e.g., the eye lenses of the Baby phantom at pitch 1.5 with 40 mm collimation), the minimum dose can be 41% lower than the maximum dose, depending on the tube start angle. In general, larger dose reductions occur for smaller peripheral organs in smaller patients when wider collimation is used. Pitch 1.5 and pitch 0.75 have different mechanisms of dose reduction. For pitch 1.5 scans, the dose is usually lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x-ray tube is posterior to the patient when it passes the longitudinal location of the organ. For pitch 0.75 scans, the dose is lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x

  8. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  9. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Gu, J; Bednarz, B; Caracappa, P F; Xu, X G

    2009-05-07

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  10. Fully automated lobe-based airway taper index calculation in a low dose MDCT CF study over 4 time-points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinheimer, Oliver; Wielpütz, Mark O.; Konietzke, Philip; Heussel, Claus P.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Brochhausen, Christoph; Hollemann, David; Savage, Dasha; Galbán, Craig J.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2017-02-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) results in severe bronchiectasis in nearly all cases. Bronchiectasis is a disease where parts of the airways are permanently dilated. The development and the progression of bronchiectasis is not evenly distributed over the entire lungs - rather, individual functional units are affected differently. We developed a fully automated method for the precise calculation of lobe-based airway taper indices. To calculate taper indices, some preparatory algorithms are needed. The airway tree is segmented, skeletonized and transformed to a rooted acyclic graph. This graph is used to label the airways. Then a modified version of the previously validated integral based method (IBM) for airway geometry determination is utilized. The rooted graph, the airway lumen and wall information are then used to calculate the airway taper indices. Using a computer-generated phantom simulating 10 cross sections of airways we present results showing a high accuracy of the modified IBM. The new taper index calculation method was applied to 144 volumetric inspiratory low-dose MDCT scans. The scans were acquired from 36 children with mild CF at 4 time-points (baseline, 3 month, 1 year, 2 years). We found a moderate correlation with the visual lobar Brody bronchiectasis scores by three raters (r2 = 0.36, p < .0001). The taper index has the potential to be a precise imaging biomarker but further improvements are needed. In combination with other imaging biomarkers, taper index calculation can be an important tool for monitoring the progression and the individual treatment of patients with bronchiectasis.

  11. Association of C-reactive protein and homocysteine with subclinical coronary plaque subtype and stenosis using low-dose MDCT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsann; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Chang, Li-Ya; Shen, Chien-Wei

    2010-10-01

    Given the uncertainty regarding the relationship of C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine (Hcy) to atherosclerotic burden, our aim was to determine whether CRP and Hcy are related to the presence of subclinical coronary plaque and stenosis. We did a cross-sectional analysis of data gathered on 1248 consecutive, newly self-referred, middle-aged subjects who underwent health check ups at China Medical University Hospital. Participants had at least one cardiac risk factor, but no known coronary heart disease. Low-dose multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography (MDCT-CA) was used to measure coronary artery stenosis and identify plaque subtypes. Subjects were divided into quartiles based on levels of high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP and Hcy. hs-CRP level and Hcy level were associated with the relative proportion of plaque subtypes; Hcy level (P<0.05) but not hs-CRP level (P>0.05) was associated with prevalence of artery segment stenosis. After multivariate adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors through logistic regression analysis, neither hs-CRP level nor Hcy level was independently associated with coronary plaque subtypes and stenosis (P>0.05). Subclinical atherosclerosis is mildly increased in subjects with higher CRP and Hcy levels, but this association is not independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. CRP and Hcy are poor predictors of atherosclerotic burden and coronary stenosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the identification and characterization of traumatic solid organ lesions in children: a retrospective comparison with baseline US and CE-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Menichini, Guendalina; Sessa, Barbara; Trinci, Margherita; Galluzzo, Michele; Miele, Vittorio

    2015-11-01

    Localized low-energy abdominal trauma is very frequent in the pediatric population. The findings of several studies have shown that ultrasonography (US) can represent a useful and cost-effective tool in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma both in adults and children. However, many parenchymal injuries are not correctly visualized at baseline US examination. The introduction of specific US contrast agents contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has enabled a better identification of traumatic organ injuries. The correct use of CEUS could therefore identify and select the children who need further diagnostic investigation computed tomography (CT), avoiding unnecessary radiation and iodinated contrast medium exposure. The purpose of our study was to assess the sensibility and feasibility of CEUS in the assessment of low-energy abdominal trauma compared to baseline US in pediatric patients, using contrast-enhanced MDCT as the reference standard. We retrospectively reviewed 73 children (51 M and 22 F; mean age 8.7 ± 2.8 years) who presented in our Emergency Department between October 2012 and October 2013, with history of minor abdominal trauma according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale and who underwent US, CEUS, and CE-MDCT. Inclusion criteria were: male or female, aged 0-16, hemodynamically stable patients with a history of minor blunt abdominal trauma. Exclusion criteria were adulthood, hemodynamical instability, history of major trauma. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy were determined for US and CEUS compared to MDCT. 6/73 patients were negative at US, CEUS, and MDCT for the presence of organ injuries. In the remaining 67 patients, US depicted 26/67 parenchymal lesions. CEUS identified 67/67 patients (67/67) with parenchymal lesions: 21 lesions of the liver (28.8 %), 26 lesions of the spleen (35.6 %), 7 lesions of right kidney (9.6 %), 13 lesions of left kidney. MDCT confirmed all parenchymal lesions (67/67). Thus, the diagnostic performance of

  13. A new approach to the assessment of lumen visibility of coronary artery stent at various heart rates using 64-slice MDCT

    PubMed Central

    Groen, J. M.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Oudkerk, M.

    2007-01-01

    Coronary artery stent lumen visibility was assessed as a function of cardiac movement and temporal resolution with an automated objective method using an anthropomorphic moving heart phantom. Nine different coronary stents filled with contrast fluid and surrounded by fat were scanned using 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) at 50–100 beats/min with the moving heart phantom. Image quality was assessed by measuring in-stent CT attenuation and by a dedicated tool in the longitudinal and axial plane. Images were scored by CT attenuation and lumen visibility and compared with theoretical scoring to analyse the effect of multi-segment reconstruction (MSR). An average increase in CT attenuation of 144 ± 59 HU and average diminished lumen visibility of 29 ± 12% was observed at higher heart rates in both planes. A negative correlation between image quality and heart rate was non-significant for the majority of measurements (P > 0.06). No improvement of image quality was observed in using MSR. In conclusion, in-stent CT attenuation increases and lumen visibility decreases at increasing heart rate. Results obtained with the automated tool show similar behaviour compared with attenuation measurements. Cardiac movement during data acquisition causes approximately twice as much blurring compared with the influence of temporal resolution on image quality. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00330-007-0568-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17429648

  14. 64-MDCT imaging of the coronary arteries and systemic arterial vascular tree in a single examination: optimisation of the scan protocol and contrast-agent administration.

    PubMed

    Napoli, A; Anzidei, M; Francone, M; Cavallo Marincola, B; Carbone, I; Geiger, D; Zaccagna, F; Di Paolo, P L; Zini, C; Catalano, C; Passariello, R

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a 64-row multidetector computed tomography (64-MDCT) acquisition protocol with biphasic administration of contrast medium for comprehensive assessment of the coronary and systemic arterial tree in a single examination. The scanning protocol comprised two acquisitions: an electrocardiograph (ECG)-gated scan at the level of the heart, followed by a total-body, low-dose scan of the systemic arterial circulation. Twenty patients were evaluated using two different strategies for contrast administration. In ten patients, the delay between the two acquisitions was set at 40 s, whereas in the remaining patients, it varied between 45 s and 65 s. For both strategies, the degree of systemic arterial opacification and the attenuation gradient between arterial and venous structures were quantitatively assessed at six extracoronary locations. Two observers evaluated in consensus the presence or absence of atherosclerosis and the degree of stenosis of arterial segments. Three hundred coronary segments were analysed. Arterial-wall changes were depicted in 155 (51%) segments, and in 35 (23%), the degree of stenosis was > 50%. Of the 640 extracoronary arterial segments, 250 (39%) presented atherosclerotic wall alterations, in 50 (20%), the degree of stenosis was > 50% and five were affected by aneurysmal dilatation. The magnitude of arterial opacification values and attenuation gradients between arterial and venous structures were significantly higher in patients scanned with the 40-s fixed-delay strategy. Whole-body CT angiography with biphasic administration of contrast agent and fixed scan delay has been shown to be a feasible and reproducible technique. Comprehensive data on the global atherosclerotic burden potentially offer important therapeutic options for subclinical, high-risk segments.

  15. Nonlinear image blending for dual-energy MDCT of the abdomen: can image quality be preserved if the contrast medium dose is reduced?

    PubMed

    Mileto, Achille; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Marin, Daniele; Alfaro-Cordoba, Marcela; Eusemann, Christian D; Scribano, Emanuele; Blandino, Alfredo; Mazziotti, Silvio; Ascenti, Giorgio

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the image quality of a dual-energy nonlinear image blending technique at reduced load of contrast medium with a simulated 120-kVp linear blending technique at a full dose during portal venous phase MDCT of the abdomen. Forty-five patients (25 men, 20 women; mean age, 65.6 ± 9.7 [SD] years; mean body weight, 74.9 ± 12.4 kg) underwent contrast-enhanced single-phase dual-energy CT of the abdomen by a random assignment to one of three different contrast medium (iomeprol 400) dose injection protocols: 1.3, 1.0, or 0.65 mL/kg of body weight. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and noise at the portal vein, liver, aorta, and kidney were compared among the different datasets using the ANOVA. Three readers qualitatively assessed all datasets in a blinded and independent fashion. Nonlinear blended images at a 25% reduced dose allowed a significant improvement in CNR (p < 0.05 for all comparisons), compared with simulated 120-kVp linear blended images at a full dose. No statistically significant difference existed in CNR and noise between the nonlinear blended images at a 50% reduced dose and the simulated 120-kVp linear blended images at a full dose. Nonlinear blended images at a 50% reduced dose were considered in all cases to have acceptable image quality. The dual-energy nonlinear image blending technique allows reducing the dose of contrast medium up to 50% during portal venous phase imaging of the abdomen while preserving image quality.

  16. Journal Club: Comparison of assessment of preoperative pulmonary vasculature in patients with non-small cell lung cancer by non-contrast- and 4D contrast-enhanced 3-T MR angiography and contrast-enhanced 64-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Seki, Shinichiro; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to prospectively and directly compare the capabilities of non-contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA), 4D contrast-enhanced MRA, and contrast-enhanced MDCT for assessing pulmonary vasculature in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) before surgical treatment. A total of 77 consecutive patients (41 men and 36 women; mean age, 71 years) with pathologically proven and clinically assessed stage I NSCLC underwent thin-section contrast-enhanced MDCT, non-contrast-enhanced and contrast-enhanced MRA, and surgical treatment. The capability for anomaly assessment of the three methods was independently evaluated by two reviewers using a 5-point visual scoring system, and final assessment for each patient was made by consensus of the two readers. Interobserver agreement for pulmonary arterial and venous assessment was evaluated with the kappa statistic. Then, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of anomalies were directly compared among the three methods by use of the McNemar test. Interobserver agreement for pulmonary artery and vein assessment was substantial or almost perfect (κ=0.72-0.86). For pulmonary arterial and venous variation assessment, there were no significant differences in sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy among non-contrast-enhanced MRA (pulmonary arteries: sensitivity, 77.1%; specificity, 97.4%; accuracy, 87.7%; pulmonary veins: sensitivity, 50%; specificity, 98.5%; accuracy, 93.2%), 4D contrast-enhanced MRA (pulmonary arteries: sensitivity, 77.1%; specificity, 97.4%; accuracy, 87.7%; pulmonary veins: sensitivity, 62.5%; specificity, 100.0%; accuracy, 95.9%), and thin-section contrast-enhanced MDCT (pulmonary arteries: sensitivity, 91.4%; specificity, 89.5%; accuracy, 90.4%; pulmonary veins: sensitivity, 50%; specificity, 100.0%; accuracy, 95.9%) (p>0.05). Pulmonary vascular assessment of patients with NSCLC before surgical resection by non-contrast-enhanced MRA can be considered equivalent to

  17. Morphological Characteristics of the Repaired Labrum According to Glenoid Location and Its Clinical Relevance After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair: Postoperative Evaluation With Computed Tomography Arthrography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yoon; Chung, Seok Won; Kwak, Joo Young

    2014-06-01

    There have been no studies on the postoperative morphological characteristics of the restored labrum at different glenoid locations and its clinical relevance after arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors. To analyze the morphological characteristics of the restored labrum at different locations of the glenoid and their relevance to clinical outcomes as well as affecting factors and to trace the inserted suture anchors after arthroscopic Bankart repair using computed tomography arthrography (CTA). Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 46 patients (mean age, 26.5 ± 6.8 years) who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with absorbable suture anchors were enrolled in this study. Patients underwent CTA preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively as well as functional outcome evaluation preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>24 months) with the Rowe score and visual analog scale for pain. Labral height and width were measured on conventional axial CTA images at the 3-, 4-, and 5-o'clock positions twice by 2 raters. The postoperative measurements were also compared with those of the healthy anterior labrum, acquired from the same CTA examination of 32 consecutive patients (mean age, 26.5 ± 8.5 years) with superior labral lesions in the same study period. The postoperative difference in the measurements and between clock positions, and the relationship between the measurements and the clinical factors and functional outcomes, were evaluated. In addition, the locations of all suture anchors were traced on each CTA image, and outcomes according to the locations of the most inferior suture anchors were assessed. The interobserver and intraobserver reliabilities of measurements at each location were excellent (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.773-0.988). Of the 46 patients, 2 (4.35%) had redislocations after surgery. Postoperative labral height and width were significantly increased at all locations (all P < .001) up to a level similar to the healthy

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Metastases-Software-Assisted Evaluation of the Ablation Zone in MDCT: Tumor-Free Follow-Up Versus Local Recurrent Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, Sebastian Bruners, Philipp; Schiffl, Katharina; Sedlmair, Martin; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Guenther, Rolf W.; Das, Marco; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in change of size and CT value between local recurrences and tumor-free areas after CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic metastases during follow-up by means of dedicated software for automatic evaluation of hepatic lesions. Thirty-two patients with 54 liver metastases from breast or colorectal cancer underwent triphasic contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate hepatic metastatic spread and localization before CT-guided RFA and for follow-up after intervention. Sixteen of these patients (65.1 {+-} 10.3 years) with 30 metastases stayed tumor-free (group 1), while the other group (n = 16 with 24 metastases; 62.0 {+-} 13.8 years) suffered from local recurrent disease (group 2). Applying an automated software tool (SyngoCT Oncology; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), size parameters (volume, RECIST, WHO) and attenuation were measured within the lesions before, 1 day after, and 28 days after RFA treatment. The natural logarithm (ln) of the quotient of the volume 1 day versus 28 days after RFA treament was computed: lnQ1//28/0{sub volume}. Analogously, ln ratios of RECIST, WHO, and attenuation were computed and statistically evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA. One lesion in group 2 was excluded from further evaluation due to automated missegmentation. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to initial volume, RECIST, and WHO (p < 0.05). Furthermore, ln ratios corresponding to volume, RECIST, and WHO differed significantly between the two groups. Attenuation evaluations showed no significant differences, but there was a trend toward attenuation assessment for the parameter lnQ28/0{sub attenuation} (p = 0.0527), showing higher values for group 1 (-0.4 {+-} 0.3) compared to group 2 (-0.2 {+-} 0.2). In conclusion, hepatic metastases and their zone of coagulation necrosis after RFA differed significantly between tumor

  19. Simultaneous screening for osteoporosis at CT colonography: bone mineral density assessment using MDCT attenuation techniques compared with the DXA reference standard.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, Perry J; Lee, Lawrence J; del Rio, Alejandro Muñoz; Lauder, Travis; Bruce, Richard J; Summers, Ron M; Pooler, B Dustin; Binkley, Neil

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of lumbar spine attenuation measurement for bone mineral density (BMD) assessment at screening computed tomographic colonography (CTC) using central dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as the reference standard. Two-hundred and fifty-two adults (240 women and 12 men; mean age 58.9 years) underwent CTC screening and central DXA BMD measurement within 2 months (mean interval 25.0 days). The lowest DXA T-score between the spine and hip served as the reference standard, with low BMD defined per World Health Organization as osteoporosis (DXA T-score ≤ -2.5) or osteopenia (DXA T-score between -1.0 and -2.4). Both phantomless quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and simple nonangled region-of-interest (ROI) multi-detector CT (MDCT) attenuation measurements were applied to the T(12) -L(5) levels. The ability to predict osteoporosis and low BMD (osteoporosis or osteopenia) by DXA was assessed. A BMD cut-off of 90 mg/mL at phantomless QCT yielded 100% sensitivity for osteoporosis (29 of 29) and a specificity of 63.8% (143 of 224); 87.2% (96 of 110) below this threshold had low BMD and 49.6% (69 of 139) above this threshold had normal BMD at DXA. At L(1) , a trabecular ROI attenuation cut-off of 160 HU was 100% sensitive for osteoporosis (29 of 29), with a specificity of 46.4% (104 of 224); 83.9% (125 of 149) below this threshold had low BMD and 57.5% (59/103) above had normal BMD at DXA. ROI performance was similar at all individual T(12) -L(5) levels. At ROC analysis, AUC for osteoporosis was 0.888 for phantomless QCT [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.780-0.946] and ranged from 0.825 to 0.853 using trabecular ROIs at single lumbar levels (0.864; 95% CI 0.752-0.930 at multivariate analysis). Supine-prone reproducibility was better with the simple ROI method compared with QCT. It is concluded that both phantomless QCT and simple ROI attenuation measurements of the lumbar spine are effective for BMD screening at CTC

  20. Radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases-software-assisted evaluation of the ablation zone in MDCT: tumor-free follow-up versus local recurrent disease.

    PubMed

    Keil, Sebastian; Bruners, Philipp; Schiffl, Katharina; Sedlmair, Martin; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Günther, Rolf W; Das, Marco; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in change of size and CT value between local recurrences and tumor-free areas after CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic metastases during follow-up by means of dedicated software for automatic evaluation of hepatic lesions. Thirty-two patients with 54 liver metastases from breast or colorectal cancer underwent triphasic contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate hepatic metastatic spread and localization before CT-guided RFA and for follow-up after intervention. Sixteen of these patients (65.1 + or - 10.3 years) with 30 metastases stayed tumor-free (group 1), while the other group (n = 16 with 24 metastases; 62.0 + or - 13.8 years) suffered from local recurrent disease (group 2). Applying an automated software tool (SyngoCT Oncology; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), size parameters (volume, RECIST, WHO) and attenuation were measured within the lesions before, 1 day after, and 28 days after RFA treatment. The natural logarithm (ln) of the quotient of the volume 1 day versus 28 days after RFA treament was computed: lnQ1//28/0(volume). Analogously, ln ratios of RECIST, WHO, and attenuation were computed and statistically evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA. One lesion in group 2 was excluded from further evaluation due to automated missegmentation. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to initial volume, RECIST, and WHO (p < 0.05). Furthermore, ln ratios corresponding to volume, RECIST, and WHO differed significantly between the two groups. Attenuation evaluations showed no significant differences, but there was a trend toward attenuation assessment for the parameter lnQ28/0(attenuation) (p = 0.0527), showing higher values for group 1 (-0.4 + or - 0.3) compared to group 2 (-0.2 + or - 0.2). In conclusion, hepatic metastases and their zone of coagulation necrosis after RFA differed significantly between tumor

  1. Comparison of 3D free-breathing coronary MR angiography and 64-MDCT angiography for detection of coronary stenosis in patients with high calcium scores.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Xihai; Huang, Jie; Francois, Christopher J; Tuite, David; Bi, Xiaoming; Li, Debiao; Carr, James C

    2007-12-01

    The objective of our study was to compare the diagnostic performance of coronary MR angiography (MRA) and 64-MDCT angiography (MDCTA) for the detection of significant stenosis (> or = 50%) in patients with high calcium scores. Eighteen patients (12 men, six women; mean age, 56 y; age range, 38-77 y) who had at least one calcified plaque with a calcium score of > 100 underwent coronary MRA and conventional coronary angiography (CAG) within 2 weeks of MDCTA. Coronary MRA image quality of the calcified segments was assessed by two observers in consensus on a 4-point scale (1 = not visible, 2 = poor, 3 = good, 4 = excellent) using a 10-segment model from the modified American Heart Association classification. Three experienced radiologists, unaware of the results of conventional CAG, independently assessed for the presence of significant stenosis on MDCTA images and the corresponding MRA images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated for each reader using conventional CAG as the gold standard. Thirty-three calcified plaques with a calcium score of > 100 were detected on MDCTA in the 18 patients. The coronary segments with nodal calcification (n = 17) showed a higher mean image quality score than the segments with diffuse calcification (n = 16) (3.47 +/- 0.62 vs 2.94 +/- 0.77, respectively; p < 0.05). Of the 33 coronary segments with calcification, 12 significant stenoses were identified on conventional CAG. The sensitivity, specificity, and area under the ROC curve (AUC) for MRA and MDCTA, respectively, were as follows: reader 1, 75%, 81%, 0.82 versus 75%, 48%, 0.68; reader 2, 83%, 71%, 0.82 versus 67%, 52%, 0.63; and reader 3, 83%, 71%, 0.85 versus 83%, 43%, 0.65, respectively. The average AUC of MRA for the three readers was significantly higher than that of MDCTA (p = 0.030). Coronary MRA has higher image quality for coronary segments with nodal calcification than for coronary segments with diffuse calcification. Coronary MRA has better

  2. Comparison of 3D Free-Breathing Coronary MR Angiography and 64-MDCT Angiography for Detection of Coronary Stenosis in Patients with High Calcium Scores

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Xihai; Huang, Jie; Francois, Christopher J.; Tuite, David; Bi, Xiaoming; Li, Debiao; Carr, James C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of our study was to compare the diagnostic performance of coronary MR angiography (MRA) and 64-MDCT angiography (MDCTA) for the detection of significant stenosis (≥ 50%) in patients with high calcium scores. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighteen patients (12 men, six women; mean age, 56 y; age range, 38–77 y) who had at least one calcified plaque with a calcium score of > 100 underwent coronary MRA and conventional coronary angiography (CAG) within 2 weeks of MDCTA. Coronary MRA image quality of the calcified segments was assessed by two observers in consensus on a 4-point scale (1 = not visible, 2 = poor, 3 = good, 4 = excellent) using a 10-segment model from the modified American Heart Association classification. Three experienced radiologists, unaware of the results of conventional CAG, independently assessed for the presence of significant stenosis on MDCTA images and the corresponding MRA images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated for each reader using conventional CAG as the gold standard. RESULTS Thirty-three calcified plaques with a calcium score of > 100 were detected on MDCTA in the 18 patients. The coronary segments with nodal calcification (n = 17) showed a higher mean image quality score than the segments with diffuse calcification (n = 16) (3.47 ± 0.62 vs 2.94 ± 0.77, respectively; p < 0.05). Of the 33 coronary segments with calcification, 12 significant stenoses were identified on conventional CAG. The sensitivity, specificity, and area under the ROC curve (AUC) for MRA and MDCTA, respectively, were as follows: reader 1, 75%, 81%, 0.82 versus 75%, 48%, 0.68; reader 2, 83%, 71%, 0.82 versus 67%, 52%, 0.63; and reader 3, 83%, 71%, 0.85 versus 83%, 43%, 0.65, respectively. The average AUC of MRA for the three readers was significantly higher than that of MDCTA (p = 0.030). CONCLUSION Coronary MRA has higher image quality for coronary segments with nodal calcification than for coronary segments with

  3. Comparative results of conservative treatments for isolated anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury and injury to both the ATFL and calcaneofibular ligament of the ankle as assessed by subtalar arthrography.

    PubMed

    Samoto, Norihiro; Sugimoto, Kazuya; Takaoka, Takanori; Fujita, Tadashi; Kitada, Chikara; Takakura, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    There have been no reports describing the results of conservative treatment of acute lateral ligament injury of the ankle in detail in terms of the severity of the injury, and the results of conservative treatment for injury with severe instability are still controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess the results of nonoperative treatment of acute lateral ligament injury according to its severity. Fifty-five consecutive acute lateral ankle ligament injuries in 54 patients who were treated nonoperatively were followed up as a prospective study. Twenty-seven were male patients and 27 were female patients; the average age was 23.9 years (12-55 years). The patients were divided into two groups according to the extent of the ligament injury: patients with an isolated injury of the anterior talofibular ligament and those with combined injuries of the anterior talofibular ligament and the calcaneofibular ligament. In addition to the routine examinations for inversion ankle sprain, subtalar arthrography was mainly used to assess the condition of the calcaneofibular ligament. The arthrography was performed an average of 3.5 days after the injury (0-5 days). Fifty-five ankles of patients who were treated nonoperatively according to the same protocol were included in this study, and were followed up for an average of 5.0 years (37-86 months). At the time of the final follow-up, 22 of 25 (88%) ankles with an isolated injury to the anterior talofibular ligament were asymptomatic; in contrast, only 9 of 30 (30%) ankles with combined injuries of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligament were asymptomatic. The average American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score of the isolated injuries was 97.8 points, in contrast to 92.4 points for the combined injuries. The results of nonoperative treatment with 1 week immobilization followed by a functional brace were excellent in patients with an isolated injury of the anterior talofibular ligament, but were

  4. Radiation dose in a "triple rule-out" coronary CT angiography protocol of emergency department patients using 64-MDCT: the impact of ECG-based tube current modulation on age, sex, and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Takakuwa, Kevin M; Halpern, Ethan J; Gingold, Eric L; Levin, David C; Shofer, Frances S

    2009-04-01

    "Triple rule-out" coronary CT angiography (CTA) using 64-MDCT technology is a new approach for evaluating emergency department patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Our objective was to evaluate the reduction in effective radiation dose through the use of tube current modulation in patients who underwent a triple rule-out coronary CTA evaluation and to document how effective radiation dose was impacted by patient age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). A retrospective analysis of triple rule-out coronary CTA examinations performed on a 64-MDCT scanner was ordered on a prospective cohort of 267 consecutive low- to moderate-risk emergency department patients with suspected ACS from a single university hospital between October 2006 and March 2008. Tube current modulation was generally used in patients with heart rates below 65 beats per minute during the second half of the study period as a way to reduce radiation exposure. We calculated effective radiation exposure using actual patient coronary CTA scanning parameters by age, sex, and BMI. Among the 172 patients evaluated without tube current modulation, effective dose averaged (+/- SD) 18.0 +/- 5.6 mSv (range, 9.9-31.3 mSv). Of the 95 patients who underwent CTA examination with tube current modulation, effective dose was significantly lower at 8.75 +/- 2.64 mSv (range, 5.4-16.6 mSv; p < 0.0001) and image quality was better (p < 0.0001) as compared with examinations without tube current modulation. There were no significant radiation differences by patient age, but tube current modulation decreased radiation exposure by at least half. Among the studies in which tube current modulation was not used, women received less radiation than men (17.0 vs 19.5 mSv, respectively; p < 0.001). For the studies with tube current modulation, there were no radiation differences by sex. Obese patients received significantly more radiation than overweight and normal-weight patients in the non

  5. Evaluation of biventricular ejection fraction with ECG-gated 16-slice CT: preliminary findings in acute pulmonary embolism in comparison with radionuclide ventriculography.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Vlassenbroek, Alain; Roelants, Véronique; D'Hoore, William; Verschuren, Franck; Goncette, Louis; Maldague, Baudouin

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the feasibility of cardiac global function evaluation during a whole-chest multi-slice CT (MSCT) acquisition in patients referred for suspicion of pulmonary embolism (PE), and to compare the results with planar equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography (ERNA). Ten consecutive haemodynamically stable patients (six female, four male; mean age 69.7 years; heart rate 65-99 bpm) with suspicion of PE underwent an MSCT and ERNA within a 6 h period. CT acquisition was performed after contrast medium injection by using 16x1.5 mm collimation and retrospective ECG gating. Left ventricular (LVEF) and right ventricular (RVEF) ejection fractions were calculated using dedicated three-dimensional software. Relationships between measurements obtained with MSCT and ERNA were assessed using linear regression analysis and reliability of MSCT was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficient. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to calculate limits of agreement between MSCT and ERNA. MSCT was performed successfully in ten patients with a mean acquisition time of 16.5+/-2.8 s. Functional cardiac evaluation was possible on CT for all patients except for one due to poor opacification of right ventricle. Linear regression analysis showed a good correlation between MSCT and ERNA for the LVEF (R=0.91) and the RVEF (R=0.89) measurements. Intra-class correlation was superior for LVEF (0.92) than for the RVEF (0.68). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that MSCT substantially overestimated the ERNA RVEF. Morphological CT data demonstrated PE in four of ten of patients and alternative diagnoses in five of ten patients. Our study reveals that MSCT with retrospective ECG gating may provide in one modality a morphological and a functional cardiopulmonary evaluation. Comparison with ERNA demonstrated a good correlation for both ventricular ejection fractions.

  6. Image quality and diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector computed tomography for the detection of coronary artery disease in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Burgstahler, C; Beck, T; Kuettner, A; Reimann, A; Kopp, A F; Heuschmid, M; Claussen, C D; Schroeder, S

    2006-03-01

    Cardiac multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) scanners permit visualization of the coronary arteries with an overall good sensitivity (sens) and specificity (spec). However, in obese patients (pts), who are at higher risk to develop coronary artery disease (CAD), image quality of MSCT is supposed to be limited. At present, there are no data whether the accuracy of MSCT depends on the body mass index (BMI). Thus, we compared the catheter-controlled MSCT results from normal weight and obese pts in a cohort of 117 pts with regard to sens, spec, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and image quality. In all, 21 normal weight pts (group I: BMI<25, 64.6+/-11.1 years, number of risk factors 2.1+/-1.1), 60 pts with mild overweight (group II: BMI 25-30, 64.6+/-8.9 years, number of risk factors 3.4+/-1.0) and 36 obese pts (group III: BMI >30, 63.0+/-8.5 years, number of risk factors 3.4+/-0.9) were examined by MSCT (Sensation 16 Speed 4 D((R)), Siemens, Germany, gantry rotation time 375 ms) and invasive coronary angiography. MSCT results were compared blinded to the results of the coronary angiography with regard to the presence or absence of a significant stenosis (>50%) in a modified AHA 13 segment (sgt) model. Image quality was assessed on a qualitative scale between 1 (very good) and 5 (insufficient image quality) for each sgt. Sens, spec, PPV and NPV were statistically not different in all three groups (I: 0.88/0.97/0.91/0.96, II: 0.83/0.97/0.88/0.95, III: 0.87/0.99/0.96/0.96). 3 pts (group I 1, group II 2) had to be excluded from analysis due to technical problems. Group I had significantly less risk factors (P < 0.001) and image quality was significantly better than in group II and III (P < 0.05). Group II and III did not differ with regard to risk factors or image quality. Overweight and obesity have an impact on MSCT image quality but did not hamper the diagnostic accuracy. Thus, MSCT is a noninvasive method to detect or rule out CAD also in pts with higher BMI. These retrospective data have to be confirmed in larger prospective trials.

  7. MDCT evaluation of sternal variations: Pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Duraikannu, Chary; Noronha, Olma V; Sundarrajan, Pushparajan

    2016-01-01

    Sternal variations and anomalies have been identified in the past during autopsy or cadaveric studies. Recently, an increasing number of minor sternal variations have been reported with the advent of multidetector computed tomography (CT). Although there are many sternal variations that occur with varying appearance and prevalence, most of them are not recognized or are underreported during routine imaging of thorax. Identification of sternal variations is important to differentiate from pathological conditions and to prevent fatal complications prior to sternal interventions like marrow aspiration or acupuncture. This article aims to describe the minor and asymptomatic sternal variations by multidetector CT and their clinical significance. PMID:27413263

  8. Bladder carcinoma: MDCT cystography and virtual cystoscopy.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Sciarra, Alessandro; Di Martino, Michele; Bernardo, Silvia; Vergari, Valeria; Gentilucci, Alessandro; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    Bladder carcinoma is the most common tumor among the low urinary tract, accounting for 90% of cancer cases. Conventional cystoscopy represents the gold standard for diagnosis and local management of bladder carcinoma. As the prevalence of transitional cell carcinoma is four-fold greater in men than in women, the endoscopic procedure presents objective difficulties related to the length and bending of male urethra. The most important problems are represented by intense discomfort for the patient and bleeding; furthermore, the high cost, invasivity, and local complications such as infections and mechanical lesions are well-known drawbacks. Additionally, conventional cystoscopy does not provide information about extravescical extensions of the tumor. CT cystography, combined with virtual cystoscopy, is mandatory for TNM staging of the tumor and also is useful when conventional cystoscopy is inconclusive or cannot be performed. We presents the CT cystography findings with virtual endoscopy correlation and bladder carcinoma appearance.

  9. MDCT imaging of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Pezzullo, Martina; Delpierre, Isabelle; Sadeghi, Niloufar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of emergency imaging is to detect treatable lesions before secondary neurological damage occurs. CT plays a primary role in the acute setting of head trauma, allowing accurate detection of lesions requiring immediate neurosurgical treatment. CT is also accurate in detecting secondary injuries and is therefore essential in follow-up. This review discusses the main characteristics of primary and secondary brain injuries. PMID:26607650

  10. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Heart Attack Treatment of a Heart Attack Life After a Heart Attack Heart Failure About Heart Failure ... Non-invasive - Invasive • Treatment of a Heart Attack • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support ...

  11. Accurate estimation of global and regional cardiac function by retrospectively gated multidetector row computed tomography: comparison with cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Belge, Bénédicte; Coche, Emmanuel; Pasquet, Agnès; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2006-07-01

    Retrospective reconstruction of ECG-gated images at different parts of the cardiac cycle allows the assessment of cardiac function by multi-detector row CT (MDCT) at the time of non-invasive coronary imaging. We compared the accuracy of such measurements by MDCT to cine magnetic resonance (MR). Forty patients underwent the assessment of global and regional cardiac function by 16-slice MDCT and cine MR. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes estimated by MDCT (134+/-51 and 67+/-56 ml) were similar to those by MR (137+/-57 and 70+/-60 ml, respectively; both P=NS) and strongly correlated (r=0.92 and r=0.95, respectively; both P<0.001). Consequently, LV ejection fractions by MDCT and MR were also similar (55+/-21 vs. 56+/-21%; P=NS) and highly correlated (r=0.95; P<0.001). Regional end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses by MDCT were highly correlated (r=0.84 and r=0.92, respectively; both P<0.001), but significantly lower than by MR (8.3+/-1.8 vs. 8.8+/-1.9 mm and 12.7+/-3.4 vs. 13.3+/-3.5 mm, respectively; both P<0.001). Values of regional wall thickening by MDCT and MR were similar (54+/-30 vs. 51+/-31%; P=NS) and also correlated well (r=0.91; P<0.001). Retrospectively gated MDCT can accurately estimate LV volumes, EF and regional LV wall thickening compared to cine MR.

  12. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  13. Gastrointestinal Tract Perforation: MDCT Findings according to the Perforation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2009-01-01

    Our objective is to describe the characteristic CT findings of gastrointestinal (GI) tract perforations at various levels of the gastrointestinal system. It is beneficial to localize the perforation site as well as to diagnose the presence of bowel perforation for planning the correct surgery. CT has been established as the most valuable imaging technique for identifying the presence, site and cause of the GI tract perforation. The amount and location of extraluminal free air usually differ among various perforation sites. Further, CT findings such as discontinuity of the bowel wall and concentrated free air bubbles in close proximity to the bowel wall can help predict the perforation site. Multidetector CT with the multiplanar reformation images has improved the accuracy of CT for predicting the perforation sites. PMID:19182505

  14. Asbestos Surveillance Program Aachen (ASPA): initial results from baseline screening for lung cancer in asbestos-exposed high-risk individuals using low-dose multidetector-row CT.

    PubMed

    Das, Marco; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H; Hering, K G; Sirbu, H; Zschiesche, W; Knoll, Lars; Felten, Michael K; Kraus, Thomas; Günther, Rolf W; Wildberger, Joachim E

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of lung cancer in a high-risk asbestos-exposed cohort using low-dose MDCT. Of a population of 5,389 former power-plant workers, 316 were characterized as individuals at highest risk for lung cancer according to a lung-cancer risk model including age, asbestos exposure and smoking habits. Of these 316, 187 (mean age: 66.6 years) individuals were included in a prospective trial. Mean asbestos exposure time was 29.65 years and 89% were smokers. Screening was performed on a 16-slice MDCT (Siemens) with low-dose technique (10/20 mAs(eff.); 1 mm/0.5 mm increment). In addition to soft copy PACS reading analysis on a workstation with a dedicated lung analysis software (LungCARE; Siemens) was performed. One strongly suspicious mass and eight cases of histologically proven lung cancer were found plus 491 additional pulmonary nodules (average volume: 40.72 ml, average diameter 4.62 mm). Asbestos-related changes (pleural plaques, fibrosis) were visible in 80 individuals. Lung cancer screening in this high-risk cohort showed a prevalence of lung cancer of 4.28% (8/187) at baseline screening with an additional large number of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. Low-dose MDCT proved to be feasible in this highly selected population.

  15. Role of multidetector computed tomography in the anatomical definition of the left atrium-pulmonary vein complex in patients with atrial fibrillation. Personal experience and pictorial assay.

    PubMed

    Benini, K; Marini, M; Del Greco, M; Nollo, G; Manera, V; Centonze, M

    2008-09-01

    This study aimed to illustrate the typical anatomical pattern and anatomical variants of the left atrium-pulmonary vein (LA-PV) complex studied by 16-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in a population of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing percutaneous transcatheter left atrial ablation. Accurate knowledge of this anatomical region is fundamental for increasing the efficiency, efficacy and accuracy of the procedure and for reducing the risk of complications. From January 2004 to March 2007, we studied 75 patients (57 men, 18 women) affected by paroxysmal and chronic AF by using MDCT. In 63 patients, the MDCT examination was performed using retrospective cardiac electrocardiographic (ECG) gating and dose modulation, with reconstructions performed at 75% of R-R interval. In the remaining 12 patients, ECG gating was not possible due to high-frequency AF. We identified 286 PV: 157 right and 129 left. On the right side, eight PV were supernumerary and one was a common trunk, whereas on the left side, we found 22 common trunks and one supernumerary vein. In 61.3% of patients, the anatomical pattern was typical (two right and two left PV). In the remaining 38.7%, it was atypical [two right PV-left common trunk (26.6%); three right PV-two left PV (6.7%); three right PV-left common trunk (2.6%); three right PV-three left PV (1.3%); right common trunk-two left PV (1.3%)]. MDCT identified branching of the right inferior PV in 94.5%, of the right superior PV in 75.6%, of the left superior PV in 7.5% and of the left inferior PV in 7.5%; 3/8 of the right supernumerary veins presented branching. With respect to the left PV ostia, the position of the orifice of the 74 recognised appendages was high in 85.1%, intermediate in 12.1% and low in 2.8%. There was no association between PV anatomical variants and clinical presentation of AF (paroxysmal or chronic). MDCT represents a fundamental diagnostic imaging tool in the anatomical definition of the LA

  16. Inferior joint space arthrography of normal temporomandibular joints: Reassessment of diagnostic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.A.; Tu, H.K.; Sleder, P.R.; Lydiatt, D.D.; Laney, T.J.

    1986-06-01

    Inferior joint space arthrograms of the temporomandibular joints of 31 healthy volunteers (62 joints) were obtained to determine normal arthrographic findings. The superior margin of the anterior recess was smooth and flat in 68% of the joints and concave in 32% with the subjects' mouths closed. The concavity was the result of the anterior ridge of the meniscus impinging on the contrast material. The concave impression could be distinguished easily from an anteriorly displaced meniscus on videotaped studies, which demonstrated a smooth transition of contrast material from the anterior to the posterior recess during opening of a subject's mouth. With the mouth open, the anterior recess decreased in size, appearing as a small, crescent-shaped collection of contrast material anterior to the head of the condyle in 52 joints (84%); it remained large in ten joints (16%) at maximal mouth opening. The configuration of the posterior recess was identical to that described previously; however, with the subjects' mouths closed, it was larger than the anterior recess, contrary to most previously reported results.

  17. Radiation dose in radiography, CT, and arthrography of the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, E.L.; Moore, R.J.; Thompson, J.R.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies were performed on a Rando Humanoid head phantom to compare radiation dosages used in temporomandibular joint examinations. Studies included transaxial and direct sagittal high-resolution CT, reduced milliamperage dynamic CT, tomoarthrography, pluridirectional and linear tomography, pantomography, transcranial plain films, and fluoroscopy. Radiation doses were determined for the brain, lens, pituitary gland, condylar marrow, and thyroid gland. Condylar marrow received doses of 64 and 52 mGy, respectively, for the GE 9800 and 8800 high-resolution scans; 21 and 17 mGy, respectively, for the dynamically sequenced scans; and 26 mGy for the GE 9800 direct sagittal sections. Tomoarthrography yielded 31 mGy and fluoroscopy 12 mGy. Other lower doses showed 5 mGy for polytomography, 3 mGy for ipsilateral joint linear tomography, 1.9 mGy for the GE 9800 slow ScoutView, 1.8 mGy for xeroradiography, 0.9 mGy for contralateral joint linear tomography, 0.3-0.4 mGy for transcranial plain films and pantomography, and 0.2 mGy for the GE 8800 ScoutView. The estimated error in this study was calculated to be +/- 15%. On a relative scale, the radiation doses from high-resolution CT and tomoarthrography are high, dynamic CT yields a medium dose, and all other tomographic and plain-film techniques yield low doses.

  18. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: a comparison between a fluoroscopic and a nonfluoroscopic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.W.; Langlais, R.P.; Abramovitch, K.

    1989-05-01

    A nonfluoroscopic temporomandibular joint arthrographic technique is contrasted with a more widely employed fluoroscopically guided technique. The nonfluoroscopic technique uses a posterior approach to joint injection, as contrasted with the lateral injection approach of the fluoroscopically guided technique. The advantages of the nonfluoroscopic technique are less radiation dose to the patient, less expensive and less sophisticated imaging equipment, and less potential for neurovascular trauma. The fluoroscopic technique offers greater control of the procedure, less patient and operator time, and the capability for a dynamic videofluoroscopic study. Both techniques appear to be safe and efficacious. Differences in anatomy, imaging modalities, patient radiation exposure, and potential complications are also discussed as part of this comparison.48 references.

  19. Controversies about effects of low-kilovoltage MDCT acquisition on Agatston calcium scoring.

    PubMed

    Deprez, Fabrice C; Vlassenbroek, Alain; Ghaye, Benoît; Raaijmakers, Rolf; Coche, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Recent articles have advocated the possibility of obtaining Agatston coronary calcium scoring at 100 kVp by using a single adapted elevated calcium threshold. To evaluate the influence of kilovoltage potential protocols on the Agatston score, we acquired successive scans of a calcium scoring phantom at 4 levels of kilovoltage potential (80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp, 55 mAs) and measured semiautomatically the individual and the total Agatston score of 6 inserts (of 5-mm and 3-mm diameter) containing hydroxyapatite at different concentrations (800, 400, 200 mg/cm(3)). Our results showed that Agatston scores obtained at various low-kilovoltage potential protocols can be highly overestimated in some particular cases. At 80 kVp, for example, mean measured Agatston score was multiplied by a factor from 1.06 (5-mm highest density insert) to 2.67 (3-mm lowest density insert) compared with the Agatston scores performed at 120 kVp. Indeed in the one hand, reducing kilovoltage potential in multidetector CT acquisitions increase the CT density of coronary calcifications that can be measured on the reconstructed images. On the other hand, Agatston score is a multi-threshold measurement (with a step weighting function). Consequently low kilovoltage potential can lead to overweight some calcifications scores. For these reasons, Agatston score with low kilovoltage potential acquisition cannot be reliably adapted by a unique recalibration of the standard calcium attenuation threshold of 130 HU and requires a standardized CT acquisition protocol at 120 kVp. Alternatives to performing low-dose coronary artery calcium scans are either using coronary calcium scans with reduced tube current (low mAs) at 120 kVp with the iterative reconstructions or using mass/volume scoring (not influenced by kilovoltage potential variations). Finally, we emphasized that incorrect Agatston score evaluation may have important clinical, financial, and health care implications.

  20. Typical MDCT Angiography Findings of an Unusual Cutaneous Neoplasia; Masson Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tutar, Onur; Samanci, Cesur; Bakan, Selim; Alis, Denizcan; Kaur, Ahmet; Şanlı, Deniz Tekcan; Yildirim, Duzgun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH), also known as masson tumour, is a lesion composed of proliferating endothelial cells. Case Report In this article we explained clinical, histological and radiological features of IPEH involving the scalp, localized on the left side of the skull and in the periauricular region. Conclusions Radiologically, intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia could be misdiagnosed as malignant or benign vascular tumour. On cross-sectional imaging it is useful demonstrating the extremely vascular component of IPEH. But IPEH has no specific radiologic features that we can use to differentiate from the aforementioned lesions. Due to that, histopathological examinations are needed to diagnose IPEH. PMID:25624958

  1. Congenital solitary kidney with multiple renal arteries: case report using MDCT angiography.

    PubMed

    Matusz, Petru; Miclăuş, Graţian Dragoslav; Banciu, Christian Dragoş; Sas, Ioan; Joseph, Shamfa C; Pirtea, Laurenţiu Cornel; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    A congenital solitary kidney with multiple renal arteries is a rare congenital abnormality that can occur in the presence of multiple other anomalies. We describe an atypical case of a right congenital solitary kidney with three renal arteries (RA) one main RA and two additional renal arteries in a 75-year-old woman with uterine didelphys. The main RA had an intraluminal diameter larger than the diameter of the additional renal arteries (AdRAs) at the origin (0.53 cm for the main RA; 0.49 cm and 0.32 cm for the two AdRAs). Both the AdRAs had a greater length than the main RA (3.51 cm for the main RA; 3.70 cm and 4.77 cm for the two AdRAs). The calculated volume of the kidney was 283 cm³, while the volume of the renal parenchyma was 258 cm³. Knowledge of this variant is extremely important in clinical practice as it has been found to be associated with proteinuria, hypertension and renal insufficiency.

  2. Small bowel obstruction in the emergency department: MDCT features of common and uncommon causes.

    PubMed

    Tirumani, Harika; Vassa, Ravi; Fasih, Najla; Ojili, Vijayanadh

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction is a common condition encountered by the radiologist in the emergency department. Though intestinal adhesions and obstructed hernias are the most common causes of acute small bowel obstruction, a variety of uncommon and rare conditions can cause acute and subacute bowel obstruction. Imaging plays a key role in the workup of bowel obstruction by identifying the cause, level, and degree of bowel obstruction. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the multi-detector computed tomography features of common and uncommon causes of acute and subacute small bowel obstruction.

  3. Development of a New Imaging Bulk Package for Multipatient Use in MDCT.

    PubMed

    Spinazzi, Alberto; Marchildon, Patrice A; Murray, Elyssa A; Giorgi, Maud; Kirchin, Miles A; Sireci, Steven N

    2015-10-01

    Multidose presentations of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved radiographic contrast agents have been considered pharmacy bulk packages. However, the use of pharmacy bulk packages for multipatient dosing does not meet the U.S. Pharmacopeia definition of a pharmacy bulk package. The purpose of this study was to validate and gain FDA approval for a new multidose preparation of iopamidol for safe, compliant multipatient dosing in the CT suite. An FDA-approved development program was undertaken to determine whether multidose presentations of iopamidol used in combination with a transfer set remain free of chemical and microbiologic contamination during the labeled maximum hold time after container closure penetration and simulated worst-case handling conditions. The program comprised antimicrobial effectiveness testing of iopamidol-300 and iopamidol-370 containers with seven microbes. Microbial growth was evaluated at five time points up to 28 days after introduction. Microbial ingress testing involved inoculation of four challenge sites with each of four microorganisms for up to 14 hours. Chemical compatibility and extractable testing was performed to ensure chemical integrity. No growth of microorganisms occurred. All evaluated samples remained sterile, indicating no microbial contamination through 14 hours of simulated clinical use. No effect on chemical integrity was found in any of the drawn iopamidol samples meeting the chemical specifications for iopamidol, and no leachable compounds were detected. The absence of any chemical or microbiologic contamination led the FDA to approve the iopamidol multidose container and transfer set as a combination product for multipatient use. The approval resulted in a new U.S. Pharmacopeia category of multidose presentation-the imaging bulk package.

  4. A numerical study of heat and water vapor transfer in MDCT-based human airway models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) thermo-fluid model is developed to study regional distributions of temperature and water vapor in three multi-detector row computed-tomography-based human airways with minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. A one-dimensional (1D) model is also solved to provide necessary initial and boundary conditions for the 3D model. Both 3D and 1D predicted temperature distributions agree well with available in vivo measurement data. On inspiration, the 3D cold high-speed air stream is split at the bifurcation to form secondary flows, with its cold regions biased toward the inner wall. The cold air flowing along the wall is warmed up more rapidly than the air in the lumen center. The repeated splitting pattern of air streams caused by bifurcations acts as an effective mechanism for rapid heat and mass transfer in 3D. This provides a key difference from the 1D model, where heating relies largely on diffusion in the radial direction, thus significantly affecting gradient-dependent variables, such as energy flux and water loss rate. We then propose the correlations for respective heat and mass transfer in the airways of up to 6 generations: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], where Nu is the Nusselt number, Sh is the Sherwood number, Re is the branch Reynolds number, D a is the airway equivalent diameter, and [Formula: see text] is the tracheal equivalent diameter.

  5. Characteristic image quality of a third generation dual-source MDCT scanner: Noise, resolution, and detectability

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Justin; Wilson, Joshua; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to assess the inherent image quality characteristics of a new multidetector computed tomography system in terms of noise, resolution, and detectability index as a function of image acquisition and reconstruction for a range of clinically relevant settings. Methods: A multisized image quality phantom (37, 30, 23, 18.5, and 12 cm physical diameter) was imaged on a SOMATOM Force scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions) under variable dose, kVp, and tube current modulation settings. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and with advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) with iterative strengths of 3, 4, and 5. Image quality was assessed in terms of the noise power spectrum (NPS), task transfer function (TTF), and detectability index for a range of detection tasks (contrasts of approximately 45, 90, 300, −900, and 1000 HU, and 2–20 mm diameter) based on a non-prewhitening matched filter model observer with eye filter. Results: Image noise magnitude decreased with decreasing phantom size, increasing dose, and increasing ADMIRE strength, offering up to 64% noise reduction relative to FBP. Noise texture in terms of the NPS was similar between FBP and ADMIRE (<5% shift in peak frequency). The resolution, based on the TTF, improved with increased ADMIRE strength by an average of 15% in the TTF 50% frequency for ADMIRE-5. The detectability index increased with increasing dose and ADMIRE strength by an average of 55%, 90%, and 163% for ADMIRE 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Assessing the impact of mA modulation for a fixed average dose over the length of the phantom, detectability was up to 49% lower in smaller phantom sections and up to 26% higher in larger phantom sections for the modulated scan compared to a fixed tube current scan. Overall, the detectability exhibited less variability with phantom size for modulated scans compared to fixed tube current scans. Conclusions: Image quality increased with increasing dose and decreasing phantom size. The CT system exhibited nonlinear noise and resolution properties, especially at very low-doses, large phantom sizes, and for low-contrast objects. Objective image quality metrics generally increased with increasing dose and ADMIRE strength, and with decreasing phantom size. The ADMIRE algorithm could offer comparable image quality at reduced doses or improved image quality at the same dose. The use of tube current modulation resulted in more consistent image quality with changing phantom size.

  6. Interrupted Aortic Arch Associated with Absence of Left Common Carotid Artery: Imaging with MDCT

    SciTech Connect

    Onbas, Omer Olgun, Hasim; Ceviz, Naci; Ors, Rahmi; Okur, Adnan

    2006-06-15

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare severe congenital heart defect defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between ascending and descending aorta. Although its association with various congenital heart defects has been reported, absence of left common carotid artery (CCA) in patients with IAA has not been reported previously. We report a case of IAA associated with the absence of left CCA which was clearly shown on multidetector-row spiral CT.

  7. Evaluation of Lung MDCT Nodule Annotation Across Radiologists and Methods1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Charles R.; Johnson, Timothy D.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Aberle, Denise R.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; MacMahon, Heber; Mullan, Brian F.; Yankelevitz, David F.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Armato, Samuel G.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Gur, David; Henschke, Claudia I.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Bland, Peyton H.; Laderach, Gary; Pais, Richie; Qing, David; Piker, Chris; Guo, Junfeng; Starkey, Adam; Max, Daniel; Croft, Barbara Y.; Clarke, Laurence P.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Integral to the mission of the National Institutes of Health–sponsored Lung Imaging Database Consortium is the accurate definition of the spatial location of pulmonary nodules. Because the majority of small lung nodules are not resected, a reference standard from histopathology is generally unavailable. Thus assessing the source of variability in defining the spatial location of lung nodules by expert radiologists using different software tools as an alternative form of truth is necessary. Materials and Methods The relative differences in performance of six radiologists each applying three annotation methods to the task of defining the spatial extent of 23 different lung nodules were evaluated. The variability of radiologists’ spatial definitions for a nodule was measured using both volumes and probability maps (p-map). Results were analyzed using a linear mixed-effects model that included nested random effects. Results Across the combination of all nodules, volume and p-map model parameters were found to be significant at P < .05 for all methods, all radiologists, and all second-order interactions except one. The radiologist and methods variables accounted for 15% and 3.5% of the total p-map variance, respectively, and 40.4% and 31.1% of the total volume variance, respectively. Conclusion Radiologists represent the major source of variance as compared with drawing tools independent of drawing metric used. Although the random noise component is larger for the p-map analysis than for volume estimation, the p-map analysis appears to have more power to detect differences in radiologist-method combinations. The standard deviation of the volume measurement task appears to be proportional to nodule volume. PMID:16979075

  8. Analyzing coronary artery disease in patients with low CAC scores by 64-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Lu, Nan-Han; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Chen, Tai-Been; Huang, Yung-Hui; Kuo, Chung-Ming; Ding, Hueisch-Jy

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores are widely used to determine risk for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). A CAC score does not have the diagnostic accuracy needed for CAD. This work uses a novel efficient approach to predict CAD in patients with low CAC scores. The study group comprised 86 subjects who underwent a screening health examination, including laboratory testing, CAC scanning, and cardiac angiography by 64-slice multidetector computed tomographic angiography. Eleven physiological variables and three personal parameters were investigated in proposed model. Logistic regression was applied to assess the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of when using individual variables and CAC score. Meta-analysis combined physiological and personal parameters by logistic regression. The diagnostic sensitivity of the CAC score was 14.3% when the CAC score was ≤30. Sensitivity increased to 57.13% using the proposed model. The statistically significant variables, based on beta values and P values, were family history, LDL-c, blood pressure, HDL-c, age, triglyceride, and cholesterol. The CAC score has low negative predictive value for CAD. This work applied a novel prediction method that uses patient information, including physiological and society parameters. The proposed method increases the accuracy of CAC score for predicting CAD.

  9. Computerized detection of diffuse lung disease in MDCT: the usefulness of statistical texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Li, Feng; Doi, Kunio; Li, Qiang

    2009-11-01

    Accurate detection of diffuse lung disease is an important step for computerized diagnosis and quantification of this disease. It is also a difficult clinical task for radiologists. We developed a computerized scheme to assist radiologists in the detection of diffuse lung disease in multi-detector computed tomography (CT). Two radiologists selected 31 normal and 37 abnormal CT scans with ground glass opacity, reticular, honeycombing and nodular disease patterns based on clinical reports. The abnormal cases in our database must contain at least an abnormal area with a severity of moderate or severe level that was subjectively rated by the radiologists. Because statistical texture features may lack the power to distinguish a nodular pattern from a normal pattern, the abnormal cases that contain only a nodular pattern were excluded. The areas that included specific abnormal patterns in the selected CT images were then delineated as reference standards by an expert chest radiologist. The lungs were first segmented in each slice by use of a thresholding technique, and then divided into contiguous volumes of interest (VOIs) with a 64 × 64 × 64 matrix size. For each VOI, we determined and employed statistical texture features, such as run-length and co-occurrence matrix features, to distinguish abnormal from normal lung parenchyma. In particular, we developed new run-length texture features with clear physical meanings to considerably improve the accuracy of our detection scheme. A quadratic classifier was employed for distinguishing between normal and abnormal VOIs by the use of a leave-one-case-out validation scheme. A rule-based criterion was employed to further determine whether a case was normal or abnormal. We investigated the impact of new and conventional texture features, VOI size and the dimensionality for regions of interest on detecting diffuse lung disease. When we employed new texture features for 3D VOIs of 64 × 64 × 64 voxels, our system achieved the highest performance level: a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 90% for the detection of abnormal VOIs, and a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 90% for the detection of abnormal cases. Our computerized scheme would be useful for assisting radiologists in the diagnosis of diffuse lung disease.

  10. A technical solution to avoid partial scan artifacts in cardiac MDCT

    PubMed Central

    Primaka, A. N.; Dong, Y.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Jorgensen, S. M.; McCollough, C. H.; Ritman, E. L.

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of cardiac image data obtained using multidetector row computed tomography (CT) is compromised by partial scan reconstructions, which improve the temporal resolution but significantly increase image-to-image CT number variations for a fixed region of interest compared to full reconstruction images. The feasibility of a new approach to solve this problem is assessed. An anthropomorphic cardiac phantom and an anesthetized pig were scanned on a dual-source CT scanner using both full and partial scan acquisition modes under different conditions. Additional scans were conducted with the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal being in synchrony with the gantry rotation. In the animal study, a simple x-ray detector was used to generate a signal once per gantry rotation. This signal was then used to pace the pig’s heart. Phantom studies demonstrated that partial scan artifacts are strongly dependent on the rotational symmetry of angular projections, which is determined by the object shape and composition and its position with respect to the isocenter. The degree of partial scan artifacts also depends on the location of the region of interest with respect to highly attenuating materials (bones, iodine, etc.) within the object. Single-source partial scan images (165 ms temporal resolution) were significantly less affected by partial scan artifacts compared to dual-source partial scan images (82 ms temporal resolution). When the ECG signal was in synchrony with the gantry rotation, the same cardiac phase always corresponded to the same positions of the x-ray tube(s) and, hence, the same scattering and beam hardening geometry. As a result, the range of image-to-image CT number variations for partial scan reconstruction images acquired in synchronized mode was decreased to that achieved using full reconstruction image data. The success of the new approach, which synchronizes the ECG signal with the position of the x-ray tube(s), was demonstrated both in the phantom and animal experiments. PMID:18196800

  11. A Numerical Study of Water Loss Rate Distributions in MDCT-Based Human Airway Models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-11-01

    Both three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) computational fluid dynamics methods are applied to study regional water loss in three multi-detector row computed-tomography-based human airway models at the minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. The overall water losses predicted by both 3D and 1D models in the entire respiratory tract agree with available experimental measurements. However, 3D and 1D models reveal different regional water loss rate distributions due to the 3D secondary flows formed at bifurcations. The secondary flows cause local skewed temperature and humidity distributions on inspiration acting to elevate the local water loss rate; and the secondary flow at the carina tends to distribute more cold air to the lower lobes. As a result, the 3D model predicts that the water loss rate first increases with increasing airway generation, and then decreases as the air approaches saturation, while the 1D model predicts a monotonic decrease of water loss rate with increasing airway generation. Moreover, the 3D (or 1D) model predicts relatively higher water loss rates in lower (or upper) lobes. The regional water loss rate can be related to the non-dimensional wall shear stress (τ (*)) by the non-dimensional mass transfer coefficient (h 0 (*) ) as [Formula: see text].

  12. Criteria for establishing shielding of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) rooms.

    PubMed

    Verdun, F R; Aroua, A; Baechler, S; Schmidt, S; Trueb, P R; Bochud, F O

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to compare two methods used for determining the proper shielding of computed tomography (CT) rooms while considering recent technological advances in CT scanners. The approaches of the German Institute for Standardisation and the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements were compared and a series of radiation measurements were performed in several CT rooms at the Lausanne University Hospital. The following three-step procedure is proposed for assuring sufficient shielding of rooms hosting new CT units with spiral mode acquisition and various X-ray beam collimation widths: (1) calculate the ambient equivalent dose for a representative average weekly dose length product at the position where shielding is required; (2) from the maximum permissible weekly dose at the location of interest, calculate the transmission factor F that must be taken to ensure proper shielding and (3) convert the transmission factor into a thickness of lead shielding. A similar approach could be adopted to use when designing shielding for fluoroscopy rooms, where the basic quantity would be the dose area product instead of the load of current (milliampere-minute).

  13. Defining vascular signatures of malignant hepatic masses: role of MDCT with 3D rendering.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sameer; Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2013-08-01

    Malignant hepatic masses, both primary and metastatic lesions, have characteristic CT appearances and enhancement patterns. Owing to advances in CT resolution, high-quality vascular maps can be generated with 3D rendering tools to aid hepatic mass evaluation. These renderings enable identification of neovascularity, which is critical for distinguishing malignant from benign lesions, and facilitate identification of small hyperenhancing malignant hepatic tumors. In this review, CT features of malignant hepatic masses are discussed in conjunction with a demonstration of the role for 3D vascular mapping.

  14. MDCT imaging following nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma: Protocol optimization and patterns of tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Coquia, Stephanie F; Johnson, Pamela T; Ahmed, Sameer; Fishman, Elliot K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the common and uncommon sites of renal cell carcinoma recurrence throughout the body by examining their appearances on computerized tomography (CT). CT imaging protocols will be discussed. The sites of recurrence have been categorized into 4 groups: chest and mediastinum, abdomen and pelvis, musculoskeletal, and neurological. For each site of recurrence, a representative CT image correlate with discussion is provided. The unique CT appearance of renal cell carcinoma recurrence and how it can be used in lesion detection will be discussed. Renal cell carcinoma recurrences are hypervascular like the primary tumor, which can aid in not only lesion detection but also in some cases, differentiation from other primary tumors. Through CT case review of various sites of recurrence, lesions are shown to be easily seen on arterial phase while sometimes being nearly inconspicuous on venous or delayed phases. Coronal and sagittal reconstructions can also improve diagnostic sensitivity. CT is the most commonly used imaging tool for surveillance of renal cell carcinoma recurrence after nephrectomy. Knowledge of sites of recurrence as well as the utility of arterial phase imaging and multiplanar reconstructions will aid in optimizing detection of disease recurrence. PMID:24349648

  15. The spectrum of facial fractures in motor vehicle accidents: an MDCT study of 374 patients.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Elina M; Koivikko, Mika P; Koskinen, Seppo K

    2014-04-01

    Road traffic accidents are a major health problem worldwide resulting frequently in maxillofacial injuries. The purpose of the study was to assess the incidence and spectrum of facial fractures in patients involved in a motor vehicle accident (MVA). Using picture archiving and communication system, all requests for suspected facial trauma were retrieved during a 62-month period; 374 met the inclusion criteria. Two researchers interpreted the multidetector computed tomography images by consensus. The motor vehicles involved were divided into two groups: those involving a passenger car or a larger vehicle and those involving a motorized two-wheeler. Furthermore, the motor vehicle accidents were divided into collisions and run-off-road accidents. Of the 374 patients (aged 15-80, mean 34), 271 (72 %) were male and 103 (28 %) female. Of all patients, 262 (70 %) had a facial or skull base fracture; of these, multiple separate fractures were present in 56 %. Nasal fractures were the most common fractures followed by orbital, skull base, and maxillary fractures. Frontal bone, LeFort, and zygomatic arch fractures were always accompanied by other fractures. Fractures were more frequent in the group of collisions compared with run-off-road accidents. In the two-wheeled group, only 15 % did not have facial or skull base fractures. Fractures often occur in multitudes as 39 % of all patients have multiple facial or skull bone fractures, and thus, emergency radiologists should be familiar with the complexity of the injuries. Negative clear sinus sign and low-energy sentinel injuries should be trusted as indications of undetected injuries in MVA victims.

  16. MDCT of pelvic inflammatory disease: a review of the pathophysiology, gamut of imaging findings, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Spain, James; Rheinboldt, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Representing an ascending, sexually spread pyogenic infection of the female genital tract, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a commonly encountered cause for emergency visits and hospitalizations among young and adult female patients. Though gynecologic evaluation and sonography constitute the mainstay of diagnosis, multidetector CT imaging of the abdomen and pelvis is not uncommonly performed, often as the initial imaging modality, due to the frequently vague and indeterminate clinical presentation. As such, knowledge and attenuation to the often subtle early imaging features of PID afford the radiologist a critical chance to direct and expedite appropriate pathways of patient care, minimizing the risk for secondary complications, including infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and enteric adhesions. In this paper, we will review the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, early and late imaging features of PID as well as potential secondary complications and treatment options. Additionally, we will discuss published data metrics on CT performance regarding sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis as well as potential imaging differential diagnostic considerations.

  17. Post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) and PMCT-angiography after cardiac surgery. Possibilities and limits.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Beatrice; Heinemann, Axel; Tzikas, Antonios; Poodendaen, Canasorn; Gulbins, Helmut; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Püschel, Klaus; Vogel, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    PMCT is a well-known tool of the forensic pathologist. It is employed worldwide. PMCT-angiography offers additional insights. This paper intends to demonstrate possibilities of both methods after cardiac surgery. Exemplary cases with typical findings were selected from our own collection. PMCT was performed as whole body CT (1mm slice, pitch 1.5, 130kV, 180-130mAs, 16 slice MDCT). In PMCT-angiography, contrast material (1.2 litres) is injected into the arteries (arterial phase, also documented with a whole body CT). Thereafter, contrast material is injected into the veins (venous phase, also documented with a whole body CT). The final CT is obtained after circulation has been provoked with a special pump (circulatory phase). PMCT visualised pseudoarthrosis and fractures of the sternum, implanted valves (TAVI) encroaching the ostia of the coronary arteries, bleeding and pericardial tamponade. PMCT-angiography showed the sources of the bleeding, vascular stenosis and obstruction and modified vascular supply. With respect to the postoperative care, malposition of tubes, drainages and complication of punctures could be seen. PMCT and PMCT-angiography can visualise complications and the cause of death. Such knowledge may allow for prevention of suffering and death. It may also aid in improving valve design and implantation procedures.

  18. Salter-Harris I fracture of the distal humerus in a neonate: imaging appearance of radiographs, ultrasound, and arthrography.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicholas M; Crawford, Lindsay

    2017-09-01

    Neonatal Salter-Harris I fractures of the distal humerus are a rare injury. This injury can be easily mistaken for a posterior elbow dislocation, creating a delay in diagnosis. We present a case of a neonate with a distal humerus Salter-Harris I fracture secondary to trauma during delivery. The patient presented with pseudoparesis of the left arm following birth. Posterior displacement of the elbow was identified on radiographs. Ultrasound of the elbow was performed after a gentle closed reduction of the left elbow was unsuccessful. A transphyseal supracondylar distal humerus fracture was identified on ultrasound. The patient subsequently had an intraoperative left elbow arthrogram to assist in visualization of the supracondylar fracture during closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. At 2-month follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact with full passive range of motion and had normal alignment of the capitellar ossification center and distal humerus on follow-up radiographs.

  19. How invasive is TMJ double-contrast arthrography in combination with cinematography? Patient discomfort versus known diagnostic gain.

    PubMed

    Engelke, W; Mommaerts, M

    1990-04-01

    There is no doubt that double-contrast TMJ fluoroscopic tomography enables a differential diagnosis and treatment in internal derangement pathosis. Its indication is, apart from the expected diagnostic gain, also determined by the degree of its invasiveness, and other alternative diagnostics being available (nuclear magnetic resonance). Data on patient discomfort and complications were gathered in 63 arthrotomographies; pain sensations and mandibular mobility, during and after the procedure in particular, were studied. We consider, along with Westesson, the procedure to be less invasive than commonly considered, once the surgeon-radiologist has gained enough experience.

  20. Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles on pre- and postoperative CT arthrography (CTA): is the Goutallier grading system reliable?

    PubMed

    Lee, Eugene; Choi, Jung-Ah; Oh, Joo Han; Ahn, Soyeon; Hong, Sung Hwan; Chai, Jee Won; Kang, Heung Sik

    2013-09-01

    To retrospectively evaluate fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles on CTA using Goutallier's grading system and quantitative measurements with comparison between pre- and postoperative states. IRB approval was obtained for this study. Two radiologists independently reviewed pre- and postoperative CTAs of 43 patients (24 males and 19 females, mean age, 58.1 years) with 46 shoulders confirmed as full-thickness tears with random distribution. FD of supraspinatus, infraspinatus/teres minor, and subscapularis was assessed using Goutallier's system and by quantitative measurements of Hounsfield units (HUs) on sagittal images. Changes in FD grades and HUs were compared between pre- and postoperative CTAs and analyzed with respect to preoperative tear size and postoperative cuff integrity. The correlations between qualitative grades and quantitative measurements and their inter-observer reliabilities were also assessed. There was statistically significant correlation between FD grades and HU measurements of all muscles on pre- and postoperative CTA (p < 0.05). Inter-observer reliability of fatty degeneration grades were excellent to substantial on both pre- and postoperative CTA in supraspinatus (0.8685 and 0.8535) and subscapularis muscles (0.7777 and 0.7972), but fair in infraspinatus/teres minor muscles (0.5791 and 0.5740); however, quantitative Hounsfield units measurements showed excellent reliability for all muscles (ICC: 0.7950 and 0.9346 for SST, 0.7922 and 0.8492 for SSC, and 0.9254 and 0.9052 for IST/TM). No muscle showed improvement of fatty degeneration after surgical repair on qualitative and quantitative assessments; there was no difference in changes of fatty degeneration after surgical repair according to preoperative tear size and post-operative cuff integrity (p > 0.05). The average dose-length product (DLP, mGy · cm) was 365.2 mGy · cm (range, 323.8-417.2 mGy · cm) and estimated average effective dose was 5.1 mSv. Goutallier grades correlated well with HUs of rotator cuff muscles. Reliability was excellent for both systems, except for FD grade of IST/TM muscles, which may be more reliably assessed using quantitative measurements.

  1. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results.

    PubMed

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Savarese, Eugenio; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario A; Masala, Salvatore; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-27

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that leakage of the contrast medium is due to an incomplete tendon-to-bone sealing, which is not a re-tear. This phenomenon could have important medicolegal implications. Level of evidence III. Treatment study: Case-control study.

  2. Sacroiliac joint: pain referral maps upon applying a new injection/arthrography technique. Part I: Asymptomatic volunteers.

    PubMed

    Fortin, J D; Dwyer, A P; West, S; Pier, J

    1994-07-01

    Pain pattern mapping of the sacroiliac joint in asymptomatic volunteers was investigated. Prospective evaluation of 10 volunteers who received sacroiliac joint injections was performed. The injections consisted of contrast material followed by Xylocaine. To determine the pain referral pattern of the sacroiliac joint in asymptomatic individuals. All 10 individuals experienced discomfort upon initial injection, with the most significant sensation felt directly around the injection site. Subsequent sensory examination revealed an area of hypesthesia running caudally from the posterior superior iliac spine. Volunteers were asked to describe the nature and location of the sensation upon sacroiliac injection. Sensory examination immediately followed the injection to determine referral patterns. Sensory examination immediately after sacroiliac injection revealed an area of buttock hypesthesia extending approximately 10 cm caudally and 3 cm laterally from the posterior superior iliac spine. This area of hypesthesia corresponded to the area of maximal pain noted upon injection. A pain referral map was successfully generated using provocative injections into the right sacroiliac joint in asymptomatic volunteers.

  3. A new predictive indicator by arthrography for future acetabular growth following conservative treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Satsuma, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kinugasa, Maki; Takeoka, Yoshiki; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to find a new predictive indicator for acetabular growth of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Seventy-three hips that were diagnosed with developmental dysplasia of the hip and treated by conservative reduction were included in our study. In 30 hips with center-edge angle ≤ 10° at age 4, the center-edge of the acetabular limbus angle (CEALA) in the arthrogram was measured. On the basis of the results, CEALA was significantly smaller in the secondary acetabular dysplasia group than in the normal group at maturity. In conclusion, CEALA is a more reliable and accurate predictive indicator for acetabular development than center-edge angle or acetabular index.

  4. Change in the Growth Rate of Localized Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in Response to Gemcitabine, Bevacizumab, and Radiation Therapy on MDCT

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, Pedram; Yaghmai, Vahid; Tochetto, Sandra M.; Galizia, Mauricio S.; Miller, Frank H.; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Small, William

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To depict treatment response to chemoradiotherapy by comparing tumor growth rate between treated and untreated patients and to compare depicted response with objective response according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 guideline. Methods and Materials: This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Volume doubling time (DT) of histologically confirmed locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma was calculated in 16 patients treated with chemoradiotherapy and 10 untreated patients by incorporating interscan interval ({Delta}t) and tumor volume at baseline (V0) and follow-up (V1) obtained by semiautomated segmentation into the following equation: DT = {Delta}t . log 2/log (V1/V0). Reciprocal of doubling time (RDT), which is the linear representation of tumor growth rate, was calculated by use of the following equation: RDT = 365/DT. The lowest RDT value of 2.42 in untreated patients was considered as the cutoff value for depiction of treatment response. Depicted response rate was defined as the proportion of patients with an RDT value of less than 2.42. Depicted response was compared with objective response according to the RECIST 1.1 guideline. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in mean RDT between treated (range, -7.12 to 3.27; mean, -1.27; median, -1.30) and untreated (range, 2.42 to 10.74; mean, 5.33; median, 4.26) patients (p < 0.05). Reciprocal of doubling time was less than 2.42 in 14 treated patients, which corresponded to a depicted response rate of 87.50% as opposed to the objective response rate of 18.75% according to the RECIST 1.1 guideline (p < 0.05) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response rate of 62.50% (p > 0.05). Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was concordant with RDT and RECIST response in 12 patients (75.00%) ({kappa}, 0.38) and 9 patients (56.25%) ({kappa}, 0.24), respectively. Conclusions: There was a significant difference between depicted response according to RDT and objective response according to RECIST. Reciprocal of doubling time might serve as a valuable biomarker for evaluation of treatment response when depiction of small changes in tumor size is concerned.

  5. MDCT-based quantification of porcine pulmonary arterial morphometry and self-similarity of arterial branching geometry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yik Ching; Clark, Alys R.; Fuld, Matthew K.; Haynes, Susan; Divekar, Abhay A.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    The pig is frequently used as an experimental model for studies of the pulmonary circulation, yet the branching and dimensional geometry of the porcine pulmonary vasculature remains poorly defined. The purposes of this study are to improve the geometric definition of the porcine pulmonary arteries and to determine whether the arterial tree exhibits self-similarity in its branching geometry. Five animals were imaged using thin slice spiral computed tomography in the prone posture during airway inflation pressure at 25 cmH2O. The luminal diameter and distance from the inlet of the left and right pulmonary arteries were measured along the left and right main arterial pathway in each lung of each animal. A further six minor pathways were measured in a single animal. The similarity in the rate of reduction of diameter with distance of all minor pathways and the two main pathways, along with similarity in the number of branches arising along the pathways, supports self-similarity in the arterial tree. The rate of reduction in diameter with distance from the inlet was not significantly different among the five animals (P > 0.48) when normalized for main pulmonary artery diameter and total main artery pathlength, which supports intersubject similarity. Other metrics to quantify the tree geometry are strikingly similar to those from airways of other quadrupeds, with the exception of a significantly larger length to diameter ratio, which is more appropriate for the vascular tree. A simplifying self-similar model for the porcine pulmonary arteries is proposed to capture the important geometric features of the arterial tree. PMID:23449941

  6. Mechanisms of angiotensin II stimulation of NCC are time-dependent in mDCT15 cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Benjamin; Mistry, Abinash; Hanson, Lauren; Mallick, Rickta; Hoover, Robert S

    2015-04-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) increases thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) activity both acutely and chronically. ANG II has been implicated as a switch that turns WNK4 from an inhibitor of NCC into an activator of NCC, and ANG II's effect on NCC appears to require WNK4. Chronically, ANG II stimulation of NCC results in an increase in total and phosphorylated NCC, but the role of NCC phosphorylation in acute ANG II actions is unclear. Here, using a mammalian cell model with robust native NCC activity, we corroborate the role that ANG II plays in WNK4 regulation and clarify the role of Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)-induced NCC phosphorylation in ANG II action. ANG II was noted to have a biphasic effect on NCC, with a peak increase in NCC activity in the physiologic range of 10(-11) M ANG II. This effect was apparent as early as 15 min and remained sustained through 120 min. These changes correlated with significant increases in NCC surface protein expression. Knockdown of WNK4 expression sharply attenuated the effect of ANG II. SPAK knockdown did not affect ANG II action at early time points (15 and 30 min), but it did attenuate the response at 60 min. Correspondingly, NCC phosphorylation did not increase at 15 or 30 min, but increased significantly at 60 min. We therefore conclude that within minutes of an increase in ANG II, NCC is rapidly trafficked to the cell surface in a phosphorylation-independent but WNK4-dependent manner. Then, after 60 min, ANG II induces SPAK-dependent phosphorylation of NCC.

  7. Mechanisms of angiotensin II stimulation of NCC are time-dependent in mDCT15 cells

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Abinash; Hanson, Lauren; Mallick, Rickta; Hoover, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) increases thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) activity both acutely and chronically. ANG II has been implicated as a switch that turns WNK4 from an inhibitor of NCC into an activator of NCC, and ANG II's effect on NCC appears to require WNK4. Chronically, ANG II stimulation of NCC results in an increase in total and phosphorylated NCC, but the role of NCC phosphorylation in acute ANG II actions is unclear. Here, using a mammalian cell model with robust native NCC activity, we corroborate the role that ANG II plays in WNK4 regulation and clarify the role of Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)-induced NCC phosphorylation in ANG II action. ANG II was noted to have a biphasic effect on NCC, with a peak increase in NCC activity in the physiologic range of 10−11 M ANG II. This effect was apparent as early as 15 min and remained sustained through 120 min. These changes correlated with significant increases in NCC surface protein expression. Knockdown of WNK4 expression sharply attenuated the effect of ANG II. SPAK knockdown did not affect ANG II action at early time points (15 and 30 min), but it did attenuate the response at 60 min. Correspondingly, NCC phosphorylation did not increase at 15 or 30 min, but increased significantly at 60 min. We therefore conclude that within minutes of an increase in ANG II, NCC is rapidly trafficked to the cell surface in a phosphorylation-independent but WNK4-dependent manner. Then, after 60 min, ANG II induces SPAK-dependent phosphorylation of NCC. PMID:25651566

  8. Carotid CT-angiography: low versus standard volume contrast media and low kV protocol for 128-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Kayan, Mustafa; Köroğlu, Mert; Yeşildağ, Ahmet; Ceylan, Ergun; Aktaş, Aykut Recep; Yasar, Selçuk; Aynali, Giray; Parlak, Cem; Munduz, Mehmet; Gürses, Cemil

    2012-09-01

    Availability and utilization of computed tomography angiography has been increasing recently. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of low amount of contrast media and low kV value in order to reduce possible side effects of contrast media and to provide optimization of kV value in the evaluation of the carotid artery with multi-detector computed tomography angiography. Forty one patients were randomized into two groups. Contrast media was administered at a dose of 1 ml/kg in group A patients and of 0.5 ml/kg in group B patients. kV value of 120 in group A and 100 in group B were chosen. Bolus tracking technique was used. Attenuation values of certain arterial segments were measured, and values over 200 HU were considered as significant. North American Symptomatic Carotid Endartherectomy Trial criteria were utilized in the evaluation of stenosis. Image quality in arterial segments of all cases was found to be sufficient for diagnosis. Arterial attenuation values were found to be higher in group B than group A. When compared separately in all arterial segments, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. For stenosis, 615 arterial segments were evaluated. Moderate stenosis in eight segments and severe stenosis in three segments were identified in group A. Occlusion in three segments, severe stenosis in three segments, and moderate stenosis in 25 segments were detected in group B. Better image quality can be obtained, and the amount of contrast media can be reduced using low kV technique in carotid artery multi-detector computed tomography angiography examination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Automatic MDCT injectors: hygiene and efficiency of disposable, prefilled, and multidosing roller pump systems in clinical routine.

    PubMed

    Buerke, Boris; Puesken, Michael; Mellmann, Alexander; Schuelke, Christoph; Knauer, Anna; Heindel, Walter; Wessling, Johannes

    2011-08-01

    This study evaluated three different injection systems with regard to microbiological contamination, time efficiency, and user handling during a clinical routine. A total of 825 patients were included. A double-syringe contrast injector with disposable syringes (system A; n = 150) and one that used prefilled syringes (system B; n = 150) were microbiologically analyzed during single use of the syringes in one patient. Moreover, the contamination of a roller pump injector capable of multidosing several patients from a contrast agent container, without the need for prior filling, was determined after being used for an entire day (system C; n = 35 injections/day for 15 days). The hygienic background was guaranteed by taking imprints of the surfaces of devices and the palms of the hands of members of CT staff before the clinical investigation. The time required for assembly of the injection systems and for filling or refilling of each injector system was measured. The handling of the three systems also was subjectively ranked by the technicians. Injection systems A, B, and C remained microbiologically sterile and free of contamination throughout their use in clinical routine. The mean (± SD) time for injection system assembly and installation of syringes and filling did not differ significantly between injection systems A and B (system A, 2.5 ± 1.1 minutes; system B, 1.9 ± 1.3 minutes; p = 0.12), whereas the time for assembly of system C was significantly shorter (0.9 ± 0.6 minutes; p < 0.05 vs system A; p < 0.05 vs system B). In the subjective ranking of injector handling, systems B and C were preferred. Double-syringe injectors used with disposable or prefilled contrast agent syringes, as well as roller pump injectors, ensure hygienic conditions in clinical routine. However, time efficiency and handling are aspects that favor prefilled and roller pump systems.

  10. Characteristics of the gubernaculum tracts in mesiodens and maxillary anterior teeth with delayed eruption on MDCT and CBCT.

    PubMed

    Oda, Masafumi; Nishida, Ikuko; Miyamoto, Ikuya; Habu, Manabu; Yoshiga, Daigo; Kodama, Masaaki; Osawa, Kenji; Tanaka, Tatsurou; Kito, Shinji; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Nishimura, Shun; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Yoshioka, Izumi; Maki, Kenshi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the characteristics of the gubernaculum tracts (GTs) in maxillary anterior teeth with normal or delayed eruption and in mesiodens by using multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography. The characteristics of GTs in maxillary anterior teeth of 205 patients with impacted mesiodens were retrospectively analyzed by using multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography. The GTs of teeth with normal or delayed eruption and the GTs of mesiodens were examined. The detection ratio of GTs in impacted mesiodens and anterior teeth with delayed eruption was significantly lower than in teeth with normal eruption. A significant difference in the angulation was found between normal and delayed eruptions. Almost all detectable GTs in the inverted mesiodens were derived from the incisive canal, while the remaining were from the alveolar crest. The connecting area of major GTs to tooth in inverted mesiodens was the cervical or root area, but in all other anterior teeth, it was the crown area. GTs of inverted mesiodens may exhibit characteristics that are different from those of normal GTs when the teeth and/or the palate are developing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance evaluation of a 64-slice CT system with z-flying focal spot.

    PubMed

    Flohr, T; Stierstorfer, K; Raupach, R; Ulzheimer, S; Bruder, H

    2004-12-01

    The meanwhile established generation of 16-slice CT systems enables routine sub-millimeter imaging at short breath-hold times. Clinical progress in the development of multidetector row CT (MDCT) technology beyond 16 slices can more likely be expected from further improvement in spatial and temporal resolution rather than from a mere increase in the speed of volume coverage. We present an evaluation of a recently introduced 64-slice CT system (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens AG, Forchheim, Germany), which uses a periodic motion of the focal spot in longitudinal direction (z-flying focal spot) to double the number of simultaneously acquired slices. This technique acquires 64 overlapping 0.6 mm slices per rotation. The sampling scheme corresponds to that of a 64 x 0.3 mm detector, with the goal of improved longitudinal resolution and reduced spiral artifacts. After an introduction to the detector design, we discuss the basics of z-flying focal spot technology (z-Sharp). We present phantom and specimen scans for performance evaluation. The measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the thinnest spiral slice is 0.65 mm. All spiral slice widths are almost independent of the pitch, with deviations of less than 0.1 mm from the nominal value. Using a high-resolution bar pattern phantom (CATPHAN, Phantom Laboratories, Salem, NY), the longitudinal resolution can be demonstrated to be up to 15 lp/cm at the isocenter independent of the pitch, corresponding to a bar diameter of 0.33 mm. Longitudinal resolution is only slightly degraded for off-center locations. At a distance of 100 mm from the isocenter, 14 lp/cm can be resolved in the z-direction, corresponding to a bar diameter of 0.36 mm. Spiral "windmill" artifacts presenting as hyper- and hypodense structures around osseous edges are effectively reduced by the z-flying focal spot technique. Cardiac scanning benefits from the short gantry rotation time of 0.33 s, providing up to 83 ms temporal resolution with 2-segment ECG

  12. A template-based approach for the analysis of lung nodules in a volumetric CT phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, Marios A.; Zeng, Rongping; Kinnard, Lisa M.; Myers, Kyle J.; Petrick, Nicholas

    2009-02-01

    Volumetric CT has the potential to improve the quantitative analysis of lung nodule size change compared to currently used one-dimensional measurement practices. Towards that goal, we have been conducting studies using an anthropomorphic phantom to quantify sources of volume measurement error. One source of error is the measurement technique or software tool used to estimate lesion volume. In this manuscript, we present a template-based approach which utilizes the properties of the acquisition and reconstruction system to quantify nodule volume. This approach may reduce the error associated with the volume estimation technique, thereby improving our ability to estimate the error directly associated with CT parameters and nodule characteristics. Our estimation approach consists of: (a) the simulation of the object-to-image transformation of a helical CT system, (b) the creation of a bank of simulated 3D nodule templates of varying sizes, and (c) the 3D matching of synthetic nodules - that were attached to lung vasculature and scanned with a 16-slice MDCT system - to the bank of simulated templates to estimate nodule volume. Results based on 10 repeat scans for different protocols and a root mean square error (RMSE) similarity metric showed a relative bias of 88%, 14%, and 4% for the measurement of 5 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm low density nodules (-630 HU) compared to -3%, -6%, and 8% for nodules of +100HU density. However, the relative bias for the small, low density nodules (5 mm, -630 HU), was significantly reduced to 7% when a penalized RMSE metric was used to enforce a symmetry constraint that reduced the impact of attached vessels. The results are promising for the use of this measurement approach as a low-bias estimator of nodule volume which will allow the systematic quantification and ranking of measurement error in volumetric CT analysis of lung nodules.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance arthrography of the hip is dependent on specialist training of the radiologist.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Ciara M; MacMahon, Peter; Byrne, Damien P; Kavanagh, Eoin; Mulhall, Kevin J

    2012-06-01

    Significant differences between magnetic resonance imaging reports and intraoperative findings at the time of hip arthroscopy were documented in our practice. We sought to examine the accuracy of radiological reporting of hip pathology based on the training level of the reporting radiologist. A retrospective review of hip arthroscopies carried out between July 2008 and June 2009 identified 61 cases where original MRI scans had been reported by general community radiologists. These scans were then reviewed by musculoskeletal specialist radiologists who were blinded to both the original report and the surgical findings. Accuracy of both subsets of radiologists was compared to arthroscopic findings with regard to labral, acetabular, femoral and impingement lesions. Musculoskeletal radiologists performed better than community radiologists in terms of overall accuracy. Accuracy rates for MSK radiologists were 85, 79, 59, and 82% for labral, acetabular chondrosis, and femoral chondrosis and impingement lesions, respectively. Whereas accuracy rates for community radiologists were 70, 28, 52, and 59% (p values = 0.08, <0.001, 0.59, <0.001). Accuracy was significantly improved for both groups of radiologists when MR arthrograms were reviewed rather than conventional MRIs. This study establishes the relationship between accuracy of reporting and the training level of the performing radiologists.

  14. Development and validation of a preoperative prediction model for colorectal cancer T-staging based on MDCT images and clinical information.

    PubMed

    Sa, Sha; Li, Jing; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Yongrui; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Defeng; Zhang, Huimao; Fu, Yu

    2017-08-15

    This study aimed to establish and evaluate the efficacy of a prediction model for colorectal cancer T-staging. T-staging was positively correlated with the level of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), expression of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), wall deformity, blurred outer edges, fat infiltration, infiltration into the surrounding tissue, tumor size and wall thickness. Age, location, enhancement rate and enhancement homogeneity were negatively correlated with T-staging. The predictive results of the model were consistent with the pathological gold standard, and the kappa value was 0.805. The total accuracy of staging improved from 51.04% to 86.98% with the proposed model. The clinical, imaging and pathological data of 611 patients with colorectal cancer (419 patients in the training group and 192 patients in the validation group) were collected. A spearman correlation analysis was used to validate the relationship among these factors and pathological T-staging. A prediction model was trained with the random forest algorithm. T staging of the patients in the validation group was predicted by both prediction model and traditional method. The consistency, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and area under the curve (AUC) were used to compare the efficacy of the two methods. The newly established comprehensive model can improve the predictive efficiency of preoperative colorectal cancer T-staging.

  15. Low-dose triple-rule-out using 320-row-detector volume MDCT--less contrast medium and lower radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Tahir; Rogalla, Patrik; Lembcke, Alexander; Mühler, Matthias R; Hamm, Bernd; Hein, Patrick A

    2011-07-01

    To investigate image quality of triple-rule-out (TRO) computed tomography (CT) using a 320-row-detector CT system with substantially reduced contrast medium volume at 100 kV. Forty-six consecutive patients with noncritical, acute chest pain underwent 320-row-detector CT using a two-step TRO protocol consisting of a non-spiral, non-gated chest CT acquisition (150 mA) followed by a non-spiral, electrocardiography-gated cardiac acquisition (200-500 mA based on body mass index (BMI)). Data were acquired using a biphasic injection protocol with a total iodinated contrast medium volume of 60 ml (370 mg/ml). Vessel attenuation and effective doses were recorded. Image quality was scored independently by two readers. Mean attenuation was 584 ± 114 Hounsfield units (HU) in the ascending aorta, 335 ± 63HU in the aortic arch, 658 ± 136HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 521 ± 97HU and 549 ± 102HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. In all but one patient, attenuation and image quality allowed accurate visualization of the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta, and coronary arteries in a single examination. Ninety-six percent of all coronary artery segments were rated diagnostic. Radiation exposure ranged between 2.0 and 3.3 mSv. Using 320-row-detector CT the investigated low-dose TRO protocol resulted in excellent opacification and image quality with substantial reduction of contrast medium volume compared to recently published TRO protocols.

  16. Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Versus Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction and Filtered Back Projection in Liver 64-MDCT: Focal Lesion Detection, Lesion Conspicuity, and Image Noise

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, William P.; Green, Doug E.; Busey, Janet M.; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Mitsumori, Lee M.; Koprowicz, Kent M.; Thibault, Jean-Baptiste; Hsieh, Jiang; Alessio, Adam M.; Choi, Eunice; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to compare three CT image reconstruction algorithms for liver lesion detection and appearance, subjective lesion conspicuity, and measured noise. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-six patients with known liver lesions were scanned with a routine clinical three-phase CT protocol using a weight-based noise index of 30 or 36. Image data from each phase were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). Randomized images were presented to two independent blinded reviewers to detect and categorize the appearance of lesions and to score lesion conspicuity. Lesion size, lesion density (in Hounsfield units), adjacent liver density (in Hounsfield units), and image noise were measured. Two different unblinded truth readers established the number, appearance, and location of lesions. RESULTS Fifty-one focal lesions were detected by truth readers. For blinded reviewers compared with truth readers, there was no difference for lesion detection among the reconstruction algorithms. Lesion appearance was statistically the same among the three reconstructions. Although one reviewer scored lesions as being more conspicuous with MBIR, the other scored them the same. There was significantly less background noise in air with MBIR (mean [± SD], 2.1 ± 1.4 HU) than with ASIR (8.9 ± 1.9 HU; p < 0.001) or FBP (10.6 ± 2.6 HU; p < 0.001). Mean lesion contrast-to-noise ratio was statistically significantly higher for MBIR (34.4 ± 29.1) than for ASIR (6.5 ± 4.9; p < 0.001) or FBP (6.3 ± 6.0; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION In routine-dose clinical CT of the liver, MBIR resulted in comparable lesion detection, lesion characterization, and subjective lesion conspicuity, but significantly lower background noise and higher contrast-to-noise ratio compared with ASIR or FBP. This finding suggests that further investigation of the use of MBIR to enable dose reduction in liver CT is warranted. PMID:23617492

  17. Thoracic lymph node delineation at dose-reduced (1 mSv) dose-modulated contrast enhanced MDCT: a retrospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Marco; Wirth, Kathrin; Tufman, Amanda; Reiser, Maximilian; Huber, Rudolf M; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G

    2016-08-01

    To compare contrast-enhanced low-dose multidetector-row computed tomography (CE-LDCT) of the chest with unenhanced (UN-) LDCT and contrast-enhanced standard-dose CT (CE-SDCT) in regard to the delineation of intrathoracic lymph nodes. Based on the international association for the study of lung cancer (IASLC) grouping of thoracic lymph nodes, two independent radiologists retrospectively assessed lymph node delineation in 9 CE-LDCTs (64 rows, 120 KV, p < 30 mAs/slice) and in 2 control groups of 36 UN-LDCTs and 36 CE-SDCTs, each matched for gender, age, chest/lung diameters, and clinical history. At a significance level of p < 0.025 (Bonferroni-correction for two control groups), two-tailed Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were applied. For the evaluation of the inter-observer agreement, Cohen's kappa statistics were used. CE-LDCT delineated lymph node groups significantly more often than UN-LDCT, in general (p < 0.001) and individually in the subcarinal (p < 0.025), the hilar (p < 0.001), and the peripheral lung (p < 0.001) zones. There were no significant differences in lymph node delineation between CE-LDCT and CE-SDCT. Inter-observer agreement was substantial to perfect for all lymph node zones (κ 0.64-1.0). Measurable lymph nodes did not significantly differ in size between cases and controls. At CE-LDCT of the chest, delineation of mediastinal and hilar lymph node groups was superior to UN-LDCT and similar to CE-SDCT. CE-LDCT may be a promising alternative for patients with non-malignant lung disease, unclear chest X-ray findings, or the need for follow-up.

  18. Application of the noise power spectrum in modern diagnostic MDCT: part I. Measurement of noise power spectra and noise equivalent quanta.

    PubMed

    Boedeker, K L; Cooper, V N; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2007-07-21

    Dose reduction efforts in diagnostic CT have brought the tradeoff of dose versus image quality to the forefront. The need for meaningful characterization of image noise beyond that offered by pixel standard deviation is becoming increasingly important. This work aims to study the implementation of the noise power spectrum (NPS) and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) on modern, multislice diagnostic CT scanners. The details of NPS and NEQ measurement are outlined and special attention is paid to issues unique to multislice CT. Aliasing, filter design and effects of acquisition geometry are investigated. While it was found that both metrics can be implemented in modern CT, it was discovered that NEQ cannot be aptly applied with certain non-traditional reconstruction filters or in helical mode. NPS and NEQ under a variety of conditions are examined. Extensions of NPS and NEQ to uses in protocol standardization are also discussed.

  19. Quantitative planar and volumetric cardiac measurements using 64 MDCT and 3T MRI versus standard 2D and M-mode echocardiography: Does anesthetic protocol matter?

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Stepien, Rebecca L; Rio, Alejandro Munoz Del; Saunders, Jimmy H; François, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of the heart utilizing computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be superior for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and systolic function in humans compared to echocardiography. The purpose of this prospective study was to test the effects of two different anesthetic protocols on cardiac measurements in 10 healthy beagle dogs using 64-multidetector row computed tomographic angiography (64-MDCTA), 3T magnetic resonance (MRI) and standard awake echocardiography. Both anesthetic protocols used propofol for induction and isoflourane for anesthetic maintenance. In addition, protocol A used midazolam/fentanyl and protocol B used dexmedetomedine as premedication and constant rate infusion during the procedure. Significant elevations in systolic and mean blood pressure were present when using protocol B. There was overall good agreement between the variables of cardiac size and systolic function generated from the MDCTA and MRI exams and no significant difference was found when comparing the variables acquired using either anesthetic protocol within each modality. Systolic function variables generated using 64-MDCTA and 3T MRI were only able to predict the left ventricular end diastolic volume as measured during awake echocardiogram when using protocol B and 64-MDCTA. For all other systolic function variables, prediction of awake echocardiographic results was not possible (P = 1). Planar variables acquired using MDCTA or MRI did not allow prediction of the corresponding measurements generated using echocardiography in the awake patients (P=1). Future studies are needed to validate this approach in a more varied population and clinically affected dogs. PMID:26082285

  20. MDCT and 3D evaluation of type 2 hypoplastic pulmonary artery sling associated with right lung agenesis, hypoplastic aortic arch, and long segment tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward Y

    2007-11-01

    The early diagnosis and complete anatomic evaluation of pulmonary artery sling, a congenital vascular anomaly in which left pulmonary artery arises from the right pulmonary artery, is paramount for proper patient management, because patients with this disorder frequently have other congenital anomalies resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, pulmonary artery sling in the neonate has been established with standard radiologic imaging studies such as plain radiographs, barium swallow studies, fluoroscopy-guided airway studies, and echocardiograms. However, with the development and widespread availability of multidetector computed tomography, pulmonary artery sling is increasingly evaluated with this newer technology. This case report presents a rare incidence of type 2 hypoplastic pulmonary artery sling in a neonate associated with right lung agenesis, hypoplastic aortic arch, and long segment tracheal stenosis. Multidetector computed tomography combined with 3-dimensional evaluation was particularly helpful in making a correct diagnosis of the complicated anatomic anomalies found in this case.

  1. Imaging of pulmonary embolism and t-PA therapy effects using MDCT and liposomal iohexol blood pool agent: preliminary results in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Burke, Stephen J; Annapragada, Ananth; Hoffman, Eric A; Chen, Emmanuel; Ghaghada, Ketan B; Sieren, Jered; van Beek, Edwin J R

    2007-03-01

    Polyethylene glycol-coated liposomal blood pool contrast agents maintain contrast enhancement over several hours. This study aimed to evaluate (long-term) imaging of pulmonary arteries, comparing conventional iodinated contrast with a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. Also, visualization of the (real-time) therapeutic effects of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) on pulmonary embolism (PE) was attempted. Six rabbits (weight approximately 4 kg) had autologous blood clots injected through the superior vena cava. Imaging was performed using conventional contrast (iohexol, 350 mg I/ml; GE HealthCare, Princeton, NJ) at a dose of 1400 mg I per animal, and after wash-out, animals were imaged using an iodinated liposomal blood pool agent (88 mg I/mL, dose 900 mg I/animal). Subsequently, five animals were injected with 2 mg of t-PA and imaging continued for up to 4(1/2) hours. Both contrast agents identified PE in the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries in all rabbits. Liposomal blood pool agent yielded uniform enhancement, which remained relatively constant throughout the experiments. Conventional agents exhibited nonuniform opacification and rapid clearance postinjection. Three of six rabbits had mistimed bolus injections, requiring repeat injections. Following t-PA, pulmonary embolus volume (central to segmental) decreased in four of five treated rabbits (range 10-57%, mean 42%). One animal showed no response to t-PA. Liposomal blood pool agents effectively identified acute PE without need for reinjection. PE resolution following t-PA was quantifiable over several hours. Blood pool agents offer the potential for repeated imaging procedures without need for repeated (nephrotoxic) contrast injections.

  2. Imaging of pulmonary embolism and t-PA therapy effects using MDCT and liposomal iohexol blood pool agent – preliminary results in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Stephen J; Annapragada, Ananth; Hoffman, Eric A; Chen, Emmanuel; Ghaghada, Ketan B; Sieren, Jered; van Beek, Edwin JR

    2007-01-01

    Hypothesis and Objectives PEGylated liposomal blood pool contrast agents maintain contrast enhancement over several hours. This study aimed to evaluate (long-term) imaging of pulmonary arteries, comparing conventional iodinated contrast with a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. Secondly, visualization of the (real-time) therapeutic effects of tissue-Plasminogen Activator (t-PA) on pulmonary embolism (PE) was attempted. Materials and Methods Six rabbits (approximate 4 kg weight) had autologous blood clots injected through the superior vena cava. Imaging was performed using conventional contrast (iohexol, 350 mg I/ml, GE HealthCare, Princeton, NJ) at a dose of 1400 mgI per animal and after wash-out, animals were imaged using an iodinated liposomal blood pool agent (88 mg I/mL, dose 900 mgI/animal). Subsequently, five animals were injected with 2mg t-PA and imaging continued for up to 4 ½ hours. Results Both contrast agents identified PE in the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries in all rabbits. Liposomal blood pool agent yielded uniform enhancement, which remained relatively constant throughout the experiments. Conventional agents exhibited non uniform opacification and rapid clearance post injection. Three out of six rabbits had mistimed bolus injections, requiring repeat injections. Following t-PA, Pulmonary embolus volume (central to segmental) decreased in four of five treated rabbits (range 10–57%, mean 42%). One animal showed no response to t-PA. Conclusions Liposomal blood pool agents effectively identified acute PE without need for re-injection. PE resolution following t-PA was quantifiable over several hours. Blood pool agents offer the potential for repeated imaging procedures without need for repeated (nephrotoxic) contrast injections. PMID:17307669

  3. Cine MRI of Tracheal Dynamics in Healthy Volunteers and Patients With Tracheobronchomalacia.

    PubMed

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Boiselle, Phillip M; Heidinger, Benedikt; Andrinopoulou, Eleni-Rosalina; O'Donnel, Carl; Alsop, David C; Litmanovich, Diana E

    2017-10-01

    Bronchoscopy and MDCT are routinely used to assess tracheobronchomalacia (TBM). Recently, dynamic MRI (cine MRI) has been proposed as a radiation-free alternative to MDCT. In this study, we tested cine MRI assessment of airway dynamics during various breathing conditions and compared cine MRI and MDCT measurements in healthy volunteers and patients with suspected TBM. Cine MRI was found to be a technically feasible alternative to MDCT for assessing central airway dynamics.

  4. In-vivo regional myocardial perfusion measurements in a porcine model by ECG-gated multislice computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Meyer, Cristopher A.; Teague, Shawn; Stecker, Michael; Hutchins, Gary; McLennan, Gordon; Persohn, Scott

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether functional multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) can identify regional areas of normally perfused and ischemic myocardium in a porcine model. Material and Methods: Three out bred pigs, two of which had ameroids surgically implanted to constrict flow within the LAD and LCx coronary arteries, were injected with 25 mL of iopromide (Isovue) at a rate of 5 mL/second via the femoral or jugular vein. Sixty axial scans along the short axis of the heart was acquired on a 16-slice CT scanner (Philips MX8000-IDT) triggered at end-diastole of the cardiac cycle and acquiring an image within 270 msec. A second series of scans were taken after an intravenous injection of a vasodilator, 150 μg/kg/min of adenosine. ROIs were drawn around the myocardial tissue and the resulting time-density curves were used to extract perfusion values. Results: Determination of the myocardial perfusion and fractional blood volume implementing three different perfusion models. A 5-point averaging or 'smoothing' algorithm was employed to effectively filter the data due to its noisy nature. The (preliminary) average perfusion and fractional blood volume values over selected axial slices for the pig without an artificially induced stenosis were measured to be 84 +/- 22 mL/min/100g-tissue and 0.17 +/- 0.04 mL/g-tissue, the former is consistent with PET scan and EBCT results. The pig with a stenosis in the left LAD coronary artery showed a reduced global perfusion value -- 45 mL/min/100g-tissue. Correlations in regional perfusion values relative to the stenosis were weak. During the infusion of adenosine, averaged perfusion values for the three subjects increased by 46 (+/-45) percent, comparable to increases measured with PET. Conclusion: Quantifying global perfusion values using MDCT appear encouraging. Future work will focus resolving the systematic effects from noise due to signal fluctuation from the porcine tachyardia (80-93 BPM) and provide a more robust measurement

  5. Evaluation of Sinonasal Diseases by Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Computed Tomography (CT) plays an important diagnostic role in patients with sinonasal diseases and determines the treatment. The CT images clearly show fine structural architecture of bony anatomy thereby determining various anatomical variation, extent of disease and characterization of various inflammatory, benign and malignant sinonasal diseases. Aim To evaluate sensitivity and specificity of CT in diagnosis of sinonasal diseases and to characterise the benign and malignant lesions with the help of various CT parameters. Also, to correlate findings of CT with histo-pathological and diagnostic nasal endoscopy/ Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS) findings. Materials and Methods In this hospital based prospective study 175 patients with symptomatic sinonasal diseases were evaluated by clinical diagnosis and 16 slice Multi Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT). The details of findings of nasal endoscopy, Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS), histopathological examination and fungal culture were collected in all those cases where those investigations were done. All those findings were correlated with CT findings and statistical analysis was done by using Test statistics (sensitivity, specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) and accuracy), Chi-Square test and Z-test for single proportions. Software used in the analysis was SPSS 17.0 version and graph pad prism 6.0 version and p < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results CT diagnosis had higher sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV in diagnosing various sinonasal diseases in comparison to clinical diagnosis. On correlating CT diagnosis with final diagnosis, congenital conditions have 100% sensitivity and specificity. Chronic sinusitis has 98.3% sensitivity and 97.8% specificity. For fungal sinusitis the sensitivity was 60% and specificity was 99.3%. Polyps have sensitivity of 94.4% and specificity of 98.1%. Benign neoplasms have sensitivity

  6. Mapping epicardial fat with multi-detector computed tomography to facilitate percutaneous transepicardial arrhythmia ablation.

    PubMed

    Abbara, Suhny; Desai, Jay C; Cury, Ricardo C; Butler, Javed; Nieman, Koen; Reddy, Vivek

    2006-03-01

    A sizable portion of ventricular tachycardia circuits are epicardial, especially in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, e.g. Chagas disease. Thus there is a growing interest among the electrophysiologists in transepicardial mapping and myocardial ablation for treatment of arrhythmias. However, increased epicardial fat can be a significant hindrance in procedural success as it can mimic infarct during mapping and can also decrease the effectiveness of ablation. Quantitative knowledge of epicardial fat pre-procedure can potentially significantly facilitate the conduct and outcomes of these procedures. In this study we assessed the epicardial fat distribution and thickness in vivo in 59 patients who underwent multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) for coronary artery assessment using a 16-slice scanner. Multiplanar reconstructions were obtained in the ventricular short axis at the basal, mid ventricular, and near the apex level, and in a four-chamber view. In the short axis slices, we measured epicardial fat diameter in nine segments, and in the four-chamber view, it was measured in five segments. In grooved segments the maximum fat thickness was recorded, while in non-grooved segments thickness at three equally spaced points were averaged. The results were as follows starting clockwise: superior inter-ventricular (IV) groove (all measurements are in mm, in basal, mid ventricular, and apical levels, respectively) (11.2, 8.6, 7.3), left ventricular (LV) superior lateral wall (1.0, 1.5, 1.7), LV inferior lateral wall (1.3, 2.2, 3.5), inferior IV groove (9.2, 6.5, 6.1), right ventricular (RV) diaphragmatic wall (1.4, 0.2, 1.0), acute margin (9.2, 7.3, 7.8), RV anterior free wall inferior (6.8, 4.0, 4.7), RV anterior free wall superior (6.5, 3.2, 3.1), RV superior wall (5.6, 2.7, 4.0), We measured the following four-chamber segments: LV apex (2.8 mm), left atrio-ventricular (AV) groove (12.7), right AV groove (14.8), RV apex (4.8), and anterior IV groove (7

  7. The diagnostic performance of non-contrast 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) versus 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance arthrography (1.5-T MRA) in femoro-acetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Rodríguez, Ana M; De Lucas-Villarrubia, Jose C; Pastrana-Ledesma, Miguel; Hualde-Juvera, Ana; Méndez-Alonso, Santiago; Padron, Mario

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T non-contrast MRI versus 1.5-T MRA for assessing labrum and articular cartilage lesions in patients with clinical suspicion of femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI). Fifty patients (thirty men and twenty women, mean age 42.5 years) underwent 1.5-T MRA, 3-T MRI and arthroscopy on the same hip. An optimized high-resolution proton density spin echo pulse sequence was included in the 3-T non-contrast MRI protocol. The 3-T non-contrast MRI identified forty-two of the forty-three arthroscopically proven tears at the labral-chondral transitional zone (sensitivity, 97.7%; specificity, 100%; positive predictive value (PPV), 100%; negative predictive value (NPV), 87.5%; accuracy 98%). With 1.5-T MRA, forty-four tears were diagnosed. However, there was one false positive (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 85.7%; PPV, 97.7%; NPV, 100%; accuracy 98%). Agreement between arthroscopy and MRI, whether 3-T non-contrast MRI or 1.5-T MRA, as to the degree of chondral lesion in the acetabulum was reached in half of the patients and in the femur in 76% of patients. Non-invasive assessment of the hip is possible with 3-T MR magnet. 3-T non-contrast MRI could replace MRA as the workhorse technique for assessing hip internal damage. MRA would then be reserved for young adults with a strong clinical suspicion of FAI but normal findings on 3-T non-contrast MRI. When compared with 1.5-T MRA, optimized sequences with 3-T non-contrast MRI help in detecting normal variants and in diagnosing articular cartilage lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Computed tomography of the meniscus of the temporomandibular joint: preliminary observations

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.A.; Morrish, R.B. Jr.; Kircos, L.T.; Dolwick, M.F.

    1982-12-01

    Anterior displacement of the meniscus of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was diagnosed in nine patients who had undergone arthrography, and they were later examined with computed tomography (CT) to see if this modality could supplant arthrography in some patients with TMJ dysfunction. The anteriorly displaced menisci were visualizsed in all nine patients by using sagittal reformations and blink mode. Four of the nine patients had the diagnosis confirmed at surgery. The precise protocol for the CT examination and how to interpret it are discussed. We are optimistic that CT may replace TMJ arthrography in selected patients.

  9. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  10. Acute bursitis calcarea trochanterica in an infant, with perforation into the hip joint demonstrated by arthrogram.

    PubMed

    Stenström, R; Gripenberg, L

    1978-04-10

    A case of bursitis calcarea trochanterica acuta is reported in a boy aged four months. The calcification was amorphous, and arthrography revealed extension into the hip joint. The lesion was treated surgically.

  11. The role of mobile computed tomography in mass fatality incidents.

    PubMed

    Rutty, Guy N; Robinson, Claire E; BouHaidar, Ralph; Jeffery, Amanda J; Morgan, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    Mobile multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners are potentially available to temporary mortuaries and can be operational within 20 min of arrival. We describe, to our knowledge, the first use of mobile MDCT for a mass fatality incident. A mobile MDCT scanner attended the disaster mortuary after a five vehicle road traffic incident. Five out of six bodies were successfully imaged by MDCT in c. 15 min per body. Subsequent full radiological analysis took c. 1 h per case. The results were compared to the autopsy examinations. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of imaging with mobile MDCT in relation to mass fatality work, illustrating the body pathway process, and its role in the identification of the pathology, personal effects, and health and safety hazards. We propose that the adoption of a single modality of mobile MDCT could replace the current use of multiple radiological sources within a mass fatality mortuary.

  12. A jumping left atrial thrombus connected to a pulmonary vein thrombus using transthoracic echocardiography and 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hidekazu

    2015-03-01

    Few studies have reported the differences between transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and 64-slice multidetector CT (64-MDCT) in identifying left atrium (LA) thrombi. I report the case of a 70 year old man with coronary artery disease and angina who was diagnosed with a thrombus in the left lower pulmonary vein extending to the LA using a non-invasive 64-MDCT scan and TTE. TTE was unable to clearly identify a thrombus in the pulmonary veins, whereas a 64-MDCT scan identified a thrombus in the pulmonary vein but was unable to detect a moving thrombus attached to the mitral valves. The 64-MDCT images of LA thrombi are smaller than those of TTE and the video created using TTE demonstrated a moving thrombus connected to the mitral valve, which was underdiagnosed by a 64-MDCT scan. This case illustrates the complementary role for both TTE and 64-MDCT in the noninvasive diagnosis of left atrial-pulmonary vein thrombi.

  13. Hyaline cartilage thickness in radiographically normal cadaveric hips: comparison of spiral CT arthrographic and macroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Wyler, Annabelle; Bousson, Valérie; Bergot, Catherine; Polivka, Marc; Leveque, Eric; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2007-02-01

    To assess spiral multidetector computed tomographic (CT) arthrography for the depiction of cartilage thickness in hips without cartilage loss, with evaluation of anatomic slices as the reference standard. Permission to perform imaging studies in cadaveric specimens of individuals who had willed their bodies to science was obtained from the institutional review board. Two independent observers measured the femoral and acetabular hyaline cartilage thickness of 12 radiographically normal cadaveric hips (from six women and five men; age range at death, 52-98 years; mean, 76.5 years) on spiral multidetector CT arthrographic reformations and on coronal anatomic slices. Regions of cartilage loss at gross or histologic examination were excluded. CT arthrographic and anatomic measurements in the coronal plane were compared by using Bland-Altman representation and a paired t test. Differences between mean cartilage thicknesses at the points of measurement were tested by means of analysis of variance. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities were determined. At CT arthrography, mean cartilage thickness ranged from 0.32 to 2.53 mm on the femoral head and from 0.95 to 3.13 mm on the acetabulum. Observers underestimated cartilage thickness in the coronal plane by 0.30 mm +/- 0.52 (mean +/- standard error) at CT arthrography (P < .001) compared with the anatomic reference standard. Ninety-five percent of the differences between CT arthrography and anatomic values ranged from -1.34 to 0.74 mm. The difference between mean cartilage thicknesses at the different measurement points was significant for coronal spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement of the femoral head and acetabulum and for sagittal and transverse CT arthrography of the femoral head (P < .001). Changes in cartilage thickness from the periphery to the center of the joint ("gradients") were found by means of spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement. Spiral

  14. Uncommon causes of acute abdominal pain: multidetector computed tomography pearls and pitfalls for the radiologist on call.

    PubMed

    Mellado, José María; Martín, Joaquín; Solanas, Susana; Yanguas, Nerea; Salceda, Javier; Cozcolluela, María Rosa

    2012-01-01

    We review uncommon causes of acute abdominal pain in which inconclusive multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) studies were followed by emergency surgery and unexpected diagnoses. Despite dedicated protocols and technical advances, MDCT of uncommon causes of acute abdominal pain still represents a significant challenge for the radiologist on call. We emphasize diagnostic pearls and pitfalls that may help the radiologist on call identify or suspect these uncommon causes of acute abdominal pain on MDCT. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multidetector computed tomography of pediatric large airway diseases: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward Y; Greenberg, S Bruce; Boiselle, Phillip M

    2011-09-01

    Advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) technology have given rise to improvements in the noninvasive and comprehensive assessment of the large airways in pediatric patients. Superb two-dimensional and three-dimensional reconstruction MDCT images have revolutionized the display of large airways and enhanced the ability to diagnose large airway diseases in children. The 320-MDCT scanner, which provides combined detailed anatomic and dynamic functional information assessment of the large airways, is promising for the assessment of dynamic large airway disease such as tracheobronchomalacia. This article discusses imaging techniques and clinical applications of MDCT for assessing large airway diseases in pediatric patients.

  16. Multidetector CT in children: current concepts and dose reduction strategies

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, Ingrid M.; van der Molen, Aart J.

    2010-01-01

    The recent technical development of multidetector CT (MDCT) has contributed to a substantial increase in its diagnostic applications and accuracy in children. A major drawback of MDCT is the use of ionising radiation with the risk of inducing secondary cancer. Therefore, justification and optimisation of paediatric MDCT is of great importance in order to minimise these risks (“as low as reasonably achievable” principle). This review will focus on all technical and non-technical aspects relevant for paediatric MDCT optimisation and includes guidelines for radiation dose level-based CT protocols. PMID:20535463

  17. Multidetector CT in children: current concepts and dose reduction strategies.

    PubMed

    Nievelstein, Rutger A J; van Dam, Ingrid M; van der Molen, Aart J

    2010-08-01

    The recent technical development of multidetector CT (MDCT) has contributed to a substantial increase in its diagnostic applications and accuracy in children. A major drawback of MDCT is the use of ionising radiation with the risk of inducing secondary cancer. Therefore, justification and optimisation of paediatric MDCT is of great importance in order to minimise these risks ("as low as reasonably achievable" principle). This review will focus on all technical and non-technical aspects relevant for paediatric MDCT optimisation and includes guidelines for radiation dose level-based CT protocols.

  18. Consideration of the Pathological Features of Pediatric Congenital Heart Diseases Which Are Ideally Suitable for Diagnosing With Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Watanabe, Noriko; Sakata, Miho; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Kagami, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Background A lots of articles published regarding the usefulness of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) mostly describe that it can be an alternative to the invasive catheterization and angiography. The unique diagnostic features of this imaging modality have been largely ignored or disregarded. We described the pathological conditions that cannot be diagnosed by conventional angiography with cardiac catheterization but can be accurately diagnosed by MDCT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed non-ECG-gated MDCT images acquired from 452 children and young adults with CHD between 2005 and 2010 in our institute. In this article, we focused on the diagnostic advantages of MDCT, and indicated five pathological conditions. (1) When Blalock-Taussig shunt total occlusion prevents catheter insertion into the artificial vessel and angiography is ruled out, the peripheral pulmonary artery during the peripheral pulmonary artery can be imaged and diagnosed using MDCT based on blood flow supplied from many small collateral vessels originating from the aorta. (2) The location and protrusion of the device in the vessel after coil embolization to treat patent ductus arteriosus can be accurately visualized by virtual endoscopy using MDCT. (3) Calcification of patches, synthetic blood vessels, and other prostheses that is indistinct on conventional angiograms is clear on MDCT. (4) Simultaneous MDCT observations of the anatomical relationships between arterial and venous systems on the same image can clarify the detail diagnosis for surgical treatment. (5) Compression of the airways by the great vessels and pulmonary segmental emphysematous change can be diagnosed by MDCT. Results and Conclusions Among patients with CHD, MDCT is useful not only as a non-invasive alternative to conventional angiography, but also as a tool for specific morphological diagnoses. In the future, it will be necessary to accumulate experience in the

  19. 78 FR 52929 - Scientific Information Request on Imaging Tests for the Diagnosis and Staging of Pancreatic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ..., PET-CT, MRI) for diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in adults with suspicious symptoms? a. What is... effectiveness of imaging techniques (e.g., MDCT angiography 3D reconstruction, other MDCT, EUS-FNA, PET-CT, MRI..., EUS-FNA, PET- CT, MRI) when used to diagnose and/or stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma? a. How are...

  20. Bladder trauma: multidetector computed tomography cystography.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Charbel; Kanth, Nalini

    2011-08-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography is rapidly becoming the most recommended study for evaluation of the bladder for suspected trauma. This article reviews the bladder trauma with emphasis on the application of MDCT cystography to traumatic bladder injuries using a pictorial essay based on images collected in our level I trauma center.

  1. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. Methods As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Results Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = < .004). No significant differences were detected concerning the modalities’ specificities (with values between P = .98). Raters' confidence was higher in RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT compared to radiography (P < .001). Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT for wrist fractures proved to be similar and in some parts even higher compared to radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run. PMID:27788215

  2. Multidetector computed tomography findings in deaths with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Levy, Angela D; Harcke, Howard T; Getz, John M; Mallak, Craig T

    2009-06-01

    This study compared autopsy with postmortem multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings in charred remains. Seventeen consecutive male subjects (mean age, 29.4 years) who perished in a fire-related event resulting in charred remains underwent total body MDCT immediately prior to routine autopsy that included serum carboxyhemoglobin measurement. MDCT showed all thermal tissue changes (skin and subcutaneous fat loss, skeletal muscle retraction, pugilistic attitude, cortical fractures, bone and organ destruction, thermal epidural hematoma, and thermal amputation) and established all fracture patterns that were lethal, but autopsy added the fire as a contributory cause of death when there was carboxyhemoglobin elevation. MDCT had limited value in determination of lethal vascular and visceral injuries. MDCT is an effective complement to autopsy in the setting of charred remains and may serve to augment a limited autopsy. This may be particularly useful in mass casualty scenarios.

  3. Clinical significance of multidetector-row computed tomography in breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Doihara, Hiroyoshi; Fujita, Takeo; Takabatake, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hirotoshi; Ogasawara, Yutaka; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Several reports support the association of higher ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rates with positive or intermediate margins compared with negative pathologic margins. Precise evaluation of tumor extension and adequate surgical margin are important factors affecting tumor recurrence after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Many studies have reported the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing the tumor extension of breast cancer, but few have evaluated the utility of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). The results of this study show the clinical significance of MDCT for detecting cancer extension and demonstrate the clinical role of MDCT in BCS. Subjects comprised 136 patients grouped into two categories based on whether or not tumor extension was evaluated with MDCT preoperatively. The positive surgical margin rate and breast conservation rate were analyzed in each group and the clinical role of MDCT in BCS was evaluated. Moreover, evaluation of intraductal extension was done both with MDCT and histologically, and computed tomography (CT)-pathologic correlations were examined retrospectively. Finally, the margin-positive cases were analyzed in relation to their clinical characteristics. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detection of the intraductal component were 71.8%, 85.7%, 82.1%, and 76.9%, respectively. The positive surgical margin rate and conservation rate are 7.46% and 81.9%, respectively, for those who were diagnosed with MDCT preoperatively; their corresponding rates without MDCT were 16.67% and 67.9%. Most margin-positive patients have remarkable lymphatic space invasion. Positive surgical margins were often recognized toward the nipple. For diagnosing the intraductal extension, MDCT shows sufficient diagnosability. Moreover, MDCT can provide appropriate information for the determination of adequate surgical margins and contribute to increases in breast conservation

  4. Comparison of Thoracic Radiography and Computed Tomography in Calves with Naturally Occurring Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Jennifer; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M; Vanegas, Jorge A; Bobe, Gerd; Poulsen, Keith P

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the severity and extent of lung disease using thoracic computed radiography (CR) compared to contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the thorax in calves with naturally occurring respiratory disease and to evaluate the feasibility and safety of performing contrast-enhanced thoracic multi-detector MDCT examinations in sedated calves. Furthermore, to evaluate if combining CR or MDCT with respiratory scoring factors will improve prediction of the chronicity of pulmonary disease in calves. Thirty Jersey heifer calves ranging in age between 25 and 89 days with naturally occurring respiratory disease. All calves were evaluated via thoracic CR and contrast-enhanced MDCT. All calves were euthanized immediately following thoracic MDCT and submitted for necropsy. Imaging and histopathology results were compared with each other. Thoracic MDCT was superior for evaluation of pneumonia in calves due to the lack of summation in all areas of the lungs. Intravenously administered sedation provided an adequate plane of sedation for acquiring MDCT images of diagnostic quality, without the need for re-scanning. A diagnosis of pneumonia was made with equal rate on both thoracic CR and MDCT. Although mild differences in classification of lung pattern and extent of lung disease were seen when comparing an experienced and a less experienced evaluator, the overall differences were not statistically significant. The best intra- and inter-observer agreement was noted when evaluating the cranioventral aspects of the lungs in either modality. Clinical respiratory scoring is inadequate for diagnosing chronicity of pneumonia in calves with naturally occurring pneumonia. Both imaging modalities allowed diagnosis of pneumonia in calves. The cranial ventral aspects of the lungs were most commonly affected. Thoracic CR and MDCT provided similar diagnostic effectiveness in diagnosing pneumonia. However, MDCT provided better assessment of subtle details, which may

  5. Multidetector-row computed tomography for prosthetic heart valve dysfunction: is concomitant non-invasive coronary angiography possible before redo-surgery?

    PubMed

    Tanis, Wilco; Suchá, Dominika; Laufer, Ward; Habets, Jesse; van Herwerden, Lex A; Symersky, Petr; Chamuleau, Steven; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2015-06-01

    Retrospective ECG-gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is increasingly used for the assessment of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction, but is also hampered by PHV-related artefacts/cardiac arrhythmias. Furthermore, it is performed without nitroglycerine or heart rate correction. The purpose was to determine whether MDCT performed before potential redo-PHV surgery is feasible for concomitant coronary artery stenosis assessment and can replace invasive coronary angiography (CAG). PHV patients with CAG and MDCT were identified. Based on medical history, two groups were created: (I) patients with no known coronary artery disease (CAD), (II) patients with known CAD. All images were scored for the presence of significant (>50 %) stenosis. CAG was the reference test. Fifty-one patients were included. In group I (n = 38), MDCT accurately ruled out significant stenosis in 19/38 (50 %) patients, but could not replace CAG in the remaining 19/38 (50 %) patients due to non-diagnostic image quality (n = 16) or significant stenosis (n = 3) detection. In group II (n = 13), MDCT correctly found no patients without significant stenosis, requiring CAG imaging in all. MDCT assessed patency in 16/19 (84 %) grafts and detected a hostile anatomy in two. MDCT performed for PHV dysfunction assessment can replace CAG (100 % accurate) in approximately half of patients without previously known CAD. • Retrospective MDCT is increasingly used for prosthetic heart valve dysfunction assessment • In case of PHV reoperation, invasive coronary angiography is also required • MDCT can replace CAG in 50 % of patients without coronary artery disease • When conclusive for coronary assessment, MDCT stenosis rule out is highly accurate • Replacing CAG saves associated risks of distant embolization of thrombi or vegetations.

  6. Four- and Eight-Channel Aortoiliac CT Angiography: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Karcaaltincaba, Musturay Foley, Dennis

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To compare performance parameters, contrast material load and radiation dose in a patient cohort having aortoiliac CT angiography using 4- and 8-channel multidetector CT (MDCT) systems. Methods. Eighteen patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms underwent initial 4-channel and follow-up 8-channel MDCT angiography. Both the 4- and 8-channel MDCT systems utilized a matrix detector of 16 x 1.25 mm rows. Scan coverage included the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries to the level of the proximal femoral arteries. For 4-channel MDCT, nominal slice thickness and beam pitch were 1.25 mm and 1.5, respectively, and for 8-channel MDCT they were 1.25 mm and 1.35 or 1.65 respectively. Scan duration, iodinated contrast material load and mean aortoiliac attenuation were compared retrospectively. Comparative radiation dose measurements for 4- and 8-channel MDCT were obtained using a multiple scan average dose technique on an abdominal phantom. Results. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, 8-channel MDCT aortoiliac angiography was performed with equivalent collimation, decreased contrast load (mean 45% decrease: 144 ml versus 83 ml of 300 mg iodine/ml contrast material) and decreased acquisition time (mean 51% shorter: 34.4 sec versus 16.9 sec) without a significant change in mean aortic enhancement (299 HU versus 300 HU, p > 0.05). Radiation dose was 2 rad for the 4-channel system and 2/1.5 rad for the 8-channel system at 1.35/1.65 pitch respectively. Conclusion. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, aortoiliac CT angiography with 8-channel MDCT produces equivalent z-axis resolution with decreased contrast load and acquisition time without increased radiation exposure.

  7. Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography in the Evaluation of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Performed with Expanded-Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio Bezzi, Mario; Bruni, Antonio; Corona, Mario; Boatta, Emanuele; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Passariello, Roberto

    2011-02-15

    We assessed, in a prospective study, the efficacy of multidetector spiral computed tomography (MDCT) in the evaluation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) patency in patients treated with the Viatorr (Gore, Flagstaff, AZ) expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE)-covered stent-graft. Eighty patients who underwent TIPS procedure using the Viatorr self-expanding e-PTFE stent-graft were evaluated at follow-up of 1, 3, 6, and 12 months with clinical and laboratory tests as well as ultrasound-color Doppler (USCD) imaging. In case of varices, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was also performed. In addition, the shunt was evaluated using MDCT at 6 and 12 months. In all cases of abnormal findings and discrepancy between MDCT and USCD, invasive control venography was performed. MDCT images were acquired before and after injection of intravenous contrast media on the axial plane and after three-dimensional reconstruction using different algorithms. MDCT was successfully performed in all patients. No artefacts correlated to the Viatorr stent-graft were observed. A missing correlation between UCSD and MDCT was noticed in 20 of 80 (25%) patients. Invasive control venography confirmed shunt patency in 16 (80%) cases and shunt malfunction in 4 (20%) cases. According to these data, MDCT sensitivity was 95.2%; specificity was 96.6%; and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were 90.9 and 98.2%, respectively. USCD sensitivity was 90%; specificity was 75%; and PPV and NPV were 54.5 and 95.7%, respectively. A high correlation (K value = 0.85) between MDCT and invasive control venography was observed. On the basis of these results, MDCT shows superior sensitivity and specificity compared with USCD in those patients in whom TIPS was performed with the Viatorr stent-graft. MDCT can be considered a valid tool in the follow-up of these patients.

  8. Assessment of left ventricular volumes, ejection fraction and regional wall motion with retrospective electrocardiogram triggered 320-detector computed tomography: a comparison with 2D-echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Nasis, Arthur; Moir, Stuart; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Cameron, James D; Mottram, Philip M

    2012-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) volumes, ejection fraction (LVEF) and regional wall motion (LVRWM) have important treatment and prognostic implications in patients with coronary artery disease. We sought to determine the accuracy of 320-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for the assessment of LV volumes, LVEF and LVRWM, using 2D-echocardiography as the reference standard. We evaluated 50 consecutive patients (mean age 60 ± 14 years, 66% male) who underwent 320-detector MDCT (dose-modulated retrospective electrocardiogram-triggering) and 2D-echocardiography within 14 days for investigation of known or suspected coronary artery disease. Two blinded readers measured LV volumes on MDCT and visually assessed LVRWM with a 3-point scale using a 17-segment model. A separate experienced echocardiologist, blinded to MDCT findings, assessed LVRWM on 2D-echocardiograms and determined LV volumes and LVEF using Simpson's biplane method. 2D-echocardiography served as the reference standard. Mean LVEF was 59 ± 9% (range 26-75%) on 2D-echocardiography and 60 ± 9% (range 27-76%) on MDCT. Using linear regression analysis, MDCT agreed very well with 2D-echocardiography for assessment of LVEDV (r(2) = 0.88; P < 0.001), LVESV (r(2) = 0.95; P < 0.001) and LVEF (r(2) = 0.90; P < 0.001). Mean differences (±standard deviation) of 14 ± 13 ml, 5 ± 7 ml and 1 ± 3% were observed between MDCT and 2D-echocardiography for LVEDV, LVESV and LVEF, respectively. On 2D-echocardiography, 81/850 (9.5%) segments had abnormal LVRWM. Agreement for assessment of LVRWM between 2D-echocardiography and MDCT was excellent (96%, k = 0.76). Accurate assessment of LV volumes, LVEF and LVRWM is feasible with 320-detector MDCT, with MDCT demonstrating slightly larger LV volumes than 2D-echocardiography.

  9. The utility of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the surveillance for postoperative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hee; Min, Yang Won; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Paik, Yong Han; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the utility of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-MRI) in surveillance for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after hepatectomy. This retrospective study analyzed 147 patients who underwent surveillance with alternating multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and Gd-MRI after hepatectomy for HCC. The patients were followed-up every 3 months during the first 2 years, and every 6 months thereafter. At each visit, MDCT was performed but once a year (every 12 months), Gd-MRI was performed instead of MDCT. Each HCC recurrence detection rate of MDCT and Gd-MRI was evaluated, and recurrent HCC characteristics were compared according to the detection test. A total of 63 patients had recurrent HCC. Among them, 9 were detected with Gd-MRI and 29 with MDCT. The baseline characteristics of patients with recurrent HCC showed no significant differences according to the detection test. The HCC recurrence detection rate of Gd-MRI and MDCT was 4.8% (9/180) and 4.3% (29/580), respectively, on the per test basis (P = 0.764). However, in the population with a follow-up period of ≥12 months, the detection rate of Gd-MRI and MDCT was 4.3% (7/150) and 1.5% (19/400), respectively (P = 0.035). Recurrent HCCs detected with Gd-MRI were smaller than those detected with MDCT (tumor size < 2 cm, 100% vs 65.5%, P = 0.040). Our data suggest that Gd-MRI has advantages in detecting recurrent HCC after hepatectomy. Surveillance with alternating MDCT and Gd-MRI may identify more recurrent HCC in an early stage than with MDCT alone in patients who received hepatectomy for HCC. PMID:28002336

  10. Temporomandibular joints: high-resolution computed tomographic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was performed in 43 patients. Exquisite detail of the face, skull base, and TMJs was obtained with CT using soft tissue and bone algorithms, narrow collimation, and multiplanar images. In 10 patients clinically suspected of joint derangement, CT results were in close agreement with surgical findings and arthrography in 13/15 joints. CT showed indirect signs of disc dislocation, and the dislocated disc itself in 81% of affected joints. In two patients, arthrography with CT proved to be more helpful than conventional arthrography alone. CT without intra-articular contrast material provided information not appreciated on conventional radiogaphs in 28 patients (65%) and was particularly helpful in evaluating patients with disc pathosis and trauma. Early experience with CT of the TMJ shows that it is an excellent method of evaluation at acceptable radiation exposure levels that adds essential information not seen on standard radiographs.

  11. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe; Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. PMID:20012039

  12. Usefulness of 40-slice multidetector row computed tomography to detect coronary disease in patients prior to cardiac valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Kefer, Joëlle; Pasquet, Agnès; Coche, Emmanuel; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-12-01

    Preoperative identification of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients prior to valve surgery requires systematic invasive coronary angiography. The purpose of this current prospective study was to evaluate whether exclusion of CAD by multi-detector CT (MDCT) might potentially avoid systematic cardiac catheterization in these patients. Eighty-two patients (53 males, 62 +/- 13 years) scheduled to undergo valve surgery underwent 40-slice MDCT before invasive quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). According to QCA, 15 patients had CAD (5 one-vessel, 6 two-vessel and 4 three-vessel disease). The remaining 67 patients had no CAD. On a per-vessel basis, MDCT correctly identified 27/29 (sensitivity 93%) vessels with and excluded 277/299 vessels (specificity 93%) without CAD. On a per-patient basis, MDCT correctly identified 14/15 patients with (sensitivity 93%) and 60/67 patients without CAD (specificity 90%). Positive and negative predictive values of MDCT were 67% and 98%. Performing invasive angiography only in patients with abnormal MDCT might have avoided QCA in 60/82 (73%). MDCT could be potentially useful in the preoperative evaluation of patients with valve disease. By selecting only those patients with coronary lesions to undergo invasive coronary angiography, it could avoid cardiac catheterization in a large number of patients without CAD.

  13. Accuracy of linear intraoral measurements using cone beam CT and multidetector CT: a tale of two CTs

    PubMed Central

    Patcas, R; Markic, G; Müller, L; Ullrich, O; Peltomäki, T; Kellenberger, C J; Karlo, C A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to compare the accuracy of linear bone measurements of cone beam CT (CBCT) with multidetector CT (MDCT) and validate intraoral soft-tissue measurements in CBCT. Methods Comparable views of CBCT and MDCT were obtained from eight intact cadaveric heads. The anatomical positions of the gingival margin and the buccal alveolar bone ridge were determined. Image measurements (CBCT/MDCT) were performed upon multiplanar reformatted data sets and compared with the anatomical measurements; the number of non-assessable sites (NASs) was evaluated. Results Radiological measurements were accurate with a mean difference from anatomical measurements of 0.14 mm (CBCT) and 0.23 mm (MDCT). These differences were statistically not significant, but the limits of agreement for bone measurements were broader in MDCT (−1.35 mm; 1.82 mm) than in CBCT (−0.93 mm; 1.21 mm). The limits of agreement for soft-tissue measurements in CBCT were smaller (−0.77 mm; 1.07 mm), indicating a slightly higher accuracy. More NASs occurred in MDCT (14.5%) than in CBCT (8.3%). Conclusions CBCT is slightly more reliable for linear measurements than MDCT and less affected by metal artefacts. CBCT accuracy of linear intraoral soft-tissue measurements is similar to the accuracy of bone measurements. PMID:22554987

  14. Differences in episode-based care costs for multidetector computed tomographic coronary angiography versus myocardial perfusion imaging for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Min, James K; Robinson, Matthew; Shaw, Leslee J; Lin, Fay; Legorreta, Antonio P; Gilmore, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a novel method for diagnosis and prognosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The opportunity costs that favour MDCT over other CAD diagnostic methods is currently unknown. This study used an episodes of care cost model based on epidemiologic and economic data evaluating individuals without known CAD undergoing MDCT or myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). It was a multicenter retrospective database review of medical and pharmacy-related claims linked by episodes of care from 2002 to 2005. CAD-related episodes of care costs were examined 1-year downstream for patients after initial MDCT that were matched to patients who underwent MPS. After adjustment for patient factors, 1-year total CAD-related episodes of care costs for MDCT were 16.4% lower than MPS, by an average of $682 (95% confidence interval $14, $1,350) per patient. While costs per CAD-related episode were similar between MDCT and MPS groups ($4,284 vs. $4,277, p=0.08). Patients without known CAD who undergo MDCT as an initial diagnostic test, compared to MPS, incurred fewer CAD-related episodes of care and lower overall CAD-related costs.

  15. Detection and quantification of coronary atherosclerotic plaque by 64-slice multidetector CT: a systematic head-to-head comparison with intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Stella-Lida; Neefjes, Lisan A; Schaap, Michiel; Li, Hui-Ling; Capuano, Ermanno; van der Giessen, Alina G; Schuurbiers, Johan C H; Gijsen, Frank J H; Dharampal, Anoeshka S; Nieman, Koen; van Geuns, Robert Jan; Mollet, Nico R; de Feyter, Pim J

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the ability of 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT)-derived plaque parameters to detect and quantify coronary atherosclerosis, using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as the reference standard. In 32 patients, IVUS and 64-MDCT was performed. The MDCT and IVUS datasets of 44 coronary arteries were co-registered using a newly developed fusion technique and quantitative parameters were derived from both imaging modalities. The threshold of >0.5 mm of maximum wall thickness was used to establish plaque presence on MDCT and IVUS. We analyzed 1364 coregistered 1-mm coronary cross-sections and 255 segments of 5-mm length. Compared with IVUS, 64-MDCT enabled correct detection in 957 of 1109 cross-sections containing plaque (sensitivity 86%). In 180 of 255 cross-sections atherosclerosis was correctly excluded (specificity 71%). On the segmental level, MDCT detected 213 of 220 segments with any atherosclerotic plaque (sensitivity 96%), whereas the presence of any plaque was correctly ruled out in 28 of 32 segments (specificity 88%). Interobserver agreement for the detection of atherosclerotic cross-sections was moderate (Cohen's kappa coefficient K=0.51), but excellent for the atherosclerotic segments (K=1.0). Pearson's correlation coefficient for vessel plaque volumes measured by MDCT and IVUS was r=0.91 (p<0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a slight non-significant underestimation of any plaque volume by MDCT (p=0.5), with a trend to underestimate noncalcified and overestimate mixed/calcified plaque volumes (p=0.22 and p=0.87 respectively). MDCT is able to detect and quantify atherosclerotic plaque. Further improvement in CT resolution is necessary for more reliable assessment of very small and distal coronary plaques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma: Comparison of multi-detector CT with digital subtraction angiography and Lipiodol CT

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-Hua; Guan, Yong-Song; Zhou, Xiang-Ping; Huang, Juan; Sun, Long; Li, Xiao; Liu, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of biphasic multi-detector row helical computed tomography (MDCT), digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and Lipiodol computed tomography (CT) in detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with nodular HCC underwent biphasic MDCT examination: hepatic arterial phase (HAP) 25 s and portal venous phase (PVP) 70 s after injection of the contrast medium (1.5 mL/kg). They also underwent hepatic angiography and intra-arterial infusion of iodized oil. Lipiodol CT was performed 3-4 wk after infusion. MDCT images were compared with DSA and Lipiodol CT images for detection of hepatic nodules. RESULTS: The three imaging techniques had the same sensitivity in detecting nodules >20 mm in diameter. There was no significant difference in the sensitivity among HAP-MDCT, Lipiodol CT and DSA for nodules of 10-20 mm in diameter. For the nodules <10 mm in diameter, HAP-MDCT identified 47, Lipiodol CT detected 27 (χ2 = 11.3, P = 0.005<0.01, HAP-MDCT vs Lipiodol CT) and DSA detected 16 (χ2 = 9.09, P = 0.005<0.01 vs Lipiodol CT and χ2 = 29.03, P = 0.005<0.01vs HAP-MDCT). However, six nodules <10 mm in diameter were detected only by Lipiodol CT. CONCLUSION: MDCT and Lipiodol CT are two complementary modalities. At present, MDCT does not obviate the need for DSA and subsequent Lipiodol CT as a preoperative examination for HCC. PMID:15633215

  17. Does Computed Tomography Change our Observation and Management of Fracture Non-Unions?

    PubMed Central

    Kleinlugtenbelt, Ydo V.; Scholtes, Vanessa A.B.; Toor, Jay; Amaechi, Christian; Maas, Mario; Bhandari, Mohit; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Kloen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) in addition to plain radiographs influences radiologists’ and orthopedic surgeons’ diagnosis and treatment plans for delayed unions and non-unions. Methods: A retrospective database of 32 non-unions was reviewed by 20 observers. On a scale of 1 to 5, observers rated on X-Ray and a subsequent Multi Detector Helical Computer Tomography (MDCT) scan was performed to determine the following categories: “healed”, “bridging callus present”, “persistent fracture line” or “surgery advised”. Interobserver reliability in each category was calculated using the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). The influence of the MDCT scan on the raters’ observations was determined in each case by subtracting the two scores of both time points. Results: All four categories show fair interobserver reliability when using plain radiographs. MDCT showed no improvement, the reliability was poor for the categories “bridging callus present” and “persistent fracture line”, and fair for “healed” and “surgery advised”. In none of the cases, MDCT led to a change of management from nonoperative to operative treatment or vice versa. For 18 out of 32 cases, the treatment plans did not alter. In seven cases MDCT led to operative treatment while on X-ray the treatment plan was undecided. Conclusion: In this study, the interobserver reliability of MDCT scan is not greater than conventional radiographs for determining non-union. However, a MDCT scan did lead to a more invasive approach in equivocal cases. Therefore a MDCT is only recommended for making treatment strategies in those cases. PMID:27847846

  18. Temporomandibular joint internal derangements: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.A.; Vogler, J.B. III; Morrish, R.B. Jr.; Goldman, S.M.; Capra, R.E.; Proctor, E.

    1984-08-01

    Two hundred patients with suspected displaced temporomandibular joint meniscus were studied with computed tomography. In 75 cases confirmation of the CT diagnosis was subsequently obtained via surgery or arthrography; correlation was found in 73 cases (97%), with one false-negative and one false-positive examination. When meniscus displacement was graded as mild, moderate, or severe, those cases diagnosed as moderate or severe were more likely to require surgery. The technique and interpretation of this technique is described; in most cases CT can replace arthrography in diagnosing displaced temporomandibular joint menisci.

  19. Imaging of postoperative shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, M; Pesce, A; Barile, A; Borgia, D; Zappia, M; Romano, A; Pogliacomi, F; Verdano, M; Pellegrini, A; Johnson, K

    2017-03-01

    Postoperative imaging in shoulder instability is still a challenge for radiologists due to various postsurgical anatomical findings that could be considered pathologic in treated shoulder. For this reason is very important a deep knowledge about surgical procedures, anatomical changes after surgery and the appropriate diagnostic imaging modalities to work up the symptomatic postoperative shoulder. Postoperative imaging options include use conventional radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI arthrography, computed tomography (CT) and CT arthrography. The purpose of our review is to explain the different surgical procedures and to describe postoperative changes detected with radiological imaging.

  20. Efficacy of using an air arthrogram for EUA and injection of the hip joint in adults.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Mohammad; Shyamsundar, Srinivasan; Bali, Navi; McBryde, Callum; O'Hara, John; Bache, Edward

    2014-09-01

    Hip arthrography usually requires the injection of iodine based dyes which can cause complications. We wanted to determine the accuracy of using air for hip arthrography. A prospective study was undertaken including all adults who had a hip arthrogram. We initially did an air arthrogram and subsequently injected iohexol to see if we were still in the joint. Forty injections were done. Mean age 32 years. There was a 100% success rate with obtaining a positive air arthrogram. Air arthrogram of the hip offers a safe, cost free and accurate alternative to iodine based arthrograms.

  1. Dual-phase CT for the assessment of acute vascular injuries in high-energy blunt trauma: the imaging findings and management implications.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Francesca; Ierardi, Anna M; Mazzei, Maria A; Magenta Biasina, Alberto; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Nicola, Refky; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Acute vascular injuries are the second most common cause of fatalities in patients with multiple traumatic injuries; thus, prompt identification and management is essential for patient survival. Over the past few years, multidetector CT (MDCT) using dual-phase scanning protocol has become the imaging modality of choice in high-energy deceleration traumas. The objective of this article was to review the role of dual-phase MDCT in the identification and management of acute vascular injuries, particularly in the chest and abdomen following multiple traumatic injuries. In addition, this article will provide examples of MDCT features of acute vascular injuries with correlative surgical and interventional findings.

  2. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware.

    PubMed

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-12-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration.

  3. Cardiac multidetector computed tomography: basic physics of image acquisition and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bardo, Dianna M E; Brown, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Cardiac MDCT is here to stay. And, it is more than just imaging coronary arteries. Understanding the differences in and the benefits of one CT scanner from another will help you to optimize the capabilities of the scanner, but requires a basic understanding of the MDCT imaging physics.This review provides key information needed to understand the differences in the types of MDCT scanners, from 64 - 320 detectors, flat panels, single and dual source configurations, step and shoot prospective and retrospective gating, and how each factor influences radiation dose, spatial and temporal resolution, and image noise.

  4. Thin-section CT of lung without ECG gating: 64-detector row CT can markedly reduce cardiac motion artifact which can simulate lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Masahiro; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sumikawa, Hiromitsu; Inoue, Atsuo; Daimon, Tadahisa; Honda, Osamu; Mihara, Naoki; Johkoh, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hironobu

    2009-01-01

    Motion artifacts, which can mimic thickened bronchial wall and the cystic appearance of bronchiectasis, constitute a potential pitfall in the diagnosis of interstitial or bronchial disease. Therefore, purpose of our study was to evaluate whether 64-detector row CT (64-MDCT) enables a reduction in respiratory or cardiac motion artifacts in the lung area on thin-section CT without ECG gating, and to examine the correlation between cardiac motion artifact and heart rate. Thirty-two patients with suspected diffuse lung disease, who underwent both 8- and 64-MDCT (gantry rotation time, 0.5 and 0.4s, respectively), were included. The heart rates of an additional 155 patients were measured (range, 48-126 beats per minute; mean, 76 beats per minute) immediately prior to 64-MDCT, and compared to the degree of cardiac motion artifact. Two independent observers evaluated the following artifacts on a monitor without the knowledge of relevant clinical information: (1) artifacts on 8- and 64-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness and those on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 32 patients; and (2) artifacts on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 155 patients. Interobserver agreement was good in evaluating artifacts on 8-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness (weighted Kappa test, kappa=0.61-0.71), and fair or poor in the other evaluations (kappa<0.31). Two observers stated that cardiac motion artifacts were more significant on 8-MDCT than on 64-MDCT in all 32 patients. Statistically significant differences were found at various checkpoints only in comparing artifacts between 8- and 64-MDCT for 1.25-mm thickness (Wilcoxon's signed-rank test, p<0.0017). Cardiac motion artifacts on 64-MDCT had no significant correlation with heart rate (Spearman's correlation coefficient by rank test). The high temporal resolution of 64-MDCT appears to reduce cardiac motion artifact that can affect thin-section scans of the lung parenchyma.

  5. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas--evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Horton, Karen H; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fishman, Elliot K

    2005-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas is a rare cystic pancreatic tumor. In this case report we provide the imaging perspective of the lesion including the role of multidetector CT (MDCT) and CT angiography and 3D imaging.

  6. Operational cooling tower model (CTTOOL V1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, S.; LocalDomainServers, L.; Garrett, A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT’s) are widely used to remove waste heat from industrial processes, including suspected proliferators of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The temperature of the air being exhausted from the MDCT is proportional to the amount of thermal energy being removed from the process cooling water, although ambient weather conditions and cooling water flow rate must be known or estimated to calculate the rate of thermal energy dissipation (Q). It is theoretically possible to derive MDCT air exhaust temperatures from thermal images taken from a remote sensor. A numerical model of a MDCT is required to translate the air exhaust temperature to a Q. This report describes the MDCT model developed by the Problem Centered Integrated Analysis (PCIA) program that was designed to perform those computational tasks. The PCIA program is a collaborative effort between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the Northrop-Grumman Corporation (NG) and the Aerospace Corporation (AERO).

  7. Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) versus multidetector computed tomography in hemodynamically stable emergency patients.

    PubMed

    Fornell Pérez, R

    2017-02-10

    This critically appraised topic (CAT) study aims to evaluate the quality and extent of the scientific evidence that supports the use of focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) versus multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in hemodynamically stable trauma patients in the emergency room. An efficient search of the literature yielded several recent articles with a high level of evidence. The CAT study concludes that FAST is an acceptable initial imaging test in hemodynamically stable patients, although its performance is limited in certain circumstances. The decision whether to use MDCT should be determined by evaluating the patient's degree of instability and the distance to the MDCT scanner. Nevertheless, few articles address the question of the distance to MDCT scanners in emergency departments.

  8. Observational case series: an algorithm incorporating multidetector computed tomography in the medicolegal investigation of human remains after a natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Berran, Philip J; Mazuchowski, Edward L; Marzouk, Abubakr; Harcke, H Theodore

    2014-07-01

    An algorithm incorporating multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), digital radiographs, and external examination was used to triage cases for noninvasive or complete autopsy after a natural disaster. The algorithm was applied to 27 individuals who died during or soon after the earthquake that struck the Republic of Haiti on January 12, 2010. Of the 27 cases reviewed, 7 (26%) required a complete autopsy to determine cause and manner of death. In the remaining 20 (74%), cause and manner of death were determined with a reasonable degree of medical certainty after review of circumstances, an external examination, and postmortem imaging by MDCT and digital radiography (noninvasive autopsy). MDCT was particularly useful in detecting skeletal fractures caused by blunt force injury which were not evident on digital radiographs. The algorithm incorporating postmortem MDCT can be useful in the triage of human remains for autopsy after a natural disaster. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology ... complete. A coronary calcium scan uses a special scanner such as an electron beam CT or a multidetector CT (MDCT) machine. ...

  10. Contribution of diffusion weighted MRI to diagnosis and staging in gastric tumors and comparison with multi-detector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fatih Özbay, Mehmet; Çallı, İskan; Doğan, Erkan; Çelik, Sebahattin; Batur, Abdussamet; Bora, Aydın; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Özgökçe, Mesut; Çetin Kotan, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Diagnostic performance of Diffusion-Weighted magnetic resonance Imaging (DWI) and Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) for TNM (Tumor, Lymph node, Metastasis) staging of gastric cancer was compared. Patients and methods We used axial T2-weighted images and DWI (b-0,400 and b-800 s/mm2) protocol on 51 pre-operative patients who had been diagnosed with gastric cancer. We also conducted MDCT examinations on them. We looked for a signal increase in the series of DWI images. The depth of tumor invasion in the stomach wall (tumor (T) staging), the involvement of lymph nodes (nodal (N) staging), and the presence or absence of metastases (metastatic staging) in DWI and CT images according to the TNM staging system were evaluated. In each diagnosis of the tumors, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative accuracy rates of DWI and MDCT examinations were found through a comparison with the results of the surgical pathology, which is the gold standard method. In addition to the compatibilities of each examination with surgical pathology, kappa statistics were used. Results Sensitivity and specificity of DWI and MDCT in lymph node staging were as follows: N1: DWI: 75.0%, 84.6%; MDCT: 66.7%, 82%;N2: DWI: 79.3%, 77.3%; MDCT: 69.0%, 68.2%; N3: DWI: 60.0%, 97.6%; MDCT: 50.0%, 90.2%. The diagnostic tool DWI seemed more compatible with the gold standard method (surgical pathology), especially in the staging of lymph node, when compared to MDCT. On the other hand, in T staging, the results of DWI and MDCT were better than the gold standard when the T stage increased. However, DWI did not demonstrate superiority to MDCT. The sensitivity and specificity of both imaging techniques for detecting distant metastasis were 100%. Conclusions The diagnostic accuracy of DWI for TNM staging in gastric cancer before surgery is at a comparable level with MDCT and adding DWI to routine protocol of evaluating lymph nodes metastasis might increase diagnostic accuracy

  11. Scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children using axial volumetric 320-detector row CT compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16- detector row CT acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Kroft, Lucia J M; Roelofs, Joost J H; Geleijns, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    Recently a 320-detector-row CT (MDCT) scanner has become available that allows axial volumetric scanning of a 16-cm-long range (50 cm field of view) in a single 0.35-s rotation. For imaging neonates and small children, volume scanning is potentially of great advantage as the entire scan range can be acquired in 0.35 s, which can reduce motion artefacts and may reduce the need for sedation in clinical CT imaging. Also, because there is no over-ranging associated with axial volumetric scanning, this may reduce patient radiation dose. To evaluate, by means of a phantom study, scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children by using axial cone-beam and helical fan-beam MDCT acquisitions. Paediatric imaging protocols were assessed for a 320-MDCT volumetric scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba, Otawara, Japan). The 320-MDCT scanner allows for cone-beam acquisitions with coverage up to 160 mm, but it also allows for helical fan-beam acquisitions in 64-, 32-, or 16-MDCT modes. The acquisition configurations that were evaluated were 320 x 0.5 mm, 240 x 0.5 mm, and 160 x 0.5 mm for axial volumetric scanning, and 64 x 0.5 mm, 32 x 0.5 mm, and 16 x 0.5 mm for helical scanning. Dose assessment was performed for clinically relevant paediatric angiographic or chest/mediastinum acquisition protocols with tube voltages of 80 or 100 kVp and tube currents between 40 and 80 mA. Scan time was 0.35 s for 320-MDCT acquisitions, scan times varied between 1.9 s and 8.3 s for helical acquisitions. Dose savings varying between 18% and 40% were achieved with axial volumetric scanning as compared to helical scanning (for 320- versus 64-MDCT at 160 mm and 80 kVp, and for 320- versus 16-MDCT at 80 mm and 100 kVp, respectively). Statistically significant reduction in radiation dose was found for axial 320-MDCT volumetric scanning compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16-MDCT scanning. Axial thoracic CT of neonates and small children with volumetric 320-MDCT can be performed

  12. Update on the imaging diagnosis of otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gredilla Molinero, J; Mancheño Losa, M; Santamaría Guinea, N; Arévalo Galeano, N; Grande Bárez, M

    2016-01-01

    Otosclerosis is a primary osteodystrophy of the temporal bone that causes progressive conductive hearing loss. The diagnosis is generally clinical, but multidetector CT (MDCT), the imaging technique of choice, is sometimes necessary. The objective of this article is to systematically review the usefulness of imaging techniques for the diagnosis and postsurgical assessment of otosclerosis, fundamentally the role of MDCT, to decrease the surgical risk. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The clinical outcome of occult pulmonary contusion on multidetector-row computed tomography in blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Deunk, Jaap; Poels, Tielke C; Brink, Monique; Dekker, Helena M; Kool, Digna R; Blickman, Johan G; van Vugt, Arie B; Edwards, Michael John Richard

    2010-02-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is a more sensitive modality as compared with conventional radiography (CR) in detecting pulmonary injuries. MDCT often detects pulmonary contusion that is not visualized by CR, defined as occult pulmonary contusion (OPC). The aim of this study was to investigate whether OPC on MDCT has implications for the outcome in blunt trauma patients. We used prospectively collected data from 1,040 adult high-energy blunt trauma patients who were primarily presented at our emergency department and who underwent CR and MDCT of the chest. All patients with pulmonary contusion were identified and divided into two groups: The "CR/computed tomography (CT) group" consisted of patients with pulmonary contusion visible on both CR and MDCT. The "CT-only" group consisted of patients with OPC, visible exclusively on MDCT. The control group consisted of blunt trauma patients without pulmonary contusion. These groups were compared with respect to difference in mortality and other outcome measures. In addition, a multivariate analysis was performed. Two hundred fifty-five patients suffered pulmonary contusion: The CT-only group consisted of 157 and the CR/CT group of 98 patients. The CT-only group did not differ from the control group with respect to mortality rate and other outcome measures. However, compared with the CR/CT group, mortality rate was significantly lower (8% versus 16%, p = 0.039) and most other outcome measures were significantly better in the CT-only group. OPC on MDCT is not associated with a worse outcome as compared with patients without pulmonary contusion. OPC has a better outcome as compared with pulmonary contusion visible on both CR and MDCT.

  14. Accuracy of percutaneous soft-tissue interventions using a multi-axis, C-arm CT system and 3D laser guidance.

    PubMed

    Kostrzewa, Michael; Rathmann, Nils; Kara, Kerim; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Diehl, Steffen J

    2015-10-01

    Purpose of this phantom study was to compare the accuracy of needle placement using a multi-axis, C-arm-based, flat-panel, cone-beam computed tomography system (CBCT guidance) with that under multi-detector computed tomography guidance (MDCT guidance). In an abdominal phantom, eight lesions (six lesions in the liver and two in the renal pelvises, respectively) were each punctured in-plane and off-plane with a 20G needle under CBCT and MDCT guidance. Access paths were initially defined and reproduced identically on the two systems. In total, 32 interventions were conducted. CBCT and MDCT guidance was compared prospectively with respect to technical success, accuracy, and overall procedural time. All 32 interventions were technically successful in that it was possible to hit the respective lesion in each procedure. When comparing the accuracy of MDCT to CBCT guidance there was no significant difference in absolute, angular, and longitudinal deviation for either in- or off-plane interventions. Overall procedural duration was significantly longer under CBCT guidance for in-plane interventions (888 vs 527s, p=0.00005), whereas, for off-plane procedures there was no significant difference between CBCT and MDCT guidance (920 vs 701s, p=0.08). Off-plane interventions took significantly longer than in-plane interventions under MDCT guidance (701 vs 527s, p=0.03), whereas under CBCT guidance no significant difference could be found between off- and in-plane procedures (920 vs. 888s, p=0.2). In this phantom study, we could show that percutaneous soft-tissue interventions under CBCT guidance can be conducted with an accuracy comparable to that under MDCT guidance. Although overall procedural duration is in general shorter using MDCT guidance, CBCT-guided interventions offer the advantage of more degrees of freedom, which is of particular importance for off-plane procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Early post-operative weight loss after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy correlates with the volume of the excised stomach and not with that of the sleeve! Preliminary data from a multi-detector computed tomography-based study.

    PubMed

    Pawanindra, Lal; Vindal, Anubhav; Midha, Manoj; Nagpal, Prashant; Manchanda, Alpana; Chander, Jagdish

    2015-10-01

    Pre- and post-operative stomach volumes can be important determinants for effectiveness of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in causing weight loss. There is little existing data on the volumes of stomach preoperatively and that excised during LSG. This study was designed to evaluate the change in gastric volume after LSG using multi-detector CT and to correlate it with early post-operative weight loss. Twenty consecutive patients with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) and medical comorbidities underwent LSG between October 2011 and October 2013 and were analysed prospectively. The pre-operative stomach volume was measured by MDCT done 1-3 days before the surgery. LSG was performed in the standard manner using a 36F bougie. The volume of excised stomach was measured by distending the specimen with saline. MDCT of the upper abdomen was repeated 3 months postoperatively to calculate the gastric sleeve volume. Weight loss and resolution of comorbidities were documented. The mean pre-operative weight of patients was 123.90 kg, and the mean pre-operative stomach volume on MDCT was 1,067 ml. The stomach volume on pre-operative MDCT correlated with pre-operative weight and BMI. The mean volume of the excised stomach was 859 ml when measured by distension of the specimen and 850 ml on MDCT. After 3 months post surgery, the mean volume of gastric sleeve on MDCT was 217 ml, and the mean weight of the patients was 101.22 kg. The volume of the excised stomach calculated by MDCT correlated with the weight loss achieved 3 months postoperatively. However, no correlation was seen between the gastric sleeve volume 3 months postoperatively and weight loss during this period. MDCT is a good method to measure gastric volume before and after LSG. Early post-operative weight loss (3 months) correlates well with the volume of the excised stomach but not with that of the gastric sleeve.

  16. [MRI in subacromial pathology. Report of 20 cases].

    PubMed

    Poey, C; Fajadet, P; Pages, M; Chaffai, M A; Lassoued, S; Maquin, P; Fournie, A; Mansat, M; Railhac, J J

    1990-01-01

    The authors report the results of MRI performed in 20 patients presenting clinical symptoms of subacromial pathology. The MRI results are correlated to the results of arthrography or arthro CT scan and also to surgical results. MRI is an excellent technique if a precise protocol with T2 weighted images is respected in order to visualize tears or minor perforations of the supraspinatus muscle.

  17. Can symptomatic acromioclavicular joints be differentiated from asymptomatic acromioclavicular joints on 3-T MR imaging?

    PubMed

    Choo, Hye Jung; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Jung Han; Cha, Seong Sook; Park, Young Mi; Park, Ji Sung; Lee, Jun Woo; Oh, Minkyung

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate retrospectively whether symptomatic acromioclavicular joints can be differentiated from asymptomatic acromioclavicular joints on 3-T MR imaging. This study included 146 patients who underwent physical examination of acromioclavicular joints and 3-T MR imaging of the shoulder. Among them, 67 patients showing positive results on physical examination were assigned to the symptomatic group, whereas 79 showing negative results were assigned to the asymptomatic group. The following MR findings were compared between the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups: presence of osteophytes, articular surface irregularity, subchondral cysts, acromioclavicular joint fluid, subacromial fluid, subacromial bony spurs, joint capsular distension, bone edema, intraarticular enhancement, periarticular enhancement, superior and inferior joint capsular distension degree, and joint capsular thickness. The patients were subsequently divided into groups based on age (younger, older) and the method of MR arthrography (direct MR arthrography, indirect MR arthrography), and all the MR findings in each subgroup were reanalyzed. The meaningful cutoff value of each significant continuous variable was calculated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The degree of superior capsular distension was the only significant MR finding of symptomatic acromioclavicular joints and its meaningful cutoff value was 2.1mm. After subgroup analyses, this variable was significant in the older age group and indirect MR arthrography group. On 3-T MR imaging, the degree of superior joint capsular distension might be a predictable MR finding in the diagnosis of symptomatic acromioclavicular joints. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Adhesive (retractile) capsulitis of the hip joint in diabetes mellitus. An x-ray histomorphological synopsis].

    PubMed

    Dihlmann, W; Höpker, W W

    1992-09-01

    Adhesive (retractile) capsulitis of the hip joint is a rare complication (association) of (juvenile) diabetes mellitus. The clinical features, plain radiographic and CT findings and histomorphological appearances of this condition are described and attention is drawn to changes in the elastic tissue in the fibrosed capsule. Three diagnostic radiological features have been defined; in their presence, arthrography or diagnostic arthroscopy need not be performed.

  19. Usefulness of multidetector computed tomography before and after pulmonary vein isolation.

    PubMed

    Revilla Orodea, Ana; Sánchez Lite, Israel; Gallego Beuth, Julio César; Sevilla Ruiz, Teresa; Sandín Fuentes, María G; Amat Santos, Ignacio Jesús; San Román Calvar, José Alberto

    To analyze the usefulness of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the preprocedural evaluation and follow-up of patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary veins and the impact of the MDCT findings on the approach to treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 92 consecutive MDCT studies done in 80 patients between January 2011 and June 2013; 70 (76%) studies were done before a first ablation procedure and 22 (24%) were done in patients who had undergone an ablation procedure. Findings were useful in 34% of the patients who underwent MDCT before the first ablation procedure and in 68% of the studies done after a procedure. The incidence of stroke associated with the ablation procedure was 3%, similar to the incidence recorded in our center before we started to use MDCT to evaluate the anatomy of the left atrium. All symptomatic patients had some pulmonary vein stenosis, and 80% had significant stenosis. Furthermore, the stenoses progressed very rapidly; treatment with balloon angioplasty was associated with early restenosis. Stenting was an alternative in cases of failed angioplasty. In the preprocedural evaluation and postprocedural follow-up of patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation, MDCT is useful for guiding treatment and detecting complications. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound versus multidetector computed tomography in preoperative gastric cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Cimavilla Román, Marta; de la Serna Higuera, Carlos; Loza Vargas, Luz Andrea; Benito Fernández, César; Barrio Andrés, Jesús; Madrigal Rubiales, Beatriz; Fernández Pérez, Gabriel; Pérez-Miranda, Manuel

    2017-09-25

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the gold standard technique in loco-regional staging of gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC). Nevertheless, the introduction of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) allows accurate studies to be performed. To compare the diagnostic yield of EUS and MDCT in loco-regional preoperative staging of gastric adenocarcinoma. This was a retrospective and comparative study of all surgical patients with GAC and preoperative staging by EUS and 64-row MDCT. The results for each case were compared with the histological data. Seventy seven surgical patients with GAC were identified and forty two had a complete preoperative staging and were finally included in the study. With regard to overall accuracy of T staging, EUS was superior to MDCT (62% vs 50%). In a subanalysis of early stages (T1-T2) and advanced stages (T3-T4), accuracy and sensitivity (S) were higher for EUS than for MDTC (83.3% vs 64.29% and 84.4% vs 59.5% respectively), although this did not reach statistical significance. The overall accuracy and sensitivity of EUS for N staging was lower than that for MDCT, although neither comparison reached statistical significance (57% vs 64% and 29% vs 55%). EUS diagnostic yield is similar to new MDCT with regard to T and N preoperative staging of GAC. Nevertheless, both techniques should be considered as complementary until more extensive and randomized studies can confirm these results.

  1. Multidetector row computed tomography evaluation of potential living laparoscopic renal donors: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Saravanan; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Small, William C; Torres, William E; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2006-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. Living related kidney donation is the major source of renal grafts due to limited availability of cadaveric kidneys. Open nephrectomy was used to harvest donor kidneys. However, the laparoscopic approach is associated with less postoperative pain and quick recovery. So, most centers now prefer a laparoscopic approach to explant donor kidneys. Laparoscopic approach is technically challenging due to limited operative visibility. Hence, accurate preoperative detection of renal arterial and venous anomalies is imperative to avoid inadvertent vascular injury and bleeding. The preoperative workup of renal donors includes clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, and imaging. Traditionally, the renal donors were evaluated with conventional imaging techniques, which included renal catheter angiography and intravenous urography. However, conventional imaging is invasive, expensive, and less accurate for evaluation of complex renal venous anomalies, small calculi, and diffuse or focal renal parenchymal lesions. The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) revolutionized the CT technology by enabling isotropic resolution with faster scan coverage in a single, short breath-hold. Consequently, MDCT has now replaced conventional imaging for comprehensive imaging of potential living renal donors. MDCT is a minimally invasive technique that can accurately detect urolithiasis, renal arterial and venous anomalies, renal parenchymal lesions, and urinary tract anomalies. Renal vascular anomalies detected by MDCT can help the surgeon in planning donor nephrectomy. MDCT with three-dimensional CT angiography enables accurate preoperative renal vascular mapping. This article reviews the role of MDCT in preoperative evaluation of potential laparoscopic renal donors.

  2. Multidetector CT and three-dimensional CT angiography of upper extremity arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jan; Efron, David T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-06-01

    Successful management of upper extremity arterial injury requires fast and accurate diagnosis. The rate of limb preservation depends on the location, severity, and time of ischemia. Indications for diagnostic imaging depend on the mechanism and type of injury, clinical signs, cardiovascular stability, and clinical suspicion. Because of ease of access, speed, and high accuracy for this diagnosis, multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography is often used as the first line imaging modality. MDCT systems with 64 slice configuration and more afford high temporal and spatial high-resolution, isotropic data acquisition and integration with whole-body trauma MDCT protocols. The use of individual injection timing protocols ensures high diagnostic image quality. Several strategies are available to reduce radiation exposure. Direct MDCT angiography findings of arterial injuries include active extravasation, luminal narrowing, lack of luminal contrast opacification, filling defect, arteriovenous fistula, and pseudoaneurysm. Important descriptors are location and length of defect, degree of luminal narrowing, and presence of distal arterial supply reconstitution. Proximal arterial injuries include the subclavian, axillary, and brachial arteries. Distal arterial injuries include the ulnar and radial arteries, as well as the palmar arterial arches. Concomitant venous injury, musculoskeletal injury, and nerve damage are common. In this exhibit, we outline the role of MDCT angiography in the diagnosis and management of upper extremity arterial injury, discuss strategies for MDCT angiography acquisition and concepts of data visualization, and illustrate various types of injuries.

  3. Sensitivity of endoscopic ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the diagnosis of pancreas divisum: a tertiary center experience.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Vladimir M; Wani, Sachin B; Fowler, Kathryn; Menias, Christine; Varma, Rakesh; Narra, Vamsi; Hovis, Christine; Murad, Faris M; Mullady, Daniel K; Jonnalagadda, Sreenivasa S; Early, Dayna S; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Azar, Riad R

    2013-04-01

    There are limited data comparing imaging modalities in the diagnosis of pancreas divisum. We aimed to: (1) evaluate the sensitivity of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for pancreas divisum; and (2) assess interobserver agreement (IOA) among expert radiologists for detecting pancreas divisum on MDCT and MRCP. For this retrospective cohort study, we identified 45 consecutive patients with pancreaticobiliary symptoms and pancreas divisum established by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography who underwent EUS and cross-sectional imaging. The control group was composed of patients without pancreas divisum who underwent endoscopic retrograde pancreatography and cross-sectional imaging. The sensitivity of EUS for pancreas divisum was 86.7%, significantly higher than the sensitivity reported in the medical records for MDCT (15.5%) or MRCP (60%) (P < 0.001 for each). On review by expert radiologists, the sensitivity of MDCT increased to 83.3% in cases where the pancreatic duct was visualized, with fair IOA (κ = 0.34). Expert review of MRCPs did not identify any additional cases of pancreas divisum; IOA was moderate (κ = 0.43). Endoscopic ultrasound is a sensitive test for diagnosing pancreas divisum and is superior to MDCT and MRCP. Review of MDCT studies by expert radiologists substantially raises its sensitivity for pancreas divisum.

  4. SENSITIVITY OF ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND, MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTER TOMOGRAPHY AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE CHOLANGIOPANCREATOGRAPHY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF PANCREAS DIVISUM: A TERTIARY CENTER EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Kushnir, Vladimir M.; Wani, Sachin B.; Fowler, Kathryn; Menias, Christine; Varma, Rakesh; Narra, Vamsi; Hovis, Christine; Murad, Faris; Mullady, Daniel; Jonnalagadda, Sreenivasa S.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Azar, Riad R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES There are limited data comparing imaging modalities in the diagnosis of pancreas divisum. We aimed to: 1. Evaluate the sensitivity of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) for pancreas divisum. 2. Assess interobserver agreement (IOA) among expert radiologists for detecting pancreas divisum on MDCT and MRCP. METHODS For this retrospective cohort study, we identified 45 consecutive patients with pancreaticobiliary symptoms and pancreas divisum established by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) who underwent EUS and cross-sectional imaging. The control group was composed of patients without pancreas divisum who underwent ERP and cross-sectional imaging. RESULTS The sensitivity of EUS for pancreas divisum was 86.7%, significantly higher than sensitivity reported in the medical records for MDCT (15.5%) or MRCP (60%) [p<0.001 for each]. On review by expert radiologists the sensitivity of MDCT increased to 83.3% in cases where the pancreatic duct was visualized, with fair IOA (қ=0.34). Expert review of MRCPs did not identify any additional cases of pancreas divisum; IOA was moderate (қ=0.43). CONCLUSIONS EUS is a sensitive test for diagnosing pancreas divisum and is superior to MDCT and MRCP. Review of MDCT studies by expert radiologists substantially raises its sensitivity for pancreas divisum. PMID:23211370

  5. Multidetector computed tomography for the evaluation of coronary artery disease; the diagnostic accuracy in calcified coronary arteries, comparing with IVUS imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Kwan; Kim, Jong Youn; Kwon, Hyuck Moon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Oh, Seung-Jin; Hong, Bum-Kee; Yoon, Young Won; Min, Pil-Ki; Kwon, Sung Woo; Lee, Byoung Kwon

    2014-05-01

    Contrast enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has been used as an alternative to coronary angiography for the assessment of coronary artery disease in the patient of the intermediate risk group. However, coronary calcium is a known limiting factor for MDCT evaluation. We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of 64-channel MDCT with each coronary artery calcium score (CACS) by compared with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging. A total of 54 symptomatic patients with intermediate-risk (10 females, mean age 59.9±6.9 years, Framingham point scores 9-20) with 162 sites who had a culprit lesion on 64-channel MDCT before performing coronary angiography with IVUS were enrolled. Patients were divided into 4 subgroups depending on CACS: 0, 1-99, 100-399, and >400. Lesion length, external elastic membrane (EEM) cross sectional area (CSA), minimal luminal area, and plaque area were measured and compared between IVUS and MDCT. The correlation coefficients for the measurements of the EEM CSA, lumen CSA, and plaque area were r=0.514, r=0.837, and r=0.578, respectively. Furthermore, there were close correlation of plaque area between four subgroups of CACS (r=0.671, r=0.623, r=0.562, r=0.571, respectively). Despite the increase in CACS, the geometric analysis of coronary arteries using with 64-channel MDCT was comparable with IVUS in symptomatic patient of the intermediate risk group.

  6. Multidetector Computed Tomography for the Evaluation of Coronary Artery Disease; The Diagnostic Accuracy in Calcified Coronary Arteries, Comparing with IVUS Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Kwan; Kim, Jong Youn; Kwon, Hyuck Moon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Oh, Seung-Jin; Hong, Bum-Kee; Yoon, Young Won; Min, Pil-Ki; Kwon, Sung Woo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Contrast enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has been used as an alternative to coronary angiography for the assessment of coronary artery disease in the patient of the intermediate risk group. However, coronary calcium is a known limiting factor for MDCT evaluation. We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of 64-channel MDCT with each coronary artery calcium score (CACS) by compared with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging. Materials and Methods A total of 54 symptomatic patients with intermediate-risk (10 females, mean age 59.9±6.9 years, Framingham point scores 9-20) with 162 sites who had a culprit lesion on 64-channel MDCT before performing coronary angiography with IVUS were enrolled. Patients were divided into 4 subgroups depending on CACS: 0, 1-99, 100-399, and >400. Lesion length, external elastic membrane (EEM) cross sectional area (CSA), minimal luminal area, and plaque area were measured and compared between IVUS and MDCT. Results The correlation coefficients for the measurements of the EEM CSA, lumen CSA, and plaque area were r=0.514, r=0.837, and r=0.578, respectively. Furthermore, there were close correlation of plaque area between four subgroups of CACS (r=0.671, r=0.623, r=0.562, r=0.571, respectively). Conclusion Despite the increase in CACS, the geometric analysis of coronary arteries using with 64-channel MDCT was comparable with IVUS in symptomatic patient of the intermediate risk group. PMID:24719125

  7. Preoperative evaluation value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography angiography in type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Chen, Qiang; Lai, Qing-quan; Huang, Wen-han; Wu, Hong; Li, Wei-cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to preoperatively evaluate the value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography in type A aortic dissection (AD). From January 2013 to December 2015, we enrolled 42 patients with type A AD who underwent MDCT angiography in our hospital. The institutional database of patients was retrospectively reviewed to identify MDCT angiography examinations for type A AD. Surgical corrections were conducted in all patients to confirm diagnostic accuracy. In this study, the diagnostic accuracy of MDCT angiography was 100% in all 42 patients. The intimal tear site locations that were identified in patients included the ascending aorta (n = 25), aortic arch (n = 12), and all other sites (n = 5). Compared with the control group, there were significant differences in the aortic arch anatomy among the cases. Regarding the distance between the left common carotid and left subclavian arteries, compared with the control group, most cases with type A AD had a significant variation. MDCT angiography plays an important role in detecting aortic arch lesions of type A AD, especially in determining the location of the intimal entry site and change of branch blood vessels. Surgeons can formulate an appropriate operating plan, according to the preoperative MDCT diagnosis information. PMID:27684852

  8. Three-dimensional demonstration of the lymphatic system in the lower extremities with multi-detector-row computed tomography: a study in a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shun; Suami, Hiroo; Imanishi, Nobuaki; Aiso, Sadakazu; Yamada, Minoru; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Chang, David W; Kishi, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has had a great impact on the staging and treatment of cancer. The purpose of this study was to study the lymphatic anatomy of the lower extremities by constructing three-dimensional images using multi-detector-row computed tomography (MDCT). To select appropriate contrast media for MDCT lymphatic imaging in a cadaver, we tested four kinds of contrast media by injecting them into fresh swine kidneys. After the suitable contrast medium was selected, 10 lower extremities from 5 fresh cadavers were studied. After injection of the contrast medium, each lower extremity was scanned with high-spatial-resolution MDCT. The zinc oxide mixture was found to be the most appropriate contrast formula for MDCT imaging of cadaver lymphatics in terms of CT value and no extravasation. The high-resolution MDCT imaging revealed two different superficial lymphatic pathways in the legs. One lymphatic pathway accompanying the great saphenous vein had a constant course and was connected to the superficial inguinal lymph nodes. However, another pathway, along the small saphenous vein, was variable. Some of the deep lymphatic vessels bypassed the inguinal lymph nodes. Using a new protocol, we were able to construct three-dimensional images of the lower extremity lymphatics in a cadaver model. MDCT imaging provided novel information about two different superficial lymphatic pathways in the lower extremities. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector CT using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection as reference standards.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Lee, D H; Ko, Y T

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare blinded with partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector (MD) CT by using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) as reference standards. 44 patients with gastric cancer underwent MDCT with air as an oral contrast agent. Surgery was performed on 37 patients, ESD on six and surgery after ESD on one. To provide comparison cases of blinded evaluation, 38 MDCT examinations were added for cases where no focal gastric lesion was seen on endoscopy. Two radiologists, blinded to the presence, number and location of the tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus multiplanar reformation (MPR) images of 82 MDCT examinations with or without gastric cancer. For partially blinded evaluation, the same radiologists, blinded to the location and number of tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus MPR images of 44 MDCT examinations of gastric cancer. Differences in assessment were resolved by consensus. 45 gastric cancers were found in surgical and ESD specimens. Detection rates of gastric cancer from axial and axial plus MPR images during blinded evaluation and from axial and axial plus MPR images during partially blinded evaluation were 62% (28/45), 64% (29/45), 64% (29/45) and 71% (32/45), respectively. There was no statistical significance for the comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection rates of gastric cancer. The detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during blinded evaluation showed no specific difference compared with the detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during partially blinded evaluation.

  10. Multidetector computed tomography analysis of benign and malignant nodules in patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caisong; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jun; Yang, Jing; Shao, Kangwei; Yuan, Lixin; Chen, Hairong; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of benign and malignant nodules in patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT). MDCT findings, including the size, solid percentage, calcification, margin, capsule, anteroposterior-transverse diameter ratio as well as the mode and the degree of enhancement of 137 thyroid nodules in 127 CLT cases were retrospectively analyzed. Furthermore, the correlation between MDCT findings and pathological results combined with the CT perfusion imaging was analyzed for the differences between benign and malignant nodules. A total of 77.5% (31/40) of malignant nodules were completely solid, and 33% (32/97) of benign nodules were predominantly cystic. Compared with the benign nodules, micro-calcification and internal calcification were more frequently observed in the malignant nodules (P<0.05). MDCT features such as ill-defined margin, absence of capsule or incomplete capsule or homogeneous enhancement were more likely to be present in the malignant nodules (P<0.05). Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed in the enhancement degree at arterial or venous phase between benign and malignant nodules (P>0.05). MDCT features are useful in differentiating the benign and malignant nodules in CLT patients, and it may be essential for a radiologist to review the MDCT characteristics of nodules in the clinical practice.

  11. Pulmonary vein morphology by free-breathing whole heart magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla versus breathhold multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fodi, Eszter; McAreavey, Dorothea; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z; Ohayon, Jacques; Saba, Magdi; Elagha, Abdalla; Pettigrew, Roderic I; Gharib, Ahmed M

    2013-04-01

    To compare pulmonary vein and left atrial anatomy using three-dimensional free-breathing whole-heart magnetic resonance imaging (MR) at 3 Tesla (T) and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). Thirty-three subjects (19 male, age 49 ± 12 years) underwent free-breathing 3T MR and contrast-enhanced MDCT during inspiratory breath hold. Pulmonary vein parameters (ostial areas, diameters, angles) were measured. All pulmonary veins and anomalies were identified by 3T MR and by MDCT. The right-sided pulmonary veins were directed more posteriorly, the right superior pulmonary vein more inferiorly, and the right inferior pulmonary vein more superiorly by 3T MR when compared with MDCT. The cross-sectional area, perimeters and minimum diameters of right-sided pulmonary vein ostia were significantly larger by MR, as were the maximum diameters of right and left inferior pulmonary veins. There were no significant differences between techniques in distance to first pulmonary vein branch. Pulmonary vein measurements demonstrated significant differences in angulations and dimensions when 3T MR is compared with MDCT. These differences likely represent hemodynamic and respiratory variation during free-breathing with MR versus breath-holding with MDCT. MR imaging at 3T during free-breathing offers an alternate method to define pulmonary vein and left atrial anatomy without exposure to radiation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Value and Accuracy of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Obstructive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Rishi Philip; Moorkath, Abdunnisar; Basti, Ram Shenoy; Suresh, Hadihally B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Objective; To find out the role of MDCT in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice with respect to the cause and level of the obstruction, and its accuracy. To identify the advantages of MDCT with respect to other imaging modalities. To correlate MDCT findings with histopathology/surgical findings/Endoscopic Retrograde CholangioPancreatography (ERCP) findings as applicable. Material/Methods This was a prospective study conducted over a period of one year from August 2014 to August 2015. Data were collected from 50 patients with clinically suspected obstructive jaundice. CT findings were correlated with histopathology/surgical findings/ERCP findings as applicable. Results Among the 50 people studied, males and females were equal in number, and the majority belonged to the 41–60 year age group. The major cause for obstructive jaundice was choledocholithiasis. MDCT with reformatting techniques was very accurate in picking a mass as the cause for biliary obstruction and was able to differentiate a benign mass from a malignant one with high accuracy. There was 100% correlation between the CT diagnosis and the final diagnosis regarding the level and type of obstruction. MDCT was able to determine the cause of obstruction with an accuracy of 96%. Conclusions MDCT with good reformatting techniques has excellent accuracy in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice with regards to the level and cause of obstruction. PMID:27429673

  13. Role of multidetector-row CT in assessing the source of arterial haemorrhage in patients with pelvic vascular trauma. Comparison with angiography.

    PubMed

    Pinto, A; Niola, R; Tortora, G; Ponticiello, G; Russo, G; Di Nuzzo, L; Gagliardi, N; Scaglione, M; Merola, S; Stavolo, C; Maglione, F; Romano, L

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the role of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in identifying active bleeding and its source in polytrauma patients with pelvic vascular injuries with or without associated fractures of the pelvis. From January 2003 to December 2007, 28 patients (19 men and nine women, age range 16-80 years) with acute symptoms from blunt pelvic trauma and a drop in haematocrit underwent MDCT and angiography. Conventional radiography of the pelvis was performed in all patients at the time of admission to the emergency department. MDCT was performed with a four-row unit in 15 patients and a 16-row unit in the remaining 13 patients. The study included whole-body CT to identify craniocerebral, vertebral, thoracic, abdominal and pelvic injuries. CT was performed before and after rapid infusion (4-5 ml/s) of intravenous contrast material (120 ml) using a power injector. A triphasic contrast-enhanced study was performed in all patients. MDCT images were transferred to a workstation to assess pelvic fracture, site of haematoma and active extravasation of contrast material, visibility of possible vascular injuries and associated traumatic lesions. At angiography, an abdominal and pelvic aortogram was obtained in all cases before selective catheterisation of the internal iliac arteries and superselective catheterisation of their branches for embolisation purposes. Results related to identifying the source of bleeding at MDCT were compared with sites of bleeding or vascular injury identified by selective pelvic angiography. The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of MDCT were determined. MDCT allowed us to identify pelvic bleeding in 21/28 patients (75%), with most cases being detected in the delayed contrast-enhanced phase (13/21 cases, 61.9%). Injured arteries were identified on MDCT in 12/21 cases (57%): the obturator artery (n=9), internal iliac artery (n=6), internal pudendal artery (n=6) and superior gluteal artery (n=5) were most frequently

  14. Effect of age and plaque morphology on diagnostic accuracy of dual source multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sunman, Hamza; Aytemir, Kudret; Yorgun, Hikmet; Canpolat, Uğur; Taher, Ali; Demiri, Edis; Hazırolan, Tuncay; Şahiner, Levent; Kaya, Ergün B.; Kabakçı, Giray; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oto, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography represents one of the most exciting technological revolutions in cardiac imaging and it has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of age and coronary plaque calcification on diagnostic accuracy of MDCT. Methods The patients were examined by using dual-source MDCT and conventional coronary angiography. MDCT results were analyzed with regard to the severity (> 50% stenosis) and morphology (non-calcified, mixed, or calcified) of coronary atherosclerotic plaques evaluated in a 16-segment model. Results In total, 181 patients (94 men and 87 women) with 2,687 coronary artery segments were examined with MDCT. Ninety three patients were older than 65 years of age (group A, 42 men) and 88 were younger (group B, 52 men). Two-hundred nine coronary artery segments (7.2%) were excluded because of small distal coronary vessel segments and/or motion artifacts. The overall number of segments with non-diagnostic image quality was similar in both groups of patients. Of the 2,687 evaluated segments, 157 (5.8%) were significantly diseased, and 144 of them were correctly detected by MDCT. Diagnostic evaluation showed that the sensitivity, positive predictive value, specificity, and negative predictive value were 89.5%, 62.5%, 96.0%, and 99.2%, respectively in group A, and 95.2%, 64.8%, 97.5%, and 99.8% in group B, respectively. In addition, detailed segment-based analyses in coronary segments with non-calcified, mixed and calcified plaques in both groups were similar diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions Very high diagnostic accuracy observed in this study suggests that MDCT coronary angiography could be a suitable diagnostic tool for not only younger patients but also for older patients. PMID:25009559

  15. Multidetector-row computed tomography of thoracic aortic anomalies in dogs and cats: Patent ductus arteriosus and vascular rings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of extracardiac intrathoracic vascular anomalies is of clinical importance, but remains challenging. Traditional imaging modalities, such as radiography, echocardiography, and angiography, are inherently limited by the difficulties of a 2-dimensional approach to a 3-dimensional object. We postulated that accurate characterization of malformations of the aorta would benefit from 3-dimensional assessment. Therefore, multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) was chosen as a 3-dimensional, new, and noninvasive imaging technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients with 2 common diseases of the intrathoracic aorta, either patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly, by contrast-enhanced 64-row computed tomography. Results Electrocardiography (ECG)-gated and thoracic nongated MDCT images were reviewed in identified cases of either a patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly. Ductal size and morphology were determined in 6 dogs that underwent ECG-gated MDCT. Vascular ring anomalies were characterized in 7 dogs and 3 cats by ECG-gated MDCT or by a nongated thoracic standard protocol. Cardiac ECG-gated MDCT clearly displayed the morphology, length, and caliber of the patent ductus arteriosus in 6 affected dogs. Persistent right aortic arch was identified in 10 animals, 8 of which showed a coexisting aberrant left subclavian artery. A mild dilation of the proximal portion of the aberrant subclavian artery near its origin of the aorta was present in 4 dogs, and a diverticulum analogous to the human Kommerell's diverticulum was present in 2 cats. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced MDCT imaging of thoracic anomalies gives valuable information about the exact aortic arch configuration. Furthermore, MDCT was able to characterize the vascular branching patterns in dogs and cats with a persistent right aortic arch and the morphology and size of the patent ductus arteriosus in affected dogs. This additional information can be of help

  16. Comparison between survey radiography, B-mode ultrasonography, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography findings in dogs with acute abdominal signs.

    PubMed

    Shanaman, Miriam M; Schwarz, Tobias; Gal, Arnon; O'Brien, Robert T

    2013-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography (CE-MDCT) is used routinely in evaluating human patients with acute abdominal symptoms. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) continues to be in its infancy as it relates to evaluation of the acute abdomen. The purpose of this study was to compare survey radiography, B-mode ultrasound, CEUS, and CE-MDCT findings in canine patients presenting with acute abdominal signs; with a focus on the ability to differentiate surgical from non-surgical conditions. Nineteen dogs were prospectively enrolled. Inclusion required a clinical diagnosis of acute abdominal signs and confirmed surgical or non-surgical causes for the clinical signs. Agreement for the majority of recorded imaging features was at least moderate. There was poor agreement in the identification of pneumoperitoneum and in the comparison of pancreatic lesion dimensions for B-mode vs. CEUS. The CT feature of fat stranding was detected in cases including, but not limited to, gastric neoplasia with perforation, pancreatitis, and small intestinal foreign body. Ultrasound underestimated the size and number of specific lesions when compared with CE-MDCT. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound was successful in detecting bowel and pancreatic perfusion deficits that CE-MDCT failed to identify. Accuracy for differentiation of surgical vs. non-surgical conditions was high for all modalities; 100%, 94%, and 94% for CE-MDCT, ultrasonography and survey radiography respectively. Findings indicated that CE-MDCT is an accurate screening test for differentiating surgical from non-surgical acute abdominal conditions in dogs. Focused CEUS following CE-MDCT or B-mode ultrasonography may be beneficial for identifying potentially significant hypoperfused lesions. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  17. Visualisation of passive middle ear implants by cone beam and multi-detector computed tomography: a comparative in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T D; Kösling, S; Mlynski, R; Plontke, S K

    2016-12-01

    Modern passive middle ear titanium prostheses are filigree structures, resulting in poorer depiction on CT compared to prostheses used in the past. We compared the visibility of newer prostheses on cone beam CT (CBCT) to multi-detector CT (MDCT) with standard and lower dose in vitro, and analysed image noise and metal artefacts. Six different titanium middle ear prostheses (three partial and one total ossicular replacement prostheses, two stapes prostheses) were implanted twice in formalin-fixed head specimens-first correctly and then with displacement. Imaging was performed using standard CBCT and MDCT as well as MDCT with lower dose (36 single imaging investigations). Images were analysed with knowledge of the used types of middle ear prostheses, but blinded with respect to the positioning in the specific case. On all images the type of prostheses and their positions could be clearly recognized. Their identifiability including their details was rated as statistically significantly higher for all CBCT investigations than for MDCT. MDCT with lower dose showed the worst results. No statistical differences were found in image noise and metal artefacts. If available, CBCT should be preferred over MDCT in diagnostic evaluation of passive middle ear prostheses. • Middle ear prostheses became more filigree, leading to poorer visibility on CT. • High spatial resolution and paraxial reconstructions are necessary requirements for imaging evaluation. • CBCT and MDCT can identify type and positioning of titanium prostheses. • Metal artefacts play a minor part in filigree titanium prostheses. • Regarding visualisation of prostheses details, cone beam CT aids the evaluation.

  18. C-Terminal Region of MAP7 Domain Containing Protein 3 (MAP7D3) Promotes Microtubule Polymerization by Binding at the C-Terminal Tail of Tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Saroj; Verma, Paul J.; Panda, Dulal

    2014-01-01

    MAP7 domain containing protein 3 (MAP7D3), a newly identified microtubule associated protein, has been shown to promote microtubule assembly and stability. Its microtubule binding region has been reported to consist of two coiled coil motifs located at the N-terminus. It possesses a MAP7 domain near the C-terminus and belongs to the microtubule associated protein 7 (MAP7) family. The MAP7 domain of MAP7 protein has been shown to bind to kinesin-1; however, the role of MAP7 domain in MAP7D3 remains unknown. Based on the bioinformatics analysis of MAP7D3, we hypothesized that the MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 may have microtubule binding activity. Indeed, we found that MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 bound to microtubules as well as enhanced the assembly of microtubules in vitro. Interestingly, a longer fragment MDCT that contained the MAP7 domain (MD) with the C-terminal tail (CT) of the protein promoted microtubule polymerization to a greater extent than MD and CT individually. MDCT stabilized microtubules against dilution induced disassembly. MDCT bound to reconstituted microtubules with an apparent dissociation constant of 3.0±0.5 µM. An immunostaining experiment showed that MDCT localized along the length of the preassembled microtubules. Competition experiments with tau indicated that MDCT shares its binding site on microtubules with tau. Further, we present evidence indicating that MDCT binds to the C-terminal tail of tubulin. In addition, MDCT could bind to tubulin in HeLa cell extract. Here, we report a microtubule binding region in the C-terminal region of MAP7D3 that may have a role in regulating microtubule assembly dynamics. PMID:24927501

  19. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged <18 years with acute abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities.

  20. Left ventricular remodelling and systolic function measurement with 64 multi-slice computed tomography versus second harmonic echocardiography in patients with coronary artery disease: a double blind study.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Cademartiri, Filippo; Geleijnse, Marcel L; Meijboom, Bob; Pugliese, Francesca; Soliman, Osama; Calabrò, Anna; Nuti, Ranuccio; de Feyter, Pim

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated LV volumes, ejection fraction (LVEF) and stroke volume (SV) obtained by 64-MDCT and to compare these data with those obtained by second harmonic 2D Echo, in patients referred for non-invasive coronary vessels evaluation. The most common technique in daily clinical practice used for determination of LV function is two-dimensional echocardiography (2D-TTE). Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is an emerging new technique to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) and was recently proposed to assess LV function. 93 patients underwent to 64-MDCT for LV function and volumes assessment by segmental reconstruction algorithm (Argus) and compared with recent (2 months) 2D-TTE, all images were processed and interpreted by two observers blinded to the Echo and MDCT results. A close correlation between TTE and 64 MDCT was demonstrated for the ejection fraction LVEF (r=0.84), end-diastolic volume LVEDV (r=0.80) and end-systolic volume LVESV (r=0.85); acceptable correlation was recruited for stroke volume LVSV (r=0.58). Optimal results were recruited for inter-observer variability for 64-MDCT measured in 45 patients: LVESV (r=0.82, p<0.001), LVEDV (r=0.83, p<0.001), LVEF (r=0.69, p<0.002) and SV (r=0.66, p<0.001). Our results, showed that functional and temporal information contained in a coronary 64-MDCT study can be used to assess left ventricular (LV) systolic function and LV dimensions with good reproducibility and acceptable correlation respect to 2D-TTE. The combination of non-invasive coronary artery imaging and assessment of global LV function might became in the future a fast and conclusive cardiac work-up in patients with CAD.

  1. Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Abdominal and Pelvic CT Image Quality Using Iopromide With Different Concentrations of Iodine (300 and 370 mg I/mL).

    PubMed

    Chen, Weixia; Li, Zhenlin; Shuai, Tao; Qian, Lingling; Deng, Liping; Liao, Kai; Zhang, Kai; Jia, Bangsheng; Song, Bin

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the quality of MDCT images obtained using iopromide with two different concentrations of iodine (300 and 370 mg I/mL) in daily clinical settings. Patients from 38 hospitals in China undergoing abdominal or pelvic CT with iopromide were prospectively recruited. MDCT was performed using iopromide with an iodine concentration of 300 or 370 mg I/mL. CT quality image was graded as excellent, good, adequate, and poor. Objective indicators were the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Outcomes were compared according to organ studied, tumor type (benign vs malignant), saline usage, and type of MDCT (16-MDCT vs 64-MDCT). A total of 4506 patients (63.7% men) with a mean (± SD) age of 56.3 ± 14.1 years and mean body mass index (weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters) of 23.2 ± 3.3 were included. Iopromide with 300 mg I/mL was used for 3042 patients (67.5%), and 370 mg I/mL was used for 1464 patients (32.2%). A total of 1847 scans (41.0%) had excellent image quality, 2454 (54.5%) had good quality, 176 (3.9%) had adequate quality, and 29 (0.6%) had poor quality. No differences were noted between CT scans that did or did not use saline, 16-MDCT versus 64-MDCT scans, and 300 versus 370 mg I/mL iopromide. Variations in the CNR and SNR were noted between the two iodine concentrations with respect to other parameters examined. Iopromide with both concentrations of iodine provided acceptable image quality, though according to CNR and SNR, one or the other may provide better quality in different situations.

  2. The value of dual-source multi detector-row computed tomography in determining pulmonary blood supply in patients with pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Chaosuwannakit, Narumol; Makarawate, Pattarapong

    2017-07-13

    Primary evaluation of patients with pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect (PA-VSD) traditionally relies upon echocardiography and conventional cardiac angiography (CCA). CA is considered the gold standard for delineation of anatomy in children with pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect (PA with VSD). Data comparing CCA and dual-source multidetector-row computed tomography angiography (MDCT) in PA with VSD patients is limited. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that MDCT is equivalent to CCA for anatomic delineation in these patients. Twenty eight patients with PA with VSD were underwent CCA and MDCT in close proximity to each other without interval therapy. A retrospective review of these 28 patients was performed. All MDCT data of pulmonary artery morphology, MAPCAs and type of blood supply (dual versus single supply) were evaluated by a blinded experts and results were compared with CCA. 28 patients had adequate size right and left pulmonary arteries (21 confluent and 7 non-confluent). Seven patients had complete absence of native pulmonary artery and three patients had stenosis of distal branches of pulmonary arteries; all had major aortopulmonary collateral arteries (MAPCAs) from descending thoracic aorta and/or subclavian arteries. Sensitivity, specificity,positive and negative predictive value of MDCT for detecting confluent of pulmonary arteries, absence of native pulmonary artery and stenosis of pulmonary arteries were all 100%. Moreover accuracy of detecting MAPCAs were excellent. These results suggest that MDCT and CCA are equilavent in their ability to delineate pulmonary artery anatomy and MAPCAs. Dual source MDCT provides high diagnostic accuracy in evaluation of pulmonary blood supply in patients with PA-VSD and allow precise characterization of the condition of pulmonary arteries and MAPCAs which is of paramount importance in managing patients with PA-VSD.

  3. Is aortic atherothrombotic disease detected using multidetector-row CT associated with an increased risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence after acute ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Ko, Youngchai; Kim, Wook-Joo; Jang, Myung Suk; Yang, Mi Hwa; Park, Jung Hyun; Choi, Sang Il; Chun, Eun Ju; Lee, Soo Joo; Han, Moon-Ku; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2012-03-01

    Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is emerging as a new tool for diagnosing aortic atherothrombotic disease (AAD). We elucidated whether MDCT-detected AAD is associated with an increased risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence on diffusion-weighted MRI after ischemic stroke. A consecutive series of patients with acute ischemic stroke confirmed using diffusion-weighted MRI who were hospitalized within 48 hours after symptom onset and underwent MDCT were identified in a prospective stroke registry database. AAD on MDCT was defined as the presence of plaque formation that was noncalcified and ≥4 mm thick, ulcerative, or soft and thrombosed (vulnerable) in the proximal aortic arch. Ischemic lesion recurrence on diffusion-weighted MRI was defined as the occurrence of any new lesion separate from the index lesion on follow-up diffusion-weighted MRI performed within 14 days after symptom onset. A total of 138 patients was selected. MDCT detected AAD in 24 of 138 (17.4%); ≥4 mm thickness in 17 of 138 (12.3%); ulcerated plaque in 20 of 138 (14.5%); and vulnerable plaque in 16 of 138 (11.6%). With respect to diffusion-weighted MRI lesion recurrence, the crude ORs (95% CIs) were as follows: AAD, 3.56 (1.43-8.89); vulnerable plaque, 3.21 (1.11-9.30); ulcerated plaque, 3.37 (1.27-8.95); and ≥4 mm thickness of the noncalcified plaque, 4.23 (1.11-16.19). These results remained significant after adjustments for potential confounders were made. This study shows that AAD detected by MDCT increases the risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence after acute ischemic stroke, thus supporting the role of MDCT in diagnosing AAD and assessing its contribution to recurrence.

  4. Pseudoaneurysm of the Internal Mammary Artery as an Unusual Cause of Post-sternotomy Hemorrhage: The Role of Multislice Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, Sridhar Unsworth-White, Jonathan; Wells, Irving P.

    2005-04-15

    Pseudoaneurysm of the internal mammary artery (IMA) following median sternotomy is extremely rare. To date, the reported cases are only in single figures. The majority of these pseudoaneurysms were suspected from the clinical presentation, echocardiography or computed tomography (CT) but were only confirmed on contrast angiography. This case report demonstrates the current ability to carry out detailed vascular imaging on a 16-slice CT scanner. This accurate delineation of the pseudoaneurysm allowed targeted therapeutic embolization to be performed without unnecessary angiographic imaging.

  5. Quantitative analysis of motion artifacts in high-pitch dual-source computed tomography of the thorax.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Boris; Jacobi, Volkmar; Beeres, Martin; Bodelle, Boris; Gruber, Tatjana; Lee, Clara; Bauer, Ralf; Kerl, Matthias; Vogl, Thomas; Zangos, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to objectively analyze motion artifacts on thoracic computed tomography (CT) with dual-source high-pitch and single-source techniques when using a no-breath-hold technique to examine patients who have difficulty complying with breath-holding instructions. A total of 120 patients who received CT of the thorax with a free-breathing technique in single-source (16 slices and 128 slices; pitch = 1.2) and dual-source (pitch = 3.0) manners were evaluated retrospectively. In each of the 3 study groups, movements of the diaphragm and pulsations of the aortic root and main pulmonary artery were analyzed for their number and severity (blurred distance). No motion artifacts of the diaphragm were identified using a pitch of 3.0 (compared with n = 14 for single-source CT using 128 slices and n = 24 using 16-slice CT). In single-source examinations, the severity of artifacts was similar between 128-slice CT and 16-slice CT: blurring distance of the lung parenchyma due to diaphragm movements was 14 versus 16 mm, and double contours of the aorta were measured as 8 and 9 mm, respectively. A high-pitch, dual-source mode is potentially advantageous for evaluating the lung parenchyma and vascular structures in patients who have difficulty complying with breath-holding instructions. Increasing from 16 to 128 slices can significantly reduce the number and severity of motion artifacts.

  6. CT for evaluation of myocardial cell therapy in heart failure: a comparison with CMR imaging.

    PubMed

    Schuleri, Karl H; Centola, Marco; Choi, Seong Hoon; Evers, Kristine S; Dawoud, Fady; George, Richard T; Lima, João A C; Lardo, Albert C

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to assess therapeutic effects of myocardial regenerative cell therapies. Cell transplantation is being widely investigated as a potential therapy in heart failure. Noninvasive imaging techniques are frequently used to investigate therapeutic effects of cell therapies in the preclinical and clinical settings. Previous studies have shown that cardiac MDCT can accurately quantify myocardial scar tissue and determine left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (LVEF). Twenty-two minipigs were randomized to intramyocardial injection of phosphate-buffered saline (placebo, n = 9) or 200 million mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, n = 13) 12 weeks after myocardial infarction (MI). Cardiac magnetic resonance and MDCT acquisitions were performed before randomization (12 weeks after MI induction) and at the study endpoint 24 weeks after MI induction. None of the animals received medication to control the intrinsic heart rate during first-pass acquisitions for assessment of LV volumes and LVEF. Delayed-enhancement MDCT imaging was performed 10 min after contrast delivery. Two blinded observers analyzed MDCT acquisitions. MDCT demonstrated that MSC therapy resulted in a reduction of infarct size from 14.3 ± 1.2% to 10.3 ± 1.5% of LV mass (p = 0.005), whereas infarct size increased in nontreated animals (from 13.8 ± 1.3% to 16.5 ± 1.5%; p = 0.02) (placebo vs. MSC; p = 0.003). Both observers had excellent agreement for infarct size (r = 0.96; p < 0.001). LVEF increased from 32.6 ± 2.2% to 36.9 ± 2.7% in MSC-treated animals (p = 0.03) and decreased in placebo animals (from 33.3 ± 1.4% to 29.1 ± 1.5%; p = 0.01; at week 24: placebo vs. MSC; p = 0.02). Infarct size, end-diastolic LV volume, and LVEF assessed by MDCT compared favorably with those assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance acquisitions (r = 0.70, r = 0.82, and r = 0.902, respectively; p < 0.001). This study demonstrated that cardiac MDCT can

  7. The Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography in the Early Diagnosis of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Çiledağ, Nazan; Arda, Kemal; Arıbaş, Bilgin Kadri; Tekgündüz, Ali Irfan Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate vessel involvement and the role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the earlydiagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in patients with febrile neutropenia and antibiotic-resistant feverundergoing autologous bone morrow transplantation. Material and Methods: In all, 74 pulmonary MDCT examinations in 37 consecutive hematopoietic stem celltransplantation patients with febrile neutropenia and clinically suspected IPA were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Diagnosis of IPA was based on Fungal Infections Cooperative Group, and National Institute of Allergy andInfectious Diseases Mycoses Study Consensus Group criteria. In all, 0, 14, and 11 patients were diagnosed as proven,probable, and possible IPA, respectively. Among the 25 patients accepted as probable and possible IPA, all had pulmonaryMDCT findings consistent with IPA. The remaining 12 patients were accepted as having fever of unknown origin (FUO)and had patent vessels based on MDCT findings.In the patients with probable and possible IPA, 72 focal pulmonary lesions were observed; in 41 of the 72 (57%) lesionsvascular occlusion was noted and the CT halo sign was observed in 25 of these 41 (61%) lesions. Resolution of feveroccurred following antifungal therapy in 19 (76%) of the 25 patients with probable and possible IPA. In all, 6 (25%)of the patients diagnosed as IPA died during follow-up. Transplant-related mortality 100 d post transplant in patientswith IPA and FUO was 24% and 0%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, MDCT has a potential role in the early diagnosis of IPA via detection of vessel occlusion. PMID:24744620

  8. Multidetector computed tomography shows reverse cardiac remodeling after double lung transplantation for pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mandich Crovetto, D; Alonso Charterina, S; Jiménez López-Guarch, C; Pont Vilalta, M; Pérez Núñez, M; de Pablo Gafas, A; Escribano Subías, P

    2016-01-01

    To use multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate the structural changes in the right heart and pulmonary arteries that occur in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension treated by double lung transplantation. This was a retrospective study of 21 consecutive patients diagnosed with severe pulmonary hypertension who underwent double lung transplantation at our center between 2010 and 2014. We analyzed the last MDCT study done before lung transplantation and the first MDCT study done after lung transplantation. We recorded the following variables: diameter of the pulmonary artery trunk, ratio of the diameter of the pulmonary artery trunk to the diameter of the ascending aorta, diameter of the right ventricle, ratio of the diameter of the left ventricle to the diameter of the right ventricle, and eccentricity index. Statistical analysis consisted of the comparison of the means of the variables recorded. In all cases analyzed, the MDCT study done a mean of 24±14 days after double lung transplantation showed a significant reduction in the size of the right heart chambers, with improved indices of ventricular interdependency index, and reduction in the size of the pulmonary artery trunk (p<0.001 for all the variables analyzed). Patients with pulmonary hypertension treated by double lung transplantation present early reverse remodeling of the changes in the structures of the right heart and pulmonary arterial tree. MDCT is useful for detecting these changes. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Three dimensional computed tomography for preoperative assessment of the pulmonary artery in patients undergoing endoscopic lobectomy or segmentectomy.

    PubMed

    Ojanguren, Amaia; Recuero, José Luis; Pardina, Marina; Milla, Lucía; Santamaría, Maite

    2017-02-01

    The interest for endoscopic pulmonary anatomic resections has grown exponentially during the last decade. During thoracoscopic procedures surgeons cannot rely on digital handling and operative field is viewed on a two-dimensional video monitor, thus frequently encountering anatomical difficulties. The hypothesis is that foreknowledge of the anatomy of each patient would greatly contribute to the safety and accuracy of the operation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 3dimensional multidetector computed tomography (3D-MDCT) software to identify the pulmonary artery branching pattern during the preoperative study of endoscopic lobectomies and segmentectomies. Descriptive prospective study of 25consecutive patients scheduled from November 2015 to July 2016 in a tertiary referral academic hospital for VATS lobectomy or segmentectomy and evaluated about branching pattern of the pulmonary artery with preoperative 16-row 3D-MDCT angiography. Intraoperative findings of the pulmonary branching pattern were compared with the preoperative 3D-MDCT angiography images. According to the intraoperative findings, 67 out of 68 (98%) of pulmonary artery branches were well defined in the 3D-MDCT angiography images. There was a unique 2mm undetected branch. No conversion to open thoracotomy was needed because of intraoperative bleending. 3D-MDCT angiography imaging is useful for preoperative identification of the pulmonary artery branching pattern. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark E; Nelson, Rendon C; Rosen, Max P; Blake, Michael A; Cash, Brooks D; Hindman, Nicole M; Kamel, Ihab R; Kaur, Harmeet; Piorkowski, Robert J; Qayyum, Aliya; Yarmish, Gail M

    2014-12-01

    The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every two years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. The Atlanta Classification by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group recently modified the terminology for the clinical course and the morphologic changes identified on imaging, primarily contrast- enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The two distinct clinical courses of the disease are classified as (1) early phase, which lasts approximately 1 week, and (2) late phase, which starts after the first week and can last for months after the initial episode. The two, primary, morphologic changes are acute, interstitial edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis. Timing of imaging, primarily MDCT, is based on the clinical phases and is, therefore, important for these imaging guidelines. Ultrasound's role is to detect gallstones after the first episode. MDCT plays a primary role in the management of acutely ill patients, only after a minimum of 48-72 hours and generally after one week. MR plays a supplementary role to MDCT. Follow-up MDCT guides management and therapy: percutaneous aspiration of fluid collections and/or placement of large caliber catheters in infected necrosis.

  11. Diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MRI for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yuko; Hieda, Masashi; Akiyama, Naoko; Terada, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Noriaki; Nishiki, Masayo; Kono, Hirotaka; Kohno, Hiroshi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Yoshikawa, Yukinobu; Kuraoka, Kazuya; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Awai, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB)-MRI for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with multidetector CT (MDCT). Fifty patients with 57 surgically proven HCCs who underwent Gd-EOB-MRI and MDCT from March 2008 to June 2011 were evaluated. Two observers evaluated MR and CT on a lesion-by-lesion basis. We analyzed sensitivity by grading on a 5-point scale, the degree of arterial enhancement and the differences in histological grades in the diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The results showed that the sensitivity of Gd-EOB-MRI was higher than that of MDCT especially for HCCs that were 1 cm in diameter or smaller. The hepatobiliary phase was useful for the detecting of small HCC. We had few cases in which it was difficult to judge HCC in the arterial enhancement between MRI and MDCT. In the diffusion-weighted image, well differentiated HCC tended to show a low signal intensity, and poorly differentiated HCC tended to show a high signal intensity. In moderately differentiated HCC's, the mean diameter of the high signal intensity group was larger than that of the low signal intensity group (24.5 mm vs. 15.8 mm). In conclusion, Gd-EOB-MRI tended to show higher sensitivity compared to MDCT in the detection of HCC.

  12. [Comparison of a dental cone beam CT with a multi-detector row CT on effective doses and physical image quality].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Tokumori, Kenji; Okamura, Kazutoshi; Yoshiura, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a dental cone beam computed tomography (dental CBCT) and a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) using effective doses and physical image quality. A dental mode (D-mode) and an implant mode (I-mode) were employed for calculating effective doses. Field of view (FOV) size of the MDCT was 150 mm. Three types of images were obtained using 3 different reconstruction functions: FC1 (for abdomen images), FC30 (for internal ear and bone images) and FC81 (for high resolution images). Effective doses obtained with the D-mode and with the I-mode were about 20% and 50% of those obtained with the MDCT, respectively. Resolution properties obtained with the D-mode and I-mode were superior to that of the MDCT in a high frequency range. Noise properties of the D-mode and the I-mode were better than those with FC81. It was found that the dental CBCT has better potential as compared with MDCT in both dental and implant modes.

  13. Multidetector CT cystography for imaging colovesical fistulas and iatrogenic bladder leaks.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Massimo; Bianco, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography currently represents the modality of choice to image the urinary bladder in traumatized patients. In this review we present our experience with MDCT cystography applications outside the trauma setting, particularly for diagnosing bladder fistulas and leaks. A detailed explanation is provided concerning exam preparation, acquisition technique, image reconstruction and interpretation. Colovesical fistulas most commonly occur as a complication of sigmoid diverticular disease, and often remain occult after extensive diagnostic work-up including cystoscopy and contrast-enhanced CT. We consistently achieved accurate preoperative visualization of colovesical fistulas using MDCT cystography. Urinary leaks and injuries represent a non-negligible occurrence after pelvic surgery, particularly obstetric and gynaecological procedures: in our experience MDCT cystography is useful to investigate iatrogenic bladder leaks or fistulas. In our opinion, MDCT cystography should be recommended as the first line modality for direct visualization or otherwise confident exclusion of both spontaneous enterovesical fistulas and bladder injuries following instrumentation procedures, obstetric or surgical interventions. Main Messages • Explanation of exam preparation, acquisition technique, image reconstruction and interpretation. • Preoperative visualization of colovesical fistulas, usually secondary to sigmoid diverticulitis. • Visualization or exclusion of iatrogenic bladder injuries following instrumentation or surgery.

  14. Integrative computed tomographic imaging of cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Christian; Hanley, Michael; Bastarrika, Gorka; Ruzsics, Balazs; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) technology have created new opportunities in cardiac imaging and provided new insights into a variety of disease states. Use of 64-slice coronary computed tomography angiography has been validated for the evaluation of clinically relevant coronary artery stenosis with high negative predictive values for ruling out significant obstructive disease. This technology has also advanced the care of patients with acute chest pain by simultaneous assessment of acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome ("triple rule out"). Although MDCT has been instrumental in the advancement of cardiac imaging, there are still limitations in patients with high or irregular heart rates. Newer MDCT scanner generations hold promise to improve some of these limitations for noninvasive cardiac imaging. The evaluation of coronary artery stenosis remains the primary clinical indication for cardiac computed tomography angiography. However, the use of MDCT for simultaneous assessment of coronary artery stenosis, atherosclerotic plaque formation, ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, and viability with a single modality is under intense investigation. Recent technical developments hold promise for accomplishing this goal and establishing MDCT as a comprehensive stand-alone test for integrative imaging of coronary heart disease.

  15. Validation of cone-beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the porcine spine: a comparative study with multidetector computed tomography and anatomical specimens.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa; Andrade, Celi Santos; Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira; Kanas, Alexandre Fligelman; Cabral, Richard Halti; Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi; Rodríguez, Hernán Joel Cervantes; Rabbani, Said Rahnamaye

    2015-05-01

    New spinal interventions or implants have been tested on ex vivo or in vivo porcine spines, as they are readily available and have been accepted as a comparable model to human cadaver spines. Imaging-guided interventional procedures of the spine are mostly based on fluoroscopy or, still, on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also available methods to guide interventional procedures. Although some MDCT data from porcine spines are available in the literature, validation of the measurements on CBCT and MRI is lacking. To describe and compare the anatomical measurements accomplished with MDCT, CBCT, and MRI of lumbar porcine spines to determine if CBCT and MRI are also useful methods for experimental studies. An experimental descriptive-comparative study. Sixteen anatomical measurements of an individual vertebra from six lumbar porcine spines (n=36 vertebrae) were compared with their MDCT, CBCT, and MRI equivalents. Comparisons were made for the absolute values of the parameters. Similarities were found in all imaging methods. Significant correlation (p<.05) was observed with all variables except those that included cartilaginous tissue from the end plates when the anatomical study was compared with the imaging methods. The CBCT and MRI provided imaging measurements of the lumbar porcine spines that were similar to the anatomical and MDCT data, and they can be useful for specific experimental research studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Assessment of neoplastic pancreatic focal injury by multidetector computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Gaspar, Alberto Motta; Morató López Alberto, Emilio; Valenzuela Tamaris, Jorge; Castillo González, Federico Armando

    2012-01-01

    pancreatic focal neoplastic lesions (PFNL) should be characterized through image methods to differentiate from no neoplastic lesions, suggesting one or more probable diagnosis, and staging of malignant lesions, in order to help define the estrategy of medial or surgical management. The multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) offers multiple properties and advantages that enable adequate characterization of the PFNL. The objective of this study is to evaluate de usefulness of MDCT in characterizing PFNL. a descriptive, retrospective caseseries study has been conducted. It consisted of reviewing MDCT studies in which PFNL were found, over a period of 4 years 11 months from January 2006 to November 2010. we obtained 54 cases of PFNL which were characterized by MDCT; 75.9% for a specific diagnosis, and were categorized as indeterminate 24.1%, considering more than one possible diagnosis. The most frequent PFNL type was pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in 51.9%. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms accounted for 16.7%. MDCT is useful for identifying and characterizing LFNP, this means the possibility of establishing one or more diagnostic possibilities and guide medical management.

  17. Three Dimensional Imaging of Ventilation Dynamics in Asthmatics Using Multi-echo Projection Acquisition with Constrained Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, James H.; O’Halloran, Rafael L.; Brodsky, Ethan K.; Bley, Thorsten A.; Francois, Christopher J.; Velikina, Julia V.; Sorkness, Ronald L.; Busse, William W.; Fain, Sean B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to detect dynamic gas trapping in 3-dimensions during forced exhalation at isotropic high spatial resolution and high temporal resolution using hyperpolarized helium-3 (HPHe-3) MRI. Ten subjects underwent HPHe-3 MRI and MDCT. MRI was performed throughout inspiration, breath-hold, and forced expiration. A multi-echo 3D projection acquisition was used to improve data collection efficiency and an iterative constrained reconstruction (I-HYPR) was implemented to improve SNR and increase robustness to motion. Two radiologists evaluated the dynamic MRI and breath-held MDCT data for gas and air trapping respectively. Phantom studies showed the proposed technique significantly improved depiction of moving objects compared to view-sharing methods. Gas trapping was detected using MRI in 5 of the 6 asthmatic subjects who displayed air trapping with MDCT. Locations in disagreement were found to represent small to moderate regions of air trapping. The proposed technique provides whole lung 3D imaging of respiration dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution and compares well to the current standard, MDCT. While MDCT can provide information about static regional air trapping, it is unable to depict dynamics in a setting more comparable to a spirometry maneuver and explore the longitudinal time evolution of the trapped regions. PMID:19785015